Robert I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople1,2

M, #18691, b. 1201, d. January 1228
FatherPierre II de Courtenay Emporer of Constantinople, Cte de Courtenay, de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Marquis de Namur1,2,3 b. 1155, d. b Jan 1218
MotherYolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders1,4,2,5 b. 1175, d. 26 Aug 1219
Last Edited9 Aug 2020
     Robert I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople and Eudokia Laskarina were engaged.2 Robert I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople was born in 1201.1 He married (?) de Neufville, daughter of Baudoin/Baldwin de Neufville, in 1228.6,1
Robert I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople died in January 1228 at Nirea.Niree, Loire-et-Cher, France; dsp.7,6,1,2
     He was Emperor of Constantinople between 1219 and 1228.8

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre II de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004821&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004822&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20EMPERORS.htm#PierreIEmpdied1219B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38883
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur1,2,3

F, #18692, b. 1225, d. after 5 May 1275
FatherJean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople4,1,2,3,5 b. 1168, d. 21 Mar 1237
MotherDoña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople1,2,3,6,5 b. bt 1198 - 1199, d. 12 Apr 1237
Last Edited17 Jun 2020
     Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur was born in 1225.1 She married Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur, son of Pierre II de Courtenay Emporer of Constantinople, Cte de Courtenay, de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Marquis de Namur and Yolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders, in 1229 at Perugia, Italy (now); Leo van de Pas says m. 19 April 1229; Capet 7 page says m. 1229/1234; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 1229; Brienne 1 page says m. 1324.1,7,2,8,3
Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur was buried after 5 May 1275 at Assisi, Italy (now).1


Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur died after 5 May 1275 at Italy (now).1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1985 454
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 14
3. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026633&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#JeanBriennedied1237. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.

Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur1,2,3

M, #18693, b. 1218, d. 1273
FatherPierre II de Courtenay Emporer of Constantinople, Cte de Courtenay, de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Marquis de Namur2,3,4,5 b. 1155, d. b Jan 1218
MotherYolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders2,6,3,5 b. 1175, d. 26 Aug 1219
Last Edited9 Aug 2020
     Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur was born in 1218 at Constantinople, Byzantium.2,3 He married Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur, daughter of Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople and Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople, in 1229 at Perugia, Italy (now); Leo van de Pas says m. 19 April 1229; Capet 7 page says m. 1229/1234; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 1229; Brienne 1 page says m. 1324.1,2,7,3,8
Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur died in 1273 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now); Capet 7 page says d. 1273; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1274.2,3
Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur was buried in 1273 at Barletta.2


     ; BALDWIN II, Latin EMPEROR OF BYZANTIUM 1228-61; subsidised 1244 by LOUIS IX OF FRANCE, to whom he had presented 'a choice selection of relics, including the rod of Moses, the jawbone of John the Baptist, and Our Lord's crown of thorns'; escaped in a Venetian galley from his burning capital when Byzantine troops recaptured the city in the name of the EMPEROR MICHAEL VIII PALAEOLOGUS July 1261; m Mary, dau of JOHN OF BRIENNE, CO-EMPEROR OF BYZANTIUM and previously KING OF JERUSALEM (see BEAUMONT, Bt), and d 1273 in exile, leaving issue.9 He was Emperor of Constantinople, BALDWIN II, Latin emperor. He was the eleven-year-old nephew of Robert of Courtenay. The reign was a helpless one, during which the emperor was reduced to peddling the Constantinople relics through Europe. between 1228 and 1261.10,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre II de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004821&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20EMPERORS.htm#PierreIEmpdied1219B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004822&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013812&tree=LEO
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem.
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Philippe I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople1

M, #18694, b. 1243, d. 15 December 1283
FatherBaudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur1,2 b. 1218, d. 1273
MotherMarie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur1,3,2 b. 1225, d. a 5 May 1275
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Philippe I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople was born in 1243 at Constantinople, Byzantium.1,2 He married Beatrix/Beatrice (?) of Anjou and Naples, daughter of Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily and Béatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence, on 15 October 1273 at Foggia, Provincia di Foggia, Puglia, Italy.1,4,5
Philippe I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople died on 15 December 1283 at Viterbo, Italy (now).1,4,2
     ; PHILIP, titular Latin EMPEROR OF BYZANTIUM; pawned by his f to Venetian bankers to fund the defence of his empire but redeemed by LOUIS VII OF FRANCE; m Beatrice of Anjou, dau of CHARLES I, KING OF NAPLES (who was prevented by the 'Sicilian Vespers' from attempting to restore his son-in-law to the throne of Byzantium 1282), and d 1286, leaving an only dau.6 He was Emperor of Constantinople between 1273 and 1285.7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 5: pp. 653-4. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38886
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 7: pp. 654-5.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005234&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20EMPERORS.htm#CatherineCourtenaydied1308. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Beatrix/Beatrice (?) of Anjou and Naples1,2

F, #18695, b. 1252, d. 1275
FatherCharles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily3,1,2,4 b. 21 Mar 1226/27, d. 7 Jan 1284/85
MotherBéatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence1,2,5,6 b. 1234, d. 23 Sep 1267
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Beatrix/Beatrice (?) of Anjou and Naples was born in 1252.1 She married Philippe I de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, son of Baudouin II de Courtenay Emperor of Constantinople, Margrave of Namur and Marie de Brienne Regent of Constantinople and Namur, on 15 October 1273 at Foggia, Provincia di Foggia, Puglia, Italy.7,1,2
Beatrix/Beatrice (?) of Anjou and Naples died in 1275.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 5: pp. 653-4. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004074&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIdied1285. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 7: pp. 654-5.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005234&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20EMPERORS.htm#CatherineCourtenaydied1308

Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary1,2

F, #18696, b. after 1109, d. after 1146
FatherUros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1080, d. 1140
MotherAnne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium2,7,4
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary was born after 1109.2,4,6 She married Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary, son of Álmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia and Predslava Sviatopolkovna (?) of Kiev, on 28 April 1127.8,9,10,4,6
Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary was buried after 1146 at Burial location unknown

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1109
     DEATH     1146 (aged 36–37)
     She was Queen consort of Hungary through her marriage with Béla II, who ruled 1131–1141. Helena was the daughter of Duke Uroš I of Rascia and his wife, Anna Diogene-Vukanovi?. Around 1129, King Stephen II of Hungary arranged her marriage with his cousin Béla, who had been blinded on the order of the king's father, King Coloman of Hungary. The king granted estates near Tolna to the couple. Following the childless king's death, her husband was crowned King of Hungary on 28 April 1131. Helena exerted material influence over her blind husband during his reign. It was she who persuaded her husband's partisans, with her two sons in her arms, to massacre, at an assembly in Arad, 68 aristocrats they suspected of having suggested King Coloman blind her husband. When her husband died on 13 February 1141, their eldest son Géza II ascended the throne while still a child. Therefore, Helena and her brother Beloš Vukanovi?, whom she had invited to the court, governed the Kingdom of Hungary till September 1146 when he came of age.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Béla II Of of Hungary 1108–1141
     Children
          Elizabeth Of Hungary 1128–1154
          Géza II of Hungary 1130–1162
     BURIAL     Unknown
     Created by: Mademoiselle
     Added: 30 Dec 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 122482565
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.11
Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary died after 1146.2,4,6
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (): “King Béla II "Vak=the Blind" of Hungary (1131-41) -cr 28.4.1131, *1108/10, +13.2.1141, bur Székesfehérvár; m.28.4.1127 Jelena of Serbia (+after 1146)"


Per Genealogy.EU (BAlkan 4): “A4. Jelena, *after 1109, +after 1146; m.28.4.1127 King Béla II of Hungary (+13.2.1141)”.8,12

; Per Med Lands:
     "BÉLA, son of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev ([1109-13 Feb 1141, bur Székesfehérvár). He was blinded, together with his father, on the orders of his uncle King Kálmán and took refuge in the monastery of Pécsvárad[637]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Almus dux et Bela filius eius" were blinded in 1117[638]. He was appointed heir to the throne by his first cousin King István II in [1129][639]. He succeeded in 1131 as BÉLA II "Vak/the Blind" King of Hungary, crowned 28 Apr 1131, one of the rare exceptions of succession to a throne by a blind person in the Balkan region. The Chronicle of Otto of Freising records that the succession of "Bela Almi filio" was challenged by his cousin Boris[640]. King Béla was under the influence of his domineering wife who took an active part in the government of the country. A charter dated 3 Sep 1138 records the confirmation of his father´s donation by "Rege Bela secundo, bonæ memoriæ Almi ducis filio, cum Helena regina" to "ecclesiam…Martyris Margarethæ…Demesiensi"[641]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1141 of "Bela rex Ungarorum" and the accession of his son[642]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "Id Feb" in 1141 of "Bela cecus" and his burial "Albe"[643]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "Id Feb" of "Bela rex"[644]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King Béla reigned for nine years and two months and was buried at Székesfehérvár[645]. The Chronica Ungarorum records the death in 1140 of "rex Bela" and his burial "in Alba"[646]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "Id Feb" in 1141 of "rex Bela cæcus filius ducis Almus" and his burial "Albæ"[647].
     "m (28 Aug 1127) JELENA of Serbia, daughter of UROŠ I Grand Župan of Serbia & his wife Anna [Diogenissa] (after 1109-after 1146). A charter dated 3 Sep 1138 records the confirmation of his father´s donation by "Rege Bela secundo, bonæ memoriæ Almi ducis filio, cum Helena regina" to "ecclesiam…Martyris Margarethæ…Demesiensi"[648]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. She brought part of northern Serbia, probably north-eastern Bosnia and Ma?va/Macsói, to Hungary as her dowry[649]. She led a campaign of revenge against the magnates alleged to have permitted the blinding of her husband, including the execution of 68 magnates at a meeting in Arad in [1131/32][650]. "
Med Lands cites:
[637] Lázár (1993), Chapter 5. .
[638] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[639] Fine (1991), p. 236.
[640] Chronicon Ottonis Frisingensis VII. 21, MGH SS XX, p. 259.
[641] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 94.
[642] Annales Gradicenses 1141, MGH SS XVII, p. 651.
[643] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 99.
[644] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
[645] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 65, p. 143.
[646] Chronica Ungarorum, 50, p. 243.
[647] Chronicon Varadiense, 13, p. 255.
[648] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 94.
[649] Fine (1991), p. 236.
[650] Hungarian Chronicle, c. 160, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 226 footnote 17.10


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 104.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 25.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 181.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "JELENA (after 1109-after 1146). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not so far been identified. She brought part of northern Serbia, probably north-eastern Bosnia and Ma?va, to Hungary as her dowry[73]. She led a campaign of revenge against the magnates alleged to have permitted the blinding of her husband, including the execution of 68 magnates at a meeting in Arad in [1131/32][74]. A charter dated 3 Sep 1138 records the confirmation of his father’s donation by "Rege Bela secundo, bonæ memoriæ Almi ducis filio, cum Helena regina" to "ecclesiam…Martyris Margarethæ…Demesiensi"[75].
     "m (28 Apr 1127) BÉLA of Hungary, son of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev ([1109-13 Feb 1141). He succeeded in 1131 as BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[73] Fine (1991), p. 236.
[74] Hungarian Chronicle, c. 160, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 226 footnote 17.
[75] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome II, p. 94.6


; Per Genealogics:
     “Jelena was born after 1109, the daughter of Uros, count of Serbia, and Anna Diogenissa. Around 1129 King Stefan II of Hungary arranged her marriage with his cousin Béla, who had been blinded on the order of the king's father, King Kálmán of Hungary. Stefan granted estates near Tolna to the couple. They had six children of whom Geisa II, Laszlo and Elisabeth would have progeny.
     “Following the childless king's death, Jelena's husband was crowned King of Hungary on 28 April 1131. Jelena exerted material influence over her blind husband during his reign. It was she, with her two sons in her arms, who persuaded his partisans, at an assembly in Arad, to massacre 68 nobles they suspected of suggesting to King Kálmán that he have her husband blinded.
     “When her husband died on 13 February 1141, their eldest son Geisa II ascended the throne while still a child. Jelena and her brother Belos of Rascia, whom she had invited to the court, governed the kingdom of Hungary until September 1146 when he came of age.
     “It is not sure when Jelena died, though it was after Geisa came of age.”.4 Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary was also known as Jelena (?) of Rascia, Queen Consort of Hungary.11 EDV-25.

Family

Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary b. bt 1108 - 1110, d. 13 Feb 1141
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 4 page (Vukanivich family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uros: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020681&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#UrosIdiedafter1130B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#Jelenadiedafter1146
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Diogenissa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020682&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,.
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 16 June 2020), memorial page for Helena Of Rascia (1109–1146), Find a Grave Memorial no. 122482565,; Maintained by Mademoiselle (contributor 46591139) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122482565. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Vukanivich family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan4.html#J
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I13508
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,.
  16. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38763
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020758&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIV

István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary1,2

M, #18697, b. circa 1133, d. 11 April 1165
FatherBéla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary1,3,4,2,5 b. bt 1108 - 1110, d. 13 Feb 1141
MotherJelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary1,6,4,2,5 b. a 1109, d. a 1146
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary was born circa 1133.1,2,5 He married Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary, daughter of Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor and Theodora Kamaterina, in 1156.1,7,8,9,2,5,10
István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary died on 11 April 1165 at Zimony, Hungary; Murdered.1,2,5
István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary was buried after 11 April 1165 at Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary.1,5


     ; This is the same person as ”Stephen IV of Hungary” at Wikipedia and as ”IV. István magyar király” at Wikipédia (HU).11,12

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 104.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISTVÁN ([1132/33]-murdered Semlin 11 Apr 1165, bur Székesfehérvár). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Geysam, Ladizlaum, Stephanum et Almus" as the four sons of "Bela cecus"[667]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[668]. Ioannes Kinnamos names "Geizæ…fratres…Vladislaus et Stephanus"[669]. The Gesta Hungarorum names "Stephanus frater suus [Ladislai ducis]" when recording that he usurped the crown for five months and five days after the death of King István III[670]. He fled to Constantinople in [1154/55] after his maternal uncle Beloš of Serbia encouraged him to rebel against his brother King Géza. However, after Emperor Manuel I made peace with Hungary in 1156, István left for the court of Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" at Würzburg. He returned to Constantinople in 1158[671]. After the death of his brother King Géza II, he and his brother László were supported by Emperor Manuel against their nephew King István III. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus et Stephanus fratres Geyze" returned from Greece and deposed King István[672]. He succeeded his brother in 1163 as ISTVÁN IV King of Hungary, but was ousted in 1164 by Beloš of Serbia, previously regent for István's older brother King Géza II[673]. Emperor Manuel marched on Hungary with a view to restoring King István IV, but changed his mind at the border and negotiated a peace treaty with King István III. István IV unsuccessfully attempted to recapture the throne in 1165, but finding little support retreated to Srem, where he was poisoned soon after[674]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Stephanus frater suus [Ladislai ducis]" was driven from the kingdom, settled in Zemun, and was buried at Székesfehérvár[675]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "in castro Zemlen…III Id Apr" in 1173 in exile of "Stephanus" and his burial "Albe"[676].
     "m (1156 or 1158) MARIA Komnene, daughter of ISAAKIOS Komnenos & his first wife Theodora [Kamaterina] ([1144]-1190). Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[677]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "Geizæ…fratres…Stephanus" and "ex fratre neptem…Mariam, Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[678]. Her marriage was arranged by her uncle Emperor Manuel I while her husband was staying in Constantinople."
Med Lands cites:
[667] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 99.
[668] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[669] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.
[670] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 68, p. 143.
[671] Kerbl (1979), pp. 106-9.
[672] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[673] Fine (1991), p. 239.
[674] Fine (1991), pp. 239-41.
[675] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 68, p. 143.
[676] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[677] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[678] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “C3. István IV King of Hungary (1163) -cr 27.1.1163, *ca 1133, +Zimony 11.4.1165, bur Székesfehérvár; m.1156 Maria Komnena”.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Byzantium 1): “E5. [1m.] Maria Komnene; m.1156 King Stephen IV of Hungary (+1165)”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA Komnene ([1144]-1190). Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal of "Fredericus Conradi Alemannorum principis ex fratre nepos" and "Mariam Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[353]. The Fasti Corbeienses (Continuatio altera) records the proposal for Friedrich I King of Germany to marry “Mariam Isaaci Comneni filiam” which was not pursued on the advice of the Pope[354]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[355]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "Geizæ…fratres…Stephanus" and "ex fratre neptem…Mariam, Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[356]. Her marriage was arranged by her uncle Emperor Manuel I while her husband was staying in Constantinople.
     "Betrothed (1153) to FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" von Staufen Duke of Swabia & his first wife Judith of Bavaria (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190). Crowned Emperor at Rome 18 Jun 1155.
     "m (1156) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia (-murdered 11 Apr 1165). After his brother's death, he and his brother István were supported by Emperor Manuel I against their nephew King István III. He succeeded his brother 1163 as ISTVÁN IV King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[353] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber IV, 1, p. 135.
[354] Harenberg, J. C. (1758) Monumenta Historica adhuc Inedita (Braunschweig), Band I, Fasti Corbeienses, p. 79.
[355] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[356] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.9
He was King of Hungary between 1162 and 1163 at Hungary.15

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020758&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIV
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1190
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330270&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_IV_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, IV. István magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/IV._Istv%C3%A1n_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html#S4
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary1,2,3

