Alice de Warkworth

F, #10441
FatherRobert Fitz Roger 2nd Baron of Warkworth1,2 b. b 1178, d. 22 Nov 1214
MotherMargaret/Margery de Chesney Lady of Horsford3,2 b. c 1170, d. b 7 Jan 1231
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited7 Sep 2019

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert FitzRoger de Warkworth and Clavering: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139367&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2063] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 April 2006: "Re: de Clavering family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 April 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 April 2006."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margery de Chesney: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139368&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 262-29, p. 238. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 96, Fitz PIERS 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 96, Fitz PIERS 4:i.

Robert Fitz Roger 2nd Baron of Warkworth1

M, #10442, b. before 1178, d. 22 November 1214
FatherRoger Fitz Richard 1st Lord of Warkworth, Lord of Clavering, co. Essed1,2 d. 1178
MotherAlice de Vere1,2 b. b 1141, d. a 1185
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited25 Mar 2020
     Robert Fitz Roger 2nd Baron of Warkworth was born before 1178.3 He married Margaret/Margery de Chesney Lady of Horsford, daughter of William de Chesney Lord of Horsford and Colne and Gilla (?), circa 1190; 2nd husband.3,4,1
Robert Fitz Roger 2nd Baron of Warkworth died on 22 November 1214; Weis says d. 1212; van de Pas says d. bef 22 Nov 1214; Ravilious says d. 22 Nov. 1214.3,1,2
     GAV-22 EDV-22. He was Lord of Clavering.3

; per Ravilious: Robert fitz Roger[6]
Death:     22 Nov 1214[1],[2]
Occ:     lord of Warkworth

of Warkworth, Northumberland and Whalton

sheriff of Northumberland[1]:
as such, rendered his accounts to the Treasury, 1200-01:
' 299. Northumberland: - Robert fitz Roger (William son of
William fitz Roscelin for him) renders his account; in lands
granted to the K. of Scotland, 100s. in Tindale, for same
term. ' [Bain I:48, cites Pipe Roll 2 John, Rot. 1[7]]

and again, 1206-07:
' 299. Northumberland: - Robert fitz Roger (Robert de Kent for
him) renders his account; in lands granted to the K. of
Scotland, 10l. in Tindale.' [Bain I:65, cites Pipe Roll
8 John, Rot. 22[7]2]

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975, Turton, Lr. Col. W. H., Reference: 118
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936, Doubleday, H. A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: V72/73.1 He was 2nd Baron of Warkworth at Warkworth, Northumberland, England.3,2

He was Sheriff of Northumberland.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert FitzRoger de Warkworth and Clavering: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139367&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2063] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 April 2006: "Re: de Clavering family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 April 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 April 2006."
  3. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 156-2, p. 187. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margery de Chesney: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139368&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 262-29, p. 238. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Clavering - Barons Clavering, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3D-K.htm#JohnFitzRobertdied1240B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Sir Enguerrand/Ingelram II de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry et Ruminghen, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire1,2,3,4,5

M, #10443, b. between 1200 and 1210, d. between 1265 and 1270
FatherGuillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry4 b. c 1175, d. 1241
MotherAgnes/Alice de Dammartin4 b. c 1166, d. a 1244
ReferenceGAV20 EDV21
Last Edited30 Dec 2013
     Sir Enguerrand/Ingelram II de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry et Ruminghen, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire was born between 1200 and 1210. He married Agnès/Isabel/Isabeau/Mahaut/Isabelle de Condé, daughter of Nicholas I de Condé Seigneur of Condé, Seigneur de Bailleul and Isabeau/Elisabeth de Morialmé dame de Beloeil et de Fraire-La-Grande, dame de Morialmé, circa 1240.1,6,4,7
Sir Enguerrand/Ingelram II de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry et Ruminghen, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire died between 1265 and 1270.
     GAV-20 EDV-21 GKJ-22. He was Seigneur de Fienes at Guisnes, France.8

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VI 465
2. An account of the families of Lennard and Barrett, 1908., Thomas Barrett-Lennard, Reference: 152
3. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 167.4 Sir Enguerrand/Ingelram II de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry et Ruminghen, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire was also known as Sir Enguerrand de Fiennes Seigneur de Fiennes, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire.4

; weis 152-28.8

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 85, de FIENNES 5:I. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 153-24A, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 57. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038520&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Isabeau) de Condé: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038521&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Florennes-Rumigny.pdf, p. 4.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 152-28, p. 134.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Giles de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038375&tree=LEO
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Fiennes.pdf: p. 3.
  11. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."

Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry1,2

M, #10444, b. circa 1175, d. 1241
FatherEnguerrand I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes3,4 b. c 1152, d. 1189
MotherSybille (?) Dame de Tingry5,6,7,3,4 d. a 1217
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited4 Sep 2020
     Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry married Isabel N.8 Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry was born circa 1175. He married Agnes/Alice de Dammartin, daughter of AlbericAubrey II (?) Count of Dammartin and Matilda (Maud) de Clermont-en-Beauvais de Ponthieu & Dammartin, before 4 January 1203; per Racines et Histoire: "m ca 1196."9,8,10
Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry died in 1241 at Holy Land; Leo van de Pas says d. 1240; Richardson says d. 1244.9,8,1,10
     GAV-21 EDV-22. Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry was also known as William (Guillaume) I de Fiennes.8,1

; per Racines et Histoire: "aux côtés de Renaud de Dammartin)"
per Wikipedia (12/26/2103): [quote]The Battle of Bouvines, which took place on 27 July 1214, was a medieval battle which ended the twelve-year Angevin-Flanders War.[3] It was fundamental in the early development of France in the Middle Ages by confirming the French crown's sovereignty over the Angevin lands of Brittany and Normandy.
Philip Augustus of France defeated an army consisting of Imperial German, English and Flemish soldiers, led by Otto IV of Germany. Other leaders included Count Ferrand of Flanders, William de Longespee and Renaud of Boulogne. The defeat was so decisive that Otto was deposed and replaced by Frederick II Hohenstaufen; Ferrand and Renaud were captured and imprisoned and King John of England was forced to sign the Magna Carta by his discontented barons. Philip was himself able to take undisputed control of most of the territories in France that had belonged to King John of England, Otto's maternal uncle and ally.[end quote]11

Family 1

Isabel N

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I de Fienes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038518&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 158B-27, p. 154. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#EnguerrandIFiennesdied1218. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, line 158B-26, p. 154.
  5. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Fiennes & du Bois, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Fiennes.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sibyl de Tingrie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038516&tree=LEO
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 85, de FIENNES 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 152-28, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 22 June 2005.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Battle of Bouvines: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bouvines. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Fiennes.pdf: p. 3.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038520&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut de Fienes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108746&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Guines page (Guines family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/guines.html

Agnes/Alice de Dammartin

F, #10445, b. circa 1166, d. after 1244
FatherAlbericAubrey II (?) Count of Dammartin1 d. 19 Sep 1200
MotherMatilda (Maud) de Clermont-en-Beauvais de Ponthieu & Dammartin2 b. 1138, d. a Oct 1200
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited1 Sep 2019
     Agnes/Alice de Dammartin was born circa 1166 at Buckinghamshire, England.3 She married Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry, son of Enguerrand I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes and Sybille (?) Dame de Tingry, before 4 January 1203; per Racines et Histoire: "m ca 1196."4,5,6
Agnes/Alice de Dammartin died after 1244.6
     GAV-21 EDV-22. Agnes/Alice de Dammartin was also known as Agnès de Dammartin.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aubri/Alberic II https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139902&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut (Mabilie) de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139903&tree=LEO
  3. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 152-28, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 85, de FIENNES 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Fiennes.pdf: p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038520&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut de Fienes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108746&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Guines page (Guines family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/guines.html

Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne1,2,3,4

M, #10446, b. circa 1010, d. 30 September 1089
FatherEudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre3,4,5,6 b. c 985, d. 15 Nov 1037
MotherErmengarde d'Auvergne4,5,6 b. c 995, d. Mar 1040
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited26 Jul 2020
     Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne was born circa 1010.7,2,4,5 He married Gersende (?) de Maine, daughter of Heribert I "Eveille-Chien" (?) Comte du Maine, circa 1044;
His 1st wife; her 1st husband; whom he repudiated 1048.1,2,3,8,4,5,9,6,10 Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne and Gersende (?) de Maine were divorced in 1048.7,2,4,5,9,6 Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne married Gundrada/Gondrée (?) between 1050 and 1055;
His 2nd wife.1,2,3,4,5,6 Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne married Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube, daughter of Raoul III/IV 'le Grand' (?) Comte de Valois de Crépy et de Vexin and Aelis/Adele (?) de Bar-sur-Aube, before 1061;
His 3rd wife.11,1,12,2,4,5,13,6
Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne died on 30 September 1089 at Epernay, Brittany, France.11,1,2,4,5
Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne was buried after 30 September 1089 at Collégiale Saint Martin, Epernay, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1010
     DEATH     30 Sep 1089 (aged 78–79)
     French Nobility. Son of Eudes II Comte de Blois and his second wife Ermengarde d'Auvergne. Also known as Thibaud I de Champagne.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Eudes II de Blois unknown–1037
          Ermengarde de Auvergne
     Spouse
          Alix de Valois 1054–1093
     Siblings
          Berthe de Blois 1005–1080
          Berthe De Blois-Chartres de Bretagne 1013–1085
     Children
          Hawise Guingamp Penthievre
          Stephen II de Blois 1045–1102
     BURIAL     Collégiale Saint Martin, Epernay, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 17 Dec 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 121851621.14
     Reference: Genealogics cites: "Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 42.5

; Per Genealogics:
     "Thibaut III was born at Epernay between 1010 and 1019, the son of Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartes, Troyes et Champagne, and Ermengarde d'Auvergne. He succeeded his father in 1037 as Thibaut III, comte de Blois, de Chartes, de Châteaudun, de Meaux, de Sancerre et de Troyes. He lost the county of Beauvais sometime after 1037. Guillaume de Jumièges records that 'comte Thibaut' was captured by Geoffroy, comte d'Anjou, who extorted the town of Tours from him by force. The _Chronica Rainaldi_ dates this to 1044.
     "By his first wife Garsende de Maine, daughter of Herbert I Eveille-Chien, comte de Maine, he had a son Stephen/Etienne who was his only child to have progeny. He divorced Garsende in 1048 and married Gondrada/Gondrée, but this marriage did not result in progeny. Before 1061 he married Adélaide de Valois; they had three sons, none of whom would have progeny.
     "Thibaut was known as a patron of abbeys who favoured monastic reform. He died on 29 September 1089, and was buried in Epernay."5 GAV-26 EDV-26.

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Thibaud III de Blois (ou Thibaud Ier de Champagne)1 (Thibault, Thibaud, Thibaut), né vers 1019, mort à Épernay le 29 ou 30 septembre 1089, est le fils d'Eudes II de Blois et d'Ermengarde d'Auvergne. Puissant maître de maison féodale, le comte de Blois commence une longue carrière politique. D'abord rejeté au nord et à l'ouest de ses domaines, en contrées par trop turbulentes, il accroît finalement son emprise politique et guerrière à l'est en devenant comte de Champagne.
Un patron politique de l'époque féodale
     "L'héritier de la maison de Blois devient comte de Blois, Tours, Châteaudun, Chartres, Sancerre, Provins, Saint-Florentin, Château-Thierry de 1037 à 1089 et de Troyes, Meaux, Vitry de 1066 à 1089.
     "Thibaud III perd Beauvais après 1037. En outre, battu à la bataille de Nouy, près de Tours assiégée en 1044, il abandonne le pouvoir concret sur la Touraine, saisie par la maison rivale d'Anjou menée par Geoffroy II Martel. Il a dû aussi en perdre le titre car le roi de France Henri Ier, à qui il a refusé de prêter hommage, l'en a dépossédé virtuellement pour le remettre tout aussi virtuellement à son vainqueur. Mais le traité qu'Angevins et Blésois signent à la fin de la bataille n'est qu'une passation de fief.
     "L'influence compromise à l'ouest, il reste à la maison de Blois de reprendre le chemin des conquêtes à l'est. En 1063-65, son neveu Eudes III de Champagne, dont il a la tutelle, se révolte contre lui. Thibaud en profite pour conquérir la Champagne et devient comte de Champagne (Thibaud Ier), instaurant ainsi la puissante maison de Blois-Champagne. Protecteur des abbayes, il favorise la réforme monastique.
     "Il a le rare privilège de voir un tout jeune parent accéder à la canonisation, Thibaut de Provins, son filleul germain2.
     "L'un de ses petits-fils, Thibaut IV de Blois (ou II de Champagne), dit Thibaud le Grand, comte de Blois-Champagne († 1152), se fait inhumer à l'abbaye Saint-Pierre de Lagny-sur-Marne pour signifier son implantation en Champagne face au Capétien3.
     "Un autre petit-fils, Étienne de Blois (puis d'Angleterre) († 1154), s'empare en 1135 du trône anglais aux dépens de sa cousine Mathilde, fille d'Henri Ier d'Angleterre, et de son frère aîné Thibaut IV.
Mariages
     "Thibaud III de Blois épouse Gersende, fille du comte Herbert Ier du Maine, avant de la répudier en 1048. Il est possible qu'il épouse ensuite Gundrade, dont l'existence ne nous est connue que par un seul document. Il est possible que Gundrade soit une transcription déformée du prénom Gersende, celui de sa première épouse.
** Cette Gundrade est dite être la mère d'Étienne II de Blois, qui épouse Adèle de Normandie (Adèle de Blois), fille de Guillaume le Conquérant, d'où la succession des comtes de Champagne, de Blois et de Sancerre, ainsi que des seigneurs de Sully (et des rois d'Angleterre sous le règne d'Etienne !).

     "En secondes (ou troisièmes) noces, il épouse, avant 1061, Adélaïde de Valois († entre 1093 et 1100), fille de Raoul IV de Vexin. Ils ont pour enfants :
** Eudes III de Troyes, comte de Troyes ;
** Philippe, évêque de Châlons ;
** Hugues Ier de Champagne, comte de Troyes, puis comte de Champagne, puis chevalier de l'Ordre du Temple ;
** Havoise, mariée à Étienne Ier de Penthièvre4.

Source
** Larousse encyclopédique en couleurs, France Loisirs 1978.
Articles connexes
** Bataille de Nouy: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataille_de_Nouy
Notes et références
** (en) Charles Cawley, « Thibaut [III] de Blois (-1089) » [archive], dans « Central France - Blois, Tours », ch. 1 : « Blois », section B : « Comtes de Blois [943]-1218 », sur MedLands – Foundation for Medieval Genealogy [archive] (consulté le 26 décembre 2017).
** Mabillon, Vita S.Theobaldi Eremitae, Acta Sanctorum Ord.S.B.Saec. VI, Pars II. Ann.MLXVI, Julii 1, paragr. 3
** Michel Bur, La formation du comté de Champagne (v. 950 - v. 1150), 1977, p. 306.
** Stéphane Morin Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIIe au XIIIe siècle, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2010. (ISBN 9782753510128), p. 184."15

; Per Med Lands:
     "THIBAUT de Blois, son of EUDES II Comte de Blois & his second wife Ermengarde d'Auvergne ([1010]-29/30 Sep 1089, bur Epernay). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names "Tetbaudus et Stephanus" as the two sons of Comte Eudes, specifying that Thibaut succeeded in "Carnotensem et Turonensem"[146]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Theobaldi filii Odonis Campaniensis" when recording that he lost Tours in 1041[147]. "Odo comes filius [Odonis comitis]" confirmed a donation of his father by charter dated to [1032/37], subscribed by "Tetbaldi filii eius, matris eius Ermengardis…Hervei vicecomitis"[148]. He succeeded his father in 1037 as THIBAUT III Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Meaux, de Sancerre et de Troyes. He lost Beauvais some time after 1037. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "comitem Tetbaldum" was captured by Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou who extorted the town of Tours from him by force[149]. The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Tetbaldus, filius Odonis comitis" was captured by "Goffrido comite Andecavorum" in 1044 after which the city of Tours surrendered[150]. Comte de Bar-sur-Aube, presumably after 1077, maybe de iure uxoris. The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "II Kal Oct" of "Tebaldus comes Carnotensium"[151]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comes Theobaldus [filius Odonis]" was buried "apud Spernacum"[152].
     "m firstly (repudiated 1048) as her first husband, GERSENDE du Maine, daughter of HERIBERT [I] "Euigilans Canis/Eveille-chien" Comte du Maine & his wife ---([1025/35]-). The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Atho marchisius" left Maine in the hands of "Gaufridi de Meduana", also naming "uxor eiusdem marchisii Garcendis…filia Herberti Cenomannorum…comitis…Evigila Canem" and specifying that she had married firstly "Theobaldo duci Campanie" and that he had repudiated her[153]. She married secondly as his second wife, Alberto Azzo II d'Este. Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom one married “Azsoni marchiso Liguriæ” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters)[154].
     "[m secondly ([1050/55]) GUNDRADA, daughter of --- (-[1055/60]). Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1089 under which “Stephanus comes” donated property to the abbey of Pontlevoy, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis patris mei et matris meæ Gundreæ…”[155]. It is assumed that she died soon after giving birth to her son. Another possibility is that “Gundreæ” in this charter is in fact a distorted transcription of “Gersendæ”, the name of Thibaut’s known first wife. This cannot be verified unless another primary source emerges which names the mother of Comte Etienne.]
     "m [secondly/thirdly] (before 1061) ADELA [Alix], daughter of --- (-12 May [1093/1100], bur Saint-Faron). "Adeladis comitisse" subscribed the donation to Cluny by "Rotrocus castri Mauritanie comes atque Dunensis castri vicecomes" dated 11 Jan 1078, immediately after "Tetbaldi comitis, Stephani comitis"[156], it being assumed that she was the wife of the former not the latter. Her parentage is uncertain. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, "Alaydis soror sancti Symonis" married "comiti Campanie Theobaldo", although Alberic confuses her with her supposed niece Adelais, daughter of Héribert [IV] Comte de Vermandois, saying that she married "Hugoni fratri regis Philippi" after the death of her husband[157]. If Alberic is correct, the [second/third] wife of Comte Thibaut III was Adela [Alix] de Valois, daughter of Raoul [III] de Crépy Comte du Vexin et de Valois & his first wife Aelis de Bar-sur-Aube. The difficulty with Alberic’s statement is an undated charter, quoted by Acta Sanctorum, under which "Rodulfus comes" [identified as Comte Raoul [III]] donated property to Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "Symonem filium meum, duos quoque generos meos, quos de filiabus meis habeo, id est Heribertum comitem et juvenem…Bartholomeum"[158]. If the wife of Thibaut III Comte de Blois had been another daughter of Comte Raoul [III], it is unclear why Thibaut would have been omitted from this document which appears to indicate clearly that Raoul had only two sons-in-law. Nevertheless, a close relationship with the family of the comtes de Valois is indicated by a charter dated to [1077/81] under which "Teobaudus comes palatinus…cum mulierum Adelaide" donated property to Montiérender, naming "bone memorie predecessorum…patris sui Odonis comitis et Heriberto cognomento senioris…comes Rodulfus predecessor suus et propinquus"[159], the latter presumably referring to Comte Raoul [III]. In addition, Comte Thibaut acquired the county of Bar-sur-Aube. If he had not been Raoul’s son-in-law, the basis for this acquisition is unclear. The necrology of Saint-Loup, Troyes records the death "XII Mai" of "Aalais uxor Theobaudi comitis Campaniæ" and her burial "in monasterio Sancti Faronis"[160]. "
Med Lands cites:
[146] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388.
[147] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1041, MGH SS XXIII, p. 786.
[148] Marmoutier-Dunois IV, p. 5.
[149] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVIII, p. 276.
[150] Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 11.
[151] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Saint-Père-enVallée, p. 195.
[152] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1037, MGH SS XXIII, p. 785.
[153] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 377.
[154] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252.
[155] Arbois de Jubainville (1859) Tome I, p. 504.
[156] Cluny, Tome IV.3517, p. 633.
[157] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1062, MGH SS XXIII, p. 793.
[158] Acta Sanctorum, September VIII, p. 725.
[159] Montiérender, 52, p. 178.
[160] Troyes Necrologies, 4 Obituaire de Saint-Loup, p. 342.6


