Mary Young1

F, #97951
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherKilgore/Gray (?)1
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
      ; Uncertain whether her mother was Thomas' 1st or 2nd wife.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

George Young Sr.1

M, #97952, b. 5 December 1755, d. 13 October 1833
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     George Young Sr. was born on 5 December 1755 at South Carolina, USA.1 He married Elizabeth McCrary in 1789 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
His 1st wife.2 George Young Sr. married Ailcy Garrett in 1805 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.3
George Young Sr. died on 13 October 1833 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA, at age 77.4
George Young Sr. was buried after 13 October 1833 at Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     5 Dec 1755, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     13 Oct 1833 (aged 77), Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
     George Young, Sr., was born 5 Dec 1755, to Thomas Young, Esq, and Catherine Brandon (sister of Revolutionary War hero Gen Thomas Brandon). He fought in the Revolutionary War, serving with the South Carolina patriot militia, and was present at the battle of King's Mountain. He was brother to Revolutionary War hero Major Thomas Young. George Young Sr. married Elizabeth McCrary, daughter of Thomas McCrary and Letitia Brandon. Elizabeth died in 1800; he married the widow Alcey (Garrett) Whitmore c1805.
The inscription on his tombstone reads: "Here lies the body of George Young, Sr., who departed this life on the 13th of October 1833, and died in the 78 year of his age. This is erected to his memory by his son George."
     George Young Sr's Revolutionary War service is recognized on a marble tablet, placed by the DAR, on the front inside wall of the Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, Clinton, South Carolina
Inscription: In 78th yr Erected by his son George
Family Members
Parents
     Thomas B. Young 1720–1791
     Catherine Brandon Young 1731–1814
Spouses
     Elizabeth McCrary Young 1755–1800 (m. 1789)
     Ailcy Garrett Whitmire-Young 1748–1822 (m. 1805)
Siblings
     William Young
1744–1834
George Young 1755–1833
     John Young 1760–1780
     Thomas Young 1764–1848
     Christopher C. Young 1772–1849
Children
     George Young 1788–1843
     Mary Young 1791–1873
     Elizabeth Young 1795–1856
     Christopher Young 1797–1825
BURIAL     Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Maintained by: Kenwg
Originally Created by: Lesley Hughes
Added: 11 Sep 2004
Find a Grave Memorial 9446864.4

Family 1

Elizabeth McCrary b. 24 Feb 1755, d. 7 Nov 1800

Family 2

Ailcy Garrett b. 1748, d. 25 Oct 1822

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446861/elizabeth-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for Elizabeth McCrary Young (25 Feb 1755–2 Nov 1800), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9446861, citing Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lesley Hughes (contributor 46620397) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446861. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8308705/ailcy-whitmire-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for Ailcy Garrett Whitmire-Young (1748–25 Oct 1822), Find a Grave Memorial ID 8308705, citing Reeder Family Cemetery, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Robin Farley Dixson Coon (contributor 46558224) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8308705
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446864/george-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for George Young Sr. (5 Dec 1755–13 Oct 1833), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9446864, citing Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446864

Rachael Young1

F, #97953
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Rachael Young was born at South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Jane Young1

F, #97954
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Jane Young was born at South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Mary Ann Young1

F, #97955, b. circa 1760
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Mary Ann Young was born circa 1760 at South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

John Young1

M, #97956, b. circa 1760, d. 10 July 1780
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     John Young was born circa 1760 at South Carolina, USA; Young [2011:1127] says b. ca 1762. FAG Memorial says b. 1760.1,2 He married Mary Whitehouse on 26 January 1763 at Edgecombe Co., North Carolina, USA,
;
Her 1st husband.3
John Young died on 10 July 1780 at Sardis, Union Co., South Carolina, USA.2
John Young was buried after 10 July 1780 at Polly Young Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1760
DEATH     10 Jul 1780 (aged 19–20), Sardis, Union County, South Carolina, USA
     John Young, son of Thomas Young and Catherine Brandon was Rev. War volunteer killed in Tory/British ambush near location of Polly Young Cemetery. Battle is known as Brandon's Defeat. Tory party included "Bloody Bill Cunningham" as well as Brit. regulars. His brother, Thomas, swore that his brother was "murdered" by the tories. He swore an oath of vengeance and became an outstanding soldier, rising in rank to become Major Thomas Young. It was reported that Col. Brandon carried his nephew's body to John's mother's home. Catherine Brandon Young was Brandon's sister.
Family Members
Parents
     Thomas B. Young 1720–1791
     Catherine Brandon Young 1731–1814
Spouse
     Mary Whitehouse McBrayer 1746–1835 (m. 1763)
Siblings
     William Young 1744–1834
     George Young 1755–1833
     Thomas Young 1764–1848
     Christopher C. Young 1772–1849
Children
     Philip Young 1777–1848
     Mary Young McBrayer 1779–1859
BURIAL     Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Uriah
Added: 3 Jun 2010
Find a Grave Memorial 53197725.2

Family

Mary Whitehouse b. 1746, d. 1835

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53197725/john-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for John Young (1760–10 Jul 1780), Find a Grave Memorial ID 53197725, citing Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Uriah (contributor 47012829) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53197725. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232077021/mary-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Mary Whitehouse McBrayer (1746–1835), Find a Grave Memorial ID 232077021, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232077021

