Elizabeth Martiau

F, #7351, d. circa 1686
FatherCapt. Nicholas Martiau1
MotherJane Berkeley
Last Edited29 Dec 2002
     Elizabeth Martiau was born at prob. York Co., Virginia, USA.2 She married Col. George Reade, son of Robert Reade Esq. of Linkenholt Hall, co. Hants and Mildred Windebank, circa 1641 at Prob. Yorktown.2,1
Elizabeth Martiau died circa 1686 at Prob. Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA.2
     Elizabeth Martiau left a will on 10 February 1686.3

Family

Col. George Reade b. 25 Oct 1608, d. b 21 Nov 1674
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Washington Family Page (based upon new and important material supplied by Mr. S H. Lee Washington, MA, of Trinity Coll, Cambridge). Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 1.
  3. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, pp. 1-2.

Andrew Knowling Gent., of Tring1

M, #7352, d. 1650
Last Edited30 Dec 2002
     Andrew Knowling Gent., of Tring married Anne Dickens, daughter of William Dickens and Anne Thornton.2,1
Andrew Knowling Gent., of Tring died in 1650.1

Family

Anne Dickens

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Washington Family Page (based upon new and important material supplied by Mr. S H. Lee Washington, MA, of Trinity Coll, Cambridge). Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 2.

Jasper Stultz (Stults)

M, #7353
Father(?) Stultz (Stults)
MotherMarie Stults (Stultz) Poturve
Last Edited29 May 2001

Mary Stultz (Stults)

F, #7354
Father(?) Stultz (Stults)
MotherMarie Stults (Stultz) Poturve
Last Edited29 May 2001

Catherine Rhoads

F, #7355, b. circa 1779
Last Edited9 Nov 2001
     Catherine Rhoads died at Highland Co., Ohio, USA. She was born circa 1779 at Shenandoah Co., Virginia, USA.1 She married George II Gall, son of John George Gall Sr. and Catharina Elizabeth Rieth, on 27 May 1800 at Rockbridge Co., Virginia, USA.1,2

Family

George II Gall b. 28 Jun 1766, d. Oct 1851
Child

Citations

  1. [S662] Agnes Nothstine, Genealogy: Gall & Nothstine - 1730-1964 (spiral bound) (n.p.: Muskogee Draughons College Press, 1965, 1965), p. 14.
  2. [S707] Kendrah Justesen < and e-mail address>, Kendrah Justesen database on WorldConnect/Rootsweb (n.p.: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kendrah&id= I160, unknown publish date).

Mary "Polly" McDonald1

F, #7356, b. 4 May 1810, d. 12 September 1844
Last Edited8 Oct 2018
     Mary "Polly" McDonald was born on 4 May 1810.2,1 She married David Gall, son of John Gall Sr. and Margaret Fulwider, on 23 December 1827.2,3
Mary "Polly" McDonald died on 12 September 1844 at age 34.2,1
Mary "Polly" McDonald was buried after 12 September 1844 at Newport Cemetery, Washington Township, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA; From Find A Grave website:Birth: 1810
Death: Sep. 12, 1844
Wife of David Gall
Family links:
Spouse: David Gall (1798 - 1868)
Children: Livingston E. Gall (1832 - 1912)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial: Newport Cemetery, Washington, Franklin County, Missouri, USA

Created by: Aisha
Record added: Jul 25, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 55447559.1
     Mary "Polly" McDonald and David Gall appeared in the census of 1840 at Boeff Township, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
A David Gall in Franklin Co. in 1840. Not sure if it is the same one. If it is the same one, his father, John Sr., and his brother, John Jr., are in the same census on p. 208
p. 210 Line 30
     Name: David Gall
     Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Boeff, Franklin, Missouri
     Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:     1 [1831-35] Livingston 1832
     Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14:     1 [1826-30] Unknown?
     Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49:     1 [1791-1800] David 1798
     Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39:     1 [1801-10] Mary (McDonald) 1810
     Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
     Free White Persons - Under 20: 2
     Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
     Total Free White Persons: 4
     Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 4.4

Family

David Gall b. 10 Dec 1798, d. bt 20 Feb 1868 - 28 Feb 1868
Child

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Mary "Polly" McDonald Gall: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55447559. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S662] Agnes Nothstine, Genealogy: Gall & Nothstine - 1730-1964 (spiral bound) (n.p.: Muskogee Draughons College Press, 1965, 1965), p. 14.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, David Gall: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=GAL&GSpartial=1&GSbyrel=all&GSst=26&GScntry=4&GSsr=1201&GRid=55447705&
  4. [S493] 1840 Federal Census, 1840 Census MO Franklin Co Boeff Twp, Source Citation: Year: 1840; Census Place: Boeff, Franklin, Missouri; Roll: 223; Page: 210; Image: 1132; Family History Library Film: 0014855
    Info: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-c&gsfn=John&gsln=Gall&gsln_x=XO&msydy=1840&msydy_x=1&msypn__ftp=Franklin+County%2c+Missouri%2c+USA&msypn=1068&msypn_PInfo=7-%7c0%7c1652393%7c0%7c2%7c3247%7c28%7c0%7c1068%7c0%7c0%7c&msypn_x=XO&msypn__ftp_x=1&cpxt=0&uidh=v51&cp=12&pcat=35&h=3251549&recoff=8&db=1840usfedcenancestry&indiv=1&ml_rpos=4
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8057/4409679_01132?pid=3251549&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank%3D1%26new%3D1%26MSAV%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gss%3Dangs-c%26gsfn%3DJohn%26gsln%3DGall%26gsln_x%3DXO%26msydy%3D1840%26msydy_x%3D1%26msypn__ftp%3DFranklin%2BCounty%252c%2BMissouri%252c%2BUSA%26msypn%3D1068%26msypn_PInfo%3D7-%257c0%257c1652393%257c0%257c2%257c3247%257c28%257c0%257c1068%257c0%257c0%257c%26msypn_x%3DXO%26msypn__ftp_x%3D1%26cpxt%3D0%26uidh%3Dv51%26cp%3D12%26pcat%3D35%26h%3D3251549%26recoff%3D8%26db%3D1840usfedcenancestry%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D4&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  5. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 90/2, line 42.
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Livingston E. Gall: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14790875
  7. [S2784] Missouri Digital Heritage, online http://www.sos.mo.gov/mdh/, Death certificate Livingston GALL seen on sos.mo.gov on 22 Sept 2018 at:
    Info: https://s1.sos.mo.gov/Records/Archives/ArchivesMvc/DeathCertificates/SearchResults
    Image: https://www.sos.mo.gov/images/archives/deathcerts/1912/1912_00004860.PDF. Hereinafter cited as MO Digital Documents Repository.

Elizabeth McWilliams

F, #7357, b. 8 January 1812, d. 17 April 1851
Last Edited4 Feb 2019
     Elizabeth McWilliams was born on 8 January 1812 at Kentucky, USA; Born ca 1812/1813 per 1850 Census, Franklin Co., MO - aged 37 on 28 Sept 1850.1,2      She married John Gall Jr., son of John Gall Sr. and Margaret Fulwider, on 15 April 1830 at Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
Ancestry.com - Missouri, Marriage Records, 1805-2002
     Name:     John Gall
     Marriage Date:     15 Apr 1830
     Marriage Place:     Franklin, Missouri, USA
     Spouse:     Elizabeth Mcwilliams
     Source Citation: Missouri State Archives; Jefferson City, MO, USA; Missouri Marriage Records [Microfilm]
     Source Information: Ancestry.com. Missouri, Marriage Records, 1805-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007.
     Original data: Missouri Marriage Records. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm.1,3
Elizabeth McWilliams died on 17 April 1851 at age 39.1
     Elizabeth McWilliams and John Gall Jr. appeared in the census of 1830 at Boeff Township, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
John is next to his father, John Gall Sr. (line 5).
p. 72, line 6
     
     Name:     John Gall Junior
     Home in 1830 (City, County, State):     Boeuf, Franklin, Missouri
     Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29:     1 [1801-10] John 1800
     Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29:     1 [1801-10] Elizabeth (McWilliams) 1812
     Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:     2
     Total Free White Persons:     2
     Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):     2.4

Elizabeth McWilliams and John Gall Jr. appeared in the census of 1840 at Boeff Township, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
A John Gall Sr. and a John Gall Jr. in Franklin Co. in 1840. Not sure if they are same ones.
     --John Jr. would have been about 40 at this time.
     --His wife Eliz. would have been about 28.
     --His dau. Melvina would have been about 7.
p. 208, Line 8
     Name: John Gall Junr
     Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Boeff, Franklin, Missouri
     Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
     Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
     Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
     Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
     Free White Persons - Under 20: 1 F
     ree White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
     Total Free White Persons: 3
     Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 3.5

Elizabeth McWilliams and John Gall Jr. appeared in the census of 28 September 1850 at District No. 31, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
He is next door to his mother and father.
p. 189, lines 16-15, dwelling 791, family 791
     13 GAL, John Jr 49 [1801] W M Farmer $450 VA
     14 " , Elizabeth 37 [1813] W F KY
     15 " , Melvina 17 [1833] W F MO Attended School.6