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Theobald III of Blois (French: Thibaut) (1012–1089) was count of Blois, Meaux and Troyes. He was son of Odo II, Count of Blois[1] and Ermengarde of Auvergne.[2]
Inherits Blois
     "Upon his father's death in 1037, Theobald inherited amongst others the counties of Blois,[1] Tours, Chartres. Châteaudun and Sancerre, and also in Champagne: Château-Thierry, Provins and St. Florentin. His brother Stephen inherited the counties of Meaux, Troyes and Vitry-le-François. By 1044, Geoffrey Martel, the Count of Anjou, was besieging Tours and Theobald responded by attempting to relieve the city.[3] They met in battle at Nouy and Theobald was captured and had to give up the county of Touraine in order to regain his freedom.[3] From then on the centre of power for the House of Blois moved to Champagne.
     "In 1054, Theobald recognized the Holy Roman Emperor, Henry III as his liege which precipitated a meeting at Ivois between Henry I and the emperor.[4] Theobald found ways to become close to the royal court again and gained political influence and began calling himself, Count Palatine.[1]
Gains Champagne
     "Theobald's nephew, Odo, Count of Champagne joined the army of William the Conqueror and participated in the Norman conquest of England. Theobald used his nephew's absence and his own influence at court to gain control over Odo's possessions in Champagne.[1] He had gained a position of considerable power, which increased when he married the daughter of Ralph IV of Valois. From 1074 onward, he left his son Henry in control of Blois, Châteaudun and Chartres.
Death
     "Following Theobald's death in 1089, Philip I, King of France, was able to arrange for Blois and Champagne to be divided between Theobald's sons.[1]
Family and children
     "Theobald's first wife Gersent of Le Mans,[2] daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, who bore him one child:
1. Stephen, Count of Blois[2]

     "His second wife Alix de Crepy (Adela) or Adele of Valois,[5] daughter of Ralph IV of Valois and Adélaide of Bar-sur-Aube, bore four children:
1. Philip, who became bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne[5]
2. Odo,[5] who inherited possessions in Champagne (Troyes). He died in 1093, leaving the possessions to his brother Hugh.
3. Hugh,[5] who became the first to be called count of Champagne.[6]
4. Hawise, also known as Hawise of Guingamp, wife of Stephen, Count of Tréguier[7]

References
1. Bouchard 2004, p. 138.
2. Evergates 1999, p. 11.
3. Bradbury 1992, p. 63.
4. Weinfurter 1999, p. 107.
5. Evergates 2007, p. 248.
6. Evergates 2007, p. 7.
7. Morin 2010, p. 184.
Sources
** Bouchard, Constance Brittain (2004). "The Kingdom of the Franks to 1108". In Luscombe, David; Riley-Smith, Jonathan (eds.) The New Cambridge Medieval ** History. Vol. 4, Part 2. Cambridge University Press.
** Bradbury, Jim (1992). The Medieval Siege. The Boydell Press.
** Evergates, Theodore, ed. (1999). Aristocratic Women in Medieval France. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Evergates, Theodore (2007). The Aristocracy in the County of Champagne, 1100-1300. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Morin, Stéphane (2010). Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIIe au XIIIe siècle (in French). Presses Universitaires de Rennes.
** Weinfurter, Stefan (1999). The Salian Century: Main Currents in an Age of Transition. University of Pennsylvania Press."16

; per Racines et Histoire: "2) Thibaud III de Blois ° 1010/12 + 29-30/09/1089 (Epernay) comte de Blois (Th. 1er), Chartres, Châteaudun et Troyes, seigneur de Meaux et Sancerre (1037 ; perd Beauvais ~1037), de Champagne (1048), capturé par Geoffroi, comte d’Anjou qui lui extorque Tours (1044) (confirme la charte de donation de son père ~1032/37)
     ép. 1) ~1044 (rép./sép. 1048/49) Gersende du Maine + après 1072 (fille du comte Herbert 1er «Eveille-Chien» comte du Maine, + 13/04/1036, et de Paule de Preuilly ; elle ép. 2) avant 1055 Adalberto Azzo II, marquis d’Este et de Ligurie)
     ép. 2) Gundrada (Gondrée)
     ép. 3) dès 1061 Alix (Adela, Alaidis, Adèle) de Valois-Crépy + un 12/05 entre 1093 et 1100/01 comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube (10) (fille de Raoul de Crépy, comte du Vexin et de Valois, et d’Adela de Breteuil) (citée avec son mari dans une charte à Montiérender ~1077/81 ; souscrit une donation à Cluny le 11/01/1078.)17 "

; Per Genealogy.EU: "C1. Cte Thibaut III de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Meaux, de Sancerre et de Troyes, etc; he lost Beauvais some time after 1037; *1012, +29/30.9.1089; 1m: Gersende (whom he repudiated 1048) dau.of Cte Herbert de Maine; 2m: Gundrada N; 3m: before 1061 Adela=Alix de Crépy (+1093/1100.)2"

;      In their articles on Hawise, Wikipedia and Wikipédia (Fr.) both indicate that Hawise was the dau. of Thibaud/Theobald III de Blois, by his 2nd wife, Adélaïde de Valois. Both articles cite: Stéphane Morin Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIe au XIIIe siècle Presses Universitaires de Rennes & Société d'émulation des Côtes-d'Armor. Rennes 2010 (ISBN 9782753510128), pp. 102 & 123.
     In the articles for Thibaud/Theobald III de Blois, Wikipedia and Wikipédia (Fr.) both show Hawise as his dau.:
Per Wikipedia:
     :His second wife Alix de Crepy (Adela) or Adele of Valois,[5] daughter of Ralph IV of Valois and Adélaide of Bar-sur-Aube, bore four children:
1. Philip, who became bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne[5]
2. Odo,[5] who inherited possessions in Champagne (Troyes). He died in 1093, leaving the possessions to his brother Hugh.
3. Hugh,[5] who became the first to be called count of Champagne.[6]
4. Hawise, also known as Hawise of Guingamp, wife of Stephen, Count of Tréguier[7]"

Wikipedia notes:
[5] Evergates 2007, p. 248.
[6] Evergates 2007, p. 7.
[7] Morin 2010, p. 184.

Wikipedia cites:
** Evergates, Theodore (2007). The Aristocracy in the County of Champagne, 1100-1300. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Morin, Stéphane (2010). Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIIe au XIIIe siècle (in French). Presses Universitaires de Rennes.

Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "En secondes (ou troisièmes) noces, il épouse, avant 1061, Adélaïde de Valois († entre 1093 et 1100), fille de Raoul IV de Vexin. Ils ont pour enfants :
** Eudes III de Troyes, comte de Troyes ;
** Philippe, évêque de Châlons ;
** Hugues Ier de Champagne, comte de Troyes, puis comte de Champagne, puis chevalier de l'Ordre du Temple ;
** Havoise, mariée à Étienne Ier de Penthièvre [4].

Wikipédia (Fr.) cites: [4] Stéphane Morin Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIIe au XIIIe siècle, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2010. (ISBN 9782753510128), p. 184."18,19,20,15 He was Count of Blois between 1037 and 1089.16 He was Count of Troyes, Count of Meaux between 1066 and 1089.16

Family 2

Gundrada/Gondrée (?) d. bt 1055 - 1060

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 31, BLOIS 4:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIIIdied1089B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 31, BLOIS 5.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garsende de Maine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020139&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MAINE.htm#GersendeM1ThibautIIIBloisM2AzzoIIEste
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-22, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page ("de Valois"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adélaide de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198144&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 November 2019), memorial page for Thibaut III de Blois (1010–30 Sep 1089), Find A Grave Memorial no. 121851621, citing Collégiale Saint Martin, Epernay, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/121851621/thibaut_iii-de_blois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Thibaud III de Blois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibaud_III_de_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_III,_Count_of_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_Count_of_Tr%C3%A9guier.
  19. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne Ier de Penthièvre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_Ier_de_Penthi%C3%A8vre
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Theobald III, Count of Blois.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012365&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012365&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EtienneIdied1102B
  25. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 32, BLOIS 5:ii.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adélaide de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198144&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00358835&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00358836&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080251&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamtroyes.htm#HuguesITroyesdied1126

Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube1,2

F, #10447, d. between 1093 and 1100
FatherRaoul III/IV 'le Grand' (?) Comte de Valois de Crépy et de Vexin1,3,2 b. c 1015, d. 23 Sep 1074
MotherAelis/Adele (?) de Bar-sur-Aube1,2,4 b. bt 1020 - 1025, d. 11 Sep 1053
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited15 Aug 2020
     Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube married Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne, son of Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre and Ermengarde d'Auvergne, before 1061;
His 3rd wife.5,6,7,8,2,9,10,11
Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube died between 1093 and 1100.12,2,10
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "C1. Cte Thibaut III de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Meaux, de Sancerre et de Troyes, etc; he lost Beauvais some time after 1037; *1012, +29/30.9.1089; 1m: Gersende (whom he repudiated 1048) dau.of Cte Herbert de Maine; 2m: Gundrada N; 3m: before 1061 Adela=Alix de Crépy (+1093/1100.)8"
; per Racines et Histoire: "2) Thibaud III de Blois ° 1010/12 + 29-30/09/1089 (Epernay) comte de Blois (Th. 1er), Chartres, Châteaudun et Troyes, seigneur de Meaux et Sancerre (1037 ; perd Beauvais ~1037), de Champagne (1048), capturé par Geoffroi, comte d’Anjou qui lui extorque Tours (1044) (confirme la charte de donation de son père ~1032/37)
     ép. 1) ~1044 (rép./sép. 1048/49) Gersende du Maine + après 1072 (fille du comte Herbert 1er «Eveille-Chien» comte du Maine, + 13/04/1036, et de Paule de Preuilly ; elle ép. 2) avant 1055 Adalberto Azzo II, marquis d’Este et de Ligurie)
     ép. 2) Gundrada (Gondrée)
     ép. 3) dès 1061 Alix (Adela, Alaidis, Adèle) de Valois-Crépy + un 12/05 entre 1093 et 1100/01 comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube (10) (fille de Raoul de Crépy, comte du Vexin et de Valois, et d’Adela de Breteuil) (citée avec son mari dans une charte à Montiérender ~1077/81 ; souscrit une donation à Cluny le 11/01/1078.)13 "

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 657.10 GAV-26 EDV-26. Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube was also known as Adela/Alix de Valois.14 Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube was also known as Alix de Crepi.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adélaide de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198144&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul III de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139712&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139713&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-22, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 31, BLOIS 4:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page ("de Valois"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adélaide de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198144&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIIIdied1089B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139713&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#AdelaideValoisMThibautIIIBlois
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_Count_of_Tr%C3%A9guier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne Ier de Penthièvre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_Ier_de_Penthi%C3%A8vre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 32, BLOIS 5:ii.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00358835&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00358836&tree=LEO
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080251&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamtroyes.htm#HuguesITroyesdied1126

Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre1,2,3

M, #10448, b. circa 985, d. 15 November 1037
FatherEudes/Odo I de Blois Cte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Tours, Beauvais, Dreux, et de Meaux, Seigneur de Chinon et de Saumur2,4,3,5 b. c 953, d. bt 12 Mar 995 - 996
MotherBertha (?) des Deux-Bourgognes2,6,3 b. bt 964 - 965, d. a 1010
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited19 Jun 2020
     Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre was born circa 985; Genealogy EU says b. 983.7,1,2 He married Matilda (?) of Normandy, daughter of Richard I "The Fearless" (?) 3rd Duke of Normandy and Emma (?) Princess of France, between 1003 and 1004; his 1st wife.8,9,3 Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre married Ermengarde d'Auvergne, daughter of Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne and Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne, circa 1010; his 2nd wife; Bunot says m. 1005.10,1,2,11,3
Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre died on 15 November 1037.10,1,2,3
     GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-27.

; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 724.12 GAV-28. Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre was also known as Eudes II Vicomte de Blois.12,13

Family 2

Matilda (?) of Normandy d. c 1005

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 31, BLOIS 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020131&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EudesIdied995. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020105&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 136-21, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 181-182, NORMANDY 3:iii.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page ("Normandy family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#MR1
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 137-21, p. 121.
  11. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174552&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 13.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_II,_Count_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#Berthedied1085
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthe de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020138&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIIIdied1089B

Ermengarde d'Auvergne1

F, #10449, b. circa 995, d. March 1040
FatherRobert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne1,2,3,4 b. c 970, d. c 1032
MotherErmengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne3,4 d. a 1010
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited25 Sep 2020
     Ermengarde d'Auvergne was born circa 995.1,4 She married Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre, son of Eudes/Odo I de Blois Cte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Tours, Beauvais, Dreux, et de Meaux, Seigneur de Chinon et de Saumur and Bertha (?) des Deux-Bourgognes, circa 1010; his 2nd wife; Bunot says m. 1005.5,6,1,3,4
Ermengarde d'Auvergne died in March 1040; Bunot says d. 1042; Racines et Histoire says aft 1042.7,1,3,4
     GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-27.

; Per Bunot email:
     “In his recent La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien,Christian Settipani has a slightly different version for the ancestry of Ermengarde d’Auvergne, comtesse of Blois. You will notice that Settipani proposes the existence of another new daughter of Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne and duc d’Aquitaine, an Engelberge, married to Dalmatius, vicomte et abbe de Brioude. I am not summarizing his (rather convincing though circumstancial) argument in favor of this hypothesis because of its exceptional density and invite you simply to read it and make yourself an opinion. It is based (as usual) on onomastics and also the transmission of important properties in Auvergne. Jean Bunot.
     “It goes like this :
1. Ermengarde d’Auvergne (+ 1042), m. 1005, Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Tours, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre (+ 1037)
2. Robert I, comte d’Auvergne 1010/16 (+ 1022/43)
3. m. c. 990/95, Ermengarde de Gevaudan (+ after 1010), half-sister of Constance d’Arles, queen of France
4. Guillaume, vicomte de Clermont, comte d’Auvergne 989 (+ 1003/13)
5. Humberge (+ 1016)
6. Etienne, comte de Gevaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude (+ c. 975)
7. m. c. 970, Adelaide d’Anjou (+ after 1026)
8. Robert II, vicomte de Clermont 962 (+ 962/74)
9. Engelberge de Brioude, dame en partie de Beaumont (+ after 962)
12. Bertrand, vicomte de Gevaudan 925/39 (+939/54)
13. Emilgarde de Brioude
14. Foulques II le Bon, comte d’Anjou (+ 958)
15. m. 937, Gerberge de Gatinais (+ c. 952)
16. Robert I, vicomte de Clermont 915/62
17. Adalgarde/Aldearde
18. Dalmatius, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 922/47 (+ 947/54)
19. Engelberge (possibly d’Auvergne) (+ after 962)
24. Heraclius, seigneur d’Antoing 892/926
25. Goda
26. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
27. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
32. Eustorge, noble d’Auvergne
33. Arsinde de Velay
34. Hubert, noble d’Auvergne
35. ép. Ermengarde
36. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
37. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
38. possibly Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne et de Macon, duc d’Aquitaine, abbe laique de Brioude (+ 918)
39. possibly Engelberge de Provence
48. Vivien, seigneur d’Antoing (+ after 898)
52. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
53. Ne... de Velay
66. Armand, vicomte de Velay 895 (+ c. 913)
67. Bertilde d’Antoing 895 (+ 913/26)
72. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
73. Ne... de Velay
76. Bernard II Plantevelue, comte d’Auvergne et de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ after 883)
77. ép. Ermengarde d’Auvergne
78. Boson, roi de Provence
79. Ermengarde d’Italie
96. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
97. Viviana
106. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
107. Engelmode
132. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
133. Engelmode
134. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
135. Viviana
146. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 977/900 (+ c. 900)
147. Engelmode
152. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne, marquis de Gothie 824/44, s/o saint Guillaume, comte et duc de Toulouse and Cunegonde
153. Dhuoda/Doda de Gascogne
154. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne (+ 868)
155. Liedgarde (+ after 868)
156. Buvinus, comte de Metz, abbe laique de Gorze 842/62
157. Ne... d/o Boson le Vieux, comte d’Arles et en Italie
158. Louis II, roi d’Italie, empereur
159. Engelberge”.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122060&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-21, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 31, BLOIS 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 136-21, p. 119.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#Berthedied1085. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthe de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020138&tree=LEO
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIIIdied1089B

Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne1,2,3

M, #10450, b. circa 970, d. circa 1032
FatherGuillaume IV d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne, vicomte de Clermont1,3,4,5,6,7 b. c 930, d. c 1016
MotherHumberge (?)1,3,4,8 b. c 930, d. 1016
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited25 Sep 2020
     Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne married Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne, daughter of Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude and Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse.9,10,3,11 Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne was born circa 970.12
Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne died circa 1032; Bunot says d. 1022-1043; Med Lands says d. bef 1032.9,1,3,4
     GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-28.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT [I] d'Auvergne (-before 1032). "Umberga" donated property to Sauxillanges for the souls of "senioris mei Vuillelmi et…filiorum meorum tam vivis quam etiam defunctis" by undated charter, subscribed by “Hubergane...Stephani, Rotberti, Willelmi, Widoni...”[167]. "Poncius…comes…Gabalitanensis telluris necnon et Forensis patriæ" donated "ecclesiam Langat…in comitatu Gabalitensi, aliam ecclesiam…Favairolas…" to Saint-Julien de Brioude, for the souls of "genitorum suorum Stephani et Alais et uxoris eius Theotbergæ et filiorum eius Stephani et Poncii vel fratrum eius Bertrandi et Willelmus et nepotum eius Stephani, Rotberti et Willelmi", by charter dated Feb [1010], signed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Willelmi fratris eius…"[168]. "Domni Stephani episcopi, domni Rotberti, domni Vuillelmi, Umbergane comitisse matris eorum" signed the undated charter under which property was donated to Sauxillanges[169]. Comte d'Auvergne.
     "m ---. The name of Comte Robert [I]'s wife is not known. As explained above under his mother Humberge, it is unlikely that she was Ermengarde, daughter of Adelais d'Anjou, either by her first husband Etienne de Brioude or by her fourth husband Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence."
Med Lands cites:
[167] Sauxillanges, 267, p. 218.
[168] Brioude 331, p. 335.
[169] Sauxillanges, 402, p. 311.4

; Per Bunot email:
     “In his recent La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien,Christian Settipani has a slightly different version for the ancestry of Ermengarde d’Auvergne, comtesse of Blois. You will notice that Settipani proposes the existence of another new daughter of Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne and duc d’Aquitaine, an Engelberge, married to Dalmatius, vicomte et abbe de Brioude. I am not summarizing his (rather convincing though circumstancial) argument in favor of this hypothesis because of its exceptional density and invite you simply to read it and make yourself an opinion. It is based (as usual) on onomastics and also the transmission of important properties in Auvergne. Jean Bunot.
     “It goes like this :
1. Ermengarde d’Auvergne (+ 1042), m. 1005, Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Tours, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre (+ 1037)
2. Robert I, comte d’Auvergne 1010/16 (+ 1022/43)
3. m. c. 990/95, Ermengarde de Gevaudan (+ after 1010), half-sister of Constance d’Arles, queen of France
4. Guillaume, vicomte de Clermont, comte d’Auvergne 989 (+ 1003/13)
5. Humberge (+ 1016)
6. Etienne, comte de Gevaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude (+ c. 975)
7. m. c. 970, Adelaide d’Anjou (+ after 1026)
8. Robert II, vicomte de Clermont 962 (+ 962/74)
9. Engelberge de Brioude, dame en partie de Beaumont (+ after 962)
12. Bertrand, vicomte de Gevaudan 925/39 (+939/54)
13. Emilgarde de Brioude
14. Foulques II le Bon, comte d’Anjou (+ 958)
15. m. 937, Gerberge de Gatinais (+ c. 952)
16. Robert I, vicomte de Clermont 915/62
17. Adalgarde/Aldearde
18. Dalmatius, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 922/47 (+ 947/54)
19. Engelberge (possibly d’Auvergne) (+ after 962)
24. Heraclius, seigneur d’Antoing 892/926
25. Goda
26. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
27. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
32. Eustorge, noble d’Auvergne
33. Arsinde de Velay
34. Hubert, noble d’Auvergne
35. ép. Ermengarde
36. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
37. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
38. possibly Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne et de Macon, duc d’Aquitaine, abbe laique de Brioude (+ 918)
39. possibly Engelberge de Provence
48. Vivien, seigneur d’Antoing (+ after 898)
52. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
53. Ne... de Velay
66. Armand, vicomte de Velay 895 (+ c. 913)
67. Bertilde d’Antoing 895 (+ 913/26)
72. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
73. Ne... de Velay
76. Bernard II Plantevelue, comte d’Auvergne et de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ after 883)
77. ép. Ermengarde d’Auvergne
78. Boson, roi de Provence
79. Ermengarde d’Italie
96. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
97. Viviana
106. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
107. Engelmode
132. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
133. Engelmode
134. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
135. Viviana
146. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 977/900 (+ c. 900)
147. Engelmode
152. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne, marquis de Gothie 824/44, s/o saint Guillaume, comte et duc de Toulouse and Cunegonde
153. Dhuoda/Doda de Gascogne
154. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne (+ 868)
155. Liedgarde (+ after 868)
156. Buvinus, comte de Metz, abbe laique de Gorze 842/62
157. Ne... d/o Boson le Vieux, comte d’Arles et en Italie
158. Louis II, roi d’Italie, empereur
159. Engelberge”.3 He was Comte d'Auvergne between 1010 and 1016.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122060&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1778] Roger Tansey, "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005 "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/FYPj-jP7R0sJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUVERGNE.htm#GuillaumeIVAuvergnedied1016. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122062&tree=LEO
  6. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/FYPj-jP7R0sJ
  7. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Guillaume IV d' Auvergne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I391681&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Umberga: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122063&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-21, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122060&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermgard de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122061&tree=LEO
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I24920
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUVERGNE.htm#_Toc29129954
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164575&tree=LEO
  17. [S4806] Généalogie de la famille de Carné, online <http://www.decarne.com/gencar/gencar.html>, Auvergne (d'), "Guillaume" II: http://a.decarne.free.fr/gencar/gencar.htm. Hereinafter cited as Généalogie de Carné.

Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne1,2

F, #10451, d. after 1010
FatherEtienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude1,2,3 d. c 975
MotherAdelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse1,2,3 b. bt 942 - 947, d. 29 May 1026
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited25 Sep 2020
     Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne married Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne, son of Guillaume IV d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne, vicomte de Clermont and Humberge (?).4,5,2,6
Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne died after 1010.2
     ; "Markus Welschhoff" wrote: Who knows the mother of Ermegarde d'Auvergne, wife of Eudes II de Blois. She was born about 995 and died on march 1040. I think, her father was Robert II d'Auvergne, but was her mother Ermegarde/Humberga of Toulouse or of Arles? And why the two names Ermegarde and Humberga, is she the same?
>>
>> Thank you for answer.
>>
>> Bye, MW
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Verschicken Sie romantische, coole und witzige Bilder per SMS!
>> Jetzt bei WEB.DE FreeMail: http://f.web.de/?mc=021193

In a post by Todd Farmerie (see below), the mother of Ermengarde d'Auvergne would evidently be Ermengarde de Brioude, daughter of Étienne de Brioude, Count of Gévaudan, and Adele d'Anjou, who married Robert III, Count d'Auvergne, d. 1032. (IIRC, Weis has no, or a different ancestry). Ermengarde/Humberga are simply variants of the same name, I'd guess the former being of french derivation; the latter, german..... There is more information, esp on the De Brioude ancestry, in the archives....
Hope this helps, Roger

From: Todd A. Farmerie (farmerie@interfold.com)
Subject: Re: Adelaide d'Anjou (was Tiburge d'Orange)
Date: 2000/07/30

>> Who are ALL of her ["her" referring to Adele d'Anjou, who married three times and was the grandmother of Ermengarde d'Auvergne] children (with the correct fathers)?

Stasser gives her the following:

by Etienne de Brioude:
1. Pons de Gevaudan
2. Bertrand de Brioude
3. Etienne de Brioude
4. Ermengarde/Humberge, Countess of Auvergne
5?. daughter, wife of Herbert of Troyes

by Raymond:
6. Guillaume Taillefer
7?. Toda/Adelaide, Countess of Besalu (I question this one)
8?. Letgarde

by Guillaume II of Provence:
9. Guillaume III
10. Constance, Queen of France
taf.1 GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-28. Ermengarde/Humberge (?) de Brioude, Countess of Auvergne was also known as Ermengarde de Gevaudan.2

; Per Bunot email:
     “In his recent La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien,Christian Settipani has a slightly different version for the ancestry of Ermengarde d’Auvergne, comtesse of Blois. You will notice that Settipani proposes the existence of another new daughter of Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne and duc d’Aquitaine, an Engelberge, married to Dalmatius, vicomte et abbe de Brioude. I am not summarizing his (rather convincing though circumstancial) argument in favor of this hypothesis because of its exceptional density and invite you simply to read it and make yourself an opinion. It is based (as usual) on onomastics and also the transmission of important properties in Auvergne. Jean Bunot.
     “It goes like this :
1. Ermengarde d’Auvergne (+ 1042), m. 1005, Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Tours, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre (+ 1037)
2. Robert I, comte d’Auvergne 1010/16 (+ 1022/43)
3. m. c. 990/95, Ermengarde de Gevaudan (+ after 1010), half-sister of Constance d’Arles, queen of France
4. Guillaume, vicomte de Clermont, comte d’Auvergne 989 (+ 1003/13)
5. Humberge (+ 1016)
6. Etienne, comte de Gevaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude (+ c. 975)
7. m. c. 970, Adelaide d’Anjou (+ after 1026)
8. Robert II, vicomte de Clermont 962 (+ 962/74)
9. Engelberge de Brioude, dame en partie de Beaumont (+ after 962)
12. Bertrand, vicomte de Gevaudan 925/39 (+939/54)
13. Emilgarde de Brioude
14. Foulques II le Bon, comte d’Anjou (+ 958)
15. m. 937, Gerberge de Gatinais (+ c. 952)
16. Robert I, vicomte de Clermont 915/62
17. Adalgarde/Aldearde
18. Dalmatius, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 922/47 (+ 947/54)
19. Engelberge (possibly d’Auvergne) (+ after 962)
24. Heraclius, seigneur d’Antoing 892/926
25. Goda
26. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
27. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
32. Eustorge, noble d’Auvergne
33. Arsinde de Velay
34. Hubert, noble d’Auvergne
35. ép. Ermengarde
36. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
37. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
38. possibly Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne et de Macon, duc d’Aquitaine, abbe laique de Brioude (+ 918)
39. possibly Engelberge de Provence
48. Vivien, seigneur d’Antoing (+ after 898)
52. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
53. Ne... de Velay
66. Armand, vicomte de Velay 895 (+ c. 913)
67. Bertilde d’Antoing 895 (+ 913/26)
72. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
73. Ne... de Velay
76. Bernard II Plantevelue, comte d’Auvergne et de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ after 883)
77. ép. Ermengarde d’Auvergne
78. Boson, roi de Provence
79. Ermengarde d’Italie
96. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
97. Viviana
106. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
107. Engelmode
132. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
133. Engelmode
134. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
135. Viviana
146. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 977/900 (+ c. 900)
147. Engelmode
152. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne, marquis de Gothie 824/44, s/o saint Guillaume, comte et duc de Toulouse and Cunegonde
153. Dhuoda/Doda de Gascogne
154. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne (+ 868)
155. Liedgarde (+ after 868)
156. Buvinus, comte de Metz, abbe laique de Gorze 842/62
157. Ne... d/o Boson le Vieux, comte d’Arles et en Italie
158. Louis II, roi d’Italie, empereur
159. Engelberge”.2

Family

Robert I/III d'Auvergne Comte d'Auvergne b. c 970, d. c 1032
Children

Citations

  1. [S1778] Roger Tansey, "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005 "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/FYPj-jP7R0sJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005."
  2. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-21, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122060&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermgard de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122061&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32623
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164575&tree=LEO
  10. [S4806] Généalogie de la famille de Carné, online <http://www.decarne.com/gencar/gencar.html>, Auvergne (d'), "Guillaume" II: http://a.decarne.free.fr/gencar/gencar.htm. Hereinafter cited as Généalogie de Carné.

Etienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux1,2,3,4

M, #10452, b. circa 1015, d. 19 May 1048
FatherEudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre1 b. c 985, d. 15 Nov 1037
MotherErmengarde d'Auvergne1 b. c 995, d. Mar 1040
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited25 Apr 2020
     Etienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux married Adela/Adèle (?) d'Aumale, daughter of Guérinfrid/Guerinfroi (?) seigneur d'Aumâle.5,1,2,3 Etienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux was born circa 1015.5
Etienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux died on 19 May 1048; Genealogy EU and Racines et Histoire say d. ca 1048.5,1,2,3
     GAV-26 EDV-26. Etienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux was also known as Stephen II (?) Count of Champagne.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 11.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 141A-22, p. 124. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177491&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#EudesIIITroyesdiedafter1118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Adela/Adèle (?) d'Aumale1

F, #10453
FatherGuérinfrid/Guerinfroi (?) seigneur d'Aumâle2 b. c 970
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited19 Jun 2020

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs puis comtes d’ Aumale & Aumale (Picardie), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 141A-22, p. 124. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 11.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177491&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#EudesIIITroyesdiedafter1118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Eudes/Odo III de Champagne Comte de Troyes et d'Aumale, Cte de Champagne, Earl of Holderness1,2,3,4

M, #10454, d. after 1096
FatherEtienne I (?) Comte de de Champagne, Troyes et Meaux1,2,3,5,6 b. c 1015, d. 19 May 1048
MotherAdela/Adèle (?) d'Aumale1,2,3,5,6
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited25 Apr 2020
     Eudes/Odo III de Champagne Comte de Troyes et d'Aumale, Cte de Champagne, Earl of Holderness married Adélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale, daughter of Robert I "The Magnificent" (?) Duke of Normandy and HerleveArlette (?) de Falaise, circa 1060.7,1,8,9,2,3,10,11,12,13,5,6
Eudes/Odo III de Champagne Comte de Troyes et d'Aumale, Cte de Champagne, Earl of Holderness died after 1096; Genealogics says d. aft 1096; Med Lands says d. aft 1115/18.1,8,2,5,6
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "D1. Cte Eudes III de Troyes et d'Aumale, Cte de Champagne, +after 1096; m.ca 1060 Adela of Normandy (+1081/84.)14"

; Per Racines et Histoire (Troyes): "Eudes III de Blois (II de Troyes) + après 1096 (~1115/18 ?) comte de Troyes et de Champagne (1047), comte d’Aumale (par droit de sa femme), se fixe en Angleterre après la conquête normande : ses domaines champenois sont alors saisis par son oncle (témoin charte de son oncle Tethbert entre 06/12/1047 et 31/08/1055 à propos des droits détenus par les chanoines de Saint-Maurice d’Angers sur l’église de Joué)
     ép.~1060 Adèle de Normandie + 1081/84"
Per Racines et Histoire (Blois-Champagne): "Eudes III de Troyes + après 1096 comte de Troyes et de Champagne, dépossédé par son oncle Thibaud (1066), éxilé en Angleterre, devient comte d’Aumale (76) et earl of Holderness
     ép.~1060 Adèle (ou Adélaïde) de Normandie + 1081/84 (soeur du Conquérant.)15,16"
; Per Genealogy.EU: "Adelaide, *ca 1030, +1081/84; 1m: before 1052 Enguerrand II de Ponthieu/de Montreuil (+1053); 2m: 1053/54 Lambert de Boulogne-sur-Mer, Cte de Lens (+1054); 3m: ca 1060 Eudes III de Troyes, Cte de Champagne (+after 1096.)17"
; Per Racines et Histoire: "Adélaïde de Normandie ° ~1030 + 1081/84
     ép. 1) avant 1052 Enguerrand II de Ponthieu comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil + 1053
     ép. 2) 1053/54 Lambert de Boulogne comte de Lens + 1054 (postérité Valognes)
     ép. 3) ~1060 Eudes III de Troyes + après 1096 (1127 ?) comte de Troyes-Champagne et d’Aumale."13

