David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton 2nd of Cadzow1

M, #86641, b. circa 1320, d. between 1374 and 1378
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton 2nd of Cadzow married Margaret Ross, daughter of William de Ross 5th Earl of Ross and Mary Macdonald.1 David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton 2nd of Cadzow was born circa 1320 at Scotland.1 He died between 1374 and 1378.1
     David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton 2nd of Cadzow per van de Pas: "David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton, 2nd of Cadzow, as a Baron he sat in King David II's Parliament, was captured with that king by the English at the battle of Nevill's Cross in 1346, and 'considered of so much importance that he was placed in the custody of the Archbishop of York, who was enjoined not to deliver him up without a special mandate from King Edward'. He was freed only on payment of a heavy ransom."1
Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938. Page 59
     1.The Highland Clans, London, 1977 , Moncreiffe of that Ilk, Hicks, David. 48 bio
     1.The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour.1

Family

Margaret Ross
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David FitzWalter FitzGilbert Hamilton, 2nd of Cadzow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00056978&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.

Ferquard (?) 1st Earl of Ross1

M, #86642, d. January 1251
ReferenceGAV23
Last Edited5 Jun 2018
     Ferquard (?) 1st Earl of Ross was born at Scotland.1 He died in January 1251.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. vol I 190.1 GAV-23.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ferquard, 1st Earl of Ross: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00056775&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Euphemia of Ross: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00543426&tree=LEO

Walter de Moravia Lord of Duffus1

M, #86643, d. after 1262
FatherHugh de Moravia lord of Duffus1 d. b 1222
MotherAnnabela (?) of Fife1
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Walter de Moravia Lord of Duffus married Euphemia (?) of Ross, daughter of Ferquard (?) 1st Earl of Ross.2,1 Walter de Moravia Lord of Duffus died after 1262.1
     Walter de Moravia Lord of Duffus per van de Pas: "his parentage not solid."1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter de Moravia, Lord of Duffus: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00543425&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Euphemia of Ross: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00543426&tree=LEO

Euphemia (?) of Ross1

F, #86644
FatherFerquard (?) 1st Earl of Ross1 d. Jan 1251
Last Edited22 Apr 2018

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Euphemia of Ross: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00543426&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter de Moravia, Lord of Duffus: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00543425&tree=LEO

Nicol (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick1

M, #86645, b. circa 1202
FatherDuncan Galloway Lord of Carrick1 d. 13 Jun 1252
MotherAvelina Fitz Walter1
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Nicol (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick was born circa 1202 at Scotland.1
     Nicol (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick per van de Pas: "His identification, previously conflated with his son Neil, by Andrew B. W. MacEwen. Nicol was the son of Duncan, 1st earl of Carrick, and Avelina le Steward, daughter of Alan, 2nd high steward of Scotland. The only fact recorded about Nicol, who succeeded his father as earl of Carrick, is that in 1220 he granted the collegiate church of St.Cuthbert at Maybole in South Ayrshire to the nuns of North Berwick in East Lothian. Nicol left a son Neil who would have progeny.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nicol, 2nd Earl of Carrick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00473483&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Neil, 3rd Earl of Carrick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028389&tree=LEO

Isabella (?)1

F, #86646
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Isabella (?) married Neil 3rd Earl of Carrick, son of Nicol (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick.1,2
     GAV-21.

Isabella (?)      per van de Pas: "Identified by Andrew B. W. MacEwen."1

Family

Neil 3rd Earl of Carrick d. 1256
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006197&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Neil, 3rd Earl of Carrick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028389&tree=LEO

Mary Bruce1

F, #86647, b. circa 1275, d. circa 1323
FatherSir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick1 b. Jul 1243, d. Mar 1304
MotherMarjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick1 b. bt 1253 - 1256, d. b 27 Oct 1292
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Mary Bruce was born circa 1275 at Scotland.1 She married Sir Nigel Campbell, son of Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow and Afraig a Charraig (?), circa 1312; Her 1st husband.2,1 Mary Bruce married Sir Alexander Fraser of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain in 1316.3,1 Mary Bruce died circa 1323.1
     Mary Bruce per van de Pas: "Mary Bruce sister of Robert I The Bruce, King of Scots, about 1312 she married Sir Nigel Campbell who died before 1316 when she married her second husband, Sir Alexander Fraser, of Touchfraser. As a prisoner of the English she had been kept in a cage in public."1
Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938. Page 144, 2179.1