F, #18698, b. circa 1144, d. 1190
FatherIsaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor2,3,4,5 b. 1115, d. 1174
MotherTheodora Kamaterina2,3,4,5 d. 1144
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary was born circa 1144.4 She and Friedrich I "Barbarossa" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor were engaged in 1153.3,6,4 Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary married István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary, son of Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary and Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary, in 1156.1,2,3,4,7,8,5
Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary died in 1190.4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH von Staufen, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his first wife Judith of Bavaria (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190, bur Tarsus [entrails], Antioch St Peter [flesh], Tyre Cathedral [legs]). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "regem Fridericum" as son of "ducem Fridericum"[536]. He succeeded in 1147 as FRIEDRICH III Duke of Swabia, resigning in 1152 in favour of his cousin Friedrich, son of Konrad III King of Germany, who succeeded as Duke Friedrich IV (see above). He left Germany in May 1147 with his uncle King Konrad III on the Second Crusade[537]. William of Tyre records him as "Fredericus Suevorum dux…ex fratre primogenitor nepos" in relation to King Konrad[538]. He was designated as successor by his uncle King Konrad shortly before the latter died, and was elected as FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 4 Mar 1152, crowned at Aachen 9 Mar 1152. He negotiated the Treaty of Constanz 23 Mar 1153 with Pope Eugenius III, who agreed his imperial coronation[539]. Pope Eugenius died 8 Jul 1153 before the coronation could take place. King of Italy 1154. After refusing the Romans' offer of a secular imperial coronation, he was eventually crowned as Emperor FRIEDRICH I at Rome 18 Jun 1155 by Pope Hadrian IV[540]. He succeeded as Comte de Bourgogne on his second marriage in 1156, de iure uxoris, and received the homage of the Burgundian magnates at Besançon in 1157. In 1157, he invaded Poland and compelled Duke Boles?aw IV to recognise German suzerainty[541]. Tensions in Italy, and particularly with the papacy, came to a head in 1166 when Emperor Friedrich's army marched to Rome where they defeated the Romans at Tusculum, captured the city, and enthroned his own papal candidate Pascal III, although the emperor was obliged to return to Germany as the army was decimated by malaria[542]. He invaded Italy again in 1174, and in May 1176 his troops were defeated at Legnano near Milan. A peace treaty was signed at Venice 24 Jul 1177[543]. On his return from Italy, he was crowned as king of Burgundy ("regnum Arelatense") at Arles 30 Jul 1178, thereby symbolically laying claim to the whole of Burgundy. He took the cross at Mainz 27 Mar 1188, in answer to the appeal of Pope Gregory VIII in Oct 1187 to relieve Jerusalem after its capture by Saladin, although he did not finally leave Germany until May 1189[544]. He received a warm welcome in Hungary and Serbia, but tensions developed with Emperor Isaakios II after he entered Byzantine territory 23 Jun 1189 at Brani?evo[545]. Anxious to protect his own interests, Emperor Isaakios signed a treaty of alliance with Saladin, which worsened the situation. After taking Philipopoulos [Plovdiv] and Adrianople, as well as threatening Constantinople, Emperor Friedrich forced Emperor Isaakios to give him provisions and ships to cross into Asia Minor, which he did in Mar 1190[546]. Friedrich was drowned while preparing to cross the river Calycadnus to enter Seleucia, apparently after falling into the river in heavy armour[547]. His body, ineffectively preserved in vinegar and taken with the army to Palestine, had disintegrated by the time it arrived at Antioch[548]. This accounts for the burial of different parts of his body in different places, as shown above.
     "m firstly (Eger before 2 Mar 1147, divorced Konstanz Mar 1153) as her first husband, ADELA von Vohburg heiress of Egerland, daughter of DIEPOLD [III] Markgraf von Vohburg und Cham & his [second wife Kunigunde von Beichlingen] (-19 Feb ----). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "Adelam" as daughter of "marchionem Theobaldum"[549]. The Annales Herbipolenses name "Etenim filiam Theobaldi marchionis de Voheburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa"[550]. The Urspergensium Chronicon names "Adilam filiam marchionis Diepoldi de Vohburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich I, and records her second marriage to "Dietho de Ravensburc ministerialis"[551]. The Annales Magdeburgenses record the separation of "Friedericus" and his first wife by "coram legatis apostolici" in 1153[552], the Annales Sancti Diibodi specifying Konstanz as the place of the separation[553]. She married secondly Dieto von Ravensburg, Welf minister 1152/80. The necrology of Isny records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Adelhaidis regina benefactrix"[554].
     "Betrothed (1153) to MARIA Komnene, daughter of ISAAKIOS Komnenos, sébastokrator & his first wife Theodora [Kamaterina] ([1144]-1190). Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal of "Fredericus Conradi Alemannorum principis ex fratre nepos" and "Mariam Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[555]. The Fasti Corbeienses (Continuatio altera) records the proposal for Friedrich I King of Germany to marry “Mariam Isaaci Comneni filiam” which was not pursued on the advice of the Pope[556]. She later married István of Hungary, who in 1163 succeeded as István IV King of Hungary. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[557].
     "m secondly (Würzburg 17 Jun 1156) BEATRIX Ctss [Palatine] de Bourgogne, daughter and heiress of RENAUD III Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne & his wife Agathe de Lorraine ([1145]-Jouhe, near Dôle 15 Nov 1184, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Continuatio Admuntensis records the marriage of Emperor Friedrich in 1156 to "Beatricem filiam Reginoldi comitis" after repudiating "filia Diepoldi marchionis"[558]. She was crowned empress at St Peter's in Rome 1 Aug 1167 by Pope Pascal III[559]. She was crowned as Queen of Burgundy at Vienne in Aug 1178."
Med Lands cites:
[536] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[537] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 259.
[538] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XVII.VIII, p. 770.
[539] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 141-2.
[540] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 144.
[541] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150.
[542] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 159-60.
[543] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 161.
[544] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 10-11.
[545] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 11-13.
[546] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 13-14, and Fine (1994), p. 24-25.
[547] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 15.
[548] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 17.
[549] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[550] Annales Herbipolenses 5 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[551] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 346.
[552] Annales Magdeburgenses 1153 1, MGH SS XVI, p. 191.
[553] Annales Diibodi Continuatio 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 29.
[554] Necrologium Isnense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 177.
[555] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1836) Ioannes Cinnamus, Nicephorus Bryennius, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), Ioannes Kinnamos, Liber IV, 1, p. 135.
[556] Harenberg, J. C. (1758) Monumenta Historica adhuc Inedita (Braunschweig), Band I, Fasti Corbeienses, p. 79.
[557] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1835) Nicetæ Choniatæ Historia, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[558] Continuatio Admuntensis 1156, MGH SS IX, p. 582.
[559] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH von Staufen, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his first wife Judith of Bavaria (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190, bur Tarsus [entrails], Antioch St Peter [flesh], Tyre Cathedral [legs]). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "regem Fridericum" as son of "ducem Fridericum"[536]. He succeeded in 1147 as FRIEDRICH III Duke of Swabia, resigning in 1152 in favour of his cousin Friedrich, son of Konrad III King of Germany, who succeeded as Duke Friedrich IV (see above). He left Germany in May 1147 with his uncle King Konrad III on the Second Crusade[537]. William of Tyre records him as "Fredericus Suevorum dux…ex fratre primogenitor nepos" in relation to King Konrad[538]. He was designated as successor by his uncle King Konrad shortly before the latter died, and was elected as FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 4 Mar 1152, crowned at Aachen 9 Mar 1152. He negotiated the Treaty of Constanz 23 Mar 1153 with Pope Eugenius III, who agreed his imperial coronation[539]. Pope Eugenius died 8 Jul 1153 before the coronation could take place. King of Italy 1154. After refusing the Romans' offer of a secular imperial coronation, he was eventually crowned as Emperor FRIEDRICH I at Rome 18 Jun 1155 by Pope Hadrian IV[540]. He succeeded as Comte de Bourgogne on his second marriage in 1156, de iure uxoris, and received the homage of the Burgundian magnates at Besançon in 1157. In 1157, he invaded Poland and compelled Duke Boles?aw IV to recognise German suzerainty[541]. Tensions in Italy, and particularly with the papacy, came to a head in 1166 when Emperor Friedrich's army marched to Rome where they defeated the Romans at Tusculum, captured the city, and enthroned his own papal candidate Pascal III, although the emperor was obliged to return to Germany as the army was decimated by malaria[542]. He invaded Italy again in 1174, and in May 1176 his troops were defeated at Legnano near Milan. A peace treaty was signed at Venice 24 Jul 1177[543]. On his return from Italy, he was crowned as king of Burgundy ("regnum Arelatense") at Arles 30 Jul 1178, thereby symbolically laying claim to the whole of Burgundy. He took the cross at Mainz 27 Mar 1188, in answer to the appeal of Pope Gregory VIII in Oct 1187 to relieve Jerusalem after its capture by Saladin, although he did not finally leave Germany until May 1189[544]. He received a warm welcome in Hungary and Serbia, but tensions developed with Emperor Isaakios II after he entered Byzantine territory 23 Jun 1189 at Brani?evo[545]. Anxious to protect his own interests, Emperor Isaakios signed a treaty of alliance with Saladin, which worsened the situation. After taking Philipopoulos [Plovdiv] and Adrianople, as well as threatening Constantinople, Emperor Friedrich forced Emperor Isaakios to give him provisions and ships to cross into Asia Minor, which he did in Mar 1190[546]. Friedrich was drowned while preparing to cross the river Calycadnus to enter Seleucia, apparently after falling into the river in heavy armour[547]. His body, ineffectively preserved in vinegar and taken with the army to Palestine, had disintegrated by the time it arrived at Antioch[548]. This accounts for the burial of different parts of his body in different places, as shown above.
     "m firstly (Eger before 2 Mar 1147, divorced Konstanz Mar 1153) as her first husband, ADELA von Vohburg heiress of Egerland, daughter of DIEPOLD [III] Markgraf von Vohburg und Cham & his [second wife Kunigunde von Beichlingen] (-19 Feb ----). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "Adelam" as daughter of "marchionem Theobaldum"[549]. The Annales Herbipolenses name "Etenim filiam Theobaldi marchionis de Voheburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa"[550]. The Urspergensium Chronicon names "Adilam filiam marchionis Diepoldi de Vohburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich I, and records her second marriage to "Dietho de Ravensburc ministerialis"[551]. The Annales Magdeburgenses record the separation of "Friedericus" and his first wife by "coram legatis apostolici" in 1153[552], the Annales Sancti Diibodi specifying Konstanz as the place of the separation[553]. She married secondly Dieto von Ravensburg, Welf minister 1152/80. The necrology of Isny records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Adelhaidis regina benefactrix"[554].
     "Betrothed (1153) to MARIA Komnene, daughter of ISAAKIOS Komnenos, sébastokrator & his first wife Theodora [Kamaterina] ([1144]-1190). Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal of "Fredericus Conradi Alemannorum principis ex fratre nepos" and "Mariam Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[555]. The Fasti Corbeienses (Continuatio altera) records the proposal for Friedrich I King of Germany to marry “Mariam Isaaci Comneni filiam” which was not pursued on the advice of the Pope[556]. She later married István of Hungary, who in 1163 succeeded as István IV King of Hungary. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[557].
     "m secondly (Würzburg 17 Jun 1156) BEATRIX Ctss [Palatine] de Bourgogne, daughter and heiress of RENAUD III Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne & his wife Agathe de Lorraine ([1145]-Jouhe, near Dôle 15 Nov 1184, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Continuatio Admuntensis records the marriage of Emperor Friedrich in 1156 to "Beatricem filiam Reginoldi comitis" after repudiating "filia Diepoldi marchionis"[558]. She was crowned empress at St Peter's in Rome 1 Aug 1167 by Pope Pascal III[559]. She was crowned as Queen of Burgundy at Vienne in Aug 1178. "
Med Lands cites:
[536] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[537] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 259.
[538] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XVII.VIII, p. 770.
[539] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 141-2.
[540] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 144.
[541] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150.
[542] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 159-60.
[543] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 161.
[544] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 10-11.
[545] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 11-13.
[546] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 13-14, and Fine (1994), p. 24-25.
[547] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 15.
[548] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 17.
[549] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[550] Annales Herbipolenses 5 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[551] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 346.
[552] Annales Magdeburgenses 1153 1, MGH SS XVI, p. 191.
[553] Annales Diibodi Continuatio 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 29.
[554] Necrologium Isnense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 177.
[555] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1836) Ioannes Cinnamus, Nicephorus Bryennius, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), Ioannes Kinnamos, Liber IV, 1, p. 135.
[556] Harenberg, J. C. (1758) Monumenta Historica adhuc Inedita (Braunschweig), Band I, Fasti Corbeienses, p. 79.
[557] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1835) Nicetæ Choniatæ Historia, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[558] Continuatio Admuntensis 1156, MGH SS IX, p. 582.
[559] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “C3. István IV King of Hungary (1163) -cr 27.1.1163, *ca 1133, +Zimony 11.4.1165, bur Székesfehérvár; m.1156 Maria Komnena”.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISTVÁN ([1132/33]-murdered Semlin 11 Apr 1165, bur Székesfehérvár). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Geysam, Ladizlaum, Stephanum et Almus" as the four sons of "Bela cecus"[667]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[668]. Ioannes Kinnamos names "Geizæ…fratres…Vladislaus et Stephanus"[669]. The Gesta Hungarorum names "Stephanus frater suus [Ladislai ducis]" when recording that he usurped the crown for five months and five days after the death of King István III[670]. He fled to Constantinople in [1154/55] after his maternal uncle Beloš of Serbia encouraged him to rebel against his brother King Géza. However, after Emperor Manuel I made peace with Hungary in 1156, István left for the court of Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" at Würzburg. He returned to Constantinople in 1158[671]. After the death of his brother King Géza II, he and his brother László were supported by Emperor Manuel against their nephew King István III. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus et Stephanus fratres Geyze" returned from Greece and deposed King István[672]. He succeeded his brother in 1163 as ISTVÁN IV King of Hungary, but was ousted in 1164 by Beloš of Serbia, previously regent for István's older brother King Géza II[673]. Emperor Manuel marched on Hungary with a view to restoring King István IV, but changed his mind at the border and negotiated a peace treaty with King István III. István IV unsuccessfully attempted to recapture the throne in 1165, but finding little support retreated to Srem, where he was poisoned soon after[674]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Stephanus frater suus [Ladislai ducis]" was driven from the kingdom, settled in Zemun, and was buried at Székesfehérvár[675]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "in castro Zemlen…III Id Apr" in 1173 in exile of "Stephanus" and his burial "Albe"[676].
     "m (1156 or 1158) MARIA Komnene, daughter of ISAAKIOS Komnenos & his first wife Theodora [Kamaterina] ([1144]-1190). Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[677]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "Geizæ…fratres…Stephanus" and "ex fratre neptem…Mariam, Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[678]. Her marriage was arranged by her uncle Emperor Manuel I while her husband was staying in Constantinople."
Med Lands cites:
[667] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 99.
[668] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[669] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.
[670] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 68, p. 143.
[671] Kerbl (1979), pp. 106-9.
[672] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[673] Fine (1991), p. 239.
[674] Fine (1991), pp. 239-41.
[675] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 68, p. 143.
[676] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[677] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[678] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.8


; This is the same person as ”Maria Komnene, Queen of Hungary” at Wikipedia and as ”Komnénosz Mária magyar királyné” at Wikipédia (HU).10,11 Maria Comnena of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary was also known as Maria Komnene of Byzantium, Queen of Hungary.10

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:154, 177.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Byzantium 1): “E5. [1m.] Maria Komnene; m.1156 King Stephen IV of Hungary (+1165)”.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA Komnene ([1144]-1190). Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal of "Fredericus Conradi Alemannorum principis ex fratre nepos" and "Mariam Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[353]. The Fasti Corbeienses (Continuatio altera) records the proposal for Friedrich I King of Germany to marry “Mariam Isaaci Comneni filiam” which was not pursued on the advice of the Pope[354]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Bladisthlabum" as the two brothers of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas", stating that István married "Mariam…imperatoris neptem, Isaacio sebastocratore natam"[355]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "Geizæ…fratres…Stephanus" and "ex fratre neptem…Mariam, Isaacii sebastocratoris filiam"[356]. Her marriage was arranged by her uncle Emperor Manuel I while her husband was staying in Constantinople.
     "Betrothed (1153) to FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" von Staufen Duke of Swabia & his first wife Judith of Bavaria (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190). Crowned Emperor at Rome 18 Jun 1155.
     "m (1156) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia (-murdered 11 Apr 1165). After his brother's death, he and his brother István were supported by Emperor Manuel I against their nephew King István III. He succeeded his brother 1163 as ISTVÁN IV King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[353] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber IV, 1, p. 135.
[354] Harenberg, J. C. (1758) Monumenta Historica adhuc Inedita (Braunschweig), Band I, Fasti Corbeienses, p. 79.
[355] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[356] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 1, p. 203.4
She was Queen consort of Hungary between 1163 and 1165.10

Family 2

István/Stephen IV (?) King of Hungary b. c 1133, d. 11 Apr 1165

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1190. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330270&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020758&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIV
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html#S4
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Komnene,_Queen_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, Komnénosz Mária magyar királyné: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komn%C3%A9nosz_M%C3%A1ria_magyar_kir%C3%A1lyn%C3%A9. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html

László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary1,2

M, #18699, b. 1131, d. 1162
FatherBéla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary3,1,4,5 b. bt 1108 - 1110, d. 13 Feb 1141
MotherJelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary3,1,6,5 b. a 1109, d. a 1146
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary was born in 1131.1 He married Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland, daughter of Boleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland and Salome (?) von Berg-Schelklingen, in 1136;
Her 1st husband.1,7,8 László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary and Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland were divorced before 1148.7,8
László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary died in 1162; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 page) says d. 14 Jan 1163.2,1
László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary was buried at Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary.1


     László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary was also known as Laszlo II (Ladislas) King of Hungary.2 He was King of Hungary in 1162 at Hungary.2

Family

Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland b. c 1132, d. bt 8 Aug 1172 - 1174
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38763
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judyta of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030628&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Judytadied11701176

Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary1

M, #18700, b. 1147, d. 4 March 1172
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary2,1,3,4,5 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary2,1,3,6,5 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary was born in 1147.7,1 He married Unknown Iaroslavna (?) of Galicia, daughter of Yaroslav I "Osmomysl" Vladimirkovitch (?) Prince of Galicia and Olga Georgievna (?) of Suzdal, in 1167; his 1st wife.1,8,9,3 Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary married Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary, daughter of Heinrich II Jasomirgott (?) Margrave, Duke of Austria, Duke of Bavaria and Theodora Comnena Duchess of Austria, in 1168; her 1st husband; his 2nd wife; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 and Babenberg pages) says m. 1168.10,7,1,11,3 Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary and Unknown Iaroslavna (?) of Galicia were divorced in 1168.1,8,9,3
Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary died on 4 March 1172 at Esztergom, Hungary; Murdered.1,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ISTVÁN (1147-murdered Esztergom 4 Mar 1172, bur Esztergom). The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[702]. The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[703]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Belam" as the two sons of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[704]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1162 of "Geyza rex" and the accession of "filius eius Stephanus"[705]. He succeeded his father in 1162 as ISTVÁN III King of Hungary. "Stephanus…rex Hungarie, beate memorie Geyse regis filius" granted property to "hominem in Supruniensis castri…Forcos", in the presence of "Heidrico palatino comite, Gabriele curiale comite, Ampudino comite, Laurencio comite, Rubeno comite, F--- comite, Dionisio comite, Vidone Pristaldo", by charter dated 1162[706]. His uncles were supported by Emperor Manuel I and succeeded in turn as kings of Hungary. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus et Stephanus fratres Geyze" returned from Greece and deposed István who fled "in Poson"[707]. István III was restored in 1164 by Beloš of Serbia, previously regent for his father. Emperor Manuel marched on Hungary with a view to restoring King István IV, but changed his mind at the border and negotiated a peace treaty under which he recognised István III as king and confirmed István's younger brother as Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia and his successor[708]. Further disputes with Byzantium followed, but Hungary was finally defeated by Byzantine forces at Zemun in 1167, after which it was forced to accept the loss of Srem, Dalmatia and part of Croatia[709]. István III King of Hungary granted "villam Luchman" to "nobiles Godefridus et Albertus" Teutonic knights who had left "terra natalis Patriæ" during the reign of King Géza II by charter dated 1171[710]. This charter represents the earliest reference so far found to the presence of Teutonic Knights in Hungary. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King István reigned for eleven years and nine months and was buried at Székesfehérvár[711]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "IV Non Mar" in 1173 of "Stephanus filius Geyse" and his burial "Strigony"[712].
     "Betrothed (1167, repudiated 1168) --- Iaroslavna of Galich, daughter of IAROSLAV Vladimirkovich "Osmomysl" Prince of Galich & his first wife Olga Iurievna of Kiev. Baumgarten mentions the betrothal of King István and the daughter of Prince Iaroslav, citing secondary sources in support, but comments that the marriage was not finalised and that she was sent back from Hungary in 1169[713]. Europäische Stammtafeln refers to this as King István's first marriage, stating that she was repudiated in 1168, but it is not known whether this statement is based on primary sources[714].
     "m (1168) as her first husband, AGNES of Austria, daughter of HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Duke of Austria [Babenberg] & his second wife Theodora Komnene ([1154]-13 Jan 1182, bur Vienna Schottenkloster). A manuscript Genealogia marchionum Austrie, written [1181/92], names "Liupoldum et Hainricum filios et filiam Agnetem" as the children of "Hainricus dux ex coniuge Theodora Greca", adding that Agnes married firstly "Stephano regi Ungarorum" and secondly "Herimanno duci Karinthie"[715]. She married secondly Hermann II Duke of Carinthia."
Med Lands cites:
[702] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[703] Florianus, M. (ed.) (1884) Chronicon Dubnicense, Historiæ Hungaricæ fontes domestici, Pars prima, Scriptores, Vol. III (Leipzig) Chronicon Zagrabiense, 14, p. 256.
[704] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[705] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[706] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 164.
[707] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[708] Fine (1991), pp. 239-40.
[709] Fine (1991), p. 242.
[710] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 184.
[711] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 67, p. 143.
[712] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 101.
[713] Baumgarten (1927), pp. 16 and 71, citing Grot, De l'Histoire de la Hongrie et du monde slave, Annal. Reg. Hung., Lib. III, p. 157, and Karamzine II note 40.
[714] ES II 154.
[715] Jaksch, A. von (ed.) (1904) Monumenta historica ducatus Carinthiæ, Band III, Die Kärntner Geschichtsquellen 811-1202 (Klagenfurt) ("Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904)"), 1164, p. 436.3
He was King of Hungary between 1161 and 1173 at Hungary.12

Family 2

Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary b. c 1154, d. 3 Jan 1182

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38766
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIII. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik3.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IaroslavnaM1167IstvanIIIHungary.
  10. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38767
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary1,2

F, #18701, b. circa 1154, d. 3 January 1182
FatherHeinrich II Jasomirgott (?) Margrave, Duke of Austria, Duke of Bavaria3,2,4,5 b. 1112, d. 13 Jan 1177
MotherTheodora Comnena Duchess of Austria3,2,4,6 b. c 1130, d. 2 Jan 1184
Last Edited21 Aug 2020
     Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary married Hermann II (?) Duke of Carinthia, son of Engelbert III (?) Graf von Sponheim, Markgraf von Istrien and Tuscany and Mathilde (?) von Sulzbach; her 2nd husband.3,2,1 Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary was born circa 1154.3,2 She married Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary, son of Géza II (?) King of Hungary and Ievfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary, in 1168; her 1st husband; his 2nd wife; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 and Babenberg pages) says m. 1168.7,3,8,2,9
Agnes (?) of Austria, Dowager Queen of Hungary died on 3 January 1182.3,2

Family 2

Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary b. 1147, d. 4 Mar 1172

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Sponheim 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/sponheim/sponh1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#HeinrichIIdied1177B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027272&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodora Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027328&tree=LEO
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38767
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIII
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Sponh 1 page (the House of Sponheim): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/sponheim/sponh1.html

Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia1,2

M, #18702, b. circa 1080, d. 1140
FatherHiubomir (Voulkan) (?)2
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia married Anne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium, daughter of Konstantinos/Constantine Diogenes and Theodora Comnena.2,3 Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia was born circa 1080.1,2
Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia died in 1140.1,4
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "One Uros I Nemanjic became Zupan of Serbia (1115-ca 1146), first under Hungarian, then Byzantine suzerainty, *ca 1080, +ca 1146; m.Anna, probably dau.of Konstantinos Diogenes AND/OR a niece of Emperor Alexios of Byzantium; they had issue."1

; Per Genealogics: "Uros I Nemanjic was born about 1080, the son of Hliubomir. At the age of about fourteen Uros was a hostage in Constantinople, with his younger brother Stefan Vukan. He became _Veliki-Zupan_ (count) of Serbia and acknowledged the overlordship first of Hungary and afterwards of Byzantium. However, this did not stop him from taking the castle Ras from Byzantium in 1129. He married Anna Diogenissa, daughter of Konstantin Diogenes and Theodora Komnena, and they had a son Uros II Primslav and three (possibly four) daughters, of whom Marija and Jelena would have progeny. Uros I died about 1040."4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 104.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 25.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 181.
4. Der Europaischer Kayser und königlichen Häuser, 1730, Lohmeier, G.4
EDV-27. Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia was also known as Urosch I (?) Count of Serbia.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "UROŠ, [son or nephew] of VUKAN Župan of Raška ([1080]-after 1130). The Alexeiad records that "Bolkan" left "his own nephews Uresis and Stephen Bolkan" as hostages with the emperor, dated from the context to [1094/95][62]. He succeeded his [uncle] as UROŠ I Veliki [Grand] Župan of Serbia. In 1125, he helped Djordje to oust Grubeša King of Duklja[63]. After the Byzantine offensive in 1126, Serbia was forced to accept Byzantine suzerainty[64].
     "m ANNA [Diogene], daughter of [KONSTANTINOS Diogenes & his wife Theodora Komnene]. Her possible parentage and marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[65], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[62] Alexeiad, Book 9, p. 290.
[63] Fine, J. V. A. (1991) The Early Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 233.
[64] Fine (1991), p. 235.
[65] ES III 181.5


; Per Med Lands: " [ANNA Diogene. Her possible parentage and marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[692], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. m UROŠ Grand Župan of Serbia, nephew of VUKAN Župan of Raška, son of --- ([1080]-after 1130).]"
Med Lands cites: [692] ES III 181.6 He was Zupan of Serbia between 1115 and 1146.1

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 4 page (Vukanivich family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uros: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020681&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Diogenissa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020682&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uros: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020681&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#UrosIdiedafter1130B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AnnaDiogeneMUrosSerbia
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marija of Serbia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304884&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#ZavidB
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#Jelenadiedafter1146

Anne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium1,2

F, #18703
FatherKonstantinos/Constantine Diogenes2,3,4 d. 1074
MotherTheodora Comnena2,5,4 b. 1053
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Anne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium married Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia, son of Hiubomir (Voulkan) (?).6,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "UROŠ, [son or nephew] of VUKAN Župan of Raška ([1080]-after 1130). The Alexeiad records that "Bolkan" left "his own nephews Uresis and Stephen Bolkan" as hostages with the emperor, dated from the context to [1094/95][62]. He succeeded his [uncle] as UROŠ I Veliki [Grand] Župan of Serbia. In 1125, he helped Djordje to oust Grubeša King of Duklja[63]. After the Byzantine offensive in 1126, Serbia was forced to accept Byzantine suzerainty[64].
     "m ANNA [Diogene], daughter of [KONSTANTINOS Diogenes & his wife Theodora Komnene]. Her possible parentage and marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[65], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[62] Alexeiad, Book 9, p. 290.
[63] Fine, J. V. A. (1991) The Early Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 233.
[64] Fine (1991), p. 235.
[65] ES III 181.7


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 25.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 181.8,2


; Anna, probably dau.of Konstantinos Diogenes AND/OR a niece of Emperor Alexios of Byzantium.1 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands: " [ANNA Diogene. Her possible parentage and marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[692], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. m UROŠ Grand Župan of Serbia, nephew of VUKAN Župan of Raška, son of --- ([1080]-after 1130).]"
Med Lands cites: [692] ES III 181.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 4 page (Vukanivich family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Diogenissa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020682&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konstantinos Diogenes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280739&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AnnaDiogeneMUrosSerbia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodora Komnena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280740&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uros: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020681&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#UrosIdiedafter1130B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Diogenissa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020682&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marija of Serbia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304884&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#ZavidB
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO

Hiubomir (Voulkan) (?)1

M, #18704
FatherStephanus (?)2
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     EDV-27 GKJ-28.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25133
  2. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25134
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uros: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020681&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Stephanus (?)1

M, #18705
ReferenceEDV28
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     EDV-28. Stephanus (?) was a Greek priest.1

Bardas Skleros Emperor of Byzantium1

M, #18706, b. circa 935
FatherPhoteinos/Pantherios (Munir) Skleros2,3 d. a 990
MotherGregoria (?)4 b. 910
Last Edited12 Jun 2020
     Bardas Skleros Emperor of Byzantium was born circa 935.1
     ; As the distinguished commander of the Eastern armies, he cowed the Empire's once mighty Arab neighbours into paying it tribute. His brothers-in-law were the glorious soldier-emperor Johannes I Tzimiskes and Michael Bourtzes, a popular hero who recaptured Antioch from the Arabs in 969.1

; Leo van de Pas cites: Genealogists' Magazine Journal of the Society of Genealogists London, Reference: June 1991 730.1
;      NB: I have chosen to follow the descent of the Skleros family as outlined in the Wikipédia (Fr.) entry, and by Williams [2004]. This shows four children for Photeinos, including Romanos.
     In recent years Genealogics has adjusted it's line. At one point, Genealogics showed Romanos as the grandson of Photeinos (son of Bardas). As of April 2020, Romanos seems to have disappeared from Genealogics.
     Med Lands still shows Romanos as the son of Bardas, not of Photeinos (Pantherios).
GA Vaut.5,3,6,2,7 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 976 and 979.1 He was Emperor of Byzantium in 987.1 He was Emperor of Byzantium in 989.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bardas Skleros: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220748&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#RomanosSklerossonofBardasA. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Photeinos (Munir) Skleros: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00215855&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gregoria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00215856&tree=LEO
  5. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Sklèros: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skl%C3%A8ros (See genealogical chart). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  6. [S1669] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 1 Aug 2004: "Re: Empress Theophano, wife of Otto II"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Aug 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 1 Aug 2004."
  7. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 7 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."

UIlrich (?) of Bohemia1

M, #18707
FatherVratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia1,2 b. c 1035, d. 14 Jan 1093
MotherSwietoslawa/Swatawa (?) of Poland1 b. c 1048, d. 1 Sep 1126
Last Edited2 Dec 2019
     UIlrich (?) of Bohemia died; died young.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 24.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ulrich of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330325&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020270&tree=LEO

Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir1,2

M, #18708, d. May 1123
FatherSviatopolk II Mikhail Iziaslavich (?) Grand Prince of Kiev1,2,3,4 b. c 1050, d. 16 Apr 1113
Motherunknown (?)2,4
ReferenceEDV28
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir married NN (?) of Hungary, daughter of Geza I (?) King of Hungary and NN Synadene of Byzantium, Queen Consort of Hungary, before 1091; his 1st wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 1091; Rurik 4 page says m. ca 1090; Med Lands ays m. bef 1091.5,1,2,4 Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir married NN Yaroslawa (?) of Poland, daughter of Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland and Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia, before 1108;
His 2nd wife. Leo van de Pas says m. 1108; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says m. bef 1108l Med Lands says m. bef 1108.6,1,7,2,8,4 Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir married Rogneda/Sviatoliuba (?) of Kiev, daughter of Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev and Kristina Ingesdotter (Christina) (?) of Sweden, on 29 June 1112;
His 3rd wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 29 Jun 1112; Rurik 4 page says m. 12.5.1112.9,10,2,11,4 Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir and Rogneda/Sviatoliuba (?) of Kiev were divorced in 1118.2,11,4
Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir died in May 1123; killed in battle.1,7,2,4
     EDV-28.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "[1m.] Yaroslav, Pr of Volynya (1100-18), +k.a.1123; 1m: ca 1090 N, dau.of Ladislas I of Hungary; 2m: ca 1108 N, dau.of king Wladislaw I of Poland; 3m: 12.5.1112 (div 1118) Sviatoliuba of Kiev (+1119), dau.of Mstislav "the Great"."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:130.10 Yaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch (?) Prince of Volynya, Grand Duke of Vladimir was also known as Yaroslav I (?) Gr Duke of Vladimir.1,7

; Per Med Lands:
     "IAROSLAV Sviatopolkovich, son of SVIATOPOLK II Iziaslavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife --- (-killed in battle May 1123). The Primary Chronicle names Iaroslav, son of Sviatopolk, recording that his father installed him in Vladimir[706]. He was installed as Prince of Volynia at the conference of Uvetichi 30 Aug 1100[707]. He fought "the Yatvyag people" in 1113[708]. He was expelled in 1118 by Vladimir "Monomakh" Grand Prince of Kiev, who replaced him by own son Andrei[709]. As Iaroslav never became Grand Prince of Kiev, his descendants were effectively excluded from the succession in accordance with the family tradition referred to in the introduction to Chapter 1, Part B.
     "m firstly (before 1091) --- of Hungary, daughter of LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary & his wife Adelheid von Rheinfelden (-before 1106). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 1091 under which her father "Ladislauo…Rex" founded the church of St Egidius, Sumich, witnessed by "Dux Lambertus frater eius, Dux David consobrinus, Gerazclauus filius regis Rutenorum gener ipsius…"[710]. Baumgarten refers to the wife of Prince Iaroslav as the daughter of King László but only cites one secondary source in support[711].
     "m secondly (before 1108) --- of Poland, daughter of W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland & his third wife Judith-Maria of Germany (-before 12 May 1112). The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to (but does not name) the three daughters of King W?adys?aw and his second wife, specifying that one of them "in Rusia viro nupsit"[712]. Baumgarten records the parentage of, but does not name, the second wife of Prince Iaroslav but cites only one secondary source in support[713].
     "m thirdly (1112 after 29 Jun, repudiated 1118) --- Mstislavna, daughter of MSTISLAV I Vladimirovich "the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife Christine of Sweden. The marriage of "the daughter of Mstislav" with Iaroslavich Sviatopolkovich is referred to in the Chronicle of Novgorod[714].
     "Iaroslav & his second wife had two children (all of whom, together with their descendants named below, are named by Baumgarten with primary sources[715])"
Med Lands cites:
[706] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1100, p. 199.
[707] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 271.
[708] Novgorod Chronicle 1113, p. 8.
[709] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 340.
[710] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome I, p. 468.
[711] Baumgarten (1927), p. 16, citing Wertner Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 205-10.
[712] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[713] Baumgarten (1927), p. 11, citing Balzer, Genealogia Piastów 105.
[714] Novgorod Chronicle 1113, p. 8.4
He was Prince of Volynya between 1100 and 1118.2

Family 1

NN (?) of Hungary d. b 1106
Child

Family 2

NN Yaroslawa (?) of Poland b. c 1089, d. b 12 May 1112
Children

Family 3

Rogneda/Sviatoliuba (?) of Kiev d. May 1123
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313560&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svjatopolk II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027056&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IaroslavSviatopolkovichdied1123B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330284&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027258&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#DauWladislawIdiedbefore12Oct1112
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Kiev: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330283&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jaroslaw I Swjatopolkowitsch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313560&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Georgij Jaroslawitsch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313558&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IuriiIaroslavichTurovdied1167.

Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia1,2

M, #18709, b. circa 909, d. 15 July 967
FatherVratislav I (?) Duke of Bohemia1,3 b. 888, d. 13 Feb 921
MotherDrahomira ze Stodor (?)1,4,5 b. c 890, d. a 935
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited8 Jul 2020
     Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia married Biogata (?) von Stockow.6,2,1,7 Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia was born circa 909 at Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now); Med Lands says b. 908/10.8,7
Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia died on 15 July 967; Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 1 page) says d. 15 July 973 or 976.1,2,7
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.8 GAV-29.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Boleslaw was the second son of Wratislaw I, duke of Bohemia and Drahomira von Stodar. Boleslaw was duke of Bohemia from 929 to his death.
     "Boleslaw is notorious for the murder, possibly at the behest of his mother Drahomira, of his brother Wenceslas (later canonised as St. Wenceslas), the result of which brought him to the Czech ducal throne. Wenceslas was murdered during a feast on 28 September 929, on the day when Boleslaw's first son was born. He received the strange name of Strachkwas, which meant 'a dreadful feast'. Being remorseful for what he had done, Boleslaw promised to devote his son to religion and educate him as a clergyman. He kept his word.
     "Despite the fratricide, Boleslaw is generally respected by Czech historians as an energetic ruler. Citing Wenceslas' religious policies as the cause of Boleslaw's fratricide seems unlikely as Boleslaw in no way impeded the growth of Christianity in Bohemia, and in fact he actually sent his daughter Mlada, a nun, to Rome to ask permission to make Prague a bishopric.
     "One major policy shift after the death of Wenceslas related to Czech-German relations. It is usually asserted that Wenceslas was an obedient client of the German King Heinrich 'the Fowler'. Boleslaw, on the other hand, found himself almost immediately at war with Heinrich's successor Otto 'the Great'. This conflict, presumably consisting of border raids (the general pattern of warfare in this region at the time) between Boleslaw on one side and the margrave of the Ostmark on the other, reached its conclusion in 950 when Boleslaw signed a peace with Otto. It cannot be said for certain if Boleslaw became a vassal of the German king, but it is known that he led a Czech force in alliance with Otto at the great victory over the Magyars at the Lech river (on 10 August 955). He had also helped Otto to crush an uprising of Slavs on the Lower Elbe in 953.
     "Czech historians also claim that Boleslaw expanded his power into Silesia, Lusatia, and Moravia, but no dates are given for these alleged conquests. If they did occur, they must have been only transitory gains because Boleslaw's successors had to conquer them all over again. Boleslaw saw the growth of Polish strength to the north of his borders and he accordingly arranged for his daughter Dobrawa to marry the Piast prince Mieszko I in 965. Boleslaw died on 15 July 967 and was succeeded by his son Boleslaw 'the Pious'."1



; Per Med Lands
     "BOLESLAV of Bohemia, son of VRATISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Drahomira ze Stodor ([908/10]-15 Jul [967]). The Chronica Boemorum names "Wincezlaum…et Bolezlaum" sons of Wratislav and Dragomir[27]. His birth date range is estimated from the birth date of his second son and the estimated birth date of Boleslav's older brother. "Bolezlav" is named as younger brother of "Vencezlaum" in the Vita Vencezslavi, which specifies that he was "mentis perversitate et actuum qualitate execrandus, diabolico tactu instinctus"[28]. He succeeded in 935, after murdering his brother, as BOLESLAV I "der Grausame" Duke of the Bohemians. His accession marked the start of a period of hostile relations with the empire until Otto I King of Germany forced Duke Boleslav to pay tribute fourteen years later, and placed him, according to Thietmar, "in the custody of his brother Heinrich Duke of Bavaria"[29]. The Bohemians helped King Otto to defeat the Hungarians at Lechfeld near Augsburg in 955, and afterwards crossed the Carpathian mountains and occupied Krakow and Silesia[30]. In 965, Duke Boleslav formed an alliance with Mieszko I Prince of Poland, confirmed by the marriage of the latter to Boleslav's daughter[31]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death of Boleslav "967 Id Iul"[32]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 967 of "Boleslaus Sacuus filius Wratislai"[33].
     "m BIAGOTA, daughter of ---. The Chronica Boemorum names "Ztrahquaz" as wife of Boleslav[34]. "
Med Lands cites:
[27] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45.
[28] Gumpoldi Vita Vencezlavi ducis Bohemiæ 15, MGH SS IV, p. 210.
[29] Thietmar 2.2, p. 90.
[30] Dzi?cio? (1963), p. 322.
[31] Dzi?cio? (1963), pp. 130-1.
[32] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.21, MGH SS IX, p. 48.
[33] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[34] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.17, MGH SS IX, p. 46.7


; Per Wikipedai:
     "Boleslaus I the Cruel, also called Boleslav I (Czech: Boleslav I. Ukrutný) (c.?915 – 15 July, 967 or 972), a member of the P?emyslid dynasty, was ruler (kníže, "duke" or "prince") of the Duchy of Bohemia from 935 to his death. He is notorious for the murder of his elder brother Wenceslaus, through which he became duke. Despite his complicity in this fratricide, Boleslaus is generally respected by Czech historians as an energetic ruler who significantly strengthened the Bohemian state and expanded its territory. His accomplishments include significant economic development due to an expansion in trade, the introduction of silver mining and the minting of the first local coinage, the Prague denarius.
Early life
     "Boleslaus was the son of Duke Vratislaus I of Bohemia (d. 921) by his marriage with Drahomíra (d. 934), probably a Hevellian princess. His father took over the rule in Prague during the time of his birth, he had to deal with both the exertion of influence by both the East Frankish dukes of Bavaria and Saxony and the Magyar incursions.
     "Boleslaus and his elder brother Wenceslaus were taught the Christian faith and reading the Psalms by their grandmother Ludmila. There is evidence that Boleslaus's pagan mother might [have] influenced him against his brother and Christianity, though he later repented. In no way did he impede the growth of Christianity during his reign in Bohemia, and in fact, he actually sent his daughter Mlada, a nun, to Pope John XIII in Rome to ask permission to make Prague a bishopric.
     "Upon his death, Vratislaus was succeeded by his eldest son Wenceslaus. While the external situation worsened with the alliance between Duke Arnulf of Bavaria and the Saxon duke Henry the Fowler, King of East Francia from 919, he could only maintain his independence by entering an agreement on an annual tribute payable to the East Frankish (German) ruler. Shortly afterwards, in 935 (or in 929, according to other sources), Wenceslaus was murdered at Stará Boleslav to where he was invited by Boleslaus. According to tradition, he was killed during the feast of Saints Cosmas and Damian (September 28), at precisely the time when a son of Boleslaus was born. The child was given a strange name: Strachkvas, which means "a dreadful feast". Remorseful for what he had done, Boleslaus promised to have his son educated as a clergyman and devoted his life to religion.
Reign
     "Once having taking over the Prague throne, one of Boleslaus's major concerns was the tribute paid yearly to the East Frankish kings as stipulated in the peace treaty that Henry the Fowler had established with Boleslaus's brother Wenceslaus. He stopped the payment shortly after he ascended the throne, which led to a prolonged war with Henry's successor King Otto. In 935 Boleslaus attacked the Thurinian allies of the Saxons in the northwest and defeated two of Otto's armies (from Thuringia and Merseburg). The war then deteriorated to border raids (the general pattern of warfare in this region at the time) and reached its conclusion in 950, when King Otto besieged a castle owned by Boleslaus's son. This prompted Boleslaus to sign a peace treaty with Otto. Although he remained undefeated, he promised to resume the payment of tribute.
     "Five years later, the armies of Czechs and Germans allied against the Magyars in the victorious Battle of Lechfeld on 10 August 955. After the battle, the remainder of the huge Magyar army turned to Bohemia, where it was crushed by Boleslaus. Shortly afterwards, in October, he also helped Otto to crush an uprising of Slavic tribes led by the Obotrite princes Nakon and Stojgn?v on the Lower Elbe river in the Battle on the Raxa.[1]
     "The defeat of invading Hungarians brought the same benefits to both Germans and Czechs. Less obvious is what Boleslaus expected to gain from his participation in Otto's war against the Obotrite princes in far north. He probably wanted to ensure that his powerful German neighbors did not interfere with him in expanding the Bohemian territories to the east.[2] As a result of the victory, Boleslaus freed the Moravian lands from Magyar raids and expanded his territory, which in turn was later conquered by Polish dukes and became known as Upper Silesia and Lesser Poland. By occupying the city of Kraków, he controlled important trade routes from Prague to Kiev and Lviv. To defuse the Bohemian-Polish conflict, Duke Boleslav married his daughter Dobrawa to the pagan Piast prince Mieszko I in 963/964, and helped bring Christianity to Poland. He even allied with Mieszko in the campaign against the Saxon count Wichmann the Younger.
     "According to the medieval chronicler Cosmas of Prague, Duke Boleslaus died on 15 July 967, a date questioned by recent research. He was succeeded by his eldest son Boleslaus the Pious.
Marriage and children
     "Boleslav's wife may have been Biagota. It is unknown if she was the mother of all his four adult children:
** Doubravka of Bohemia,
** Boleslaus II, Duke of Bohemia,
** Strachkvas of Bohemia,
** Mlada of Bohemia.

Sources
** Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Line 244-7
** The Plantagenet Ancestry by William Henry Turton, Page 85
1. "Boje polabských Slovan? za nezávislost v letech 928 – 955" (in Czech). E-st?edov?k.cz. Retrieved 7 September 2013.
2. "Boleslav I." (in Czech). leccos.com. Retrieved 4 September 2013."9

Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia was also known as Boleslaus I (?) Duke of Bohemia.9

; Per Enc. of World History: "BOLESLAV I. He seems to have carried on constant warfare against the encroaching Germans, until forced (950) to accept German suzerainty. To the east he conquered Moravia, part of Slovakia, part of Silesia, and even Kraków. Furthermore, he appears to have established a fairly strong royal power over the old tribal chiefs."10

He was Duke of Bohemia. (See attached map of expansion of Bohemian state during reigns of Boleslav I and Boleslav II, from Wikipedia: By A. Blaschka - Doc. Dr. Jaroslav Prokeš: Obrázkové d?jiny naší samostatnosti, díl první, Nakladatelství ?eské grafické unie a.s., Praha, 1931, vydání druhé, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8457195) between 935 and 972.2,9

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020256&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020252&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Drahomira von Stodar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020253&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Biagota von Stockow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020257&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIdied973976B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020256&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boleslaus_I,_Duke_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29050
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dobrawa|Dubrawka of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049954&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubravka_of_Bohemia

Biogata (?) von Stockow1

F, #18710, b. circa 905
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited31 Jan 2020
     Biogata (?) von Stockow married Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia, son of Vratislav I (?) Duke of Bohemia and Drahomira ze Stodor (?).1,2,3,4 Biogata (?) von Stockow was born circa 905.5
     GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.6

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Biagota von Stockow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020257&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020256&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIdied973976B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29051
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Biagota von Stockow: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020257&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dobrawa|Dubrawka of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049954&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubravka_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia1

M, #18711, b. between 927 and 928, d. 7 February 999
FatherBoleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia2,1,3 b. c 909, d. 15 Jul 967
MotherBiogata (?) von Stockow4,1,3 b. c 905
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia married Emma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia.5,1,6,7 Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia married Adiiva (?)8,9,10 Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia was born between 927 and 928.6
Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia died on 7 February 999.11,9,6
Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia was buried after 7 February 999 at Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH          c.932
     DEATH     7 Feb 999 (aged 66–67)
     Duke of Bohemia. Born to the House of Premysl, the only son of Borislav I, known as 'the Cruel.' He succeeded his father about 972, and was known as ‘the Pious'. He fathered three sons and was succeeded by the eldest, Borislav III. Bio by: Iola
     BURIAL     Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: David Conway
     Added: 23 Oct 2002
     Find A Grave Memorial 6871807.9,12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Boleslaw II was the son of Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome', duke of Bohemia, and Biagota von Stockow. He became duke upon his father's death in 967.
     "Boleslaw II maintained good relations with the Ottonian German kings, and in 975 he supported Otto II during his civil war against Heinrich II, duke of Bavaria. In 977 Boleslaw again attacked Bavaria, but on this occasion was barred from annexing any lands by Otto II. Boleslaw's reign is most notable for the foundation of the diocese of Prague in 973. It was placed within the jurisdiction of the archbishop of Mainz. In 982 a nobleman called Vojtech was appointed to this position until he abandoned his primacy to lead a mission to the Old Prussians in 994. (Vojtech became known as Adalbert the German form of his name. He was killed in Prussia in 997, and later canonised as St. Adalbert.)
     "War between Poland and Bohemia was continual in this period, and by 990 Boleslaw had occupied Silesia.
     "On 28 September 995, Boleslaw and his confederates, the Vrsovci, stormed Libice in southern Bohemia and massacred Slavnik's dynasty. This clan had been the main rival of Premyslid power in Bohemia. Boleslaw's brutal triumph ensured the unity of Bohemia under a single ruler.
     "Boleslaw and his wife Hemma/Emma had five children. Their eldest son Wenceslas died young; the second son Boleslav III succeeded him as duke of Bohemia, but he was captured, blinded and died imprisoned in Poland; the third son Jaromir replaced his younger brother Udalrich, but he was castrated, blinded and finally murdered; the next son Udalrich/Oldrich, also became duke of Bohemia, and was the only sibling to have progeny, the last child, Luta, was only mentioned in 1026.
     "Boleslaw II died on 7 February 999."1 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; This is the same person as:
”Boleslaus II, Duke of Bohemia” at Wikipedia and as
”Boleslav II.” at [ITAL:Wikipedie (IT).13,14

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.15
Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia was also known as Boleslaus II (?) Duke of Bohemia.13

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "BOLESLAV II. He apparently continued the policies of his father and saw to the final victory of the Christian faith (foundation of the bishopric of Prague, 973). Missionaries from Bohemia took an active part in the conversion of Hungary and Poland.
     "The entire 11th and 12th centuries were filled with chronic dynastic conflicts between members of the Premysl family and the various claimants appealing to Poland and more particularly to the German emperors for support. The result was the gradual integration of Bohemia with Germany, and the extension of feudalism to the Czech lands."16

; According to The Henry Project:
     "Conjectured son-in-law (long chronology, unconvincing): Boleslav II, d. 7 February 999, duke of Bohemia.
     "The theory that Adiva married Boleslav II of Bohemia was reported in a 1965 article by Bernard Orna [Orna (1965); thanks are due to Peter Stewart for sending a copy of the article, and to Todd Farmerie, for earlier giving an outline], who attributed the hypothesis to Dr. Pavel Radom?rský of the National Museum in Prague. The author describes and gives an illustration of a Bohemian coin having a figure of a woman and an inscription which reads "+V+DIV?+V" around the circumference of the coin. Since letters on coins were frequently upside-down or backwards during that period, Orna states that Radom?rský would see the inscription as reading "ADIVEA", with the first and last "V" representing an "A". Thus, the coins would supposedly name Eadweard's daughter Adiva, further identified with Boleslav's queen Emma/Hemma (d. 1006), who is known from the chronicler Cosmas [Cosmas, Chron. Boemorum, i, 33, MGH SS 9: 55; obit. at ibid., i, 39, s.a. 1006, p. 62] and from coins [Fiala (1889), 16]. This last identification is made on the strength of the supposition that Elfgifa (i.e., Ælfgifu) was the English form of Emma (Elfgifa having previously been given as the English form of Adiva's name). However, even though there was a queen who was known as both Ælfgifu and Emma (Emma of Normandy, wife successively of Æthelred II and Cnut), the names Emma and Ælfgifu are not interchangeable in general. Also, as noted above, identifying Ælfgifu as the English form of Adiva's name requires an emendation of William of Malmesbury. The known Anglo-Saxon features of some of the coinage of Boleslav II suggests some sort of connection between England and Bohemia during the late tenth century [see Fiala (1889), 13-15, showing a number of coins of Boleslav II in the type of Æthelred II], but even if that connection was a royal marriage, there seems to be no convincing reason to place it in the generation of Eadweard's children. Indeed, the chronology of this theory seems rather long, especially if Boleslav is being suggested as the husband of Adiva, who, as noted above, almost certainly married before 940. Boleslav II succeeded his father Boleslav I as duke on 15 July 967 [Cosmas, Chron. Boemorum, i, 21, MGH SS 9: 48], and did not die until 7 February 999 [ibid., i, 33, MGH SS 9: 56]. Thus, his floruit seems rather late for a supposed husband of Adiva, although too little is known about his birthdate to rule out the relationship on this basis alone. Thus, the evidence for this relationship seems very weak."17

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOLESLAV ([927/28]-7 Feb 999). The Chronica Boemorum names "secundus Bolezlaus dux" as son of Boleslav[35]. His birth date range is estimated from the birth date of his younger brother, and assuming that the birth date range of their father is accurate. He succeeded his father in [967] as BOLESLAV II "der Fromme" Duke of the Bohemians. Duke Boleslav supported the rebellion of Heinrich II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria against his cousin Emperor Otto II in [974/75]. After the latter confiscated the duke's territories, ex-Duke Heinrich fled to Bohemia and took refuge with Duke Boleslav[36]. Emperor Otto II founded a bishopric in Prague in 975[37]. Duke Boleslav supported Heinrich "den Zänker" ex-Duke of Bavaria in his rebellion against Otto III King of Germany in 984[38]. He founded Lundenburg abbey in 993. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 999 of "Boleslaus Pius filius Boleslai Sacui", adding that he created the bishopric of Prague and founded the monasteries of "sanctum Georgium et in Breunowia et in Insula"[39].
     "m HEMMA, daughter of --- (-1005 or 1006). The Chronica Boemorum names "Hemmam" as wife of "secundus Bolezlaus dux", without giving her origin, and records her death in 1006 in a later passage[40]. Thietmar records that she was sent into exile with her son Jaromir and the latter's unnamed younger brother[41], which appears to be dated to 1003.
     "Duke Boleslav has been suggested as the possible husband of Ælfgifu of Wessex, daughter of Edward "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda ---. Hroswitha of Gandersheim describes her as "Adiva … younger in years and likewise inferior in merit" [to her older sister Eadgyth, whom she accompanied to Germany to provide an alternative choice of bride for Otto of Germany[42]. According to William of Malmesbury, she married "a certain Duke near the Alps"[43], who has not been identified. It seems improbable chronologically that her husband could have been Duke Boleslav. Although the duke's birth date is not known, his younger brother Strakhvas was born 28 Sep 929[44]. It therefore seems unlikely that Boleslaw could have been born much earlier than 925 at the earliest, whereas Ælfgifu was probably born in the range [910/15] assuming that she was of marriageable age when she went to Germany with her sister.] "
Med Lands cites:
[35] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.21, MGH SS IX, p. 48.
[36] Thietmar 3.7, p. 132.
[37] Cosmas Pragensis Chronica Boemorum, I, c. 22, cited in Dzieciel, p. 184.
[38] Thietmar 4.5, p. 153.
[39] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[40] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.32 and 39, MGH SS IX, pp. 55 and 62.
[41] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221.
[42] Hroswitha of Gandersheim, Gesta Ottonis, quoted in Hill, B. H. (1972) Medieval Monarchy in Action: The German Empire from Henry I to Henry IV (London), p. 122.
[43] Sharpe, Rev. J. (trans.), revised Stephenson, Rev. J. (1854) William of Malmesbury, The Kings before the Norman Conquest (Seeleys, London, reprint Llanerch, 1989) II, 126, p. 110.
[44] ES I.I 176.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 1): "C1. Duke Boleslav II of Bohemia (967/72-999), +7.2.999, bur St.George, Prague; m.Hemma/Elgiva of England."18 He was Duke of Bohemia. (See attached map of expansion of Bohemian state during reigns of Boleslav I and Boleslav II, from Wikipedia: By A. Blaschka - Doc. Dr. Jaroslav Prokeš: Obrázkové d?jiny naší samostatnosti, díl první, Nakladatelství ?eské grafické unie a.s., Praha, 1931, vydání druhé, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8457195) between 972 and 999.9,1,13