; Per Med Lands:
     "EUDES de Troyes, son of ETIENNE I Comte de Troyes [Blois] & his wife Adela --- (-after [1115/18]). "Odo puer nepos comiti Tethberti" witnessed a charter dated to [6 Dec 1047/31 Aug 1055] under which the canons of St Maurice d'Angers temporarily relinquished certain rights in the church of Joué[101]. He succeeded his father in [1048] as Comte de Troyes. He succeeded as Comte d’Aumâle, de iure uxoris. He was disinherited before 1071 and sought refuge in Normandy. Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[102]. He was granted the lordship of Holderness in [1087] by William I King of England, following the forfeiture of Drogo de La Beuvrière[103]. A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “manerium Horneshay et ecclesiam…et Marram eius piscaturam et Thorp ibi juxta” by “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius”[104]. Orderic Vitalis records that “primus Normannorum Stephanus de Albamarla filius Odonis Campaniæ comitis” fortified “castellum suum super Aucium flumen” at the expense of William II King of England and placed there a garrison against “ducem” [Robert III Duke of Normandy], dated to [1089/90][105]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitem Odonem de Campania…Stephani patrem" was imprisoned in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy which planned to place his son on the English throne[106]. He lost the lordship of Holderness. Albert of Aix names "…Stephanus de Albemarla filius Udonis comitis de Campania…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[107]. "…Stephanus de Albamarla…" subscribed a charter dated 8 Aug 1111 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the episcopate of Somerset at Bath[108]. He is referred to as “comes Odo” in the Lindsey survey 1115/18.
     "m ([1060]) as her third husband, ADELAIS de Normandie, widow firstly of ENGUERRAND [II] Comte de Montreuil Seigneur d’Aumâle and secondly of LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens, illegitimate daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- (-[1082/84]). Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as the daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[109]. The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum”[110]. She retained the title Comtesse d'Aumâle after her first marriage. Her second marriage is deduced from the same charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy which also names “Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia”[111]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[112]. William I King of England donated various properties to the abbey of La Trinité de Caen, including "burgum de Hulmo" with the consent of "Adelisa amita mea…cujus hereditas erat sed et comitissa A. de Albamarla…in vita sua", by charter dated 1082[113]. "
Med Lands cites:
[101] Angers Cathedral, 46, p. 98.
[102] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221.
[103] Domesday Descendants, p. 227.
[104] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548.
[105] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IX, p. 319.
[106] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 39.
[107] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXIII, p. 316.
[108] Bath St Peter 43, p. 46.
[109] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1026, p. 34.
[110] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60.
[111] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60.
[112] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221.
[113] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 68.6
Eudes/Odo III de Champagne Comte de Troyes et d'Aumale, Cte de Champagne, Earl of Holderness lived at an unknown place ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Odo (Modern French: Eudes; c.?1040–1115)[1] was Count of Troyes and of Meaux from 1047 to 1066, then Count of Aumale from 1069 to 1115. He was later also known as the count of Champagne and as Eudes II of Troyes.
Biography
     "Odo was the son of Stephen II of Troyes and Meaux, and Adele.[2] He was still a minor at the death of his father, and his uncle Theobald III of Blois acted as regent of Troyes.[citation needed]
     "In 1060, Odo married Adelaide of Normandy, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and widow of Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu, Lord of Aumale and Lambert II, Count of Lens.[1] After the death of Enguerrand's only daughter Adelaide, her mother Adelaide of Normandy became her heir and hence through his marriage Odo acquired the title Count (or Earl) of Aumale in Normandy Jure uxoris (by right of his wife).[3]
     "Adelaide (sometime called Adeliza) was also sister of William the Conqueror,[1] and Odo accompanied his brother-in-law in the Norman conquest of England (1066).[3] Theobald III of Blois then seized Odo's counties in the Champagne region,[citation needed] One version states William I, for his services in the conquest gave Odo Holderness in Yorkshire.[3] Another proposes that the Lordship of Holderness was granted to William's sister Adelaide, in 1087, and Odo became Earl of Holderness by right of his wife.
     "Odo was, with Alan Rufus and Roger of Poitou, one of the commanders of the army sent by King William II to besiege William de St-Calais at Durham Castle after the Rebellion of 1088, and who signed St-Calais's guarantee of personal safety.
     "Odo was implicated in a plot to place his son Stephen of Aumale on the English throne.[4] Stephen was the first cousin of brothers William Rufus, King of England and Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy.[5] Stephen was apparently not put on trial himself as he may have been out of the king's reach in Normandy.[6] Odo was imprisoned in 1095.[citation needed] Odo lost his English lands for his complicity[7] but they were restored to Stephen two years after the death of William Rufus.
Family
     "Odo had one son with Adelaide: Stephen, Count of Aumale (died 1127).[8]
     "In 1902 Richard Langrishe published a paper in which he put forward the theory that Odo was the primogenitor of the Irish family of Le Gras (Grace).[3] This amended an older theory that Raymond FitzGerald (died 1185/1198) was the primogenitor.[9] However Richard Roach (1970) upheld the older proposition, but more recently M. T. Flanagan (2004) disagreed with Roach because FitzGerald had no known legitimate heirs.[10][11]
Notes
1. Bates 2004.
2. Evergates 1999, p. 12.
3. Langrishe 1902, p. 64-67.
4. C. Warren Hollister, 'Magnates and Curiales in Early Norman England', Viator, Vol. 8, No. 1 (1977), p. 68
5. David Crouch, The Normans; The History of a Dynasty (London; New York: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), p. 147
6. Frank Barlow, William Rufus (London: Methuen, 1983), p. 358
7. C. Warren Hollister, 'Magnates and Curiales in Early Norman England', Viator, Vol. 8, No. 1 (1977), p. 70
8. Barlow 1983, p. 272.
9. Langrishe 1900, p. 319-324.
10. Roach 1970, p. 180.
11. Flanagan 2004.
References
** Barlow, Frank (1983), William Rufus (illustrated ed.), University of California Press, p. 272, ISBN 0-520-04936-5
** Bates, David (Sep 2004), "Odo, earl of Kent (d. 1097)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/20543, retrieved 23 August 2010
** Evergates, Theodore, ed. (1999). Aristocratic Women in Medieval France. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Flanagan, M. T. (September 2004), "Fitzgerald, Raymond fitz William (d. 1189x92)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9582, retrieved 24 August 2010
** Langrishe, Richard (31 December 1900), "The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland", The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 5, 30 (4): 319–324, JSTOR 25507087
** Langrishe, Richard (31 March 1902), "The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland", The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 5, 32 (1): 64–67, JSTOR 25507186
** Roach, Richard (1970), The Norman Invasion of Ireland, Anvil Books, ISBN 0-947962-81-6."4

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Eudes III de Champagne1, mort après 1115/1118[réf. nécessaire], est comte de Troyes et de Meaux d'environ 1045-48 à 1063-65. En Normandie, il est dit « comte » (sans jamais être désigné comte d'Aumale) ou « comte de Champagne », après 1065-70, et en Angleterre, il est seigneur d'Holderness (Yorkshire de l'Est) de 1086-87 à 1095.
Biographie
     "Il est le fils d'Étienne II, comte de Troyes et de Meaux, et d'Adèle. Il est encore mineur à la mort de son père, et son oncle Thibaut III, comte de Blois assure sa tutelle1. Thibaud III de Blois en profite pour reformer la grande principauté bléso-champenoise qui existait du temps de son père Eudes II de Blois († 1037)1. Se faisant, il se rapproche du roi Henri Ier de France, notamment en participant aux nombreuses campagnes du roi contre la Normandie1. Du coup, à la fin de la minorité d'Eudes, qui doit se situer vers 10582, il obtient que celui-ci devienne son vassal et non celui du roi1.
     "En 1063-65, Eudes se révolte contre son oncle1. Il compromet les efforts de celui-ci pour consolider sa principauté, en donnant au roi de France, par l'intermédiaire de l'évêque de Châlons, le contrôle total de la ville de Châlons1. Peu après, Eudes s'enfuit de Champagne1. D'après la tradition, rapportée par la chronique de l'abbaye de Meaux, Eudes trouve refuge en Normandie après avoir été accusé du meurtre de l'un de ses principaux vassaux1. Il est possible qu'Eudes ait envisagé, pour lui ou son fils Étienne, un retour à la tête de la Champagne1. Quoi qu'il en soit, l'alliance bléso-normande, scellée en 1080-85 par le mariage d'Étienne-Henri de Blois et Adèle de Normandie met fin à cette possibilité1.
     "Entre 1065 et 10701, quelque temps après son arrivée en Normandie, Eudes obtient la main d'Adélaïde de Normandie, la demi-sœur de Guillaume le Conquérant, le duc de Normandie1. Elle est veuve en premières noces d'Enguerrand II, comte de Ponthieu, et en secondes noces de Lambert II, comte de Lens1.
     "Après leur mariage, il obtient du duc de ne pas retourner en Champagne, où la situation est trop dangereuse pour lui1. Il obtient aussi, en droit de sa femme, la cité d'Aumale avec dix chevaliers de l'archevêque de Rouen, charge à lui de porter l'étendard de l'archevêque lorsqu'il utilise ces hommes1.
     "Dans les actes qui nous sont parvenus, Eudes n'est jamais désigné comme « comte d'Aumale », mais simplement comme « comte » (sans précision) ou « comte de Champagne »1. Seule sa femme est désignée « comtesse d'Aumale », pour la première fois en 1082 lors d’une charte de donation de Guillaume le Conquérant et sa femme Mathilde de Flandre, en faveur de l'abbaye aux Dames de Caen1. L'acte mentionne les donations faites par Adélaïde et ses enfants, mais Eudes n'est pas mentionné comme bienfaiteur1. De même, dans les chartes de donation de son fils Étienne, son père n'est jamais mentionné, mais uniquement sa mère1. Pour l'historien Pierre Bauduin, c'est peut-être à cause de l'inconsistance du personnage, qui ne possède rien à son nom et qui est simplement le représentant de sa femme, chargé de remplir les obligations militaires que sa femme ne peut accomplir1.
     "En 1086-87, le Conquérant lui donne l'honneur d'Holderness, dans le Yorkshire de l'Est (Angleterre)1. En 1088 a lieu en Angleterre une rébellion de barons cherchant à réunir l'Angleterre et la Normandie sous un même commandement. Lorsque les terres de l'évêque de Durham Guillaume de Saint-Calais sont saisies, son neveu Guillaume le Roux, roi d'Angleterre, donne à Eudes une partie de celles se trouvant dans le Yorkshire3. Il est plus tard l'un des lieutenants d'une force envoyée au nord par le roi pour arrêter l'évêque de Durham. Plus tard, il fait partie des trois juges laïcs au procès pour trahison de l'évêque4.
     "En 1095, il est impliqué dans une conspiration ratée contre son neveu Guillaume le Roux5. D'après le chroniqueur Jean de Worcester, les conspirateurs avaient l'intention de tuer leur suzerain et de le remplacer sur le trône par Étienne, le fils d'Eudes. Il est puni par le roi, peut-être emprisonné, et ses terres anglaises lui sont confisquées6. Arnoul de Montgommery reçoit l'année suivante les terres du Yorkshire et du Lincolnshire qui avaient auparavant appartenu à Eudes. Lorsque Arnoul est lui-même banni d'Angleterre, en 1102, le roi Henri Ier les donne à Étienne d'Aumale7.
Famille et descendance
     "De son mariage avec Adélaïde de Normandie, demi-sœur de Guillaume le Conquérant, le duc de Normandie, il n'a qu'un enfant connu :
** Étienne (avant 1070-vers 1127), comte d'Aumale, seigneur d'Holderness.

Notes et références
1. Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (xe-xie siècles), p. 313-316.
2. Jean Dunbabin, « Geoffrey of Chaumont, Thibaud of Blois and William the Conqueror », Anglo-Norman Studies XVI: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1993, Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 1994, p. 109-110.
3. Frank Barlow, William Rufus, p. 83.
4. Frank Barlow, William Rufus, p. 85-87.
5. Frank Barlow, op. cit., p. 347-348.
6. Frank Barlow, op. cit., p. 358.
7. (en) Kathleen Thompson, « Montgomery, Arnulf de (c.1066–1118x22) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
Lien externe
** « Comtes de Troyes » [archive], sur Charles Crawley's Medieval Lands: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm
Sources
** (en) Frank Barlow, William Rufus, New Haven (Conn.) ; London : Yale univ. press, 2000. (ISBN 9780300082913).
** (fr) Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (xe-xie siècles), Presses universitaires de Caen, 2e édition (2006), p. 304, 313-316.
Bibliographie
** Michel Bur, La Formation du comté de Champagne, v. 950-v. 1150, thèse, volume 54 d'Annales de l'Est : Mémoire, éditeur : Université de Nancy II, 1974, 573 p.18 "

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:46; 3:635.5 GAV-25 EDV-25. He was Comte de Troyes et de Meaux between 1047 and 1066.4,18

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 11.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odo,_Count_of_Champagne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177491&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#EudesIIITroyesdiedafter1118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 136-23, p. 120. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/richa001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 3.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108319&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#Adelaisdied1081
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#E3T
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ers comtes de Troyes p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Troyes.pdf
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 12: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page ("Normandy Family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#ARo2
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Eudes III de Champagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudes_III_de_Champagne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#EtienneAumalediedbefore1130
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00315259&tree=LEO

Gerhard I Flaminius (?) Graaf van Gelre, Graf von Wassenberg1,2

M, #10455, b. 1068, d. between 1129 and 1131
FatherDietrich Flamens (?)3,2,4 d. 1082
Mother(?) (?) of Molsberg
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited7 Aug 2020
     Gerhard I Flaminius (?) Graaf van Gelre, Graf von Wassenberg was born in 1068 at Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany (now).5 He married Clemence (?) de Poitou, heiress of Gleibert, Css de Longwy, daughter of Pierre-Guillaume V (VII) "l'Aigret" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou and Ermesinde (?) de Longwy, circa 1086.6,7,2,8
Gerhard I Flaminius (?) Graaf van Gelre, Graf von Wassenberg died between 1129 and 1131 at Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany (now); Med Lands says d. bef 1129 or 24 Oct 1131; Genealogics says d. bef 1138.2,8,5
Gerhard I Flaminius (?) Graaf van Gelre, Graf von Wassenberg was buried between 1129 and 1131 at Wassenberg Wald Friedhof, Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1068, Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     DEATH     1129 (aged 60–61), Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     Count of Wasserberg, Count of Geldre
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Clémence de Poitou von Wassenburg unknown–1142
     Children
          Gerhard II von Geldern 1090 – unknown
     BURIAL     Wassenberg Wald Friedhof, Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 14 May 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 146461845.5
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Gerhard I Flaminius was born about 1060, the son of Dietrich Flamens. He was the first count of Gelre from the family of Flamens. After 1086 he married Clémence de Poitou, heiress of Gleiberg, widow of Konrad I, Graf von Luxemburg, and the daughter of Guillaume V-VII, duke of Aquitaine, comte de Poitou, and Ermesinde de Longwy. They had three children, Yolande, Judith and Gerhard, who would have progeny.
     "Gerhard was mentioned in 1085 as count of Wassenberg, and in 1096 for the first time as count of Gelre. The title of Landgrave also appears in 1096.
     "Gerhard at different times called himself after Wassenberg (Gerhard III von Wassenberg) and after Gelre (Gerhard I von Gelre), until the designation of Gelre prevailed in 1118. As the possessor of the imperial stewardship and of a church stewardship and as an allodial landowner, Gerhard considered that his sphere of influence had shifted to Gelre by 1098. As a result of this shift the castle of Gelre was probably started about then; it was mentioned by 1237. Gerhard was the largest secular ruler after the duke of Brabant and count of Luxembourg-Namur in Lower Lotharingia. As the sole ruler in his region he remained strongly loyal to the empire.
     "The year of his death is not known, but it probably occurred before 1138, possibly before 8 March 1129."9


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 6:25.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 2.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Geldern-Heinsberg): “B1. Gerhard I Flaminius, Ct of Geldern and Wassenberg, +1134/37; 1m: NN; 2m: after 1086 Clementia von Gleiberg (+4.1.1142); all kids by 1m.”.10

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Gerard I of Guelders (c. 1060 – 8 March 1129) was Count of Guelders (Gelre in Dutch). He was the son of Theodoric of Wassenberg.
     "He may have been married to Clementia of Aquitaine, although that proposed marriage seems to be based on a falsified document.[1] It is also possible that he married an unnamed daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy.[2] Gerard had three children:[3]
** Jutta of Wassenberg, married Waleran II of Limburg.
** Yolande of Wassenberg (Yolande of Guelders), married 1) Baldwin III, Count of Hainaut and 2) Godfrey II de Ribemont Châtelain de Valenciennes
** Gerard II, Count of Guelders married Ermengarde of Zutphen, daughter of Otto II, Count of Zutphen.
References
1. Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pyrénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, p. 386 footnote 40.
2. Herimanni, Liber de Restauratione Sancti Martini Tornacensis 33, MGH SS XIV, p. 287.
3. Nobility from the Lower Rhine Region from Medieval Lands."11
GAV-25 EDV-25.

Reference: Weis [1992:143] line 163-25.12 Gerhard I Flaminius (?) Graaf van Gelre, Graf von Wassenberg was also known as Gerard I of Guelders.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERHARD von Wassenberg, son of DIETRICH "Flamens" Graf [von Wassenberg] & his wife --- (-[before 1129 or 24 Oct [1131]]). The Chronicon Huberti names "Gerardus et Gozwinus filius eius [=Theodericum]" in 1082[975]. Graf von Wassenberg. The Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium records that "Gerardum…de castello…Guassenberge et Gozwinum avunculum eius de castello…Heinesberge" introduced abbot Luipo into the abbey of Saint-Trond in 1085[976]. "Gerardus de Gelre, Arnoldus comes de Berge, Waleramus comes de Lemburg, Gerardus comes de Iuliaco…" signed the charter dated 1085 under which Friedrich Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster St Martin, Köln[977]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed a donation of property "in Traiecto quam comes Gerardus de Wassenbergen invaserat" to St Servatius, Maastricht by charter dated 1087[978]. Graaf van Gelre 1096: "…Gerardi comitis de Gelre et fratris eius Henrici…" witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida Boloniensis comitissa" donated property in "Genapia" to Afflighem abbey[979]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed the donation of property "in Horenchusen…[et] in Dorwilere" made to Köln St Maria by "Meginherus de Randenrode cum neque uxorem neque filium haberet", in the presence of "fratre suo Hartberno", by charter dated 13 Apr 1104 witnessed by "Gerhart de Gelleron comes, Gerhart comes de Iulicho et frater eius Gerlach, Gerhart de Hochstaden, Dieterich de Mere, Heriman de Zulpico…"[980]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln donated serfs to Köln St Severin, with the consent of "Francone urbis nostre prefecto", by charter dated 1109, witnessed by "Gerhardo comite de Gelre, Adelberto de Safenberg, Adelberto de Nervennich, Herimanno de Udenkircha, Gerhardo de Julicho, Gerhardo de Hoinstathe, Gerlacho de Isenburch et fratre sui Regenbaldo, Harperno de Randenrothe…"[981]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster Rees by charter dated 1112 witnessed by "Henricus dux de Lintburg, Almer advocatus, Hugo, Adolf comes de Safenberk, Advocatus Teodericus, Comes Gerhardus et filius eius Gerhardus…"[982]. "…Gerhardus comes de Gelleren et filius eius Gerhardus…" witnessed the charter dated 1117 under which Friedrich Archbishop of Köln donated property to Meregelpe[983]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed the dismissal of "comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus" from the Vogteischaft of Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 5 Apr 1118 witnessed by "Comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus, Comes Adolfus de Monte, Comes Adolfus de Saphenberg, Comes Gerhardus de Iuliaco, Gerhardus iunior filius Gerhardi, Gerhardus de Caesle, Arnulfus de Odenkirche"[984]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed donations to Kloster Dunwald and shared the Vogteischaft with "comitis Adolphi" by charter dated 1118 witnessed by "Adolfus comes de Monte et frater eius Euerhardus, Gerardus comes de Wassenberg […et filius eius Gerardus], Theodericus comes de Thonburch, Theodericus comes de Ara, domnus Goswinus de Hennesberg et frater eius Gerardus…Gerardus de Wyckerode…"[985]. "Comes Gerhardus" founded a church "in meo allodio Wassenberg" by charter dated 30 Sep 1118[986]. [Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed a donation to Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 1129 witnessed by "…Liberi. Paganus dux, Franco burgicomes, Gerhardus comes de Gelre, Adolfus comes de Monte, Adolfus comes de Saffenberg…"[987]. It is unclear whether this document refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].] [The necrology of Wassenberg records the death 24 Oct [1131] of “dominus Gerardus Longus comes Gelrie, qui fuit fundator et dotator huius ecclesie in Wassenberg”[988]. It is unclear from this document whether it refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].]
     "m [firstly] ---. The name and origin of the wife of Gerhard is not known.
     "[m [secondly] as her [second/third] husband, CLEMENTIA, widow [firstly] of CONRAD Comte [de Luxembourg] [and secondly of --- Graf von Gleiberg], daughter of --- (-after 1141). This marriage is confirmed by the second version of a charter confirming the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg, dated 1129, which records the donation made by "Clementia comitissa de Glizberc…per manum Gerhardi mariti sui comitis de Gelre"[989]. The donor is identified in other sources as the widow of Conrad [I] Comte [de Luxembourg] (see LUXEMBOURG). Szabolcs de Vajay dismisses Clementia’s supposed [second/third] marriage, assuming that the document in question is spurious[990]. However, the language of the document is not obviously anachronistic, the only surprising element being the large number of witnesses. See FRANCONIA NOBILITY for discussion about Clementia’s possible [second] marriage.]"
Med Lands cites:
[975] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 42 (54), MGH SS VIII, p. 591.
[976] Rodulfi Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium III, MGH SS X, p. 241.
[977] Köln Quellen, Band I, 40, p. 502.
[978] D H IV 394, p. 521.
[979] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723), Tome I, LXVII, p. 77.
[980] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 263, p. 170.
[981] Köln St Severin, 5, p. 8.
[982] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 274, p. 177.
[983] Spaen, W. A. van (1805) Oordeelkundige inleiding tot de Historie van Gelre, Vierde Deel (Utrecht) Codex diplomaticus, IV, p. 6.
[984] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 286, p. 187.
[985] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 288, p. 188.
[986] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 289, p. 189.
[987] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 307, p. 203.
[988] Sloet (1872), 261, p. 255.8