Maj. Thomas Young Jr.1,2

M, #97957, b. 17 January 1764, d. 7 November 1848
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Maj. Thomas Young Jr. married Sarah Cunningham.3
Maj. Thomas Young Jr. was born on 17 January 1764 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA.1,2
Maj. Thomas Young Jr. died on 7 November 1848 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA, at age 84.2
Maj. Thomas Young Jr. was buried after 7 November 1848 at Old Union Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     17 Jan 1764, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     7 Nov 1848 (aged 84), Union County, South Carolina, USA
NOTE: There is another memorial for Major Thomas Young, but that memorial is a cenotaph of a non-cemetery monument to Major Young. This memorial not a cenotaph, but is his actual cemetery burial memorial.
MEMOIR OF MAJOR THOMAS YOUNG
     “...On that occasion, my brother, John Young, was murdered. I shall never forget my feelings when told of his death. I do not believe I had ever used an oath before that day, but then I tore open my bosom, and swore that I would never rest till I had avenged his death. Subsequently a hundred tories felt the weight of my arm for the deed, and around Steedham's neck I fastened the rope as a reward for his cruelties...”
Major Thomas Young, Revolutionary War Patriot
     This is a transcription of a photocopy from the South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol IV Summer 1976 Number 3. The spelling and punctuation are as in the original photocopy.
     This memoir was published In Orion, October and November, 1843. Maj. Young died in 1848 and 1s buried in the Old Union Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Monarch, SC.
     The Revolutionary history of the Southern Colonies is yet to be written. Rich and varied as may have been the materials for the work, it is nevertheless, a lamentable truth, that very little has been preserved of the early struggles of the Revolutionists.
     One by one have the florious old heroes of '76 gone "to that bourne from which no traveller returns," leaving behind them no precious record of the past. Many a deed of noble daring, many a heroic example worthy of the palmiest days of Greece and Rome, has been buried with them in the tomb.
     The historian, to be true to the age of which he writes, should not be content to give merely accounts of battles and the movements of kings and princes. He should endeavour to give us an idea of the manners and habits of the people, the character and spirit of the age. He should strive to "hold as 't were the mirror up to Nature, to show virtue her own features, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time, its form and pressure." To do this. In writing of the past, he must needs rely greatly on traditionary records. Every ballad, every pasquinade, every anecdote, should be treasured up as fruitful material. How imperfect indeed, would be our conceptions of the sanguinary partisan wars of the revolution, which ravaged the southern colonies, bursting asunder the bands of society, dividing kindred and friends, and arraying brother against brother, in mortal strife–if we were forced to rely upon the written history of the country. To the page of history the southern student turns, in vain, to learn the character of his fore fathers: and to the battle field the youthful patriot need not look for monument to commemorate their deeds of glory. They have
     "no monument inscription stone, Their race, their deeds, their names almost unknown.”
     In tradition only, are these things treasured up, and swiftly are they passing away who were actors in the scenes. While they moved amongst us, we felt not the importance of their testimony; but now they are gone, we feel that there is a blank in the page of our country's history which time can never fill.
     We are happy to see, even at this late hour, a disposition awakened to save something from oblivion, and with this view we offer to the public through the medium of Orion, the following memoir of as brave a soldier as ever drew the sword in the holy cause of freedom--Major Thomas Young.
     We will present the record in his own words, and
     “nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice.”
     I was born in Lawrence [Laurens] District, S. C., on the seventeenth of January 1764. My father, Thomas Young, soon after removed to Union District where I have lived to this day. In the spring of 1780, I think in April, Col. Brandon was encamped with a party of 70 or 80 whigs, about five miles below Union courthouse, where Christopher Young now lives. Their object was to collect forces for the approaching campaign, and to keep a check upon the tories. They had taken prisoner one Adam Steedham, as vile a tory as ever lived. By some means Steedham escaped during the night, and notified the tories of Brandon’s position. The whigs were attacked by a large body of the enemy before day and completely routed (see note *1 below). On that occasion, my brother, John Young, was murdered. I shall never forget my feelings when told of his death. I do not believe I had ever used an oath before that day, but then I tore open my bosom, and swore that I would never rest till I had avenged his death. Subsequently a hundred tories felt the weight of my arm for the deed, and around Steedham's neck I fastened the rope as a reward for his cruelties. On the next day I left home in my shirt sleeves, and joined Brandon's party. Christopher Brandon and I joined at the same time, and the first engagement we were in, was at Stallions in York District
     We had received Intelligence of a party of tories, then stationed at Stallions; a detachment of about fifty whigs under Col. Brandon, moved to attack them. Before we arrived at the house in which they were fortified, we were divided into two parties. Capt. Love with a party of sixteen--of whom I was one--marched to attack the front, while Col. Brandon with the remainder, made a circuit to intercept those who should attempt to escape, and also to attack the rear. Mrs. Stallions was a sister of Capt Love, and on the approach of her brother she ran out, and begged him not to fire upon the house. He told her it was too late now, and that their only chance for safety was to surrender. She ran back to the house and sprang upon the door step, which was pretty high. At this moment, the house was attacked In the rear by Col. Brandon's party, and Mrs. Stallions was killed by a ball shot through the opposite door. At the same moment with Brandon's attack, our party raised a shout and rushed forward. We fired several rounds, which were briskly returned. It was not long, however, before the tories ran up a flag, first upon the end of a gun, but as that did not look exactly peaceful, a ball was put through the fellow's arm, and in a few moments it was raised on a ram rod, and we ceased firing. While we were fighting a man was seen running through an open field near us. I raised my gun to shoot him, when some of our party exclaimed, "Don't fire; he is one of our own men." I drew down my gun, and in a moment he halted, wheeled round, and fired at us. Old Squire Kennedy (who was an excellent marksman) raised his rifle and brought him down. We had but one wounded, William Kennedy, who was shot by my side. I was attempting to fire in at the door of the house, when I saw two of the tories" In the act of shooting at myself and Kennedy. I sprang aside and escaped, calling at the same time to my companion, but he was shot (while moving) through the wrist and thigh.
     The loss of the tories was two killed, four wounded, and twenty eight prisoners whom we sent to Charlotte, N. C. After the fight, Love and Stallions met and shed bitter tears; Stallions was dismissed on parole to bury his wife and arrange his affairs.
     The next engagement I was in, was at King's Mountain, S. C., I believe on the 7th of October, 1780. I was under the command of Col. Brandon. Late in the evening preceding the battle, we met Colonels Campbell, Shelby, Cleaveland, and Sevier, with their respective regiments, at the Cowpens, where they had been killing some beeves. As soon as we got something to eat, for we were very hungry and weary, we retired to sleep at random in the woods. I did not wake until broad day light. In the morning we received intelligence that Major Ferguson was encamped somewhere near the Cherokee Ford on Broad River. We pushed forward, but heard no tidings of the enemy. At a meeting house, on the eastern side of the river, we discovered some signs and continued our pursuit for some distance, when a halt was ordered, and were on the point of sending out for some beeves, when we met George Watkins, a whig, who had been taken prisoner and was on his way home on parole. He gave us information of the position of the enemy.
     A consultation of the officers was then held, and the command was given to Col. Campbell. Watkins had informed us that we were within a mile of the enemy. We then formed into four divisions; who commanded each division I cannot now say. I think Col. Roebuck commanded the one I was in.
     Major Ferguson had taken a very strong position upon the summit of the mountain, and it appeared like an impossibility to dislodge him, but we had come there to do it, and we were determined, one and all, to do it, or die trying. The attack was begun on the north side of the mountain. The orders were at the firing of the first gun, for every man to raise a whoop, rush forward, and fight his way as he best could. When our division came up to the northern base of the mountain, we dismounted, and Col. Roebuck drew us a little to the left and commenced the attack. I well remember how I behaved. Ben Hollingsworth and I took right up the side of the mountain, and fought our way, from tree to tree, up to the summit. I recollect I stood behind one tree and fired til the bark was nearly all knocked off, and my eyes pretty well filled with It. One fellow shaved me pretty close, for his bullet took a piece out of my gun stock. Before I was aware of it, I found myself apparently between my own regiment and the enemy, as I judged, from seeing the paper which the whigs wore in their hats, and the pine knots the tories wore in theirs, these being the badges of distinction.
     On the top of the mountain, in the thickest of the fight, I saw Col. Williams fall, and a braver or a better man never died upon the field of battle. I had seen him once before that day; it was in the beginning of the action, as he charged by me full speed around the mountain; toward the summit a ball struck his horse under the jaw when he commenced stamping as if he were in a nest of yellow jackets. Col. W. threw the reins over the animal's neck – sprang to the ground, and dashed onward.
     The moment I heard the cry that Col. Williams was shot, I ran to his assistance, for I loved him as a father, he had ever been so kind to me, and almost always carried carrying cake in his pocket for me and his little son Joseph. They carried him into a tent, and sprinkled some water in his face. He revived, and his first words were, "For God's sake boys, don't give up the hill!" I remember it as well as if it had occurred yesterday. I left him in the arms of his son Daniel, and returned to the field to avenge his fall. Col. Williams died next day, and was buried not far from the field of his glory.
     Joseph Williams--who was a mere boy–-and his brother Daniel, were, I think, subsequently massacred by the tories at Hay's station. I remember to have heard it that they were surrounded by the tories, and during the fight a crib or outhouse around the building in which the whigs were stationed caught fire, and when they found there was no hope, Daniel Williams threw his father’s pistols into the flames, exclaiming that he would rather see them burn, than go into the hands of a tory. Our loss at the battle of King's Mountain, was about twenty five killed and wounded. The enemy lost above three hundred, who were left on the ground among them Major Ferguson. We took, moreover, seven or eight hundred prisoners. Awful indeed was the scene of the wounded, the dying, and the dead on the field, after the carnage of that dreadful day. A few days after the battle, a court martial was held to try some of the tories who were known to be of the most outrageous and blood thirsty character. About twenty were found guilty, but ten received a pardon or respite. Nine were hung, and the tenth was pinioned, awaiting his fate. It was now nearly dark. His brother, a mere lad, threw his arms around him, and set up a most piteous crying and screaming, as if he would go into convulsions. While the soldiers were attracted by his behaviour, he managed to cut the cords, and his brother escaped.
     After the battle we marched upon the head waters of Cane Creek, In North Carolina with our prisoners, where we all came very nearly starving to death. The country was very thinly settled, and provisions could not be had for love or money. I thought green pumpkins, sliced and fried, about the sweetest eating I ever had in my life. From this point we marched over into the Dutch settlements in the fork of Catawba and recruited, until we joined Gen. Morgan at Grindall Shoals.
     The next engagement I was in was at Hammond's store, on Bush River, somewhere near '96. Gen. Morgan was encamped at Grindall Shoals to keep the tories in check. He despatched Col. Washington with a detachment of militia, and about seventy dragoons, to attack a body of tories, who had been plundering the whigs. We came up with them at Hammond's store; in fact, we picked up several scattering ones, within about three miles of the place, from whom we learned all about their position. When we came in sight, we perceived that the tories had formed in line on the brow of the hill opposite to us. We had a long hill to descend and another to rise. Col. Washington and his dragoons gave a shout, drew swords, and charged down the hill like madmen. The tories fled In every direction without firing a gun. We took a great many prisoners and killed a few. Here I must relate an incident which occurred on this occasion. In Washington's corps there was a boy of fourteen or fifteen, a mere lad, who in crossing Tiger River was ducked by a blunder of his horse. The men laughed and jeered at him very much, at which he got very made, and swore that boy or no boy, he would kill a man that day or die. He accomplished the former. I remember very well being highly amused at the little fellow charging round a crib after a tory, cutting and slashing away with his puny arm, till he brought him down.
     We then returned to Morgan's encampment at Grindall Shoals, on the Packolette, and there we remained, eating beef and scouting through the neighborhood until we heard of Tarlton's approach. Having received intelligence that Col. Tarlton designed to cross the Packolette at Easternood Shoals above us. Gen. Morgan broke up his encampment early on the morning of the 16th, and retreated up the mountain road by Hancock's Ville, taking the left hand road not far above. In a direction toward the head of Thickety Creek. We arrived at the field of the Cowpens about sun down, and were then told that there we should meet the enemy. The news was received with great joy by the army. We were very anxious for battle, and many a hearty curse had been vented against Gen. Morgan during that day’s march, for retreating, as we thought, to avoid a fight. Night came upon us, yet much remained to be done. It was all important to strengthen the cavalry. Gen. Morgan knew well the power of Tarlton's legion, and he was too wily an officer not to prepare himself as well as circumstances would admit. Two companies of volunteers were called for. One was raised by Major Jolly of Union District, and the other, I think, by Major McCall. I attached myself to Major Jolly's company. We drew swords that night, and were informed we had authority to press any horse not belonging to a dragoon or an officer, into our service for the day.
     It was upon this occasion I was more perfectly convinced of Gen. Morgan's qualifications to command militia, than I had ever before been. He went among the volunteers, helped them fix their swords, joked with them about their sweet hearts, told them to keep in good spirits, and the day would be ours. And long after I laid down, he was going about among the soldiers encouraging them, and telling them that the old wagoner would crack his whip over Ben (Tarlton) in the morning, as sure as they lived.
     'Just hold up your heads, boys, three fires, he would say, and you are free, and then when you return to your homes, how the old folks will bless you, and the girls kiss you, for your gallant conduct!" I don't believe he slept a wink that night!
     But to the battle. Our pickets were stationed three miles In advance. Samuel Clowney was one of the picket guard, and I often heard him afterwards laugh at his narrow escape. Three of Washington's dragoons were out on a scout, when they came almost in contact with the advanced guard of the British army; they wheeled, and were pursued almost into camp. Two got in safely; one poor fellow, whose horse fell down, was taken prisoner. It was about day that the pickets were driven in.
     The morning of the 17th of January, 1781, was bitterly cold. We were formed in order of battle, and the men were slapping their hands together to keep warm–-an exertion not long necessary.
     The battle field was almost a plain with a ravine on both hands, and very little under growth in front or near us. The regulars, under the command of Col. Howard, a brave man, were formed in two ranks, their right flank resting upon the head of the ravine on the right. The militia were formed on the left of the regulars, under command of Col. Pickens, their left flank resting near the head of the ravine on the left. The cavalry formed in rear of the centre, or rather in rear of the left wing of the regulars. About Sun rise, the British line advanced at a sort of trot, with a loud halloo. It was the most beautiful line I ever saw. When they shouted, I heard Morgan say, "They give us the British halloo, boys, give them the Indian hallow, by G—— and he galloped along the lines, cheering the men, and telling them not to fire until we could see the whites of their eyes. Every officer was crying don't fire! for It was a hard matter for us to keep from it.
     I should have said the British line advanced under cover of their artillery; for it opened so fiercely upon the centre, that Col. Washington moved his cavalry from the centre towards the right wing.
     The militia fired first. It was for a time, pop pop pop and then a whole volley; but when the regulars fired, it seemed like one sheet of flame from right to left. Oh, it was beautiful! I have heard old Col. Fair say often, that he believed John Savage fired the first gun in this battle. He was riding to and fro, along the lines, When he saw Savage fix his eye upon a British officer; he stepped out of the ranks, raised his gun--fired, and he saw the officer fall.
     After the first fire, the militia retreated, and the cavalry covered their retreat. They were again formed and renewed the attack, and we retired to the rear. They fought some time, and retreated again and then formed a second time. In this I can hardly be mistaken, for I recollect well that the cavalry was twice, during the action, between our army and the enemy. I have understood that one of the retreats was ordered by mistake by one of Morgan's officers. How true this is I cannot say.
     After the second forming, the firing became general and unintermitting. In the hottest of it, I saw Col. Brandon coming at full speed to the rear and waving his sword to Col. Washington. In a moment the command to charge was given, and I soon found that the British cavalry had charged the American right. We made a most furious charge, and cutting through the British cavalry, wheeled and charged them in the rear.
     In this charge, I exchanged my tackey for the finest horse I ever rode; it was the quickest swap I ever made In my life!
