Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg1,2,3

M, #13801, b. 25 September 1744, d. 16 November 1797
FatherAugustus Wilhelm (?) Prince of Prussia1,2,4,3 b. 9 Aug 1722, d. 12 Jun 1758
MotherLuise Amalie (?) Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel1,2,5,3 b. 29 Jan 1722, d. 13 Jan 1780
Last Edited12 Nov 2004
     Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg was born on 25 September 1744 at Berlin, Saxony, Germany (now).1,3 He married Elisabeth Christina Ulrica (?) Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel, daughter of Karl I (?) Duke von Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Philippine Charlotte (?) Princess of Prussia, on 14 July 1765 at Charlottenburg, Germany (now); his 1st wife.2,3,6,7 Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg and Elisabeth Christina Ulrica (?) Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel were divorced in 1769.2,3 Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg married Frederica Louisa (?) Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt, daughter of Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt and Henrietta Carolina (?), on 14 July 1769 at Charlottenburg, Germany (now); his 2nd wife.1,3
Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg died on 16 November 1797 at Marmorpalais, near Berlin, Saxony, Germany (now), at age 53.1,3
     ; Indolent, pleasure-loving and sensual, he was very different from his uncle and predecessor, Friedrich II 'the Great'. He was handsome and a patron of the arts, particularly music. A patron of Beethoven and Mozart, his own orchestra had a European reputation. As he was completely under the influence of his mistress, Wilhelmine Enke, his uncle used him for missions to other courts but was worried about the future of Prussia under this nephew.

Friedrich Wilhelm II married his first cousin, Elisabeth of Brunswick, but this was not a success as Elisabeth, beautiful and high-spirited, refused to accept his infidelities and, after the birth of their daughter, took lovers herself. His uncle, worried that a bastard might inherit the throne, forced him to divorce her even though he was quite fond of her. She then went to live at Stettin but never remarried.

However, Friedrich Wilhelm II did marry again and by his second wife had eight children. Nevertheless, there were again mistresses, two of whom he bigamously married 'with the left hand' while his second wife was still alive and producing children herself.

In 1781, still only heir to the throne, he joined the Rosicrucians and came under the influence of the fanatical Johann Christof Wollner. In 1786, when Friedrich Wilhelm II became king, Wollner was appointed privy councillor for finance and, except in name, became Prime Minister.

Not approving of religious 'enlighteners', proclamations were issued to protect religion from change. A new censorship law was issued and even a kind of Protestant Inquisition was established.

As Friedrich Wilhelm II was no military man, he placed the army under both the Duke of Brunswick and General von Mollendorf, who through their neglect were the cause of Prussia's defeat at Jena in 1806. In 1787 he sent an army to Holland to assist his besieged sister, Wilhelmine, Princess of Orange; this proved a costly exercise which only delayed the inevitable.

In 1793 and 1795, Prussia obtained extra territory from Poland. In 1791 during a meeting with the Emperor Leopold, he agreed to support the French King, Louis XVI, and a formal alliance was signed on 7 February 1792. Another treaty, on 19 April 1794 with the 'sea powers', was financially advantageous for Prussia. However, the threat of Russia, made him sign a treaty with the French Republic on 5 April 1795, which was regarded as a betrayal by the European nations and as well left morally isolated.

The unrest in the newly acquired territories were proving very costly and, when he died, Prussia was in a state of bankruptcy and confusion, with the army decayed and the monarchy discredited. He was only fifty-three when he died, worn out by his debaucheries.3

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. L'Allemagne dynastique , Huberty, Giraud, Magdelaine, Reference: vol V page 183.
2. The Royal House of Stuart London, 1969,1971,1976. , A. C. Addington, Reference: page 290.3

Family 2

Frederica Louisa (?) Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt b. 16 Oct 1751, d. 25 Feb 1805
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 82: Prussia - First Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich Wilhelm II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005896&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008573&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Princess Luise Amalie of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00010515&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Princess Elisabeth Christina Ulrica: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00010533&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf6.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Princess Friederike Charlotte Ulrike Katharine of Prussia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008595&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenz 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohz/hohenz4.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Prince Friedrich Ludwig Karl of Prussia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008591&tree=LEO