Family

John Gall Jr. b. 12 Nov 1800, d. 12 Sep 1876
Child

Citations

  1. [S662] Agnes Nothstine, Genealogy: Gall & Nothstine - 1730-1964 (spiral bound) (n.p.: Muskogee Draughons College Press, 1965, 1965), p. 14.
  2. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 70, Household 791, line 14.
  3. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, Marriage record seen on Ancestry.com on 4 Feb 2019 at:
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?dbid=1171&h=11133357&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=9071
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1171/vrmmo1833_c2388-0137?pid=11133357&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?dbid%3D1171%26h%3D11133357%26indiv%3Dtry%26o_vc%3DRecord:OtherRecord%26rhSource%3D9071&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.
  4. [S4478] 1840 Federal Census, 1840 Census MO Franklin Co St Johns Twp, 1830; Census Place: Boeuf, Franklin, Missouri; Series: M19; Roll: 72; Page: 140; Family History Library Film: 0014853
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?dbid=8058&h=2024459&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=9071
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8058/4409678_00287?pid=2024459&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?dbid%3D8058%26h%3D2024459%26indiv%3Dtry%26o_vc%3DRecord:OtherRecord%26rhSource%3D9071&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  5. [S493] 1840 Federal Census, 1840 Census MO Franklin Co Boeff Twp, Source Citation: Year: 1840; Census Place: Boeff, Franklin, Missouri; Roll: 223; Page: 208; Image: 1128; Family History Library Film: 0014855.
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-c&gsfn=John&gsln=Gall&gsln_x=XO&msydy=1840&msydy_x=1&msypn__ftp=Franklin+County%2c+Missouri%2c+USA&msypn=1068&msypn_PInfo=7-%7c0%7c1652393%7c0%7c2%7c3247%7c28%7c0%7c1068%7c0%7c0%7c&msypn_x=XO&msypn__ftp_x=1&cpxt=0&uidh=v51&cp=12&pcat=35&h=3251465&recoff=7+8+19&db=1840usfedcenancestry&indiv=1&ml_rpos=2
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8057/4409679_01128?pid=3251465&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank%3D1%26new%3D1%26MSAV%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gss%3Dangs-c%26gsfn%3DJohn%26gsln%3DGall%26gsln_x%3DXO%26msydy%3D1840%26msydy_x%3D1%26msypn__ftp%3DFranklin%2BCounty%252c%2BMissouri%252c%2BUSA%26msypn%3D1068%26msypn_PInfo%3D7-%257c0%257c1652393%257c0%257c2%257c3247%257c28%257c0%257c1068%257c0%257c0%257c%26msypn_x%3DXO%26msypn__ftp_x%3D1%26cpxt%3D0%26uidh%3Dv51%26cp%3D12%26pcat%3D35%26h%3D3251465%26recoff%3D7%2B8%2B19%26db%3D1840usfedcenancestry%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D2&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  6. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, Year: 1850; Census Place: District 31, Franklin, Missouri; Roll: M432_399; Page: 70A; Image: 143
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&indiv=try&h=3767200
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8054/4200559_00143?pid=3767200&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1850usfedcenancestry%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D3767200&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  7. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 70, Household 791, line 15.

Roxanna HuntHurt

F, #7358, b. circa 1809
Last Edited13 Oct 2018
     Roxanna HuntHurt was born circa 1809 at Kentucky, USA.1 She married Jacob Gall, son of John Gall Sr. and Margaret Fulwider, on 10 October 1826 at Franklin Co., Missouri, USA; Ancestry Marriage record says marriage date 7/9/1826: Missouri Marriages, 1766-1983
Name: Jacob Gall
Spouse: Roxana Hurt
Marriage Date: 7 Sep 1826
Location: Franklin
State: Missouri
Source Information: Hunting For Bears, comp.. Missouri Marriages, 1766-1983 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
Original data: Missouri marriage information taken from county courthouse records. Many of these records were extracted from copies of the original records in microfilm, microfiche, or book format, located at the Family History Library.2,3
     Roxanna HuntHurt and Jacob Gall appeared in the census of 1840 at Boeff Township, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
This is a Jacob Gall in Franklin Co. in 1840. Not sure if it is the same one, but if so, his father and brothers John Jr and David are in the same census.
p. 212, Line 8
     Name: Jacob Gall
     Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Boeff, Franklin, Missouri
     Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 1
     Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
     Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2
     Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
     Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
     Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1
     Persons Employed in Agriculture: 3
     Free White Persons - Under 20: 5
     Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
     Total Free White Persons: 7
     Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 7.4

Roxanna HuntHurt and Jacob Gall appeared in the census of 22 October 1850 at District No. 31, Franklin Co., Missouri, USA;
p. 89-A, lines 19-23, dwelling 1118, family 1118
     19 GALL, Jacob 45 [1805] Male White Farmer Real Estate $800 born VA married
     20 " , Rowxana 41 [1809] Female White born KY married
     21 " , Christopher 17 [1833] Male White Farmer born MO in school
     22 " , Walter 15 [1835] Male White born MO in school
     23 " , Amanda 12 [1838] Female White born MO in school.5

Family

Jacob Gall b. 28 Nov 1787, d. b 1863
Children

Citations

  1. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 89/1, Household 1118/1118, line 22.
  2. [S662] Agnes Nothstine, Genealogy: Gall & Nothstine - 1730-1964 (spiral bound) (n.p.: Muskogee Draughons College Press, 1965, 1965), p. 14.
  3. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=MOmarriages_ga&h=35087&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=gr_t68721256_p42186595264_ktidz0q3d68721256z0q26pidz0q3d42186595264z0q26hidz0q3d82767513763z0q26dbidz0q3d7843z0q26rpidz0q3d35087z0q26hfz0q3dAllHintsz0q26pnz0q3d1z0q26hsz0q3drecentz0q26ssrcz0q3dgrz0q26pgz0q3d32880z0q26pgplz0q3dtidz0q257cpidz0q257chidz0q257cdbidz0q257crpidz0q257chfz0q257cpnz0q257chsz0q257cssrcz0q26pgpsz0q3d42186595264_h82767513763. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.
  4. [S493] 1840 Federal Census, 1840 Census MO Franklin Co Boeff Twp, Year: 1840; Census Place: Boeff, Franklin, Missouri; Page: 212
    Info: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-c&gsfn=John&gsln=Gall&gsln_x=XO&msydy=1840&msydy_x=1&msypn__ftp=Franklin+County%2c+Missouri%2c+USA&msypn=1068&msypn_PInfo=7-%7c0%7c1652393%7c0%7c2%7c3247%7c28%7c0%7c1068%7c0%7c0%7c&msypn_x=XO&msypn__ftp_x=1&cpxt=0&uidh=v51&cp=12&pcat=35&h=3251589&recoff=8&db=1840usfedcenancestry&indiv=1&ml_rpos=5
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8057/4409679_01136?pid=3251589&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank%3D1%26new%3D1%26MSAV%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gss%3Dangs-c%26gsfn%3DJohn%26gsln%3DGall%26gsln_x%3DXO%26msydy%3D1840%26msydy_x%3D1%26msypn__ftp%3DFranklin%2BCounty%252c%2BMissouri%252c%2BUSA%26msypn%3D1068%26msypn_PInfo%3D7-%257c0%257c1652393%257c0%257c2%257c3247%257c28%257c0%257c1068%257c0%257c0%257c%26msypn_x%3DXO%26msypn__ftp_x%3D1%26cpxt%3D0%26uidh%3Dv51%26cp%3D12%26pcat%3D35%26h%3D3251589%26recoff%3D8%26db%3D1840usfedcenancestry%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D5&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  5. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: District 31, Franklin, Missouri; Roll: M432_399; Page: 89A; Image: 181.
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&indiv=try&h=3768802
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8054/4200559_00181?pid=3768802&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1850usfedcenancestry%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D3768802&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  6. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 89/1, Household 1118/1118, line 21.
  7. [S484] 1850 Federal Census, 1850 Census MO Franklin Co Dist 31, p. 89/1, Household 1118/1118, line 23.

