Elisabeth (?)1

F, #93421, d. after 1269
Last Edited4 Jan 2020
     Elisabeth (?) married Heinrich II (?) Herr von Lichtenberg, son of Ludwig I von Lichtenberg Vogt von Neuweiler.1
Elisabeth (?) died after 1269.1
     Elisabeth (?)
Per Med Lands: "m ELISABETH, daughter of --- (-after [27 Oct 1266/1269]). “Ludowicus et Conradus fratres nati bone memorie Henrici quondam de Lichtenberc” confirmed their father’s donation made “laborans in extremis” (“in banno ville de Scheffelingesheim” to Neuwiller free from “omni censu et juribus...de nostro ac fratrum nostrorum et domine Elisabet matris nostre”), by charter dated 1269[610]."
Med Lands cites: [610] Alsatia Diplomatica, Tome I, DCLXI, p. 466.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#LudwigLichtenbergdied1249A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#LudwigLichtenbergMElisabethBaden

Heinrich von Lichtenberg1

M, #93422
FatherHeinrich II (?) Herr von Lichtenberg1 d. bt 1266 - 1269
MotherElisabeth (?)1 d. a 1269
Last Edited4 Jan 2020
     Heinrich von Lichtenberg married Adelheid von Eberstein, daughter of Otto I (?) Graf von Eberstein and Kunigunde (?) von Freiburg, circa 8 January 1252; Date of contract.1,2
     Heinrich von Lichtenberg
Per Med Lands: "HEINRICH von Lichtenberg . There is considerable confusion about the identity of the husband of Adelheid von Eberstein. The 8 Jan 1251 (O.S.?) marriage contract quoted below calls him “Henrico...juniori”, suggesting that he was the son of “Henrico...senio[ri”. If Adelheid’s husband was the son of Heinrich [II] von Lichtenberg, he must have been considerably older than his supposed sisters Kunigunde and Agnes considering the dates of their marriages. If that is correct, Heinrich may have been born from an otherwise earlier unrecorded marriage of his father. The question is further confused by the epitaph of Adelheid von Eberstein. Lehmann says that Adelheid was the second wife of Heinrich [II], naming Elisabeth as his first wife[611]. The difficulty with Lehmann’s position is the 1269 charter quoted above, under which Heinrich [II]’s two sons Ludwig and Konrad confirmed a donation of their father made on his deathbed (“laborans in extremis”) in the presence of his wife Elisabeth, their mother. There is no indication in the document that Heinrich [II] survived his illness sufficiently long to marry again. m (contract 8 Jan 1252) ADELHEID von Eberstein, daughter of OTTO [I] von Eberstein & his first wife Kunigunde von Freiburg (-1 Nov 1291). “Otto junior dominus de Eberstein” confirmed the marriage between “Adelheidim...filiam meam” and “Henrico nobili viro juniori de Lichtenberc”, appointing as fiduciaries “Eberhardem seniorem de Eberstein, prepositum Argentinensem fratres meos...”, by charter dated 8 Jan 1251 (O.S.?)[612]. There is some confusion about the epitaph which records Adelheid’s death. Krieg von Hochfelden states that an inscription in Kloster Neuenburg records the death "Kal Nov" 1291 of "domina Adelheidis de Eberstein, uxor domini Conradi de Lichtenberg"[613]. Noting Wenck’s Hessische Landesgeschichte, which reproduces the 8 Jan 1251 marriage contract quoted above, Krieg von Hochfelden specifically draws attention to Adelheid’s husband being named “Konrad” not “Heinrich” in the epitaph. On the other hand, Lehmann records the epitaph as “dna. Adelheidis de Eberstein uxor dni. Henrici de Lichtenberg” without citing the source from which he takes this quote[614]."
Med Lands cites:
[611] Lehmann (1862), Band 1, p. 30.
[612] Hessischen Landesgeschichte, Band II (1789), Urkundenbuch, CXLVII, p. 175.
[613] Krieg von Hochfelden (1836), p. 313, footnote 112, quoting Herzog, B. Elsäßische Chronik, Lib. III, Blatt 47, 6.
[614] Lehmann (1862), Band 1, p. 31, footnote 36.1

Family

Adelheid von Eberstein d. 1 Nov 1291

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#LudwigLichtenbergMElisabethBaden. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BADEN.htm#BeatrixEbersteinMHugoTubingen

Uta (?)1

F, #93423, b. 1104, d. 1185
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Uta (?) married Berthold IV (?) Gref von Eberstein, son of Bertold III (?) von Eberstein.1 Uta (?) was born in 1104.2
Uta (?) died in 1185; Med Lands says d. 1185; Find A Grave says d. 1196.1,2
Uta (?) was buried in 1185 at Kloster Herrenalb, Bad Herrenalb, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1104
     DEATH     1196 (aged 91–92)
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Berthold von Eberstein 1095–1158
     BURIAL     Kloster Herrenalb, Bad Herrenalb, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 25 Feb 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial 158610695.1,2
     Uta (?)
Per Med Lands: "m UTA, daughter of --- (-[1185], bur Herrenalb). "Bertholdus dominus de Eberstein" founded Kloster Herrenalb, with the consent of "coniugis nostre Ute et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1149/52][715]. According to Neuenstein, she was "Utta von Sinsheim", suggesting that she was "aus dem Geschlechte der Grafen im Kraichgau, die eine Burg zu Sinsheim besassen"[716]. An inscription at Herrenalb records the burial of "Berchtoldi comitis de Eberstein et domine Ute uxoris eius fundatorum hujus monasterii et plurimorum comitum de Eberstein"[717]."
Med Lands cites:
[715] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band II, CCCXXX, p. 49.
[716] Neuenstein (1897), p. 33, citing "der Heilbronner Stammbaum" (no precise citation).
[717] Neuenstein (1897), p. 34, quoting "Urkundb. Herrenalb".1
Uta (?) was also known as Utta von Calw.2 GAV-27.

Family

Berthold IV (?) Gref von Eberstein b. 1095, d. c 1158
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BADEN.htm#_Toc507763642. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 January 2020), memorial page for Utta von Calw (1104–1196), Find A Grave Memorial no. 158610695, citing Kloster Herrenalb, Bad Herrenalb, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/158610695/utta-von_calw. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Zavid Nemanjic Grand Zupan of Serbia1

M, #93424
FatherUros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia1,2 b. c 1080, d. 1140
MotherAnne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium1
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Zavid Nemanjic Grand Zupan of Serbia
Per Med Lands:
     "ZAVID, [son of UROŠ I Grand Župan of Serbia] & his wife [Anna Diogene]. Zavid’s supposed parentage, and the fact that he was the father of the four children shown below, is deduced from a combination of information. Miroslav names his father as Zavid in a gospel which he wrote[80]. Other sources consistently name Tihomir, Stracimir, Miroslav and Nemanja as brothers, although it is not specified that they all shared the same father and mother. According to a charter written in 1198 by Nemanja, his great-grandfather and grandfather had "ruled the land". (“Stephanus Nemanja, Serbiæ magnus županus” visited Mount Athos, charter dated 2 Nov 1198[81], Serbian text not consulted). This statement is also found in the biographies of Nemanja written by his sons. The deduction is that Nemanja's father, Zavid, was another son of Uroš I Grand Župan of Serbia (Chapter 2.C). Emperor Manuel I's choice of Tihomir as new ruler of Serbia in [1166] also makes more sense if he was closely related to the former dynasty rather than an outsider, as such a choice is more likely to have been acceptable to Serbia's leaders. Zavid presumably rebelled in some way against his [presumed] father or oldest brother, as Zavid's son Nemanja was born while his father was exiled in Zeta[82].
     "m ---. The name of Zavid's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[80] Fine (1994), p. 3.
[81] Monumenta Serbica, VIII, p. 3.
[82] According to the biography of Nemanja written by son Stefan, Fine (1994), p. 3.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#ZavidB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#UrosIdiedafter1130B
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOSNIA.htm#ToljenI

