Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West1,2,3,4,5

M, #4261, b. 16 August 778, d. 20 June 840
FatherCharlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West3,4 b. 2 Apr 747, d. 28 Jan 814
MotherHildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau3,4 b. 758, d. 30 Apr 783
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited19 Sep 2014
     Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West was born on 16 August 778 at Casseeuil-sur-Garonne, Lot-et-Garonne, France.6,3,4 He married Ermengarde (?) of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingram (Ingeramne) (?) Count of Hesbaye, between 794 and 798; his 1st wife.6,7,3,4 Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West married Judith (?) von Altdorf, daughter of Guelph III (I ?) (?) Graf in Bavaria and Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf and Eigilwich/Heilwig (?) of Saxony, in February 819 at Aachen, Germany (now); his 2nd wife.8,9,4,6
Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West died on 20 June 840 at Frankfurt am Main, Germany, at age 61; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says d. in Ingelheim.10,3,4
Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West was buried after 20 June 840 at St. Arnold, Germany (now).4
     GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West Louis the Pious (emperor), educated at the Palace School, crowned in his father's lifetime. Sincerely religious, a reformer of his court, the Frankish Church, and the monasteries, he allowed himself to be crowned again by the pope (816). The influence of his ecclesiastical adviser Benedict of Aniane on an ideology of political Augustinianismto the detriment of traditional Frankish principlesincreased tension with the aristocracy. Louis was ineffectual as a soldier and ruler. He and his heirs concentrated on a long struggle (leading to civil war) over territorial questions, to the neglect of government, foreign policy, and defensea program that hastened the breakup of the empire.

A significant series of partitions involved Louis's sons: Lothair (d. 855), Louis the German (d. 876), Pepin (d. 838), and their half-brother, Charles the Bald (d. 877).

The division of 817: Aquitaine and parts of Septimania and Burgundy went to Pepin, as subking; Bavaria and the marches to the east were assigned to Louis the German as subking, undivided; Francia, German and Gallic, and most of Burgundy were retained by Louis and his eldest son, Lothair. Italy went to a third subking.

Lothair I (emperor). On the death of Louis the Pious, the three heirs contained their struggle, and after the indecisive battle of Fontenay (841), Carolingian prestige sank to a new depth. Charles the Bald and Louis the German formed an alliance against Lothair (who was supported by the clergy in the interests of unity) in the bilingual (Teutonic and Romance) Oaths of Strassburg (842), sworn by the rulers and their armies, each in their own vernacular. They then forced a family compact on Lothair at Verdun.11

Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West His father's only surviving son, he was crowned emperor by his father in 813 without assistance from the clergy. However, in 816 he was anointed by the Pope, implying that the honour depended upon the Pope. In 817 he issued the 'Ordinatio Imperii' which effectively divided the Empire between his three sons. However, this was not the only reason for the disintegration of the Carolingian Empire. High offices had become hereditary and so less subject to the Emperor's favour. As well, the Vikings began raiding the Empire more frequently.

Just as Charlemagne had been a Frankish warrior, Louis saw himself as a servant of the Church. As a result, where the papal elections had previously required imperial approval, this was no longer the case under the rule of Louis the Pious.

In 817 he brutally suppressed his nephew, Bernard of Italy; however, feeling guilty about the brutality, in 821 he pardoned those involved in the uprising, only to have this public confession about his guilt interpreted by the Frankish nobles in 822 as a sign of weakness.

By now he had lost control over both church and nobility and, as well, as a widower he had married again and a fourth son was born. Now he was also to be plagued by dynastic problems. His second wife, Judith, wanting the largest part of the empire for her son, joined forces with Louis's sons, Ludwig the German and Pippin, against Lothar, the eldest son. The results were that two factions developed in the Empire, one wanting to keep the Empire united and the other to continue the Frankish custom of dividing lands between all sons.

In 829 Judith persuaded Louis the Pious to set aside his settlement of 817 and include Judith's son, Charles, in the partition of the Empire. However, Ludwig the German and Pippin, jealous of Charles's portion, joined forces with Lothar, their eldest brother and, in 830, rebelled against their father.

The eldest three sons, supported by Pope Gregory IV, defeated their father in 833. Lothar was restored as Emperor designate and Louis the Pious was forced to perform a humiliating penance. However, Ludwig the German and Pippin were still dissatisfied and again took up arms. In 838 Pippin died followed, in 840, by Louis the Pious; but it took until 843 when, at Verdun, the Frankish tradition triumphed and the Empire was divided between the three surviving sons.3

Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West Louis I "the Fair", *Casseuil-sur-Garonne VIII.778, +Ingelheim 20.6.840, bur.St.Arnold (Ger), King of Aquitania (781-814), King of Franks and Italy (814-833)+(834-840), Holy Roman Emperor (814/16-840); 1m: 798 Empress Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingeramme of Hesbaye (*Hesbaye, Liege ca 778, +Angers 3.10.818); 2m: Aken II.819 Judith von Altdorf (*800 +Tours 19.4.843.)4

Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 68
2. The Holy Roman Empire, A Dictionary Handbook , Zophy, Reference: biography.3

Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West (an unknown value.)12,13,14,6 He was King of Aquitaine between 781 and 814.4,3 He was Holy Roman Emperor; Stone (2000) chart 30-2: "...he was the only surviving son when his father died." between 814 and 840.15,10,5 He was King of the Franks and Italy between 814 and 840.4

Family 1

Children

Family 2

Ermengarde (?) of Hesbaye b. c 778, d. 3 Oct 818
Children

Family 3

Judith (?) von Altdorf d. 19 Apr 843
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I "the Pious": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020040&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_Pious. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 140-14, p. 122. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I, p. 124.
  8. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020394&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 148-14, p. 129.
  11. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 174-6.
  12. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  14. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  15. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 30-2.
  16. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alpais de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036200&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020431&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036217&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rotrud or Hildegard de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036221&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020512&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles 'the Bald': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120041&tree=LEO

Judith (?) von Altdorf1,2

F, #4262, d. 19 April 843
FatherGuelph III (I ?) (?) Graf in Bavaria and Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf3,2 b. b 780, d. c 825
MotherEigilwich/Heilwig (?) of Saxony4,2 b. c 780, d. a 833
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited25 Oct 2004
     Judith (?) von Altdorf was born in 800 at Altdorf, Bavaria, Germany.2,5,1 She married Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West, son of Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West and Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau, in February 819 at Aachen, Germany (now); his 2nd wife.1,6,5,7
Judith (?) von Altdorf died on 19 April 843 at Tours, Neustria, France (now).1,2,5,8
     Judith (?) von Altdorf Leo van de Pas cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11
2. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1968.1 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

Judith (?) von Altdorf Judith, *800, +Tours 19.4.843; m.819 Emperor Louis I (*778 +840.)2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020394&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eigilwich/Heilwig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020393&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 140-14, p. 122. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I.
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles 'the Bald': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120041&tree=LEO

Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West1

M, #4263, b. 2 April 747, d. 28 January 814
FatherPepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks2,3 b. 714, d. 24 Sep 768
MotherBertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon4,3 b. 720, d. 12 Jul 783
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited19 Sep 2014
     Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West was born on 2 April 747 at Aachen, Rhineland, Prussia; leovdpas@bigpond.com ("Leo van de Pas") wrote in message news:<000301c3605a$aa0540e0$b1e9fea9@old>...

>> Someone pointed out I may have the wrong date of birth for Charlemagne.
>> Hereby the sources I have. Can anyone tell what it should be?
>> Many thanks
>> Leo van de Pas
>>
>> Erich Brandenburg, "Die Nackommen Karls des Grossen"
>> published in 1935 and republished in 1995
>> page 1 Charlemagne is born 2 April 742
>>
>> Siegfried Roesch, "Caroli Magni Progenies"
>> published in 1977
>> page 56 Charlemagne born 742 (?) 2 April (?) (in Ingelheim?)
>>
>> Prince W. K. von Isenburg
>> Europaische Stammtafeln, Volume I
>> published1936, republished 1975 by Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven
>> Tafel 2 Charlemagne born 2 April 747 (!!!! different year!!)
>>
>> Editor Detlev Schwennicke, "Europaische Stammtafeln"
>> Neue Folge Band I.1 published 1998
>> Tafel 4 Charlemagne born (2 April 747)
>>
>> It seems 2 April is accepted but not the year.


Leo is right about the acceptance, but I think this is the wrong way round and the year should be fixed on rather than the alleged date.

The year traditionally given until the mid-20th century was 842, supposedly before his parents' marriage, since the emperor was reputed to be in his seventy-second year at his death in January 814 (Thegan in _Vita Hludowici_ wrote: "in senectute bona plenus dierum perrexit in pace...anno aetatis suae 72").

As to 2 April for the date, KF Werner ['La date de naissance de Charlemagne', _Bulletin de la Société nationale des antiquaires, 1972_ (Paris, 1975) p. 116] quoted a document from Lorsch abbey, supposedly written in the first half of the ninth century, catalogued as ms Phillips 1869 in Staatsbibliothek, Berlin: "IIII Non. Apr. Nativitas domni et gloriosissimi Karoli imperatoris et semper Augusti".