     At this moment the bugle sounded. We, about half formed and making a sort of circuit at full speed, came up in rear of the British line, shouting and charging like madmen. At this moment Col. Howard gave the word "charge bayonets!" and the day was ours. The British broke, and throwing down their guns and cartouch boxes, made for the wagon road, and did the prettiest sort of running!
     After this Major Jolly and seven or eight of us, resolved upon an excursion to capture some of the baggage. We went about twelve miles, and captured two British soldiers, two negroes, and two horses laden with portmanteaus. One of the portmanteaus belonged to a paymaster in the British service, and contained gold. Jolly Insisted upon my returning with the prize to camp, while he pursued a little farther. I did so. Jolly's party dashed onward, and soon captured an armorer's wagon, with which they became so much engaged that they forgot all about me. I rode along for some miles at my leisure, on my fine gray charger, talking to my prisoners, when, all at once I saw, coming in advance, a party, which I soon discovered to be British. I knew it was no time to consider now; so I wheeled, put spurs to my horse, and made down the road in hopes of meeting Jolly and his party. My horse was stiff, however, from the severe exercise I had given him that morning, and I soon found that they were gaining upon me. I wheeled abruptly to the right into a cross road, but a party of three or four dashed through the woods and intercepted me. It was now a plain case, and I could no longer hope to engage one at a time. Mv pistol was empty, so I drew my sword and made battle. I never fought so hard In my life. I knew it was death anyhow, and I resolved to sell my life as dearly as possible.
     In a few minutes one finger on my left hand was split open; then I received a cut on my sword arm by a parry which disabled It. In the next instant a cut from a sabre across my forehead, (the scar of which I shall carry to my grave) the skin slipped down over my eyes, and the blood blinded me so that I could see nothing. Then came a thrust in the right shoulder blade, then a cut upon the left shoulder, and a last cut (which you can feel for yourself) on the back of my head--and I fell upon my horses's neck. They took me down, bound up my wounds, and placed me again on my horse a prisoner of war.
     When they joined the party in the main road, there were two tories who knew me very well Littlefield and Kelly. Littlefield cocked his gun, and swore he would kill me. In a moment nearly twenty British soldiers drew their swords, and cursing him for a d–-d coward, for wanting to kill a boy without arms and a prisoner–-ran him off. Littlefield did not like me. and for a very good reason. While we were at Grindall Shoals with Morgan, he once caught me out, and tried to take my gun away from me. I knocked him down with it, and as he rose I clicked it, and told him if he didn’t run I'd blow him through. He did not long hesitate which of the two to choose.
     I asked Kelly not to tell the British who I was, and I do not think the fellow did. Col. Tarlton sent for me, and I rode by his side for several miles. He was a very fine looking man, with rather a proud bearing, but very gentlemanly in his manners. He asked me a great many questions, and I told him one lie, which I have often thought of since. In reply to his query whether Morgan was reinforced before the battle? I told him "he was not, but that he expected a reinforcement every minute." "He asked me how many dragoons Washington had." I replied that "he had seventy, and two volunteer companies of mounted militia, but you know they won't fight." "By G d!" he quickly replied, "they did today, though!" I begged him to parole me, but he said, "If he did, I should go right off and turn to fighting again." I then told him he could get three men in exchange for me, and he replied "Very well, when we get to Cornwallis's army, you shall be paroled or exchanged; and mean while, I’11 see that your wounds are taken care of."
     We got to Hamilton Ford, on Broad River, about dark. Just before we came to the river, a British dragoon came up at full speed, and told Col. Tarlton that Washington was close behind in pursuit. It was now very dark, and the river was said to be swimming. The British were not willing to take water. Col. Tarlton flew into a terrible passion, and drawing his sword, swore he would cut down the first man who hesitated. They knew him too well to hesitate longer. During the confusion, a young Virginian by the name of Deshaser (also a prisoner) and myself, managed to get into the woods. In truth a British soldier had agreed to let us escape, and to desert if we would assist him in securing the plunder he had taken.
     We slipped away one at a time up the river, Deshaser first, then myself. I waited what I thought a very long time for the British soldier, and he came not. At last I began to think the British were across, and I gave a low whistle--Deshaser answered me, and we met. It was now very dark and raining when we came to the Packolette. I could not find the ford, and it was well, for the river was swimming. We therefore made our way up the river, and had not gone far before we approached a barn. It had a light in it, and I heard a cough. We halted and reconnoitred, and finding it occupied by some British soldiers, we pressed on and soon arrived at old Captain Grant's where I was glad to stop. The old man and his lovely daughter washed and dressed my wounds, and in looking over the bag of plunder which the soldier had given us, they found a fine ruffled shirt, which I put on and went to bed. I shall never forget that girl or the old man for their kindness!
     On the next day I left with Deshaser, and arrived at home that evening, where I was confined by a violent fever for eight or ten day; but thanks to the kind nursing and attention of old Mrs. Brandon, I recovered. I now slept in the woods for about three weeks, waiting for some of the whigs to come in and commence operations. I was concerned about a horse. The British soldiers, when they took me, dismounted me from the fine charger I captured at the Cowpens and put me on a pacing pony. One day I met old Molly Willard riding a very fine sorrel horse, and told her we must swap. She wouldn’t listen to it–-but I replied that there was no used in talking, the horse I would have, and the exchange was made not much to the old woman's satisfaction, for she didn't love the whigs; I don't believe the Willards have forgiven me for that horse swap to this day.
     Soon after this I joined a detachment of whigs under Col. Brandon, and scouted through the country till we reached the siege at Fort Motte. There I remained for several days, when we joined a detachment under command of Col. Hampton, to take Orangeberg. The state troops, under Col. Hampton, outmarched us, for we had a piece of artillery to manage. We arrived the morning after them. The tories were lodged in a brick house, and kept up a monstrous shouting and firing to very little purpose. As soon as the piece of artillery was brought to bear upon the house, a breach was made through the gable end; then another, a little lower; then about the centre, and they surrendered.
     I then joined a party of dragoons under Capt. Boykin, at the solicitation of Capt. Giles, to capture some horses we heard were billeted out by the British, near Bacon's Bridge, in the low country. It was a most hazardous expedition, and required great courage and prudence. Capt. Boykin had both. We went to the hotel and called for the hostler. Capt. Boykin drew his pistol, cocked it, and told him if he did not open the stable door, he would shoot him dead. You may rest assured he did not long consider about it! They got three very fine animals: two stallions and a gelding. Neither Giles nor I got a horse, and we were in no very good humor, as we knew we should have to go back at so rapid a pace that our nags could not stand it. Sure enough, after one day and night's travel, our horses began to fail, and we resolved to take the words; but Boykin begged us to try and keep up, and as we soon should come to another billet of horses, we should have the first choice. Well, next day we did come upon a fine lot of horses, wild as devils. Giles and I went in, and I soon caught a yellow sorrel mare. Giles, who was an excellent judge or horse flesh, was struck with her form, and said to me, "Young, If you will let me have that mare, I will help you catch any horse in the lot!" I gave her to him, and picked me out a bay mare. Time proved that Giles was correct in his judgment, as the yellow mare was never caught in a chase, or beaten in a race afterwards. We were all now well mounted, and pushed off to join our detachment above.
     When we arrived at Granby, we were nearly all discharged. Col. Brandon, Major, Jolly and myself, resolved to make an excursion to 96 where the siege were then going on.
     (note: The siege of Nintey Six, May 22 to June 18, 1781: Major General Nathaniel Greene with 1,000 patriot troops besieged 550 loyalists, unsuccessfully)
     Here I remained during the siege. As we every day got our parallels nearer the garrison, we could see them very plain when they went out to a brook or spring for water. The Americans had constructed a sort of moving battery, but as the cannon of the fort were brought to bear upon it, they were forced to abandon the use of it. It had not been used for some time, when an idea struck old Squire Kennedy, (who was an excellent marksman) that he could pick off a man now and then as they went to the spring. He and I took our rifles and went into the woods to practice at 200 years. We were arrested and taken before an officer, to whom we gave our excuse and design. He laughed, and told us to practice no more, but to try our luck from the battery if we wanted to, so we took our position, and as a fellow came down to the spring. Kennedy fired and he fell; several ran out and gathered round him, and among them I noticed a man raise his head, and look round as if he wondered where that shot could have come from. I touched my trigger and he fell, and we made off, for fear it might be our time to fall next.
     After the siege of 96, I returned to my old neighborhood, and was engaged in various scouting expeditions till peace was declared. I was on a scouting expedition to Mudlick, under Col. Brandon. We were all mounted. We saw two spies, before we came upon the tories, and pursued them to the creek. Col. Brandon sent out Major Jolly with a flank guard to prevent their outflanking us--they were on the opposite side of the creek, and commanded the ford, so that we could not cross. Jolly and I approached very near; so near that a cousin of mine, William Young, hailed us and inquired who commanded. A good deal was said to keep us engaged. Young waved his sword to me several times, and hallooed to me to go away; a moment after we were fired upon by a party who had crept up the creek through the bushes.
     A shot went under Jolly's horse’s belly, and another shaved my horse's forelegs. We returned the fire, but did no damage, save putting a ball through Young’s horse's nose. We then retreated, under the hope that they would pursue us, but they did not. This same cousin of mine had offered a hundred guineas to any man who would bring me into 96. In one of our excursions we heard of a band of tories being concealed in a very dense thicket, over on Sandy River; it was said they had a great deal of plunder. A party, of which I recollect Col. Brandon, Col. Casey, Col. Hughes, and Major Jolly, were members, went to attack them. We got there early in the day, and it was not long before we had possession of the place. In the fight I took a little fellow, by the name of Tom Moore, prisoner. I ran him for some distance, shot at him and broke his arm. When I took him back Tom Salter wanted to kill him, because Moore had once had him prisoner, and would in all probability have killed him, if he had not escaped. I cocked my gun, and told them no! He was my man, and I would shoot the first one who harmed him. During this skirmish I witnessed rather an amusing scene between Col. Hughes and a tory. Hughes had dismounted to get a chance to shoot at some fellow through the bushes, when a tory sprang upon his horse and dashed away. Hughes discovered it in time, fired, and put a ball through the hind tree of the saddle and the fellow's thigh. The tory fell, and Hughes got his horse. In this excursion we got a great deal of plunder, which had been concealed by the tories.
     Once after this, I was taken by a party of "Outliers," (a name given to the Greys) the most notorious and abandoned plunders and murderers of that gloomy period. On account of the kindness I had once shown to one of them while a prisoner in my charge, I was set at liberty without being hurt.
     While we were in North Carolina recruiting, an incident occurred which it may be well enough to relate. One Capt. Reid was at a neighbor's house, in York District, on a visit. The landlady saw two men approaching the house whom she knew to be tories, and told Capt. Reid he had better escape, for they would kill him. He replied, no.' they had been his neighbors; he had known Love and Sadler all his life, and had nothing to fear from them. He walked out into the yard, offered them his hand, and they killed him. His mother, a very old woman, came to where we were encamped in North Carolina. One morning we were called out on parade, and this old woman came before us, leaning on the arms of two officers. She drew from her bosom the bloody pocket book of her son, and three times attempted to go to her knees, but was prevented by the officers who supported her.
     Col. Brandon stepped out and asked if there were any here willing to volunteer to avenge her wrongs. Twenty five stepped out at once. I was one of the number. We started, rode all night, halted in the day, kept watch in the woods, but slept not; the next night we arrived at old Love's. One part of our company was to attack the house, another the barn. The house was attacked, and the door broken down by a powerful man by the name of Maddox, who was afterwards killed at King's Mountain. As he was staving open the door, he floored old Love and knocked some of his teeth out. At this moment a cry was raised that they were in the barn, and to the barn we all rushed. One of our men fired through the door and killed one of the murderers, the other was killed in the skirmish. What is most strange about the matter is, that another man was sleeping with them, and in the melee he escaped unhurt. We now felt that we had done all that was required to us, and returned to our quarters In North Carolina.
     (note: This incident led to the skirmish as Stallion’s, mentioned earlier. As related by Rev Saye: “Their friends in turn sought vengeance; pursued Brandon in considerable force, and he retired before them until he came within the Bethel congregation, where he recruited his force and turned to meet his pursuers. They had followed him to the head of Fishing Creek and turned down that stream. Brandon paused. A short time before he overtook their party Col. Love fell in with him. This Love had encountered the Tories single handed but a short time before, killed two of their number and made his escape by dodging in a briery old field. Brandon soon learned that the Tories had stopped at the house of a man named Sterling (Stallions) to get dinner. This Sterling had married the sister of Col. Love. He was a Tory and his wife a Whig. Brandon divided his force into two parties, leading one himself and the other under the direction of Love. The house was surrounded and several rounds fired before the Tories surrendered. Mrs. Sterling was killed, and a son of William Kennedy was wounded in this battle. Several Tories were killed, one of them by Kennedy himself as soon as he saw his son shot. Brandon conducted his prisoners forthwith to Charlotte.”)
     After the declaration of peace In 1783, Major Thomas Young married, and settled in Union District, upon the spot where he now lives, where he has brought up a large family. He is beloved by his neighbors for his kindness, and respected by all for the scars he received in the cause of Liberty.
     If the perusal of this sketch should give as much pleasure to the reader, as its preparation has given to us, we shall be amply repaid. May the venerable patriot's evening of life be spent in peace, and a richer reward for his services than earth can give, await him beyond the grave.
     *1 This was the “Battle of Brandon’s Defeat”. The John Young killed in this battle, so deeply felt by Thomas Young, was Major Thomas Young’s twin. Another account of this battle, from the writings of Reverend James Hodge Saye (drawing on the reminiscences of Maj. Joseph McJunkin):
     “When the news of the fall of Charleston reached the upcountry the Whig population was greatly alarmed... Cols. Thomas, Brandon and Lysle met on June 4 to concert measures for mutual safety and for the protection of the country comprehended within their several commands. They agreed to concentrate their troops and form a camp near Fairforest Creek, about four miles from the present site of Union, on the road to Adam's Ford on Tyger River. The present resident of Christopher Young is on the spot. As the place was near the center of Brandon’s command, his men first arrived on the ground. He had in his possession a part of the powder formerly entrusted to Col. [John] Thomas, and as he considered its preservation of the greatest importance, he directed Joseph Hughes, William Sharp, John Savage, Aquilla Hollingsworth, Samuel Otterson, Benjamin Jolley and Joseph McJunkin to conceal it with great care in the neighboring forests. They were engaged in this business and absent from the camp on the night on which Brandon's men were assembling at the place appointed.
     “Some one of the parties coming in arrested a Tory and brought him into camp. He was of the kind then denominated ‘a pet Tory.’ He was examined and presently let go or made his escape. He went immediately to the troop of Tories commanded by the famous William Cunningham, better known as ‘Bloody Bill.’ Cunningham immediately set out to surprise Brandon. He made a charge upon his camp soon after sunrise, killed a few of his men, took some prisoners and dispersed the remainder. Among the slain was a brother of Joseph McJunkin and a youth by the name of Young. This defeat occurred on the 8th or 10th of June, 1780.”
     Intelligence of the intended movements of the Whigs had been conveyed to the Little River Tories a few days previous by Col. [Thomas] Fletchall, and Cunningham made immediate arrangements to meet them at that place. “Robert Lusk was taken prisoner on this occasion and compelled to disclose the place where the powder was concealed.
     “But the work of hiding had been done so effectually that the Tories found very little of it. This powder was afterward carried off by stealth to the east side of Broad River and constituted the principal supply of Sumter’s men at Huck’s Defeat, Rocky Mount and Hanging Rock. The Tories pursued some of the fugitives to the distance of fifteen miles. Among them was Samuel Clowney, who subsequently distinguished himself as one of the bravest of the brave.
“Capt. McJunkin then addressed the assemblage, reiterating the sentiments of young Thomas (note John Thomas, son of Colonel Thomas, gave an impassioned speech encouraging the group to continue fighting). It was proposed that those who were in favor of fighting it out when the question was put should throw up their hats and clap their hands. The question was put. Every hat flew up, the air resounded with clapping of hands and shouts of defiance to the armies of Britain and the foes of freedom. It was then proposed that those who through the need of clothing or a wish to see their families had a desire to return home were at liberty to do so provided they would agree to meet the others at the Tuccasegee [Tuckasegee] Ford on the Catawba River. Capt. McJunkin and most of the party set out at once for that place. Here they had the good fortune to meet Col. Thomas Sumter. The late Major Samuel Morrow of Spartanburg District was one of the party above mentioned."
*****
Thomas Young was married twice:
First to Lettie Hughes by whom he had:
Mary Young, who married Robert Livingston
Catherine Young, who married Miles Buford