Family 1

Adiiva (?) d. 1005
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020256&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIdied973976B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Biagota von Stockow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020257&tree=LEO
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29049
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIIdied999
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020260&tree=LEO
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 473 (Chart 31), 489 (Chart 33). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  11. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29048
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 31 January 2020), memorial page for Borislav II (c.932–7 Feb 999), Find A Grave Memorial no. 6871807, citing Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6871807/borislav_ii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boleslaus_II,_Duke_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4781] Wikipedie - Otevrená encyklopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Boleslav II.: https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boleslav_II.. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedie (CZ).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO
  16. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/edwar001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357

Emma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia1,2,3

F, #18712, d. between 1005 and 1006
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited18 Jul 2020
     Emma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia married Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia, son of Boleslav I "the Cruel" (?) Duke of Bohemia and Biogata (?) von Stockow.1,4,2,3
Emma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia died between 1005 and 1006.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BOLESLAV ([927/28]-7 Feb 999). The Chronica Boemorum names "secundus Bolezlaus dux" as son of Boleslav[35]. His birth date range is estimated from the birth date of his younger brother, and assuming that the birth date range of their father is accurate. He succeeded his father in [967] as BOLESLAV II "der Fromme" Duke of the Bohemians. Duke Boleslav supported the rebellion of Heinrich II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria against his cousin Emperor Otto II in [974/75]. After the latter confiscated the duke's territories, ex-Duke Heinrich fled to Bohemia and took refuge with Duke Boleslav[36]. Emperor Otto II founded a bishopric in Prague in 975[37]. Duke Boleslav supported Heinrich "den Zänker" ex-Duke of Bavaria in his rebellion against Otto III King of Germany in 984[38]. He founded Lundenburg abbey in 993. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 999 of "Boleslaus Pius filius Boleslai Sacui", adding that he created the bishopric of Prague and founded the monasteries of "sanctum Georgium et in Breunowia et in Insula"[39].
     "m HEMMA, daughter of --- (-1005 or 1006). The Chronica Boemorum names "Hemmam" as wife of "secundus Bolezlaus dux", without giving her origin, and records her death in 1006 in a later passage[40]. Thietmar records that she was sent into exile with her son Jaromir and the latter's unnamed younger brother[41], which appears to be dated to 1003.
     "Duke Boleslav has been suggested as the possible husband of Ælfgifu of Wessex, daughter of Edward "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda ---. Hroswitha of Gandersheim describes her as "Adiva … younger in years and likewise inferior in merit" [to her older sister Eadgyth, whom she accompanied to Germany to provide an alternative choice of bride for Otto of Germany[42]. According to William of Malmesbury, she married "a certain Duke near the Alps"[43], who has not been identified. It seems improbable chronologically that her husband could have been Duke Boleslav. Although the duke's birth date is not known, his younger brother Strakhvas was born 28 Sep 929[44]. It therefore seems unlikely that Boleslaw could have been born much earlier than 925 at the earliest, whereas Ælfgifu was probably born in the range [910/15] assuming that she was of marriageable age when she went to Germany with her sister.] "
Med Lands cites:
[35] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.21, MGH SS IX, p. 48.
[36] Thietmar 3.7, p. 132.
[37] Cosmas Pragensis Chronica Boemorum, I, c. 22, cited in Dzieciel, p. 184.
[38] Thietmar 4.5, p. 153.
[39] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[40] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.32 and 39, MGH SS IX, pp. 55 and 62.
[41] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221.
[42] Hroswitha of Gandersheim, Gesta Ottonis, quoted in Hill, B. H. (1972) Medieval Monarchy in Action: The German Empire from Henry I to Henry IV (London), p. 122.
[43] Sharpe, Rev. J. (trans.), revised Stephenson, Rev. J. (1854) William of Malmesbury, The Kings before the Norman Conquest (Seeleys, London, reprint Llanerch, 1989) II, 126, p. 110.
[44] ES I.I 176.2


; Per Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 1): "C1. Duke Boleslav II of Bohemia (967/72-999), +7.2.999, bur St.George, Prague; m.Hemma/Elgiva of England."5

; This is the same person as:
”Emma of M?lník” at Wikipedia and as
”Emma (kn?žna)” at [ITAL:Wikipedie (IT).6,7

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.3 GAV-30. She was Duchess consort of Bohemia/Queen of Bohemia between 989 and 999.7,6

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29049
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIIdied999. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020260&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_of_M%C4%9Bln%C3%ADk. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S4781] Wikipedie - Otevrená encyklopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Emma (kn?žna): https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_(kn%C4%9B%C5%BEna). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedie (CZ).
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357

Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia1

M, #18713, b. circa 970, d. 9 November 1034
FatherBoleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia2,1,3,4,5 b. bt 927 - 928, d. 7 Feb 999
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia3,4,2,5,6 d. bt 1005 - 1006
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited18 Jul 2020
     Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia married Božena (?), daughter of Kresina (?); Bozens was apparently his mistress, not his wife.7,8,5 Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia was born circa 970.2
Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia died on 9 November 1034; Genalogics says d. 9 Nov 1034; Med Lands says d. 9 Nov 1042.1,7,2,5
Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia was buried after 9 November 1034 at Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH          unknown, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     DEATH     9 Nov 1034, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     b. 975
     Great Grandson of: Duke Vratislav I
     Oldrich a member of the Premyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 1012 to 1033 and briefly again in 1034. His accession to the Bohemian throne marked the start of a phase of stability during internal dynastic struggles. Under his rule, the Moravian lands were reconquered from Polish occupation.
     Oldrich was the third son of Duke Boleslaus II of Bohemia (d. 999) and his consort Emma of Melník. Upon the death of his father, his eldest brother Boleslaus III succeeded him as duke, however, he soon entered into a fierce conflict with his younger brothers Oldrich and Jaromír. In 1001 both had to flee to the Bavarian court at Regensburg. When Boleslaus III was deposed by the rivaling Vršovci dynasty the next year and the Polish ruler Boleslaw I the Brave invaded Bohemia, King Henry II of Germany intervened. Upon his expedition to Prague, Boleslaus' brothers were able to return and Jaromír was installed as Bohemian duke in 1004.
     In 1032, Duke Oldrich was invited to the Hoftag diet at Merseburg, but did not appear. His absence raised the ire of the emperor and Conrad, busy with events in Burgundy, charged his son Henry III with punishing the recalcitrant Bohemian. Oldrich was arrested, deposed and sent to Bavaria. He was again replaced by his brother Jaromír. However, when Oldrich was pardoned the next year, he returned to Bohemia and had Jaromír captured, blinded, and deposed. He seized power again and drove out Jaromír's son from Moravia.
     Oldrich died abruptly on 9 November 1034 and later examination of his skeleton reveal his skull to have suffered a fatal blow. Jaromír then renounced the throne in favor of his nephew Bretislaus.
     According to legend rendered by the medieval chronicler Cosmas of Prague, Duke Oldrich about 1002 married a peasant girl known as Božena, daughter of Kresina, after discarding his first wife on the grounds that they were childless. Together they had a son: Bretislaus I.
SOURCE:
     "Burials at St. George's Basilica, Prague" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Burials_at_St._George%27s_Basilica,_Prague
     Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old%C5%99ich,_Duke_of_Bohemia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Boleslaus II of Bohemia
     Children
          B?etislav I. of Bohemia 1002–1055
     BURIAL     Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 16 May 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial 162722801.1,9
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.
2. Royal Highness ancestry of the royal child, London, 1982., Sir Ian Moncreiffe of That Ilk, Reference: 65.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2


; Per Genealogics:
     “Udalrich was the son of Boleslaw II 'the Pious', duke of Bohemia, and Hemma. He was duke of Bohemia from 1012 to 1033 and briefly in 1034. He had three older brothers: Wenceslas, Boleslaw III and Jaromir. Jaromir rebelled against his elder brother Boleslaw III, but was unable to secure the throne which was subsequently taken by Boleslaw I Chrobry, king of Poland. Jaromir and his brother Udalrich then sought military backing from the German King Heinrich II. This action definitively placed Bohemia within the jurisdiction of the Holy Roman Empire.
     “Udalrich deposed Jaromir on 12 April 1012 and recognised the suzerainty of the Holy Roman Emperor. Discarding his wife on the grounds that they were childless, Udalrich had two sons by a peasant woman known as Bozena. Udalrich and his son Bretislaw sought to win back Moravia from the Poles, and in 1029 Bretislaw drove the Poles out of the eastern lands. Bretislaw's efforts in Slovakia against Hungary failed in 1030 because of the jealousy of the Emperor Conrad II. In the following year, Czech forces refused to take the field for the emperor.
     “In 1032, Udalrich was invited to the Diet of Merseburg, and did not appear. His absence raised the ire of the emperor; Conrad, busy with events in Burgundy, charged his son Heinrich VI, duke of Bavaria, with punishing the recalcitrant Bohemian. Udalrich paid homage to Conrad, and was deposed and sent to Bavaria. He was replaced by his brother Jaromir, but Udalrich seized power again in 1034.
     “Udalrich died suddenly on 9 November 1034; later examination of his skeleton revealed his skull to have suffered a fatal blow. Udalrich was succeeded by his son Bretislaw. On 4 November 1035 Jaromir was murdered.”.2

; This is the same person as ”Old?ich, Duke of Bohemia” at Wikipedia.10 GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30.

; Per Med Lands:
     "OLDRICH (-9 Nov 1042). The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Udalricus et Iaromir" as two other sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" & his wife, specifying that the former was brought up learning German at the court of Emperor Heinrich II[65]. Thietmar records that "the duke of the Bohemians castrated his brother Jaromir and wanted to suffocate the younger brother in his bath" before sending them both into exile with their mother[66]. He succeeded after deposing his brother in 1012 as OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians. He was deposed in 1033. He was restored as joint duke with his brother later in the same year. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "V Id Nov" of "Oudalricus"[67]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1042 of "Odalricus…filius Boleslai" captured and blinded by "Mezconem Ducem Poloniæ"[68].
     "m ---. The Chronica Boemorum refers to the childless marriage of "Oudalricus", but does not name his wife[69].
     "Mistress (1): BOZENA, daughter of --- (-1052). The Chronica Boemorum names "Bozena" as the mother of "Braziclau", son of "Oudalricus", and in a later passage records her death in 1052[70]. Duke Oldrich had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
     "i) B?ETISLAV (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055)."

Med Lands cites:
[LIND:[65] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.36, MGH SS IX, p. 58.
[66] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221.
[67] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.42, MGH SS IX, p. 65.
[68] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[69] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56.
[70] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34 and II.13, MGH SS IX, pp. 56 and 75.5
He was Duke of Bohemia between 1012 and 1034.1

Family

Božena (?) d. 1052
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw II 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020259&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIIdied999. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020260&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bozena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020267&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 31 January 2020), memorial page for Oldrich of Bohemia (unknown–9 Nov 1034), Find A Grave Memorial no. 162722801, citing Bazilika Svatého Ji?í, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162722801/oldrich_of-bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old%C5%99ich,_Duke_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bretislaw I 'the Warrior': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020268&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BretislavIdied1055B

Božena (?)1,2,3

F, #18714, d. 1052
FatherKresina (?)4,5
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Božena (?) married Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia, son of Boleslaw II "the Pious" (?) Duke of Bohemia and Emma/Hemma (?) of Saxony, Queen of Bohemia; Bozens was apparently his mistress, not his wife.6,4,7
Božena (?) died in 1052.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "OLDRICH (-9 Nov 1042). The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Udalricus et Iaromir" as two other sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" & his wife, specifying that the former was brought up learning German at the court of Emperor Heinrich II[65]. Thietmar records that "the duke of the Bohemians castrated his brother Jaromir and wanted to suffocate the younger brother in his bath" before sending them both into exile with their mother[66]. He succeeded after deposing his brother in 1012 as OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians. He was deposed in 1033. He was restored as joint duke with his brother later in the same year. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "V Id Nov" of "Oudalricus"[67]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1042 of "Odalricus…filius Boleslai" captured and blinded by "Mezconem Ducem Poloniæ"[68].
     "m ---. The Chronica Boemorum refers to the childless marriage of "Oudalricus", but does not name his wife[69].
     "Mistress (1): BOZENA, daughter of --- (-1052). The Chronica Boemorum names "Bozena" as the mother of "Braziclau", son of "Oudalricus", and in a later passage records her death in 1052[70]. Duke Oldrich had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
     "i) B?ETISLAV (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055)."

Med Lands cites:
[LIND:[65] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.36, MGH SS IX, p. 58.
[66] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221.
[67] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.42, MGH SS IX, p. 65.
[68] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[69] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56.
[70] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34 and II.13, MGH SS IX, pp. 56 and 75.7


; This is the same person as ”Božena (K?esinová)” at Wikipedia.3

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.4 GAV-29 EDV-29.

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29046
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bozena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020267&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo%C5%BEena_(K%C5%99esinov%C3%A1). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bozena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020267&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kresina: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280748&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bretislaw I 'the Warrior': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020268&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BretislavIdied1055B

Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia1,2

M, #18715, b. between 1002 and 1005, d. 10 January 1055
FatherUdalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia1,3,4,2,5 b. c 970, d. 9 Nov 1034
MotherBožena (?)1,6,4,2,5 d. 1052
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia was born between 1002 and 1005.1,2 He married Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt, daughter of Heinrich I von Schweinfurt Herzog von Schweinfurt, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau and Gerberge von Hammerstein, after 1021 at Olomouc (Olmütz), Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic (now);
Her 1st husband.1,7,2,5,8,9
Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia died on 10 January 1055 at Chrudim.1,2
Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia was buried after 10 January 1055 at Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH          1002, Pardubický (Pardubice), Czech Republic
     DEATH     10 Jan 1055 (aged 52–53), Pardubický (Pardubice), Czech Republic
     B?etislav I. known as the Bohemian Achilles, of the house of the P?emyslids, was Duke of Bohemia from 1035 until his death. He was the son of Duke Old?ich and his low-born concubine Božena. As an illegitimate son could not obtain a desirable wife by conventional means, he chose to kidnap his future wife Judith of Schweinfurt a daughter of the Bavarian noble Henry of Schweinfurt, Margrave of Nordgau, in 1019 at Schweinfurt. It was in 1030 that Bretislaus married the afore-mentioned Judith. Before his death, Bretislaus organised the succession (in 1054) and issued the famous Seniority Law, introducing agnatic seniority for order of succession. Younger members of the dynasty were supposed to govern fiefs (technically, parts of Moravia), but only at the Duke's discretion.His eldest son Spytihn?v was to succeed him as Duke of Bohemia with control over that territory. Moravia was incorporated into the Bohemian duchy, but divided between three of his younger sons. The Olomouc Appanage went to Vratislaus; the Znojmo Appanage went to Konrád; and the Brno Appanage went to Otto. The youngest son, Jaromír, entered the church and became Bishop of Prague.
     Bretislaus died at Chrudim in 1055 during his preparation for another invasion of Hungary and was succeeded by his son Spytihn?v II as Duke of Bohemia. His younger children were left the region of Moravia. Otto and Vratislav were shut out of the government by Spytihn?v, but after his death both gained control of Moravia and Bohemia, respectively.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Oldrich of Bohemia unknown–1034
     Spouse
          Judith von Schweinfurt unknown–1058
     Children
          Vratislav II Of Bohemia 1032–1092
     BURIAL     Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 29 Sep 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 117856600.1,10
     ; This is the same person as ”Bretislav I” at Wikipedia.11 GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-29.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Bretislaw was born between 1002 and 1005, the son of Udalrich, duke of Bohemia of the House of the Premyslids, then the protector of the Zatecko province. Known as 'the Bohemian Achilles', Bretislaw was the duke of Bohemia from 1035 until his death.
     “In 1019, while raiding the nunnery at Schweinfurt, Bretislaw cut the bar of the convent door with his sword and kidnapped his future wife Judith von Schweinfurt, a daughter of Heinrich von Schweinfurt, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau. He married Judith after 1021, and they had a daughter Dymudis who remained unmarried, and five sons: Spytihnev II, Wratislaw II, Konrad I, Jaromir and Otto I. Except for Jaromir, who became bishop of Prague and Emperor Heinrich IV's chancellor, they all had progeny.
     “During his father's reign, in 1029 he took back Moravia from Poland. About 1031 Bretislav invaded Hungary in order to prevent its expansion under King Stephen. The partition of Bohemia between Udalrich and his elder brother Jaromir in 1034 was probably the reason why Bretislaw fled beyond the Bohemian border only to come back to take the throne from Jaromir.
     “In 1035 Bretislaw helped Emperor Conrad II in his war against the Lusatians. In 1039 he invaded Little Poland, captured Krakow and Poznan and sacked Gniezno, bringing the relics of St. Adalbert back with him. On the way back he conquered part of Silesia including Wroclaw. His main goal was to set up an Archbishopric See in Prague and create a large state subject only to the Holy Roman Empire. In 1040 the German King Heinrich III invaded Bohemia, but was forced to retreat by an ambush on his supply lines. However, Bretislaw was aware that he could not hold out indefinitely against the Germans and signed a truce with Heinrich III. In the ensuing peace treaty Bretislaw renounced all of his conquests save for Moravia.
     “In 1047 Emperor Heinrich III negotiated a peace treaty between Bretislaw and the Poles. This pact worked in Bretislaw's favour as the Polish ruler swore never again to attack Bohemia in return for an annual subsidy to Gniezno. In 1054 Bretislaw issued the famous Seniority Law. For the first time this act stated that Bohemia and Moravia would pass directly through the senior line of the Premyslid dynasty. Younger members of the dynasty were allowed to govern Moravia, but only at the duke's discretion.
     “Bretislaw was the author of decrees concerning the rules of Christianisation, which included bans on polygamy and trading on holidays.
     “Bretislaw died at Chrudim on 10 January 1055 during his preparation for another invasion of Hungary. Before his death, Bretislaw had organised the succession. His eldest son Spytihnev was to succeed him as duke of Bohemia, with control over that territory. Moravia was put under the Bohemian crown, but divided between three of his younger sons. Olomouc went to Wratislaw, Znojmo went to Konrad, and Brno went to Otto. Jaromir entered the church and became bishop of Prague in 1068.”.2

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 23.
2. Royal Highness ancestry of the royal child, London, 1982., Sir Ian Moncreiffe of That Ilk, Reference: 65.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "B?ETISLAV of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress Bozena --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit[84]). The Chronica Boemorum names "Braziclau" as son of "Oudalricus" and his mistress Bozena[85]. The Annalista Saxo records "Bracilaus, Boemie ducis Odolrici filius" kidnapping "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde" from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[86]. Duke of Moravia 1025-1031. He succeeded in 1034 as B?ETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "IV Id Jan" of "Brazislaus dux"[87]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1055 of "Bretislaus…filius Odalrici"[88].
     "m (Olmütz after 1021) as her first husband, JUDITH von Schweinfurt, daughter of HEINRICH von Schweinfurt Markgraf auf dem Nordgau & his wife Gerberga von Gleisberg ([1010/15]-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[89]. In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav. The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihn?v and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[90]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[91]. She married secondly (after Jan 1055) [as his second wife,] Péter ex-King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[84] Annalista Saxo 1058 specifies that his wife was buried next to Duke B?etislav.
[85] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56.
[86] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[87] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[88] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[89] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[90] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[91] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Premyslids - Bohemia): “D4. Duke Udalrich=Oldrich of Bohemia (12.4.1012-1033)+(1034), +9.11.1034, bur St.George, Prague; he had illegitimate issue by (?2.m.) Bozena N (+1052/5)”.12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Wittel 19): “D3. Judith von Schweinfurt, *ca 990, +2.8.1058; 1m: ca 1030 Bretislav I of Bohemia (*1005 +1055); 2m: 11.4.1055 Pietro Orseolo (*1011 +1059)”.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH (-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[1093]. In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav. The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihn?v and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[1094]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[1095]. The marriage is not mentioned in Wegener, although he refers cryptically to "Lui von Frizberg, I. Tuta Regina. II. Judith von Schweinfurt"[1096].
     "m [firstly] (after 1021) B?ETISLAW of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit). He succeeded in 1034 as B?ETISLAW I Duke of Bohemia.
     "[m secondly ([1055]) as his second wife, PÉTER Orseolo King of Hungary, son of PIETRO OTTONE Orseolo Doge of Venice & his wife Maria [Grimelda] of Hungary ([Venice] [1010/15]- Székesfehérvár late 1046[1097], bur Pécs, St Peter's Cathedral). As referred to above, this marriage is mentioned in the Annalista Saxo but is impossible assuming King Péter's death date is correct.]"
Med Lands cites:
[1093] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[1094] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[1095] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78.
[1096] Wegener (1965/67), p. 141 footnote 2, quoting a manuscript "Haus Frizberg (Post Wildon) 1955, S. 1-26".
[1097] According to ES II 153, King Péter died 30 Aug 1059, although the source on which this is based has not yet been identified.9
He was Duke of Moravia between 1025 and 1031.1

; Per Enc. of World History: "BETISLAV I (the Restorer), who overran Silesia, took Kraków (1039), and for a time ruled Poland, which had entered into a period of disruption."13 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1034 and 1055.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bretislaw I 'the Warrior': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020268&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Udalrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020265&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BretislavIdied1055B
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bozena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020267&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel19.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020269&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#JudithSchweinfurtdied1058
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 31 January 2020), memorial page for B?etislav I. of Bohemia (1002–10 Jan 1055), Find A Grave Memorial no. 117856600, citing Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117856600/b_etislav_i_-of_bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bretislav_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The Premyslids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304882&tree=LEO
  15. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11411
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B

Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt1,2

F, #18716, b. circa 990, d. 2 August 1058
FatherHeinrich I von Schweinfurt Herzog von Schweinfurt, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau3,4,5,6,7 b. c 975, d. 18 Sep 1017
MotherGerberge von Hammerstein3,5,6,8 b. c 970, d. a 1036
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited15 Aug 2020
     Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt was born circa 990.3 She married Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia, son of Udalrich/Oldrich/Ulric I (?) Duke of Bohemia and Božena (?), after 1021 at Olomouc (Olmütz), Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic (now);
Her 1st husband.2,3,9,10,5,6 Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt married Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary, son of Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice and Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary, on 11 April 1055;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.11,3,6
Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt died on 2 August 1058 at Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary.2,11,3,12,5,6
Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt was buried after 2 August 1058 at Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojtecha, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     2 Aug 1058, Székesfehérvár, Fejér, Hungary
     Judith von Schweinfurt was a duchesse of Bohemia and the wife of Bretislaus I of Bohemia. Her parents were Heinrich, Markgraf von Nordgau (margrave of Bavaria) of the House of Babenberg and his wife Gerberga.
     The House of Premysl wished to confirm its good relationship with the Babenbergs through a marriage to Judith in 1020. Judith was a desirable bride, but Oldrich of Bohemia had only one son, Bretislaus, and he was of illegitimate birth, thus complicating the prospect of a marriage with the high-born Judith. Bretislaus solved the problem by kidnapping Judith from a monastery, although he was never punished for the crime. He married Judith some time later. Their first son Spytihnev was born after almost ten years, which led to the hypothesis that the kidnapping happened in 1029, although Judith may have given birth to daughters before her first son.
     After Bretislaus's death in 1055, Judith was expelled from Bohemia by order of Spytihnìv. She settled in Hungary, where, according to chronicler Cosmas of Prague, she married "Petri regi Ungariorum" (Pietro Orseolo, deposed king of Hungary) to spite Spytihnìv. This marriage is not unanimously accepted as fact by historians.
     Judith died in 1058. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying (among other things) that her son Vratislav had retrieved her body in order to bury her next to Bretislaus. They are buried in St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague.
     Family Members
     Spouses
          B?etislav I. of Bohemia 1002–1055
          Pietro Orseolo
     Children
          Vratislav II Of Bohemia 1032–1092
     BURIAL     Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Created by: Marti Utter
     Added: 5 Jul 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 148730246.11,12,6
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Premyslids - Bohemia): “D4. Duke Udalrich=Oldrich of Bohemia (12.4.1012-1033)+(1034), +9.11.1034, bur St.George, Prague; he had illegitimate issue by (?2.m.) Bozena N (+1052/5)”.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "B?ETISLAV of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress Bozena --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit[84]). The Chronica Boemorum names "Braziclau" as son of "Oudalricus" and his mistress Bozena[85]. The Annalista Saxo records "Bracilaus, Boemie ducis Odolrici filius" kidnapping "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde" from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[86]. Duke of Moravia 1025-1031. He succeeded in 1034 as B?ETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "IV Id Jan" of "Brazislaus dux"[87]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1055 of "Bretislaus…filius Odalrici"[88].
     "m (Olmütz after 1021) as her first husband, JUDITH von Schweinfurt, daughter of HEINRICH von Schweinfurt Markgraf auf dem Nordgau & his wife Gerberga von Gleisberg ([1010/15]-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[89]. In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav. The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihn?v and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[90]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[91]. She married secondly (after Jan 1055) [as his second wife,] Péter ex-King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[84] Annalista Saxo 1058 specifies that his wife was buried next to Duke B?etislav.
[85] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56.
[86] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[87] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[88] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[89] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[90] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[91] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78.10


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 8, 23.5

; This is the same person as ”Judith of Schweinfurt” at Wikipedia.14 GAV-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH (-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[1093]. In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav. The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihn?v and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[1094]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[1095]. The marriage is not mentioned in Wegener, although he refers cryptically to "Lui von Frizberg, I. Tuta Regina. II. Judith von Schweinfurt"[1096].
     "m [firstly] (after 1021) B?ETISLAW of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit). He succeeded in 1034 as B?ETISLAW I Duke of Bohemia.
     "[m secondly ([1055]) as his second wife, PÉTER Orseolo King of Hungary, son of PIETRO OTTONE Orseolo Doge of Venice & his wife Maria [Grimelda] of Hungary ([Venice] [1010/15]- Székesfehérvár late 1046[1097], bur Pécs, St Peter's Cathedral). As referred to above, this marriage is mentioned in the Annalista Saxo but is impossible assuming King Péter's death date is correct.]"
Med Lands cites:
[1093] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[1094] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[1095] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78.
[1096] Wegener (1965/67), p. 141 footnote 2, quoting a manuscript "Haus Frizberg (Post Wildon) 1955, S. 1-26".
[1097] According to ES II 153, King Péter died 30 Aug 1059, although the source on which this is based has not yet been identified.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Wittel 19): “D3. Judith von Schweinfurt, *ca 990, +2.8.1058; 1m: ca 1030 Bretislav I of Bohemia (*1005 +1055); 2m: 11.4.1055 Pietro Orseolo (*1011 +1059)”.3

Family 2

Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary b. 1011, d. 30 Aug 1059

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel19.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel19.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HeinrichSchweinfurtdied1017. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020269&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#JudithSchweinfurtdied1058
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079999&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geberge: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080000&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bretislaw I 'the Warrior': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020268&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BretislavIdied1055B
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Orseolo page (Orseolo Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/orseolo.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 December 2019), memorial page for Judith von Schweinfurt (unknown–2 Aug 1058), Find A Grave Memorial no. 148730246, citing Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Marti Utter (contributor 47720777), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/148730246/judith-von-schweinfurt. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The Premyslids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Schweinfurt. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304882&tree=LEO
  16. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11411
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B

Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #18717, b. 1236, d. 24 October 1271
FatherBela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1 b. Nov 1206, d. 3 May 1270
MotherMarie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia1 b. c 1206, d. 1270
Last Edited23 Nov 2004
     Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary was born in 1236.1,3 She married Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria, son of Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria and Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein, in 1250.1,2,4,5
Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary died on 24 October 1271.1,3
Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary was buried after 24 October 1271 at Kloster Seligenthal, Landshut, Stadtkreis Landshut, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany.1


     ; Elizabeth (Erzsébet), *1236, +24.10.1271, bur Seligenthal; m.1250 Duke Heinrich I of Lower Bavaria (*19.11.1235 +3.2.1290.)1

Family

Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria b. 19 Nov 1235, d. 3 Feb 1290
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 270. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020776&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348878&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katarina of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00162062&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036535&tree=LEO

Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria1,2,3

M, #18718, b. 19 November 1235, d. 3 February 1290
FatherOtto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria2,4,3 b. 7 Apr 1206, d. 29 Nov 1253
MotherAgnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein2,3 b. 1201, d. 16 Aug 1267
Last Edited23 Nov 2004
     Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria was born on 19 November 1235 at Landshut, Lower Bavaria, Germany (now).2,3 He married Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary, daughter of Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, in 1250.1,5,2,3
Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria died on 3 February 1290 at age 54.2,3
Heinrich I/XIII (?) Duke of Lower Bavaria was buried after 3 February 1290 at Kloster Seligenthal, Landshut, Stadtkreis Landshut, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).2


     ; Duke Heinrich XIII of Lower Bavaria (1253-90), *Landshut 19.11.1235, +Burghausen 3.2.1290, bur Seligenthal; m.1244/50 Elisabeth of Hungary (*1236 +24.10.1271.)2

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 26.3

Family

Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary b. 1236, d. 24 Oct 1271
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020776&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO
  5. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 270. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348878&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katarina of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00162062&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wettin 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036535&tree=LEO

Anna/Agnes (?) of Hungary1,2,3

F, #18719, b. between 1226 and 1227, d. after 1270
FatherBela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2,4,3 b. Nov 1206, d. 3 May 1270
MotherMarie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia1,2,4,3 b. c 1206, d. 1270
Last Edited8 Dec 2020
     Anna/Agnes (?) of Hungary was born between 1226 and 1227.2,4 She married Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria, son of Mikhail Vsevolodich "the Saint" (?) Gr Pr of Kiev, Prince of Pereslavl, Novgorod, Chernigov, and Galitzk and Marija Romanowna (?) of Halicz, between 1243 and 1244; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 page) says m. 1243; Leo van de Pas says m. 1244; Med Lands says m. 1243.5,2,6,4
Anna/Agnes (?) of Hungary died after 1270.2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 105.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia. biography.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "Anna was born about 1226, the daughter of Béla IV, king of Hungary, and Maria Laskarina. In 1244 she married Rosztiszlo, who would become grand duke of Kiev and king of Bulgaria, son of Michail 'the Saint', grand duke of Kiev, and Marija Romanowna of Halicz. At the time Rosztiszlo could not strengthen his rule in Halicz, so he went to the court of King Béla IV of Hungary, and there he married Anna. Anna and Rosztiszlo had two sons Béla and Michael, and four daughters, of whom Erzsébet and Kunhata would have progeny.
     "Anna had always been her father's favourite daughter. He allowed her to exercise increasing influence over him. In his last will Béla entrusted his daughter and his followers to her son-in-law Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia, husband of Kunhata, because he did not trust his eldest son Stephan.
     "Michael inherited their father's part of Bosnia. Béla IV, having made these assignments to his grandsons, decided also to make some further changes in his peripheral territories, and assigned Slavonia, Dalmatia, and Croatia, which until then had all been under his heir, the future Stephan V of Hungary, to a younger son Béla.
     "Stephan was furious and immediately revolted against his father; during the ensuing war Anna and her son Béla of Machva assisted Béla IV. Anna's father and brother concluded a peace on 5 December 1262, according to which the kingdom was divided, Stephan acquiring the territories east of the river Danube as 'junior king'. After the peace, Stephan occupied the possessions which Anna's sons had inherited from their father in the eastern parts of the kingdom (the former royal possessions in Bereg County and the castle of Füzér). Anna submitted a formal complaint against her brother to Pope Urban IV, but the 'junior king' did not hand back their possessions.
     "Anna went to live at her son-in-law's royal court in Bohemia. Przemysl Ottokar II married Anna's daughter Kunhata in 1261 and they became parents to Wenceslas II, who would become king of Bohemia, and two daughters, Kunigunde and Agnes, all of whom would have progeny. Anna's husband died in 1262, leaving her a widow. It is unknown when Anna died, but it may have been about 1274."4



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Anna of Hungary (born 1226) was a daughter of Béla IV of Hungary and his wife, Maria Laskarina. Anna was a member of the House of Árpád. Anna gained many titles from her marriage to Rostislav Mikhailovich.
Family
     "Anna was the third of ten children borne to her parents. She was sister to three saints: Kinga, Margaret and Blessed Jolenta. Other siblings included Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth of Hungary, Duchess of Bavaria.
     "Her paternal grandparents were Andrew II of Hungary and Gertrude of Merania, sister to Agnes of Merania.
     "Her maternal grandparents were Theodore I Laskaris and Anna Komnena Angelina.[1]
Marriage
     "In 1243, Anna married Rostislav Mikhailovich. Rostislav could not strengthen his rule in Halych, so he went to the court of King Béla IV of Hungary, and there he married Anna. Anna had always been her father's favourite daughter. He allowed her to exercise more and more influence over him. In his last will, Béla entrusted his daughter and his followers to her son-in-law, Ottokar II of Bohemia, because he did not trust his eldest son Stephen. Michael inherited their father's part of Bosnia. King Béla IV, having made these assignments to his grandsons, decided also to make some further changes in his peripheral territories, and assigned Slavonia, Dalmatia, and Croatia, which until then had all been under his heir, the future Stephen V of Hungary, to a younger son named Béla.
     "Stephen was infuriated and immediately revolted against his father; during the ensuing war, Anna and her son, Béla of Macsó assisted Béla IV.[2] Anna's father and brother concluded a peace on 5 December 1262, and according to the peace the kingdom was divided, the latter acquiring the territories east of the river Danube as “junior king”. After the peace, Stephen V occupied the possessions which Anna's sons had inherited from their father in the eastern parts of the kingdom (the former royal possessions in Bereg County and the Castle of Füzér). Anna submitted a formal complaint against her brother to Pope Urban IV, but the "junior king" did not hand back their possessions.
     "Anna went to live at her son-in-law's royal court in Bohemia. Ottokar married Anna's daughter, Kunigunda in 1261 and they became parents to Wenceslaus II of Bohemia. Anna's husband died in 1262, leaving Anna a widow. It is unknown when Anna died but probably about 1274.
Children
     "The couple had the following children:
** Duke Béla of Macsó (ca. 1243 – November, 1272)
** Duke Michael of Bosnia (before 1245 – 1271)
** Unnamed daughter (perhaps Anna) wife firstly of Tsar Michael Asen I of Bulgaria, secondly of Tsar Koloman II of Bulgaria
** Kunigunda, Queen Consort of Bohemia (1245 – September 9, 1285), wife firstly of King Ottokar II of Bohemia, and secondly of Zaviš von Falkenstein-Rosenberg
** Gryfina, High Duchess consort of Poland, (? – May 26, 1303/1309), wife of Prince Leszek II of Cracow
** Margaret, a nun.

References
1. Ancestors of Anne Arpad
2. Kristó, Pál; Makk, Ferenc. Korai magyar történeti lexikon (9-14. század)."7



; Per Med Lands:
     "ANNA [Agnes] ([1226/27]-). Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Georgius Akropolites who names "Rosum Urum…Ungariæ regis generum" as father-in-law of "Bulgarorum…princeps"[942]. The name of the wife of Rostislav is confirmed by the Annales Polonorum recording the marriage in 1265 of their daughter Gryfina, in a later passage specifying that she was daughter of "ducis Roczislay et…Anna"[943]. A charter dated 15 Jul 1264 records the confirmation by "ipsius patris regis Belæ IV" of a donation by "Agnes, viduæ post Radislaum ducem Galitiæ, ducissæ Galitiæ, de Bosna et de Mazo, ac Michaeli et Belæ natis eius"[944]. Baumgarten names the wife of Prince Rostislav and gives her origin but only cites one secondary source in support[945].
     "m (1243) ROSTISLAV Mikhailovich ex-Prince of Galich, son of MIKHAIL Vsevolodich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife Maria Romanovna of Galich ([1225]-1263). After the Mongol invasion, he sought refuge with Béla IV King of Hungary, married the king's daughter, and was appointed Ban of Ma?va/Macsói. He assumed the title ROSTISLAV Tsar of the Bulgarians, and was recognised as such by Hungary[946]."
Med Lands cites:
[942] Georgius Akropolites 62, p. 134.
[943] Annales Polonorum I 1265 and 1279, MGH SS XIX, pp. 636 and 644.
[944] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actæ Bosnæ, LXXXI, p. 15.
[945] Baumgarten (1927), p. 35, citing Wertner, M. Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 463-75.
[946] Fine (1994), p. 171.3


; Per Med Lands:
     "ROSTISLAV Mikhailovich, son of MIKHAIL Vsevolodich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife Maria Romanovna of Galich ([1225]-1263). The Novgorod Chronicle records that he was appointed Prince of Novgorod in 1229 by his father but was expelled 8 Dec 1230[329]. Grand Prince of Kiev 1231/1240. Prince of Galich 1236/1238. After the Mongol invasion, he sought refuge with Bela IV King of Hungary, married the king's daughter, and was appointed Ban of Ma?va. He mediated the peace between Bulgaria and the empire of Nikaia in 1256[330]. On the death of his son-in-law Kalojan II Tsar of Bulgaria in 1258, Rostislav invaded Bulgaria from neighbouring Ma?va, ostensibly to protect the interests of his daughter, who was handed to him at Trnovo. He retreated to Vidin where he assumed the title ROSTISLAV Tsar of the Bulgarians, and was recognised as such by Hungary[331]. His forces were temporarily expelled from Vidin province by his rival Konstantin Tih, during Rostislav's temporary absence helping his father-in-law Bela IV King of Hungary in his war with Bohemia, but he was restored by Hungarian troops which expelled Konstantin from the area in 1261[332]. On his death, his lands were divided between his sons, Mikhail taking his part of Bosnia and Bela taking Ma?va.
     "m (1243) ANNA [Agnes] of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia ([1226/27]-). Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Georgius Akropolites who names "Rosum Urum…Ungariæ regis generum" as father-in-law of "Bulgarorum…princeps"[333]. The name of the wife of Rostislav is confirmed by the Annales Polonorum recording the marriage in 1265 of their daughter Gryfina, in a later passage specifying that she was daughter of "ducis Roczislay et…Anna"[334]. A charter dated 15 Jul 1264 records the confirmation by "ipsius patris regis Belæ IV" of a donation by "Agnes, viduæ post Radislaum ducem Galitiæ, ducissæ Galitiæ, de Bosna et de Mazo, ac Michaeli et Belæ natis eius"[335]. Baumgarten names the wife of Prince Rostislav and gives her origin but only cites one secondary source in support[336]."
Med Lands cites:
[329] Novgorod Chronicle 1229 and 1230, pp. 73 and 75.
[330] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 159.
[331] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 171.
[332] Fine (1994), p. 174.
[333] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1837) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 62, p. 134.
[334] Annales Polonorum I 1265 and 1279, MGH SS XIX, pp. 636 and 644.
[335] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1892) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb), Vol. XXIII, Actæ Bosnæ, LXXXI, p. 15.
[336] Baumgarten (1927), p. 35, citing Wertner, M. Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 463-75.6

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38779
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AnnaMRostislavIBulgaria. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020722&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosztiszlo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027046&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RostislavMikhailovichdied1263B.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_of_Hungary,_Duchess_of_Macs%C3%B3. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Erzsebet of Halicz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00072288&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik6.html
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunhata of Slavonia and Machva: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#KunigundaRostislavnadied1285.

Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria1,2,3,4

M, #18720, b. 1225, d. circa 1263
FatherMikhail Vsevolodich "the Saint" (?) Gr Pr of Kiev, Prince of Pereslavl, Novgorod, Chernigov, and Galitzk3,1,5,6,7 b. 1179, d. 20 Sep 1246
MotherMarija Romanowna (?) of Halicz3,1,8 d. a 1241
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited23 Nov 2020
     Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria was born in 1225.3,1,9 He married Anna/Agnes (?) of Hungary, daughter of Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, between 1243 and 1244; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 page) says m. 1243; Leo van de Pas says m. 1244; Med Lands says m. 1243.1,10,9,11
Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria died circa 1263; Genealogy.EU (Rurik 6 page) says d. 1262; Leo van de Pas says d. ca 1264; Med Lands says d. 1263.3,1,4,9
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ANNA [Agnes] ([1226/27]-). Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Georgius Akropolites who names "Rosum Urum…Ungariæ regis generum" as father-in-law of "Bulgarorum…princeps"[942]. The name of the wife of Rostislav is confirmed by the Annales Polonorum recording the marriage in 1265 of their daughter Gryfina, in a later passage specifying that she was daughter of "ducis Roczislay et…Anna"[943]. A charter dated 15 Jul 1264 records the confirmation by "ipsius patris regis Belæ IV" of a donation by "Agnes, viduæ post Radislaum ducem Galitiæ, ducissæ Galitiæ, de Bosna et de Mazo, ac Michaeli et Belæ natis eius"[944]. Baumgarten names the wife of Prince Rostislav and gives her origin but only cites one secondary source in support[945].
     "m (1243) ROSTISLAV Mikhailovich ex-Prince of Galich, son of MIKHAIL Vsevolodich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife Maria Romanovna of Galich ([1225]-1263). After the Mongol invasion, he sought refuge with Béla IV King of Hungary, married the king's daughter, and was appointed Ban of Ma?va/Macsói. He assumed the title ROSTISLAV Tsar of the Bulgarians, and was recognised as such by Hungary[946]."
Med Lands cites:
[942] Georgius Akropolites 62, p. 134.
[943] Annales Polonorum I 1265 and 1279, MGH SS XIX, pp. 636 and 644.
[944] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actæ Bosnæ, LXXXI, p. 15.
[945] Baumgarten (1927), p. 35, citing Wertner, M. Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 463-75.
[946] Fine (1994), p. 171.12
He was Tsar of Bulgaria.3 He was Ban of Slavonia.3 He was Ban of Serbian Machva.3

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Rostislav, Pr of Novgorod (1229-30), Pr of Galitzia (1238), Pr of Lutzk (1239), Pr of Chernigov (1240-43), Ban of Serbian Machva, Ban of Slavonia, Tsar of Bulgaria, *1225, +1262; m.1243 Anna of Hungary (*1226/27 +after 1270.)3"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Rostislav Mikhailovich (Hungarian: Rosztyiszláv,[1] Bulgarian and Russian: ????????? ??????????) (after 1210[2] / c. 1225[3] – 1262)[4] was a Rus' prince (a member of the Rurik dynasty), and a dignitary in the Kingdom of Hungary.[1]
     "He was prince of Novgorod (1230), of Halych (1236–1237, 1241–1242), of Lutsk (1240), and of Chernigov (1241–1242).[2] When he could not strengthen his rule in Halych, he went to the court of King Béla IV of Hungary, and married the king's daughter, Anna.[1]
     "He was the Ban of Slavonia (1247–1248), and later he became the first Duke of Macsó (after 1248–1262), and thus he governed the southern parts of the kingdom.[1] In 1257, he occupied Vidin and thenceforward he styled himself Tsar of Bulgaria.[5]
Early life
     "Rostislav was the eldest son of Prince Mikhail Vsevolodovich (who may have been either prince of Pereyaslavl or Chernigov when Rostislav was born) and his wife Elena Romanovna (or Maria Romanovna),[3] a daughter of Roman Mstislavich, prince of Volhynia and Halych.[2] The Russian annals mentioned him for the first time in 1229 when the Novgorodians invited his father to be their prince.[2]
Prince of Novgorod
     "Rostislav underwent the ritual hair-cutting ceremony (postrig) in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod on May 19, 1230, and his father installed him on the throne.[2] The postrig conferred on Rostislav the official status of prince of Novgorod and thus he ruled Novgorod as a fully fledged prince after the ceremony.[2] Rostislav, in keeping with his father's policy, continued to pass legislation favoring the Novgorodians.[2]
     "In September a frost destroyed the crops in the Novgorod district causing a great famine.[2] Novgorodians opposed to his father's rule took advantage of the calamity to foment unrest, and they incited the townsmen to plunder the court of Posadnik Vodovik who was his father's man.[2] Although the posadnik forced the rival boyars to swear oaths of allegiance on November 6, but a month later when he and Rostislav visited Torzhok, the Novgorodians looted Vodovik's court and those of his supporters.[2] Shortly afterwards Rostislav was forced to flee to his father.[2]
     "The Novgorodians considered themselves free to invite another prince, and they summoned Prince Yaroslav Vsevolodovich of Vladimir, who came on December 30.[2]
Prince of Halych
     "Towards the end of September 1235, Mikhail Vsevolodovich occupied Halych whose prince (his brother-in-law and thus Rostislav's maternal uncle) Daniil Romanovich had fled from the principality.[2] In the spring of 1236, Rostislav accompanied his father who attacked the principality of Volhynia which was still under the rule of Daniil Romanovich.[2] However, in the meantime the Cumans plundered the Galician lands forcing Mikhail Vsevolodovich to abandon his campaign.[2]
     "At the beginning of the summer of 1236, Daniil Romanovich and his brother Vasilko Romanovich rallied their troops to march against Mikhail Vsevolodovich and Rostislav, but they barricaded themselves in Halych with their retinue, the local militia, and a contingent of Hungarians sent by king Béla IV, and thus their opponents had to withdraw.[2]
     "After the Hungarian troops had departed, Daniil Romanovich tried again, and Mikhail Vsevolodovich attempted to placate him by giving him Przemy?l.[2] Shortly afterwards, Rostislav was appointed to rule Halych by his father who was about departing for Kiev which had been occupied by Yaroslav Vsevolodovich.[2] After Mikhail had reoccupied Kiev, he and Rostislav attacked Przemy?l and took it back from Daniil Romanovich.[2]
     "Rostislav retained the loyalty of the Galician boyars but he was not as capable a military commander as his father.[2] Around 1237, he rode against the Lithuanians who had pillaged the lands of duke Conrad of Mazovia who had been his ally against Daniil Romanovich.[2] He also took all the boyars and horsemen with him and only a skeleton force remained behind to defend Halych.[2] The people of Halych therefore summoned Daniil Romanovich and installed him as prince.[2] On hearing the news, Rostislav fled to king Béla IV.[2]
The Tatar invasion of the Kievan Rus’
     "In the winter of 1237, the Tatar troops led by Batu Khan devastated Ryazan; by 1240, almost the lands of Chernigov, Pereyaslavl, Ryazan, and Suzdalia lay in ruins.[2] During the first half of 1240, Mikhail Vsevolodovich defied Batu Khan by putting his envoys, who were seeking to coax him into submitting, to death.[2] The only allies to whom he could turn for aid were the Hungarians and the Poles, and therefore he fled to Hungary.[2] He attempted to arrange a marriage for Rostislav with the king's daughter, but Béla IV saw no advantage to forming an alliance and evicted the two princes from Hungary.[2]
     "Rostislav and his father went to Masovia where his father decided that the expedient course of action was to seek reconciliation with Daniil Romanovich who had been controlling his domains by that time and holding Mikhail Vsevolodovich's wife (and his own sister) captive.[2] Mikhail Vsevolodovich sent envoys to his brother-in-law admitting that he had sinned against him on many occasions by waging war and by reneging on his promises.[2] He pledged never again to antagonize Daniil Romanovich and forswore making any future attempts on Halych.[2] Daniil Romanovich invited him to Volhynia, returned his wife, and relinquished control of Kiev and he gave Lutsk to Rostislav, evidently, in compensation for taking away Halych.[2]
     "Meanwhile, the Tatars sacked Kiev which fell on December 6, 1240.[2] On learning Kiev's fate, Mikhail Vsevolodovich and his family withdrew from Volhynia and for the second time imposed himself on Conrad of Mazovia's graces.[2] In the spring of 1241, Mikhail Vsevolodovich went home to Kiev and gave Chernigov to Rostislav.[2]
     "Boyar greed gave Rostislav the pretext for reviving his quest for Halych where the local magnates acknowledged Daniil Romanovich (his uncle) as their prince, but appropriated authority to themselves.[2] In 1241, Rostislav marshaled the princes of Bolokhoveni, and besieged Bakota which was an important purveyor of salt.[2] When he failed to take the city, he withdrew to Chernigov, but later he redirected his attack against the more important towns of Halych and Przemy?l.[2] He had strong support from the local boyars who cajoled the townsmen of Halych itself into capitulating without a fight.[2] After occupying Halych, Rostislav made prince Konstantin Vladimirovich Ryazansky the ruler of Przemy?l.[2] The bishops of the only two eparchies in Halych also supported Rostislav.[2]
     "However, his uncles (Daniil and Vasil’ko Romanovich) retaliated by marching against Halych; unable to withstand their attack, Rostislav fled with his supporters and sought sanctuary in Shchekotov.[2] His uncles pursued him, but on learning that the Tatars had left Hungary and were returning via Halych, they abandoned the chase.[2] As the Tatars passed through Halych, they routed Rostislav's force at a location which the chronicler identifies as a small pine forest; he therefore fled again to the Hungarians.[2]
His struggle for Halych
     "Béla IV, who had returned home from Dalmatia after May in 1242, approved Rostislav's marriage to his daughter, Anna.[2] The king was seeking to organize a new defensive system by creating client states to the south and east of Hungary, and in his search for a vassal whom he could appoint to Halych, he chose Rostislav.[2]
     "On learning that Béla IV had given his daughter in marriage to Rostislav, his father believed that his efforts to form an alliance with the Árpád dynasty had finally been realized.[2] Mikhail Vsevolodovich therefore rode to Hungary expecting to negotiate the agreements that normally accompanied such an alliance.[2] However, Béla IV rebuffed him, and he, greatly angered also by his son, returned to Chernigov and disowned Rostislav.[2]
     "Acting as his father-in-law's agent, Rostislav made two unsuccessful attacks of Halych.[2] Sometime in 1244, he led a Hungarian force against Przemy?l; Daniil Romanovich, however, marshaled his troops and routed the attackers making Rostislav flee to Hungary.[2] In the following year, Rostislav recruited many Hungarians and Poles and launched an attack against Jaros?aw north of Przemy?l; on August 17, 1245, his uncle, with Cuman help, annihilated the enemy, and Rostislav had to flee again to Hungary.[2]
In this battle, where the horse of our most liked son-in-law, the prince /Rostislav/, who have already been mentioned several times, was killed, Master L?rinc, following steadily the passion of customary faithfulness and thinking more of the life of the above-mentioned prince than his own life, gave the horse he was riding to the prince mentioned above, and he flung himself at the thick lines of the enemy exposing himself to streams of perils, which have been proven to us by the narration of the above-mentioned prince and the reports of our many followers and other trustworthy men. —?King Béla’s Charter of April 13, 1264 to L?rinc, Judge of the Royal Court and Count of Moson[6]