However, it appears that the date and even the year of his birth were not remembered accurately in Charlemagne's lifetime within his own entourage: Einhard reported that the emperor at his death in 814 was in his seventy-second year, placing his birth before 28 Jan 743. This is not plausible for several reasons, mainly from the extant records of his parents' marriage (variously in 744 and 749) along with the reasonable deduction - from papal blessing of his associate kingship in childhood - that he had been born in recognised wedlock; and from records of his own and his siblings' births (ranging from 747 to 758/9) along with the simultaneous gift of countships to Charlemagne and his younger brother Carloman in 763, after they first accompanied their father on campaign in 762, indicating that they were close enough in age for common treatment in these respects (see Werner (1975) p. 119 note 2 for references).

Given this, the date of 2 April may well have been a polite fiction, invented later as a mark of honour to the emperor due to the fact that Easter Sunday had fallen on this date in 747. Christian Settipani [_La préhistoire des Capétiens 481–987_ (Villeneuve d'Ascq, 1993) p. 191 note 3] suggested that the silence of contemporaries about a coincidence between the emperor's birth and the most joyful day of the religious year actually excluded the possibility of his having been born in 747 - relying on the putative exact date rather than the whole calendar year. The safer conclusion appears to me that Charlemagne was indeed born in 747, as reported by a good source, and _perhaps_ after 15 August in that year when his uncle Carloman evidently attested a charter before leaving to take monastic orders in Rome, since his departure was related ahead of the birth. (However, the order of reporting in medieval annals is not always a trustworthy guide to the actual order of events).

The precise date of 2 April 748 was determined by Matthias Becher ['Neue Überlegungen zum Geburtsdatum Karls des Grossen', _Francia_ 19/1 (1992) - a minor reservation on this is given by Janet Nelson ['La cour impériale de Charlemagne', _La royauté et les élites dans l'Europe carolingienne (du début du IXe aux environs de 920_, edited by Régine le Jan (Lille, 1998) p. 182 note 25]. Christian Settipani (op cit p. 191) agreed with Becher.

For the year, _Annales Laubacenses_ in MGH SS vol. I p. 10 under 747 records "Nativitas regis magni Caroli". NB this entry was dependant on the following and both seem to have been written before Charlemagne became emperor: _Annales Petaviani_, MGH SS I p. 11 (747) "Et ipso anno fuit natus Karolus rex". Werner (1975) pp. 135-6 suggested that this entry and other notes about the Pippinid family were written before the death of Carloman in December 771, because no annalist after that time would have bothered to record the birth of the latter's son Pippin in 770. Charlemagne's birth in 747 is recorded here following mention of his uncle Carloman's departure for Italy, which possibly did not take place until after 15 August in that year (Settipani p. 191 note 3, citing _Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Stavelot-Malmédy_ (Brussels, 1909) pp. 51 et seq no 18). However, Carloman's tonsuring at Monte Cassino took place in 746 according to _Annales Xantenses_ and _Annales regni Francorum_, at variance with some other sources but possibly reliable - the Stavelot-Malmédy charter may have been misdated, or the precise order of the two events may not have been known when the entries were made in _Annanles Petaviani_.

I think it's reasonable on the evidence to accept that Charlemagne was born in 747, possibly on 2 April or after 15 August but with little chance now of recovering any certainty about the date.

Peter Stewart.5,6,7 He married unknown (?) in 769; his 1st wife.1 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West married Desiderata (?), daughter of Didier (?) King of Lombards, in 770.8 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West and Desiderata (?) were divorced in 771; repudiated.8 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West and unknown (?) were divorced in 771.1 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West married Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau, daughter of Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau and Emma (?) of Allemania, on 30 April 771; his 2nd wife.9,10,1 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West married Fastrada (?), daughter of Rodolfo III (?) Ct. of Franconia, in October 783; his 3rd wife.11 Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West married Luitgard (?) in 794.12
Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West died on 28 January 814 at Aix La Chapelle, France, at age 66.6,1
     GAV-31 EDV-32.

Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West Charles the Great (Charlemagne), a reign of the first magnitude in European history. Charles was well over six feet tall, a superb swimmer, with an athletic frame, large expressive eyes, and a merrydisposition. He understood Greek, spoke Latin, but did not learn to write. He preferred the Frankish dress. In general he continued the Frankish policies: (1) expansion of Frankish rule to include all the Germans was completed (omitting only Scandinavia and Britain); (2) a close understanding with the papacy; (3) support of Church reform (which settled the foundations of medieval Christian unity).

Charlemagne conquered Lombard Italy and became king of the Lombards, whose kingdom was absorbed into the Frankish Empire. Charlemagne also established his rule in Venetia, Istria, Dalmatia, and Corsica.

At Roncesvalles near Pamplona, on a pass in the western Pyrenees, the Basques destroyed the rear guard of Charlemagne's army as it was returning to France. The battle inspired the late 11th-century poem The Song of Roland, the most famous of the chansons de geste, or medieval epics. The poem celebrates Roland as the perfect chivalric knight and Charlemagne as the ideal Christian king. The poem was popular in French, Spanish, and Italian literature of the later Middle Ages; the values expressed are those of the 11th, not the 8th century.

Reform of the Church along Roman lines had, for Charlemagne, three purposes: (1) the establishment of peace throughout the empire by means of a uniform Roman ritual (replacing the Gallican) that would win divine favor; (2) development of an educated clergy capable of effective pastoral and missionary work; (3) the creation of a body of literate clerics who could serve as instruments of his administration. The Capitulary (a royal-administrative order divided into capitula, or articles) of Herstal (779) advanced these goals by providing secular assistance to local clergy and assisting in the expansion of a parish system with regular services into rural areas throughout the empire. Charlemagne presided at synods, settled dogmatic questions, established schools for the education of the clergy, made ecclesiastical appointments, and, above all, insisted that all clericsbishops, abbots, parish priestsproperly discharge their religious duties; thus, he subordinated the institutional Church to the king as the divinely appointed head of Christendom. The Church was strengthened and tied closely to the monarchy.

The political and religious turmoil in the Byzantine Empire, especially during the iconoclastic controversy [>]; Charlemagne's behavior as leader of the West in his relations with the Abbasid Caliphate of Baghdad [>] and with the patriarch of Jerusalem; the removal of the Byzantine emperor's name from papal documents during the reign of Pope Adrian (771-95); and the difficulties Pope Leo III (795-816) experienced with both the emperor at Constantinople and the Roman nobility, leading to the pope's increasing dependence on Charlesthese developments form the background to the imperial coronation.

According to Charlemagne's biographer, Einhard, on Christmas Day 800, at the beginning of Mass, the pope crowned Charles emperor, the Romans acclaimed him as emperor, and the pope performed the (Byzantine) proskynesis (obeisance) due an emperor. Eventually the Frankish chancery adopted the description “the most serene, august, pacific great emperor crowned by God governing the Roman Empire, who is, by the mercy of God, King of the Franks and the Lombards” as an integral part of Charles's title. For Alcuin and the political theorists at Charles's court, the image implied a return to the model of the biblical King David and to the images of Theodoric and Constantine, not to the image of the Byzantine emperor. While the imperial style conferred dignity and some political advantage in Italy, and the imperial motto Renovatio romani imperii (Renewal of the Roman Empire) suggested a revival of the Roman Empire in the West, still, for the aristocratic families in the rest of the Carolingian world, the title was meaninglesshis Frankish supporters considered him a Frankish king. The Greeks regarded Charlemagne as a usurper and the papal coronation as an act of rebellion; that event marked a decisive break between Rome and Constantinople.

GOVERNMENT. (1) In the Frankish kingdom: centralization continued; taxation in the Roman sense (which survived only under local and private auspices) was replaced by services in return for land grants (the economic basis of Carolingian society). Such services included labor on public works among the lower ranks, the provision of food for the court and public officials on duty, and judicial and military obligations (primarily among the upper ranks). Charlemagne's continuous campaigns reduced the small farmers, accentuating the tendency to serfdom. Charlemagne tried to offset this tendency by allowing groups of poorer farmers to cooperate in sending a single soldier, and by excusing the poorest from ordinary field service. Systematization of the army and of military service was also begun. Commendation and immunity continued, and the basis of later feudal development was firmly established.

Education and learning. To advance his religious and educational reforms, Charlemagne drew scholars from across Europe: Alcuin of York (England); Peter of Pisa, and Paul the Deacon of Aquileia (Italy); Theodulf of Orleans and Einhard of Fulda to his court at Aachen, where Alcuin set up the Palace School, which became a center for the study of liberal arts and the copying of manuscripts. (Other scriptoria were at the monasteries of Corbie, St. Denis, St. Wandrille, St. Martin of Tours, Metz, Verona, Lucca.) Scholars at these centers expanded literacy, developed the Carolingian minuscule script (so called because it has lowercase letters; the Romans had only capitals), and copied and preserved classical, patristic, and early medieval texts. Using minuscule meant that a sheet of vellum (lambskin or calfskin) could contain more letters, which illustrates how a small technological change had broad cultural consequences. Though the scriptoria showed little creativity, many manuscripts were preserved and the foundation was laid for later study.

The disintegration of the Carolingian Empire. Such efficiency as the Carolingian government possessed under Charlemagne derived from his personality rather than from permanent institutions. The empire's vast size, the poor communication among the parts, the great ethnic diversity, and the lack of adequate administrative machinery (bureaucracy) sped disintegration. Local administration was carried on by unpaid officials whose compensation was a share of the revenue. Local offices tended to become hereditary. The tentative partitions of the empire in Charlemagne's lifetime followed Frankish tradition. Only one son, Louis the Pious, survived, and the empire was passed on to him undivided. The decisive stage in the partition of the empire came under Louis and his heirs.