Miroslav Nemanjic Knez of Hum1

M, #93425, d. 1198
FatherZavid Nemanjic Grand Zupan of Serbia1
Last Edited4 Jan 2020
     Miroslav Nemanjic Knez of Hum married (?) (?) of Bosnia between 1180 and 1190.2
Miroslav Nemanjic Knez of Hum died in 1198.1
     Miroslav Nemanjic Knez of Hum
Per Med Lands:
     "MIROSLAV of Serbia, brother of STEFAN Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia, son of ZAVID & his wife --- (-[1198]). Miroslav names his father as Zavid in a gospel which he wrote[181]. He was installed as Župan in part of Serbia in [1166]. He was expelled, along with his two brothers, by their third brother Nemanja in [1167/68][182]. He made peace with his brother Nemanja after their brother Tihomir was killed, and was installed as Grand Knez of Hum (formerly Zahumlje, later Hercegovina), with his capital at Ston, which may have been the area over which he was Župan from [1166][183] After the murder in 1180 of Rainer Archbishop of Split, probably by pirates based at the mouth of the Neretva River, the Pope demanded that Miroslav, as the area's overlord, punish the offenders. The dispute escalated when Miroslav refused and expelled the Catholic Bishop from Ston, after which he allowed Orthodox priests to take over various Catholic church buildings[184]. His attack on the island of Kor?ula was repelled in 1184, with help from Dubrovnik, against which Nemanja declared war[185]. “Stephanus Nemanja, Serbiæ magnæ županus et fratres Stracimir et Miroslav” made peace with “Ragusio, comite Gervasio”, dated 27 Sep 1186[186]. From [1190], Miroslav appears to have shared control of Hum with his nephew Rastko, although he held at least the region of the Lim River with Bijelo Polje. “Ragusini, Gervasio comite” made a treaty with “comite Miroslavo, fratre Stephani Nemanja, Serbiæ magni župani”, dated 17 Jun 1190[187]. After Miroslav's death, Hungary claimed Hum but it is not clear whether it took control[188].
     "m ([1180/90]) --- of Bosnia, sister of KULIN Ban of Bosnia, daughter of --- (-after 1199). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. The date range of this marriage covers the period during which Kulin is known to have been Ban of Bosnia, after Miroslav's installation as Grand Knez of Hum by his brother. It is very approximate. She lived at her brother's court after the death of her husband[189]."
Med Lands cites:
[181] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 3.
[182] Fine (1994), p. 4.
[183] Fine (1991), p. 244, and Fine (1994), p. 5.
[184] Fine (1994), p. 20.
[185] Fine (1994), p. 8.
[186] Monumenta Serbica, III, p. 1.
[187] Monumenta Serbica, V, p. 2.
[188] Fine (1994), p. 52.
[189] Fine (1994), p. 45.1

Family

(?) (?) of Bosnia d. a 1199
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOSNIA.htm#ToljenI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOSNIA.htm#sisterKulinMMiroslavHum

(?) (?) of Bosnia1

F, #93426, d. after 1199
Last Edited4 Jan 2020
     (?) (?) of Bosnia married Miroslav Nemanjic Knez of Hum, son of Zavid Nemanjic Grand Zupan of Serbia, between 1180 and 1190.1
(?) (?) of Bosnia died after 1199.1
     (?) (?) of Bosnia
Per Med Lands: "daughter (-after 1199). The date range of her marriage covers the period during which Kulin is known to have been Ban of Bosnia, and after the time when Miroslav was installed as Grand Knez of Hum by his brother. It is very approximate. She lived at her brother's court after the death of her husband[15]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. m ([1180/90]) MIROSLAV Grand Knez of Hum, brother of STEFAN Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia, son of ZAVID & his wife --- (-[1198])."
Med Lands cites [15] Fine (1994), p. 45.1

(?) (?) of Bosnia
Per Med Lands: "...a sister of Julin Ban of Bosnia."2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOSNIA.htm#sisterKulinMMiroslavHum. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOSNIA.htm#ToljenI

Ioannes Makrembolites1

M, #93427, d. after 1040
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Ioannes Makrembolites married (?) Keroulalrios, daughter of (?) Keroulalrios.2,1
Ioannes Makrembolites died after 1040.1
     Ioannes Makrembolites
Per Med Lands: "IOANNES Makrembolites (-after 1040). Cedrenus records that "Michaele Cerulario et Joanne Macrempolita" rebelled against Emperor Mikhael IV, dated to [1040/41] from the context[438]. m --- Keroularie, daughter of ---. The name of Ioannes's wife is not known. Her family origin is confirmed by the Historia of Mikhael Attaliota which records that "vestiarius Constantinus Ducas" married "neptis patriarchæ [Kerularii]"[439]."
Med Lands cites:
[438] Cedrenus II, col. 263.
[439] Niebuhr, B. G. (ed.) (1853) Michael Attaliota, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) ("Mikhael Attaliota"), p. 56.1

Family

(?) Keroulalrios
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EvdokiaMakrembolitissadied1096. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#KeroularieMIoannesMakrembolites

(?) Keroulalrios1

F, #93428
Father(?) Keroulalrios2
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     (?) Keroulalrios married Ioannes Makrembolites.1,2
     (?) Keroulalrios
Per Med Lands: "daughter . Her family origin is confirmed by the Historia of Mikhael Attaliota which records that "vestiarius Constantinus Ducas" married "neptis patriarchæ [Kerularii]"[390]. m IOANNES Makremobilites, son of --- (-after 1040)."1

Family

Ioannes Makrembolites d. a 1040
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#KeroularieMIoannesMakrembolites. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EvdokiaMakrembolitissadied1096

(?) Keroulalrios1

M, #93429
Last Edited5 Jan 2020

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EvdokiaMakrembolitissadied1096. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Alusian (?) of Bulgaria1

M, #93430, b. circa 995, d. after 1068
FatherIwan Wladislaw (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians1,2,3 b. c 975, d. 1018
MotherMarija (?)1,2 d. bt 1029 - 1031
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited16 Apr 2020
     Alusian (?) of Bulgaria was born circa 995.1
Alusian (?) of Bulgaria died after 1068.
     Alusian (?) of Bulgaria
Per Wikipedia:
     "Alusian (Bulgarian: ???????, Greek: ??????????) was a Bulgarian and Byzantine noble who ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for a short time in 1041.
Life
     "Alusian was the second son of Emperor Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria (r. 1015–1018) by his wife Maria. Together with his older brother Presian II he attempted to resist Bulgaria's annexation by the Byzantine Empire in 1018 but eventually had to surrender to Emperor Basil II (r. 976–1025) in the same year.
     "In the Byzantine Empire Alusian joined the ranks of the court aristocracy and was appointed governor (strat?gos) of the theme of Theodosioupolis. Alusian increased his wealth by marrying a rich member of the Armenian nobility, but in the later 1030s he lost the favor of Emperor Michael IV the Paphlagonian (r. 1034–1041) and his brother, the powerful parakoimomenos John the Orphanotrophos. Alusian was deprived of certain estates and fined a hefty amount for alleged misdeeds.
     "Hearing of the successful uprising of his second cousin Peter Delyan against the emperor in 1040, Alusian fled the Roman court and joined Peter's ranks.[1] Alusian was welcomed by Peter, who gave him an army with which to attack Thessalonica. The siege however was raised by the Romans, and the Bulgarian army was defeated. Alusian barely escaped and returned to Ostrovo.[1]
     "One night in 1041, during dinner, Alusian took advantage of Peter's inebriation and cut off his nose and blinded him with a kitchen knife. Since Alusian was of the blood of Tsar Samuel (r. 997–1014), he was quickly proclaimed emperor in Peter's place by his troops, but conspired to desert to the Byzantines. As the Bulgarian and Byzantine troops were preparing for battle, Alusian deserted to the enemy, surrendering the blinded Peter Delyan to the emperor.[1] As a reward, his possessions and lands were restored to him and he was given the high court rank of magistros.[1] The same title had been granted earlier to other deposed emperors of Bulgaria, namely Boris II in 971 and Presian II in 1018.
     "Alusian's subsequent fate is unknown, but his descendants, the Alousianoi, continued to prosper in the ranks of the Byzantine aristocracy until the 14th century.[1]
Family
     "By his marriage to an Armenian noblewoman from the theme of Kharsianon, Alusian had several children, including:[1]
1. Basil, an Eastern Roman general, governor of Edessa
2. Samuel, an Eastern Roman officer in the Armeniac theme
3. An unnamed daughter, who married the future Eastern Roman Emperor Romanos IV Diogenes