; Per Med Lands:
     "CLEMENTIA (-after 1141). Her [first] marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 7 Jul 1083 under which "Conradus comes" founded the Benedictine abbey of Münster [Altmünster] in Luxembourg, with the consent of "uxore mea Clementia cum filiis et filiabus nostris"[114]. "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[115]. Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[116]. Her supposed [second/third] marriage is confirmed by a second version of the charter confirming the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg, dated 1129, which records the donation made by "Clementia comitissa de Glizberc…per manum Gerhardi mariti sui comitis de Gelre", with the consent of "palatine comitisse Gertrudis" [identified as Gertrud von Northeim, widow of Siegfried Graf von Orlamünde, Pfalzgrafen von Lothringen, and wife of Otto von Salm Graf von Rheineck, presumably a relative whose family relationship has not been traced, although see below for some speculation about this] to whom one fourth part of the property belonged[117]. Szabolcs de Vajay dismisses this supposed [second/third] marriage, considering that this second Schiffenberg document is a falsification[118]. However, the language of the document is not obviously anachronistic, the only surprising element being the large number of witnesses. The doubts surrounding the authenticity of these documents is discussed at length by Wyss[119]. "Clementia comitissa de Glizberg cum meis nepotibus Ottone et Wilhelmo" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, with the consent of "domne Gertrudis palatine…[et] Adela filia eiusdem palatine", by charter dated 1141[120]. The documents relating to Clementia´s supposed [second/third] marriage also suggest a possible [second] marriage, because of the two references to her as “comitissa de Glizberc”. No primary source document has yet been identified in which Clementia´s [first] husband is described as “Graf von Gleiberg”. Nor has any record been found of the county of Gleiberg being held by her son by this [first] marriage, Guillaume [I] Comte de Luxembourg, nor by Guillaume´s son Conrad [II] Comte de Luxembourg. One possible explanation is that Clementia was not in fact heiress of Gleiberg, although she is often described as such in contemporary secondary sources, and that she was accorded the title in the 1129 and 1141 as the widow of an otherwise unidentified “Graf von Gleiberg” whom she married after the death of Conrad [I] Comte de Luxembourg. If that is correct, this shadowy [second] husband may have been the uncle or great-uncle of the cousins Otto and Wilhelm who are named above and who would have inherited the title after his death. If Clementia was dowager countess of Gleiberg, maybe continuing to hold part of the county as dower from her [second] husband, this would explain the necessity of her acting jointly with her nephews in the 1129 and 1141 documents. If all this speculation is correct, the consent given in the joint interest in the property in question held by Gertrud von Northeim and her daughter may provide an indication of the family origin of Clementia herself: maybe she was Gertrud´s maternal aunt, a member of the Braunschweig family? [firstly] [as his first wife,] CONRAD [I] Comte [de Luxembourg], son of GISELBERT Graf von Salm, Comte [de Luxembourg] & his wife --- (-in Palestine 8 Aug 1086, bur Luxembourg Münster Abbey). [m [secondly] --- Graf von Gleiberg, son of ---.] [m [secondly/thirdly] [as his second wife,] GERHARD [I] Graaf van Gelre, son of DIETRICH "Flamens" Graf [von Wassenberg] & his wife --- (-before 9 Apr 1138).]"
Med Lands cites:
[114] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, Diplomata Belgica, Liber II, XXXV, p. 269.
[115] Vanderkindere, A. (1902) La formation territoriale des principautés belges au moyen-âge (Brussels), Vol. II, p. 357, quoting Bertholot, III, pr. XXXV.
[116] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch I, 465a, p. 524.
[117] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch I, 465b, p. 524.
[118] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, p. 386 footnote 40.
[119] Wyss (1899), Abhandlung über die Schiffenberger Stiftungsurkunden und Fälschungen, pp. 411-98.
[120] Heinemann, O. van (ed.) (1867) Codex Diplomaticus Anhaltinus (Dessau), Teil I, 285, p. 211.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “H1. Clementia of Aquitaine, heiress of Longwy, Frau von Gleiberg, *1060, +4.1.1142; 1m: shortly before 1075 Ct Konrad of Luxemburg (+1086); 2m: Ct Gerhard of Geldern (+1134/37)”.14 He was Count of Guelders between 1096 and 1129.11

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 277. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerhard I Flaminius: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120756&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dietrich Flamens: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120755&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#GerhardIGelderndied1138. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for Gerhard I von Wassenburg (1068–1129), Find A Grave Memorial no. 146461845, citing Wassenberg Wald Friedhof, Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/146461845/gerhard_i-von_wassenburg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020902&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#GerhardIGelderndied1138B
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerhard I Flaminius: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120756&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Geldern-Heinsberg: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/geldern.html#AG2
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_I,_Count_of_Guelders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 163-25, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HESSEN.htm#ClemenceGleibergMConradLuxembourg
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Poitou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#CG5
  15. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I31812
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith van Wassenberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050325&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#JuttaGelderndied1151
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande van Wassenberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026392&tree=LEO

Konstantinos/Constantinus Angelos Admiral of Sicily1

M, #10457, b. circa 1085, d. after July 1166
FatherManolis Angelos2
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited28 Aug 2003
     Konstantinos/Constantinus Angelos Admiral of Sicily was born circa 1085.1 He married Theodora Comnena, daughter of Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East and Eirene Dukaina, circa 1120.3,4,1
Konstantinos/Constantinus Angelos Admiral of Sicily died after July 1166.1
     GAV-25 EDV-26.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html

Theodora Comnena1

F, #10458, b. 1096
FatherAlexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East1 b. 1048, d. 15 Aug 1118
MotherEirene Dukaina1 b. c 1065
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited28 Aug 2003
     Theodora Comnena was born in 1096.1 She married Konstantinos/Constantinus Angelos Admiral of Sicily, son of Manolis Angelos, circa 1120.2,1,3
     GAV-25 EDV-26. Theodora Comnena was also known as Theodora Komnene.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html

Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East1,2,3

M, #10459, b. 1048, d. 15 August 1118
FatherIoannes/John Comnenus2 b. 1015, d. 1067
MotherAnna Dalassena Regent of Byzantium2,4 d. bt 1100 - 1101
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited20 Feb 2020
     Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East was born in 1048.5,2,3 He married Argyropulina (?) circa 1075; his 1st wife.2 Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East married Eirene Dukaina, daughter of Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas and Maria (?) of Bulgaria, in 1077; his 2nd wife.5,2,3
Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East died on 15 August 1118; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 16 Jul 1118; Byzant 1 page says d. 15 Aug 1118.5,2,3
     GAV-26 EDV-26. Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East was also known as Alexios I Komnenos Emperor of Byzantium.2 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 1081 and 1118.2,3

Family 1

Argyropulina (?) d. c 1077

Family 2

Eirene Dukaina b. c 1065
Children

Citations

  1. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 523. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Dalassene: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049927&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena, p. 19.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AndronikosKdied1130. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html

Eirene Dukaina1,2

F, #10460, b. circa 1065
FatherProtovestiary Andronicus Ducas3,2 d. 1077
MotherMaria (?) of Bulgaria3,2 d. a 1089
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited20 Feb 2020
     Eirene Dukaina was born circa 1065.4 She married Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East, son of Ioannes/John Comnenus and Anna Dalassena Regent of Byzantium, in 1077; his 2nd wife.5,1,6
     GAV-26 EDV-26. Eirene Dukaina was also known as Eirene Ducaena. Eirene Dukaina was also known as Eirene/Irene Ducas.7,2

Family

Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East b. 1048, d. 15 Aug 1118
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 3 page (The Dukas family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant3.html
  3. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 522. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 105A-24, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 45-27, p. 47.
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  7. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena, p. 523.
  8. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena, p. 19.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AndronikosKdied1130. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html

Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas1,2

M, #10461, d. 1077
FatherIoannes/John Ducas Caesar3,1,2 d. 1088
MotherEirene Pegonitissa4,2
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited2 Sep 2004
     Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas married Maria (?) of Bulgaria, daughter of Trajan/Trojan (?) Khan (Tzar) of the West Bulgars, before 1063.5,1,2,6
Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas died in 1077.2
     GAV-27 EDV-27.

; Protovestiarius = The officer in charge of the imperial wardrobe and the money concerned with it.7

; deserted Emperor Romanus at Manzikery.8

Family

Maria (?) of Bulgaria d. a 1089
Children

Citations

  1. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 522. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 3 page (The Dukas family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant3.html
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32777
  4. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32778
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 8 page (The Tsars of the first Bulgarian Empire in Ochrida): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan8.html
  7. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena, p. 527.
  8. [S1668] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 Aug 2004: "Re: Empress Theophano, wife of Otto II"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EJJcx5MLHhE/m/MsWrwPDeYBYJ) to e-mail address, 1 Aug 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 Aug 2004."
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 3 page (The Dukas family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant3.html

Maria (?) of Bulgaria1,2

F, #10462, d. after 1089
FatherTrajan/Trojan (?) Khan (Tzar) of the West Bulgars2,3
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Maria (?) of Bulgaria married Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas, son of Ioannes/John Ducas Caesar and Eirene Pegonitissa, before 1063.4,1,5,2
Maria (?) of Bulgaria died after 1089.5,2
     GAV-27 EDV-27.

Family

Protovestiary Andronicus Ducas d. 1077
Children

Citations

  1. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 522. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 8 page (The Tsars of the first Bulgarian Empire in Ochrida): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan8.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Trajan (Troianos) of Bulgaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141474&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 3 page (The Dukas family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant3.html
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 3 page (The Dukas family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant3.html

Trajan/Trojan (?) Khan (Tzar) of the West Bulgars1

M, #10463
FatherIwan Wladislaw (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians1,2,3 b. c 975, d. 1018
MotherMarija (?)1,3 d. bt 1029 - 1031
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Reference: Genealogics cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:168.3 GAV-28 EDV-28.

; Weis [1992:99].4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 8 page (The Tsars of the first Bulgarian Empire in Ochrida): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan8.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Iwan Wladislaw: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141472&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Trajan (Troianos) of Bulgaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141474&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47; line 105A-24, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Samuel I (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians1

M, #10464, d. 6 October 1014
Fatherkomes Nikolaos (?) Tsar of Bulgaria2,3,4 d. 976
MotherRipsimé (?)5,6
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited5 Jan 2020
     Samuel I (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians married Agatha Chryselie, daughter of Joannes Chryselios Lord of Durazzo, circa 970.1,7
Samuel I (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians died on 6 October 1014 at Prilep, Bulgaria (now).8,7
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Samuel, who became Tsar of the Bulgarians (997-1014), and moved the capital to Ochrida, he conquered Diocleia, Trebinje and Zahumlje, and made Bosnia and Raska (Serbia) vassals of Bulgaria, +Prilep 1014; m.ca 970 Agathe, dau.of Joannes Chryselios, Lord of Durazzo."1

; Per Med Lands:
     "SAMUIL (-Prilep 6 Oct 1014). Zonaras records that "Bulgaricis quatuor filii, David, Moses, Aaron et Samuel" encouraged the Bulgarians to revolt against Byzantine control[127]. Cedrenus records that "Davidus, Moses, Aaron et Samuelis, filii cuiusdam in Bulgaria largiter potentis comitis" rebelled against Byzantium after the death of Tsar Peter[128]. Samuil, later Tsar of Bulgaria, names "my father, my mother, my brother…Nicolas…--- and David" in a monument erected in [992/93][129]. Adontz highlights two spurious charters, fabricated in the 16th and late 18th/early 19th centuries respectively, from which it was wrongly deduced by some historians that Samuil was the son of Sišman[130]. Zonaras records that "quatuor fratribus Davidi, Mosi, Aaroni et Samueli…qui Comitopoli appellabantur" defeated the Byzantine forces[131]. He conquered Thessaly in 986, defeated a Byzantine army at Sardika [Sofija] and reconquered the territory of the original Bulgarian state as well as the region of Thessaloniki, after which he conquered Durazzo in [996][132]. In 997, he conquered Duklja, Trebinje and Zahumlje, and reduced Bosnia and Raška [Serbia] to vassals of Bulgaria. He was crowned SAMUIL Tsar of the Bulgarians in 997, with his capital at Prespa. He moved his capital to Ochrida, where he restored the Bulgarian Patriarch Damian[133]. In [1000/1001], Byzantium under Emperor Basileios II launched a counter-offensive against Bulgaria, and recaptured Sardika (1001), Macedonia, Thessaly, Vidin and Skoplje (1004), and Durazzo (1005), the last following the betrayal by Samuil's son-in-law. Samuil's army was crushed in Jul 1014 at Clidion, near Strymon, although Tsar Samuil escaped to Prilep where he died soon afterwards[134]. Cedrenus records this defeat 20 Jul "indictione 12" and Samuil’s escape to "castellum Prilapum" where he died two days later[135]. Lupus Protospatarius records that "Samuel rex" died in 1015 and was succeeded by his son[136]. m ([970]) AGATHA Chryselie, daughter of IOANNES Chryselios Lord of Durazzo & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. Her marriage date is estimated by Adontz on the assumption that her son Gavriil Radomir was adult in 986[137]."
Med Lands cites:
[127] Zonaras II, Liber XVI, XXIII, col. 114.
[128] Cedrenus II, col. 82.
[129] Adontz (1938), p. 40.
[130] Adontz (1938), p. 36.
[131] Zonaras II, Liber XVII, VI, col. 151.
[132] Fine (1991), pp. 192-93.
[133] Fine (1991), p. 196.
[134] Fine (1991), pp. 195, 197-98.
[135] Cedrenus II, col. 191.
[136] Lupus Protospatarius 1017, MGH SS V, p. 57.
[137] Adontz (1938), p. 51.7
GAV-29. Samuel I (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians was also known as Samuil (?) Tsar of the Bulgarrians.7

; Weis [AR7] line 45-27.8 He was Tsar of the Bulgarians between 997 and 1014.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 8 page - The Tsars of the first Bulgarian Empire in Ochrida: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan8.html
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32780
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#IvanVladislavdied1018A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nikola Kumet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332110&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#_Toc359577756
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ripsimija: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332111&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BULGARIA.htm#dauMVaszolyHungary
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-27, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 8 page (The Tsars of the first Bulgarian Empire in Ochrida): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan8.html

Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria1,2

M, #10465, b. 1073, d. 12 November 1136
FatherLeopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria1,2,3,4 b. c 1050, d. 12 Oct 1095
MotherIda (?) von Ratelberg1,2,5,4 b. b 1040, d. a 1101
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria was born in 1073 at Melk, Melk Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria.2,1 He married NN von Perg; his 1st wife.2 Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria married Agnes (?) von Waiblingen, daughter of Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne, in 1106; his 2nd wife.6,1,2,7,8
Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria died on 12 November 1136; Genealogy.EU (Babenberg page) says d. 15 Nov 1136.6,1,2
     GAV-25 EDV-26. Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria was also known as Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" Margrave of Austria. He was Margrave of Austria in 1102.1

Family 1

NN von Perg d. b 1105

Family 2

Agnes (?) von Waiblingen b. bt 1072 - 1074, d. 24 Sep 1143
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leopold II 'the Fair': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079791&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#LiutpoldIIdied1095. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Ratelberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079792&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-24, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027263&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Agnesdied11601163
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027272&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#HeinrichIIdied1177B
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30965
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310307&tree=LEO

Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland1,2,3

F, #10466, b. circa 1111, d. 25 January 1163
FatherSaint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria1,2,4,5 b. 1073, d. 12 Nov 1136
MotherAgnes (?) von Waiblingen1,2,6,4,5 b. bt 1072 - 1074, d. 24 Sep 1143
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland was born circa 1111; Genealogy.EU (Babenberg page) says b. 1108/1113; Genealogics says b. ca 1110/1111; Med Lands says b. 1108/1111.7,1,2,4,5 She married Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland, son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland and Zbislava Sviatopolkovna (?) Kijowska, between 1125 and 1127; Med Lands says m. 1120/25.7,1,2,8,9,10,4,5
Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland died on 25 January 1163; Genealogy.EU (Babenberg & Piast 4 pages) says d. 1160/3.7,1,2,10,3,4
Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland was buried after 25 January 1163 at Kloster Pforte, Bad Kösen, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1113
     DEATH     24 Jan 1160 (aged 46–47)
     Nobility. She was born either 1108 or 1113 as the fourth child of Leopold III and his second wife Agnes von Waiblingen, she was also a half-sister of King Conrad III (+1152). She married Wladyslaw II the Exile in 1123 and bore him five children, including Richesa and Mieszko the Staggerer. She died in Altenburg and was buried in Pforta. Her grave is not marked.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Leopold III, Margrave of Austria 1073–1136
          Agnes von Waiblingen 1072–1143
     Spouse
          Vladislas II King Of Poland 1105–1159
     Siblings
          Adalbert of Austria 1107–1136
          Leopold IV of Austria 1107–1141
          Otto of Freising 1109–1158
          Bertha of Austria 1110–1150
          Heinrich II of Austria 1112–1177
          Konrad of Austria 1115–1168
          Ernst of Austria 1118–1137
     Half Siblings
          Heilika von Staufen Lengenfeld unknown–1110
          Friedrich II of Swabia 1090–1147
          Sophia Zu Hohenstaufen Pfitzingen 1091–1115
          Konrad III. von Hohenstaufen 1093–1152
     Children
          Boleslaw of Silesia 1127–1201
          Richilde of Poland 1134–1185
          Mieszko The Staggerer 1138–1211
     BURIAL     Kloster Pforte, Bad Kösen, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Aug 2009
     Find A Grave Memorial 40725203.11
     GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 15.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Agnes of Babenberg (German: Agnes von Babenberg, Polish: Agnieszka Babenberg; b. ca. 1108/13 – d. 24/25 January 1163), was a German noblewoman, a scion of the Franconian House of Babenberg and by marriage High Duchess of Poland and Duchess of Silesia.
     "She was a daughter of Leopold III, Margrave of Austria, by his second wife, Agnes, second but eldest surviving daughter of Emperor Henry IV.[1][citation needed]
Life
Family and personality
     "Through her mother, Agnes was a descendant of the Salian Dynasty, which ruled the Holy Roman Empire since 1024 until her maternal uncle, Emperor Henry V, died without issue in 1125. She was the half-sister of Frederick II, Duke of Swabia, and Conrad III, King of Germany since 1138 (both born from her mother's first marriage with Frederick I, Duke of Swabia). Of her full-siblings, one sister Judith married Marquess William V of Montferrat and one brother was Bishop Otto of Freising, a renowned medieval chronicler.
     "According to Wincenty Kad?ubek, Polish chronicler and Bishop of Kraków (and this opinion is shared by other sources), Agnes was a very ambitious, energetic woman, and proud of her origins. It is no wonder the Bishop called her in the pages of his Polish Chronicle, "Tigress" (Polish: tygrysica).
Marriage
     "The ruler of Poland, Duke Boles?aw III Wrymouth, in order to hold his ground against the Empire wanted to obtain a powerful ally against Lothair III of Supplinburg, who in 1125 had been elected King of the Romans against Duke Frederick II of Swabia. He therefore forged an alliance with the Babenbergs and the Hohenstaufen families, who, as relatives of the extinct Salian dynasty, were the natural rivals of Lothair. In order to seal this alliance, a marriage between Boles?aw III's eldest son W?adys?aw and Agnes was agreed. The wedding took place around 1125; according to some historians, the couple had already received the Duchy of Silesia from Boles?aw III as a gift.
High Duchess of Poland
     "Boles?aw III died on 28 October 1138. In his will, he divided Poland between his sons. As the oldest son, the supreme authority in the country was assigned to W?adys?aw II with the title of high duke (princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the Seniorate Province (which included Lesser Poland, eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia) and the authority over Pomerania. His half-brothers Boleslaw IV, Mieszko III and Henry received hereditary fiefs as junior dukes. In addition, W?adys?aw II would also receive the lands of ??czyca, then granted by Boles?aw III to his widow, Salomea of Berg, for life as her dower and to revert to the Seniorate Province upon her death.
     "Almost immediately, the high duke began his efforts to unify the country under his rule. Wincenty Kad?ubek stated that the confrontation between W?adys?aw II and his half-brothers was mainly instigated by Agnes, who believed that her husband, as the eldest son, had the right to be the sole ruler of the whole country.
     "In order to strengthen the authority of the high duke, it is believed that Agnes took part in the downfall of one of the most powerful nobles in the country, the voivode Piotr W?ostowic, who supported the junior dukes. According to a legend, the capture of W?ostowic was thanks to Agnes, because she sent her own retainers to his castle and they captured him during the night. This event was recorded in German contemporary historiography; however, since this story is not confirmed, it not generally accepted by modern historians. Agnes demanded W?ostowic's death, but her husband decided instead to make an example of him. W?ostowic was blinded, muted and sentenced to exile.
Deposition and exile
     "The tyrannical rule of W?adys?aw II and Agnes led to many of their subjects switching their allegiance to the junior dukes. In early 1146 the high duke's forces were finally defeated near Pozna?. W?adys?aw II escaped to Bohemia, while Agnes and her children remained in Kraków, where for some time they maintained resistance against the junior dukes from the Wawel Castle. However, the attempts to defend the city were unsuccessful and, in the end, the whole family was reunited in exile.
     "After a short time at the Bohemian court of Duke Vladislaus II, Agnes' half-brother, King Conrad III of Germany, offered his hospitality to the Polish ducal family, who settled at the Kaiserpfalz of Altenburg. At first, it seemed that W?adys?aw II would soon regain power in Poland. A German expedition against the junior dukes was launched in 1146, but due to flooding of the Oder River and the pressures on the German king by the margraves Albert the Bear and Conrad of Meissen, the campaign failed.
     "The failure of the expedition did not discourage Agnes, who continued with her attempts to restore her husband. She asked for the intervention of Pope Eugenius III, who decided to raise the question in the 1148 Council of Reims, and sent his legate Guy to Poland to obtain the submission of the junior dukes. However, they refused to accept the return of W?adys?aw II, and the pope declared a ban over Poland. The pope's actions had few repercussions thanks for the united support of the Polish church hierarchy for the junior dukes.
     "In 1152 King Conrad III died and was succeeded by his nephew Frederick Barbarossa. With the accession of this energetic ruler, the hopes of Agnes and W?adys?aw II of returning to Poland were rekindled. With the encouragement of his aunt, the new German king launched an expedition against Poland in 1157. The campaign was a success but unexpectedly Barbarossa did not restore W?adys?aw II to the Polish throne. Instead High Duke Boles?aw IV was declared a vassal of Emperor Frederick and was compelled to pay tribute to him. In compensation to W?adys?aw II, he forced Boles?aw to promise the restitution of the Silesian duchy to W?adys?aw's sons.
Death and aftermaths
     "Both Agnes and W?adys?aw II knew that their battle was finally lost. They remained in Altenburg, where W?adys?aw II died on 30 May 1159. Agnes' day of death is generally placed by sources between 24 and 25 January, but the year remained disputed among historians and sources. Certainly she survived her husband,[2] and it is known that she did not return to Silesia with her sons when they were finally restored in their heritage in 1163. Thus, it is believed that Agnes died between 1160 and 1163. She was buried in the Cistercian abbey of Pforta near Naumburg on the Saale river.
Children
     "Agnes and Wladyslaw had the following children:
1. Boles?aw I the Tall (1127 – 8 December 1201).
2. Mieszko I Tanglefoot (1131 – 16 May 1211).
3. Richeza (1140 – 16 June 1185), married firstly in 1152 to Alfonso VII, King of Galicia, Castile and León, secondly in 1162 to Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence and thirdly by 1167 to Count Albert III of Everstein.
4. Konrad Spindleshanks (1146/57 – 17 January 1180/90).
5. Albert (c. 1156 - c. 1168/78).

Bibliography
** Allstrom, Carl Magnus. Dictionary of Royal Lineage (Poland), 1902
** Louda, Jirí and Michael MacLagan. Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition. London, UK: Little, Brown and Company, 1999.
References
1. Marek, Miroslav. "Complete Genealogy of the House of Babenberg". Genealogy.EU.[self-published source][better source needed]
2. Some sources placed her death around 1157; thePeerage.com: Agnes Babenberg.3 "

Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland was also known as Agnes von Österreich.4

; Per Med Lands: "AGNES ([1108/1113]-Altenburg/Thür 24/25 Jan or 26 Sep [1160/63], bur Kloster Pforte/Saale). The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Poleslaus dux de Polan"[182], although there appears to be no "Boles?aw" at the time to whom this could refer. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as "Leopoldis marchio et Henricus…sororem germanam" and wife of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia"[183]. Her origin is further confirmed by a charter dated Jan 1150 in which Cardinal-deacon Guido informs Konrad III King of Germany of the steps he took against "ducis Poloniæ et coniugis eius sororis vestræ…ducis W"[184]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Agnes ducissa Polonie filia marchionis"[185]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Agnes ux Wlaslai ducis Zlezorum filia fundatoris S Crucis"[186]. m ([1120/25]) W?ADYS?AW of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his first wife Zbislava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (1105-30 May 1159). He succeeded in 1138 as W?ADYS?AW II "Wygnaniec/the Exile" Prince of Krakow and Silesia."
Med Lands cites:
[182] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
[183] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[184] Schlesisches Urkundenbuch I 971-1230, 20, p. 15.
[185] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[186] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.5

Family

Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland b. 1105, d. 30 May 1159
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Babenberg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027263&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Agnesdied11601163. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-25, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027262&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 November 2019), memorial page for Agnes von Babenberg (1113–24 Jan 1160), Find A Grave Memorial no. 40725203, citing Kloster Pforte, Bad Kösen, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/40725203/agnes-von_babenberg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079768&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#BoleslawIdied1201B
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064932&tree=LEO
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 147-27, p. 129.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_Laskonogi

Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland1,2,3,4,5

M, #10467, b. 1105, d. 30 May 1159
FatherBoleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland2,3,6,7,8,9,10 b. 20 Aug 1086, d. 28 Oct 1138
MotherZbislava Sviatopolkovna (?) Kijowska2,3,8,11,10 b. bt 1085 - 1090, d. bt 1113 - 1114
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland was born in 1105.12,2,3,4 He married Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland, daughter of Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria and Agnes (?) von Waiblingen, between 1125 and 1127; Med Lands says m. 1120/25.13,12,14,2,3,4,15,16
Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland died on 30 May 1159 at Altenburg, Saxony, Germany.13,12,2,3,4
Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland was buried after 30 May 1159 at Pegau Monastery, Pegau (near Altenburg), Landkreis Leipzig, Saxony (Sachsen), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1105, Kraków, Miasto Kraków, Ma?opolskie, Poland
     DEATH     30 May 1159 (aged 53–54), Altenburg, Landkreis Altenburger Land, Thüringen, Germany
     Family Members
     Parents
          Boleslaw III Wrymouth 1086–1138
     Spouse
          Agnes von Babenberg 1113–1160
     Siblings
          Casimir of Masovia unknown–1194
          Richeza 1116–1160
          Mieszko III Stary 1126–1202
     Children
          Richilde of Poland 1134–1185
     BURIAL     Pegau Monastery, Pegau, Landkreis Leipzig, Saxony (Sachsen), Germany
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 20 Feb 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 85231862.2,4,17
     ; Per Med Lands: "AGNES ([1108/1113]-Altenburg/Thür 24/25 Jan or 26 Sep [1160/63], bur Kloster Pforte/Saale). The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Poleslaus dux de Polan"[182], although there appears to be no "Boles?aw" at the time to whom this could refer. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as "Leopoldis marchio et Henricus…sororem germanam" and wife of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia"[183]. Her origin is further confirmed by a charter dated Jan 1150 in which Cardinal-deacon Guido informs Konrad III King of Germany of the steps he took against "ducis Poloniæ et coniugis eius sororis vestræ…ducis W"[184]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Agnes ducissa Polonie filia marchionis"[185]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Agnes ux Wlaslai ducis Zlezorum filia fundatoris S Crucis"[186]. m ([1120/25]) W?ADYS?AW of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his first wife Zbislava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (1105-30 May 1159). He succeeded in 1138 as W?ADYS?AW II "Wygnaniec/the Exile" Prince of Krakow and Silesia."
Med Lands cites:
[182] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
[183] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[184] Schlesisches Urkundenbuch I 971-1230, 20, p. 15.
[185] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[186] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.16


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Vladislaus II the Exile (Polish: W?adys?aw II Wygnaniec) (1105 – 30 May 1159) was a High Duke of Poland and Duke of Silesia from 1138 until his expulsion in 1146. He is the progenitor of the Silesian Piasts.
Life
Governor of Silesia
     "He was the eldest son of Duke Boles?aw III Wrymouth, sole ruler of Poland since 1107, by his first wife Zbyslava, a daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev. As the firstborn son, W?adys?aw's father decided to involve him actively in the government of the country. Some historians believe that Boles?aw III gave W?adys?aw the district of Silesia before his own death, in order to create an hereditary fief for his eldest descendants.
     "Around 1125 W?adys?aw married Agnes of Babenberg, daughter of Margrave Leopold III of Austria; this union gave him a close connection with the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Germany: Agnes by her mother was a granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV and a half-sister of the Franconian duke Conrad III of Hohenstaufen, the later King of Germany. Thanks to W?adys?aw, Silesia was saved during the wars of 1133–1135 with Bohemia: he stopped the destruction of the major areas of his district after the Bohemian forces crossed the Oder river.
     "In 1137, during the whitsun meeting with Duke Sob?slav I of Bohemia at Niemcza (other sources mention K?odzko), in which several disputed matters were decided, W?adys?aw stood as godfather in the baptism of the youngest son of Sob?slav, the future Duke Wenceslaus II.
High Duke of Poland
     "Duke Boles?aw III died on 28 October 1138. In his will, he sought to maintain the unity of the Polish lands as well as to prevent inheritance conflicts among his sons. He therefore determined a kind of mitigated primogeniture principle: As the oldest son, the supreme authority in the country was assigned to W?adys?aw with the title of a High Duke (Princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the central Seniorate Province, stretching from Lesser Poland at Kraków to eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia, as well as the authority over the Pomerelian lands at Gda?sk on the Baltic Sea. His younger half-brothers Boles?aw IV the Curly and Mieszko III received the eastern Duchy of Masovia (composed of Masovia with eastern Kuyavia) and the western Duchy of Greater Poland (the remaining parts of Greater Poland with Lubusz Land) respectively, each as hereditary fiefs.
     "Upon the death of Boles?aw's widow Salomea of Berg, W?adys?aw would also receive her oprawa wdowia (a kind of usufruct pension) at ??czyca, which had to revert to the Seniorate. On the other hand, he was obliged to provide his youngest half-brother Henry with the lands of Sandomierz when he would come of age (though only for life). The district however was not separated from the Seniorate until 1146. The youngest of his half-brothers, the later High Duke Casimir II the Just was not assigned any province; it is speculated that he was born after Boles?aw III's death.
     "At the time of the death of his father, W?adys?aw was already an adult, with many years of marriage and at least one surviving son, Boles?aw I the Tall, born in 1127 (the date of birth of the second son, Mieszko IV Tanglefoot, is still debatable and varies between 1130 and 1146). Following the examples of his predecessors Boles?aw I Chrobry in 992, Mieszko II Lambert in 1032, and his own father in 1106, the High Duke almost immediately tried to restore the unity of the country. Given his life experience and military leadership, it was generally expected that in the end, he would be successful.
The First Conflicts with the Junior Dukes
     "The disputes of W?adys?aw with his stepmother Salomea and his half-brothers began openly in 1141, when the Dowager Duchess, without the knowledge and consent of the High Duke, commenced to divide her ??czyca province between her sons. Also, she tried to resolve the marriage of her youngest daughter Agnieszka and thus to find a suitable ally for her sons. The most appropriate candidate for a son-in-law had to be one of the sons of the Grand Prince Vsevolod II of Kiev. After hearing the news about the events in ??czyca, W?adys?aw decided to make a quick response, as a result of which the Grand Prince of Kiev not only broke all his pacts with the Junior Dukes, but also arranged the betrothal of his daughter Zvenislava to W?adys?aw's eldest son Boles?aw. The wedding took place one year later, in 1142.
     "His ties with the Kievan Rus' benefited him during 1142-1143, when W?adys?aw decided to fight against the districts of his brothers. W?adys?aw's victory was beyond dispute, being backed by his alliances with the Rus', Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire.
The W?ostowic Affair and the Second part of the Fight with his brothers
     "During Wladyslaw's reign, the Silesian voivode (count palatine) Piotr W?ostowic had the greatest and most decisive impact. A firm follower of Duke Boles?aw III, he had soon acquired enormous political significance in the country, covering the most important court offices. In his prerogative as voivode he had the right to appoint officials in local authorities across Poland, including in the areas of the Junior Dukes, which made him the person from whose decisions was determined the fate of the state. In view of the conflict between her sons and W?adys?aw looming ahead, Boles?aw's wife Salomea of Berg intrigued against him, whereafter W?ostowic had to resign and was replaced by one of her minions. When W?adys?aw succeeded his father, he reinstated the voivode, however the increased power of W?ostowic fostered deep negative relations, especially with his wife Agnes of Babenberg, who - not without reason - considered him a traitor.
     "On 27 July 1144 Salomea of Berg, Duke Boles?aw's widow and W?ostowic's bitter enemy, died. As in accordance with the Duke's will, her province of ??czyca had to revert to the Senoriate Province of W?adys?aw, the voivode, in agreement with the Junior Dukes, planned a coup d'état in order to take the contested district, perhaps as emolument for the younger Henry. Again in this case, W?adys?aw appealed for aid to his Kievan allies. Without waiting the arrival of food he sent his troops against the forces of Boles?aw IV the Curly and Mieszko III; unexpectedly, W?adys?aw suffered a defeat. It wasn't until the arrival of the Kievans that the fate of the battle and the war turned to W?adys?aw's side. Immediately, a favourable peace treaty was made, which permitted the High Duke to take full control over ??czyca; however, he had to give to the Kievan cohorts, in exchange for their aid, the Polish castle at Wizna.
     "In the meanwhile, the tensions between W?adys?aw and Piotr W?ostowic worsened. The position of the Count Palatine in the civil war was clearly against the High Duke. This attitude clearly did not correspond with Wladyslaw's concept of autocracy, and after this episode he thought about the total removal of his brothers from their lands. By 1145 however, it seemed that a reconciliation between the High Duke and W?ostowic was possible, as evidenced by the invitation to W?adys?aw by the voivode on the occasion of W?ostowic's son wedding. At the beginning of the following year the High Duke, however, decided to bet everything on one gamble: eliminate W?ostowic from his life for good. He ordered one of his knights, Dobek, to capture him. Dobek arrived at W?ostowic's court at O?bin (in present-day Wroc?aw), and during the night captured the voivode with his men. High Duchess Agnes demanded W?ostowic's death, but W?adys?aw decided instead to make an example out of him: he was blinded, mutilated and sentenced to exile.
     "W?ostowic was respected and had many friends, and his fate caused many nobles to switch their allegiance to the Junior Dukes. Furthermore, the blinded W?ostowic fled to the Kievan Rus', which had so far supported W?adys?aw, and convinced them to break their alliance.
Deposition and Escape to Bohemia
     "At the beginning of 1146 W?adys?aw decided to make the final attack on his rivaling half-brothers. Initially, it seemed that victory of the High Duke was only a matter of time, since he managed to take Masovia without obstacles and forced Duke Boles?aw IV the Curly to withdraw to the defense of his brother Mieszko III at Pozna? in Greater Poland. There, unexpectedly, began W?adys?aw's disaster. The reason for this was the insecurity of his other districts, where mighty rebellions erupted against W?adys?aw's dictatorial politics. The rebels quickly grew in power thanks to the support of Archbishop Jakub ze ?nina of Gniezno, who excommunicated the High Duke – as a punishment for the fate of the voivode W?ostowic – resulting in an additional series of rebellions. The defeat at the end was thanks not only to the combined forces of Duke Bo?eslaw IV at Poznan with the troops of the other Junior Dukes, but also by W?adys?aw's own subjects, which was a total surprise to him. The High Duke was forced to flee abroad; shortly afterwards his wife Agnes and children joined him, after their unsuccessful attempts to defend Kraków.
     "The Junior Dukes had a complete success, and W?adys?aw was now under the mercy of his neighbours. Initially, he and his family stayed in the court of his namesake and brother-in-law Duke Vladislaus II of Bohemia at Prague Castle. The title of a High Duke was assumed by Bo?eslaw IV. W?adys?aw never returned to Poland.
Exile in Germany. Unsuccessful expedition of King Conrad III
     "Soon after his arrival in Bohemia, his brother-in-law King Conrad III of Germany offered him his hospitality. W?adys?aw shortly after moved to Germany and paid tribute to King Conrad and asked for assistance in regaining the throne.[1] As King Conrad had also been able to reinstate Vladislaus of Bohemia shortly before, it initially appeared that W?adys?aw would regain power over Poland very soon. The expedition against the Junior Dukes was launched in 1146, but due to flooding of the Oder river and the pressure on the German king by the margraves Albert the Bear and Conrad of Meissen, who showed no interest in an armed conflict at the German eastern border, the campaign finally failed.
     "W?adys?aw of course did not lose hope of changing his fate, but for now he had to accept the postponement of his return, particularly when Conrad III started the Second Crusade with King Louis VII of France to the Holy Land the next year. During this time, the former High Duke administrated the Kaiserpfalz at Altenburg and its dependencies in the Imperial Pleissnerland. Without waiting for German aid, W?adys?aw and his wife Agnes went to the Roman Curia and asked Pope Eugene III for help, but this attempt was also unsuccessful.
Death and Legacy
     "In 1152 King Conrad III died and was succeeded by his nephew Frederick Barbarossa. With this, the hopes of W?adys?aw of returning to Poland were reborn. Following the inducements of W?adys?aw and Frederick's aunt Agnes of Babenberg, the Holy Roman Emperor launched a new expedition to Greater Poland in 1157. The campaign was a success, but unexpectedly Frederick Barbarossa did not restore W?adys?aw to the Polish throne, after Boles?aw IV apprehended at Krzyszkowo had to declare himself a vassal to the Emperor and was compelled to pay tribute to him. In compensation, the Emperor forced Boles?aw IV to promise the restitution of Silesia to W?adys?aw's sons Boles?aw the Tall and Mieszko IV Tanglefoot.[2]
     "At this time, it appears, W?adys?aw knew that his battle for supremacy in Poland was finally lost. He remained in exile at Altenburg, where he died two years later. It was not until 1163 that Boles?aw IV finally granted the Silesian province to W?adys?aw's sons.
     "Apart from the question of an actual enfeoffment of W?adys?aw's sons by the Emperor, a disruption between them and their Piast cousins had occurred. In the following centuries, Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among their descendants and successors, who from the early 14th century onwards gradually became vassals of the Imperial Kingdom of Bohemia. By the 1335 Treaty of Trentschin the Polish king Casimir III the Great renounced all claims to the Silesian lands, which remained under the rule of the Silesian Piasts until the male line of the dynasty finally became extinct with the death of Duke George William of Legnica in 1675.
Marriage and children
     "In 1125 W?adys?aw married Agnes of Babenberg (b. ca. 1108/1113 – d. at Altenburg, 24 January 1160/63), daughter of Margrave Saint Leopold III of Austria and Agnes of Germany,[3][4] who in turn was a daughter of Emperor Henry IV. She was also the half-sister of King Conrad III of Germany.
     "They had:
1. Boles?aw I the Tall (b. 1127 – d. 8 December 1201)[5]
2. Mieszko I Tanglefoot (b. ca. 1130 – 16 May 1211)[5]
3. Richeza (b. 1140 – d. 16 June 1185), married firstly in 1152 to Alfonso VII, King of Galicia, Castile and León,[6] secondly in 1162 to Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence and thirdly by 1167 to Count Albert III of Everstein.
4. Konrad Spindleshanks (b. 1146/57 – d. 17 January 1190).
5. Albert (d. young, ca. 1168).
See also
** Silesian Piasts: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silesian_Piasts
** Carmen Mauri: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmen_Mauri
** History of Poland (966–1385): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Poland_during_the_Piast_dynasty
*** Dukes of Silesia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Silesia
Notes
1. In 1146 Wladislaw accepts imperial souverainty (German)
2. Freed 2016, p. 170.
3. Berend, Urba?czyk & Wiszewski 2013, p. 224.
4. Wyrzykowska 2016, p. 186.
5. Davies 1982, p. 64.
6. Reilly 1998, p. 114.
References
** Berend, Nora; Urba?czyk, Przemys?aw; Wiszewski, Przemys?aw (2013). Central Europe in the High Middle Ages: Bohemia, Hungary and Poland, c.900–c.1300. ** Cambridge University Press.
** Davies, Norman (1982). God's Playground:A History of Poland. Vol. I. Columbia University Press.
** Freed, John B. (2016). Frederick Barbarossa: The Prince and the Myth. Yale University Press.
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1998). The Kingdom of León-Castilla under King Alfonso VII, 1126–1157. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Wyrzykowska, Malgorzata (2016). "The Cult of Saints of the House of Habsburg in Silesian Baroque Art". In Bogade, Marco (ed.) Transregionalität in Kult und Kultur: Bayern, Böhmen und Schlesien zur Zeit der Gegenreformation. Bohlau Verlag Koln Weimar Wein."18