Political and social consequences. The pressures of Muslim, Magyar, and Viking invasions, combined with the civil wars among Charlemagne's descendants who could do little to halt those invasions, accelerated the disintegration of the Carolingian Empire and hastened the development of what modern students call feudalism and manorialism. As regional aristocracies assumed responsibility for defense and the protection of the weak, aristocratic authority accordingly increased. Strong men governed virtually independent territories in which weak and distant kings could not interfere. “Political power became a private, heritable property for great lords and counts,” in the apt words of Joseph R. Strayer. Feudalism concerned the rights, powers, and lifestyle of the military elite; manorialism involved the services and obligations of the peasant classes. Since the economic power of the military elite rested on estates worked by peasants, feudalism and manorialism were inextricably linked. During the great invasions, peasants needed protection, and lords demanded something in return for their protection. Thus, free peasants surrendered themselves and their land to the lords' jurisdiction. The land was given back to them, but the peasants were then tied to the land by various kinds of payments and services. Local custom determined what those services were, but everywhere in the old Carolingian world peasants became part of the lord's permanent labor force and were obliged to turn over to him a portion of their annual harvestusually in produce, sometimes in cash. In entering a relationship with a feudal lord, free farmers lost status and became servile, or serfs. They were subject to the lord's jurisdiction and were bound to the land and could not leave it without his permission. The unstable conditions created by the Viking assaults on Europe led to a great loss of personal freedom.13

Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West King of the Franks 768-814. Crowned Holy Roman Emperor 25 Dec. 800.9,14 He was King of the Franks between 768 and 814.10,15 He was King of Lombards between 774 and 814.8 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 25 December 800 and 814.10,5,15

Family 2

Gersvinda (?)
Child

Family 3

unknown (?)

Family 4

Himiltrude (?) b. c 742
Child

Family 5

Desiderata (?)

Family 6

Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau b. 758, d. 30 Apr 783
Children

Family 7

Fastrada (?) d. 10 Aug 795
Children

Family 8

Child

Family 9

Luitgard (?)

Family 11

Adallind (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charlemagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getextras.php?personID=I00000001&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin 'the Short': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020000&tree=LEO
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrada 'au grand pied': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020001&tree=LEO
  5. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 30-1.
  6. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 120. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I.
  7. [S1479] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email "Re: Birthdate for Charlemagne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 August 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 11 August 2003."
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  9. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-13, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fastrada: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020009&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Luitgard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020010&tree=LEO
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 173-4. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 172.
  16. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruothild: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020021&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adalthrud: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020022&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin "der Bucklige": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020003&tree=LEO
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 175.
  20. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles "the Youger": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020016&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin I (Karlmann): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020039&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rotrud (Hruothraud): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020028&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020018&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I "the Pious": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020040&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020032&tree=LEO&PHPSESSID=ddc2127542108d09cf9a72ee0b0e19fd
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  27. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020019&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020026&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodrada: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020027&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hiltrud: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020036&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hruodhaid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020025&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Drogo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020023&tree=LEO
  33. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020024&tree=LEO
  34. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dietrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020020&tree=LEO

Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks1,2

M, #4264, b. 714, d. 24 September 768
FatherCharles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks2,1,3 b. 689, d. 22 Oct 741
MotherChrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia4,1,2 b. 690, d. 724
ReferenceGAV33 EDV33
Last Edited19 Sep 2014
     Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks was born in 714 at Jupille (near Liege), France (now).2,1,5 He married Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon, daughter of Heribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon and Bertrada (?), in 740.2,1,6
Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks died on 24 September 768 at St. Denis, France.1,2
     GAV-33 EDV-33 GKJ-34.

Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks Pepin was elected king by the Frankish magnates. Both the house of Pepin and the papacy (in the process of securing independence from the emperor at Constantinople) needed each other's support. The immediate need of the popes was for protection against the expanding Lombard monarchy. Aistulf, king of the Lombards, had taken Ravenna (751), the seat of the exarch, besieged Rome, and exacted tribute.

Pope Stephen II arrived in Gaul, anointed Pepin, and by conferring the title Patricius Romanorum (which could legally come only from Constantinople), designated him in a sense regent and protector of Italy. The result was to give some authority to Pepin's new title as king of the Franks.

Pepin marched into Italy, defeated the Lombards, and required them to hand over the exarchate and Pentapolis to the pope. The Lombards failed to do so. Pepin returned and, after defeating the Lombards again, made his famous Donation. The Donation of Pepin established the Franks, a distant, non-Italian power, as the allies and defenders of the papacy.

Pepin conquered Septimania, disciplined Aquitaine, and so brought effective Frankish rule to the Pyrenees. On his death his lands were given to his sons, Charles receiving Austrasia, Neustria, and northern Aquitaine; Carloman, southern Aquitaine, Burgundy, Provence, Septimania. The brothers ruled together, 768-71; Charles alone, 771-814.

Administration. Modern scholarship stresses that Carolingian political power and effective administration rested on the cooperation of the Frankish aristocracy, the dominant social class. The great comital landlords held real power at the local level. Their loyalty to the monarchy was acquired and maintained by grants of land and war booty. Aristocratic families gradually improved their economic position, and countships often became hereditary in one family, “though not usually in patrilinear succession.” With the help of the aristocracy, Pepin III and Charlemagne were able to wage wars of expansion and to suppress rebellion. To limit local abuses, the missi dominici (usually a bishop and count) were introduced (802) as officers on circuit in a given district. The missi held their own courts, had power to remove a count for cause, and were charged with the supervision of financial, judicial, and clerical administration. They formed an essential link between the local and central governments. Under the counts were viscounts and vicars (centenarii). Margraves (Mark Grafen) were set over the marks, with extended powers to meet the needs of their position. Local administration of justice was reformed by the introduction of scabini, local landowners appointed by the counts to sit as permanent judiciary officers.7

Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks Having inherited the joint right to rule the kingdom of The Franks together with his brother Carloman, he became sole ruler in 747 when Carloman retired into the monastery of Monte Casino. In 751 he asked Pope Zacharias to end the nominal rule of the Merovingians and have sole power, together with the title 'King of The Franks'. The Pope agreed and King Childeric III was placed in a monastery.

Saint Boniface anointed Pippin as King of The Franks at Soissons. Two years later---having saved the next Pope, Stephen II, from the Lombards---Pippin was again anointed at the Abbey of St. Denis, together with his two young sons, Charles and Carloman, by the Pope himself. Pippin was a much more able king than the Merovingian 'Rois faineants' (do nothing kings). The Franks went to Italy to support the Pope and defeated Astolfo, King of the Lombards. Pippin was rewarded and made a senator of Rome even though he could neither read nor write.

After the pope was attacked again, he again defeated Astolfo and made a gift to the Pope of Lombard lands near Rome. This bequest was the beginning of the Pope's status as a temporal souvereign. Pippin died at the Abbey of St. Denis in 768. His sons Charles and Carloman forthwith divided the Frank domains. However, Carloman soon died, leaving Charles, as the sole ruler of the kingdom of The Franks, to become the most important ruler ever to have 'the Great' added to his name. Charles The Great, or Carolus Magnus, became better known as Charlemagne.1

Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 53.1 He was Mayor of the Neustria, deposed the last of the Merovingian Kings and became the first Kind of the Franks of the second race between 741 and 751.8,9,2 He was King of the Franks between 751 and 768.10,2

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin 'the Short': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020000&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles Martel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020918&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrodtrud: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020919&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-12, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrada 'au grand pied': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020001&tree=LEO
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 173. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 172.
  10. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 50-12.
  11. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 298, 313-316. Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  12. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II, p. 1.

