John Beauchamp1

M, #17521, b. circa 1593, d. circa 1652
FatherThomas Beauchamp2 b. c 1550, d. c 1619
MotherDorothy Clarke3 b. c 1572
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited25 Jul 2017
     John Beauchamp was born circa 1593 at London, England.1,4 He married Alice Freeman, daughter of Edmund I Freeman and Alice Coles, on 27 December 1615 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.5,6 John Beauchamp died circa 1652 at England.1,4
     John Beauchamp This is what appears to be John's participation with the Plymouth Plantation

Before 1625 Plymouth sent one of their own, a Mr. Allerton, to London. While there he contacted a Mr. Sherley who was a goldsmith. Goldsmiths were the bankers of the day. They were who you saw when you needed a loan. Mr. Sherley in turn contacted a Mr. Andrews and a Mr. Beauchamp to invest in the Plymouth Plantation. Beauchamp paid £1127 and Andrews 1136. It is said "Mr. Sherley pretendeth that hee did alsoe add the some of £1190 for his share." As part of the agreement Sherley would receive shipments of skins and sell them. Then he would share profits with Beauchamp and Andrews. He would also pay the bills of the Plymouth colonists. These treaties were signed in 1625, 26 and 27.
In 1636 there was a plague epidemic. Everyone who could was spending as much time as possible outside of the city. Sherley would only spend 1 day a week there. It was during this bout of pestilence that Sherley received a shipment of beaver skins. What would in good times fetch up to £24 per pound was now less then £8. So Sherley decided to sit on the skins till the market went up. In the meantime he had to pay some bills run up by the colonists. He was owed money by a Mr. Hall who was out of town. When contacted he said he could not pay. So Sherley went to see Beauchamp and Andrews. He told them they should each pay a third. They both refused. This all comes from a letter from Sherley to Plymouth.
In Plymouth the colonists were worried because in the 10 years of doing business with Sherley he had never once sent them an account of what he had been doing. They decided to halt all shipments till they got a full account. After doing so they received letters from Beauchamp and Andrews complaining about not receiving and furs and being £1100 in the hole. The colonists were shocked, they wrote back that they had been sending furs for a long time, and that they should see Sherley about their share.
Sherley refused to pay up. Apparantly he was mad about their refusal to pay the bills earlier. Beauchamp sued Sherley in Chancerie but apparantly lost. Andrew and Beauchamp again wrote to the colonists and blamed them. The colonists took all their furs and sent them to Beauchamp and Andrews. They sent 1325 pounds to be divided equally among them. Beauchamp made £400, apparantly over the £1127 he invested. Andrews however was still dowd £40. This was in 1637.
Apparantly Sherley had been receiving furs for a long time and had been pocketing the profit without giving any to Beauchamp or Andrews. Finally in 1641 the colonists became so fed up with the lying cheating Sherley and tried to terminate their contract with him. On Oct 15, 1641 they wrote up a termination contract and had it sent to each of the three merchants, Sherley, Andrews and Beauchamp.
Beauchamp refused to accept their terms believing he was owed more. He demanded either an extra £400 or £400, I'm not clear on this. In April 7, 1643 Sherley sent a letter to the colonists arguing against Beauchamps claims. Apparantly what happened was that when the coalition fell apart each man tried to get as much out of it as he could and Sherly and Andrews turned on Beauchamp.
Finally in 1645 Beauchamp received £210 10s and I guess was satisfied. He was the last person to whom the colonists owed money. From this point on they were in the black. He apparantly had no further dealing with Plymouth.
----------
A letter sent by John Beauchamp. A photocopy of this letter was in the book "Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation" by William Bradford, Gov. I am not sure what the circumstances around the letter were.

"??r

Mr Stuckey procured me to lend yor Brother my money and therefore I used him as much as I could to get any Interest & Principall when I needed. but at last he fayled in both, and for what I did for himself. But I remember nothing that might make me concede him or Mr Perkins to be engaged to yor Brother except as a Taylor for his Costome But if I can by my best enquiry discover any such thing I shallbe as dilligent to enforme your as I desire by your next and speedy supplying me with my due Debts to be continued
Little Brittaine Yor servicable friend
Aprell 3, 1649 Jo. Beauchamp."4 GAV-10.

John Beauchamp Was a major stockholder in the company that financed the "Mayflower."4

Family

Alice Freeman b. b 15 Apr 1601, d. c 1640
Children

Citations

  1. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I409
  2. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I411
  3. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I412
  4. [S1228] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:674841, Osiris Johnson (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0190
  5. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I410
  6. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, compiler, The Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley & His Wife Emma Arabella Bosworth (Woodstock, VT: N. G. Parke, 1960), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy.
  7. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0192
  8. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0194
  9. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0198
  10. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0196
  11. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0193
  12. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0201
  13. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0197
  14. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0200
  15. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0998
  16. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0203

Alice Freeman1

F, #17522, b. before 15 April 1601, d. circa 1640
FatherEdmund I Freeman2,3 b. c 1572, d. b 6 Jun 1623
MotherAlice Coles4,3 b. c 1576, d. b 5 Mar 1652
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited25 Jul 2017
     Alice Freeman was born before 15 April 1601 at Pulborough, Sussex, England; date of baptism.1,3 She was baptized on 15 April 1601 at Sussex, England.3 She married John Beauchamp, son of Thomas Beauchamp and Dorothy Clarke, on 27 December 1615 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.1,3 Alice Freeman died circa 1640 at Preston, Suffolk, England.5
     GAV-10.
Alice Freeman is mentioned in the will of Edmund I Freeman on 30 June 1623; per Jacobus [1960:24] "His will, dated 30 May 1623, provides for his wife; daughter Alice Beauchamp; son John Freeman; youngest daughter Elizabeth; grandchildren (unnamed); "my sister Harte"; servants, George coles, "my wives brother"; two eldest sons, Edmund and william Freeman, executors and residuary legatees, overseers, Nicholas Bell of Arondell and George Coles of Amberley."3 Alice Freeman witnessed the death of Alice Coles before 5 March 1652 at Reigate, Surrey, England; per Jacobus [1960:24] she died in the home of her daughter Alice.3

Family

John Beauchamp b. c 1593, d. c 1652
Children

Citations

  1. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I410
  2. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I414
  3. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, compiler, The Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley & His Wife Emma Arabella Bosworth (Woodstock, VT: N. G. Parke, 1960), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy.
  4. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I415
  5. [S1228] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:674841, Osiris Johnson (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0191
  6. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0192
  7. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0194
  8. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0198
  9. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0196
  10. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0193
  11. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0201
  12. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0197
  13. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0200
  14. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0998
  15. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0203

Thomas Beauchamp1

M, #17523, b. circa 1550, d. circa 1619
FatherJohn Beauchamp I2 b. b 1531, d. a 1619
ReferenceGAV11
Last Edited22 Aug 2002
     Thomas Beauchamp married Dorothy Clarke, daughter of Edward Clarke.3 Thomas Beauchamp was born circa 1550 at Crosgrove, Northamptonshire, England.1 He died after 27 December 1613 at London, Middlesex, England.4 He died circa 1619 at London, England.1
     GAV-11.