Emma de Mortain1,2

F, #7359, b. circa 1058, d. 1080
FatherRobert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall3,2,1 b. 1031, d. 8 Dec 1090
MotherMaud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain3,1,2 b. c 1049, d. 21 Sep 1082
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited23 Oct 2004
     Emma de Mortain was born circa 1058 at Mortagne-au-Perche.2 She married Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse, son of Pons II Guillaume (?) comte de Toulouse, Albi & Dijon and Almodis (?) de la Haute Marche, between 1071 and 1080; his 1st wife.4,3,5,1,2
Emma de Mortain died in 1080.4
     GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Emma de Mortain Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 694B.2

Family

Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse b. c 1044, d. 1094
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Mortain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00205379&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, pp. 88-89. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 185-2, p. 159. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106194&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html#PG4

Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall1

M, #7360, b. 1031, d. 8 December 1090
FatherHarlevin de Conteville Seigneur de Conteville2 b. c 1001, d. bt 1033 - 1092
MotherHerleveArlette (?) de Falaise2 b. c 1003, d. c 1050
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited12 Jan 2014
     Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall was born in 1031.3 He married Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain, daughter of Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois and Mabile de Bellême, before 1066.1,4,5
Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall died on 8 December 1090.5
Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall died in 1095.3
     He was Earl of Moreton (Mortain) at Normandy, France (now).6 GAV-26 EDV-26. GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall "Robert, Earl of Moreton, in Normandy, who, participating with his brother, the bishop of Bayeux, in the triumph of Hastings, was rewarded by his victorious kinsman, Duke William, with the Earldom of Cornwall (anno 1068), and grants of not less than seven hundred and ninety-three manors. This nobleman m. Maud, dau. of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury, and had issue, William, his successor, and three daus., one of whom m. Andrew de Vetrei; another, Guy de la Nal; and the youngest, the Earl of Thoulouse [sic], brother of Raymond, Count of St. Giles, who behaved so valiantly in the Jerusalem expedition. The period of the decease of Robert, Earl of Moreton and Cornwall, is not ascertained, but he appears to have been s. by his son, William de Moreton, Earl of Cornwall..."4 Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall was also known as Robert de Mortaigne Earl of Cornwall.7

Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall "...half brother of the Conquerer and a companion at the Battle of Hastings, 1066."3 He was Earl of Cornwall in 1068.6

Family

Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain b. c 1049, d. 21 Sep 1082
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:viii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 183, NORMANDY 6:iv.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 185-1, p. 159. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, pp. 88-89. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S2391] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 Sep 2011: "Complete Peerage Addition: Death date of Maud de Montgomery, Countess of Mortain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 Sep 2011. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 Sep 2011."
  6. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, p. 88.
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10370
  8. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32161
  9. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10683
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 82, de FERRERS 5.
  11. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Mortain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00205379&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  13. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I10183

Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain1,2,3

F, #7361, b. circa 1049, d. 21 September 1082
FatherRoger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois2 b. 1005, d. 27 Jul 1094
MotherMabile de Bellême b. 1015, d. 2 Dec 1079
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited12 Jan 2014
     Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain was born circa 1049 at Mortaigne, Normandy, France.4 She married Robert De Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall, son of Harlevin de Conteville Seigneur de Conteville and HerleveArlette (?) de Falaise, before 1066.1,2,3
Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain died on 21 September 1082; per Richardson: [quote]The authors, David Bates and Anne Curry, in their book, England and
Normandy in the Middle Ages (1994): 136-137 cite evidence that Maud de
Montgomery, Countess of Mortain, died in 1082:

pg. 136: "Lastly, in the pancarte of Grestain, the pincerna of the
Countess Matilda of Mortain promised an annual sum of £15 Anglorum
nummorum to the abbey at her death in 1082." END OF QUOTE.

pg. 137: "In contrast to the treatment they received from William,
Notre-Dame of Grestain and Saint-Léger des Préaux were not neglected
by their traditional aristocratic benefactors after 1066. The bulk of
the grants which contribed to Grestain's substantial endowment in
England came from Herluin de Conteville's son and successor, Count
Robert of Mortain, with support from Robert's father-in-law, Roger de
Montgomery. The pancarte states that Roger transferred to Grestain
the property in England which he had given to his daughter Matilda
(Robert of Mortain's wife) on her death in 1082." END OF QUOTE

The above material may be viewed at the following weblink:

http://books.google.com/books?id=_2ydotlxKeUC&pg=PA137

The source given for this information is: D. Bates and V. Gazeau,
"L'abbaye de Grestain et la familly d'Herluin de Conteville," in
Annales de Normandie, 40 (1990): pp. 5-30, esp. p. 29. [end quote]5,3
     Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain per Richardson: [quote]Complete Peerage, 3 (1913): 427-428 (sub Cornwall) includes an account
of Robert, Count of Mortain [died 1090], the uterine half-brother of
King William the Conqueror.

Regarding his first wife, Maud de Montgomery, the following limited
information is supplied:

"He married, 1stly, before 1066, Maud, daughter of Roger (de
Montgomery), Earl of Shrewsbury, by his 1st wife, Mabel, daughter and
heiress of William, Seigneur d'Alençon and Bellême. She was buried in
the Abbey of Grestain." END OF QUOTE.

As we can see, no death date is provided for Maud de Montgomery.
Rather, we are told only her place of burial.

Regardless, the death date of Maud, Countess of Mortain, as 21
September is found in an ancient calendar published in 1825 in an
obscure source, Codicum Manuscriptorum Ecclesiae Cathedralis
Dunelmensis. On page 214, the following information is provided:

"Nomina quae in Kalendario (supra Tr. 5.) occurrunt.

XI. Kal. Octobr. [21 September] Obiit Mathildis Comitissa de
Moretonio." END OF QUOTE.

The above item may be viewed at the following weblink:

http://books.google.com/books?id=tCIDAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA214

On page 206 the editor of the book identifies Maud, Countess of
Mortain, above as the wife of Robert, Count of Mortain, the half-
brother of King William the Conqueror ["Fuit ista Matildis Uxor Roberti Comitis de Moretonio in Normannia].

It should be noted that Maud de Montgomery, Countess of Mortain, is
ancestress to numerous people well known in medieval history,
including Eleanor of Aquitaine, wife of King Louis VII of France and
King Henry II of England; Eleanor of Provence, wife of King Henry III
of England; Ela of Salisbury, wife of William Longespee, Earl of
Salisbury; Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Earl of Derby; Guy de Thouars (died
1213), Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond; as well as various Kings of
Aragon, France, and Portugal. [end quote]3 GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:viii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, pp. 88-89. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S2391] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 Sep 2011: "Complete Peerage Addition: Death date of Maud de Montgomery, Countess of Mortain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 Sep 2011. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 Sep 2011."
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10372
  5. [S2392] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 30 Sep 2011: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Death date of Maud de Montgomery, Countess of Mortain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 30 Sep 2011. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 30 Sep 2011."
  6. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32161
  7. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10683
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  9. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Mortain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00205379&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  10. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I10183

William Rust

M, #7362, b. circa 1634, d. circa 1699
Last Edited15 Jun 2018
     William Rust was born circa 1634 at Suffolk, England.1,2 He married Ann MedcalfeMetcalf, daughter of William MedcalfeMetcalf, before May 1662.3,2
William Rust died circa 1699 at Westmoreland Co., Virginia, USA.1,2

Family

Ann MedcalfeMetcalf b. WFT Est. 1627-1651, d. b 1697
Child

Citations

  1. [S667] Unknown author, Rust of Virginia p. 1 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S669] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Family #4085 (n.p.: Release date: November 29, 1995, unknown publish date).
  3. [S668] Unknown author, Rust of Virginia p. 2 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Ann MedcalfeMetcalf

F, #7363, b. WFT Est. 1627-1651, d. before 1697
FatherWilliam MedcalfeMetcalf d. 1655
Last Edited15 Jun 2018
     Ann MedcalfeMetcalf was born WFT Est. 1627-1651.1 She married William Rust before May 1662.2,1
Ann MedcalfeMetcalf died before 1697.2,1

Family

William Rust b. c 1634, d. c 1699
Child

Citations

  1. [S669] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Family #4085 (n.p.: Release date: November 29, 1995, unknown publish date).
  2. [S668] Unknown author, Rust of Virginia p. 2 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

John Steptoe

M, #7364, b. circa 1673, d. after 5 January 1719/20
FatherAnthony Steptoe1 b. 1653, d. 1709
MotherLucy Stephen2,1 d. 1675
Last Edited30 Mar 2018
     John Steptoe was born circa 1673 at England.3,1 He married Elizabeth Eustace in 1705 at Lancaster Co., Virginia, USA.4,1
John Steptoe died after 5 January 1719/20 at Virginia, USA.1
     John Steptoe (an unknown value.)5

John Steptoe left a will on 5 January 1719/20.3,1

Family

Elizabeth Eustace b. 1677, d. 1691
Children

Citations

  1. [S4103] Stella Pickett Hardy, colonial Families of the Southern State of America: A History and Genealogy of Colonial Families who Settled in the Colonies Prior to the Revolution (New York: Tobias A. Wright Printer & Publisher, 1911), p. 484. Hereinafter cited as Hardy [1911] Colonial Families of the So States.
  2. [S2243] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gdecourcy, Garland DeCourcy (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 Feb 2008.
  3. [S2243] e-mail address, updated 29 Feb 2008, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gdecourcy&id=I005212
  4. [S2243] e-mail address, updated 29 Feb 2008, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gdecourcy&id=I005213
  5. [S671] Unknown author, WFT 2-3215 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

William MedcalfeMetcalf

M, #7365, d. 1655
Last Edited15 Jun 2018
     William MedcalfeMetcalf married an unknown person.
William MedcalfeMetcalf died in 1655 at Westmoreland Co., Virginia, USA.