Rachel Wills1

F, #4265
FatherJesse Wills1
MotherRachel Hudson1 b. c 1773
Last Edited13 Oct 2017
     In Joshua Hudson Sr.'s will dated 5 January 1799 at Amherst Co., Virginia, USA, Rachel Wills was named as an heir; (Transcript of will provided by reddynj@juno.com)
Will of Joshua HUDSON
     Jan.5, 1799 - Apr. 20, 1801
     Will Book 4, pp.6-8, Amherst Co, VA.
     "In the name of God Amen I Joshua HUDSON of the County of Amherst being weake of Body but of sound mind and memory, do make and Ordain this my last will and Testament in name and form following.
     To wit: It is my Will & desire that after my Decease my Body be intered in a decent and Christian like manner at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named. My soul I recommend to Almighty God hoping to find Mercy & forgiveness at his hands and as touching such worldly goods as it hath Pleased Almighty God to bless me I dispose of in manner following vist:
     Item: I give and bequeath to my Daughter Sarah WRIGHT five Shillings to be paid by my Executors out of my Estate having formerly giving her what I intended for her.
     Item: I give and Bequeath unto my son Rush HUDSON Eight Acres of Land on the End of Turkey Mountain adjoining the Tract he now lives on to complement my Old Peach Orchard and as much more as will make up the Quantity to him & his heirs forever.
Item: I give & Bequeath to my Daughter Mary DAWSON the Sum of ten Pounds Per annum to be paid her by Reuben HUDSON her heirs & assigns during her Natural Life for her Maintainence.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Elizabeth DENNIS and the heirs of her body a good sound Title in the Negro formerly taken away by her named Jude and five Shillings Current Money.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto Horatio HUDSON and Nancy HUDSON Infant Children of my son Joshua HUDSON dec'd the Sum of seventy five Pounds Current Money in Consideration of their fathers Estate which fell into my hands on his decease which Sum my Executors are directed to receive out of my Estate and put out to Interest for the said Children until they come of Age or get married and that the Principal & Interest be Equally divided between them share & share alike and in Causes Either of them should Depart this Life before that time my desire is that the Survivor have the - - - of the said Seventy five Pounds & Interest and my Executors bring against the sd Children no further - - - and for Bedding or Clothing so as to receive the sd Seventy five Pounds & Interest.
     Item: It is my Will and desire that the Tract of land whereon I now live be sold by my Executors on Twelve Months Credit for the best Price can be had and the money Owing from such Sale to be Equally divided between my two Sons Reuben & George HUDSON to them & their heirs upon Reuben's paying to my Daughter Mary DAWSON ten Pounds p- Annum during her natural Life for her maintainence.
     Item: I give and bequeath to my Daughter Frances TATE five Shillings and no more.
     Item: I give unto my Daughter Ann GITTERSON five Shillings and no more having formerly given her a Negro Girl.
     Item: I give unto the heirs of Robert HUDSON dec'd the Sum of five Shillings.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Lucy SANDRIDGE the Sum of fifty Pounds to be paid equally divided between the heirs of her Body share and share alike to be received out of my Estate and paid into the hands of Pullom SANDRIDGE for the purpose aforesaid and to be paid by him to the Children as they come of age or get married.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Peggy CHILDRESS five Shillings and not more.
     Item: I give unto my Daughter Molly BALLINGER five Shillings & no more;
I give unto the Heirs of my Daughter Rachel MILES the sum of five Shillings.
     Item: I give unto the legal representative of my Daughter Patsy RUCKER dec'd the sum of five Shillings & no more.
I give unto my Gran Daughter Rachel HUDSON MILES the Sum of Seventy five Pounds to be put out to Interest for her maintainence and the balance paid her when she comes of age or gets married and the said Sum to be raised by my Executor from my Estate.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Son George HUDSON one Negro man Andrew and to him and his heirs forever.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Grand Daughter Molly DAWSON the Sum of fifty Pounds current money to be raised out of my Estate by my Executors and put out to Interest for her until she comes of age or gets married.
     Item: I give and bequeath unto my Grand Son Flemming DAWSON the Sum of fifty Pounds to be raised out of my Estate and put out to Interst for him by my Executors until he comes of age.
     Item: It is my Will and desire that all my just debts be fully paid and that all my Estate Desposed of be sold by my Executors for the best Price can be had on Twelve Months Credit and after complying with the aforesaid legacys the balance of the said Sale to the Equally Divided between my Son Reuben HUDSON and the lawful begotten Heirs of Robert HUDSON dec'd One moiety to the said Reuben and his heirs and the other moiety to the said Heirs of Robert HUDSON dec'd
     Item: Lastly I appoint my friend Rellson SANDRIDGE & my Son Reuben HUDSON my Executors to this last Will & Testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand & fixed my Seal this 5 day of January, One thousand Seven hundred & Ninty Nine - - -
     Joshua HUDSON
     Signed Sealed & Acknowledged
     in Presence of
      Sharrod X BUGG
      John X HUDSON
      Rush X HUDSON"
(evident codicil)
     " September 18th 1800 My Will and desire is that fifty Pounds directed to be paid to Fleming DAWSON in consequence of his misconduct I wish the same to be withdrawn from him & paid by my Executors to my Son Rush HUDSON.
      Joshua HUDSON
      Wit: Rush HUDSON, Jr.
      D.S. GARLAND"
(evident codicil)
     "Whereas by my last Will & Testament executed the fifth day of January, 1799, I directed my Executors to Receive out of my Estate the Sum of Seventy five Pounds & Pay the same to Horatio & Nancy HUDSON Infant Children of Joshua HUDSON Dec'd in lieu of their father's Estate which fell into my hands which Estate has lately been demanded by the Executors of the said Children & delivered to them. It is therefore my Will & desire that the said Children do receive nothing further from my Estate than what they have already rec'd and that my Executors do receive from my Estate in manner aforesaid the said Seventy five Pounds and Pay the same to my Son Rush HUDSON - - Given under my hand & Seal this 16 day of November, 1800.
     his Joshua X HUDSON mark
     Sig'd Sealed in presence of us
      Isaac RUCKER
      Bennett HUDSON
      George WILLIS."1

Citations

  1. [S3625] Joshua HUDSON (Sr.) will (5 Jan 1799), Will of Joshua Hudson of Amherst Co., VA- 5 Jan 1799, proved 20 Apr 1801 Will Book 4, pp. 6-9: Will seen on Ancestry.com on 13 Oct. 2017 at: https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/collection/1030/tree/65223573/person/36509999973/media/ea208628-6f00-4e7b-be66-3b5422f72db1?_phsrc=OQU386&usePUBJs=true, unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as Will - HUDSON, Joshua 5 Jan 1799.

HnabiNebi (?) Duke of Alamannia

M, #4266, d. 724
FatherHouching (?) Duke of Allamannia d. 709
ReferenceGAV34 EDV34
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     HnabiNebi (?) Duke of Alamannia died in 724.1,2
     He was Count in the Linzgau.3 GAV-34 EDV-34 GKJ-35.

HnabiNebi (?) Duke of Alamannia (an unknown value.)4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  2. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 182-3, p. 156. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 182-3, 156.

Emma (?) of Allemania

F, #4267, d. 798
FatherHnabiNebi (?) Duke of Alamannia d. 724
ReferenceGAV33 EDV33
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Emma (?) of Allemania married Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau, son of Erlafried I (?), in 779.1
Emma (?) of Allemania died in 798.2
     GAV-33 EDV-33 GKJ-34.

Emma (?) of Allemania (an unknown value.)1,3

Citations

  1. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 182-4, p. 156. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks1,2

M, #4268, b. 689, d. 22 October 741
FatherPepin II (?) of Heristal3,1,2 b. 635, d. 15 Nov 714
MotherAlpaisAlpaida (?) of Saxony4,2,1 b. 654
ReferenceGAV33 EDV34
Last Edited19 Sep 2014
     Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks married Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia, daughter of St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves; his 1st wife.1,2 Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks was born in 689 at Heristal, Liege, France; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 676.5,2,1 He married Suanhilde (?), daughter of Grimaldo (?) and Viletrude (?), in 725.1,2,6
Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks died on 22 October 741 at Quiercy-sur-Ouse, Aisne, France (now).1,2
Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks was buried after 22 October 741 at St. Denis, Paris, France (now).2,1
     GAV-34 EDV-34 GKJ-35.

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks Charles Martel (i.e., the Hammer), Pepin's son, an ally of the Lombards.

Decline of royal power under the last Merovingians and feudal decentralization. Feudalism implies a kind of politically decentralized society in which public powerto raise an army, to hold courts that administer some form of law or justice, to coin money, and to negotiate with outside powerspasses into private hands. Feudal decentralization was characterized by the breakdown of the old class and Germanic tribal organizations without an effective system to replace it, which led to the personal and economic dependence on private individuals; by the increasing concentration of land in the hands of a few (i.e., a landed “aristocracy” of which the mayors of the palace were representative; and perhaps by the increasing importance of the possession of a horse and the ability to fight on horseback. (This was due in part to the arrival of the stirrup, an Asian invention, that attached rider to horse, enabling him to use the force of his galloping animal to strike and cripple his enemy.) However, although Charles Martel used some cavalry in his wars against the Muslims, the infantry was the typical and decisive unit in all Carolingian warfare, and so the stirrup's importance has been downplayed. Warriors who attached themselves to strong “lords” were at first supported in the lord's own household; they were later rewarded, sometimes with land, sometimes with cash, with which they maintained themselves. In the lord's household, the wife frequently had responsibility for the dispersal of cash and goods.

Invasion of Spain (al-Andalus) by the Muslims under the command of the Berber Tariq ibn Ziyad [>]. The peninsula was subdued by 716. Raids across the Pyrenees began in the next year and culminated at Poitiers in 732, where Arab forces were defeated by Charles Martel [>]. The battle retrospectively retained far greater significance in European annals than in Islamic accounts, where it is described only as a skirmish.

Martel's victory at Tours arrested the advance of the Muslims in the west, and was followed by their final retreat over the Pyrenees (759).

Missionary activities of St. Boniface (Winfrid, Wynfrith), Apostle of Germany. With the support of Charles Martel and Pope Gregory II, Boniface worked to establish a centralized and episcopal church in Germany under Carolingian supervision. He founded dioceses, made Mainz a metropolitan see, established several monasteries, including Fulda, and encouraged the observance of the Rule of St. Benedict in all houses of men and women.