Thomas Beauchamp left a will on 15 December 1613; Testament Thomas Beacham de Cosgrove
In the name of God Amen the XVth day of december anno dei 1613

I Thomas Beacham of Cosgrove in the countie of Northton yeoman being sicke in bodie but thanked by God of perfect memorie In praies? (AN ODD FORM OF PRAISE?) I commit my soul to Allmighty God My maker and redeamer and my body to be buride in the parish church or churchyard of Cosgrove aforesaid.

Item I give and bequeath to my sonne Edward all my lands and close called by the name of Burks? Bryos? within the fields and parishes of Cosgrove Northe and East Surrie wot I purchased of John Goodman, Ellis Emerson and John Whittmoald to him and his homes forever giving and paying to my sonne Richard one hundred pounds of good and lawful money of England within five years after my decease

Item I give and Bequeath to my son Thomas my house and coppyhold land in Downham in the Isle of Elie in the countie of Cambridge

Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Margarott my house in Wolverton in the county of Buckingham wot I purchased of my Brother Robte Beacham and three score and ten pounds whereof forty pounds at the daie of her marriage or within ten daies after and the other thirty pounds at the age of twenty and one years

Item I give and bequeath to my sonne John Beacham my estate right title and Interest in my house in Sisam with the petenance or els foure score pounds of good and lawfull money of England

Item I give and bequeath unto Antony Mylgate of Wolverton and to Richard Windmill of the same VI S VIII P (SIX SHILLING EIGHT PENCE) betwixt them that is to ether of them III S IIII P (THREE SHILLING FOUR PENCE. IN OLDER TIMES THEY WOULDN'T ABREVIATE IV FOR IIII)

Item I give to my sonne Edward three garners with all the hovill post and timber belonging to them with the tables and settles in the house with all boards and timber for building with all pallis? and hedge mounds

Item I give to each of my godchildren XII P and to James ---- XII P

Item I give to --- --- --- my --- --- and to --- --- --- XII P to Marie Bird XII P

Item I give to the repair of the parish church of Cosgrove III S IIII P

Item I ordain that if any of my foure younger children depart this naturall life before the above said portions and legacies to them by my bequeathed to be due and paiable to remaine to the proper use and behest of the other that remaine living

Item I give to my sonne Edward my worser cart and plough and harrowe and my browne gelding wot I bought of William Emerson and one redd Hereford

Item I give to my sonne Edward my one half of land and housing with which my fathers parte at the next fallow, paying the rent due to my Father at St. Thomas' day come twelve month and till then my wife to pay it

My legacies a performed, my debts paid, my funeral expenses discharged, all my other goods moveable and unmoveable unbequeathed I give to Dorothie my wife whom I make and ppoint my sole executrix of this my last will and testament.

I ordain and appoint William Ellis of Thropp and my brother Christopher overseers of this my will, and for their pains either of them 2s

In witness hereof I have set to my hand and seal this day and year first written. Thomas Beacham. Signed and sealed in the presence of Arthur Emerson, Christopher Beacham, John Maywood, Robert Bagnell.

NOTES

close: In the line starting "church of churchyard" he does say my lands and close called by the .. Back then close could mean "an enclosed place, especially land surrounding or beside a catherdral or other building. In the Thomas' era it could also mean a narrow lane or alley. Coppyhold: Coppyhold does appear to be a word he uses. Surprisingly enough there is a word copyholder it's a person or a thing that holds the copy so that the copier can copy it. Important before movable print. But I don't think that's what it means.4

Family

Dorothy Clarke b. c 1572
Children

Dorothy Clarke1

F, #17524, b. circa 1572
FatherEdward Clarke2 b. b 1554
ReferenceGAV11
Last Edited22 Aug 2002
     Dorothy Clarke married Thomas Beauchamp, son of John Beauchamp I.1 Dorothy Clarke was born circa 1572.1
     GAV-11.

Family

Thomas Beauchamp b. c 1550, d. c 1619
Children

Edward Clarke1

M, #17525, b. before 1554
ReferenceGAV12
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     Edward Clarke died at Roade, Northamptonshire, England.2 He was born before 1554.2
     GAV-12.

Family

Child

Edmund I Freeman1,2

M, #17526, b. circa 1572, d. before 6 June 1623
FatherJohn Freeman1
ReferenceGAV11
Last Edited26 Jul 2017
     Edmund I Freeman was born circa 1572 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.1,3 He married Alice Coles, daughter of George Coles, on 1 January 1591 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.4,2 Edmund I Freeman died before 6 June 1623 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.1,2

His estate was probated on 18 June 1623.2
     GAV-11.

Edmund I Freeman left a will on 30 June 1623; per Jacobus [1960:24] "His will, dated 30 May 1623, provides for his wife; daughter Alice Beauchamp; son John Freeman; youngest daughter Elizabeth; grandchildren (unnamed); "my sister Harte"; servants, George coles, "my wives brother"; two eldest sons, Edmund and william Freeman, executors and residuary legatees, overseers, Nicholas Bell of Arondell and George Coles of Amberley."2

Family

Alice Coles b. c 1576, d. b 5 Mar 1652
Children

Citations

  1. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I414
  2. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, compiler, The Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley & His Wife Emma Arabella Bosworth (Woodstock, VT: N. G. Parke, 1960), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy.
  3. [S1228] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:674841, Osiris Johnson (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0214
  4. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I415
  5. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy, pp. 24-7.