     "After his defeat, Rostislav never returned to Halych.[2]
Ban of Slavonia and Duke of Macsó
     "Rostislav received land grants from his father-in-law in Hungary, and thus he became the lord of the royal possessions of Bereg and the Castle of Füzér.[4] He was mentioned among the dignitaries of Béla IV as Ban of Slavonia in 1247, and from 1254 onward he was mentioned as the Duke of Macsó (in Latin, dux de Macho).[1] The Banate of Macsó originally centered around the river Kolubara, but later it also included Belgrade (in Hungarian, Nándorfehérvár) and by 1256, if not earlier, Brani?evo (in Hungarian, Barancs).[5]
     "In 1255, a peace between the Kingdom of Hungary and the Bulgarian Empire was sealed, and Tsar Michael of Bulgaria married Rostislav's daughter.[5] In 1256, Rostislav mediated a peace between his son-in-law and Emperor Theodore II of Nicaea.[5]
His struggle for Bulgaria
     "Late in 1256 (probably in December), a group of boyars, who had decided to kill Tsar Michael and replace him with his first cousin, Koloman, attacked the former, who died soon afterwards from his wounds.[5] To further his claims, Koloman II forcibly married Michael's widow, the daughter of Rostislav, but he could not consolidate power and was killed almost immediately.[5] To protect his daughter, Rostislav now, early in 1257, invaded Bulgaria; it seems he was using her as an excuse to acquire the Bulgarian throne for himself.[5] Rostislav appeared at the gates of T?rnovo and recovered his daughter; though it is sometimes stated that he briefly obtained T?rnovo, but it seems that he probably never actually gained possession of the city.[5]
     "Having failed to take T?rnovo, Rostislav retreated to Vidin where he established himself, taking the title of Tsar of Bulgaria, and the Hungarians recognized him with this title.[5] Meanwhile, in southeastern Bulgaria, Mitso (a relative of Ivan Asen II) was proclaimed tsar, but the boyars who were holding T?rnovo elected one of their number, Constantine Tikh as tsar.[5]
     "Shortly afterwards, Rostislav led a large portion of his troops off to Bohemia in order to assist his father-in-law against King Ottokar II of Bohemia.[5] Thus his Vidin province became undermanned, and the situation was ideal for Tsar Constantine Tikh who attacked the token forces left behind in Vidin and regained not only the city but the whole province to the borders of the province of Brani?evo.[5]
     "As soon as the Hungarians concluded peace with the Bohemians in March 1261, they, led by Stephen V of Hungary (co-king and Rostislav's brother-in-law) attacked Bulgaria.[5] They first overran the Vidin province and forced Tsar Constantine Tikh to withdraw his troops from it.[5] As a result of Hungary's action, Rostislav was restored to the position he had held prior to Constantine Tikh's attack on him in 1260.[5] Whether further Bulgarian territory east of Vidin (e.g., Lom) was taken by the Hungarians or Rostislav is not known.[5]
     "When he died, his lands were divided between two sons: his part of Bosnia went to his elder son Michael, while, Macsó went to his younger son, Béla; the immediate fate of Vidin is not known.[5]
Marriage and children
     "#1243: Anna of Hungary (c. 1226 – after 1274), daughter of King Béla IV of Hungary and his wife, Maria Laskarina[1][3]
** Duke Michael of Bosnia (? – 1271)[1]
** Duke Béla of Macsó (? – November, 1272)[1]
** Unnamed daughter (perhaps Anna),[3] wife firstly of Tsar Michael Asen I of Bulgaria, secondly of Tsar Koloman II of Bulgaria[5]
** Kunigunda (1245 – September 9, 1285), wife firstly of King Ottokar II of Bohemia, and secondly of nobleman Záviš of Falkenštejn (Rosenberg)[3]
** Agrippina (? – May 26, 1303/1309), wife of Prince Leszek II of Cracow[3]

Footnotes
1. Kristó, Gyula; Engel, Pál; Makk, Ferenc. Korai magyar történeti lexikon (9-14. század).[page needed]
2. Dimnik, Martin. The Dynasty of Chernigov - 1146-1246.
3. Charles Cawley (2008-05-19). "Russia, Rurikids - Grand Princes of Kiev, Princes of Chernigov, descendants of Sviatoslav II, Grand Prince of Kiev (fourth son of Iaroslav I)". Medieval Lands. Foundation of Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 2009-02-22.
4. Zsoldos, Attila. Családi ügy - IV. Béla és István ifjabb király viszálya az 1260-as években.
5. Fine, John V. A. The Late Medieval Balkans - A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest.
6. Kristó, Gyula. Középkori históriák oklevelekben (1002-1410).[page needed]
Sources
** Dimnik, Martin: The Dynasty of Chernigov - 1146-1246; Cambridge University Press, 2003, Cambridge; ISBN 978-0-521-03981-9.
** Fine, John V. A., Jr.: The Late Medieval Balkans - A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest; The University of Michigan Press, 2006, Ann Arbor; ISBN 978-0-472-08260-5.
** Kristó, Gyula: Középkori históriák oklevelekben (1002-1410) (Medieval Stories in Royal Charters /1002-1410/); Szegedi Középkorász M?hely in association with the Gondolat Kiadó, 1992, Szeged; ISBN 963-04-1956-4.
** Kristó, Gyula (General Editor) - Engel, Pál (Editor) - Makk, Ferenc (Editor): Korai magyar történeti lexikon (9-14. század) (Encyclopedia of the Early Hungarian History /9th-14th centuries/); Akadémiai Kiadó, 1994, Budapest; ISBN 963-05-6722-9.
** Zsoldos, Attila: Családi ügy - IV. Béla és István ifjabb király viszálya az 1260-as években (A Family Affair - The Conflict of Béla IV and Junior King Stephen in the 1260s); História - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, 2007, Budapest; ISBN 978-963-9627-15-4.
Further reading
** ????, ?., 2014. ? ????? ????????? ????? ????? ?????????? ??????????. ??????? ????? ???'?????-???????????? ????????????? ???????????? ????? ????? ???????. ????????? ?????, (24), pp.183-194."13

; Per Genealogics:
     "Rosztiszlo was born sometime between 1212 and 1225, the eldest son of Michail 'the Saint', grand duke of Kiev, and Marija Romanowna of Halicz. The Russian annals mention him for the first time in 1229 when the Novgorodians invited his father to be their prince.
     "Rosztiszlo underwent the ritual hair-cutting ceremony _(postrig)_ in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod on 19 May 1230, and his father installed him on the throne. The _postrig_ conferred on Rosztiszlo the official status of prince of Novgorod and thus he ruled Novgorod as a fully fledged prince after the ceremony. Rosztiszlo, in keeping with his father's policy, continued to pass legislation favouring the Novgorodians.
     "In September 1230 a frost destroyed the crops in the Novgorod district, causing a great famine. Novgorodians opposed to his father's rule took advantage of the calamity to foment unrest, and they incited the townsmen to plunder the court of _posadnik_ (mayor) Vodovik who was his father's man. Although the _posadnik_ forced the rival boyars to swear oaths of allegiance on 6 November, a month later, when he and Rosztiszlo visited Torzhok, the Novgorodians looted Vodovik's court and those of his supporters. Shortly afterwards Rosztiszlo was forced to flee to his father. The Novgorodians considered themselves free to invite another prince, and they summoned Prince Yaroslav Vsevolodovich of Vladimir, who came on 30 December.
     "Towards the end of September 1235 Rosztiszlo's father Michail occupied Halicz, whose prince (his brother-in-law and thus Rosztiszlo's maternal uncle) Daniil Romanowitsch had fled from the principality. In the spring of 1236 Rosztiszlo accompanied his father in attacking the principality of Volhynia which was still under the rule of Daniil Romanowitsch. However, in the meantime the Cumans plundered the Galician lands, forcing Michail to abandon his campaign.
     "At the beginning of the summer of 1236 Daniil Romanowitsch and his brother Vasilko rallied their troops to march against Michail and Rosztiszlo, but they barricaded themselves in Halicz with their retinue, the local militia, and a contingent of Hungarians sent by King Béla IV, and their opponents had to withdraw.
     "After the Hungarian troops had departed, Daniil Romanowitsch tried again, and Michail attempted to placate him by giving him Przemysl. Shortly afterwards Rosztiszlo was appointed to rule Halicz by his father, who wished to depart for Kiev which had been occupied by Yaroslav Vsvelodovich. After Michail had reoccupied Kiev, he and Rosztiszlo attacked Przemysl and took it back from Daniil Romanowitsch.
     "Rosztiszlo retained the loyalty of the Galician boyars, but he was not as capable a military commander as his father. Around 1237 he rode against the Lithuanians who had pillaged the lands of his father's maternal uncle Konrad I, duke of Masovia, who had been his ally against Daniil Romanowitsch. He also took all the boyars and horsemen with him and only a skeleton force remained behind to defend Halicz. The people of Halicz thereupon summoned Daniil and installed him as prince. On hearing the news, Rosztiszlo fled to Béla IV, king of Hungary.
     "In the winter of 1237 the Tatar troops led by Batu Khan devastated Ryazan; by 1240 almost all the lands of Chernigov, Perejaslawl, Ryazan, and Suzdalia lay in ruins. During the first half of 1240 Michail defied Batu Khan by putting to death his envoys, who had been seeking to coax him into submitting to Batu. The only allies to whom he could turn for aid were the Hungarians and the Poles, and therefore he fled to Hungary. He attempted to arrange a marriage for Rosztiszlo with the king's daughter Anna, but Béla saw no advantage to forming an alliance and evicted the two princes from Hungary. Rosztiszlo and his father took refuge in Masovia as guests of Konrad I, and Michail decided that the expedient course of action was to seek reconciliation with Daniil Romanowitsch, who had been controlling his domains by that time and holding Rosztiszlo's mother (his own sister) captive. Michail sent envoys to his brother-in-law admitting that he had sinned against him on many occasions by waging war and by reneging on his promises. He pledged never again to antagonise Daniil and forswore making any future attempts on Halicz. Daniiel invited him to Volhynia, returned his wife, and relinquished control of Kiev, and he gave Lutsk to Rosztiszlo, evidently in compensation for taking away Halicz.
     "Meanwhile, the Tatars sacked Kiev, which fell on 6 December 1240. On learning Kiev's fate, Michail and his family withdrew from Volhynia and for the second time imposed themselves on Konrad of Masovia's hospitality. In the spring of 1241 Michail went home to Kiev and gave Chernigov to Rosztiszlo.
     "Boyar greed gave Rosztiszlo the pretext for reviving his quest for Halicz, where the local magnates acknowledged his uncle Daniil Romanowitsch as their prince, but appropriated authority to themselves. In 1241 Rosztiszlo marshalled the princes of Bolokhov and besieged Bakota, an important purveyor of salt. When he failed to take the city he withdrew to Chernigov, but later he redirected his attack against the more important towns of Halicz and Przemysl. He had strong support from the local boyars who cajoled the townsmen of Halicz itself into capitulating without a fight. After occupying Halicz, Rosztiszlo made Prince Konstantin Vladimirovich Ryazansky the ruler of Przemysl. The bishops of the only two dioceses in Halicz also supported Rosztiszlo.
     "However his uncles Daniil and Vasilko Romanowitsch retaliated by marching against Halicz; unable to withstand their attack, Rosztiszlo fled with his supporters and sought sanctuary in Shchetkotov. His uncles pursued him, but on learning that the Tatars had left Hungary and were returning via Halicz, they abandoned the chase. As the Tatars passed through Halicz, they routed Rosztiszlo's force at a location which the chronicler identifies as a small pine forest; he then fled again to the Hungarians.
     "Béla IV, who had returned home from Dalmatia after May 1242, approved Rosztiszlo's marriage to his daughter Anna. The king was seeking to organise a new defensive system by creating client states to the south and east of Hungary, and in his search for a vassal whom he could appoint to Halicz, he chose Rosztiszlo. He and Anna had two sons and three daughters, but only their daughters Kunigunde and Erzsebet are recorded as having progeny.
     "On learning that Béla IV had given his daughter in marriage to Rosztiszlo, his father believed that his efforts to form an alliance with the Arpad dynasty had finally been realised, Michail therefore rode to Hungary expecting to negotiate the agreements that normally accompanied such an alliance. However, Béla IV rebuffed him and he returned to Chernigov, angry with what he saw as Rosztiszlo's disloyalty.
     "Acting as his father-in-law's agent, Rosztiszlo made two unsuccessful attacks on Halicz. Sometime in 1244 he led a Hungarian force against Przemysl; however Daniil Romanowitsch marshalled his troop and routed the attackers, forcing Rosztiszlo to flee back to Hungary. In the following year Rosztiszlo recruited many Hungarians and Poles and launched an attack against Jaroslaw north of Przemysl; on 17 August 1245 his uncle, with Cuman help, annihilated Rosztiszlo, who again had to flee to Hungary. After this defeat, Rosztiszlo never returned to Halicz.
     "Rosztiszlo received land grants from his father-in-law in Hungary, and thus he became the lord of the royal possessions of Bereg and the castle of Füzér. He was mentioned among the dignitaries of Béla IV as ban of Slavonia in 1247, and from 1254 onward he was mentioned as the duke of Macva (in Latin, _dux de Macho_). The banate of Macva originally centred on the river Kolubara, but later it also included Belgrade (Nándorfehérvár in Hungarian) and by 1256, if not earlier, Branicevo (Barancs in Hungarian).
     "In 1255 a peace between the kingdom of Hungary and the Bulgarian empire was sealed, and Mihaly II Asen, tsar of Bulgaria, married Rosztiszlo's daughter Erzebet. In 1256 Rosztiszlo mediated a peace between his son-in-law and Theodoros II Dukas Laskaris, emperor of Byzantium.
     "Late in 1256 (probably in December) a group of boyars, who had decided to kill Tsar Mihaly and replace him with his first cousin Koloman II, attacked Mihaly who died soon afterwards from his wounds. To further his claims, Koloman forcibly married Mihaly's widow Erzsebet, but he could not consolidate power and was killed almost immediately. To protect his daughter, Rosztiszlo early in 1257 invaded Bulgaria; it seems he was using her as an excuse to acquire the Bulgarian throne for himself. Rosztiszlo appeared at the gates of Tarnovo and recovered his daughter; though it is sometimes stated that he briefly obtained Tarnovo, it seems that he probably never actually gained possession of the city.
     "Having failed to take Tarnovo, Rosztiszlo retreated to Vidin where he established himself, taking the title of Tsar of Bulgaria, and the Hungarians recognised him with this title. Meanwhile, in southeastern Bulgaria, Mitso (a relative of Mihaly's father Iwan Asen II) was proclaimed tsar, but the boyars who were holding Tarnovo elected one of their number, Constantine Tikh as tsar.
     "Shortly afterwards Rosztiszlo led a large portion of his troops to Bohemia in order to assist his father-in-law Béla IV against Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia. Thus his Vidin province became undermanned, and the situation was ideal for Tsar Constantine Tikh who attacked the token forces left behind in Vidin and gained not only the city but the whole province up to the borders of the province of Branicevo.
     "As soon as the Hungarians concluded peace with the Bohemians in March 1261, they attacked Bulgaria, led by Stephan V of Hungary (his father Béla IV's co-king and Rosztiszlo's brother-in-law). They first overran the Vidin province and forced Tsar Constantine Tikh to withdraw his troops from it. As a result of Hungary's action, Rosztiszlo was restored to the position he had held prior to Constantine Tikh's attack on him in 1260. Whether further Bulgarian territory east of Vidin was taken by the Hungarians or Rosztiszlo is not known. In October 1261 Rosztiszlo's daughter Kunigunde married Przemysl Ottokar II, with whom she had progeny including Wenceslas II, the future king of Bohemia and Poland.
     "When Rosztiszlo died about 1264, his lands were divided between his two sons: his part of Bosnia went to the elder son Michael, while Macva went to his younger son Béla; the immediate fate of Vidin is not known."14

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 91.
2. Nemesi Evkonyv 1972/75 Luzern, 1972. , Reference: 493.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 131.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia. biographical detail
s.14 EDV-23. Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria was also known as Rostislav (?) Gr Pr of Chernigov.15 Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria was also known as Rosztiszlo (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, King of Bulgaria.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROSTISLAV Mikhailovich, son of MIKHAIL Vsevolodich Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife Maria Romanovna of Galich ([1225]-1263). The Novgorod Chronicle records that he was appointed Prince of Novgorod in 1229 by his father but was expelled 8 Dec 1230[329]. Grand Prince of Kiev 1231/1240. Prince of Galich 1236/1238. After the Mongol invasion, he sought refuge with Bela IV King of Hungary, married the king's daughter, and was appointed Ban of Ma?va. He mediated the peace between Bulgaria and the empire of Nikaia in 1256[330]. On the death of his son-in-law Kalojan II Tsar of Bulgaria in 1258, Rostislav invaded Bulgaria from neighbouring Ma?va, ostensibly to protect the interests of his daughter, who was handed to him at Trnovo. He retreated to Vidin where he assumed the title ROSTISLAV Tsar of the Bulgarians, and was recognised as such by Hungary[331]. His forces were temporarily expelled from Vidin province by his rival Konstantin Tih, during Rostislav's temporary absence helping his father-in-law Bela IV King of Hungary in his war with Bohemia, but he was restored by Hungarian troops which expelled Konstantin from the area in 1261[332]. On his death, his lands were divided between his sons, Mikhail taking his part of Bosnia and Bela taking Ma?va.
     "m (1243) ANNA [Agnes] of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia ([1226/27]-). Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Georgius Akropolites who names "Rosum Urum…Ungariæ regis generum" as father-in-law of "Bulgarorum…princeps"[333]. The name of the wife of Rostislav is confirmed by the Annales Polonorum recording the marriage in 1265 of their daughter Gryfina, in a later passage specifying that she was daughter of "ducis Roczislay et…Anna"[334]. A charter dated 15 Jul 1264 records the confirmation by "ipsius patris regis Belæ IV" of a donation by "Agnes, viduæ post Radislaum ducem Galitiæ, ducissæ Galitiæ, de Bosna et de Mazo, ac Michaeli et Belæ natis eius"[335]. Baumgarten names the wife of Prince Rostislav and gives her origin but only cites one secondary source in support[336]."
Med Lands cites:
[329] Novgorod Chronicle 1229 and 1230, pp. 73 and 75.
[330] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 159.
[331] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 171.
[332] Fine (1994), p. 174.
[333] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1837) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 62, p. 134.
[334] Annales Polonorum I 1265 and 1279, MGH SS XIX, pp. 636 and 644.
[335] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1892) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb), Vol. XXIII, Actæ Bosnæ, LXXXI, p. 15.
[336] Baumgarten (1927), p. 35, citing Wertner, M. Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 463-75.9
He was Prince of Novgorod between 1229 and 1230.3,13 He was Prince of Halych between 1236 and 1237.13 He was Prince of Galitzia in 1238.3 He was Prince of Lutsk in 1240.13 He was Prince of Chernigov between 1240 and 1243.3,13 He was Prince of Halych between 1241 and 1242.13 He was Ban of Clavonia between 1247 and 1248.13 He was Duke of Macsó between 1254 and 1262.13

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosztiszlo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027046&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik6.html
  4. [S2101] Tony Hoskins, "Hoskins email 21 Oct 2006: "Kunigunda Rostislavna, Queen of Bohemia: Rurikid gateway to     the West"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Oct 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Hoskins email 21 Oct 2006."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Michail 'the Saint': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079953&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MikhailVsevolodichdied1246B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Michail 'the Saint': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079953&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 9: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik9.html#MRG
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RostislavMikhailovichdied1263B.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020722&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AnnaMRostislavIBulgaria
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rostislav_Mikhailovich. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosztiszlo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027046&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast3.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Erzsebet of Halicz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00072288&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunhata of Slavonia and Machva: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#KunigundaRostislavnadied1285.