After Lettie died, he married Sarah Cunningham. They had:
William Young, who married Elizabeth Young
George H. Young, who married Agatha Humphries
Christopher Young
Thomas Young, who married Amelia Rail
John B Young
James Davis Young
Robert Gregory Young
Richard Young
Jane Young

*************************
Further confirmation that Thomas Young, Jr, is "Major" Thomas Young is the following record:
State of South Carolina,
Union District
     appeared in open court and Jeremiah Gregory, and made oath that they have known Major Thomas Young from his childhood, that the said Thomas entered the service of his country in the Revolutionary war, in the month of June 1780, that he continued constantly in the service of his country until the close of the Revolution except for a short time that he was disabled from wounds received in battle. On the 16th of January 1781, agreeable to notice given by General Morgan the said Thomas Young joined the Cavalry commanded by Colonel William Washington, and on the 17th in the battle of the Cowpens, he received several severe sword wounds, as follows to wit one on the right forearm, one on the posterior part of the right shoulder, one on the point of the left shoulder, one on the forehead and another on the back part of his head. That these wounds are at present calculated to prevent the said Thomas Young from their effects as well as increasing age from obtaining a livelihood from his own industry. That the said Thomas Young since the close of the Revolution, has constantly resided in Union District, and has been a farmer by profession, -- That he is now about 64 years of age and is in need of the aid of his country.
Sworn to before me in open Court
     S/ Richard Gantt, P. Judge
     S/ Jos McJunkin
     S/ Jeremiah Gregory
     S/ Joshua Palmer
************
Reference to Thomas Young found in the book “KING’S MOUNTAIN” by Hank Messick
Published by Little, Brown & Company (Canada) LTD - 4/76 ** p142
     Thomas Young, fighting with Williams, spotted a cousin as he neared the top of the hill. The youth was Matthew McCrary, a reluctant Tory whose mother made him join Ferguson in the hope it would persuade the British not to hang his father, who was a prisoner. Matthew, on seeing Young, whooped with joy and rand down the hill to throw his arms around his cousin.
     “I told him to get a gun and fight,” said Young. “He said he could not. I bade him to let me go that I might fight.”
*************
     Major Thomas Young's Father, Thomas Young Senior, is sometimes mistaken for his son, in some genealogies. Thomas Young senior played no role in the Revolutionary War, other than supplying provisions to the militia and Continental forces; he describes himself in his own will, dated 1778, as "...sick in body...". He does appear on the Anson County militia list, in 1759, serving, however, as a private under Captain Edward Musgrove (Anson County is part of North Carolina, but at the time extended into what today is much of northwestern South Carolina).
Family Members
Parents
     Thomas B. Young 1720–1791
     Catherine Brandon Young 1731–1814
Spouse
     Sarah Cunningham Young unknown–1845
Children
     William Young 1795–1868
     Thomas Young 1801–1870
Siblings
     William Young 1744–1834
     George Young 1755–1833
     John Young 1760–1780
     Thomas Young 1764–1848
     Christopher C. Young 1772–1849
BURIAL     Old Union Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Kenwg
Added: 17 Oct 2016
Find a Grave Memorial 171446971.2

Family

Sarah Cunningham d. 4 Mar 1845

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/171446971/thomas-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for MAJ Thomas Young Jr. (17 Jan 1764–7 Nov 1848), Find a Grave Memorial ID 171446971, citing Old Union Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/171446971. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/172174482/sarah-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Sarah Cunningham Young (unknown–4 Mar 1845), Find a Grave Memorial ID 172174482, citing Old Union Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/172174482

Ruth Young1

F, #97958
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Ruth Young was born at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Eleanor Young1

F, #97959, b. 1767
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Eleanor Young was born in 1767 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Elizabeth Young1

F, #97960
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Elizabeth Young was born at South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Letitia Young1

F, #97961
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Letitia Young was born at South Carolina, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.

Christopher C. Young1,2

M, #97962, b. 14 August 1772, d. 23 February 1849
FatherThomas Young Sr.1 b. b 1730, d. b 3 Feb 1791
MotherCatherine Brandon1 b. 1731, d. a 6 Jan 1815
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Christopher C. Young was born on 14 August 1772 at Sardis, Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1,2 He married Mary "Polly" Humphries before 1815
; According to her FAG memorial, their first born child listed, George, was born in 1815.3
Christopher C. Young died on 23 February 1849 at Sardis, Union Co., South Carolina, USA, at age 76.2
Christopher C. Young was buried after 23 February 1849 at Polly Young Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     14 Aug 1772, Sardis, Union County, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     23 Feb 1849 (aged 76), Sardis, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Christopher Young was son of Thomas Young and Catherine Brandon Young (her father was Col. Brandon of Rev. War fame.
Family Members
Parents
     Thomas B. Young 1720–1791
     Catherine Brandon Young 1731–1814
Spouse
     Mary Humphries Young 1786–1870
Siblings
     William Young 1744–1834
     George Young 1755–1833
     John Young 1760–1780
     Thomas Young 1764–1848
Children
     George McCrary Young 1815–1887
     John B. Young 1817–1862
     Catherine Brandon Young Sartor 1825–1875
     Sarah Young Hill 1832–1862
BURIAL     Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Uriah
Added: 5 Jun 2008
Find a Grave Memorial 27347374.2

Family

Mary "Polly" Humphries b. 18 Mar 1786, d. 8 Sep 1870

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1127. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347374/christopher-c-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Christopher C. Young (14 Aug 1772–23 Feb 1849), Find a Grave Memorial ID 27347374, citing Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Uriah (contributor 47012829) at Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347374/christopher-c-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Christopher C. Young (14 Aug 1772–23 Feb 1849), Find a Grave Memorial ID 27347374, citing Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Uriah (contributor 47012829).. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347215/mary-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Mary “Polly” Humphries Young (18 Mar 1786–8 Sep 1870), Find a Grave Memorial ID 27347215, citing Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Uriah (contributor 47012829) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347215

Rebecca Bogan1

F, #97964, b. 1759, d. 28 November 1803
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Rebecca Bogan was born in 1759 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1 She married George Harlan Sr. circa 1775 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
Her 1st husband.2 Rebecca Bogan married Col. Thomas Brandon, son of George Brandon, in 1800 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1
Rebecca Bogan died on 28 November 1803 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1
Rebecca Bogan was buried after 28 November 1803 at Old Union Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1759, Union County, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     28 Nov 1803 (aged 43–44), Union County, South Carolina, USA
Rebecca Bogan Harlan, wife of George Harlan, married around 1775 in Union Dist., SC.
Children: Elizabeth (Brandon); Samuel; George; Hannah; John; Isaac; Joshua; William & Eleanor.
After George died she married Col. Thomas Brandon.
Buried in Harlan Cemetery, Union Dist., SC.
Family Members
Parents
     John Bogan 1720–1803
     Hannah Jane Griest Bogan 1732–1803
Spouses
     George Harlan 1755–1798 (m. 1775)
     Thomas Brandon 1741–1802 (m. 1800)
Siblings
     Isaac Bogan 1750–1805
Children
     Samuel Harlan 1778–1847
     George Harlan 1780 – unknown
     John Harlan 1785–1785
     Joshua Harlan 1788–1826
BURIAL     Harlan Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: comer
Added: 7 Dec 2013
Find a Grave Memorial 121376992.1