Alice Coles1

F, #17527, b. circa 1576, d. before 5 March 1652
FatherGeorge Coles1 b. c 1550, d. c 1612
ReferenceGAV11
Last Edited25 Jul 2017
     Alice Coles was born circa 1576 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.1 She married Edmund I Freeman, son of John Freeman, on 1 January 1591 at Pulborough, Sussex, England.1,2 Alice Coles died before 5 March 1652 at Reigate, Surrey, England; per Jacobus [1960:24] she died in the home of her daughter Alice.2

Her estate was probated between 5 March 1651 and 1652.2
     GAV-11.
Alice Coles is mentioned in the will of Edmund I Freeman on 30 June 1623; per Jacobus [1960:24] "His will, dated 30 May 1623, provides for his wife; daughter Alice Beauchamp; son John Freeman; youngest daughter Elizabeth; grandchildren (unnamed); "my sister Harte"; servants, George coles, "my wives brother"; two eldest sons, Edmund and william Freeman, executors and residuary legatees, overseers, Nicholas Bell of Arondell and George Coles of Amberley."2

Alice Coles left a will on 13 November 1650.2

Family

Edmund I Freeman b. c 1572, d. b 6 Jun 1623
Children

Citations

  1. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I415
  2. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, compiler, The Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley & His Wife Emma Arabella Bosworth (Woodstock, VT: N. G. Parke, 1960), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy.
  3. [S2604] Donald Lines Jacobus, Jacobus [1960] Ackley-Bosworth Genealogy, pp. 24-7.

John Freeman1

M, #17528
ReferenceGAV12
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     GAV-12.

Family

Child

George Coles1

M, #17529, b. circa 1550, d. circa 1612
ReferenceGAV12
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     George Coles was born circa 1550 at Cowlford, Pulborough, Sussex, England.2 He died circa 1612 at Cowlford, Pulborough, Sussex, England.2
     GAV-12.

Family

Child

Ambrose Dixon I1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #17530, b. before 1625, d. 12 April 1687
FatherWilliam Dixon I7 b. b 1598
MotherKatherine Berkeley7 b. c 1598
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited29 Aug 2002
     Ambrose Dixon I was born before 1625 at London, England.1 He married Mary Wilson circa 1625 at Westmoreland Co., Virginia, USA.8,1 Ambrose Dixon I was buried in 1687 at Family graveyard on "Dixie's Choice" (about a mile west of Marion P. O.), Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1 He died on 12 April 1687 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.9 He died on 12 April 1687 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.10,7
     Ambrose Dixon I Received in an e-mail from Lygia Cutts
" 1. AMBROSE2 DIXON (WILLIAM DIXON OF1 LONDON) (Source: A Family History - Wright-Lewis-Moore & Connected Families by John Wright Boyd, pg. 43-47.) was born in London, England, and died April 12, 1687 in Annamessex, Somerset Co., Maryland. He married MARY WILSON PADDINGTON.

Notes for AMBROSE DIXON:
Source for the following information was pages photo copied from a book sent to me by another Beauchamp/Dixon researcher, the name of the book is unknown:
Ambrose was transported to Virginia by Richard Bayly, of Northampton County in 1649 and bacame a resident. In 1652, his wife Mary, was transported into the colony of Virginia by himself and Stephen Horsey, of Northampton County. Because of his religion, Quakerism, Ambrose left Northampton County, Virginia, along with Stephen Horsey and others and migrated to Maryland before January 1661/2. They came to the settlement at Annemessex on the lower Eastern Shore of Maryland. Ambrose made his home on "Dixon's Choice, on the south side of the Great Annemessex River, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland (in later years Somerset County) with his land adjoining Stephen Horsey's Plantation, "Colebourne", and was the center for Quaker activities in this area at the time of its settlement. During the course of his life he amassed a large property in Somerset County in fertile land and several negros. He spent his time devoted to farming and his religious interests. For years, "Dixon's Choice remained in the Dixon family and in the graveyard, where he lies to rest, many generations of the Dixon connection have been buried. The graveyard is located about a mile west of Marion P.O., in Somerset County.

Notes on the family of Ambrose Dixon, taken from the "Cottingham Genealogy" web site (http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prarie/5597)

The first mention of Ambrose DIXON is in Accomack/Northampton County Court Records dated 7 Sept. 1640. Here are the exact words and spellings:

Forasmuch as it hath appeared unto this Court this present day that there is certen wages due unto Ambrose DIXON and unto some others For theire service and Labour done and performed [on board the] Pinnace called the Accomack which as yet remayneth unsatisfied It is thereupon thought Fitt and soe ordered By this Courte that as well the said Ambrose DIXON as allsoe
the rest whose wages are remayninge behind and unpayed shall Bee satisfied and discharged unto them and eyther of them By and out of the Cargoe that lately came in the said Vessell called the Accomack as afforesaid fiz. For soe much as they and eyther of them shall justly make appeare to bee Due

29 Aug. 1642 The deposition of Thomas Savage taken in open Court. This deponant saith that att March last was twelve month Ambrose DIXON owed unto Richard Hudson the quantitye of two barrells of Corne, And the said DIXON haveing not the said Corne came to this deponant and desired him to pay it for him which this deponant promised the said Hudson to doe, which Corne neither the said Hudson nor his Assignes came to fatch in three Months after Whereupon this deponant did give them notice divers tymes to fatch the said Corne which they never did, soe this deponant disposed of the said Corne, And further this deponant saith that Ambrose DIXON promised to give this deponant thirty shillings sterling in Goods as they Cost the first penny when Capt. Stone his Pinnace came from New England (no doubt this is the Accomack, the pinnace that DIXON was caulker/carpenter on - the court decides the same day that DIXON owes the debt plus court charges)

1 Feb. 1643/44 (they used the old calendar in those days)
Bee it Knowne unto all men by these presents That I William Scott of the Cittie of London Marriner have made constitutided and Authorized my true and loveing Friend Ambrosse DIXSON in the Countye of Northampton shipp Carpenter to bee my true and lawfull Attourney for mee and in my name place and stead all such goods debts Merchauntdizes as I have belonging to my selfe or Lawfull Attourney And to make such Returnes of the same as I shall give further order, Giveing and by these presents graunting unto my said Attourney full power and Authority to doe and deale as effectually in the promisses As I myself might or could effect (and so on) In witnes whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this 18th September 1643 28 July 1645

The deposition of Ambrose Dixson taken in open Court.
This deponent saith that when hee and his mate had made an end of the boate which they built for Randall Revell Thomas Harrison asked them saying have you done And sayde I did write a noate (etc about Harrison's noate and Revell's misusing it - DIXON finishes his deposition with) And further not the marke of Ambrose Dixson

Ambrose DIXON married the widow Mary Peddington, their first 6 children are born in Northampton Co. starting with Mary DIXON c1650, Thomas DIXON c1651, Sarah DIXON c1653, Ambrose DIXON c1655 (died young), Elizabeth DIXON c1657, and Grace DIXON c1659.