Family

Child

Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser1

M, #7366, b. 8 January 1086, d. 23 May 1125
FatherHeinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor2,1,3 b. 11 Nov 1050, d. 7 Aug 1106
MotherBertha (?) of Savoy, Countess of Maurienne2,1 b. 1051, d. 27 Dec 1087
Last Edited6 Apr 2008
     Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser was born on 8 January 1086.4,5 He married Matilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain, daughter of Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland, on 7 January 1114 at Mainz, Germany; her 1st husband.6,7,8,9,10,5,11
Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser died on 23 May 1125 at age 39.6,1,5
     Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser Heinrich V, King of Germany and Italy (1106-25), Emperor (1106/11-25), *8.1.1086, +23.5.1125; m.Mainz 7.1.1114 Mathilde of England (*7.2.1102 +10.9.1167.)5 Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser was also known as Henry V Holy Roman Emperor.9,1 As of between 1106 and 1125, Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser lived at an unknown place ; King of Germany and Italy.5 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 1106 and 1125.5

Heinrich V (?) Deutscher Konig, Romischer Kaiser HENRY V (married to Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England, in 1114). A brutal, resourceful, treacherous ruler, Henry continued his father's policies. Skillfully pretending to be dependent on the princes, he continued lay investiture, opposed papal interference in Germany, and retained the support of the lay and clerical princes; in the meantime, relying on the towns and ministeriales, he built up the nucleus of a strong power. Wars against Hungary, Poland, and Bohemia (1108-10).

1110-1111: Imposing expedition to Italy to secure the imperial crown, universally supported in Germany. In Italy the Lombard towns (except Milan) and even the Countess Matilda yielded to Henry. Pope Paschal II (1099-1118) offered to renounce all feudal and secular holdings of the Church (except those of the see of Rome) in return for the concession of free elections and the abandonment of lay investiture, a papal humiliation more than equal to the imperial mortification at Canossa.

1114-1115: A series of revolts (in Lorraine, along the lower Rhine, in Westphalia, and soon in East Saxony and Thuringia). Henry was saved by the loyalty of the South Germans.

1125: Henry left no direct heir, and at the bitterly fought election of 1125, the archbishops of Mainz and Cologne, foes of the anticlerical Salian line, cleverly prevented, with papal aid, the election of the nearest heir, Frederick of Swabia, of the house of Hohenstaufen, on the grounds that the hereditary principle was dangerous. Lothair of Supplinburg, duke of Saxony, was chosen, opening the great struggle of Welf and Waiblinger (Hohenstaufen) in Germany (Guelf and Ghibelline in Italy). between 1106 and 1125.12

Family

Matilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain b. 7 Feb 1102, d. 10 Sep 1167

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  4. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html#H5
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), de Baugency. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  7. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 11-3.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 517-518. Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession", Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#MH1
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 206.

Simon le Scrope of Flotmanby and Wensley1

M, #7367
FatherRobert le Scrope of Barton1 d. 1190
ReferenceGAV23 EDV21
Last Edited4 Aug 2006
     Simon le Scrope of Flotmanby and Wensley married Ingoliane (?)1
     GAV-23 EDV-21 GKJ-21.

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Juliane Brun1

F, #7368
FatherRoger Brun of Fylingdales, Yorks1
ReferenceGAV22 EDV20
Last Edited3 Aug 2006
     Juliane Brun married Henry le Scrope of Flotmanby and Wensley, son of Simon le Scrope of Flotmanby and Wensley and Ingoliane (?).1
     GAV-22 EDV-20 GKJ-20.

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Roger Brun of Fylingdales, Yorks1

M, #7369
ReferenceGAV23 EDV21
Last Edited3 Aug 2006
     GAV-23 EDV-21 GKJ-21.

Roger Brun of Fylingdales, Yorks lived at Fylingdales, Yorkshire, England.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Ingoliane (?)1

F, #7370
ReferenceGAV23 EDV21
Last Edited3 Aug 2006
     Ingoliane (?) married Simon le Scrope of Flotmanby and Wensley, son of Robert le Scrope of Barton.1
     GAV-23 EDV-21 GKJ-21.

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Robert le Scrope of Barton1

M, #7371, d. 1190
ReferenceGAV24 EDV22
Last Edited4 Aug 2006
     Robert le Scrope of Barton died in 1190 at Acre, Palestine; died on crusade.1
     GAV-24 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Robert le Scrope of Barton Scrope of Danby is Heir Male and head of a House which in its time has held the Baronies of Scrope of Masham (1350-1517), and Scrope of Bolton (1370-1630), the Earldoms of Wiltshire (1397-1399), and of Sunderland (1627-1630), and the Sovereignty of the Isle of Man (1393-99), and can claim five Garter Knights. To the mediaeval church this family gave two Bishops, and an Archbishop of York, and to the secular world, a Ld Chancellor, four High Treasurers, and two Ch Justices. The name (pronounced Scroop) is believed to derive from an old Norse nickname meaning Crab, given to some remote ancestor, and in this belief several members of the family later bore a crab as their crest. Hence also their joking motto, as a crab walks sideways.

During the twelfth century the Scropes, "grandez gentils hommes et dez noblez," held lands in Lincolnshire at Barton-on-Humber. Richard Scrope; m Agnes de Clare, sis of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Hertford, and had issue, a s, Robert Scrope, of Barton, living 1166. A Robert Scrope, of Barton; d on crusade at Acre 1190, leaving descendants in the male line, who continued to hold the Barton lands until 1304.1

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg1,2

F, #7372, b. circa 1253, d. 17 October 1277
FatherDirk II (?) von Heinsberg, Heer van Valkenburg3,2,4 b. c 1225, d. 14 Oct 1268
MotherBertha (?) de Montjoie5,2,4 b. c 1220, d. b 12 Jul 1254
Last Edited24 Aug 2008
     Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was born circa 1253.6,1 She married Richard (?) 1st Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou, son of John I Lackland (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 16 June 1269 at Kaiserslautern, Germany; his 3rd wife.7,8,6,1,9,2,4
Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg died on 17 October 1277.6,1,2,4
Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was buried after 17 October 1277 at Friars Minor, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.2,4
     Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was also known as Beatrice de Falkenburg.4

Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg (an unknown value.)7

Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg Richard had been elected German king in 1257, and was a widower for nearly eight years before he married Beatrice. Given his rank and vast wealth, he could command just about any bride he fancied - and Beatrice was said to be one of the most beautiful women of her time. The dates you have appear to be correct: she was born b ca 1253, died on 17 October 1277, and buried in the Franciscan church at Oxford.

Her family name was Falkenburg (not -berg). Incorrect information is given about this in many sources, including DNB and _Cambridge Medieval History_. She was daughter of Dietrich I (sometimes numbered II) von Heinsberg, lord of Falkenburg. For details, see 'Beatrice of Falkenburg, the Third Wife of Richard of Cornwall' by Frank R Lewis, _English Historical Review_ 52 (1937) 279-282.3 Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was also known as Beatrice De Fauquemont.1 Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was also known as Beatrice (?) of Falkenstein.6 Beatrix (?) van Valkenburg was also known as Beatrice (?) Margrave de Vasto.3

Family

Richard (?) 1st Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou b. 5 Jan 1209, d. 2 Apr 1272

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice van Valkenburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00394336&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1654] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 2 June 2004 "Re: Birthdate for Beatrice of Fauconberg"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 2 June 2004."
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cornwall 4: pp. 230-231. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Montjoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00021713&tree=LEO
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 280. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.11.

Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland1,2,3,4

M, #7375, b. 24 August 1198, d. 8 July 1249
FatherWilliam I "The Lion" (?) Earl of Northumberland, King of Scotland1,5,2,6,3,4 b. 1143, d. 4 Dec 1214
MotherErmengarde de Beaumont1,5,2,3,4 b. c 1170, d. 11 Feb 1233
Last Edited3 May 2008
     Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland was born on 24 August 1198 at Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland.7,8,5,2,3,4 He married Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, daughter of John I Lackland (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 19 June 1221 at York, Westminster, Middlesex, England; his 1st wife.9,10,5,2,3,4 Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland married Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland, daughter of Enguerrand III de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Cte de Roucy et de Perche and Marie de Montmirail, on 15 May 1239 at Roxburgh, Scotland; her 1st husband; Genealogy.EU (Coucy 1 page) says m. 12 May 1239.7,8,5,11,12,2,3,4
Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland died on 8 July 1249 at Isle of Kerrera, Oban, Scotland, at age 50; Leo van de Pas says d. 8 July 1249.7,8,5,2,3,4
Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland was buried after 12 July 1249 at Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire, Scotland.8,2
     Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 315.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol II page 67.3 He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, pp. 407-408] ALEXANDER II THE PEACEFUL King of Scotland, 4 December 1214-6 July 1249. Crowned: Scone Abbey, 6 December 1214. Born: Haddington, East Lothian, 24 August 1198. Died: Isle of Kerrera, Oban, 6 July 1249, aged 50. Buried: Melrose Abbey. Married: (1) 18 June 1221 at York, Joan (1210-38), dau. King John of England: no children; (2) 15 May 1239 at Roxburgh, Marie, dau. Enguerrand III de Coucy: 1 child. Alexander also had one illegitimate daughter. Despite his nickname, earned more through his role as a codifier of laws than as a peace-keeper, Alexander ruled Scotland with an iron hand and maintained a guarded peace with England. Alexander faced the inevitable uprisings amongst the Highlanders, the first led by Donald, son of Donald MacWilliam who had rebelled during the reign of Alexander's father WILLIAM. The rebellion was soon quashed and Donald was killed in June 1215, his severed head put on display outside Alexander's court. Although there were further uprisings, they came to nothing, and the continued fortification of Scotland meant that Alexander had a reasonably firm control over the north, and over the lords of Galloway, who also retained pretensions of independence.
Although Alexander accepted the authority of the English king JOHN, he did not respect him, and readily joined the English barons in their uprising against him. John led an army against Alexander, plundering several towns along the Scottish border, but with little effect. Alexander was one of the signatories to the Magna Carta at Runnymede in 1215. His relationship with HENRY III was stronger, though cautious. Alexander married Henry's sister Joan, though she was barely eleven, a political marriage that bore no fruit. Although Henry claimed a sovereign authority over Scotland this was never accepted by Alexander and there were several diplomatic exchanges throughout his reign, usually involving money or proposed marriages. Eventually terms were reached in 1237 when Alexander gave up his claim on Northumberland.
Alexander's first wife died in March 1238. Alexander was now forty, and the marriage had been childless. He married again, but it was not until 1241 that a son (ALEXANDER III) was born. These years without an heir, especially after the death of Alexander's cousin, John, in 1237, had seen the rise to prominence of Robert le Brus, lord of Annandale. He was the husband of Alexander's cousin Isabella, the eldest surviving child of William the Lion's brother David. In 1238 it was agreed that in the absence of any direct heir from Alexander, Isabella's son, Robert le Brus, would become king. This rise to power of a Norman lord fuelled further discontent amongst the Highlanders. The most resistance came from the lords of Argyll, who still called themselves kings of the Isles, and it was while preparing for battle against EWEN of the Isles in 1249 that Alexander caught a fever and died. He was succeeded by his infant son. between 4 December 1214 and 6 July 1249.7,8,5