Pope Gregory III, threatened by the Lombards, sent an embassy to Martel, and offered the title of consul in return for protection. Charles, an ally of the Lombard king, ignored the appeal. At the end of his life, Martel, like a true sovereign, divided the Merovingian lands between his sons, Austrasia and the German duchies going to Carloman, Neustria and Burgundy to Pepin. Carloman and Pepin ruled together, 741-47; Pepin ruled alone, 747-68.7

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks Charles Martell, Maiordomus in Austrasia (719-741), Duke of Franks (737-741), *689, +Quiercy-sur-Oise 22.10.741, bur St.Denis; 1m: Chrotrude (*ca 690 +ca 724), dau.of Leutwinus, Bp of Trier; 2m: Suanahilde/Sonichilde N.1

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 52.2

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks In 732 defeated the Arabs at Poitiers

BIOGRAPHY
Chosen Duke of Austrasia in 714, he became mayor of the palace of King Clothaire IV in 720 and was the true ruler of the Franks. His first battles were with the Saxons, Alemanni and Bavarians. However, his importance was established when he rolled back the tide of the Saracen Moslem conquest in a desperate battle between Tours and Poitiers in 732.

Prior to the battle, Abdul Rahman, the Arab governor of Spain, had won a great battle near Bordeaux. This Moslem threat united the Burgundians and the Gauls of Provence, who then acknowledged the sovereignty ofto Charles Martel, as they saw him as their saviour from the Moslem conquests.

The battle at Poitiers, now almost forgotten, must rank among the most important as it halted the Moslem conquest of Europe. Charles finished his work by driving the Saracens out of Burgundy and the Languedoc in 737.

Great as he was, he never aspired to being more than 'mayor of the palace' and Duke of Austrasia. When he died in 741, his sons, Carloman and Pippin, still joint mayors of the palace, shared the power over the kingdom of the Franks with Merovingian King Childeric III of the Franks.2

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia. Victor over the Saracens at Poitiers/Tours, 732.8,9,10 He was Mayor of Austrasia and Neustria between 714 and 741.11

Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks victor at the Battle of Tours, stopping the Saracen invasion insuring the sruvival of "our Western Christian civilization"... in October 732.5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles Martel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020918&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020925&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chalpaida/Alpais: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020926&tree=LEO
  5. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Swanahild: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020928&tree=LEO
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), various. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  9. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  11. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 172.
  12. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hiltrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201695&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alda: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201697&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin 'the Short': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020000&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Carloman: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280786&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Landrade: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201703&tree=LEO
  17. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44326

Pepin II (?) of Heristal1,2,3

M, #4269, b. 635, d. 15 November 714
FatherAnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia3,2,4 b. c 630, d. 675
MotherSaint Begga (?) of Landen2,3,5 b. 613, d. 693
ReferenceGAV35 EDV36
Last Edited4 Sep 2005
     Pepin II (?) of Heristal was born in 635 at Heristal, Liege, France.6,7 He married Plectrudis (?), daughter of Hugobert (?), in 673.2,3,8 Pepin II (?) of Heristal married AlpaisAlpaida (?) of Saxony in 688.9
Pepin II (?) of Heristal died on 15 November 714 at Jupille (near Liege), France (now); The date given by almost every modern historian for the death of Charlemagne's great-grandfather Pippin (the Fat) of Heristal is 16 December 714.

For instance, this is stated - without a source - by Eduard Hlawitschka in
'Die Vorfahren Karls des Grossen', _Karl der Grosse: Lebenswerk und
Nachleben_, Band I, Persönlichkeit und Geschichte (Düsseldorf, 1965) p. 62
and table. Christian Settipani in _La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987_,
(Villeneuve d'Ascq, 1993), p. 154, describes this date as traditional, also
giving no source. Neither of these authors refers to any other date or
discusses the matter further.

The annals of many monasteries record Pippin's death in 714, and the source
for 16 December is 'Annales Mettenses priores', edited by Bernhard von
Simson, MGH SSrG 10 (Hanover & Leipzig, 1905) p. 19: "Pippinus princeps...in
pace obiit XVII. Kal. Ian.". The same month, without a specific date, is
given in 'Annales Petaviani', edited by Georg Heinrich Pertz, MGH SS I p.
7: "domnus Pippinus mortuus est in mense Decembrio".

Although more definite than "tradition", these apparently derive from a
copied record of his burial rather than his death, as suggested by 'Annales
Sancti Amandi', edited by Georg Heinrich Pertz, MGH SS I p. 6: "depositio
Pippino in mense Decembrio".

Pippin died at Jupille near Heristal & was buried at Saint-Arnoul in Metz,
the church dedicated to his grandfather. In the necrology of Saint-Arnoul,
most likely to be accurate, his death was placed on 15 November: "XVII
kalendas Decembris. Pipinus dux" see Joseph Depoin, 'Obits mémorables tirés
de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', _Revue Mabillon_ 6
(1910-1911) p. 265.

I don't know why this information should have been overlooked.

Peter Stewart.10,2
Pepin II (?) of Heristal was buried on 16 December 714 at Cathedral de Saint-Arnoul, Metz, Austrasia, France (now).10
     Pepin II (?) of Heristal He succeeded his father as major domus of Austrien, became a Duke in 680 and, in 688, became major domus of the whole of France. About 673 he married Plectrudis but he fathered his heir by his mistress Alpais.2 GAV-34 EDV-36 GKJ-36.

Pepin II (?) of Heristal Pepin II (of Heristal), grandson of Pepin I, gained supremacy in Austrasia and Neustria by his victory at Tertry. The kingdom was on the verge of dissolution (ducal separatism), and Pepin began an effort to reduce the landed aristocracy from which he himself had sprung.11

Pepin II (?) of Heristal Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 52
2. Kwartieren Greidanus-Jaeger in Stamreeksen 1994, 's-Gravenhage., Mr. G.J.J. van Wimersma Greidanus, Reference: 754
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.1 3.2 Pepin II (?) of Heristal was also known as Pippin "the Fat" (?) of Heristal.

Pepin II (?) of Heristal (an unknown value.)12,9,6 He was Maiordomus in Austrasia and Neustria and Bourgogne between 687 and 714.1,13,3

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020925&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansegisel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020923&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Begga: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020924&tree=LEO
  6. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Plektrudis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020927&tree=LEO
  9. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1781] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 4 May 2005 "Death of Pippin the Fat"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 4 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 4 May 2005."
  11. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 171. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  12. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 172.
  14. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I872
  15. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles Martel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020918&tree=LEO

AnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia1,2,3

M, #4270, b. circa 630, d. 675
FatherSaint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz4,3,5,2 b. c 13 Aug 582, d. 16 Aug 640
MotherDode (Clothilde) Heristal3 b. 586
ReferenceGAV36 EDV36
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     AnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia was born circa 630 at France; Charlemagne Desc. says b. 602.1,2 He married Saint Begga (?) of Landen, daughter of Pepin I "the Elder" (?) of Landen and Itta/Iduburga (?), before 639; Emergence of the Carolingians in Austrasia. The son of Arnulf married the daughter of Count Pepin I (of Landen, d. 640), mayor of the palace, founding the line later called Carolingian.1,6,4,3,2,7
AnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia died in 675; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 2 page) says d. 694.2,3
AnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia died in 685 at Andene Monastery.8
     GAV-36 EDV-36 GKJ-36.9 He was Mayor (maiordomus) of the Palace of Austrasia between 632 and 638.1,6,2

Family

Saint Begga (?) of Landen b. 613, d. 693
Children

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansegisel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020923&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  4. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Arnulf of Metz at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01752b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Arnulf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020922&tree=LEO
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 171. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  7. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Begga: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020924&tree=LEO
  8. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  9. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020925&tree=LEO
  11. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44119

Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz1,2,3,4

M, #4271, b. circa 13 August 582, d. 16 August 640
FatherBodegisel II (?) of Schelde d. 588
MotherSaint Oda (?) of Savoy d. 640
ReferenceGAV36
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz was born circa 13 August 582 at Heristal, Liege, France.5,6,7,4 He married Dode (Clothilde) Heristal, daughter of Arnoldus (?) Bishop of Metz, circa 596; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 2 page) says m. 611.6
Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz died on 16 August 640 at Remirmont, France; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 2 page) says d. 641; Leo van de Pas says d. ca 18 July 640.6,1,3,4
Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz was buried after 16 October 640 at Church of the Apostles, Metz, France.1
     Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz St. Arnulf of Metz - Statesman, bishop under the Merovingians, born c. 580; died c. 640. His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia, the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. In the school in which he was placed during his boyhood he excelled through his talent and his good behaviour. According to the custom of the age, he was sent in due time to the court of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia (595-612), to be initiated in the various branches of the government. Under the guidance of Gundulf, the Mayor of the Palace, he soon became so proficient that he was placed on the regular list of royal officers, and among the first of the kings ministers. He distinguished himself both as a military commander and in the civil administration; at one time he had under his care six distinct provinces. In due course Arnulf was married to a Frankish woman of noble lineage, by whom he had two sons, Anseghisel and Clodulf. While Arnulf was enjoying worldly emoluments and honours he did not forget higher and spiritual things. His thoughts dwelled often on monasteries, and with his friend Romaricus, likewise an officer of the court, he planned to make a pilgrimage to the Abbey of Lérins, evidently for the purpose of devoting his life to God. But in the meantime the Episcopal See of Metz became vacant. Arnulf was universally designated as a worthy candidate for the office, and he was consecrated bishop of that see about 611. In his new position he set the example of a virtuous life to his subjects, and attended to matters of ecclesiastical government. In 625 he took part in a council held by the Frankish bishops at Reims. With all this Arnulf retained his station at the court of the king, and took a prominent part in the national life of his people. In 613, after the death of Theodebert, he, with Pepin of Landen and other nobles, called to Austrasia Clothaire II, King of Neustria. When, in 625, the realm of Austrasia was entrusted to the kings son Dagobert, Arnulf became not only the tutor, but also the chief minister, of the young king. At the time of the estrangement between the two kings, and 625, Arnulf with other bishops and nobles tried to effect a reconciliation. But Arnulf dreaded the responsibilities of the episcopal office and grew weary of court life. About the year 626 he obtained the appointment of a successor to the Episcopal See of Metz; he himself and his friend Romaricus withdrew to a solitary place in the mountains of the Vosges. There he lived in communion with God until his death. His remains, interred by Romaricus, were transferred about a year afterwards, by Bishop Goeric, to the basilica of the Holy Apostles in Metz.