In 1651 he joined Edmund Scarburgh and several others in riding against the Indians in defiance of the law. A Court Order of 10 May 1651 says:
Whereas Mr Edmund Scarburgh, Mr Thomas Johnson, Mr Richard Vaughan, Captain John Dollinge, John Robinson, Toby Norton, Richard Baily, Ambrose DIXON, Richard Hill, Jenkin Price And divers others Inhabitants and free men in the Upper parte of the parish in the Countie of Northampton Did in a Hostile manner (contrary to the knowne Lawes of Virginia And the League made with the Indians) upon the 28th day of Aprill last past Rayse a partie of men to the number of fiftie persons with Armes and ammunicon And upon the aforesaid daie marched amonge the Indians with a Resolucon to take or kill the Queene of Pocamoke, shott att Indians, slashed and cut [can't read], Took Indyans prisoner, And bound one of them with a Chayne, which said Accons caused the Indyans To Invade the Countie, to the great danger of our Lives and Estate, It is therefore ordered That the Sherriff shall forthwith Arrest the Bodies of all the abovesaid parties... (goes on to say they are to remain in custody until they post bonds to appear in person at James Citty to answer the Governor and Council on 21 May) The same year, 1651, Ambrose DIXON is among those that signed the Oath of Fidelity to the Commonwealth (The king had been beheaded and the monarchy dissolved, Cromwell was in power)

12 Oct. 1652 Ambrose DIXON and Stephen Horsely (Horsey) patent 600 acres in Northampton County for transportation of 12 persons among whom is Mary Dixon.

29 Oct. 1655 - Whereas it appeareth to ye Courte that a dogg and bitch of Ambrose DIXON followed one Tho: Ward and was by a servant of Mr Jno Tilnage found aworrying of two sheep of ye said Tilnage which dyed of the biting of ye said dogge and bitch It is ordered that ye said Tho: Ward shall forthwith make payment unto ye said Mr Jno Tilnage 360 lbs tob. and caske with court charge It is further ordered if any man or woman for further time shall walk with a dogge or bitch that shall kill any sheep that it be thereby charged that the party soe offending shall pay the full value of the sheep worried or killed

This is from Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland by Torrence:
page 299 - "As early as November, 1658, Ambrose Dixon (and 3 others) was before Northampton Court at the suit of the Reverend Thomas Teackle, rector of Hungar's Parish, for non-payment of minister's and church dues, having been formerly ordered by the vestry to pay them. The court sustained the vestry's order."
page 303-304 - " In November, 1660, Ambrose DIXON (and 4 others) were brought before the court of Northampton County for breach of the law concerning Quakers. Ambrose DIXON was arraigned for having met with and spoken amongst the people called Quakers, while fearlessly (and perhaps stubbornly) he "acknowledged the same."... "In January 1661/2, when the delinquents in payment of minister's and other parish dues, in Hungar's Parish, were ordered by the Northampton Courtto make payment of amounts that appeared to be due by them from the year 1654, Ambrose DIXON was among those who were returned by the authorities as non est inventus (he had left Virginia and could not be found)."DIXON moved into Maryland, settling in Annamessex in 1661. Resentment was very strong in Virginia over the encouragement the governor of Maryland was giving to people to come and settle in Somerset County. Col. Edmund Scarburgh swore that this part of the Eastern Shore really belonged to Virginia. In 1663 he took some of the commissioners and 40 horsemen and invaded the newly formed county with an eye to forcing the inhabitants to swear loyalty to Virginia, not Maryland. The party reached Annamessex on Sunday night, the 11th of October. The next day they went to the house of one of the commissioners, Stephen Horsey, and demanded he swear his obedience to Virginia. Horsey said he could not because he could be hanged by the governor of MD. The broad arrow of confiscation was placed on his door and he was arrested. The party next proceeded to the house of Ambrose DIXON. Two other Quakers who had fled Virginia were there with him. Scarburgh again demanded submission, but DIXON refused. In Scarburgh's own words DIXON was, "a caulker by profession that lived longe in ye lower parts, was often in question for his quaking profession, removed to Anamessicks, there to Act what hee could not be here permitted, Is a prater of nonsense, and much led by ye spirit of Ignorance, for which he is followed, A receiver of many quakers, his house ye place of their Resort, and a Conveyor of our ingaged persons out of the County, averse to Government, for which hee stands arrested, and ye broad arrow on his doore, but bids defiance until severer course reforme him." Scarburgh then proceeded to Manokin where all but 2 of the inhabitants subscribed alligance to Virginia. In all of the about 50 freemen living in the area only 8 refused to give in to the colonel. He then left feeling that he had secured the area for Virginia. On the 10th of November 1663 the Court at Accomack sent on officer to rally the subscribers to come together and defend themselves against the Quakers. By June, 1664 Governor Calvert complained to Governor Berkeley of Virginia of Scarburgh's invasion, beating and imprisoning the people of Annamessex and Manokin. Berkeley replied that Scarburgh had no authoriy and had acted alone. The boundary was finally settled at a later date, and even later Scarburgh was finally reprimanded for his actions. The high regard in which DIXON was held was shone when he was named in 1666 one of the first surveyors of the highways for the county. The same year he was elected to represent the county as a delegate in Annapolis. He did not go, however, perhaps because as a Quaker he could not be sworn in. Quakers refused to "swear". At a later date they were allowed to "affirm" where swearing in would be required of non-Quakers.