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England b. 22 Jul 1210, d. 5 Mar 1238

Family 3

Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland b. bt 1220 - 1225
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 115, HUNTINGDON 5:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alexander II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002874&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Lion': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002868&tree=LEO
  7. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 407-408. Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), PLANTAGENET 16:iii, p. 280. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 200, PLANTAGENET 8:i.
  11. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002876&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  13. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley: British Kings, p. 410 (Chart 22).
  14. [S2010] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 Dec 2005: "Re: Patrick Dunbar / Agnes Randolph"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 Dec 2005."
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.15.

Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #7376, b. 26 December 1194, d. 13 December 1250
FatherHeinrich VI (?) Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily1,2,3,7,4,5,6 b. Nov 1165, d. 28 Sep 1197
MotherConstance (?) Queen of Sicily1,8,2,3,9,4,5,10,6 b. 2 Nov 1154, d. 27 Nov 1198
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited14 Feb 2019
     Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor was born on 26 December 1194 at Jesi near Ancona.1,3,4,5,6 He married Constanza/Constance (?) of Aragon, daughter of Alfonso II Raimundez (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon and Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, in February 1210 at Messina, Italy; his 1st wife, her 2nd husband.4,11,2,12,3 Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Saint Agnes (Anezka) (?) of Prague were engaged.13 Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor married Yolande/ Isabella II de Brienne Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople and Maria di Montferrato Queen of Jerusalem, on 9 November 1225 at Brindisi, Italy (now).14,2,3,4,15,5,16,10 Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor married Isabelle (?) of England, daughter of John I Lackland (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 20 July 1235 at Worms, Germany (now); his 4th wife.17,18,3,4,6
Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor died on 13 December 1250 at Fiorentino Castle, Lucera, at age 55.1,19,3,4,5,6
     EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich II Roger, King of Germany (1197-1250), King Two Sicilies (1198-1250), Duke of Swabia (1212-16) =Friedrich IV, Emperor from 1220, cr in Roma, *Iesi 26.12.1194, +Castel Fiorentino 13.12.1250; 1m: Messina 1209 Constance d'Aragon (*1179 +Catania 1222); 2m: Brindisi 1225 Isabelle II de Brienne, Queen of Jerusalem (*1211 +Andria 1228); 3m: Worms 20.7.1235 Isabelle Plantagenet (*1214 +1.12.1241.)4 He was King of Jerusalem.10 Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor was also known as Frederick II Holy Roman Emperor.20

Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor Faris, p. 280.17 He was King of Germany between 1197 and 1250.4 He was King of Siciliy between 1197 and 1250.8,4 He was Duke of Swabia between 1212 and 1216.4

Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor FREDERICK II (Stupor Mundi), amiable, charming, pitiless, arrogant; the most brilliant ruler and one of the most learned men of his day; a legislator of the first order, able soldier, diplomat, skeptic, one of the leading scientific investigators of his time; an astrologer with the mind of a Renaissance rationalist; Sicilian by taste and training, half Norman by blood, with little of the German about him. Crowned king of the Romans, 1212; king of the Germans, at Aachen, 1215; emperor, at Rome, 1220.

1213: The Golden Bull of Eger: Frederick, who had already sworn an oath to keep his two crowns separate and to support the pope, abandoned the German Church to Innocent (conceding the free election of bishops, the right of appeal to Rome) and undertook to support the pope against heretics.

1214: The Battle of Bouvines [>]: Frederick and Philip II completed the defeat of Otto and the Welfs. On the death of Innocent III (1216), Frederick's personal rule may be said to have begun.

1216-1227: Frederick on tolerable terms with Pope Honorius III, his old tutor: election (1220) of Frederick's son Henry as king of the Romans (a violation of Frederick's promise); Frederick allowed to retain Sicily during his lifetime; renewal of his crusading oath. Granting of generous privileges (1220) to the clergy: exemption of the Church from taxation and of clerics from lay jurisdiction, making clerical princes virtually independent territorial princes; support of the bishops against the towns; promises to suppress heresy. Crusade postponed until 1225.

1227-1229: Frederick's crusade [>]: return of Frederick due to illness; first excommunication (1227); resumption of crusade (1228); violent papal and imperial propaganda and recrimination; the Teutonic Knights under Hermann of Salza remained faithful to Frederick. Aware of the commercial value of Muslim friendship, Frederick negotiated a ten-year truce (1229) with El-Kamil, sultan of Egypt, which restored Jerusalem, Nazareth, and Bethlehem to Christian hands. Frederick crowned himself king of Jerusalem. Papal war (1228-29) of devastation in Apulia (first known papal mercenaries, the soldiers of the keys); Frederick on his return expelled the papal forces and threatened the Patrimonium Petri with invasion.

1230: Hollow Peace of San Germano with Pope Gregory IX: Frederick promised to protect the papal domains, confirmed papal rights over Sicily, and was absolved. In preparation for the next struggle, Frederick concentrated on Italy, especially Sicily. Frederick's son Henry, on his majority (1228), devoted himself to Germany and favored the towns. Frederick, like Barbarossa, had leaned heavily on the German episcopate, especially Engelbert of Cologne, and had increased the independence of the lay princes and ministeriales; administrative offices tended to become hereditary, and after Engelbert's death (1225), the administration had become less efficient. Settlement of the Teutonic Knights in Prussia: union (1237) with the Livonian Brothers of the Sword and eastward expansion: foundation of Thorn (1231), Kulm (1232), and Marienwerder (1233).

1231: Privilege of Worms. Hoping for German support for his Italian policy, Frederick extended to the lay princes his generous grants of 1220 to the clergy, giving them control over local justice, minting rights, roads, streams, and so on. Territorial sovereignty of both lay and clerical princes strengthened. The Decree of Ravenna (1232) allowed expansion of the power of the princes at the expense of the towns. Henry objected, revolted (1234), and tried to win the German and Italian towns to his side.

1235-1237: Frederick's last visit to Germany. Deposition, arrest, and imprisonment of Henry, who committed suicide in prison (1242) and was succeeded by his brother Conrad (1237); conciliation and peace with the Welfs strengthened Frederick in Germany. Great reform Diet of Mainz (the German Melfi, 1235); issue of the model Landfrieden, ordinances for the reestablishment of peace. Frederick was unable to stem the steady progress of towns (resulting from expanding commerce) in Germany or Italy.

1237: At Cortenuova, Frederick smashed the Second Lombard League and humiliated Milan.

1239: Pope Gregory's second excommunication of Frederick, followed by battle of pamphlets and preaching: Frederick painted as a heretic, rake, anti-Christ. He retorted with a demand for reform of the Church and an appeal to the princes of Europe, proposing a league of monarchs against the papacy. Beginning of the amalgamation of northern and central Italy with the imperial administration on Sicilian lines: a system of general vicariates under imperial vicars, each city with an imperial podestà (generally Apulians, and often relatives of Frederick).

1241: Gregory's call for a synod at Rome to depose Frederick. Frederick ravaged papal territory, almost took Rome, and his fleet captured a large delegation of prelates off Genoa on their way to the synod; annexation of papal Tuscany to the empire. Gregory's death (1241), Celestine IV (1241). During the two-year interregnum in the papacy, Frederick intrigued for a friendly pope.

1243: Frederick welcomed the election of Innocent IV, who turned out to be the architect of his ruin.

1244: Frederick's invasion of the Campagna and vain efforts at reconciliation with the pope; Innocent's flight to Lyons and call for a synod.

1245: The Synod of Lyons. Appeal to the Germans to revolt and elect a new king; deposition of Frederick; Louis IX's efforts at conciliation and Frederick's offers rebuffed by the pope: Innocent unleashed the Franciscans and Dominicans in a war of propaganda and proclaimed a crusade against Frederick. Henry Raspe, duke of Thuringia (d. 1247), was set up (1246) as an antiking in Germany.