Family 1

Sir Nigel Campbell b. c 1275, d. b 1316

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043790&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Nigel Campbell: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043786&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Alexander Fraser, of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00235169&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Fraser, of Aberbothnot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00282725&tree=LEO

Sir Nigel Campbell1

M, #86648, b. circa 1275, d. before 1316
FatherSir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow2 b. c 1240, d. 1296
MotherAfraig a Charraig (?)3
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Sir Nigel Campbell was born circa 1275 at Scotland.1 He married Mary Bruce, daughter of Sir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick and Marjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick, circa 1312; Her 1st husband.1,4 Sir Nigel Campbell died before 1316.1
     Sir Nigel Campbell per van de Pas: "Mary Bruce sister of Robert I The Bruce, King of Scots, about 1312 she married Sir Nigel Campbell who died before 1316 when she married her second husband, Sir Alexander Fraser, of To.1

Family

Mary Bruce b. c 1275, d. c 1323

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Nigel Campbell: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043786&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Colin 'Mor' Campbell, of Lochow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043792&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Afraig a Charraig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043793&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043790&tree=LEO

Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow1

M, #86649, b. circa 1240, d. 1296
FatherSir Gillespic Cambell2 b. c 1220, d. c 1280
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow married Afraig a Charraig (?)3,1 Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow was born circa 1240.1 He died in 1296 at Battle or Red Fod/Battle of the String of Lorne; per Wikipedia: "The Battle of Red Ford or Battle of the String of Lorne was a battle in 1294 or else after September 1296 between Clan Campbell and Clan MacDougall in Lorne, Scotland.[1] The battle was fought over disputed lands. It ended in defeat of the Clan Campbell of Lochawe.[2] The battle was on the borders of Loch Awe and Lorne, with the site and battle named Red Ford (Scottish Gaelic: Ath Dearg) after the ford which ran red with blood where the battle took place.
     
Clan MacDougall having allied itself with John Balliol in his a competitor for the Scottish crown, upon his coronation in 1292, the chief of Clan MacDougall, Alasdair MacDubhgaill was rewarded by being appointed Sheriff of Argyll in 1293.[3] Having the influences of power, Clan MacDougall extended their influence and due to this, Clan Campbell and some other Highland clans like Clan Donald found themselves in dispute with Clan MacDougall. Cailean Mor "Big Colin" the 4th Chief of Clan Campbell signed his Ragman Role Oath of Fealty pledging allegiance to King Edward I of England withother nobles on August 27, 1296 so it is quite likely that he died in the Battle of the Red Ford on the String of Lorne in Netherlorn, Argyll at some time after that date.
     Although no exact details of the battle are at hand, a great many lives were lost on both sides and the ford ran red with blood of the fallen and the wounded. Cailean Mór Caimbeul (Sir Colin Campbell) was killed in battle.[2][1]
     After the battle, Sir Colin Campbell's body was carried to the church of St. Peter the Deacon at Kilchrenan and buried there.[4]
[:TAB:Notes:
[1] Maughan 1897, p140
[2] Adam 1970, p205
[3] Paterson 2008, p19
[4] "Clan Campbell". 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
     References
      Patterson, Raymond Campbell (2008). The Lords of the Isles, A history of Clan Donald. Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited. ISBN 1-84158-718-4.
      Adam, Frank (1970). The Clans, Septs, and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands. Edinburgh and London: Johnston and Bacon. ISBN 0-7179-4500-6.
      Maughan, William Charles (1897). Annals of Garelochside, being an account historical and topographical of the parishes of Row, Rosneath and Cardross. Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner.
      Campbell: http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel2.htm.1,4
     Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow per van de pas: "Sir Cailean 'Mor' mac Gilleasbaig Caimbeul, lord of Menstrie, was governor of the Lochobha region. Sir Colin is regarded to be the seventh of the chiefs of the Campbells, and was one of the nominees selected by Robert Bruce in 1291 when his title to the crown was to be investigated. The story runs that this Sir Colin was so distinguished by his warlike achievements and the additions he made to the family estates that he obtained the surname of 'More' or 'Great' and that from him the chief of the clan is to this day styled in Gaelic _MacCalian More_, or the son of Colin the Great."1
Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938. Page 144
     2. The Heraldry of The Campbells, Inverary, 1977. , Johnston, G. Harvey. 17
     3. The Great Historic Families of Scotland, London, 1889, Taylor, James. 230 biography
     4. The Campbells 1250-1513, Edinburgh, 2006 , Boardman, Stephen.1