Since coming into Annamessex, Ambrose and Mary DIXON had had 2 more children - Alice born 14 Feb. 1663/64 and Hannah (who died young) born 9 Sept. 1666. From then until his death in 1687, DIXON appears 14 more times in the court record for various reasons. That he remained defiant and independent-minded into his old age can be seen in a court case in was involved in in 1677.

Ambrose remained an independent thinker all of his long life. When he was in his late 50's he again got into trouble with the authorities. It seems that he disposed of tobacco that the Aunder-sheriff had confiscated on his property to pay his overdue rents and taxes. The "broad arrow" that is mentioned here is the same mark that was put on the door of his house by Col. Scarburgh in 1663. Since almost no one could read in those days, a sign that everyone understood was used. The "Broad arrow" was the sign that property had been confiscated by the authorities and no longer belonged to the previous owner.

In 1677 (from Judicial Records 1675-1677) it says:
Whereas complaint hath this day beene made to me against Ambrose DIXON of the county of Somerset planter did in or neare about in month of ffebruary last past at ye tobacco house of ye said DIXON upon his plantation after ye marke and dispose of 5 hogsheads of tobacco which was by William Stevens undersheriff to Captain Thomas Waller of Somerset County marked with an broad arrow and intended to be weighed and received of him ye said DIXON towards defraying of his publick dues and his lordships rents and that when ye said William Stevens did accordingly goe about to weigh ye same and to take an exact accompt thereof both for his owne satisfaction and for ye satisfaction of him ye said DIXON that then ye said DIXON (in contempt of ye power and authority of ye said Stevens) did openly and violently by force of armes and divers threatening and abusive speeches withstand and oppose ye said undersheriff and would not suffer him to execute his office but disposed of ye said tobacco aforesaid If therefore ye said DIXON shall not attend ye next county court to bee held in ye said county repaire to it ye said court and therefore before ye commissioners of ye same openly and in public view of ye whole court prostrate himselfe upon his knees and acknowledge his great error to his said Lord Proprietor and crave pardon and forgiveness for ye same promising ammendment for ye same and ye future then and you are hereby strictly willed and required to have ye body of him ye said DIXON at ye next provincial court to bee held att St Maries on ye 19th day of June next to suffer such punishment for ye same as his said Lordships Justices shall think fitt to inflict upon himAmbrose DIXON openly and in publique view of ye whole court did acknowledge his great error and humbly craves pardon and forgiveness for ye same DIXON had clearly gotten in over his head this time and the justices were quick to make an example of him. Whether they then sent him to St. Marys is never said, but probably they made do with his apology.

Ambrose DIXON wrote had his will written the 7th of April 1686:
Dau Elizabeth wife of Robert Dukes one negro woman Called Betty Ginney and her increase also 1 horse
grandchild Thomas Potter sonn of Henry Potter 1 cow and calf 1 mare and her female increase 1 young female negro
Thomas Potter to be put to scoole there to learne reading and writting and arethmatik
son in law Edmund Beauchamp 1 cow and calf 1 young black mare called Ginney ye Younger
Elizabeth Willson ye wife of George Willson mare of ye bay coller with a white star in her forehead called by ye name of Jinney wifes son HenryPenington one negro girl about 10 years old
James Brown 1000 lbs of good Merchantible tobacco in cask
rest to wife Mary Dixon except part Thomas Dixon lives on
son Thomas Dixon, son in law Thomas Cottingham, son in law Edmund Beauchamp, son in law Robert Dukes, son in law John Richards, son in law Henry Potter
after decease of Wife to be equally divided
if Mary intermarry she is to injoy and posess 1/3only
promised to make over to friends 1 acre of land for ye consideration of 12 pence in money received where meeting house now is
Mary Dixon executrix
Signed with his marke A
codicil - if any of my said children and sons in law shall in any way trouble or molest illegaly my beloved wife, my executrix Mary Dixon in or about or concerning this my last will and testament their shares to be void
Ambrose Dixon
AD
his marke

1688 (on August 14) the appraisers of his estate took their inventory room by room. Here it is, let's take the tour:
In Ye Hall
Ambrose Dixon's bed and furniture (that means blankets, sheets, pillows, etc)

13 yards of single serge (fabric)
8 3/4 of course kearsey (more fabric)
1 small carpett, 3 cupboard clothes
12 old turkey worked chairs (meand tooled leather)
6 old leather chairs
5 small pieces of old pewter
1 pair of iron doggs (you lay logs on them in fireplace)
1 warming pann (to warm the bed before you get in)
1 small round table and cupboard
3 old chests In ye Closset adjoining to ye Hall
1 match coat (heavy wool coat)
1 chest and 8 botles
1 ild baskett and a littel yarneIn the other little closset
15 nailes (these were very valuable)
1 little sauce pann and skilettIn ye Kitchen
1 old chest and table 1 bread tray and sifter and pillian
(as you can see this was a winter kitchen - in August and during hot weather
all cooking was done in the negroes quarter as you can tell from the inventory
there.)
In ye Milke House
3 peuter dishes one little bason
1 frying pan
5 narrow axes and 1 grubbing how
1 box and 8 botles
(hard to tell if this was a shed attached to the house as they often were or a
separate building. My money's on shed because it's listed in the middle of the
listings of rooms in the house. This concludes the downstairs, then then went
upstairs)
In the Porch Chamber
1 feather bed and furniture
1 feather bed and furniture
2 diaper table clothes 14 napkins 2 towells (diaper was a type of cloth)
1 small parcell of silke
1 chest and box
3 chaimber potts
(the word chamber always meant an upstairs room, in this case we know he
had a porch because this chamber was over it...also you'll notice Dixon's own
bed was downstairs, again because it was summer and it would be cooler
downstairs)
In ye Wainscott chaimber
1 old feather bed and furniture
In ye Chaimber adjacent
1 old small feather bed
6 diaper napkins
3 pewter dishes 10 plates
1 head of a still and 6 spoons
1 iron box with heaters with several trifling things
(the "iron box" was a box iron with heaters used to iron material - wondering
why only spoons? forks were not in use in America at this date. There were a
few in England but they hadn't made it to the colonies yet)
In the nigroes quarter
8 iron potts
3 old kettles
2 racks
2 spitts
5 paire pott hooks
1 brass mortar and pestle
1 old tankard
4 wedges
1 driping and 1 frying pan
1 peicher (pitcher) basin and 2 pr tongs
1 old caske
1 broken kettle 1 gring stone
1 broken iron pott
1 white servant his time 1 year
1 nigroe man named Watt
1 nigroe woman and 3 children
1 nigroe woman and 5 children
1 hand mill and 2 old gunns
(so 11 people all slept in the quarter and you'll notice there are no beds)
Without Doors
1 mare, 1 colt, 1 horse, 3 yearlings, 1 two-year old
3 cowes and calves
3 cowes and yearlings
2 drought oxen
28 young cattele
8 sheep
1 parcel of hoggs
1 cart and wheeles
sum 328-3-0 (pounds-shillings-pence) This was a well-to-do amount