References
1. Kazhdan (1991), p. 70
External links
** Detailed List of Bulgarian Rulers
Sources
** Fine, John Van Antwerp (1994), The Late Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest, University of Michigan Press, ISBN 978-0-472-08260-5
** Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991), Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6."4



Alusian (?) of Bulgaria
Per Med Lands: "ALUSIAN (-after 1068). Cedrenus records that "Alusianus patricius et Theodosiopolis præfectus, secundus Aaronis filius" rebelled and joined Tsar Peter Deljan, dated to [1041] from the context[180]. Zonaras also names "Aaronis…filius patricius Alusianus"[181]. It is not chronologically possible for Alusian to have been the son of Aaron. In addition, other sources indicate that Ivan Vladislav was the only survivor of the massacre of Aaron’s family. It is more probable that Alusian was Ivan Vladislav’s son, although the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not been identified. He settled in Constantinople and became a Byzantine patrikios in 1019, strategos of Theodosiopolis in Anatolia. Psellos records that "the more agreeable of Aaron's sons….Alousianus" proved chiefly responsible for the victory of Emperor Mikael IV, but that he escaped back to Bulgaria to foment another rebellion[182]. Alusian's troops captured and blinded Deljan, enabling Alusian to assume leadership of the whole movement. After an unsuccessful battle with Byzantine troops, he negotiated an amnesty for himself, left the rebellion leaderless, and returned to Constantinople in 1041[183]. He was in Armenia in 1068. m (1019 or after) ---, an Armenian. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified. The marriage presumably took place after Alusian settled in Constantinople."
Med Lands cites:
[180] Cedrenus II, col. 263.
[181] Zonaras II, Liber XVII, XVI, col. 194.
[182] Psellos, pp. 113-14.
[183] Fine (1991), pp. 205-06.2
Alusian (?) of Bulgaria lived at an unknown place ; GAV-29.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:168.1


Alusian (?) of Bulgaria
Per Genealogics:
     "Alusian was the second son of Iwan Wladislaw, Tsar of Bulgaria, and his wife Marija. Together with his older brother Presian II he attempted to resist Bulgaria's annexation by the Byzantine empire in 1018 but eventually had to surrender to Emperor Basilius II.
     "In the Byzantine empire Alusian joined the ranks of the court aristocracy and was appointed governor _(strategos)_ of the theme (Byzantine administrative division) of Theodosioupolis. Alusian increased his wealth by marrying a rich member of the Armenian nobility, but in the later 1030s he lost the favour of Emperor Michael IV 'the Paphlagonian' and his brother, the powerful court eunuch Ioannes 'the Orphanotrophos'. Alusian was deprived of certain estates and fined a hefty amount for alleged misdeeds.
     "Hearing of the successful uprising of Peter Delyan, who may have been Alusian's cousin, against the emperor in 1040, Alusian fled the Byzantine court and joined Peter's ranks. Alusian was welcomed by Peter, who gave him an army with which to attack Thessalonica. The siege however was raised by the Byzantines, and the Bulgarian army was defeated. Alusian barely escaped and returned to Ostrovo.
     "One night in 1041, during dinner, Alusian took advantage of Peter's inebriation and cut off his nose and blinded him with a kitchen knife. Since Alusian was of the blood of Tsar Samuel, he was quickly proclaimed emperor in Peter's place by his troops, but conspired to desert to the Byzantines. As the Bulgarian and Byzantine troops were preparing for battle, Alusian deserted to the enemy, surrendering the blinded Peter Delyan to the emperor. As a reward, his possessions and lands were restored to him and he was given the high court rank of _magistros._ The same title had been granted earlier to deposed emperors of Bulgaria, namely Boris II in 971 and Presian II in 1018.
     "Alusian's subsequent fate is unknown, but his descendants, the Alousianoi, continued to prosper in the ranks of the Byzantine aristocracy until the 14th century.
     "By his marriage to an Armenian noblewoman from the house of Kharsianon, Alusian had several children, including Basil, a Byzantine general, governor of Edessa, Samuel, a Byzantine officer in the Armeniac theme, and Anna, who married the future Byzantine emperor Romanos IV Diogenes."1

He was living in 1019.1 He was Emperor of Bulgaria in 1041 at Bulgaria.4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alusian of Bulgaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00399704&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#IvanVladislavdied1018B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Iwan Wladislaw: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141472&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alusian_of_Bulgaria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Ripsimé (?)1

F, #93431
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Ripsimé (?) married komes Nikolaos (?) Tsar of Bulgaria.1,2,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:168.
GAV-30. Ripsimé (?) was also known as Ripsimija (?)3 Ripsimé (?) was also known as Hripsime (?)2

Ripsimé (?)
Per Med Lands:
     "m RIPSIME, daughter of --- (-before [992/93]). Samuil, later Tsar of Bulgaria, names "my father, my mother, my brother…Nicolas…--- and David" in a monument erected in [992/93][111]. Adontz quotes the monument (in Bulgarian) in full, including Samuil’s mother’s name. However, on the subsequent page he states that "du nom de la mère il ne reste que la dernière lettre" and that "Michel de Devol permet de le rétablir en témoignant que le père de Samuel s’appelait Nicolas et la mère ??????"[112]. Unfortunately, he gives no citation for this statement but on an earlier page quotes a passage inserted in another text written by "Michel évêque de Devol", and cites a German secondary source although it is not at all clear from what he writes that this is where the passage naming Samuil’s mother can be found[113]. No other information is known about Ripsimé. However, one somewhat outlandish scenario appears to reconcile the conflicts between the different primary sources, discussed below under Ripsimé’s supposed son Aaron, which relate to the parentage of her supposed four sons: that Ripsimé was the anonymous Armenian wife of Ivan, brother of Tsar Peter I, who married Nikolaos as her second husband, and that Aaron and Moisei were her sons by her first marriage, while Samuil and David were born to her second husband. This possibility seems too remote to justify recasting the presentation of the families in the present document."
Med Lands cites:
[111] Adontz (1938), p. 40.
[112] Adontz (1938), p. 41.
[113] Proki?, V. B. (1906) Die Zusätze in der Handschrift des Iohannes Skylitzes (München), cited by Adontz (1938), p. 40.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#_Toc359577756. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nikola Kumet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332110&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ripsimija: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332111&tree=LEO

Theodoros Chryselios1

M, #93432
FatherJoannes Chryselios Lord of Durazzo1 b. c 940, d. a 1005
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Theodoros Chryselios
Per Med Lands: " [THEODOROS Chryselios. Archon of Durazzo.] m --- of Bulgaria, daughter of NIKOLAOS [Kumet] & his wife Ripsime ---."1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#TheodorosChryselios. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

(?) of Bulgaria1

F, #93433
Fatherkomes Nikolaos (?) Tsar of Bulgaria1 d. 976
MotherRipsimé (?)1
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     (?) of Bulgaria
Per Med Lands. "[daughter. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. m THEODOROS Chryselios, archon of Durazzo, son of [IOANNES Chryselios Lord of Durazzo & his wife ---]1. If his parentage is correct, Theodoros was the brother of Agatha Chryselie who married Samuil, later Tsar of the Bulgarians, see above.]"