Family

Afraig a Charraig (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Colin 'Mor' Campbell, of Lochow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043792&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Gillespic Cambel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043791&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Afraig a Charraig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043793&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Battle of Red Ford: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Red_Ford. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Afraig a Charraig (?)1

F, #86650
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Afraig a Charraig (?) married Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow, son of Sir Gillespic Cambell.1,2
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938.
Page 144.1

Family

Sir Colin "Mor" Campbell of Lochow b. c 1240, d. 1296
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Afraig a Charraig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043793&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Colin 'Mor' Campbell, of Lochow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043792&tree=LEO

Sir Gillespic Cambell1

M, #86651, b. circa 1220, d. circa 1280
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Sir Gillespic Cambell was born circa 1220 at Scotland.1 He died circa 1280.1
     Sir Gillespic Cambell per van de Pas: "In 1263 Sir Gillespic held from the Crown the lands of Menstrie and Sauchie. Ardchonnel castle was the original home of the family. On 12 March 1266 he witnessed the charter of Alexander III to Newburgh."1
Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. The Heraldry of The Campbells, Inverary, 1977. , Johnston, G. Harvey. 17
     2. The Great Historic Families of Scotland, London, 1889, Taylor, James. 230
     3. The Campbells 1250-1513, Edinburgh, 2006 , Boardman, Stephen.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Gillespic Cambel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043791&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.

Sir Alexander Fraser of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain1

M, #86652, b. circa 1290, d. 12 August 1332
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Sir Alexander Fraser of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain was born circa 1290 at Scotland.1 He married Mary Bruce, daughter of Sir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick and Marjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick, in 1316.1,2 Sir Alexander Fraser of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain died on 12 August 1332 at Battle of Dupplin Moor;      per Wikipedia: "The death of Robert I in 1329 left Scotland with a four-year-old king, David II (1329–1371). His right to the throne was far from absolute, and in the early 1330s was challenged by Edward Balliol, son of John Balliol. The rebels were known as "The Disinherited", since they lost their land as a consequence of the Battle of Bannockburn.
     In the winter of 1331, in response to the urgings of Henry Beaumont, chief among the disinherited, Balliol left his home in France and came to England, where he settled in Sandal Manor in Yorkshire. Beaumont then visited King Edward III of England, The purpose of the meeting was recorded in the Brut Chronicle: "So came Sir Henry of Beaumont to King Edward of England and praiede him, in way of charitie, that he wolde grant of his grace unto Sir Edward Balliol that he moste safliche gone bi land from Sandall for to conquere his ritz heritage in Scotland." Edward agreed to let him go, but by sea, not land.
     By the summer of 1332 all of the preparations for the expedition were complete. The size of the force assembled by Balliol and Beaumont cannot be established with any real accuracy, but the sources all agree that it was fairly modest: the Bridlington Chronicle suggests a figure of 500 men-at-arms and 1,000 foot; Henry Knighton, prone on occasions to wild exaggeration, puts forward a figure of 300 men-at-arms and 3,000 foot; while the Lanercost Chronicle, probably the most reliable, suggests a total force in the region of 1,500 to 2,800. All agree that by far the largest proportion of the footmen were archers, armed with the longbow. By mid-July Balliol's little armada of some 88 ships waited for the right moment to sail. It came with the news that Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray, the guardian of the infant David, had died suddenly on 20 July.
The rebels and their English allies sailed on 31 July from several Yorkshire ports to Kinghorn in Fife to get round the terms of the Treaty of Northampton that did not permit English forces to cross the Tweed.[citation needed] From Kinghorn they marched to Dunfermline and then on towards Perth. On 10 August they camped at Forteviot, just south of the River Earn, a few miles short of their objective. To the north of the river Donald, Earl of Mar, the new regent, had taken up position with a much stronger force on the heights of Dupplin Moor. The disinherited now faced one Scottish army to their front with another commanded by Patrick Earl of Dunbar fast approaching from the rear.
     In view of their predicament it comes as no surprise that morale in Balliol's camp began to sink. According to Thomas Gray, the disinherited lords were so dismayed by the size of Mar's army that they accused Henry Beaumont of having betrayed them with false promises of Scottish support for Balliol. But Beaumont, the most experienced soldier on either side, reacted to this dangerous situation with coolness and precision. It was obvious that they could not wait for Dunbar to link up with Mar. He decided to risk crossing the Earn at night, and launching a surprise attack on the enemy.
     On the opposite bank of the river the Scots had a clear view of Balliol's small army. Mar was so confident of his strength and the superiority of his position that he did not even bother to set a watch, and his army settled down on the night of 10 August, relaxed enough to spend much of the time drinking, convinced of an easy victory the following day. At midnight, unobserved by the carousing Scots, Sir Alexander Mowbray led a picked force across a nearby ford shown to him by the sole traitor from the Scottish camp, one Murray of Tullibardine.
     After crossing the ford Mowbray climbed up the rising ground towards Gask, where he immediately attacked the slumbering Scottish camp followers, in the mistaken belief that he had encountered Mar's host. He learned his mistake by daybreak on 11 August; but by that time the rest of the English army had safely crossed the Earn and taken up a strong defensive position on some high ground at the head of a narrow valley. Mar had been outflanked. Learning of the rapid approach of the main Scots force, Balliol's army was ordered to form a line, with the archers projecting outwards on both flanks and the men-at-arms in the centre, the whole formation resembling a quarter moon. All were dismounted, save for a small group of Germans to the rear. Beaumont now made ready to employ tactics that had been demonstrated in outline at Boroughbridge ten years before, which in their fully evolved form were to allow the English to dominate the battlefields of Britain and western Europe for the next hundred years.
     The Scots were angry that their enemy had been allowed to carry out so simple a manoeuvre under their noses. Lord Robert Bruce, the illegitimate son of the late king, made no secret of his conviction that Mar's incompetence was evidence of treachery. Mar denied this, and like the Earl of Gloucester at Bannockburn, resolved to be the first into battle. Lord Robert claimed this honour for himself and both charged off to destruction, followed by their disorganised schiltrons, all semblance of generalship gone. Bruce and Mar's wild charge was met by great clouds of arrows, which fell in rapid succession on the Scottish flanks. Each bowman was so skilled, and could shoot at such speed, that he had several arrows in the air at one time. The badly armoured Scots with their unvisored helmets had no protection against the repeated volleys. Bruce's battalion, pushing through the storm of missiles, was the first to make contact with the enemy centre, forcing Beaumont and the men-at-arms to yield some ground. But the barrage of arrows was so unrelenting and fierce that his flanks converged towards the middle, as if seeking shelter from a storm. The front units were pushed forward on to Beaumont's spears. Retreat or redeployment was made impossible by the arrival of Mar's schiltron, charging down the narrow glen, and straight into the rear of Lord Robert's men. The crush was so great that many fell never to rise again. The chronicler and historian John Capgrave describes the carnage at Dupplin thus:
     In this battle...more were slain by the Scots themselves than by the English. For rushing forward on each other, each crushed his neighbour, and for every one fallen there fell a second, and then a third fell, and those who were behind pressing forward and hastening to the fight, the whole army became a heap of the slain.
     The bodies of the Scots were piled so high above each other that it is said they reached the height of a spear. The English surrounded the bloody heap, thrusting in their swords and spears, so that no one could be taken out alive. Scots losses were heavy: Mar and Bruce were both killed, as was Thomas Randolph, 2nd Earl of Moray, Murdoch III, Earl of Menteith and Alexander Fraser, the High Chamberlain. The exact number of the dead is unknown, but estimates range from a low of 2,000 to a high of 13,000. English losses were light, amounting to no more than thirty-three knights and men-at-arms. The Earl of Fife tried to lead the survivors of Mar's shattered army on an orderly retreat; but this turned into a rout after Beaumont and others took to horse, charging off in pursuit. Many who escaped the carnage inflicted by the archers were cut down by the cavalry.
     A stone cross, now in St. Serf's Church in Dunning, once marked the traditional site of the battle, although there is no strong reason to locate the battle there.
he Battle of Dupplin Moor was the worst Scottish defeat since the Battle of Falkirk, 34 years before, far exceeding the setback at Methven. The losses were heavy, but they could be made good, and Dunbar's army, probably as strong as Mar's, was still in the field. However, the worst casualty of all was the national confidence that had grown from the successive victories of King Robert Bruce, which had produced an illusory sense of invulnerability. Once again the nation had tasted serious defeat, and the effect it had on morale surely explains Dunbar's reluctance to engage Balliol's tired little army in battle. In his classic study, A History of War in the Middle Ages, Sir Charles Oman says of Dupplin: "The Battle of Dupplin forms a turning point in the history of Scottish wars. For the future the English always adopted the order of battle which Balliol and Beaumont had discovered. It was the first in a long series of battles won by a combination of archers and dismounted men-at-arms."
     A few weeks after the battle Edward Balliol was crowned king at Scone. But dangerously isolated in a hostile country he moved his forces south to the old Balliol patrimony in Galloway, the only part of Scotland that showed any kind of support for the new king. In December at Annan he was surprised by a party of Bruce loyalists and chased half-dressed across the English border. Any future attempt to recover his throne would have to be with the open support of the English king.
     Notes:
      "Inventory battlefields". Historic Scotland. Retrieved 2012-04-12.
     References:
      Brown, C (2001). The Second Scottish War of Independence.
      Brown, M (1997). The Black Douglases.
      Campbell, T (1970). J. Hale, ed. England, Scotland and the Hundred Years War. Europe in the Late Middle Ages.
      Nicholson, R (1965). Edward III and the Scots.
      Oman, Charles (1898). A History of the Art of War in the Middle Ages.
      Ramsay, R (1913). The Genesis of Lancaster, 1307–1399.
      Reid, R. C (1956–57). "Edward de Balliol". Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Antiquarian and Natural History Society. 3rd series. vol.35.
      "The Disinherited and the Battle of Dupplin Moor", http://skyelander.orgfree.com/dupplin.html.1,3
     Sir Alexander Fraser of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain      per van de Pas: "Sir Alexander Fraser, of Touchfraser, was the son of Sir Andrew Fraser, of Touchfraser and his wife Beatrix.
     In 1316 Sir Alexander Fraser married Lady Mary Bruce, widow of Sir Neil Campbell and sister of King Robert The Bruce. In 1319 he became Lord Chamberlain and Sheriff of Kincardine and of Stirling, but lost his wife about 1323. He was killed on 12 August 1332 at the battle of Dupplin."1
Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938.
2179.1

Family

Mary Bruce b. c 1275, d. c 1323
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Alexander Fraser, of Touchfraser, Lord Chamberlain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00235169&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00043790&tree=LEO
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Battle of Dupplin MooR: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Dupplin_Moor. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Fraser, of Aberbothnot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00282725&tree=LEO

Sir Adam Gordon of That Ilk1

M, #86653, d. 1402
FatherSir John Gordon of Strathbogie2 d. b Feb 1361
MotherElizabeth (?)3
ReferenceGAV19
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Sir Adam Gordon of That Ilk was born at Scotland.1 He married Elizabeth Keith Lady of Aboyne, daughter of Sir William Keith 1st Marischal of Scotland and Margaret Fraser.1 Sir Adam Gordon of That Ilk died in 1402 at Battle of Homildon;      per Wikipedia: "The Battle of Homildon Hill was a conflict between English and Scottish armies on 14 September 1402 in Northumberland, England. The battle was recounted in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, part 1. Although Humbleton Hill is the modern name of the site, over the centuries it has been variously named Homildon, Hameldun, Holmedon, and Homilheugh.
During the time leading to the repudiation of the Truce of Leulinghem, both Kingdoms began to raid the other. On 22 June 1402, a small force backed by the Scots government, returning from one such raid, was beaten by George Dunbar, the Earl of March's son, at the Battle of Nesbit Moor, at which no quarter was given.
     Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas, arguably the most militarily powerful man in Scotland, and a key part of the Duke of Albany's administration, used the pretext of Nisbet Muir to lead a punitive expedition into England. With Murdoch of Fife, Albany's son, Douglas's army marched as far as Newcastle to avenge the battle. At the head of 10,000 men, he laid waste to the whole of Northumberland.
     March persuaded Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, and his son Harry "Hotspur" to lie in wait for the returning Scots at Wooler. Once Douglas's men had made camp at Milfield, relatively low ground, the English army rushed to attack. The Scots did however have keen sentries and the army was able to retreat to the higher ground of Homildon hill, and organised into traditional Schiltron formations. Douglas had not learnt the lessons that had defeated his great uncle at the Battle of Halidon Hill seventy years previously. The Schiltrons presented a large target for the English Longbowmen, and the formations started to break. A hundred men, under Sir John Swinton of the Swintons of that Ilk, chose to charge the enemy saying: "Better to die in the mellay than be shot down like deer". All perished. It has been suggested that Douglas hesitated to signal the advance of his main force, and when he did, it was too little too late. Douglas's mauled army met the as yet unbloodied English men at arms, and were routed. Many of Douglas's leading captains were captured, including his kinsman George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus, Thomas Dunbar, 5th Earl of Moray and Murdoch of Fife. Douglas himself was captured having been wounded five times, including the loss of an eye. This wounding was despite the fact that it is alleged Douglas' armour had taken three years in its construction.[1]
     With so many of the Scots leaders and chivalry taken prisoner, Albany was left in a precarious position militarily if not politically. It was only due to King Henry's internal and Welsh problems that the English did not press home their victory with a full-scale invasion of Scotland. Henry IV was keen that so many able soldiers should not return to Scotland to fight against him, so refused to allow those who held noble captives to ransom them.[2] This act became one of the many grievances that the Percys had with the Crown. In 1403 they allied themselves with Owain Glynd?r, and went into open rebellion against the English king. Hotspur set his prisoners free, as there was by now no chance of remuneration for them, and many including Douglas decided to join forces with him. Indeed, Douglas fought, and was again heavily wounded, at Hotspur's final fight at the Battle of Shrewsbury.[3]
     References:
      Bower, W. (1987), Scotichronicon Vol 8: 1390-1430. Edited by D.E.R. Watt, from the Latin manuscript authored by Bower in the 1440s. Edinburgh: The Mercat Press.
      Brenan, G. History of the House of Percy II vols. London, 1902.
      Cavendish, R. (2002). The Battle of Homildon Hill. History Today, 52(9), 54-55.
      Maxwell, Sir H., History of the House of Douglas II vols, Edinburgh 1902.
      Robson, J., Border Battles and Battlefields, 1897.
      Sadler, J., Border Fury-England and Scotland at war 1296-1568. Longman, 2005.
      Swinton, G. S. C. John of Swinton: a Border Fighter of the Middle Ages, in the Scottish Historical Review, vol 16, 1919.
      Wylie, J. H. (1969). History of England under Henry the Fourth, reprinted from an 1884 London edition. New York: AMS.1,4
     GAV-19.

Family

Elizabeth Keith Lady of Aboyne
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Adam Gordon, of That Ilk: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046330&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439062&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439063&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Battle of homildon Hill (Not to be confused with Battle of Halidon Hill): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Homildon_Hill. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Gordon of Gordon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046190&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Gordon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046332&tree=LEO

John Gordon1

M, #86655, d. circa 1407
FatherSir Adam Gordon of That Ilk1 d. 1402
MotherElizabeth Keith Lady of Aboyne1
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     John Gordon was born at Scotland.1 He died circa 1407.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938. Page 1360.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Gordon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046332&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.

Mary Nisbet1

F, #86656, d. 11 March 1802
FatherRev. John Nisbet1,2 b. 1677, d. 1756
MotherMary Pitcairn1,2 d. 1757
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     Mary Nisbet married William IV Robertson D. D., son of Rev. William III Robertson and Eleanor Pitcairn, on 21 August 1751 at Scotland; his cousin; Per Pitcairn [1905:494]: "three sons and two daughters
     Ancestry.com - Midlothian (Edinburgh), Scotland, Extracted Parish Records
     Text:     Robertson, William, minister at Gladsmure, and Miss Mary, d. to Mr. James Nisbet, minister in N. E. p. 11 Aug 1751
     Book:     Volume 5. The Register of Marriages. (Marriage)
     Collection:     Midlothian: Edinburgh - Register of Marriages, 1751-1800
     Source Information: Ancestry.com. Midlothian (Edinburgh), Scotland, Extracted Parish Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.
     Original data: Electronic databases created from various publications of parish and probate records.1,3,4 Mary Nisbet died on 11 March 1802 at Scotland.5

Citations

  1. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, Dict of Natl Biography seen on Ancestry.com on 23 April 2018 at:
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=DictNatBiogV1&h=10046684&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=60144
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1981/31205_Vol16-01329?pid=10046684&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3DDictNatBiogV1%26h%3D10046684%26indiv%3Dtry%26o_vc%3DRecord:OtherRecord%26rhSource%3D60144&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.
  2. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, The History of the Fife Pitcairns with Transcripts from Old Charters (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1905), p. 476. Hereinafter cited as Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns.
  3. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, pp. 475, 494.
  4. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, Marriage record seen on Ancestry.com on 27 april 2018 at: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=5958&h=142973&ssrc=pt&tid=67738533&pid=36228275370&usePUB=true
  5. [S4167] Sir Leslie Stephen, editor, Dictionary of National Biography, 22 volumes (London: Oxford University Press, 1921-22), Vol. 16, p. 1315. Hereinafter cited as Stephen [1921-22] Dictionary of Natl Biography.