1247-1256: Henry Raspe was followed by William of Holland, who was supported by a newly formed league of Rhenish towns. Innocent's ruthless but vain campaign against Frederick's episcopal allies in Germany; bitter warfare in northern Italy with extreme cruelty on both sides; Italian conspiracy to assassinate Frederick (probably with Innocent's knowledge) put down in cold blood.

1248: The defeat of Frederick after a long siege of Parma did not destroy his hold on northern Italy.

1250: Sudden death of Frederick; burial in the cathedral at Palmero, where his sarcophagus remains. between 1212 and 1250.19 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 1215 and 1250.20 He was King of Jerusalem between 1225 and 1243.21

Family 2

Constanza/Constance (?) of Aragon b. 1179, d. 23 Jun 1222
Child

Family 3

Adelheid (?)
Child

Family 4

Saint Agnes (Anezka) (?) of Prague b. 1205, d. 6 Mar 1282

Family 6

Yolande/ Isabella II de Brienne Queen of Jerusalem b. 1211, d. 8 May 1228
Child

Family 7

Bianca Lancia b. c 1212, d. bt 1233 - 1234
Children

Family 8

Isabelle (?) of England b. 1214, d. 1 Dec 1241
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 86. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  3. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013463&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013538&tree=LEO
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 217. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza of Sicily: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013539&tree=LEO
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession", Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  13. [S1458] Catholic Community Forum - Patron Saints Index, online http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/indexsnt.htm, Agnes of Prague, http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainta40.htm. Hereinafter cited as Patron Saints Index.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  15. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013541&tree=LEO
  16. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem.
  17. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 280. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 29A-27, p. 31. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 209.
  20. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 207.
  21. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 235.
  22. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00263412&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerardo von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00262000&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanceflor von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348871&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  26. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich (VII) von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046526&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enzio of Torre and Galura: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348852&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Federico von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348861&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad IV von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046528&tree=LEO
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 7 page (The Batatzes Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant7.html
  31. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza 'Anna' von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196628&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manfredo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013536&tree=LEO
  33. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Violanta von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310270&tree=LEO
  34. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013466&tree=LEO

William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke1,2

M, #7377, b. 1190, d. 23 April 1231
FatherWilliam Marshall 1st Earl of Pembroke1,2 b. c 1146, d. 14 May 1219
MotherIsabella de Clare Countess of Strigoil1,2 b. 1173, d. 1220
Last Edited17 May 2009
     William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke was born in 1190 at Normandy, France.1,2 He married Alix de Béthune Dame de Chocques, daughter of Baudouin de Béthune seigneur de Choques in Artois, Cte d'Aumale and Hawise (?) Countess of Aumale, Lady of Holderness, in 1203; his 1st wife.3,2,4,5 William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke married Alianor (Eleanor) (?) of England, daughter of John I Lackland (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 23 April 1224; her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.6,1,7,8,9,2,10
William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke died on 23 April 1231.1,2,10
William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke was buried after 23 April 1231 at Temple Church, London, England.1,2,10
     William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke Magna Charta surety.1,2

William Marshal 4th Earl of Pembroke van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 196
2. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard.2

Family 2

Alianor (Eleanor) (?) of England b. 1215, d. 13 Apr 1275

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 149, MARSHAL 3:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Marshal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007050&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I5207
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Béthune: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00315266&tree=LEO
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bethune.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 280. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005962&tree=LEO
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Leicester 4: pp. 444-445.

Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester1,2

M, #7378, b. between 1208 and 1209, d. 4 August 1265
FatherSimon V de Montfort 5th Earl of Leicester, Duke of Narbonne4,5,1,2 b. c 1175
MotherAlice de Montmorency1,3,2 d. 24 Feb 1221
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited28 Dec 2008
     Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester was born between 1208 and 1209.6,1 He married Alianor (Eleanor) (?) of England, daughter of John I Lackland (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 7 January 1238 at Westminster Palace, London, Middlesex, England; her 2nd husband.7,6,1,8,9,2
Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester died on 4 August 1265 at Battle of Evesham, Evesham, Worcestershire, England; killed.10,1,2
Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester was buried after 4 August 1265 at Evesham Abbey, Evesham, Worcestershire, England.2
     Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 196
2. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant,forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Sir Bernard Burke, Reference: 376
3. The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VII 543
4. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 642
5. Simon de Montfort London, 1962. , Margaret Wade Labarge, Reference: biography.1

Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester "Little is known about his early years, even to when exactly he was born. The only thing we do know is that the Montforts were not only devout Christians but also believed in education, so that Simon was probably fluent in Latin. In 1218 his father was killed, his second brother in 1220 and his mother in 1221. When the French king took most of their French lands, Amaury, the elder brother, inherited the Montfort lands. This left only one option to Simon: to become a soldier. By the time he reached maturity, his elder brother Amaury was secure in his French territory and so resigned his questionable rights to the English inheritance to Simon.

Accordingly, Simon went to England and approached Ranulf, Earl of Chester, who had first held the lands for Simon's father and, after 1218, had been given proper possession by the English king. The elderly Earl, without direct heirs, supported his young French cousin and the legal process was set in action. In 1231 the king accepted homage from Simon for the Earldom of Leicester, yet it took another eight years before he was formally invested with the Earldom.

In 1235 and again in 1239 his brother Amaury came to visit him in England and helped to secure the Earldom of Leicester for him. In vain Simon de Montfort made two efforts to marry a wealthy widow: first, Mahaut, Countess of Boulogne; then Jeanne, Countess of Flanders. However, it seems he became more and more a favourite of King Henry III and, quite suddenly on 6 January 1238, married the king's sister, Eleanor, who was also a widow as well as wealthy and young. However, prior vows of chastity by Eleanor and opposition from many sources forced Simon to go to Rome to receive papal dispensation. On 10 May 1238 he received Pope Gregory IX's approval.

While he was away Eleanor had been at Kenilworth and he hurried to be with her before the birth of their son on 28 November 1238. When Henry III's queen gave birth to a son-and-heir, Simon de Montfort was honoured at the baptism on 16 July 1239. However, on 9 August at a public occasion when Simon and Eleanor arrived, the king raged against them, implying that they had sinned before their marriage and that the Earl should be excommunicated. Embarrassed, Simon and Eleanor had to withdraw from court. They tried to make peace with the king but, when this failed and with Eleanor again pregnant, they fled to France. It appears the real cause of the king's anger was about money Simon owed to Thomas of Savoy, the queen's uncle, and was unable to repay. When Thomas of Savoy pressed for payment, the king himself had to pay. While in France they said goodbye to Simon's brother, Amaury, who was to go on crusade in Palestine.

In 1240 Simon and Eleanor returned to England with the king again receiving them with honour. Simon then prepared to go on crusade with Richard, Earl of Cornwall. It seems that Eleanor, yet again pregnant, accompanied him as far as Italy, remaining in Brindisi with her two little sons while Simon went on to the Holy Land. Very likely Eleanor would have been to see her sister Isabella, wife of Emperor Friedrich II, who was also pregnant but who would die of a fever after childbirth.

Richard, Earl of Cornwall, as always a capable diplomat, arranged a truce with the Saracens as well as arranging the return of French prisoners captured at Gaza. Having achieved his aims, the Earl of Cornwall embarked at Acre on 3 May 1241 and returned home. However, as Simon de Montfort had remained behind, some of the people of Jerusalem wrote to Emperor Friedrich II asking him to make Simon Governor of Jerusalem, but this did not happen.

In 1242 Simon then returned to France with the Duke of Burgundy while his mother-in-law, Isabella of Angoulême, and her second husband were stirring up trouble between France and England. Henry III of England, deciding to support his mother, went to France and summoned Simon de Montfort to join in the campaign. Simon offered his support with the proviso that the king redress some of his grievances. This the king did and Simon now returned to his position of being one of the king's main advisers. The campaign, begun by the treachery of the king's mother, not only failed but showed the military superiority of the French king. Simon de Montfort blamed Henry III, regarding him as the cause of the failure. Soon the Count of La Marche, Isabella's second husband, sued for peace with the French king and, after an absence of four years, Simon returned to England.

The next few years were peaceful, but troubles were again fomenting as, impoverished after the failure in France, the king wanted his nobles to refill his coffers. There were also financial troubles with the pope, the rebellious Welsh and, as well, in Gascony. In 1247 the king's Lusignan half-brothers and sisters arrived in England, putting further stress on the government's coffers. On 1 May 1248 the king appointed him as his direct representative in charge of Gascony.

Before setting out, Simon renewed the truce with France as well as making an agreement with the king of Navarre. In Gascony some of the local knights were imprisoned for several years without trial unless able to pay an extortionate ransom. By the end of 1249 Simon had restored peace.