Family 1

George Harlan Sr. b. 1755, d. 1798

Family 2

Col. Thomas Brandon b. 1741, d. 2 Feb 1802

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376992/rebecca-bogan-brandon: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for Rebecca Bogan Harlan Brandon (1759–28 Nov 1803), Find a Grave Memorial ID 121376992, citing Harlan Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by comer (contributor 47131419) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376992. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376850/george-harlan: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for George Harlan Sr. (1755–1798), Find a Grave Memorial ID 121376850, citing Harlan Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by comer (contributor 47131419) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376850

George Harlan Sr.1

M, #97965, b. 1755, d. 1798
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     George Harlan Sr. was born in 1755 at Chatham Co., North Carolina, USA.1 He married Rebecca Bogan circa 1775 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
Her 1st husband.1
George Harlan Sr. died in 1798 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1
George Harlan Sr. was buried in 1798 at Harlan Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1755, Chatham County, North Carolina, USA
DEATH     1798 (aged 42–43), Union County, South Carolina, USA
Son of Samuel Harlan. Revolutionary War soldier. Married Rebecca Bogan around 1775 in Union Dist., SC. Children: Elizabeth (Brandon); Samuel; George; Hannah; John; Isaac; Joshua; William & Eleanor. Wife Rebecca married Col. Thomas Brandon after George's death. George & Rebecca are buried in the Harlan Cemetery, Union District, SC.
Family Members
Spouse
     Rebecca Bogan Harlan Brandon 1759–1803 (m. 1775)
Children
     Samuel Harlan 1778–1847
     George Harlan 1780 – unknown
     John Harlan 1785–1785
     Joshua Harlan 1788–1826
BURIAL     Harlan Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: comer
Added: 7 Dec 2013
Find a Grave Memorial 121376850.1

     Reference: Harlan [1914:91]: "189. George Harlan" (Samuel,'' Aaron •*), Friend, farmer, b. about 1755 in Chatham Co., N. C; d. Sept. or Oct., 1798 in Union District, S. C; bur. there in
" Harlan Cemetery." He m. about 1775 in that District, Rebecca ; her maiden name could not be found. She d. there and was bur. it is supposed in " Harlan Cemetery."
Issue :
687. Elizabeth, b. 7, 12, 1776; m. Harrison Brandon. No further record.
688. Samuel, b. 5, 31, 1778; d. 3 Mo., 1847 : m- Nancy Fitzpatrick.
689. George (farmer), b. 4, 14, 1780, in Union District, S. C; d. about the year 1830, in Phillips Co., Ark; bur. there. He em., probably at the same time as his brother Samuel, into Monroe Co., Ky., and later into Phillips Co., Ark. He m. in Union District, but the name of his wife could not be found. At the time of his going into .Arkansas Territory, that portion of our now Commonwealth belonged to France. Issue :
(i) Thomas Cowlie, b. iSoi ; d. 1841, in Phillips Co; bur. there in Camp Ground Cemetery. He m. 1825, Elizabeth Wright, and had :
(a) Henry W., b. 11 Mo., 1826; d. 11 jNIo., 1858; m. Mary Jane Atchley, 6 Mo., 1853.
(b) John H., b. 1830, in that county ; d. 7, 2, 1862, in ^Mississippi, in the Confederate Army; m. Huldah J. Allen, 1858.
(c) Verlinda. b. 1834; d. 1848. in Helena, Ark; unni.
(d) James Bright (engineer), b. 6, 26, 1837. Phillips Co., Ark; m. 5, 16, 1856, Mariana Aletcalf, b. Pulaski Co., 111; d. 9, 22, 1859. in Phillips Co; bur. there. He m. (2) 7. 3, 1864, Lucy N. Coonrod, a dau. of Henry. Pie resided, 1890, in Mound City, 111. Children : John H., b. 3, 9. 1857: d. II ilo., 1857. Nancy Jane, b. 9, 18, 1858; d. 9 Mo.1858. James B., b. 1, 25, 1867; d. 1, 14, 1868. Thomas Henry, b. ib. 25, 1868; d. 6, 26, 1874. Laura Bell. b. 8, 16, 1870; d. 3, 7. 1875. Mary Ann, b. 8. 1872. Minnie A., b. 3. 5,
1875. Frederick A., b. 8, it, 1876. "Martha E., b. 12, 30, 1S78. Susan M.. b. 9, 14, 1880. George E.. b. 8. 24, 1884. Emma T., b. I, 28. 1886. All b. in Pulaski Co., 111.
(e) Thomas Cowlie, b. 12 Mo., 1841 ; d. 1842.

(ii) Henrv, b. 1802 ; m. Emeline Smith,
(iii) Harmon, b. 1804.
(iv) Nathaniel R.. b. 1806.
(v) William T., b. 1808.
(vi) Elizabeth, b. 1810 : d. 1840 ; m. George W. Wilcox.
(vii) Nancy, b. 1812 ; d. 1842 ; m. Elisha Williams.

690. Hannah, b. 11, 30, 1782. No further information.
691. John, b. 5, 2, 1785, L'nion District, S. C; d. there in infancy.
692. Isaac, b. 12, 26, 1786, same. No further information.
693. Joshua, b. 4, 14, 1788, same; d. there in infancy.
694. William, b. 4, 4, 1791, same ; d. there, 1808 ; unm.
695. Eleanor, b. 6, 22, 1795, same. No further information.

This was " Farmer George Harlan " * of Union District, S. C. His estate was appraised Oct. 22, 1798. The sale bill returned and tiled Jan. 2, 1799. The amount of his personal estate was $1622." at Citation.2

Family

Rebecca Bogan b. 1759, d. 28 Nov 1803

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376850/george-harlan: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for George Harlan Sr. (1755–1798), Find a Grave Memorial ID 121376850, citing Harlan Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by comer (contributor 47131419) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121376850. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S1024] Alpheus H. Harlan, History and genealogy of the Harlan family and particularly of the descendants of George and Michael Harlan who settled in ChesterCounty, Pa. In 1687. (2 Volumes) (Baltimore, MD: The Lord Baltimore Press, 1914), Vol. 1, pp. 91-2. Hereinafter cited as Harlan [1914] Gen of Harlan Family Chester Co PA.

Elizabeth McCrary1

F, #97967, b. 24 February 1755, d. 7 November 1800
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Elizabeth McCrary was born on 24 February 1755 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA.1 She married George Young Sr., son of Thomas Young Sr. and Catherine Brandon, in 1789 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
His 1st wife.1
Elizabeth McCrary died on 7 November 1800 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA, at age 45.1
Elizabeth McCrary was buried after 7 November 1800 at Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     25 Feb 1755, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     2 Nov 1800 (aged 45), Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Inscription: Age about 45y
Family Members
Parents
     Thomas McCrary 1737–1793
     Letitia Brandon McCrary 1737–1790
Spouse
     George Young 1755–1833 (m. 1789)
Siblings
     Matthew McCrary 1760–1794
     Thomas McCrary 1763–1835
     George Brandon McCrary 1770–1845
     Andrew McCrary 1775–1852
Children
     George Young 1788–1843
     Mary Young 1791–1873
     Elizabeth Young 1795–1856
     Christopher Young 1797–1825
BURIAL     Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Lesley Hughes
Added: 11 Sep 2004
Find a Grave Memorial 9446861.1

Family

George Young Sr. b. 5 Dec 1755, d. 13 Oct 1833

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446861/elizabeth-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for Elizabeth McCrary Young (25 Feb 1755–2 Nov 1800), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9446861, citing Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lesley Hughes (contributor 46620397) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9446861. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Ailcy Garrett1

F, #97968, b. 1748, d. 25 October 1822
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     Ailcy Garrett was born in 1748.1 She married John Whitmore in 1767
;
Her 1st husband.2 Ailcy Garrett married George Young Sr., son of Thomas Young Sr. and Catherine Brandon, in 1805 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA,
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1
Ailcy Garrett died on 25 October 1822 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA.1
Ailcy Garrett was buried after 25 October 1822 at Reeder Family Cemetery, Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1748, Virginia, USA
DEATH     25 Oct 1822 (aged 73–74), Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Aged 74 years
Gravesite Details: w/o 1 John Whitmire 2) George Young
Family Members
Spouses
     John Whitmore 1746–1793 (m. 1767)
     George Young 1755–1833 (m. 1805)
Children
     Sarah Whitmore Duckett 1770–1832
     Lydia Whitmore Reeder 1772–1858
     Margaret Whitmore Prude 1774–1853
     Anna Whitmore Reeder 1778–1822
     Mary Whitmore Duckett 1779–1854
BURIAL     Reeder Family Cemetery, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Robin Farley Dixson Coon
Added: 23 Jan 2004
Find a Grave Memorial 8308705.1

Family 1

John Whitmore b. 12 Aug 1746, d. 1793

Family 2

George Young Sr. b. 5 Dec 1755, d. 13 Oct 1833

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8308705/ailcy-whitmire-young: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for Ailcy Garrett Whitmire-Young (1748–25 Oct 1822), Find a Grave Memorial ID 8308705, citing Reeder Family Cemetery, Laurens County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Robin Farley Dixson Coon (contributor 46558224) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8308705. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/219362189/john-whitmore: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for John Whitmore (12 Aug 1746–1793), Find a Grave Memorial ID 219362189,; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) Burial Details Unknown at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/219362189

John Whitmore1

M, #97969, b. 12 August 1746, d. 1793
Last Edited11 Apr 2022
     John Whitmore was born on 12 August 1746 at Virginia, USA.1 He married Ailcy Garrett in 1767
;
Her 1st husband.1
John Whitmore was buried in 1793 at Burial location unknown ; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     12 Aug 1746, Virginia, USA
DEATH     1793 (aged 46–47), Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
     John Whitmore was the son of Joseph and Margaret (Jones) Whitmore. He was born in Virginia, and emigrated to South Carolina with his parents and siblings about 1748, where they settled in what was then the "Ninety-Six" district. He married Ailcy Garrett 18 Nov 1767 in what later became Laurens County (from the Ninety-Six District). He died between 1790, when he last appears in the census, and 1793, when in July his father Joseph granted a plot of land (where he - Joseph - and his wife are now buried), to the "widow" Ailsy Whitmore, wife of his son John, and their daughters, and when in his will Joseph mentions his "only" son George.
     John Whitmore's burial details have been lost; he most likely was buried on the family property in or near Laurens.
Family Members
Parents
     Joseph Whitmore 1720–1804
     Margaret Jones Whitmore 1729–1793
Spouse
     Ailcy Garrett Whitmire-Young 1748–1822 (m. 1767)
Siblings
     Lucey Jones 1746–1823
     Sarah Whitmore Whitmore 1762–1843
Children
     Sarah Whitmore Duckett 1770–1832
     Lydia Whitmore Reeder 1772–1858
     Margaret Whitmore Prude 1774–1853
     Anna Whitmore Reeder 1778–1822
     Mary Whitmore Duckett 1779–1854
BURIAL     Burial Details Unknown
Created by: Kenwg
Added: 4 Dec 2020
Find a Grave Memorial 219362189.1

John Whitmore died in 1793 at Laurens Co., South Carolina, USA.1

Family

Ailcy Garrett b. 1748, d. 25 Oct 1822

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/219362189/john-whitmore: accessed 11 April 2022), memorial page for John Whitmore (12 Aug 1746–1793), Find a Grave Memorial ID 219362189,; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) Burial Details Unknown at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/219362189. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Mary Whitehouse1