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#_Toc359577756. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Moisei (?) of Bulgaria1

M, #93434, d. 986
Fatherkomes Nikolaos (?) Tsar of Bulgaria1 d. 976
MotherRipsimé (?)1
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Moisei (?) of Bulgaria died in 986 at Serrhai; Killed in battle.1
     Moisei (?) of Bulgaria
Per Med Lands: "[MOISEI (-killed in battle Serrhai [986]). Zonaras records that "Bulgaricis quatuor filii, David, Moses, Aaron et Samuel" encouraged the Bulgarians to revolt against Byzantine control[122]. Cedrenus records that "Davidus, Moses, Aaron et Samuelis, filii cuiusdam in Bulgaria largiter potentis comitis" rebelled against Byzantium after the death of Tsar Peter[123]. Moisei’s parentage appears confirmed by Zonaras and Cedrenus, read together with the monumental inscription quoted below which names the father of the brothers Samuil and David. The assumption therefore is that Aaron and Moisei were both brothers of Samuil and David. As noted above, Adontz suggests that Aaron and Moisei were in fact the sons of Ivan, brother of Tsar Peter I (see above), although he cites no primary source naming Moisei on which he relies[124]. Zonaras records that "quatuor fratribus Davidi, Mosi, Aaroni et Samueli…qui Comitopoli appellabantur" defeated the Byzantine forces, adding that Moisei was killed "in opugnatione Serræ"[125]. Cedrenus records that "Moisis" was killed in battle "at Serras"[126].]"
Med Lands cites:
[122] Zonaras II, Liber XVI, XXIII, col. 114.
[123] Cedrenus II, col. 82.
[124] Adontz (1938), p. 44, citing Rosen, Baron V. R. (1883) Extraits de la Chronique de Yahya d’Antioche (St. Petersburg), p. 58.
[125] Zonaras II, Liber XVII, VI, col. 151.
[126] Cedrenus Tome II, p. 455, cited in Adontz (1938), p. 11.1


Moisei (?) of Bulgaria
Killed in battle.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#_Toc359577756. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

(?) von Schlesien1

F, #93435, b. circa 1241, d. before October 1243
FatherHenryk II "Pobozny" (?) Duke of Lower Silesia, Duke of Krakow and Great Poland1 b. c 1196, d. 9 Apr 1241
MotherAnna (?) of Bohemia1,2 b. bt 1201 - 1204, d. 23 Jun 1265
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     (?) von Schlesien was born circa 1241.1
(?) von Schlesien died before October 1243.1
     Reference: Genealogics ciites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:9.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Schlesien: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064854&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030717&tree=LEO

Anastasia Aleksandrovna (?)1

F, #93436
FatherAleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk2 d. Apr 1195
MotherNN Vladimirovna (?)2
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Anastasia Aleksandrovna (?) married Boleslaw I (?) Duke of Masovia, Sandomir & Sieradz, son of Konrad I (?) Duke of Masovia, Kujawien, Sieradz, Leczyca and Krakow and Agafia Svjatoslava (?) of Novgorod;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1
     Anastasia Aleksandrovna (?)
Per Med Lands: "ANASTASIA Aleksandrovna. Baumgarten names her, shows her parentage, and both her marriages, citing Russian primary sources in support[543]. m firstly ([1245/Jul 1247]) as his second wife, BOLES?AW I Prince of Masovia, son of KONRAD I Prince of Mazovia & his wife Agafia Sviatoslavna of Novgorod-Sieviersk ([1208]-1248 after 25 Feb). m secondly DEMETRI, magnate in Hungary."
Med Lands cites: [543] Baumgarten (1927), p. 58, citing chr. russes II 185, and III 85.1

Family

Boleslaw I (?) Duke of Masovia, Sandomir & Sieradz b. c 1208, d. a 25 Feb 1248

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnastasiaAleksandrovnaM2BoleslawIMasovia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavIIIziaslavichdied1172B.

Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk1

M, #93437, d. April 1195
FatherVsevolod Mstislavich (?) Prince of Bielsk and Volynya1 d. Apr 1195
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk married NN Vladimirovna (?), daughter of Vladimir Rurikovich (?).2
Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk died in April 1195.1
     Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk
Per Med Lands: "ALEKSANDR Vsevolodich (-after 1234). Prince of Bielsk 1195. Prince of Volynia 1207/14. m --- Vladimirovna, daughter of VLADIMIR Rurikovich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife ---.1 He was Prince of Bielsk in 1195.3 As of between 1207 and 1214, Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk lived at an unknown place ; Prince of Volynia.3

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavIIIziaslavichdied1172B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirovnaMAleksandrVsevolodich.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnastasiaAleksandrovnaM2BoleslawIMasovia.

NN Vladimirovna (?)1

F, #93438
FatherVladimir Rurikovich (?)2 b. 1187, d. 3 Mar 1239
Last Edited2 Mar 2020
     NN Vladimirovna (?) married Aleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk, son of Vsevolod Mstislavich (?) Prince of Bielsk and Volynya.1
     NN Vladimirovna (?)
Per Med Lands: "ALEKSANDR Vsevolodich (-after 1234). Prince of Bielsk 1195. Prince of Volynia 1207/14. m --- Vladimirovna, daughter of VLADIMIR Rurikovich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife ---.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirovnaMAleksandrVsevolodich. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RiurikIIRostislavichdied1215.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavIIIziaslavichdied1172B.

Vsevolod Aleksandrovich (?) Prince of Beilsk1

M, #93439
FatherAleksandr Vsevolodich (?) Prince of Volynia and Bielsk1 d. Apr 1195
MotherNN Vladimirovna (?)1
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Vsevolod Aleksandrovich (?) Prince of Beilsk
Per Med Lands: "VSEVOLOD Aleksandrovich. Prince of Bielsk 1244. m ---. The name of Vsevolod´s wife is not known."1 He was Prince of Beilsk in 1244.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavIIIziaslavichdied1172B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#BoleslawIdied1313B

Konrad von Glogau1

M, #93440, b. between 1252 and 1260, d. 11 October 1304
FatherKonrad I (?) Duke Glogowsko-Bytomski1 b. bt 1228 - 1231, d. bt 18 Apr 1273 - 9 Oct 1274
MotherSalomea (?) of Poland1 b. c 1225, d. Apr 1267
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     Konrad von Glogau was born between 1252 and 1260.1
Konrad von Glogau was buried on 11 October 1304 at Lüben, Poland (now).1


Konrad von Glogau died on 11 October 1304.1
     Konrad von Glogau
Per Med Lands: "KONRAD von Glogau ([1252/60]-11 Oct 1304, bur Lüben). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) "Conrado Stinaviense, Henrico Glogoviense et Primisline Sprotaviense ducellis" as sons of "Conradus Glogoviense" & his first wife[226]. Subdeacon at Breslau 1284. Provost at Breslau Cathedral 1287. Elected Bishop of Aquileja 1299. Duke of Sagan. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "1304 V Id Oct" of "Cunradus dux Slezie et dominus Sagani…qui et Korbirlin dictus", specifying that he was "prepositus Sancti Iohannis in Wratislawis" and buried in Lüben[227]."
Med Lands cites:
[226] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568.
[227] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 552.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#KonradIGlogaudied12731274B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Primko von Glogau1

M, #93441, b. between 1255 and 1260, d. 26 February 1289
FatherKonrad I (?) Duke Glogowsko-Bytomski1 b. bt 1228 - 1231, d. bt 18 Apr 1273 - 9 Oct 1274
MotherSalomea (?) of Poland1 b. c 1225, d. Apr 1267
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     Primko von Glogau was buried at Lüben, Poland (now).1