Are you wondering why he had 18 chairs, but only "1 small round table"? In those days boards were usually laid across chests or cross-bucks and covered with a cloth for meals. Also children were usually expected to stand during meals while adults sat. The large number of chairs are because Quaker "meetings" were held at his house although a meeting house had recently been built on an acre of ground near DIXON's own house.

Remember in the will that Ambrose DIXON wrote he added a codicil stating that if any of the children or sons-in-law bothered his wife in any way they would forfeit their part of his estate? It would seem their son Thomas DIXON did not want to take any chances. About 6 years after his father's death Thomas had drawn up the following "obligation" to make it clear to the law that he had done all he could to make his mother comfortable in her old age. The understanding was that he could then run the plantation on his own and not be accused of "troubling or molesting her".

>From Judicial Records 1693-1694
Know all men that wee Thomas Dixon and John West both of Somerset County and Province of Maryland doe acknowledge and confess our selves to owe and are indebted unto Mary Dixon relict of Ambrose Dixon the just sum of 300 pounds sterling money of England which we promise to pay the said Mary

28 July 1694
The condition of this obligation is such that if ye above bound Thomas Dixon doe forthwith build or cause to be built one sufficient good 20 foot square house or room with a chimney therein well fitted and furnished by all consement speed at ye proper cost and charge of him the said Thomas Dixon which said house or room to be for ye proper use and benefit and behoof of her ye said Mary Dixon during her natural life as also ye said Thomas Dixon shall find and allow to the said Mary one sufficient servant to attend her the said Mary during her life as said with sufficient of entertainment of meate drinke washing lodging apparell or other neccessaries fitting and convenient for the said Mary during her natural life as also the said Thomas Dixon doe well and truly perform the last will and testament of the said deceased Ambrose Dixon so far as is to be fulfilled and the Law require then the said obligation to be void and of none effect signed Thomas Dixon J. West (In other words Mary either got her room, servant, etc. for the rest of her life or they forfeited 300 pounds sterling to her and Thomas lost his inheritance. I have a feeling she had a very comfortable old age.

Known children of Ambrose and Mary Dixon were:
1. Mary Dixon, b. c1650, d. ?; mar. (1666) Thomas Cottingham
2. Thomas Dixon, b. c1651, d. 1720; mar. (12 Aug.1672) Christianna
Potter
3.Sarah Dixon, b. c1655; mar. 11 Jun. 1668 Edward Beauchamp
4. Ambrose Dixon, b. c1655, died young
5. Elizabeth Dixon, b. c1657, d. 28 Feb. 1687/8; mar. (1674) Robert Dukes
6. Grace Dixon, b. c1659; mar. (1676) John Richards
7. Alice Dixon, b. 14 Peb. 1663/4; mar. (1679) Henry Potter; mar. 2nd
Randall Minshull
8. Hannah Dixon, b. 9 Sep. 1666, d. Oct. 1667

More About AMBROSE DIXON:
Burial: Family Graveyard located on "Dixie's Choice" (about a mile west of
Marion P.O.)1
Reference: (an unknown value.)11 GAV-10.

Ambrose Dixon I That Ambrose was son of William is not certain.7 He was Quaker.1

Ambrose Dixon I immigrated in 1649 to James City?, Virginia, USA.1

Ambrose Dixon I lived between 1649 and 1661 at Virginia, USA.1

Ambrose Dixon I In a census for the Virginia East Shore. in 1651.1

Ambrose Dixon I Immigrated to Maryland with his children Ambrose, Elizabeth, Thomas, Grace, Mary and Sarah in 1661.7

Ambrose Dixon I lived between 1661 and 1687 at Maryland, USA.1

Ambrose Dixon I Returned to VA with children Thomas, Grace, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah, leaving Ambrose in MD circa 1662.1

Ambrose Dixon I Returned to MD with children Thomas, Grace, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah and wife Mary on 1 April 1663.1

Family

Mary Wilson b. c 1625, d. 1688
Children

Citations

  1. [S1228] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:674841, Osiris Johnson (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0204
  2. [S1636] Clayton Torrence, Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland: A Study in Foundations and Founders (Rear 63 E. Main St., Westminster, MD 21157: orig: Whittete & Shepperson, reprint: Family Line Publications, orig. 1935, reprint 1992), 132. Hereinafter cited as Torrence [1935] Old Somerset MD.
  3. [S1285] Unknown author, The Early Settlers of Maryland (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), 135, 133
    'Ambrose Dixon' found in L. 5 F. 255, 'Ambrose Dickeson' found in L. 5 F. 73.
  4. [S1286] Unknown author, Early Virginia Immigrants (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), 96
    'Dixon, Amb., 1649, by Richard Bayly, Northampton Co.'
  5. [S1279] Unknown author, Immigrant Ancestors (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), 12
    'Ambrose Dixon.'
  6. [S1287] Unknown author, Will of Ambrose Dixon, I (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), 'Ambrose Dixon.'
  7. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001.
  8. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I408
  9. [S782] e-mail address, update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I407
  10. [S1287] Unknown author, Will of Ambrose Dixon, I, 'Signed Apr 7, 1686, estate appraisal Aug 14, 1688.'
  11. [S1357] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=thall, Tina Hall (unknown location), downloaded updated 22 Jan 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thall&id=I5563; cites: " Edmund Beauchamp of Maryland", by Mary Turpin Layton, DAR Magazine, January 1932.
  12. [S1288] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=derekgilbert, Derek Gilbert (unknown location), downloaded updated 9 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=derekgilbert&id=I0327
  13. [S1355] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=godennuttalljr, Jr. Glen Oden Nuttall (unknown location), downloaded updated 6 June 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=godennuttalljr&id=I573
  14. [S1288] e-mail address, updated 9 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=derekgilbert&id=I1606
  15. [S1357] e-mail address, updated 22 Jan 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thall&id=I5816; cites "A History of the Beauchamp Family and Some Allied Lines", by Rosemary Beauchamp Brown, 2nd edition 1998.
  16. [S1357] e-mail address, updated 22 Jan 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thall&id=I5817
  17. [S1356] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=ginorio, F. Joseph Ginorio (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Dec 1999, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ginorio&id=I2101

Mary Wilson1,2

F, #17531, b. circa 1625, d. 1688
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited22 Aug 2002
     Mary Wilson was born circa 1625.2 She married Ambrose Dixon I, son of William Dixon I and Katherine Berkeley, circa 1625 at Westmoreland Co., Virginia, USA.1,2 Mary Wilson married Henry Peddington before 1647.3 Mary Wilson died in 1688 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.2
     GAV-10.

Mary Wilson Received in an e-mail from Lygia Cutts, a descendant of Ambrose Dixon and Mary Wilson
"Ambrose Dixon marries a widow named Mary whose first husband was Henry Peddington (Pedenden, Pedlington and other varied spellings). Her husband had died by 1647, leaving her with one son - Henry Jr. As Mrs Peddington she appears twice in the early court records:

26 Nov. 1638 - Whereas Henry Peddenden made it appeare unto this court that there is 200 acres of land dew to him for the transportation of 4 persons into the Country (can't read) give him a small neck of land lyeinge in Hungars (for transportation of) Henry Peddenden, Mary his wife, Christopher Bryan, James Hardyn [so Mary was already married to him when they arrived]

20 Sept.1644 - The deposition of Thomas Clifton taken in open Court This deponent saith that Mrs Pedenden (later Mary DIXON) lost a peece of Ribbandine which goodwife Weede Boy found and gave it to Anne Smyth Mrs Pedenden seeing the sayde Anne have it upon her head tooke her into the house by the arme and toore it out of her haire, John Hinman came to Mr Pedendens house and Fell into words of greate distaste, Whereupon the said Mr Pedenden told the said Hinman saying I never inform"d the Court with an untrust (goes on about their arguement) It is assumed by many that Mary Peddington DIXON was born Mary Wilson, sister of George Wilson. She married Peddington (or Pedenden, Pedlington, etc) in England and both migrated to Virginia where Henry died by 1647 and remarried DIXON by 1649. Her brother George Wilson later joined them in settling in Somerset Co.About 1649."3

Family 1

Ambrose Dixon I b. b 1625, d. 12 Apr 1687
Children

Family 2

Henry Peddington b. b 1625, d. 1647
Child

Citations

  1. [S782] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=trishaann&surname=Beauchamp%2C+Curtis, E. Parker Todd (unknown location), downloaded update 8 Sept 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=trishaann&id=I408
  2. [S1228] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:674841, Osiris Johnson (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0204
  3. [S1228] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:674841&id=I0205
  4. [S1288] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=derekgilbert, Derek Gilbert (unknown location), downloaded updated 9 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=derekgilbert&id=I0327
  5. [S1355] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=godennuttalljr, Jr. Glen Oden Nuttall (unknown location), downloaded updated 6 June 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=godennuttalljr&id=I573
  6. [S1288] e-mail address, updated 9 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=derekgilbert&id=I1606
  7. [S1357] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=thall, Tina Hall (unknown location), downloaded updated 22 Jan 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thall&id=I5816; cites "A History of the Beauchamp Family and Some Allied Lines", by Rosemary Beauchamp Brown, 2nd edition 1998.
  8. [S1357] e-mail address, updated 22 Jan 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thall&id=I5817
  9. [S1356] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=ginorio, F. Joseph Ginorio (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Dec 1999, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ginorio&id=I2101

James Curtis1

M, #17532, b. 7 November 1666, d. 1721
FatherDaniel Curtis2 d. 1681
MotherMary Green3
ChartsAncestors - Myrtle Lee ROBERTS
ReferenceGAV9
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     James Curtis was born on 7 November 1666 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1 He married Sarah Hall, daughter of Charles Hall and Alice (?), on 2 February 1685 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.4 James Curtis died in 1721 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Family

Sarah Hall b. 26 May 1668
Children

Sarah Hall1

F, #17533, b. 26 May 1668
FatherCharles Hall2 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)3 d. 1724
ChartsAncestors - Myrtle Lee ROBERTS
ReferenceGAV9
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     Sarah Hall was born on 26 May 1668 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1 She married James Curtis, son of Daniel Curtis and Mary Green, on 2 February 1685 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1
     GAV-9.

Family

James Curtis b. 7 Nov 1666, d. 1721
Children

Charles Hall1

M, #17536, b. 22 February 1665
FatherCharles Hall1 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)1 d. 1724
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Charles Hall was born on 22 February 1665 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1 He married Martha Davis on 31 October 1693 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.2

Family

Martha Davis

Martha Davis1

F, #17537
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Martha Davis married Charles Hall, son of Charles Hall and Alice (?), on 31 October 1693 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Family

Charles Hall b. 22 Feb 1665

Katherine Hall1

F, #17538, b. 20 June 1670
FatherCharles Hall1 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)1 d. 1724
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Katherine Hall was born on 20 June 1670 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Alice Hall1

F, #17539, b. 2 July 1673
FatherCharles Hall1 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)1 d. 1724
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Alice Hall was born on 2 July 1673 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Mary Hall1

F, #17540, b. 16 August 1675
FatherCharles Hall1 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)1 d. 1724
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Mary Hall was born on 16 August 1675 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Rachel Hall1

F, #17541, b. 3 July 1677
FatherCharles Hall1 d. c 1695
MotherAlice (?)1 d. 1724
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Rachel Hall was born on 3 July 1677 at Annemessex, Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Elizabeth Curtis1

F, #17542, b. 7 July 1687
FatherJames Curtis1 b. 7 Nov 1666, d. 1721
MotherSarah Hall1 b. 26 May 1668
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Elizabeth Curtis was born on 7 July 1687 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

James Curtis1

M, #17543, b. 1694
FatherJames Curtis1 b. 7 Nov 1666, d. 1721
MotherSarah Hall1 b. 26 May 1668
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     James Curtis was born in 1694 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1

Daniel Curtis1

M, #17544, d. 1681
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     Daniel Curtis married Mary Green on 1 July 1666 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.2 Daniel Curtis died in 1681 at Accomack Co., Virginia, USA.1
     GAV-10.

Family

Mary Green
Child

Mary Green1

F, #17545
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited22 Jan 2003
     Mary Green married Daniel Curtis on 1 July 1666 at Somerset Co., Maryland, USA.1
     GAV-10.

Family

Daniel Curtis d. 1681
Child

Walter Childe Esq.1

M, #17546, b. 20 March 1608, d. circa 1653
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited5 Sep 2017
     Walter Childe Esq. was born on 20 March 1608 at St. Mary Redcliff Parish, Somerset, England.1 He married Elizabeth Sanders on 30 June 1630 at Bristol, Somerset, England.2 Walter Childe Esq. died circa 1653 at Jamestown, James City Co., Virginia, USA.1
     GAV-10. He witnessed the marriage of Walter Chiles Sr. and Elizabeth Maury before 1630 at England; Their son Walter Jr. was born ca 1630
per Eakin [1983:4]: "The wife of Walter Chiles, Sr. was elizabeth. So far this writer has been unable to ascertain her maiden name. In a letter written 7 Feb 1978 Mrs. Virginia W. Austin (State Chairman, Genealogical Records Committee, Virginia D. A. R.) states, 'All the records I have indicatre he married Elizabeth Maury, but there is in the Colonial Dames of the 17th Century file forlder for Chiles a notation where someone had found the marriage of a Walter Chiles to an Elizabreth Sanders June 1630 in Bristol Cathdral.' The William and Mary Quarterly mentions there was a second marriage to an Alice Luckin. I find no reference to an Alice Luckin Chiles in the U. S. Records."3,4,5 Walter Childe Esq. was was mentioned in a land transaction by Walter Chiles Sr. on 1 March 1638 at On the Appamatox River, near Petersburg, Charles City Co. (now Prince George Co.), Virginia, USA, per Eakin [1983:1]: "...by 1 Mar 1638 was again in Virginia. On that date he was awarded 400 acres in Charles City County. The award stipulation was: '50 acres being due for his own personal adventure, 50 for his wifde Elizabeth, 50 for his son William, 50 for son Walter and two hundred for the transportation of four other person, viz: Henry Fulton, John Govey, John Shaw and Sarah Cole, to the colony.' The location of the land was Westerly upon thge Appamattuck River,m Northerly upon land of Edward Tunstall and Southerly towards the falls."6

Family

Elizabeth Sanders b. c 1610, d. 1672
Child

Citations

  1. [S783] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=marirw, Martha Irwin (unknown location), downloaded update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5036
  2. [S783] e-mail address, update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5037
  3. [S783] e-mail address, update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5018
  4. [S3186] Joanne Chiles Eakin, compiler, Walter Chiles of Jamestown (Published by the author. Printed by Wee Print, 3423 S. Noland, Independence, Missouri 64055: Joanne Chiles Eakin, 1983), p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Walter Chiles of Jamestown.
  5. [S3359] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, 2012 Edition (with revisions and updates) (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), p. 30. Hereinafter cited as Roberts [2012] Ancestors of Am Pres.
  6. [S3186] Joanne Chiles Eakin, Walter Chiles of Jamestown, p. 1.
  7. [S783] e-mail address, update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5038

Elizabeth Sanders1

F, #17547, b. circa 1610, d. 1672
ReferenceGAV10
Last Edited5 Sep 2017
     Elizabeth Sanders was born circa 1610 at England.1 She married Walter Childe Esq. on 30 June 1630 at Bristol, Somerset, England.1 Elizabeth Sanders died in 1672 at Jamestown, James City Co., Virginia, USA.1
     GAV-10. She witnessed the marriage of Walter Chiles Sr. and Elizabeth Maury before 1630 at England; Their son Walter Jr. was born ca 1630
per Eakin [1983:4]: "The wife of Walter Chiles, Sr. was elizabeth. So far this writer has been unable to ascertain her maiden name. In a letter written 7 Feb 1978 Mrs. Virginia W. Austin (State Chairman, Genealogical Records Committee, Virginia D. A. R.) states, 'All the records I have indicatre he married Elizabeth Maury, but there is in the Colonial Dames of the 17th Century file forlder for Chiles a notation where someone had found the marriage of a Walter Chiles to an Elizabreth Sanders June 1630 in Bristol Cathdral.' The William and Mary Quarterly mentions there was a second marriage to an Alice Luckin. I find no reference to an Alice Luckin Chiles in the U. S. Records."2,3,4

Family

Walter Childe Esq. b. 20 Mar 1608, d. c 1653
Child

Citations

  1. [S783] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=marirw, Martha Irwin (unknown location), downloaded update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5037
  2. [S783] e-mail address, update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5018
  3. [S3186] Joanne Chiles Eakin, compiler, Walter Chiles of Jamestown (Published by the author. Printed by Wee Print, 3423 S. Noland, Independence, Missouri 64055: Joanne Chiles Eakin, 1983), p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Walter Chiles of Jamestown.
  4. [S3359] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, 2012 Edition (with revisions and updates) (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), p. 30. Hereinafter cited as Roberts [2012] Ancestors of Am Pres.
  5. [S783] e-mail address, update 7 Sept. 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marirw&id=I5038

Margaret Chiles1

F, #17548, b. circa 1610
FatherWalter Chiles Sr.1 b. c 1608, d. 1653
MotherElizabeth Maury1 b. c 1585, d. 1672
Last Edited6 Oct 2001
     Margaret Chiles was born circa 1610.1

Richard Chiles1

M, #17549
FatherWalter Chiles Sr.1 b. c 1608, d. 1653
MotherElizabeth Maury1 b. c 1585, d. 1672
Last Edited6 Oct 2001

Humphrie Chiles1

M, #17550
FatherWalter Chiles Sr.1 b. c 1608, d. 1653
MotherElizabeth Maury1 b. c 1585, d. 1672
Last Edited6 Oct 2001