Of the two sons of Arnulf, Clodulf became his third successor in the See of Metz. Anseghisel remained in the service of the State; from his union with Begga, a daughter of Pepin of Landen, was born Pepin of Heristal, the founder of the Carlovingian dynasty. In this manner Arnulf was the ancestor of the mighty rulers of that house. The life or Arnulf exhibits to a certain extent the episcopal office and career in the Merovingian State. The bishops were much considered at court; their advice was listened to; they took part in the dispensation of justice by the courts; they had a voice in the appointment of royal officers; they were often used as the king's ambassadors, and held high administrative positions. For the people under their care, they were the protectors of their rights, their spokesmen before the king and the link uniting royalty with its subjects. The opportunities for good were thus unlimited; and Arnulf used them to good advantage.2

Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference 51.4 GAV-36 EDV-37 GKJ-37.

Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz St.Arnulf, Bp of Metz (612-627), Maiordomus of Dagobert I of Austrasia, *ca 582, +641; m. 611 Dode/Ode (Clothilde.)3

Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz Stone (2000) Chart 50-8: "...a counselor of King Chlothar II and of the young Dagobert I."6 He and Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks were Maiordomus of Dagobert I of Austrasia.3 Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz was Bishop of Metz between 613 and 629.8

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cv. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  2. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Arnulf of Metz at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01752b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  4. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Arnulf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020922&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  5. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 190-8, p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  8. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 50-8.
  9. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I11051
  10. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansegisel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020923&tree=LEO

Bodegisel I (?)1

M, #4272
FatherSaint Gandolfus (?) Bishop of Tongres
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Bodegisel I (?) married Palatina (?), daughter of Gallus Magnus (?) Bishop of Troyes.1
     Bodegisel I (?) (an unknown value.)2

Family

Palatina (?)

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cv. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  2. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia1,2,3

F, #4273, b. 690, d. 724
FatherSt. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves2 d. 713
ReferenceGAV34 EDV34
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia married Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks, son of Pepin II (?) of Heristal and AlpaisAlpaida (?) of Saxony; his 1st wife.2,1 Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia was born in 690.2
Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia died in 724.3,4,2
     GAV-34 EDV34 GKJ-35.

Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 53.3

Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia (an unknown value.)5,4

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles Martel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020918&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrodtrud: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020919&tree=LEO
  4. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  5. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin 'the Short': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020000&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Carloman: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280786&tree=LEO

St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves1,2

M, #4274, d. 713
FatherCount Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers d. 677
MotherKunza (?) b. c 640, d. bt 630 - 727
ReferenceGAV35 EDV35
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves died in 713.3
     St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves (an unknown value.)3 GAV-35 EDV-35 GKJ-36. St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves was also known as St. Luitwin (?) Bishop of Treves.2 St. Leutwinis (Lievin) (?) Bishop of Treves was also known as Saint Lievin (?) Bishop of Treves.4 He was Bishop of Treves between 685 and 704.5

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  2. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I11317
  3. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10357
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-10, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html

Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers1

M, #4275, d. 677
FatherBodlion (?)2 b. c 610
MotherSigrada (?)2 b. c 630
ReferenceGAV36 EDV37
Last Edited20 Jan 2003
     Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers married Kunza (?), daughter of Clodoule/Chlodulf (?) Bishop of Metz, between 617 and 670; WFT Est.3
Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers died in 677.3
     Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers Count Guerin (or Warin), brother of St. Leger, Bishop of Autun; described as being descended from the ancient Burgundian Kings.4 GAV-36 EDV-37 GKJ-37.

Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers Weis AR 50-9.3,5

Family

Kunza (?) b. c 640, d. bt 630 - 727
Children

Citations

  1. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I09443
  2. [S792] e-mail address, updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I11318
  3. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  4. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cvi. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-9, p. 51: "...of uncertain parentage...brother of St. Leger, d. 677, Bishop of Autun:. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Kunza (?)

F, #4276, b. circa 640, d. between 630 and 727
FatherClodoule/Chlodulf (?) Bishop of Metz1 b. 610, d. 696
ReferenceGAV36 EDV36
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Kunza (?) married Count Warinus (?) Count of Poitiers, son of Bodlion (?) and Sigrada (?), between 617 and 670; WFT Est.2
Kunza (?) died between 630 and 727; WFT Est.2 She was born circa 640.1
     GAV-36 EDV-36 GKJ-37.

Kunza (?) (an unknown value.)2,3

Citations

  1. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I11319
  2. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-9, p. 51: "...sister of Bazin, Bishop of Treves". Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S792] e-mail address, updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I09443

Ida J. Hudson1

F, #4277, b. 3 September 1864, d. 20 October 1888
FatherIsaac M. "Ike" Hudson1 b. c 1838, d. 29 Jun 1906
MotherAnn E. Singleton1
Last Edited10 Dec 2017
     Ida J. Hudson was born on 3 September 1864.1 She married George H. Luster on 2 December 1885 at Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; his 1st wife.2
Ida J. Hudson died on 20 October 1888 at age 24.1
Ida J. Hudson was buried after 20 October 1888 at Spring Hill Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; from Find A Grave:
     Birth:      Sep. 3, 1864
     Death:      Oct. 20, 1888
     George Luster married Ida J Hudson Dec 02 1885 in Davidson CO TN.
     Family links: Parents: Isaac M. Hudson (____ - 1906)
     Spouse: George H. Luster (1857 - 1935)*
     Children: Turner Hudson Luster (1887 - 1957)*
     Burial: Spring Hill Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, USA
     Created by: James Hill
     Record added: Nov 27, 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial# 31754660.1
     Ida J. Hudson was listed as a resident in Isaac M. "Ike" Hudson and Ann E. Singleton's household in the census report on 22 July 1870 at District 19, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; p. 84-A, lines 11-18, dwelling 42, family 44
     11 HUDSON, Isaac 31 [1839] M W Farmer $1000 KY
     12 " , Anna 28 [1842] F W Keeping house TN
     13 " , Aratia 8 [1862] M W At home TN
     14 " , Ida 5 [1865] F W At home TN
     15 BEELEY, William 23 [1847] M W At home TN,
     16 MAY, Francis 40 [1830] F W Domestic Servant TN Cannot read Cannot write
     17 " , Anna 13 [1857] F W At home TN Cannot read Cannot write
     18 HAYES, pAULINE 5 [1865] F Black At home TN.3

Ida J. Hudson was listed as a resident in Isaac M. "Ike" Hudson and Ann E. Singleton's household in the census report on 16 June 1880 at District 19, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; pp. 305-D & 306-A, lines 47-50, 1, dwelling 196, family 207
     47 HUDSON, Isaac W M 40 [1840] Self Married Farmer KY KY KY
     48 " , Anna W F 35 [1845] Wife Married Keeping House TN TN TN
     49 " , Aratia W M 18 [1862] Son Single Laborer TN KY TN
     50 " , Ida W F 15 [1865] Daughter Single At School TN KY TN
     1 " , Ellouise W F 6 [1874] Daughter Single TN KY TN
     2 HARRIS, Tilomon Black Male 7 [1873] Servant Single TN TN TN.4
     

Family

George H. Luster b. 1 Oct 1857, d. 5 Jun 1935
Child

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Ida J Hudson Luster: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=31754660. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, George H. Luster: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=146865860
  3. [S3797] Unknown household, 1870 1870 Federal Census, unknown repository address unknown repository, Year: 1870; Census Place: District 19, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: M593_1522; Page: 84A; Family History Library Film: 553021
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1870usfedcen&indiv=try&h=7130945
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7163/4276591_00172?pid=7130945&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1870usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D7130945&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  4. [S3879] 1880 Federal Census, 1880 Census TN Davidson Co District 19, Year: 1880; Census Place: District 19, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: 1251; Family History Film: 1255251; Page: 305D; Enumeration District: 078
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&indiv=try&h=15358560
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/6742/4244541-00615?pid=15358560&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1880usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D15358560&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  5. [S3880] Unknown household, 1900 1900 Federal Census, unknown repository address unknown repository, Year: 1900; Census Place: Civil District 19, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: 1566; Page: 11B; Enumeration District: 0134; FHL microfilm: 1241566
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1900usfedcen&indiv=try&h=60200793
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7602/4118953_00494?pid=60200793&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1900usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D60200793&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true