F, #97970, b. 1746, d. 1835
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Mary Whitehouse was born in 1746 at Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA.1 She married John Young, son of Thomas Young Sr. and Catherine Brandon, on 26 January 1763 at Edgecombe Co., North Carolina, USA,
;
Her 1st husband.1 Mary Whitehouse married Samuel McBrayer Sr. after 1787
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.2
Mary Whitehouse was buried in 1835 at Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe Co., North Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1746, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, USA
DEATH     1835 (aged 88–89), Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Married John Young on 26 Jan 1763 Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
Married Samuel McBrayer ca 1787. She was his 2nd wife.
Her YOUNG children were:
Samuel
Mary

Her MCBRAYER children were:
Andrew (1788-1851)
Martha (1791-1855)
Jane (1793)
Emelia (1794-1837)

Family Members
Spouses
     John Young 1760–1780 (m. 1763)
     Samuel McBrayer 1736–1814 (m. 1787)
Children
     Mary Young McBrayer 1779–1859
     Andrew McBrayer 1788–1851
     Martha McBrayer Fletcher 1791–1855
     Margaret Amelia McBrayer Cowart 1799–1870
BURIAL     Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Created by: Lanita Sconce Smith
Added: 14 Sep 2021
Find a Grave Memorial 232077021.1

Mary Whitehouse died in 1835 at Buncombe Co., North Carolina, USA.1

Family 1

John Young b. c 1760, d. 10 Jul 1780

Family 2

Samuel McBrayer Sr. b. 1736, d. 2 May 1814

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232077021/mary-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Mary Whitehouse McBrayer (1746–1835), Find a Grave Memorial ID 232077021, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232077021. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/74552942/samuel-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Samuel McBrayer Sr. (1736–2 May 1814), Find a Grave Memorial ID 74552942, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/74552942

Samuel McBrayer Sr.1

M, #97971, b. 1736, d. 2 May 1814
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Samuel McBrayer Sr. was born in 1736 at Pennsylvania, USA.1 He married Elizabeth Ashe in 1763 at Pennsylvania, USA,
;
His 1st wife.2 Samuel McBrayer Sr. married Mary Whitehouse after 1787
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1
Samuel McBrayer Sr. died on 2 May 1814 at Buncombe Co., North Carolina, USA.1
Samuel McBrayer Sr. was buried after 2 May 1814 at Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe Co., North Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1736, Pennsylvania, USA
DEATH     2 May 1814 (aged 77–78), Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Married Elizabeth ASH[E] ca 1763 in probably Cumberland, Pennsylvania.
Married Mary Whitehouse after 1787.
Gravesite Details The Ashworth Family Cemetery (aka: Old Pioneer Cemetery) is about 2 miles down the road from Sherill's Inn. It sits on the knoll of a small hill in the valley. There is only one legible stone and a small statue. All the rest are field stones.
This shared by Contributor: Mary McBrayer Payne • 48991232: From the 1700s including Pre-Revolution, among the many surnames found in the records were: Abel, Ashworth, Justice, McBrayer, Whitaker, and so many more. Then on a pilgrimage in the early 1980’s, Carl B. McBrayer, in the company of Bud McBrayer and their families rediscovered the all-inclusive old Pioneer Cemetery. The ensuing cleanup, restoration, signage/fencing of the old cemetery was made possible by the generous individuals who helped restore the grounds.
Family Members
Parents
     William McBrayer 1696–1795
     Rebecca Brown McBrayer 1704–1805
Spouses
     Elizabeth Ashe McBrayer 1740–1787 (m. 1763)
     Mary Whitehouse McBrayer 1746–1835 (m. 1787)
Siblings
     James McBrayer unknown–1796
     David McBrayer 1745–1816
     David McBrayer 1746–1813
Children
     Mary McBrayer Justice 1768–1811
     James McBrayer 1769–1851
     Samuel McBrayer 1771–1840
     David McBrayer 1772–1855
     John B McBrayer 1774–1863
     Andrew McBrayer 1788–1851
     Martha McBrayer Fletcher 1791–1855
     Margaret Amelia McBrayer Cowart 1799–1870
BURIAL     Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Created by: Lanita Sconce Smith
Added: 7 Aug 2011
Find a Grave Memorial 74552942.1

Family 1

Elizabeth Ashe b. 1740, d. Mar 1787

Family 2

Mary Whitehouse b. 1746, d. 1835

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/74552942/samuel-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Samuel McBrayer Sr. (1736–2 May 1814), Find a Grave Memorial ID 74552942, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/74552942. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232076499/elizabeth-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Elizabeth Ashe McBrayer (1740–Mar 1787), Find a Grave Memorial ID 232076499, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232076499

Elizabeth Ashe1

F, #97972, b. 1740, d. March 1787
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Elizabeth Ashe was born in 1740 at Cumberland Co., Pennsylvania, USA.1 She married Samuel McBrayer Sr. in 1763 at Pennsylvania, USA,
;
His 1st wife.1
Elizabeth Ashe was buried in March 1787 at Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe Co., North Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     1740, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, USA
DEATH     Mar 1787 (aged 46–47), Rutherford County, North Carolina, USA
After Rutherford County's initial creation in 1779, there have been some distinct changes made to the boundaries. In 1791, a small portion of the west sides of Rutherford and Burke County created Buncombe County. Thus the reasoning that Elizabeth is buried here what became Buncombe County.
Her husband, Samuel, is also buried here.
Daughter of John Ashe and Isabella Patterson
Her children were:
William (1764-1819)
Mary (1768-1811)
James (1769-1851)
Samuel (1771-1846)
David (1772-1855)
John B. (1774-1863)
Ichabod (1780-1837)
Sarah Garner (1785-1854)

Family Members
Parents
     John Ash 1720–1787
     Isabella Patterson Ash 1722–1786
Spouse
     Samuel McBrayer 1736–1814 (m. 1763)
Siblings
     Mary Ash Burris 1744–1812
     William Ash 1752–1831
Children
     Mary McBrayer Justice 1768–1811
     James McBrayer 1769–1851
     Samuel McBrayer 1771–1840
     David McBrayer 1772–1855
     John B McBrayer 1774–1863
BURIAL     Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Created by: Lanita Sconce Smith
Added: 14 Sep 2021
Find a Grave Memorial 232076499.1

Elizabeth Ashe died in March 1787 at Rutherford Co., North Carolina, USA.1

Family

Samuel McBrayer Sr. b. 1736, d. 2 May 1814

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232076499/elizabeth-mcbrayer: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Elizabeth Ashe McBrayer (1740–Mar 1787), Find a Grave Memorial ID 232076499, citing Ashworth Family Cemetery, Fairview, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA; Maintained by Lanita Sconce Smith (contributor 46834015) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/232076499. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Sarah Cunningham1

F, #97973, d. 4 March 1845
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Sarah Cunningham married Maj. Thomas Young Jr., son of Thomas Young Sr. and Catherine Brandon.1

Sarah Cunningham died on 4 March 1845 at Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1
Sarah Cunningham was buried after 4 March 1845 at Old Union Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     unknown
DEATH     4 Mar 1845, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Family Members
Spouse
     Thomas Young 1764–1848
Children
     William Young 1795–1868
     Thomas Young 1801–1870
BURIAL     Old Union Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Kenwg
Added: 3 Nov 2016
Find a Grave Memorial 172174482.1

Family

Maj. Thomas Young Jr. b. 17 Jan 1764, d. 7 Nov 1848

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/172174482/sarah-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Sarah Cunningham Young (unknown–4 Mar 1845), Find a Grave Memorial ID 172174482, citing Old Union Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Kenwg (contributor 47774038) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/172174482. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Mary "Polly" Humphries1

F, #97974, b. 18 March 1786, d. 8 September 1870
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Mary "Polly" Humphries was born on 18 March 1786 at Sardis, Union Co., South Carolina, USA.1 She married Christopher C. Young, son of Thomas Young Sr. and Catherine Brandon, before 1815
; According to her FAG memorial, their first born child listed, George, was born in 1815.1
Mary "Polly" Humphries died on 8 September 1870 at Sardis, Union Co., South Carolina, USA, at age 84.1
Mary "Polly" Humphries was buried after 8 September 1870 at Polly Young Cemetery, Union Co., South Carolina, USA; From Find A Grave:
BIRTH     18 Mar 1786, Sardis, Union County, South Carolina, USA
DEATH     8 Sep 1870 (aged 84), Sardis, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Mary "Polly" Young was married to Christopher Young. She was daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Betsy) Palmer Humphries. Stone reads: "Our Mother
She with Father by whose side she sleeps, joined the Presbyterian Church at Unionville in October 1842."
Family Members
Spouse
     Christopher C. Young 1772–1849
Children
     George McCrary Young 1815–1887
     John B. Young 1817–1862
     Catherine Brandon Young Sartor 1825–1875
     Sarah Young Hill 1832–1862
BURIAL     Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Uriah
Added: 5 Jun 2008
Find a Grave Memorial 27347215.1

Family

Christopher C. Young b. 14 Aug 1772, d. 23 Feb 1849

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347215/mary-young: accessed 12 April 2022), memorial page for Mary “Polly” Humphries Young (18 Mar 1786–8 Sep 1870), Find a Grave Memorial ID 27347215, citing Polly Young Cemetery, Union County, South Carolina, USA; Maintained by Uriah (contributor 47012829) at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347215. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Edward Smith1

M, #97975, b. 1760
FatherEdward Smith1 d. 1789
MotherMary Young1 b. b 1750
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Edward Smith was born in 1760 at South Carolina, USA.2
     Reference: Per Young [2011:734]:
     "Edward Smith, possible son of Mary Young (she was a sister of Thomas Young [Y5] of Lincoln Co TN, and daughter of William Young), was born circa 1760. It would be more likely that Edward was a son of Millington Smith and a nephew of Mary Young; Ed lived next door to Millington in the Tyger River-Dutchman's Creek area of east central Spartanburg Co SC in 1800, but by 1810 had moved a short distance away. Mary Young's husband was an Edward Smith, but he died between 1787 and 1789; it would be normal to name a son after the father, but it is also quite common to name a son after an uncle. (1hewy)." at Citation.2

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1057. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S5385] John E. Young, Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN, p. 734.