Late in 1251 Simon and Eleanor returned to England; but soon the continual complaints from the Gascons to Henry III convinced the latter that Simon had to be tried. However, after several weeks of a somewhat volatile trial, the king decided in Simon's favour, only to change his mind twenty-four hours later and, in front of the court, hurl abuse and call Simon a traitor. Simon returned to Gascony while Eleanor remained in England to await the birth of another child. At first Simon tried to restore peace by force, but then was relieved by the king's eldest son, Edward, who had been declared Lord of Gascony. However, after his departure, the troubles in Gascony only increased. This time the king went himself to Gascony and humbly asked for Simon's assistance, and once again Simon's military ability restored peace in Gascony.

In July 1256 the king had to admit to owing his sister Eleanor a great deal of money. At the same time, Simon was involved with the insurmountable troubles of his great-nephew, the Count of Bigorre, and, in August 1256, the great-nephew simply gave the county to Simon. But in 1259, when the great-nephew was again acting as Count of Bigorre, Simon leased the county to Henry III.

By 1258 the troubles in England for Henry III began in earnest. Henry III had angered the English barons by accepting Sicily from the pope for his younger son. This had been done without Henry consulting his barons, and the resulting expenses the pope wanted paid were crippling Henry's finances. As well, the troubles between Simon and Henry III intensified. In the struggle between king and barons, the barons were at first joined by Simon as well as Prince Edward, the king's eldest son. However, Edward was soon reconciled with his father.

In July 1260 Henry III again considered trying Simon de Montfort as a traitor, even against the advice of King Louis IX of France. However, common sense prevailed and again a tentative reconciliation took place, but with Simon going to France in voluntary exile. Henry III then decided on an open trial in the French court, the king's sister Eleanor, Simon's wife, began pursuing her rights of inheritance in Angoulême.

In the spring of 1263 the baronial party re-emerged wanting Simon de Montfort as its leader. As well, Henry III had alienated Gilbert de Clare, heir to the Earl of Gloucester, who then joined the baronial party. After a confusing period, the barons attacked one of their enemies---the foreign Bishop of Hereford, Peter d'Aigueblanche--- imprisoning him at Eardisley. Although Simon de Montfort by now had taken control of the baronial army, Henry III had started to make defensive moves.

By June 1263 matters came to a climax when, to support his father, Prince Edward obtained entrance to the Templar's stronghold and robbed them of their treasure. With his army Simon de Montfort then moved to London without declaring himself to be in open revolt. Securing the ports, he prevented Henry III from gaining support from the continent. Having also secured Dover Castle, he then went to London. Here, although Henry III and Simon agreed to peace, the actions of Prince Edward disturbed their negotiations. Consequently the summer of 1263 was one of upheaval in England; so that again Louis IX of France tried to mediate.

Henry III then broke the truce by declaring previous agreements void. King Louis IX then decided that the king of England had the full power and unrestriced rule of his kingdom, but with the king expected to adhere to all royal privileges, charters, liberties and customs. This last part had been the subject of the barons' bitter complaint and such a half-hearted finding brought England to civil war.

At Gloucester the first clash between the opponents took place, the barons taking Gloucester only to have Prince Edward approach with a larger army. Realizing the futility of battle, Prince Edward tricked the barons and, no sooner had the baronial party withdrawn, imprisoned those people of Gloucester who had favoured the barons. Near Lewes the two opposing parties then again prepared for battle. Prince Edward attacked one wing of mainly Londoners who had insulted his mother and, because of this, pursued them when they fled. This proved disastrous for the royal army as it allowed the barons to attack the king's centre line and capture the king. As well, the king's brother, Richard of Cornwall, was captured and, when Prince Edward returned, the barons were victorious.

A few days later---with Prince Edward and Henry of Almain, son of Richard of Cornwall, giving themselves up as hostages for their fathers---Simon de Montfort immediately set our to pacify the country. However, Henry III's queen was in France and there raised another army; as well, the pope began agitating against both Simon and the baronial party. Nevertheless, for the next fifteen months the country was still controlled by Simon de Montfort.

After the king and his son fully accepted the requirements of Simon de Montfort, Prince Edward and Henry of Almain were given restricted freedom. But soon quarrels broke out amongst the barons with arrogance, injured pride and greed the common cause. Consequently the Earl of Gloucester disentangled himself from the baronial party, to be joined by Prince Edward who had escaped. Prince Edward then gathered an army and surprised the barons, imprisoning a great number before turning on Simon de Montfort's party. At Evesham on 4 August 1265 when the battle ensued, young Henry de Montfort was killed. Shortly afterwards, when Simon de Montfort fell, his head was cut off and his body mutilated."1

Simon VI de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester per van de Pas: "Simon was born in 1208 or 1209, the son of Simon V de Montfort, 5th earl of Leicester, duke of Narbonne, and Alix de Montmorency. Little is known about his early years, even to when exactly he was born. The only thing we do know is that the Montforts were not only devout Christians but also believed in education, so that Simon was probably fluent in Latin. His father was killed in 1218, his second brother in 1220 and his mother in 1221. When the French king took most of their French lands, his elder brother Amaury inherited the Montfort lands. This left only one option to Simon, to pursue a military career. By the time Simon reached maturity, Amaury was secure in his French territory and so resigned his questionable rights to the English inheritance to Simon.

Accordingly, Simon went to England and approached Ranulf, earl of Chester, who had first held the lands for Simon's father, and after 1218 had been given proper possession by the English king. The elderly earl, without direct heirs, supported his young French cousin and the legal process was set in action. In 1231 the king accepted homage from Simon for the earldom of Leicester, but it took another eight years before he was formally invested with the earldom.

In 1235 and again in 1239 Amaury came to visit Simon in England and helped to secure the earldom of Leicester for him. Simon de Montfort made two vain efforts to marry a wealthy widow: first Mahaut, countess of Boulogne, then Jeanne, countess of Flanders. However, it seems he increasingly became more and more a favourite of King Henry III, and on 6 January 1238 he married the king's sister Eleanor, who was also a widow as well as wealthy and young. Prior vows of chastity by Eleanor and opposition from many sources forced Simon to go to Rome to receive papal dispensation. On 10 May 1238 he received Pope Gregory IX's approval.

While he was away Eleanor had been at Kenilworth and he hurried to be with her before the birth of their son on 28 November 1238. When Henry III's queen gave birth to a son and heir, Simon de Montfort was honoured at the baptism on 16 July 1239. However on 9 August, at a public occasion when Simon and Eleanor arrived, the king raged against them, implying that they had sinned before their marriage and that Simon should be excommunicated. Embarrassed, Simon and Eleanor had to withdraw from court. They tried to make peace with the king, but when this failed and with Eleanor again pregnant, they fled to France. It appears the real cause of the king's anger was about money Simon owed to Tommaso II de Savoie, the queen's uncle, and was unable to repay. When Tommaso pressed for payment, the king himself had to pay. While in France Simon and Eleanor said goodbye to Simon's brother Amaury, who was to go on crusade in Palestine.

In 1240 Simon and Eleanor returned to England, the king again received them with honour. Simon then prepared to go on crusade with Henry's brother Richard, earl of Cornwall. It seems that Eleanor, again pregnant, accompanied him as far as Italy, remaining in Brindisi with her two little sons while Simon went on to the Holy Land. Very likely Eleanor would have been to see her sister Isabella, wife of Emperor Friedrich II, who was also pregnant but who would die of a fever after childbirth.

Richard, earl of Cornwall, a capable diplomat, arranged a truce with the Saracens as well as the return of French prisoners captured at Gaza. Having achieved his aims, the he embarked at Acre on 3 May 1241 and returned home. However, Simon de Montfort had remained behind, and some of the people of Jerusalem wrote to Emperor Friedrich II asking him to make Simon governor of Jerusalem. This did not happen.

In 1242 Simon returned to France with the duke of Burgundy while his mother-in-law Isabella of Angoulême and her second husband the count of La Marche were stirring up trouble between France and England. Henry III of England, deciding to support his mother, went to France and summoned Simon de Montfort to join in the campaign. Simon offered his support with the proviso that the king should redress some of his grievances. This the king did and Simon returned to his position as one of the king's main advisers. The campaign, begun by the treachery of the king's mother, not only failed but also showed the military superiority of the French king. Simon de Montfort blamed Henry III, regarding him as the cause of the failure. Soon the count of La Marche sued for peace with the French king, and after an absence of four years, Simon returned to England.

The next few years were peaceful, but troubles were again fomenting. Impoverished after the failure in France, the king wanted his nobles to refill his coffers. There were also financial troubles with the pope, the rebellious Welsh and in Gascony. In 1247 the king's Lusignan half-brothers and sisters arrived in England, putting further stress on the government's coffers. On 1 May 1248 the king appointed Simon as his direct representative in charge of Gascony.

Before setting out, Simon renewed the truce with France as well as making an agreement with the king of Navarre. In Gascony some of the local knights were imprisoned by Simon for several years without trial unless able to pay an extortionate ransom. By the end of 1249 Simon had restored peace.

Late in 1251 Simon and Eleanor returned to England. However the continual complaints from the Gascons to Henry III soon convinced Henry that Simon had to be tried. After several weeks of a somewhat volatile trial, the king decided in Simon's favour, only to change his mind twenty-four hours later, and in front of the court hurl abuse and call Simon a traitor. Simon returned to Gascony while Eleanor remained in England to await the birth of another child. Simon tried to restore peace in Gascony by force, but he was relieved by the king's eldest son Edward, who had been declared lord of Gascony. After Simon's departure the troubles in Gascony only increased. This time the king went himself to Gascony and humbly asked for Simon's assistance, and once again Simon's military ability restored peace in Gascony.