Sir Thomas Blount of Kinlet1,2

M, #4278, b. 1456, d. 1524
FatherSir Humphrey Blount of Kinlet1,2 b. 1422, d. 12 Oct 1477
MotherElizabeth Wynnington1,2,3 d. a 1502
Last Edited16 Jul 2016
     Sir Thomas Blount of Kinlet married Anne Croft, daughter of Sir Richard Croft Knt., of Croft Castle and Eleanor Cornwall.1,4 Sir Thomas Blount of Kinlet was born in 1456.2
Sir Thomas Blount of Kinlet died in 1524.1,2

Family

Anne Croft d. 27 Sep 1549
Children

Citations

  1. [S2009] Nathaniel Taylor, "Taylor email 15 Nov 2005: "Blount of Kinlet, Astley, North Carolina (was re: Children of Sancha de Ayala)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Taylor email 15 Nov 2005."
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Thomas Blount: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425506&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Winnington: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425504&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anne Croft: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425507&tree=LEO
  5. [S3434] Ravinmaven, ""Best" line for Anne Hyde, Duchess of York?," e-mail message from ravinmaven2001 via <e-mail address> (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 July 2016. Hereinafter cited as "Ravinmaven Email 5 Jul 2016: ""Best" line for Anne."
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Blount: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00247796&tree=LEO

Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon1,2

F, #4279, b. 720, d. 12 July 783
FatherHeribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon2,1,3
MotherBertrada (?)
ReferenceGAV33 EDV33
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon was born in 720 at Laon, Aisne, France.4 She married Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks, son of Charles Martel "the Hammer" (?) King of the Franks and Chrotrud/Rotrou/Rotrude (?) of Austrasia, in 740.2,5,1
Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon died on 12 July 783 at Choisy-au-Bac, Haute-Savoie, France.2,1
     GAV-33 EDV-33 GKJ-34.

Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 53.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrada 'au grand pied': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020001&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heribert/Caribert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020920&tree=LEO
  4. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin 'the Short': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020000&tree=LEO
  6. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 1. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II.

Heribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon1

M, #4280
MotherBertrada "the Elder" (?)2 d. a 23 Jun 721
ReferenceGAV34 EDV34
Last Edited17 Nov 2003
     Heribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon was born at Laon, Aisne, France.3
     Heribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 53.1 GAV-34 EDV-34 GKJ-35.

Heribert/Caribert (?) Count of Laon founded the Prum Monastery on 23 June 721.1

Family

Bertrada (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heribert/Caribert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020920&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrada 'the Elder': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020921&tree=LEO
  3. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrada 'au grand pied': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020001&tree=LEO

Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau1

F, #4281, b. 758, d. 30 April 783
FatherCount GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau d. c 790
MotherEmma (?) of Allemania d. 798
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited25 May 2009
     Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau was born in 758.1 She married Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West, son of Pepin III "The Short" (?) King of the Franks and Bertha/Bertrade (?) of Laon, on 30 April 771; his 2nd wife.2,3,1
Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau died on 30 April 783 at Thionville, Moselle, France.2,4
     Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 63.1 GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-33.

Hildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau (an unknown value.)2,5

Family

Charlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West b. 2 Apr 747, d. 28 Jan 814
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charlemagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getextras.php?personID=I00000001&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-13, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  8. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles "the Youger": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020016&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin I (Karlmann): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020039&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rotrud (Hruothraud): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020028&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020018&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I "the Pious": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020040&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020032&tree=LEO&PHPSESSID=ddc2127542108d09cf9a72ee0b0e19fd
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020019&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020026&tree=LEO

Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau

M, #4282, d. circa 790
FatherErlafried I (?)
ReferenceGAV33 EDV33
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau married Emma (?) of Allemania, daughter of HnabiNebi (?) Duke of Alamannia, in 779.1
Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau died circa 790.1,2
     GAV-33 EDV-33 GKJ-34.

Count GeroudGerold I (?) Duke of Swabia, Count in Vinzgau (an unknown value.)1,2

Citations

  1. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  2. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

Houching (?) Duke of Allamannia

M, #4283, d. 709
FatherGodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia b. c 630, d. c 709
MotherRegentrude(?) (?) of Bavaria1
ReferenceGAV35 EDV35
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Houching (?) Duke of Allamannia died in 709.2
     GAV-35 EDV-35 GKJ-36.

Houching (?) Duke of Allamannia (an unknown value.)2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Regentrude ?) of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220716&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

GodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia

M, #4284, b. circa 630, d. circa 709
ReferenceGAV36 EDV36
Last Edited10 Mar 2004
     GodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia was born circa 630.1 He married Regentrude(?) (?) of Bavaria, daughter of Theodo II (?) Duke of Bavaria and Regintrude (?), in 657.2,1
GodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia died circa 709; in or before 709.3,1
     GAV-36 EDV-36 GKJ-37.

GodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia Leo van de pas cites: 1. Les Ancetres de Charlemagne Paris, 1990 , Christian Settipani
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700 Baltimore, 1995, Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter L.Sheppard, Reference: 156
3. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: 123.1

GodefroyGodfried (?) Duke of Alamannia (an unknown value.)4 He was living between 679 and 708; "seen in 679."5

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gottfried: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220715&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Regentrude ?) of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220716&tree=LEO
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 182-1, p. 156. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 182-1, 156.

Theodo II (?) Duke of Bavaria1

M, #4285, d. 716
FatherFara II (?) Duke of Bavaria b. bt 587 - 625, d. bt 628 - 708
MotherFara (?)2
ReferenceGAV37 EDV37
Last Edited10 Mar 2004
     Theodo II (?) Duke of Bavaria married Regintrude (?), daughter of Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks and Ragnetrude (?).1
Theodo II (?) Duke of Bavaria died in 716.1
     GAV-37 EDV-37 GKJ-38.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220713&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fara: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00248930&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Regentrude ?) of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220716&tree=LEO

Regintrude (?)

F, #4286
FatherDagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks b. bt 608 - 610, d. 19 Jan 639
MotherRagnetrude (?)
ReferenceGAV37 EDV37
Last Edited10 Mar 2004
     Regintrude (?) married Theodo II (?) Duke of Bavaria, son of Fara II (?) Duke of Bavaria and Fara (?).1
     GAV-37 EDV-37 GKJ-38.

Regintrude (?) Leo van de Pas: "she is not the daughter of Dagobert I.2'

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220713&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Regintrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220714&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Regentrude ?) of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220716&tree=LEO

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks1,2,3

M, #4287, b. between 608 and 610, d. 19 January 639
FatherClothaire II "Le Jeune, Le Grand" (?) King of the Franks4,2,3 b. 18 Oct 584, d. bt 4 Jan 629 - 18 Oct 629
MotherBeretrude (?)5,2,3 d. 618
ReferenceGAV37 EDV37
Last Edited15 Aug 2004
     Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks married Wulfegunde (?); his 4th wife.6,2 Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks married Berthilde (?); his 5th wife.7,2 Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks was born between 608 and 610; Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says b. 606; Leo van de Pas says b. 608/610.2,3 He married Gometrude (?), daughter of unknown (?), in 626; his 2nd wife; repudiated.2,8,3 Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks married Nantilda (?) in 629; his 3rd wife.9,2,3 Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks married Ragnetrude (?) in 630; his 1st wife.2,10,3
Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks died on 19 January 639; Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says d. Nov 639; Leo van de Pas says d. 19 Jan 639.2,3
Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks was buried after 19 January 639 at St. Denis, Paris, France (now).2
     He and Saint Arnulf (Arnuld) (?) Bishop of Metz were Maiordomus of Dagobert I of Austrasia.11

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks [2m.] Dagobert I, *606, +XI.639, bur Saint-Denis, King of Austrasia (629-634), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne, Soissons and all the Land of Franks (629-639), King of Aquitaine (631-639); 1m: 626 Gometrude (reputiated); 2m: 629 Nantilde N (+642); 3m: 630 Ragnetrude N.3 GAV-37 EDV-37 GKJ-38.

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: I-1 2
2. Encyclopaedia Britannica Chicago,London,Toronto, 1961
3. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.2

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks In 622 he became king of Austrasia and in 629 of all the Frankish lands. He secured peace by making a friendship treaty with the Byzantine Emperor, Heraclius, by defeating the Gascons and the Bretons, then campaigning against the Slavs on his eastern frontier.

In 631 he sent an army to Spain to help the Visigothic usurper, Swinthila. He moved his capital from Austrasia to Paris, a central location from which the kingdom could be governed more effectively.

He then appeased the Austrasians by making his three-year-old son, Sigebert, their king in 634. Dagobert loved justice but was also greedy and dissolute. During his reign there was a revival of the arts, a revision of the Frankish law, and encouragement for learning. Dagobert founded the first great abbey of Saint Denis to which he made many gifts.

His chief advisers were two Austrasian aristocrats, Arnulf, bishop of Metz, and Pippin, who was made mayor of Dagobert's palace. It was a marriage arranged between Arnulf's son and Pippin's daughter that was to form the powerful dynasty known later as the Carolingians.2

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks Dagobert (Lothair's son), the last strong ruler of the Merovingian house, made wide dynastic alliances and found wise advisers in Bishop Arnulf and Pepin of Landen. His firm rule led to a revolt. Under the rois fainéants(lazy, “do-nothing kings,” who were rulers in name only) following Dagobert, the mayors of the palace emerged from a menial position to take a dominant role in the government both in Austrasia and Neustria.1 He was King of Austrasia between 623 and 628.12 He was King of all Franks between 629 and 639.12,3

Family 1

Wulfegunde (?)