Isobel Crawford?1

F, #97976, b. circa 1771
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Isobel Crawford? was born circa 1771.1 She married Capt. Richard Young, son of William Young Sr. and Elizabeth Griggs, circa 1783
;
She could have been his 2nd wife.1
     Reference: Per Young [2011:1101-02]:
     "Richard Young [y1e], son of William Young Senr and an unknown mother, was born about 1755 and was named in his father's 31 March 1787 will. (Refer to the information given under Richard's brothers Thomas and William.) By the late 1770s Richard may have married since he was shown in the 1790 census with two females in the household. If so, there is no hard evidence that there were any children from this marriage. The extra people in Richard's house could have just as likely been some of the children of his late brother Nathaniel, one nephew being William. About 1783 Richard married Isobel _____ (Crawford? See the Crawford story following Nathaniel Young, son of William Young Senr). Any information on the first wife, if there was one, has not been found. Isobel was born about 1771. There was a Richard Young who served in the Continental Militia under Colonel Brandon after the fall of Charleston in 1780. Since Richard was the only Young with that name in Colonel Brandon's area of command, he must by our subject. On a deed dated 27 April 1795 Richard witnessed a purchase of two tracts on Dutchman Creek north of Tyger River by Buckner Smith from Jesse Christian and wife Rachael. On a 24 February 1809 deed Richard's wife Isobel was named when he sold 50 acres to Reuben Newman, land on the south side of and bordering the Tyger River, and "being part of a tract of land granted to Benjamin Wofford," land next to that already owned by Newman; witnesses were William Young (a nephew?, son of his brother Nathaniel?) and Willis Willeford (Richard's son-inlaw). On 17 March 1812 Richard (and William) again were witnesses, this time for the sale of 66 acres on James Creek from Archibald Smith to Isael Beeson. And on 14 September 1815 Richard and Isobel gave to their "beloved son-in-law Willis Willeford and our daughter Polly Willeford his wife" 100 acres, "being part of two tracts of land one granted to Benjamin Wofford and the other to Joshua Smith lying on the south side of Tyger River" near Anthony Shand's field; witnesses were William Young and Thomas Young. Part of this land was purchased from Owen Forester in 1796.
     "These land deed records can leave no doubt as to where in Spartanburg Co Richard lived. The distance from where James Creek and Tyger River meet, and moving northeast to Dutchman Creek, is no more than five miles on horseback. In 1790 Richard was living two doors from Patty, the widow of his brother Nathaniel, and four doors from his brother Thomas; Reuben Newman lived three doors on the other side of Nathaniel's widow.
     "Richard died in Spartanburg Co on 14 November 1837 leaving a large estate and over two dozen slaves, and a will dated 29 April 1834. In the will he gave to "my Son William Anthony Young all my Estate Both Real and personal Expting Henry & Nelly" and gave to "my oldest Son Thomas Young my servant henry." He also gave to his "Daughter Polley Welleford my servant Nelly." Son William A Young was named as executor. The will was quite short, and there were no implications that there may have been a first wife or other children. The death date is known from a paper dated 5 December 1837 written by his son William A Young to a Mr Bomer in which William says "I want you to send me sitatons By the Boy my farther died one fourteenth of November Last which I am Left to manage the fares". etc.
     "Richard served on the American side in the War of Independence in Colonel Brandon's Regiment. Since it was the policy of the new U.S. government to repay its soldiers for their service in the defense of the Continental side in the War by granting the veterans government land, or by granting them escheat ed l and ( l and t aken from the British
sympathizers), Richard may have obtained much of his land holdings in this manner. His neighbor Reuben Newman was an appraiser for the estate, and son William was the administrator. Richard had three probable children:
1. Mary Young, b c1786 [Y6]
2. Thomas Young, b 1797
3. William Anthony Young, b 1809

     "Archibald Smith was a son of the above John Buckner Smith and a brother of Nancy Smith who married Richard's nephew John Archibald Young [Y1]. Arch bought the 66 acres from John Young on 23 December 1808 just before John and his family moved to Giles Co TN. The James Creek land in that sale was described as being "at the north west corner of a tract of two hundred acres originally granted to George Crawford." The 1808 deed was witnessed by John Holley and Buckner Smith. Neither Smith men could sign their names. Soon after Arch sold the 66 acres in March 1812, he moved to Giles Co settling on land just north of and bordering John Young. (JE, NY, 1waehizpy)
." at Citation.1

Isobel Crawford? and Capt. Richard Young appeared in the census of 1830 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA; Richard is one line below his son, Capt. Thomas Young.
p. 327, line 14
Record ID     8058::660251
Name     Captain Richard Young
Home in 1830 (City, County, State)     Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29     1 [1801-10] William 1809
Free White Persons - Males - 70 thru 79     1 [1751-60] Richard c1755
Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59     1 [1771-80] Isobel (Crawford?) c1771
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23     3
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54     1
Slaves - Females - Under 10     4
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23     4
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35     1
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54     1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49     1
Total Free White Persons     3
Total Slaves     14
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored)     17

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1830 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
Original data: Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.2

Family

Capt. Richard Young b. c 1755, d. a 29 Apr 1834
Children

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), pp. 1101-02. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S5408] 1830 Federal Census, 1830 Census SC Spartanburg Co, Year: 1830; Census Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 171; Page: 327; Family History Library Film: 0022505 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8058&h=660251
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/8058/images/4410695_00650?treeid=81611629&personid=112132784326&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=660251

Samuel Todd1

M, #97977
FatherWilliam Tod1 b. c 1624
Last Edited2 May 2022
      ; Per McMurtry [2013]: "Calendar of Southampton Apprenticeship Registers 1609-1740: 'Todd Samuel, son of William Tod of Eling, Yeo to John Swift, glazier, for 7 years from date of indenture, 23-Dec-1678. Entered 14-Jun-1683.1'"

Citations

  1. [S3773] Todds of Joseph Todd of Eling and of Rutherford/Cannon Co TN, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=toddtf17&id=I4414, Seen on 2 May 2022 at https://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/trees/234165/I1/william-tod/individual. Hereinafter cited as McMurtry RootsWeb Todd Family.

Thomas Young1

M, #97978, b. 1797, d. between 1860 and 1870
FatherCapt. Richard Young1 b. c 1755, d. a 29 Apr 1834
MotherIsobel Crawford?1 b. c 1771
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Thomas Young was born in 1797 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA.1 He married Sarah (?) before 1830
; She appeared in the 1830 census and their first known child, William was born in 1831.2,3
Thomas Young died between 1860 and 1870 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA.2
     He was a mentioned with Capt. Richard Young and Isobel Crawford? at Citation; Per Young [2011:1101-02]:
     "Richard Young [y1e], son of William Young Senr and an unknown mother, was born about 1755 and was named in his father's 31 March 1787 will. (Refer to the information given under Richard's brothers Thomas and William.) By the late 1770s Richard may have married since he was shown in the 1790 census with two females in the household. If so, there is no hard evidence that there were any children from this marriage. The extra people in Richard's house could have just as likely been some of the children of his late brother Nathaniel, one nephew being William. About 1783 Richard married Isobel _____ (Crawford? See the Crawford story following Nathaniel Young, son of William Young Senr). Any information on the first wife, if there was one, has not been found. Isobel was born about 1771. There was a Richard Young who served in the Continental Militia under Colonel Brandon after the fall of Charleston in 1780. Since Richard was the only Young with that name in Colonel Brandon's area of command, he must by our subject. On a deed dated 27 April 1795 Richard witnessed a purchase of two tracts on Dutchman Creek north of Tyger River by Buckner Smith from Jesse Christian and wife Rachael. On a 24 February 1809 deed Richard's wife Isobel was named when he sold 50 acres to Reuben Newman, land on the south side of and bordering the Tyger River, and "being part of a tract of land granted to Benjamin Wofford," land next to that already owned by Newman; witnesses were William Young (a nephew?, son of his brother Nathaniel?) and Willis Willeford (Richard's son-inlaw). On 17 March 1812 Richard (and William) again were witnesses, this time for the sale of 66 acres on James Creek from Archibald Smith to Isael Beeson. And on 14 September 1815 Richard and Isobel gave to their "beloved son-in-law Willis Willeford and our daughter Polly Willeford his wife" 100 acres, "being part of two tracts of land one granted to Benjamin Wofford and the other to Joshua Smith lying on the south side of Tyger River" near Anthony Shand's field; witnesses were William Young and Thomas Young. Part of this land was purchased from Owen Forester in 1796.
     "These land deed records can leave no doubt as to where in Spartanburg Co Richard lived. The distance from where James Creek and Tyger River meet, and moving northeast to Dutchman Creek, is no more than five miles on horseback. In 1790 Richard was living two doors from Patty, the widow of his brother Nathaniel, and four doors from his brother Thomas; Reuben Newman lived three doors on the other side of Nathaniel's widow.
     "Richard died in Spartanburg Co on 14 November 1837 leaving a large estate and over two dozen slaves, and a will dated 29 April 1834. In the will he gave to "my Son William Anthony Young all my Estate Both Real and personal Expting Henry & Nelly" and gave to "my oldest Son Thomas Young my servant henry." He also gave to his "Daughter Polley Welleford my servant Nelly." Son William A Young was named as executor. The will was quite short, and there were no implications that there may have been a first wife or other children. The death date is known from a paper dated 5 December 1837 written by his son William A Young to a Mr Bomer in which William says "I want you to send me sitatons By the Boy my farther died one fourteenth of November Last which I am Left to manage the fares". etc.
     "Richard served on the American side in the War of Independence in Colonel Brandon's Regiment. Since it was the policy of the new U.S. government to repay its soldiers for their service in the defense of the Continental side in the War by granting the veterans government land, or by granting them escheat ed l and ( l and t aken from the British
sympathizers), Richard may have obtained much of his land holdings in this manner. His neighbor Reuben Newman was an appraiser for the estate, and son William was the administrator. Richard had three probable children:
1. Mary Young, b c1786 [Y6]
2. Thomas Young, b 1797
3. William Anthony Young, b 1809

     "Archibald Smith was a son of the above John Buckner Smith and a brother of Nancy Smith who married Richard's nephew John Archibald Young [Y1]. Arch bought the 66 acres from John Young on 23 December 1808 just before John and his family moved to Giles Co TN. The James Creek land in that sale was described as being "at the north west corner of a tract of two hundred acres originally granted to George Crawford." The 1808 deed was witnessed by John Holley and Buckner Smith. Neither Smith men could sign their names. Soon after Arch sold the 66 acres in March 1812, he moved to Giles Co settling on land just north of and bordering John Young. (JE, NY, 1waehizpy)
."1

Reference: Per Young [2011:1129]:
     "Thomas Young [y1e2], son of Richard Young and Isobel _____ of the James Creek-Tyger River community of Spartanburg Co SC, was born there about 1797 and remained there the remainder of his life. The 1790 through the 1810 censuses of the county show a male of a generation older than Thomas living with Richard, or living very close to him. In the 1820 census there was no Thomas Young of this age in the county; see the following Thomas Young entry. In September 1815 a Thomas Young witnessed a gift from Richard to Thomas' sister Mary. Richard did name a son Thomas in his 1837 will, so there is no doubt that Richard did have a son of that name. In the 1830 census Thomas first appeared, called "Capt Thomas Young," and was newly married, living quite close to Richard Young. In the 1840, Thomas was the only Thomas Young in Spartanburg Co (age 40s); he lived two doors from William Young (age 20s), and Asa Vise (age 40s) lived between them. In 1850 Thomas was living close to his brother William Anthony Young in Spartanburg Co. Thomas had a wife named Sarah _____ who was born in SC about 1804 (age 30s in 1840 census). Thomas died in the 1860s in Spartanburg Co. Sarah died there in the 1850s. He had six children, all apparently born along James Creek in Spartanburg Co:
a. William H Young, b 1831
b. Lucinda Young, b 1832
c. Benjamin N Young, b 20 Mar 1836
d. Phillip B Young, b Jul 1841
e. Sarah Ann Young, b 10 Apr 1843
f. Thomas L Young, b Apr 1846 (JE, 1aehijknpq)."
at Citation.2