In July 1256 the king had to admit to owing his sister Eleanor a great deal of money. At the same time, Simon was involved with the insurmountable troubles of his great-nephew, the count of Bigorre, and in August 1256 the count simply gave the county to Simon. In 1259, when the great-nephew was again acting as count of Bigorre, Simon leased the county to Henry III.

By 1258 the troubles for Henry III in England began in earnest. Henry had angered the English barons by accepting Sicily from the pope for his younger son. This had been done without Henry consulting his barons, and the resulting expenses the pope wanted paid were crippling Henry's finances. As well, the troubles between Simon and Henry intensified. In the struggle between king and barons, the barons were at first joined by Simon as well as Prince Edward, the king's eldest son. However, Edward was soon reconciled with his father.

In July 1260 Henry III again considered trying Simon de Montfort as a traitor, against the advice of King Louis IX of France. However, common sense prevailed and a tentative reconciliation again took place, though with Simon going to France in voluntary exile. Henry III then decided on an open trial in the French court. Eleanor began pursuing her rights of inheritance in Angoulême.

In the spring of 1263 the baronial party re-emerged wanting Simon de Montfort as its leader. As well, Henry III had alienated Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earl of Gloucester, who then joined the baronial party. After a confusing period, the barons attacked one of their enemies, the foreign bishop of Hereford, Peter d'Aigueblanche, imprisoning him at Eardisley. Although Simon de Montfort by now had taken control of the baronial army, Henry III had started to make defensive moves.

By June 1263 matters came to a climax when, to support his father, Prince Edward obtained entrance to the Templars' stronghold and robbed them of their treasure. With his army Simon de Montfort moved on London, though without declaring himself to be in open revolt. Securing the ports, he prevented Henry III from gaining support from the continent. Having also secured Dover Castle, he then went to London. Here, although Henry III and Simon agreed to peace, the actions of Prince Edward disturbed their negotiations. Consequently the summer of 1263 was one of upheaval in England and again Louis IX of France tried to mediate.

Henry III broke the truce by declaring previous agreements void. King Louis IX then decided that the king of England had the full power and unrestricted rule of his kingdom, but with the king expected to adhere to all royal privileges, charters, liberties and customs. This last part had been the subject of the barons' bitter complaint and such a half-hearted finding brought England to civil war.

At Gloucester the first clash between the opponents took place, the barons taking Gloucester only to have Prince Edward approach with a larger army. Realising the futility of battle, Edward tricked the barons into withdrawing, and as soon as the baronial party had done so, he imprisoned those people of Gloucester who had favoured the barons. Near Lewes the two opposing parties again prepared for battle. Prince Edward attacked one wing made up mainly of Londoners who had insulted his mother, and because of this he pursued them when they fled. This proved disastrous for the royal army as it allowed the barons to attack the king's centre and capture the king. The king's brother Richard of Cornwall was also captured, and when Prince Edward returned he found the barons victorious.

A few days later---with Prince Edward and Henry of Almain, son of Richard of Cornwall, giving themselves up as hostages for their fathers---Simon de Montfort set out to pacify the country. However Henry III's queen was in France and there raised another army; as well, the pope began agitating against both Simon and the baronial party. Nevertheless, for the next fifteen months the country was controlled by Simon de Montfort.

After the king and his son fully accepted Simon's demands, Prince Edward and Henry of Almain were given restricted freedom. But soon quarrels broke out among the barons, with arrogance, injured pride and greed the common cause. The earl of Gloucester disentangled himself from the baronial party, to be joined by Prince Edward who had escaped. Edward then gathered an army and surprised the barons, imprisoning a great number before turning on Simon de Montfort's party. Battle was joined at Evesham on 4 August 1265. Young Henry de Montfort was killed, and shortly afterwards Simon de Montfort fell. His head was cut off and his body mutilated."1 GAV-22 EDV-22.

Family

Alianor (Eleanor) (?) of England b. 1215, d. 13 Apr 1275
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon VI de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121969&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Leicester 4: pp. 444-445. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Montmorency: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120981&tree=LEO
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 160, de MONTFORT of Leicester 5:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon V de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120980&tree=LEO
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 280. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.11.
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005962&tree=LEO
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 521 (Chart 38). Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Leicester 4.i: p. 445.
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Leicester 4.ii: p. 445.
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I33084
  14. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121970&tree=LEO
  15. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley: British Kings, pp. 361-363.
  16. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eléonore de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121984&tree=LEO

Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots1

M, #7379, b. 4 September 1241, d. 19 March 1286
FatherAlexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland2,3,4,5,6 b. 24 Aug 1198, d. 8 Jul 1249
MotherMarie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland2,3,7,8,6 b. bt 1220 - 1225
Last Edited3 May 2008
     Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots was born on 4 September 1241 at Roxburgh, Scotland.3,4,6 He married Margaret (?) Princess of England, daughter of Henry III (?) of Winchester, King of England and Eleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng., on 26 December 1251 at York, Yorkshire, England; his 1st wife.9,1,10,11,4,6 Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots married Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort, daughter of Robert IV de Dreux Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Montfort and Beatrix de Montfort Comtesse de Montfort-L'Amaury, on 14 October 1285 at Jedburgh Abbey, Jedburgh, Scotland; her 1st husband.12,1,3,13,4,6
Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots died on 19 March 1286 at near Kinghorn, Fife, Scotland, at age 44; killed from a fall from his horse nr Kinghorn, Fife.2,1,3,4,6
Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots was buried after 19 March 1286 at Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, Scotland.1,6
     He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, pp. 408-409] ALEXANDER III THE GLORIOUS King of Scotland 8 July 1249-19 March 1286. Crowned: Scone Abbey, 13 July 1249. Born: Roxburgh, 4 September 1241. Died: 19 March 1286, aged 44. Buried: Dunfermline Abbey. Married: (1) 26 December 1251 at York, Margaret (1240-75), dau. Henry III of England: 3 children; (2) 1 November 1285 at Jedburgh, Yolande (d. 1323) dau. Robert, Count of Dreux: no children. Alexander was seven when he succeeded his father, and only ten when he was married to the daughter of HENRY III of England, but he went on to become one of Scotland's strongest kings, hence his nickname of "the Glorious". Even in his youth he was not overwhelmed by matters of state and refused to submit to Henry III as his overlord, except for his lands in England. Henry had a rather paternal feeling for Alexander and relationships were cordial and strong. It was through the good offices of Henry III that the dispute with EWEN, lord of the Isles, was resolved amicably in 1255, whenafter Ewen became a loyal supporter of the Scottish king. Ewen's cousin, DUGALD, remained obdurate, however, and encouraged the Norwegian king Haakon to enforce his claim upon the Hebrides. When Alexander assumed full control of government in 1261, he entered negotiations with Haakon in an attempt to buy sovereignty over the Islands. Haakon, probably against his better judgment, was talked into bringing an invasion force to Scotland in 1263 to claim the whole of the Hebrides and Man. His force was unsuccessful. There is a legend that one of the Norse, seeking to land quietly and catch the Scots by surprise, trod on a thistle and let out a cry, thereby warning the Scots. Thereafter the thistle became the emblem of the Scots. Haakon, now an old man, caught a fever and died. Negotiations continued with his successor, Magnus VI, and under the Treaty of Perth in 1266, Alexander acquired the whole of the Western Isles for four thousand merks (about £2,700). Alexander now ruled a Scotland whose boundaries are the same as today's, except for the exclusion of Orkney and Shetland.
Alexander's reign was peaceful and prosperous, but personal disaster beset his final days. Alexander's eldest son and heir, also called Alexander, died in January 1284 at the age of twenty. Although married he had no children. Alexander's second son, David, had died a few years earlier, aged only eight. His daughter, Margaret, died in childbirth in April 1283, though her daughter, MARGARET, survived. Alexander rapidly married a new wife, Yolande of Dreux, in November 1285. One night, a little over four months later, whilst Alexander was returning to his wife at Dunfermline Palace after a routine council meeting in Edinburgh, his horse stumbled over a cliff near Kinghorn in Fife, and Alexander was killed. He was only forty-four. His strong realm was plunged into a period of darkness that would lead to war. between 8 July 1249 and 19 March 1286.2,3

Family 1

Margaret (?) Princess of England b. 29 Oct 1240, d. Feb 1275
Children

Family 2

Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort b. 1263, d. 1323

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  2. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession."
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  5. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alexander II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002874&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002876&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.11.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 281. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan "Lines of Succession", Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  12. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998, p. 196, Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html

Richard (?) of England1,2

M, #7380, b. circa 1247, d. 29 August 1250
FatherHenry III (?) of Winchester, King of England1,2 b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
MotherEleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.1,2 b. 1223, d. 24 Jun 1291
Last Edited3 May 2008
     Richard (?) of England was born circa 1247.3,1,2
Richard (?) of England died on 29 August 1250.3,1,2
Richard (?) of England was buried after 29 August 1250 at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England.3,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 281. Hereinafter cited as Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry."