RECENT UPDATES - An ongoing log of updates to my genealogy research. See tabs at bottom of page for links to earlier updates.

June 6, 2020: For about three months I have been meticulously going through our direct ancestors from the Medieval age (born after 0900 or died before 1500) Cleaning them up and adding additional information. In some cases I have completely changed certain lines based on new information that I’ve found. I started with about 7,300 ancestors who fit this group and have slowly whittled that down to 6,009 to go as of today. Back to work…

May 31, 2020: I have continued my work on my medieval European ancestors (roughly 900-1400). As before, I have to particularly laud the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy and its Medieval Lands project (now over 4,400 citations in my data). For those fortunate to read French or other languages, I would also like to highlight the value I have found in other language versions of Wikipedia. The French, Spanish, German, and Polish editions, for example, oftem have much more detail and better sources when dealing with (respectively) French, Spanish, German or Polish individuals.

I have particularly enjoyed fleshing out the historical Danes and Saxons that appear in the Saxon Tales series of novels of one of my favorite authors, Bernard Cornwell, and who have turned out in many cases to be direct ancestors.

April 21, 2020: Since the last update noted here (Jan. 20, 2020), I have continued my work on my medieval European ancestors (roughly 900-1400). This has allowed me to not only add considerable detail and discover some new lines, but also to identify and correct several mistakes that I had incorporated in years past. As I studied these lines, I learned of many controversies that make a definitive identification of an individual’s ancestors problematic. I now try to be more deliberate in discussing those controversies when I come across them, and, more specifically, in clearly identifying which line of reasoning I may have chosen to follow. Amazingly, new research continues to be done that is helping to clarify some of these controversies. Unfortunately, this ongoing research sometimes leads to confusion between even some of the more authoritative secondary sources. As before, I have to particularly laud the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy and its Medieval Lands project (now nearly 4,200 citations in my data). For those fortunate to read French, I would also like to highlight the value I have found in Wikipédia (the French edition of Wikipedia). The French edition is sometimes much better researched with better citations of sources.

A good example of my current work has been my effort to sort out the children of Roger I, Count of Sicily. Roger and his three wives somewhere around seventeen children and Roger may have had one or two illegitimate children, as well. At least two of the daughters were named Mathilda. His children married into noble families all over southern Europe. I still haven’t resolved all of this to my satisfaction.

January 20, 2020: Happy New Year! I continue to update my medieval ancestors with new data from Genealogics, Med Lands and Wikipedia. Lots of intersting new connections and corrections have been posted over the past three months. I'm currently working on my Polish ancestors from 900-1400 C.E.

See other tabs for 2016 - 2018 Updates