Thomas Young and Sarah (?) appeared in the census of 1830 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA; Thomas is one line above his father, Capt. Richard Young.
p. 327, line 13
Record ID     8058::660250
Name     Captain Thos Young
Home in 1830 (City, County, State)     Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39     1 [1791-1800] Thomas 1797
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29     1 [1801-10] Sarah c1804
Slaves - Females - Under 10     1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49     2
Total Free White Persons     2
Total Slaves     1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored)     3

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1830 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
Original data: Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.3
In Capt. Richard Young's will dated 29 April 1834 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA, Thomas Young was named as an heir; Ancestry.com - South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980
Record ID     9080::643491
Record Page     Link
Name     Richard Young
Residence Date     Abt 1834
Residence Place     State of South Carolina
Will Date     29 April 1834
Probate Date     29 April 1834
Probate Place     Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA
Inferred Death Year     1834
Inferred Death Place     South Carolina, USA
Item Description     Index and Will, Vol 1-3, Books A-D, 1787-1858

Others Listed          Relationship
Richard Young     
William Anthony Young     Son
Thomas Young          Son
Henry               Servant
Polley Welleford          Daughter
Source Citation: South Carolina Will Transcripts, 1782-1868; Author: United States. Works Progress Administration (South Carolina); Probate Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina
Source Information: Ancestry.com. South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original data: South Carolina County, District and Probate Courts.4

Family

Sarah (?) b. c 1804, d. bt 1850 - 1870
Children

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), pp. 1101-02. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S5385] John E. Young, Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN, p. 1129.
  3. [S5408] 1830 Federal Census, 1830 Census SC Spartanburg Co, Year: 1830; Census Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 171; Page: 327; Family History Library Film: 0022505 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8058&h=660250
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/8058/images/4410695_00650?treeid=81611629&personid=112132784326&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=660251
  4. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=9080&h=643491
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/9080/images/007649575_00424?usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=643491. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.

William Anthony Young1

M, #97979, b. 1809
FatherCapt. Richard Young1 b. c 1755, d. a 29 Apr 1834
MotherIsobel Crawford?1 b. c 1771
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     William Anthony Young was born in 1809 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA.1
     He was a mentioned with Capt. Richard Young and Isobel Crawford? at Citation; Per Young [2011:1101-02]:
     "Richard Young [y1e], son of William Young Senr and an unknown mother, was born about 1755 and was named in his father's 31 March 1787 will. (Refer to the information given under Richard's brothers Thomas and William.) By the late 1770s Richard may have married since he was shown in the 1790 census with two females in the household. If so, there is no hard evidence that there were any children from this marriage. The extra people in Richard's house could have just as likely been some of the children of his late brother Nathaniel, one nephew being William. About 1783 Richard married Isobel _____ (Crawford? See the Crawford story following Nathaniel Young, son of William Young Senr). Any information on the first wife, if there was one, has not been found. Isobel was born about 1771. There was a Richard Young who served in the Continental Militia under Colonel Brandon after the fall of Charleston in 1780. Since Richard was the only Young with that name in Colonel Brandon's area of command, he must by our subject. On a deed dated 27 April 1795 Richard witnessed a purchase of two tracts on Dutchman Creek north of Tyger River by Buckner Smith from Jesse Christian and wife Rachael. On a 24 February 1809 deed Richard's wife Isobel was named when he sold 50 acres to Reuben Newman, land on the south side of and bordering the Tyger River, and "being part of a tract of land granted to Benjamin Wofford," land next to that already owned by Newman; witnesses were William Young (a nephew?, son of his brother Nathaniel?) and Willis Willeford (Richard's son-inlaw). On 17 March 1812 Richard (and William) again were witnesses, this time for the sale of 66 acres on James Creek from Archibald Smith to Isael Beeson. And on 14 September 1815 Richard and Isobel gave to their "beloved son-in-law Willis Willeford and our daughter Polly Willeford his wife" 100 acres, "being part of two tracts of land one granted to Benjamin Wofford and the other to Joshua Smith lying on the south side of Tyger River" near Anthony Shand's field; witnesses were William Young and Thomas Young. Part of this land was purchased from Owen Forester in 1796.
     "These land deed records can leave no doubt as to where in Spartanburg Co Richard lived. The distance from where James Creek and Tyger River meet, and moving northeast to Dutchman Creek, is no more than five miles on horseback. In 1790 Richard was living two doors from Patty, the widow of his brother Nathaniel, and four doors from his brother Thomas; Reuben Newman lived three doors on the other side of Nathaniel's widow.
     "Richard died in Spartanburg Co on 14 November 1837 leaving a large estate and over two dozen slaves, and a will dated 29 April 1834. In the will he gave to "my Son William Anthony Young all my Estate Both Real and personal Expting Henry & Nelly" and gave to "my oldest Son Thomas Young my servant henry." He also gave to his "Daughter Polley Welleford my servant Nelly." Son William A Young was named as executor. The will was quite short, and there were no implications that there may have been a first wife or other children. The death date is known from a paper dated 5 December 1837 written by his son William A Young to a Mr Bomer in which William says "I want you to send me sitatons By the Boy my farther died one fourteenth of November Last which I am Left to manage the fares". etc.
     "Richard served on the American side in the War of Independence in Colonel Brandon's Regiment. Since it was the policy of the new U.S. government to repay its soldiers for their service in the defense of the Continental side in the War by granting the veterans government land, or by granting them escheat ed l and ( l and t aken from the British
sympathizers), Richard may have obtained much of his land holdings in this manner. His neighbor Reuben Newman was an appraiser for the estate, and son William was the administrator. Richard had three probable children:
1. Mary Young, b c1786 [Y6]
2. Thomas Young, b 1797
3. William Anthony Young, b 1809

     "Archibald Smith was a son of the above John Buckner Smith and a brother of Nancy Smith who married Richard's nephew John Archibald Young [Y1]. Arch bought the 66 acres from John Young on 23 December 1808 just before John and his family moved to Giles Co TN. The James Creek land in that sale was described as being "at the north west corner of a tract of two hundred acres originally granted to George Crawford." The 1808 deed was witnessed by John Holley and Buckner Smith. Neither Smith men could sign their names. Soon after Arch sold the 66 acres in March 1812, he moved to Giles Co settling on land just north of and bordering John Young. (JE, NY, 1waehizpy)
."1

William Anthony Young appeared on the census of 1830 in the household of Capt. Richard Young and Isobel Crawford? at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA; Richard is one line below his son, Capt. Thomas Young.
p. 327, line 14
Record ID     8058::660251
Name     Captain Richard Young
Home in 1830 (City, County, State)     Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29     1 [1801-10] William 1809
Free White Persons - Males - 70 thru 79     1 [1751-60] Richard c1755
Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59     1 [1771-80] Isobel (Crawford?) c1771
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23     3
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54     1
Slaves - Females - Under 10     4
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23     4
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35     1
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54     1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49     1
Total Free White Persons     3
Total Slaves     14
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored)     17

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1830 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
Original data: Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.2
In Capt. Richard Young's will dated 29 April 1834 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA, William Anthony Young was named as executor; Ancestry.com - South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980
Record ID     9080::643491
Record Page     Link
Name     Richard Young
Residence Date     Abt 1834
Residence Place     State of South Carolina
Will Date     29 April 1834
Probate Date     29 April 1834
Probate Place     Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA
Inferred Death Year     1834
Inferred Death Place     South Carolina, USA
Item Description     Index and Will, Vol 1-3, Books A-D, 1787-1858

Others Listed          Relationship
Richard Young     
William Anthony Young     Son
Thomas Young          Son
Henry               Servant
Polley Welleford          Daughter
Source Citation: South Carolina Will Transcripts, 1782-1868; Author: United States. Works Progress Administration (South Carolina); Probate Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina
Source Information: Ancestry.com. South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original data: South Carolina County, District and Probate Courts.3

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), pp. 1101-02. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S5408] 1830 Federal Census, 1830 Census SC Spartanburg Co, Year: 1830; Census Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 171; Page: 327; Family History Library Film: 0022505 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8058&h=660251
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/8058/images/4410695_00650?treeid=81611629&personid=112132784326&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=660251
  3. [S2354] Ancestry.Com Web Site, online http://search.ancestry.com/, South Carolina, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=9080&h=643491
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/9080/images/007649575_00424?usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=643491. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry.Com Web Site.

Sarah (?)1

F, #97980, b. circa 1804, d. between 1850 and 1870
Last Edited12 Apr 2022
     Sarah (?) was born circa 1804 at South Carolina, USA.1 She married Thomas Young, son of Capt. Richard Young and Isobel Crawford?, before 1830
; She appeared in the 1830 census and their first known child, William was born in 1831.1,2
Sarah (?) died between 1850 and 1870 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA.1
     Reference: Per Young [2011:1129]:
     "Thomas Young [y1e2], son of Richard Young and Isobel _____ of the James Creek-Tyger River community of Spartanburg Co SC, was born there about 1797 and remained there the remainder of his life. The 1790 through the 1810 censuses of the county show a male of a generation older than Thomas living with Richard, or living very close to him. In the 1820 census there was no Thomas Young of this age in the county; see the following Thomas Young entry. In September 1815 a Thomas Young witnessed a gift from Richard to Thomas' sister Mary. Richard did name a son Thomas in his 1837 will, so there is no doubt that Richard did have a son of that name. In the 1830 census Thomas first appeared, called "Capt Thomas Young," and was newly married, living quite close to Richard Young. In the 1840, Thomas was the only Thomas Young in Spartanburg Co (age 40s); he lived two doors from William Young (age 20s), and Asa Vise (age 40s) lived between them. In 1850 Thomas was living close to his brother William Anthony Young in Spartanburg Co. Thomas had a wife named Sarah _____ who was born in SC about 1804 (age 30s in 1840 census). Thomas died in the 1860s in Spartanburg Co. Sarah died there in the 1850s. He had six children, all apparently born along James Creek in Spartanburg Co:
a. William H Young, b 1831
b. Lucinda Young, b 1832
c. Benjamin N Young, b 20 Mar 1836
d. Phillip B Young, b Jul 1841
e. Sarah Ann Young, b 10 Apr 1843
f. Thomas L Young, b Apr 1846 (JE, 1aehijknpq)."
at Citation.1

Sarah (?) and Thomas Young appeared in the census of 1830 at Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, USA; Thomas is one line above his father, Capt. Richard Young.
p. 327, line 13
Record ID     8058::660250
Name     Captain Thos Young
Home in 1830 (City, County, State)     Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39     1 [1791-1800] Thomas 1797
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29     1 [1801-10] Sarah c1804
Slaves - Females - Under 10     1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49     2
Total Free White Persons     2
Total Slaves     1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored)     3

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1830 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
Original data: Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.2

Family

Thomas Young b. 1797, d. bt 1860 - 1870
Children

Citations

  1. [S5385] John E. Young, The Young Families of Early Giles County, Tennessee. Two Volumes, 2nd Edition with 2013 Updates (Santa Maria, CA: Janaway Publishing, Inc., 1986, 2011 (w/2013 updates)), p. 1129. Hereinafter cited as Young 2011 - Young Families of Early Giles Co TN.
  2. [S5408] 1830 Federal Census, 1830 Census SC Spartanburg Co, Year: 1830; Census Place: Spartanburg, South Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 171; Page: 327; Family History Library Film: 0022505 accessed 12 April 2022
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8058&h=660250
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/8058/images/4410695_00650?treeid=81611629&personid=112132784326&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true&pId=660251