Margaret Bruce1

F, #86657
FatherSir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick1 b. Jul 1243, d. Mar 1304
MotherMarjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick1 b. bt 1253 - 1256, d. b 27 Oct 1292
Last Edited22 Apr 2018
     Margaret Bruce married Sir William de Carlyle.2
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 315.1

Family

Sir William de Carlyle

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295572&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William de Carlyle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295571&tree=LEO

Catherine Borthwick1

F, #86659
FatherWilliam Borthwick 4th Lord Borthwick1 b. c 1492, d. bt 28 May 1543 - 19 Feb 1544
ReferenceGAV14
Last Edited23 Apr 2018
     Catherine Borthwick married Sir James Crichton of Frendraugt, son of William Crichton 3rd Lord Crichton and Margaret (?) of Scotland.1,2
     Reference: van de Pas cites: The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States; Baltimore, 2004, Roberts, Gary Boyd. Page 101.1,2 GAV-14.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine Borthwick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00434909&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S4122] Gary Boyd Roberts, Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States with a 2008 Addendum, Coda and Final Addition, in 2 volumes (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Col., Inc., 2008), Vol I, p. 101. Hereinafter cited as Roberts Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants.
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir James Crichton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00434908&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Crichton, of Frendraught: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00664280&tree=LEO

George Halkerston1

M, #86660
Last Edited23 Apr 2018
     George Halkerston married Margaret Crichton, daughter of William Crichton 3rd Lord Crichton and Margaret (?) of Scotland, before 13 July 1507; Her 2nd husband.1
     George Halkerston Per Richardson [2011:III:164]: "Merchant and Burgess of Edinburgh."1

Family

Margaret Crichton b. c 1485, d. b 1546

Citations

  1. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol. III, p. 164. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

David Pitcairn of Dreghorn1,2

M, #86661, b. circa 1649, d. 27 January 1709
FatherAlexander Pitcairn3 b. 1622, d. Sep 1695
MotherJanet Clark of St. Andrews4
ChartsAncestors - Robert Delaney PRATT
Last Edited26 Apr 2018
     David Pitcairn of Dreghorn was born circa 1649; Incsription on grave marker syas he died in in 1709 in his 60th year. He married Mary Ann Anderson in 1689.1,5 David Pitcairn of Dreghorn died on 27 January 1709 at Scotland.1,6 He was buried after 27 January 1709 at Colinton, Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland; per Pitcairn [1905:469]: "In the churchyard of Colinton there is a splendid monument which is nearly entire, except as regards the folloing simple inscription, recently broght to light, and all bu illegible, having been covered with reubbish beyond the memory of the present generation: 'Here lies Mr. David Pitcairn of Dredhorn, who departed this life 27th January 1709, and of his age the 60 year: leaving behind him Mary Anderson, his wife, with five sons and seven daughters by her.6'

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Eleanor Pitcairn Robertson: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/104874494/eleanor-robertson. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, Dict of Natl Biography seen on Ancestry.com on 23 April 2018 at:
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=DictNatBiogV1&h=10046684&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=60144
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1981/31205_Vol16-01329?pid=10046684&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3DDictNatBiogV1%26h%3D10046684%26indiv%3Dtry%26o_vc%3DRecord:OtherRecord%26rhSource%3D60144&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.
  3. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, The History of the Fife Pitcairns with Transcripts from Old Charters (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1905), pp. 465-7. Hereinafter cited as Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns.
  4. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 466.
  5. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 468.
  6. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, pp. 46-9.
  7. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 471.
  8. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 469.
  9. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 470.