; Per Genealogics:
     "Wladislaw II 'the Exile' was born about 1105, the son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty, king of Poland and his first wife Sbislava of Kiev. Between 1125 and 1127 Wladislaw married Agnes von Österreich, daughter of Leopold III von Österreich, Markgraf von der Ostmark, and Agnes von Franconia. They had two sons Boleslaw I and Mieszko I, and a daughter Richza/Rikinsa, all of whom had progeny. Richza married Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León.
     "Following the death of his father Boleslaw III Krzywousty, Wladislaw as his eldest son became high duke of Poland. He controlled the high-ducal provinces of Kraków and Gniezno and also his hereditary province of Silesia.
     "In 1145 Wladislaw attempted to take control of the country, and mutilated the governor, Piotr Wlostowic. In 1146 Wladislaw was driven into exile by his younger brothers, and on 30 May 1159 he died in Altenburg, Germany.
     "In 1163 the province of Silesia was granted to Wladislaw's sons by Duke Boleslaw IV 'the Curly', eldest son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty by his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among Wladislaw's descendants and successors, until they died out in 1675."8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 191; II 82.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 191.8
GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Med Lands:
     "W?ADYS?AW of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his first wife Zbislava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (1105-30 May 1159). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) the five sons of Boles?aw III "Vladislaum, Boleslaum, Mesiconem, Kazimirum, Henricum", specifying that W?adys?aw succeeded in Silesia[18]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the birth in 1105 of "Vladizlaus secundus"[19]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that the mother of "Boleslaus suo primogenito Wladislao filio" was "ex quadam Ruthena nobili"[20]. He succeeded in 1138 as W?ADYS?AW II "Wygnaniec/the Exile" Prince of Krakow and Silesia. He was expelled by his brother Boles?aw IV: the Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record that in 1146 "Wladizlaus fugit et Cracovia devastatur"[21]. In 1146, Konrad III King of Germany (whose half-sister was W?adys?aw's wife) unsuccessfully tried to reinstate him[22]. After Boles?aw IV refused tribute to Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, the latter invaded Poland in Aug 1157, forced Boles?aw and his other brothers to submit, and compelled them to accept arbitration with their brother W?adys?aw[23]. [The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record the death in 1148 "Wladyzlaus"[24]. This person has not been identified. The entry could indicate the exiled Duke W?adys?aw II, the date being mistaken, but his own death is recorded in the same source in 1159.] The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1159 of "Wladizlaus dux Polonie"[25] and the Annales Cracovienses Compilati the death in 1159 of "Wladyslaus in exilio"[26]. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "4 Non Iun" of "dux Wladizlaus Cracovie, Gnezdne, Syrazye, Kalisie et Slezie, pater fundatoris Bolezlai"[27].
     "m ([1120/25]) AGNES of Austria, daughter of LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria [Babenberg] & his second wife Agnes of Germany [Staufen] ([1108/1113]-Altenburg/Thür 24/25 Jan [1160/63], bur Kloster Pforte an der Saale). The information concerning the wife of Duke W?adys?aw II is contradictory. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Poleslaus dux de Polan"[28], although there appears to be no "Boles?aw" at the time to whom this could refer. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as "Leopoldis marchio et Henricus…sororem germanam" and wife of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia"[29]. Her origin is further confirmed by a charter dated Jan 1150 in which Cardinal-deacon Guido informs Konrad III King of Germany of the steps he took against "ducis Poloniæ et coniugis eius sororis vestræ…ducis W"[30]. On the other hand, according to the Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, the wife of Duke W?adys?aw was Christina, daughter of Emperor Heinrich IV (stating in one passage that "Heinricum quintum" was "fratrem uxoris [=Wladislai]" and in a later passage that she was "filia imperatoris Henrici quarti…Cristine domine")[31]. The Chronica principum Polonie also states that "Boleslaus suo primogenito Wladislao filio" married "filiam imperatoris Cristinam"[32]. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie provides a third possibility, naming her "Adilheidis uxor eius filia imperatoris Heinrici IV" (the entry follows that recording the death of Duke W?adys?aw, to whom "eius" presumably refers) when recording her death "VIII Kal Sep"[33]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies that "filia imperatoris Henrici quarti…Cristine domine", mother of "Boleslam, Mesicone, Conrado Loripade", was "in Porta sepulta"[34]. It is chronologically implausible for the wife of Duke W?adys?aw to have been the daughter of Emperor Heinrich IV, the births of whose known children are recorded between 1070 and 1086, assuming that the estimated birth dates of the couple's children are in the range [1127] to [1146] as shown below. The explanation is presumably confusion with the mother-in-law of Duke W?adys?aw who was one of the emperor's daughters. Concerning her first name, the records of Kloster Neuburg make no known errors in recording the names of the numerous children of Leopold III Markgraf of Austria, although it is true that (as noted above) the name "Boleslas" is in error for "Wladislas". Onomastics help little in finding a solution, as both "Agnes" and "Adelheid" were names given to her descendants. The further complicating factor is the curious story concerning her grandson Jaroslav and his reported hatred of his stepmother "Adelheid" (see below), while elsewhere the second wife of Jaroslaw's father Boles?aw is named Christina. The issue appears to be resolved by two necrology entries: the necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Agnes ducissa Polonie filia marchionis"[35], and the necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Agnes ux Wlaslai ducis Zlezorum filia fundatoris S Crucis"[36]."
Med Lands cites:
[18] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[19] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1105, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.
[20] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 92.
[21] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1146, MGH SS XIX, p. 590.
[22] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 54.
[23] Jordan (1986), p. 54, and Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 150.
[24] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1148, MGH SS XIX, p. 590.
[25] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1159, MGH SS XIX, p. 591.
[26] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1159, MGH SS XIX, p. 591.
[27] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 550.
[28] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
[29] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[30] Schlesisches Urkundenbuch I 971-1230, 20, p. 15.
[31] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, pp. 562 and 566.
[32] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 84.
[33] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 550.
[34] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, pp. 562 and 566.
[35] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[36] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.19
He was High Duke of Poland, Duke of Krakow and Silesia. See atached map of Poland in 1138 (from Wikipedia: By Farary - Own work w oparciu m.in. o: Samsonowicz H., Historia Polski do roku 1795, Warszawa 1990, s. 36–38. ISBN 83-02-04285-4., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10054812) between 1139 and 1146.2,18

Family

Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland b. c 1111, d. 25 Jan 1163
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027262&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE%20NOBILITY.htm#GuillemetteMontpellierMBernardIVMelgueil. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO
  7. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00224026. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladislaw II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027262&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#BoleslawIIIdied1138B
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027273&tree=LEO
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-25, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027263&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Agnesdied11601163
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 November 2019), memorial page for Vladislas II King Of Poland (1105–30 May 1159), Find A Grave Memorial no. 85231862, citing Pegau Monastery, Pegau, Landkreis Leipzig, Saxony (Sachsen), Germany ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85231862/vladislas_ii-king_of_poland. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W%C5%82adys%C5%82aw_II_the_Exile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#WladyslawIIdied1159B
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079768&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#BoleslawIdied1201B
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064932&tree=LEO
  23. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 147-27, p. 129.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  26. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_Laskonogi
  27. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Babenberg

Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland1,2

M, #10468, b. 25 July 1016, d. 19 March 1058
FatherMieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland2,3,4,5 b. 990, d. 10 May 1034
MotherRixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland2,3,6,5 b. c 995, d. 21 Mar 1063
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland was born on 25 July 1016.2,7,5 He married Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland, daughter of Saint Vladimir/Volodimir I Svyatoslavich "Velikiy/the Great" (?) Prince of Novgorod, Grand Duke of Kiev, between 1041 and 1042; Weis [AR7] line 147-23 says m. 1038; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says m. 1041/2; Pagina Dom. Curiosa says m. 1038; Genealogics says m. ca 1041/1042.8,9,7,5,10
Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland died on 19 March 1058 at age 41; Weis [AR7] line 147-23 says d. 1058; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says d. 28.11.1058; Pagina Dom. Curiosa says d. 19 Mar 1058.11,2,7,5
Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland was buried after 28 November 1058 at Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Poznan, Miasto Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     28 Jul 1016, Kraków, Ma?opolskie, Poland
     DEATH     28 Nov 1058 (aged 42), Pozna?, Wielkopolskie, Poland
     Family Members
     Parents
          Mieszko II Lambert unknown–1034
          Richeza of Lotharingia unknown–1063
     Spouse
          Dobronega of Kiev unknown–1087
     Siblings
          Gertrude of Poland unknown–1108
          Richeza Of Poland 1013–1075
     Children
          Boleslaw of Poland 1042–1081
          Wladyslaw I Herman 1044–1102
          Swatawa of Poland 1048–1126
     BURIAL     Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Pozna?, Miasto Pozna?, Wielkopolskie, Poland
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 5 Mar 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 66508886.12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Kazimierz was born on 25 July 1016, the son of Mieszko II Lambert, king of Poland, and Richeza of Lorraine. Relatively little is known of his early life, but he must have spent his childhood at the royal court of Poland in Gniezno. Mieszko II was crowned the king of Poland in 1025 after he father's death. Many landlords, however, feared the single rule of the monarch. This situation led to conflicts in the country, in which Mieszko's brothers turned against him and Emperor Konrad II's forces attacked the country, seizing Lusatia. Years of chaos and conflict followed, during which Mieszko died in 1034 in suspicious circumstances, after a forced abdication and a brief restoration.
     "After the death of her husband, Richeza probably tried to seize the power in the country and secure the crown for her son. However, she failed and Kazimierz had to flee to the kingdom of Hungary while the central parts of Poland were controlled by his uncle Bezprym. The region of Greater Poland revolted against the nobles and clergy and a mass pagan revival ensued there. Also the land of Masovia seceded and a local landlord named Mieclaw formed a state of his own there. A similar situation arose in Pomerania, where the power was held by a local dynasty loosely related to the Piasts. Bretislaw I 'the Warrior', duke of Bohemia and Moravia, observing the period of turmoil in Poland, took advantage of his neighbours' weakness and invaded the country. After a short struggle he conquered Silesia and Lesser Poland, and severely pillaged Greater Poland, burning Gniezno to the ground and looting the relics of Saint Adalbert.
     "The following year the new Holy Roman Emperor, Heinrich III, allied himself with the exiled Polish ruler against the Bohemians. Kazimierz was given a troop of 1000 heavy footmen and a significant amount of gold to restore his power in the country. Kazimierz also signed an alliance with Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch 'the Wise', grand duke of Kiev. The alliance was sealed by Kazimierz's marriage to Jaroslav's half-sister Dobronega (Maria). He and Maria had five children, of whom two sons, Boleslaw and Wladyslaw I Herman, and a daughter Swatawa, would have progeny.
     "With Jaroslav's support Kazimierz returned to Poland and managed to retake most of his domain. In 1041 the defeated Bretislaw signed a treaty at Regensburg in which he renounced his claims to all Polish lands except Silesia, which was to be incorporated into the Crown of Bohemia. It was Kazimierz's success in strengthening royal power and ending internal strife that earned him the epithet of 'the Restorer'.
     "The treaty gained Kazimierz a period of peace at the southern border and the capital of Poland was moved to Kraków, the only major Polish city relatively untouched by the wars. It is probable that Emperor Heinrich was happy with the balance of power restored in the region, and that he forced Kazimierz not to crown himself king of Poland. In 1046 the emperor held royal and imperial courts at Merseburg and Meissen, at which he formally ended the conflict between the duke of Pomerania, Bretislaw of Bohemia and Kazimierz.
     "In 1047 Kazimierz, aided by his brother-in-law Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch of Kiev, started a war against Masovia and seized the lands. It is probable that he also defeated Mieclaw's allies from Pomerania and attached Gdansk to Poland. This secured his power in central Poland. Three years later, against the will of the emperor, Kazimierz seized Czech-controlled Silesia, thus securing most of his father's domain. In 1054 in Quedlinburg the emperor ruled that Silesia was to remain in Poland in exchange for a yearly tribute of 117 kg of silver and 7 kg of gold.
     "At that time Kazimierz focused on internal matters. In conflict with the emperor over Silesia, he supported the papacy in the Investiture Controversy and gained the support of the Church. To strengthen his rule he recreated the bishopric of Kraków and Wroclaw and erected the new Cathedral Basilica of St. Stanislaus and St. Wenceslaus in Kraków. During Kazimierz's rule heraldry was introduced to Poland, and unlike his predecessors, he promoted landed gentry over his own mounted warriors (the 'druzyna') as his base of power. One of his reforms was the introduction to Poland of a key element of feudalism: the granting of fiefdoms to his retinue of warriors, thus gradually transforming them into medieval knights.
     "Kazimierz died on 19 March 1058. He was succeeded by his elder son Boleslaw, who was in turn followed by his brother Wladyslaw I Herman."5



; Per Genealogy.EU: "Kazimierz I Karol, Ct of Poland (1039-58), *25.7.1016, +28.11.1058; m.1041/42 Dobronega of Kiev (+1087.)7"



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 82.
2. Królewska Krew, Poznan, 1997 , Prinke, Rafal & Andrzej Sikorski. 234.5


; Per Med Lands: "KAZIMIERZ KAROL (25 Jul 1016-19 Mar 1058). The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the birth "1016 VIII Kal Aug" of "Kazimirus dux"[130]. The Annales Cracovienses Vetusti record the birth in 1016 of "Kazimyr"[131]. The Annales Kamenzenses record the birth in 1015 of "Kasimir dux"[132]. He became a monk but was dispensed his monastic vows by the Pope in order to reconquer his country. He obtained military support from Germany[133] and succeeded in 1039 as KAZIMIERZ I "Odnowiciel/the Renewer/the Restorer" Prince of Poland. The Annalista Saxo records the return to Poland in 1039 of "Kazimer filius Miseconis ducis Polanorum", specifying that he married "regis Ruscie filiam" and naming their two sons[134]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death of "Kazimirus dux" in 1058[135]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "Gazmer dux"[136]. m (1043) DOBRONEGA MARIA Vladimirovna of Kiev, illegitimate daughter of VLADIMIR I Sviatoslavich "Velikiy/the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev & his mistress --- (before 1012-1087). The Annales Polanorum state that "Kazimirum duxit ex Russia Mariam" in 1025[137], although the date is clearly inaccurate. The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to the wife of King Kazimierz as "de Rusia nobilem"[138]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Kazimirus" married "Dobrognewam"[139]. The Primary Chronicle records the marriage of "Yaroslav's sister" to Kazimierz of Poland in 1043 but does not name her[140]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1087 of "Dobronega uxor Kazimir"[141]."
Med Lands cites:
[130] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1016, MGH SS XIX, p. 586.
[131] Pertz, G. H. (ed.) (1866) Annales Poloniæ, Scriptores rerum Germanicarum in usum scholarum (Hannover), Annales Cracovienses Vetusti, p. 2.
[132] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 8.
[133] Dzi?cio? (1963), p. 200.
[134] Annalista Saxo 1039.
[135] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1058, MGH SS XIX, p. 587.
[136] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[137] Annales Polanorum II 1025, MGH SS XIX, p. 618.
[138] Chronicæ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438.
[139] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 58.
[140] Cross, S. H. and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, O. P. (trans. & eds.) (1973) The Russian Primary Chronicle, Laurentian Text (Cambridge, Massachusetts), 1043, p. 139.
[141] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1087, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.13


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Casimir I the Restorer (Polish: Kazimierz Karol I Odnowiciel; b. Kraków, 25 July 1016 – d. Pozna?, 28 November 1058), was Duke of Poland of the Piast dynasty and the de jure monarch of the entire country from 1034 until his death.
     "He was the only son of Mieszko II Lambert by his wife Richeza, daughter of Count Palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia (of the Ezzonids) and granddaughter of Emperor Otto II.
     "Casimir is known as the Restorer because he managed to reunite all parts of the Polish Kingdom after a period of turmoil. He reinstated Masovia, Silesia and Pomerania into his realm. However, he failed to crown himself King of Poland, mainly because of internal and external threats to his rule.
Life
Early years
     "Relatively little is known of Casimir's early life. He must have spent his childhood at the royal court of Poland in Gniezno. In order to acquire a proper education, he was sent to one of the Polish monasteries in 1026. According to some older sources he initially wanted to have a career in the Church (it is probable that he held the post of oblate) and even asked for a dispensation to become a monk. This hypothesis, however, is not supported by modern historians. Regardless, he left church work for good in 1031.
Rule of his father, Mieszko II
     "Casimir's father, Mieszko II, was crowned King of Poland in 1025 after the death of his father Boles?aw I the Brave. However, the powerful magnates of the country feared a strong central government like the one that existed under Boles?aw I's rule. This led to considerable friction between the King and the nobility. Taking advantage of the King's precarious situation, Mieszko II's older half-brother Bezprym and younger brother Otto turned against him and allied themselves with the Holy Roman Emperor Conrad II, whose forces attacked Poland and regained Lusatia. Years of chaos and conflict followed, during which Mieszko II was forced to cede the throne to Bezprym in 1031, fled to Bohemia, was imprisoned by Duke Old?ich and castrated, returned to rule a portion of the kingdom, eventually regained the kingdom, and then died in May 1034 under suspicious circumstances.
     "Sometime during the reign of Bezprym, Casimir and his sisters were taken by their mother to Germany (her native land) for refuge. It has been reported that Queen Richeza brought the Polish royal crown and regalia to Emperor Conrad II at Bezprym's request to indicate his acceptance of the primacy of his western neighbor,[1] although the Queen could have taken them for safekeeping, or they could have been brought to the Emperor by another means. At the time of his father's death in 1034, Casimir was about 18 years old and in Germany at the court of his uncle Hermann II, Archbishop of Köln.
Interregnum
     "The central district of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) revolted against the nobles and Catholic clergy in a mass rebellion. A pagan revival in the area lasted for several years. The district of Masovia seceded and a local lord, Miec?aw, formed a state of his own. A similar situation occurred in Pomerania.
     "In 1037 both the young prince and his mother returned to Poland and attempted to seize the throne. This precipitated a rebellion by local barons, which coupled with the so-called "Pagan Reaction" of the commoners, forced Casimir and Richeza to flee to Saxony. However, soon Casimir returned to Poland and in 1038, once again, tried to regain power with the aide of his influential mother. This also failed and he had to flee again, this time to the Kingdom of Hungary where he was imprisoned by Stephen I. The Dowager Queen remained in Germany as a nun until her death, in 1063.
     "Taking advantage of the chaos and his neighbour's weakness, Duke Bretislaus I of Bohemia invaded and ravaged the country in 1039. Lesser and Greater Poland were severely pillaged, Pozna? was captured, and Bretislaus sacked Gniezno, taking the relics of Saint Adalbert, Radim Gaudentius, and the five hermit brothers[2] with him. On the way back he conquered part of Silesia, including Wroc?aw, destroyed religious buildings which were built by Mieszko I during the feast of the conversion of Poland, and plundered Mieszko I's tomb.
Restoration
     "After initially escaping to Hungary, Casimir went to Germany, where in 1039 his relative the Emperor Henry III (who feared the increased power of the Bohemian ruler) gave him military and financial support. Casimir received a force of 1,000 heavy footmen and a significant amount of gold to restore his power in Poland. Casimir also signed an alliance with Yaroslav I the Wise, the Prince of Kievan Rus', who was linked with him through Casimir's marriage with Yaroslav's sister, Maria Dobroniega. With this support, Casimir returned to Poland and managed to retake most of his domain. In 1041, Bretislaus, defeated in his second attempted invasion by Emperor Henry III, signed a treaty at Regensburg (1042) in which he renounced his claims to all Polish lands except for Silesia, which was to be incorporated into the Bohemian Kingdom.[3] It was Casimir's success in strengthening royal power and ending internal strife that earned him the epithet of "the Restorer".
     "The treaty gained Casimir a period of peace on the southern border and the capital of Poland was moved to Kraków, the only major Polish city relatively untouched by the wars. It is probable that the Holy Roman Emperor was pleased with the balance of power that had been restored to the region and forced Casimir not to crown himself the King of Poland. In 1046 Emperor Henry III held royal and imperial courts at Merseburg and Meissen, at which he ended the strife among the Duke of Pomerania (Dux Bomeraniorum), Duke Bretislaus of Bohemia, and Casimir I.
     "In 1047 Casimir, aided by his Kievan brother-in-law, started a war against Masovia and seized the land. It is probable that he also defeated Miec?aw's allies from Pomerania and attached Gda?sk to Poland. This secured his power in central Poland. Three years later, against the will of the Emperor, Casimir seized Bohemian-controlled Silesia, thus securing most of his father's domain. In 1054 in Quedlinburg, the Emperor ruled that Silesia was to remain in Poland in exchange for a yearly tribute of 117 kg. of silver and 7 kg. of gold.
     "At that time Casimir focused on internal matters. To strengthen his rule he re-created the bishopric in Kraków and Wroc?aw and erected the new Wawel Cathedral. During Casimir's rule heraldry was introduced into Poland and, unlike his predecessors, he promoted landed gentry over the dru?yna as his base of power. One of his reforms was the introduction, to Poland, of a key element of feudalism: the granting of fiefdoms to his retinue of warriors, thus gradually transforming them into medieval knights.
Marriage and issue
     "Casimir married Maria Dobroniega (ca. 1012–1087), daughter of Grand Duke Vladimir I of Kiev.[4] There is no consensus among historians as to when it took place. W?adymir D. Koroliuk said that it was in 1039, Aleksej A. Szachmatow and Iwan Linniczenko agreed on 1041, while Dymitr S. Lichaczew postulated that it occurred during 1043.[5]
     "Casimir and Maria had five children:
1. Boles?aw II the Bold (ca. 1043 – 2/3 April 1081/82).
2. W?adys?aw I Herman (ca. 1044 – 4 June 1102)
3. Mieszko (16 April 1045 – 28 January 1065).
4. Otto (ca. 1046–1048).
5. ?wi?tos?awa (ca. 1048 – 1 September 1126), married ca. 1062 to Duke (from 1085, King) Vratislaus II of Bohemia.[6]
Notes
1. Boshof, Egon (2008). Die Salier (in German) (5th ed.), p. 71. Kohlhammer. ISBN 3-17-020183-2.
2. Smith, Richard Upsher, Jr. Hermit Life. Camaldolese spirituality: essential sources. Touchstone, Jan/Feb 2008. Accessed on Jan 2, 2015 at www.touchstonemag.com/archives/article.php?id=21-01-050-b. Note that the reference cites the existence of the five hermit brothers in Poland ("Bruno’s “Life of the Five Hermit Brothers,” written to promote the canonization of Romuald’s disciples martyred in pagan Poland in 1004..."), not the theft of their relics by Bretislaus I.
3. Kosmas: Chronicle of the Czechs, Warsaw 1968, p. 154, note. 18, says that the rest of Silesia, included the left side of the Odra River in Wroc?aw and Opole remained in Bohemia; by the other hand, T. Jurek: Ryczyn biskupi, Roczniki historyczne 1994, pp. 40–44, believes that already in 1041 Poland regained the control over the rest of Silesia included land of Golensizi tribe.
4. Robert-Henri Bautier, Anne de Kiev, Reine de France, et la Politique Royale au XI E SIÈCLE: Étude Critique De La Documentation. Revue Des études Slaves 57, no. 4 (1985): 545.
5. Krzysztof Benyskiewicz, Ksi??? Polski W?adys?aw I Herman 1079–1102, Zielona Góra 2010, s. 34.
6. Knoll & Schaer 2003, p. 82.
References
** Gesta principum Polonorum:The Deeds of the Princes of the Poles. Translated by Knoll, Paul W; Schaer, Frank. Central European University Press. 2003."14

GAV-27 EDV-27. Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland was also known as Casimir I Karol 'the Restorer' (?) King of Poland.14

; Per Enc. of World History: "CASIMIR I (the Restorer), who succeeded, with the aid of the Emperor Henry III, in reconquering his domain, reestablishing Christianity, and restoring order. Silesia was recovered (1054). In return Casimir was obliged to give up the royal title (becoming merely a grand duke) and to make numerous concessions to the nobility and clergy, thus initiating a baneful practice."15

He was King of Poland between 1040 and 1058.5

Family

Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland b. a 1011, d. 1087
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  2. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231034. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko II Lambert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049959&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kazimierz I Karol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027277&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049960&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-23, p. 129; line 241-5, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231353
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dobronega (Maria) of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027278&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 147-23, p. 129.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 December 2019), memorial page for Casimir I King Of Poland (28 Jul 1016–28 Nov 1058), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66508886, citing Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Pa, Pozna?, Miasto Pozna?, Wielkopolskie, Poland ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66508886/casimir_i-king_of_poland. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIdied1034. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_I_the_Restorer. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  16. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226085
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Swatawa|Swatislawa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020271&tree=LEO

Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland1,2,3,4

F, #10469, b. after 1011, d. 1087
FatherSaint Vladimir/Volodimir I Svyatoslavich "Velikiy/the Great" (?) Prince of Novgorod, Grand Duke of Kiev2,4 b. bt 958 - 960, d. 15 Jul 1015
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland was born after 1011; Weis says b. after 1011; Rafal Pinke says b. 1012/1016; Genealogy.EU Rurik 1 pages says b. aft 1012; Genealogics says b. ca 1013/1014.5,1,2,6 She married Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland, son of Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland and Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland, between 1041 and 1042; Weis [AR7] line 147-23 says m. 1038; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says m. 1041/2; Pagina Dom. Curiosa says m. 1038; Genealogics says m. ca 1041/1042.5,1,2,7,6
Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland died in 1087.5,1,2,6
Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland was buried in 1087 at Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Miasto Kraków, Malopolskie, Poland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     1087
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Casimir I King Of Poland 1016–1058
     Children
          Boleslaw of Poland 1042–1081
          Swatawa of Poland 1048–1126
     BURIAL     Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Miasto Kraków, Ma?opolskie, Poland
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 16 Nov 2003
     Find A Grave Memorial 8093477.8
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 82,89.6

; Per Genealogics:
     "It is uncertain which of her father's concubines was her mother. Dobronega was born about 1013/1014, one of the youngest children of St. Vladimir I 'the Great', grand duke of Kiev and Novgorod. It is uncertain which of her father's concubines was her mother.
     "About 1041/1042 Dobronega married Kazimierz I Karol, king of Poland, son of Mieszko II Lambert, then duke of Poland, and Richeza de Lorraine. This marriage helped Kazimierz to gain support in his claim to the Polish throne. He had attempted to seize the throne twice before, both times unsuccessfully. With the support of Dobronega's brother Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch, grand duke of Kiev, Kazimierz was able to make a successful claim.
     "The couple had five children, of whom Boleslaw II, Wladyslaw I Herman and Swatawa/Swatislawa would have progeny.
     "Maria's husband died on 28 November 1058. Her sixteen year old son Boleslaw II became king of Poland. He is considered one of the most capable of the Piast rulers; however he was deposed and expelled from the country in 1079 and died two years later in 1081.
     "Dobronega survived her son by six years and died in 1087."6

; Per Med Lands: "DOBRONEGA MARIA Vladimirovna (before 1012-1087). The Primary Chronicle records the marriage of "Yaroslav's sister" to Kazimierz of Poland in 1043 but does not name her[145]. The Annales Polanorum state that "Kazimirum duxit ex Russia Mariam" in 1025[146], although the date is clearly inaccurate. The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to the wife of King Kazimierz as "de Rusia nobilem"[147]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Kazimirus" married "Dobrognewam"[148]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1087 of "Dobronega uxor Kazimir"[149]. m (1043) KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland, son of MIESZKO II Lambert King of Poland & his wife Richeza [Ezzonen] (25 Jul 1016-19 Mar 1058)."
Med Lands cites:
[145] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1043, p. 139.
[146] Annales Polanorum II 1025, MGH SS XIX, p. 618.
[147] Chronicæ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438.
[148] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 58.
[149] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1087, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.4


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Maria Dobroniega of Kiev (b. aft. 1012[1] – d. 13 December 1087), was a Kievian Rus princess of the Rurikid dynasty and by marriage Duchess of Poland.
Life
Family
     "She was one of the younger children of Vladimir I, Grand Prince of Kiev. The identity of her mother is disputed among historians and web sources.
     "Grand Prince Vladimir I had married seven times and had fathered many children, legitimate and illegitimate. Anna Porphyrogeneta, his sixth wife, is known to have predeceased Vladimir by four years. Chronicle Thietmar of Merseburg, writing from contemporary accounts, mentions that Boleslaw I of Poland captured Vladimir I's widow during his raid on Kiev in 1018. The historians long had no clue as to identity of this wife. The emigre historian Nicholas Baumgarten, however, pointed to the controversial record of the "Genealogia Welforum" and the "Historia Welforum Weingartensis" that one daughter of Count Kuno von Oenningen (future Duke Konrad I of Swabia) by "filia Ottonis Magni imperatoris" (Otto the Great's daughter; possibly Rechlinda Otona [Regelindis], claimed by some as illegitimate daughter and by others legitimate, born from his first marriage with Edith of England) married "rex Rugorum" (King of Rus). He interpreted this evidence as pertaining to Vladimir I's last wife. This woman is a possible identity for Maria's mother.
Marriage
     "Maria married around 1040 to Casimir I the Restorer, Duke of Poland. This marriage helped Casimir to gain support in his reclaim over the Polish throne. Casimir had attempted to seize the throne twice before, both times he failed. With the support of Maria's brother, Yaroslav I the Wise, Casimir was able to make a successful claim.
     "The couple had five children:[2]
1. Boles?aw II the Bold (b. c. 1043 – d. 2/3 April 1081/82).
2. W?adys?aw I Herman (b. c. 1044 – d. 4 June 1102)
3. Mieszko (b. 16 April 1045 – d. 28 January 1065).
4. Otto (b. c. 1046 – d. 1048).
5. ?wi?tos?awa (b. c. 1048 – d. 1 September 1126), married c. 1062 to Duke (and since 1085 King) Vratislaus II of Bohemia.
     "Maria's husband died on 28 November 1058. Her sixteen-year-old son, Boles?aw, became King of Poland. Boles?aw II is considered one of the most capable of the Piast rulers. However, he was deposed & expelled from the country in 1079. Boles?aw II died two years later, in 1081 or 1082.
     "Maria survived her oldest son by five or six years, dying in 1087.
References
1. Marek, Miroslav. "Complete Genealogy of the House of Piast". Genealogy.EU.[self-published source][better source needed]: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html#DV1
2. RUSSIA, RURIKID : http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#Dobronegadied1087.3 "

; Per Genealogy.EU: "[6m.] Dobronega-Maria, *after 1012, +1087; m.1038/42 King Kazimir I of Poland (*25.7.1016 +19.3.1058.)2" GAV-27 EDV-27.

Family

Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland b. 25 Jul 1016, d. 19 Mar 1058
Children

Citations

  1. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231353. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Dobroniega_of_Kiev. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#Dobronegadied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-23, p. 129; line 241-5, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dobronega (Maria) of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027278&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kazimierz I Karol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027277&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 December 2019), memorial page for Dobronega of Kiev (unknown–1087), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8093477, citing Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Miasto Kraków, Ma?opolskie, Poland ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8093477/dobronega-of-kiev. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  12. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226085
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Swatawa|Swatislawa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020271&tree=LEO

Adelia von Öhningen1,2

F, #10470, d. 14 August 1018
FatherKonrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen1,3,2 b. 920
MotherRichlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben1,2,4 b. 950, d. 999
Last Edited1 Jul 2020
     Adelia von Öhningen married Saint Vladimir/Volodimir I Svyatoslavich "Velikiy/the Great" (?) Prince of Novgorod, Grand Duke of Kiev, son of Svyatoslav I Igorjevitch (?) Grand Duke of Kiev and Malusha (Maloucha) (?) of Lubech, after 1011; his 6th wife; Weis [AR7] m. aft 1011; Rurik 1 page says m. 1012.5,6,1
Adelia von Öhningen died on 14 August 1018; Weis [AR7] d. 14 Aug 1018; Rurik 1 page says d. 1019; Leo van de Pas says d. aft 14 Aug 1018.5,6,1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 128.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Oenningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331094&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Konraddied997B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, duke Cuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120359&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-5, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html