He was born between 1255 and 1260.1
Primko von Glogau died on 26 February 1289 at near Siewierz, Poland (now); Per Med Lands: "Killed in battle."1
     Primko von Glogau
Per Med Lands: "PRIMKO von Glogau ([1255/65]-killed in battle near Siewierz 26 Feb 1289). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) "Conrado Stinaviense, Henrico Glogoviense et Primisline Sprotaviense ducellis" as sons of "Conradus Glogoviense" & his first wife[228]. Duke of Steinau [?cinawa]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Prymslone Sprottoviensi ducis" survived his father "Conrado Stynnaviensi"[229]. The Annales Grissowienses record that "dux Priberito frater ducis Glogovie" was killed "1289 IV Kal Mar"[230]. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie adds that he was killed "in Sever opido episcopi Cracovie iuxta Bytom", specifying that he was buried in Lüben[231]."
Med Lands cites:
[228] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568.
[229] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 109.
[230] Annales Grissowienses maiores 1288, MGH SS XIX, p. 541.
[231] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, pp. 551-2.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#KonradIGlogaudied12731274B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Hedwig von Glogau Abbess of St. Clara1

F, #93442, b. between 1255 and 1265, d. 9 June 1318
FatherKonrad I (?) Duke Glogowsko-Bytomski1 b. bt 1228 - 1231, d. bt 18 Apr 1273 - 9 Oct 1274
MotherSalomea (?) of Poland1 b. c 1225, d. Apr 1267
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     Hedwig von Glogau Abbess of St. Clara was born between 1255 and 1265.1
Hedwig von Glogau Abbess of St. Clara died on 9 June 1318 at Kloster St. Claren, Weissenfels, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany.1
     Hedwig von Glogau Abbess of St. Clara
Per Med Lands: "HEDWIG ([1255/65]-9 Jun 1318, bur St Clara, Breslau). The Notæ Sanctæ Claræ record that "Hedwigis, filia Conradi ducis Glogoviensis" was third abbess of St Clara, Trebnitz, specifying that she died "1318 V Id Iun" and was buried in the monastery[232]. Abbess of St Clara in Breslau 1283. "
Med Lands cites: [232] Notæ Monialium Sanctæ Claræ Wratislaviensium, MGH SS XIX, p. 534.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#KonradIGlogaudied12731274B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

(?) (?) of Cornwall1

F, #93443, d. after 25 November 1256
FatherRichard (?) 1st Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou1 b. 5 Jan 1209, d. 2 Apr 1272
MotherSanchia (?) de Provence1 b. 1225, d. 9 Nov 1261
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     (?) (?) of Cornwall died after 25 November 1256.1 She and Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine were engaged on 26 November 1256 at Bacharach, Germany (now).1
     (?) (?) of Cornwall
Per Med Lands: "[daughter (-after 25 Nov 1256). "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" confirmed his betrothal "cum filia fratris…regis Anglie", or in case of impossibility "cum filia sororis eiusdem", by charter dated 25 Nov 1256[259]. This betrothal was arranged to confirm Duke Ludwig's agreement to support the candidature of Richard Earl of Cornwall as king of Germany, her dowry being 12,000 marks[260]. Duke Ludwig’s support for Earl Richard is confirmed in a charter dated 26 Nov 1256[261]. It is assumed that this daughter, concerning whom no other record has yet been found, was born from her father’s second marriage, as daughters from his first marriage would probably have been considered to old for betrothal at that date. Betrothed (Bacharach 26 Nov 1256) to LUDWIG II "der Strenge" Duke of Bavaria, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 2 Feb 1294, bur Kloster Fürstenfeld).]"
Med Lands cites:
[259] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 63, p. 157.
[260] Bayley (1949), p. 66.
[261] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#dauRichardCornwallBetLudwigIIBavaria. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Albrecht III von Hohenberg1

M, #93444, d. after 25 November 1304
FatherAlbrecht II 'der Minnesänger' (?) Graf von Hohenberg, Gf von Rotenburg, Gf von Haigerloch1 b. c 1235, d. 17 Apr 1298
MotherMargareta von Furstenberg1 d. 1296
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     Albrecht III von Hohenberg married Clara Euphemia von Görz, daughter of Albert IV/I (?) Graf von Görz und Tirol and Euphemia (?) von Glogau, in 1296.1,2
Albrecht III von Hohenberg died after 25 November 1304.1
     Albrecht III von Hohenberg
Per Med Lands: "ALBRECHT [III] von Hohenberg (-after 25 Nov 1304). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 14 Feb 1300 which names "comiti Alberto filio comitis felicis recordationis Alberti…comitis de Hohinburg"[570]. "Burchardus de Honburch comes" named "fratruele nostro Alberto" in a charter dated 25 Nov 1304[571]. m [firstly] (Grüningen 1 Aug 1284) as her first husband, ---. The Chronicon Sindelfingensis records the marriage 1 Aug 1284 “in castro Grúningen” of “comes Albertus de Hoinberch...filio suo”[572]. The name of Albrecht's first wife is not known. [m secondly (contract 9 Feb 1296) CLARA EUPHEMIA von Görz, daughter of ALBRECHT [II] Graf von Görz & his second wife Euphemia von Ortenburg.]"
Med Lands cites:
[570] Monumenta Hohenbergica 179, p. 143.
[571] Monumenta Hohenbergica 202, p. 159.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#AlbertIIIHohenbergdied1304. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#ClaraEuphemiaMHohenburg

Clara Euphemia von Görz1

F, #93445
FatherAlbert IV/I (?) Graf von Görz und Tirol1 b. c 1240, d. 1 Apr 1304
MotherEuphemia (?) von Glogau1 b. bt 1251 - 1254, d. b 1275
Last Edited7 Jan 2020
     Clara Euphemia von Görz and Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary were engaged on 6 June 1286; Per Med Lands: "Betrothed (6 Jun 1286) to ANDRÁS of Hungary, son of ISTVÁN of Hungary Duke of Slavonia & his second wife Tomosina Morosoni (Venice [1265/70]-Buda 14 Jan 1301, bur Buda). He succeed in 1290 as ANDRÁS III "Velencei/the Venetian" King of Hungary."1 Clara Euphemia von Görz married Albrecht III von Hohenberg, son of Albrecht II 'der Minnesänger' (?) Graf von Hohenberg, Gf von Rotenburg, Gf von Haigerloch and Margareta von Furstenberg, in 1296.2,1
     Clara Euphemia von Görz
Per Med Lands: "CLARA EUPHEMIA . The marriage contract between "Dominum Albertum comitem Goricie…filiam suam dominam Claram" and "domino Andrea…duce Sclavonie nepote olim…domini Andree regis Hungarie" is dated 6 Jun 1286, and names "dominum Albertinum Mauroceno de Venecia…avunculus eiusdem domini ducis"[1038]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 9 Feb 1296 under which his mother "Grævinne Ofmey von Görtz" donated money, from the sale of her share in the inheritance of Hardegg and Plain received from her brother, to "miner Tohter Offemeyn Claren", with the consent of "mines Herren und wirtes Graven Albrechts von Görtz und…siner eriben Grafen Heinriches und Grafen Albrechtes mines sunes"[1039]. Betrothed (6 Jun 1286) to ANDRÁS of Hungary, son of ISTVÁN of Hungary Duke of Slavonia & his second wife Tomosina Morosoni (Venice [1265/70]-Buda 14 Jan 1301, bur Buda). He succeed in 1290 as ANDRÁS III "Velencei/the Venetian" King of Hungary. m (contract 9 Feb 1296) ALBRECHT [III] Graf von Hohenberg, son of ALBRECHT [II] "der Minnesänger" Graf von Hohenburg, Rotenburg und Haigerloch & his first wife --- (-after 25 Nov 1304)."
Med Lands cites:
[1038] Firnhaber ´Heinrich Graf von Hardeck, Burggraf von Duino´, XIII, p. 198.
[1039] Firnhaber ´Heinrich Graf von Hardeck, Burggraf von Duino´, XVI, p. 205.1

Family 1

Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary b. c 1265, d. 14 Jan 1301

Family 2

Albrecht III von Hohenberg d. a 25 Nov 1304

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#ClaraEuphemiaMHohenburg. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#AlbertIIIHohenbergdied1304

Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau1,2

M, #93446, b. between 1296 and 1300, d. between 1361 and 1364
FatherHenryk I-III (?) von Schlesien, Duke Glogowski1 b. bt 1251 - 1260, d. 9 Dec 1309
MotherMatilde (?) Herzogin von Brunswick-Lüneburg1 b. 1276, d. b 29 Jan 1319
Last Edited11 Jan 2020
     Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau was born between 1296 and 1300.1,3 He married Margarete (?) von Pommern, daughter of Bogislaw IV (?) Duke of Pomerania-Wolgast and Marguerite (?) von Rugen, on 12 September 1324 at Avignon, Departement du Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France (now);
Her 2nd husband. Married by papal dispensation.1,2,3,4
Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau died between 1361 and 1364; Med Lands says d. 17 Oct 1361/1364.1,3
     Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau
Per Med Lands: "JOHANN ([1296/1300]-[17 Oct 1361/1364]). The Chronica principum Polonie names "Heinricum, Conradum, Johannem et Primslaum" as the four sons of "Heinricus dux Glogoviensis", adding that Johann inherited "Stinaviam atque Goram"[247]. Duke of Steinau [?cinawa]. “Henricus...dux Zlesie et Glogovie ac dmnus Saganensis” swore allegiance to King Jan, listing all his towns and castles and naming “fratres nros...Conradum...ducem Zlesie et Glogovie dmnum Olsnensem ac dmnum Joannem ducem Zlesie et Glogovie ac dmnum Stynavie”, by charter dated [8/10] May 1329[248]. m ([1316/24], Papal dispensation Avignon 12 Sep 1324) as her second husband, MARGARETA von Pommern, widow of NIKOLAUS "das Kind" von Mecklenburg Herr zu Rostock, daughter of BOGISLAW IV Duke of Pomerania & his second wife Margareta von Rügen ([1286/88]-before 25 Jul 1334). The Annales Lubicenses record the marriage of "Nicholaus dominus de Rostocke" and "filiam Buxslai Slavonum principis" in 1300[249]. Pope John XXII issued a dispensation for the marriage of “Iohannis ducis Slesie” and “Margarete sororis...Wartislai ducis Stetinensis”, despite their 3o consanguinity, dated 12 Sep 1324[250]."
Med Lands cites:
[247] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, pp. 148-9.
[248] Silesiacarum Rerum Scriptores (1729), Codicis Silesiæ Diplomatici, LXVIII, p. 845.
[249] Annales Lubicenses 1300, MGH SS XVI, p. 417.
[250] Theiner (1860), Tome I, CCCV, p. 201.1


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Nachkommen Gorms des Alten 1978. , S. Otto Brenner, Reference: 880.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:13.3



Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau
Per Wikipedia:
     "John (Polish: Jan ?cinawski; c. 1298 – by 19 May 1365) was a Duke of ?aga?, ?cinawa, etc. during 1309–1317 (with his brothers as co-rulers), Duke of Pozna? during 1312–1314 (with his brothers) and sole Duke of ?cinawa since.
     "He was the fourth son of Henry III (I), Duke of G?ogów, by his wife Matilda, daughter of Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg.
Life
     "At the time of his father's death, John was still a minor, and therefore he remained under the care of mother and his older brother Henry IV the Faithful.
     "On 29 February 1312 was made the first division of the Duchy, under which John, Henry IV and Przemko II received ?aga?, ?cinawa and Pozna?; also, they received the promise of inheritance over G?ogów after the death of their mother Matilda, who held this land as her dower. The rest of the lands were taken by his other brothers Conrad I and Boles?aw.
     "The period of joint rule of the princes faced several difficulties, the most importante of them was the loss of part of Greater Poland in favor of W?adys?aw I the Elbow-high. At the same time they also lost part of the territories acquired by the father to the Dukes of Legnica.
     "In 1317, John received from his brother Henry IV the districts of ?cinawa, Góra and Lubin as his own independent Duchy.
     "In the internal politics, John's participation was almost null. The Duke of ?cinawa interferences were exclusively in contact with his brothers. On 29 July 1326 Jan concluded a treaty with Henry IV and the childless Przemko II according to which if one of them died without male issue, the other two inherited his land. At the same time, due to his hostile relations with the Dukes of Legnica, John made contacts with Poland.
     "In 1328, John supported the inhabitants of Brzeg-Legnica in the fight against Boles?aw III the Generous and Henry VI the Good; however, this war caused significant areas of devastation outside Lower Silesia.
     "On 29 April 1329, John succumbed to the pressures from the King John of Bohemia and paid homage to him in Wroclaw. The Bohemian King, however, guaranteed to him the right to decide the fate of his lands without the consent of his brothers.
     "At the beginning of 1331 Przemko II of G?ogów died, probably poisoned by his vassals. According to the treaty signed between the brothers in 1326, all his lands (with the exception of the city of G?ogów, who passed to Przemko II's widow Constance as her dower) were divided between John and Henry IV. Unexpectedly, these plans were changed by King John, who shortly after invaded G?ogów and took control over the Duchy, forced Constance to flee and John to sold him for 2,000 grzywna his rights over the half of Przemko II's lands. At the same time, W?adys?aw I the Elbow-high take advantage with the reigning confusion and occupied the Greater Poland lands who still remained under the hands of Henry III's sons after 1314. Despite the interference of King John, the Duke of ?cinawa participated in his expedition against Poland and in the unsuccessful siege of Pozna?.
     "In order to prevent that John could sold ?cinawa to Bohemia, on 25 July 1334 Henry IV and Conrad I entered into an arrangement with him, under which John was forbidden to sold any part of ?cinawa without the consent of his brothers. Despite this John, with constant financial problems, tried to sell his Duchy. On 29 January 1336, during a visit to Prague, John decided to transfer ?cinawa after his death to King John in exchange for the rule over G?ogów during his lifetime. Only the strong protests of his brothers eventually caused the annulment of the treaty with Bohemia. However, Henry IV and Conrad I couldn't stop John when he pledged Lubin to Boles?aw III the Generous.
     "In order to avoid sells or divisions, on 27 August 1337, Henry IV and Conrad I purchased to John all his Duchy of ?cinawa, but he could retain the sovereignty during his life. The sell was confirmed by the King of Bohemia. The price, however, was decided by King John, and was the abandonment of the previously pledged Lubin. Despite all these efforts to maintain the unity of the Duchy, shortly after, and probably with the consent of the brothers, John sold the Bohemia Góra ?l?ska (the town was soon recovered in unknown circumstances, and re-sold in 1345 for 1,500 fines).
     "During the 1340s, 1350s and 1360s, John sold his Duchy piece after piece first to his brother Henry IV and later to his son Henry V of Iron. And so on 30 April 1341 he sold Wschowa to Henry V, in 1353 the castle of Ryczyn, half of ?cinawa and the territory between the Odra and Barycz in 1358 and Polkowice in 1361.
     "In 1343, during the war between Henry V and King Casimir III the Great, John supported militarily his nephew, so that when the Polish army entered in Silesia, ?cinawa was sieged and plundered.
     "By 14 January 1316, John married Margaret (b. 1286/88 – d. bef. 25 July 1334), daughter of Bogislaw IV, Duke of Pomerania, and widow of Nicholas I the Child, Lord of Rostock. They had no children.
     "John died between 1361 and 1365 and was buried in the monastery of Lubi??. After his death his lands were divided between his brother Conrad I and his nephew Henry V.
References
** Cawley, Charles, SILESIA, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#HeinrichIISagandied1342B
** Marek, Miroslav. "Complete Genealogy of the House of Piast". Genealogy.EU.[self-published source][better source needed]: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast7.html#HK1
** This article was translated from his original version in Polish Wikipedia.5 Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau was also known as Johann Duke of Scinawa.5 Johann I von Glogau Duke of Steinau was also known as Johann Fürst von Schlesien in Steinau.3 He was Duke of Namys?ów between 1309 and 1312 at Poland (now). He was Duke of Ole?nica between 1309 and 1312 at Poland (now).5 He was Duike of Kalisz between 1309 and 1312 at Kalisz, Poland (now).5 He was Duke of Gniezno between 1309 and 1312 at Poland (now).5 He was Duke of Pozna? Between 1309 and 1314 at Poznan, Miasto Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland (now).5 He was Duke of ?aga? Between 1309 and 1317 at Poland (now).5 He was Duke of ?cinawa between 1309 and 1365 at Poland (now).5