Rev. John Nisbet1,2

M, #86662, b. 1677, d. 1756
Last Edited26 Apr 2018
     Rev. John Nisbet was born in 1677.1 He married Mary Pitcairn, daughter of David Pitcairn of Dreghorn and Mary Ann Anderson, in 1717.1,2 Rev. John Nisbet died in June 1755; per Pitcairn [1905:472]: "...sin his eightieth year."2 He died in 1756.1
     He was per Pitcairn [1905:471]: "...one of the Edinburgh clergy."2

Family

Mary Pitcairn d. 1757
Child

Citations

  1. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, Dict of Natl Biography seen on Ancestry.com on 23 April 2018 at:
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=DictNatBiogV1&h=10046684&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=60144
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1981/31205_Vol16-01329?pid=10046684&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3DDictNatBiogV1%26h%3D10046684%26indiv%3Dtry%26o_vc%3DRecord:OtherRecord%26rhSource%3D60144&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.
  2. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, The History of the Fife Pitcairns with Transcripts from Old Charters (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1905), p. 471. Hereinafter cited as Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns.
  3. [S4166] Constance Pitcairn, Pitcairn [1905] History of the Fife Pitcairns, p. 476.

Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie1

M, #86663, d. before February 1361
ReferenceGAV20
Last Edited29 Apr 2018
     Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie was born at Scotland.1 He married Elizabeth (?)2,1 Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie died before February 1361.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour.
4:514.1 GAV-20.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439062&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439063&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392260&tree=LEO

Elizabeth (?)1

F, #86664
ReferenceGAV20
Last Edited29 Apr 2018
     Elizabeth (?) married Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie.1,2
     Reference: van de Pas cites: The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour.
4:514.1 GAV-20.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439063&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439062&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392260&tree=LEO

Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie1

M, #86665, d. circa 1364
FatherSir John Gordon of Strathbogie1 d. b Feb 1361
MotherElizabeth (?)1
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie was born at Scotland.1 He married Elizabeth Cruickshank.2 Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie died circa 1364; per van de Pas "He died before 11 October 1396."1
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. [S00094] ~Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Adeligen Häuser. 1954B 117
     2. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour. 4:514-5.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Gordon, of Strathbogie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392260&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Cruickshank: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392261&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jock Gordon, of Scurdague: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392257&tree=LEO

Elizabeth Cruickshank1

F, #86666
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Elizabeth Cruickshank married Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie, son of Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie and Elizabeth (?).1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Adeligen Häuser .
1954B 117.1 Elizabeth Cruickshank was living in 1377.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Cruickshank: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392261&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jock Gordon, of Scurdague: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392257&tree=LEO

Jock Gordon of Scurdague1

M, #86667, d. 1394
FatherSir John Gordon of Strathbogie1 d. c 1364
MotherElizabeth Cruickshank1
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Jock Gordon of Scurdague was born at Scotland.1 He married Elizabeth/Margaret Maitland.2 Jock Gordon of Scurdague died in 1394.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Adeligen Häuser. 1954B 117.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jock Gordon, of Scurdague: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392257&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Maitland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392258&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Gordon, of Auchleuchry: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439052&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Gordon, of Methlic: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392254&tree=LEO

Elizabeth/Margaret Maitland1

F, #86668
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Elizabeth/Margaret Maitland married Jock Gordon of Scurdague, son of Sir John Gordon of Strathbogie and Elizabeth Cruickshank.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Adeligen Häuser. 1954B 117
     2. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour. 4:515-6.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Maitland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392258&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Gordon, of Auchleuchry: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439052&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Gordon, of Methlic: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392254&tree=LEO

John Gordon of Auchleuchry1

M, #86669
FatherJock Gordon of Scurdague1 d. 1394
MotherElizabeth/Margaret Maitland1
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     John Gordon of Auchleuchry married Elizabeth Abernethy, daughter of Lawrence Abernethy 1st Baron Saltoun, of Abernethy and Margaret (?).2
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. The Thanage of Fermartyn Aberdeen, 1864 , Temple, Rev. William. 309
     2. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour. 7:407
     3. Gordon Descents Ancestors of Prince William 18 June 2004, Higgins, John.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Gordon, of Auchleuchry: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439052&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Abernethy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439053&tree=LEO

Elizabeth Abernethy1

F, #86670
FatherLawrence Abernethy 1st Baron Saltoun, of Abernethy1,2 b. c 1400, d. b 13 Mar 1460
MotherMargaret (?)1,3
Last Edited24 Apr 2018
     Elizabeth Abernethy married John Gordon of Auchleuchry, son of Jock Gordon of Scurdague and Elizabeth/Margaret Maitland.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. Gordon Descents Ancestors of Prince William 18 June 2004, Higgins, John.
     2. The Thanage of Fermartyn Aberdeen, 1864 , Temple, Rev. William. 309
     3. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour. 7:407.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Abernethy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00439053&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lawrence Abernethy, 1st Baron Saltoun, of Abernethy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046215&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046216&tree=LEO