Family 2

Berthilde (?)

Family 3

Gometrude (?)

Family 5

Ragnetrude (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 171. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dagobert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199467&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  4. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199462&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beretrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199464&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfegunde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199471&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199472&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gometrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199469&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nantilda: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199470&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ragnetrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199468&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin2.html
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 170.
  13. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199475&tree=LEO

Ragnetrude (?)1

F, #4288
ReferenceGAV37 EDV37
Last Edited15 Aug 2004
     Ragnetrude (?) married Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks, son of Clothaire II "Le Jeune, Le Grand" (?) King of the Franks and Beretrude (?), in 630; his 1st wife.2,1,3
     Ragnetrude (?) Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.1 GAV-37 EDV-37 GKJ-38. Ragnetrude (?) was also known as Ragnetrude (?) of Austrasia.4

Ragnetrude (?) (an unknown value.)5

Family

Dagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks b. bt 608 - 610, d. 19 Jan 639
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ragnetrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199468&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dagobert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199467&tree=LEO
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32147
  5. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1490] Leo's Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199475&tree=LEO

Fara II (?) Duke of Bavaria

M, #4289, b. between 587 and 625, d. between 628 and 708
ReferenceGAV38 EDV38
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Fara II (?) Duke of Bavaria was born between 587 and 625; WFT Est.1
Fara II (?) Duke of Bavaria died between 628 and 708; WFT Est.1
     GAV-38 EDV-38 GKJ-39.

Fara II (?) Duke of Bavaria (an unknown value.)1

Citations

  1. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex1,2,3

M, #4290, b. circa 795, d. 13 January 858
FatherEgbert (?) King of Wessex4 b. 775, d. a 19 Nov 839
MotherRedburga (Raedburh) (?)4 b. 788
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited19 Sep 2014
     Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex was born circa 795; probably in the court of Charlemagne; Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1 page) says b. 795/810.5,4 He married Osburh/Osburga (?), daughter of Oslac (?) of Hampshire, the Royal Cup Bearer, of the Isle of Wight, circa 830.5,4 Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex married Judith (?) Princess of France, daughter of Charles II "The Bald" (?) Holy Roman Emperor, etc. and ErmentrudeErmengardeHermintrudis (?) of Orleans, on 1 October 856 at Verberie-sur-Oise, France.6,5,7,8,3,9
Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex was buried circa January 858 at Steyning, Sussex, England.5
Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex died on 13 January 858 at England.10,1,4
Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex was buried after 13 January 858 at Winchester Cathedral, London, England.4
     Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex Ethelwulf, King of Wessex (839-855)+(857-858), King of Essex, Sussex & Kent (839-58), *ca 795/810, +13.1.858, bur Winchester Cathedral; 1m: ca 830 Osburga (+852/5), dau.of Oslac of Hampshire or the Isle of Wight; 2m: Verberie-sur-Oise, France 1/15.10.856 Judith of Franks (*843/444, +after 870); all issue from 1m.4 GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-31. Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex was also known as Ethelwulf (?)11

Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex King of England, 839-858, d. 13 Jan 858; m 1) Osburh, dau. of Oslac, the royal cup-bearer.12 He was King of Wessex: [Ashley, pp. 316-317] ATHELWOLF Kent, 825-839, 856-858; Wessex, July(?) 839-855. Born: France (probably the court of Charlemagne, Aachen), c795; Died: 13 January 858, aged about 62. Buried: Steyning (Sussex) but later moved to Winchester Cathedral. Married: (1) c830, Osburh (died c852), dau. Oslac of Hampshire: 5 children; (2) 1 October 856 at Verberie-sur-Oise, France, Judith (c843-post 879), dau. Charles the Bald, king of the Franks: no children. Athelwolf was the son of EGBERT, whose subjugation of most of England from 825 onward became the foundation of the future kingdom of England. Although usually listed amongst the kings of England, Athelwolf remained king of Wessex only. These territories incorporated Sussex, Kent and Essex, which Athelwolf had conquered on his father's behalf in 825 and of which Athelwolf was duly appointed sub-king. Athelwolf appointed his brother (or son) ATHELSTAN as sub-king of these territories when he became king of Wessex. However, Athelwolf did not directly rule East Anglia, Mercia or Northumbria, all of which had their own kings who acknowledged Athelwolf as their overlord. Athelwolf's direct ascent to the throne of Wessex was a rare event in the West Saxon kingdom. Over the past three centuries the kingdom had passed either to the next most appropriate local chieftain as confirmed by the council or witan or, in a few cases, by conquest. Wessex had been a fairly loose knit confederacy of smaller kingdoms, and succession did not pass directly from father to son. Egbert's rigorous readministration of the kingdom had ensured his eldest son would inherit and that there would not be the inter-dynastic squabbling that had weakened other kingdoms. The ability to appoint younger sons to sub-kingdoms helped this process. Elsewhere the leading chieftain of the shire became the ealdorman, a position of considerable privilege second only to the king. In Athelwolf's time we find that the ealdormen became of major importance in helping defend the kingdom from the Danes, whose raids increased considerably during the 840s. Athelwolf or his ealdormen succeeded in defeating the Danes on almost every occasion. The raids reached a peak in the years 850/1 when there were three assaults spread across the south. The sequence may not be as the ASC records, but it suggests that first an army landed in Devon which was defeated by the local ealdorman. A further army arrived off the Kent coast near Sandwich, where Athelstan and his ealdormen fought a sea battle, defeating the Danes and capturing nine of their ships. The Danes spent that winter in Thanet. Then, early in 851, a major force arrived in over three hundred ships which sailed up the Thames and attacked inland. It first defeated BEORHTWULF of Mercia and then turned its attention south of the Thames, where it met Athelwolf and his son ATHELBALD at a place called Acleah, somewhere in Surrey (usually associated with Ockley, though not all authorities agree). If the number of ships is correct (and not miscopied as 350 instead of 35) then the Danish force must have numbered nearly 10,000 men. The ASC notes that this was the greatest slaughter of the Danes that was known up to that time and was evidently a significant battle.
A few years of peace followed, and we may imagine that after the battle of Acleah Athelwolf had agreed some form of peace arrangement with the Danes, or that they sought easier places of conquest. The following year (852) Beorhtwulf of Mercia died, and a new king, BURGRED, appeared. He was almost certainly a vassal of Athelwolf's, possibly even one of his ealdormen. At Easter 853, Burgred married Athelwolf's daughter Athelswith, and later that year Athelwolf aided Burgred in his battle against the Welsh where they subjected CYNGEN AP CADELL to a major defeat.
Athelwolf's life was soon after tinged with sadness as his wife died, probably at the end of 853 or early 854. By all accounts Athelwolf loved her deeply. The character of this king is somewhat perplexing. Many of the chroniclers recorded his bravery in battle, and there is no reason to doubt that he was anything other than courageous; but he was a very religious man and from his youth had apparently been devoted to the church. He probably accepted his role as king as a consequence of his heritage and his role in battle as a necessary evil, but there is no reason to assume he relished fighting. In 855, even though it is recorded that the Danes had wintered in Sheppey in Kent, and thus still represented a threat, Athelwolf abdicated the throne. He first donated a tenth of his estate to the church, a measure that was bound to endear him to later chroniclers, and then set off on a pilgrimage to Rome with his youngest son ALFRED. He left the government of England to his two eldest sons, Athelbald and ATHELBERT, supported ably by his council of ealdormen. He must have been convinced that he had left England in safe hands. He was himself now approaching sixty and would have been too old to fight. The ASC records that he spent a year in Rome and on his return spent some time at the court of Charles the Bald, king of the Franks, whose daughter Judith he married. This was clearly a political alliance as Judith was no more than thirteen, but it had its repercussions. At the ceremony, the officiating archbishop, Hincmar of Rheims, placed a crown upon Judith's head, thereby making her a queen. This position had been outlawed by the West Saxons sixty years earlier because of the wickedness of BEORHTRIC's wife Eadburh. It may have been this action that alienated the ealdormen of Wessex for when Athelwolf returned to England later that year (856) he was welcomed but they would not accept him as king. This has been described as a civil war, but it is unlikely to have been that destructive. Athelwolf almost certainly did not want the rigours of kingship, and was quite happy to retire to Sussex as the sub-king of the Kent, Sussex and Essex territories. He died there some eighteen months later. between 839 and 856.10,1,5

Family 1

Osburh/Osburga (?) b. 810, d. c 852
Children

Family 2

Judith (?) Princess of France b. 844, d. a 879

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 73, ENGLAND 14. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), appendix. Hereinafter cited as Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 298, 316-317. Hereinafter cited as Ashley: British Kings.
  6. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998, p. 27.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  8. [S1490] Leo van de Pas Web Site "Leo's Genealogics Website", online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018644&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Leo's Genealogics Website.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-14, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/wessex.pdf "Kings of Wessex and England: 802-1066". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 1-9, p. 1.
  13. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannon & Griffiths, British Monarchy 1998, p. 44.