Family

Margarete (?) von Pommern d. b 27 Aug 1337

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#HeinrichIdied1310. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POMERANIA.htm#Margaretadied1337
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064889&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete von Pommern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064252&tree=LEO
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_Duke_of_%C5%9Acinawa. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Hedwig von Schlesien Abbess of Trebnitz1

F, #93447, d. circa 28 May 1348
FatherHenryk II-IV "Wierny" (?) Duke Zaganski1 b. bt 1291 - 1293, d. 22 Jan 1342
MotherMechtild/Mathilde (?) Markgräfin von Brandenburg1,2,3 b. bt 1298 - 1300, d. b 31 Mar 1329
Last Edited12 Jan 2020
     Hedwig von Schlesien Abbess of Trebnitz died circa 28 May 1348.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Nachkommen Gorms des Alten 1978. , S. Otto Brenner.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III/1 13.1



Hedwig von Schlesien Abbess of Trebnitz
Per Med Lands: "HEDWIG ([1312/16]-1348). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. Abbess of Trebnitz."4

Hedwig von Schlesien Abbess of Trebnitz
Per Med Lands: "PRIMKO von Glogau ([1300/08]-11 Jan 1331, bur Lüben). The Chronica principum Polonie names "Heinricum, Conradum, Johannem et Primslaum…alias Primko" as the four sons of "Heinricus dux.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig von Schlesien: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Markgräfin Mechtild von Brandenburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030711&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRANDENBURG,%20PRUSSIA.htm#Mathildedied13251329. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#HeinrichIISagandied1342B

Salome/Salomea von Schlesien Herzögin von Glogau1,2

F, #93448, b. circa 1320, d. after 12 June 1359
FatherHenryk II-IV "Wierny" (?) Duke Zaganski1 b. bt 1291 - 1293, d. 22 Jan 1342
MotherMechtild/Mathilde (?) Markgräfin von Brandenburg1,3 b. bt 1298 - 1300, d. b 31 Mar 1329
Last Edited12 Jan 2020
     Salome/Salomea von Schlesien Herzögin von Glogau was born circa 1320.1 She married Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen after 26 August 1328;
His 2nd wife.4
Salome/Salomea von Schlesien Herzögin von Glogau died after 12 June 1359.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Nachkommen Gorms des Alten 1978. , S. Otto Brenner, Reference: 1440.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:13.1



Salome/Salomea von Schlesien Herzögin von Glogau
Per Med Lands: "SALOMEA (-after 12 Jun 1359). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. m ([1328/35]) as his second wife, HEINRICH [II] von Plauen gt von Schwarzburg Vogt zu Plauen, son of HEINRICH [I] Vogt von Plauen & his wife Jutta von Schwarzburg-Blankenburg (-18 Dec 1350)."5

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salome von Schlesien: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064902&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#HeinrichIISagandied1342B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRANDENBURG,%20PRUSSIA.htm#Mathildedied13251329.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II gen. Reuss: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079333&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#Salomeadiedafter12Jun1359
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#WladislawAuschwitzdied13211324

Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen1

M, #93449, b. circa 1290, d. 18 December 1350
Last Edited12 Jan 2020
     Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen was born circa 1290 at Plauen, Vogtlandkreis, Saxony (Sachsen), Germany (now).1 He married Sofie von Veichlingen in 1316;
His 1st wife.2 Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen married Salome/Salomea von Schlesien Herzögin von Glogau, daughter of Henryk II-IV "Wierny" (?) Duke Zaganski and Mechtild/Mathilde (?) Markgräfin von Brandenburg, after 26 August 1328;
His 2nd wife.1
Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen died on 18 December 1350.1
     Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen
Per Genealogics:
     "Heinrich was born in Plauen about 1289, the eldest son of Heinrich I 'der Russe', Vogt von Plauen, and Jutta, Gräfin von Schwarzburg-Blankenburg. He was first mentioned on 14 February 1301. After the death of his grandfather Heinrich I, Vogt von Plauen, in 1303 he ruled Plauen jointly with his older cousin Heinrich III 'der Lange'.
     "In 1306 the division took place between the two cousins, in which Heinrich II received the lordship of Greiz with Zwickau, Reichenbach, Mylau, Ronneburg and Schmöllin, and imperial fiefs in the Pleissner land. On 31 December 1306 at Bobenneukirchen all the guardians agreed over their holdings in the land of Regnitz.
     "From 1307 Heinrich was known as Heinrich 'Reusse' and made the nickname the family name. His two younger brothers joined the Teutonic Order, where the youngest brother in 1335 became the Order's commander of Kuln and from 1336 to 1338 Grand Commander of the Order.
     "In 1306 Heinrich married Sofie von Beichlingen, daughter of Graf Heinrich I von Beichlingen und Lohra, and Gräfin Oda von Honstein. The marriage did not result in progeny. About 1335 he married Salome von Schlesien, daughter of Henryk II-IV 'the Faithful', Duke Zaganski, and Mechtild, Markgräfin von Brandenburg. They had five sons and six daughters, of whom Heinrich III would have progeny.
     "In the years 1306/7 Heinrich II and his cousin Heinrich III 'der Lange' sided with the Wettin margraves of Meissen against King Albrecht I von Habsburg. On 28 January 1310 the Wettin Friedrich I 'der Freidige', Markgraf von Meissen, Landgraf von Thüringen, arbitrated a dispute between the two cousins on one side and the guardians of Gera on the other. However on 7 January 1312, Heinrich II and all the other guardians met in Prague with Johann 'the Blind', king of Bohemia, to form a military alliance with him as regent of the empire against Friedrich I 'der Freidige'. On 14 August 1314 armed conflict broke out between Friedrich I 'der Freidige', in cooperation with the burgrave of Nürnberg, against Heinrich, guardian of Gera, over the lordship of Schleiz. Heinrich II sided with the Wettins, whereas Heinrich III 'der Lange' fought on the side of Gera. On 8 April 1315 the new German king, Ludwig IV 'der Bayer', intervened in the struggle and named Heinrich II, Heinrich III 'der Lange' and the two guardians of Gera as administrators over the Pleissner land and the towns of Altenburg, Zwickau and Chemnitz. On 17 May 1316 the king confirmed for all the guardians the rights, liberties and grants conferred by his predecessors. On 28 September 1316 Markgraf Friedrich called a truce, and in the Treaty of Weisenfels of 1 November 1316 the guardians of Gera were allowed to keep Schleiz with Saalburg and Burgk. Under the mediation of Heinrich II, on 12 May 1317 an agreement was reached between Margrave Friedrich I 'der Freidige' and the guardians, namely Heinrich II, Heinrich III 'der Lange', and the guardians of Gera, over the mine of Hohenforst at Kirchberg, by which the guardians received shares in the mine.
     "When the health of Margrave Friedrich 'der Freidige' deteriorated after 1320, Heinrich von Schwarzburg and Heinrich II Reuss were appointed guardians of his son Friedrich 'der Ernsthafte', then still a minor.
     "Relations must have been good with the king, because on 22 January 1323 he confirmed Heinrich in all his holdings and sovereignty. That Heinrich still thought in the context of the family policies of the guardians of Weida is apparent from a document of 15 August 1324. In this he transferred to his 'cousin' Heinrich von Gera, commander of the Teutonic Order in Reichenbach, many properties in the parish of Reichenbach.
     "On the death of the old margrave Friedrich 'der Freidige' on 16 November 1323, Heinrich von Schwarzburg took over in Thuringia, and Heinrich was administrator in Meissen, the Oster land and the Pleissner land. It was probably Heinrich who negotiated the family link between the Wittelsbachs and the Wettins. His ward Friedrich II 'der Ernsthafte' became engaged to Mathilde von Bayern, the daughter of Emperor Ludwig IV 'der Bayer'. At the end of 1324 Heinrich of Schwarzburg was killed in a military campaign, and Heinrich II became sole guardian of Friedrich. In April 1325 Friedrich designated him 'captain of our country'. As signs of the margrave's favour he was invested with the castle of Waldeck and some villages near Jena and with the castle and town of Pölzig in Altenburg.
     "Heinrich reached the height of his power when Emperor Ludwig in 1326 bestowed on him the guardianship of his son, the underage Ludwig V 'der Brandenburger', Markgraf von Brandenburg, Herzog von Kärnten, Graf von Tirol. The following year Ludwig awarded to him the imperial castle Gleisberg an der Saale, today's Kunitzburg, gave him the mining rights and invested him with the fortresses of Triptis, Ziegenrück and Auma through his son the margrave. He accompanied Margrave Ludwig in July 1327 to several cities in Brandenburg.
     "The policy of Heinrich II's cousin Heinrich III 'der Lange' von Plauen was quite different. His loose feudal relationship to the distant counts of Everstein offered him no protection from the Wettin margraves of Meissen. Probably the policy of Heinrich II raised his concern, so his good relations with the Bohemian king led Heinrich III in 1327 to give up to him the rule over Plauen and Vogtsberg and to receive them from his as fiefs.
     "In Heinrich II's first major accounting of his guardianship to Friedrich and Thuringian and Meissen lords and knights on 20 February 1328 at Buttelstedt, the growing differences between him and Friedrich remained hidden. It is not clear whether Heinrich took advantage of his guardianship, or Friedrich, now 18 years old, had become careless. The relationship with Ludwig 'der Bayer', emperor since 1328, remained undiminished. In 1329 Ludwig entrusted him with the castle of Treuen, which was directly accountable only to the empire ('reichsunmittelbar').
     "On 24 June 1329 Emperor Ludwig 'der Bayer' honoured Heinrich II and the guardians of Plauen, Gera and Weida in a regal charter from Pavia in north Italy, written on parchment bearing a gold seal. In it the emperor named the guardians 'ministerialen principales' (vassals with the status of princes). With this charter the guardians were given the rights over the lands' militia, the right to invoke the death penalty without appeal (Blutbann), to raise taxes and to escort, as well as rights to hunting, fishing, mining and minting coins. This document formed the foundation for the sovereignty of the guardians.
     "When this charter reached the guardians is unknown. But as early as 6 August 1329 Heinrich II requested Margrave Friedrich 'der Ernsthafte' to be relieved of his role as guardian. The emperor did not favour this, but the break between Heinrich and Friedrich was irreconcilable. This became obvious in September 1329 when Heinrich passed the castle of Stein, later known as Posterstein, to the Bohemian king and received it back as a fief. This was a direct affront to Margrave Friedrich. When the Wettins prepared a formal indictment in mid-1331, that Heinrich had pressured Friedrich to grant him many fiefs, even that Heinrich had sought the margrave's life, the fracture was visible to all.
     "When military conflict had broken out, on 24 August 1331 in Nürnberg an attempt was made by an imperial mediator to mediate the dispute. There was no further mention of an attack on the margrave, but Heinrich had to return all the fiefs granted by Friedrich, was compensated in money but had to look to the empire to compensate him for any personal losses suffered. The dispute was only settled on 1 August 1332 by an imperial decree.
     "Heinrich remained on the lookout for potential allies. On 7 September 1332 he formed a defensive alliance with Heinrich II 'der Lange' von Plauen and Bishop Heinrich of Naumburg against Margrave Friedrich. A short time later there was a revolt by the count of Schwarzburg and Orlamünde, and the cities of Erfurt and Mühlhausen, against the margrave, which was joined by Heinrich II, Heinrich III 'der Lange' and the bishop of Naumburg. It only ended on 29 June 1335 with the Peace of Eisenach which favoured the margrave.
     "Through the mediation of the emperor, an agreement was reached on 19 August 1337 between all lines of guardians and the margrave to end the dispute over the mine of Hohenforst near Kirchberg, which recognised the rights of the guardians. As before, Emperor Ludwig stood by his guardians. On 27 April 1338 at the royal residence at Frankfurt an der Main, the emperor formally released Heinrich from the guardianship of Margrave Friedrich 'der Ernsthafte', nine years after their paths had separated in reality. With this the margrave pledged the fortress of Freyburg to Heinrich. In 1342, when Margrave Friedrich acquired the castle and countship of Orlamünde, the Thuringian Counts' War (Grafenfehde) broke out between the Wettins and a large confederation of princes and lords. On 1 September 1342 Heinrich sided with the margrave, and on 6 September the margrave reached a separate peace with the guardians and thereby ensured their neutrality. When the war broke out again in 1343, Heinrich and the other guardians were not among the margrave's opponents.
     "The initial political utterances and deeds of Friedrich III 'der Strenge', the son and successor of Margrave Friedrich 'der Ernsthafte', persuaded Heinrich II, Heinrich 'der Ältere' of Weida and the two guardians of Plauen to write to Emperor Karl IV as king of Bohemia, to remind him that the guardians had been vassals of the king of Bohemia since 1327 and that Heinrich II had held the castle of Posterstein as a fief of Bohemia since September 1329. Only a month later, Friedrich 'der Ernsthafte' died on 18 November 1349.
     "Heinrich survived his former ward by 13 months. He died on 18 December 1350."1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 166.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.3:353.1



Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen
Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH von Plauen gt von Schwarzburg "Reuß" (-18 Dec 1350). "Heinricus advocatus de Plawe senior et Henricus de Seburc et Heinricus de Swarzburg filii filiorum eius" confirmed the property of Kloster Cronschwitz by charter dated 24 Aug 1302[1124]. "Heinricus advocatus de Gera et Heinricus senior et Heinricus junior advocati dicti de Plawe" committed to "matertere nostre sorori Mechthildi de Plawe priorisse in Cronswiz" to donate revenue annually to Kloster Cronschwitz by charter dated 20 May 1304, witnessed by "frater Heinricus de Gera prior Plawensis…"[1125]. "Henricus de Plawe advocatus dictus Ruthenus" donated property to Kloster Cronschwitz, for the soul of "collateralis nostre…domine Sophie necnon progenitorum nostrorum", by charter dated 12 Aug 1313, witnessed by "Henricus advocatus de Wida senior patruus noster, Henricus advocatus de Plawe patruus noster…"[1126].
     "m firstly ([19 Jun 1306/12 Aug 1313]) SOPHIA von Beichlingen, daughter of HEINRICH Graf von Beichlingen & his wife Oda von Honstein (-[1335]). "Henricus de Plawe advocatus dictus Ruthenus" donated property to Kloster Cronschwitz, for the soul of "collateralis nostre…domine Sophie necnon progenitorum nostrorum", by charter dated 12 Aug 1313[1127]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
     "m secondly SALOMEA von Sagan, daughter of HEINRICH II Duke of Sagan [Piast] & his wife Mathilde von Brandenburg (-after 12 Jun 1359). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[1124] Weida Urkundenbuch, 350, p. 172.
[1125] Weida Urkundenbuch, 369, p. 179.
[1126] Weida Urkundenbuch, 444, p. 211.
[1127] Weida Urkundenbuch, 444, p. 211.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II gen. Reuss: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079333&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sofie von Beichlingen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00124307&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HeinrichPlauendied1350. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#WladislawAuschwitzdied13211324

Sofie von Veichlingen1

F, #93450
Last Edited12 Jan 2020
     Sofie von Veichlingen married Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen in 1316;
His 1st wife.1
     Sofie von Veichlingen was living in 1313.1

Family

Heinrich II gen. Reuss Reuss Vogt von Plauen b. c 1290, d. 18 Dec 1350

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sofie von Beichlingen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00124307&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.