Frederica Louisa (?) Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt1

F, #13802, b. 16 October 1751, d. 25 February 1805
FatherLudwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt1 b. 15 Dec 1719, d. 6 Apr 1790
MotherHenrietta Carolina (?)1 d. 30 Mar 1774
Last Edited12 Nov 2004
     Frederica Louisa (?) Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt was born on 16 October 1751.1 She married Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg, son of Augustus Wilhelm (?) Prince of Prussia and Luise Amalie (?) Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, on 14 July 1769 at Charlottenburg, Germany (now); his 2nd wife.1,2
Frederica Louisa (?) Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt died on 25 February 1805 at age 53.1

Family

Friedrich Wilhelm II (?) King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg b. 25 Sep 1744, d. 16 Nov 1797
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich Wilhelm II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005896&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenz 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohz/hohenz4.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Prince Friedrich Ludwig Karl of Prussia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008591&tree=LEO

Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt1,2,3

M, #13803, b. 15 December 1719, d. 6 April 1790
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt died on 6 April 1790 at age 70.2 He was born on 15 December 1719.2 He married Henrietta Carolina (?), daughter of Christian III (?) Wittelsbach, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, Duke of Deux-Points, on 12 August 1741.1,2
     Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt was 8th Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt.2

; Leo van de pas cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.3

; LOUIS IX, 8th LANDGRAVE OF HESSE-DARMSTADT; b 15 Dec 1719; Corps Cdr under FREDERICK THE GREAT in Prussian serv; m 1st 12 Aug 1741 (Henriette) Caroline Chrstiana Louisa (d 30 March 1774), called 'The Great Landgravine' (patroness of such literary figures as Goethe, Grimm and Herder), dau of Christian III of Wittelsbach, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld; m 2nd morganatically 1775 Marie Adelaide de Cheirouze, cr Countess of Lemberg, and d 6 April 1790.2

Family

Henrietta Carolina (?) d. 30 Mar 1774
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007461&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 104: Russia - House of Romanov-Holstein-Gottorp. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

Henrietta Carolina (?)1

F, #13804, d. 30 March 1774
FatherChristian III (?) Wittelsbach, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, Duke of Deux-Points1
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Henrietta Carolina (?) married Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt on 12 August 1741.1,2
Henrietta Carolina (?) died on 30 March 1774.2

Family

Ludwig IX (?) Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt b. 15 Dec 1719, d. 6 Apr 1790
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 104: Russia - House of Romanov-Holstein-Gottorp. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

Christian III (?) Wittelsbach, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, Duke of Deux-Points1,2

M, #13805
Last Edited2 Nov 2002

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily1,2,3,4

M, #13806, b. November 1165, d. 28 September 1197
FatherFriedrich I "Barbarossa" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor5,3,4,6,7 b. c 1122, d. 10 Jun 1190
MotherBeatrix de Bourgogne Css Palatine de Bourgogne3,5,4,7,8 b. c 1145, d. 15 Nov 1184
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily was born in November 1165 at Nijmegen, Nijmegen Municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands.9,5,3,10,4 He married Constance de Hauteville Queen of Sicily, daughter of Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia and Beatrice de Rethel, on 27 January 1186 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy (now).11,5,12,13,3,10,14,15,16,4
Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily died on 28 September 1197 at Messina, Città Metropolitana di Messina, Sicilia, Italy (now), at age 31.5,3,10,4
Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily was buried after 28 September 1197 at Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     Nov 1165, Nijmegen, Nijmegen Municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands
     DEATH     28 Sep 1197 (aged 31), Messina, Città Metropolitana di Messina, Sicilia, Italy
     Holy Roman Emperor. Born Heinrich Hohenstaufen, the second son of Friedrich I 'Barbarossa' Hohenstaufen, Holy Roman Emperor and Beatrice de Bourgogne at Nijmegen, Holland. He succeeded to the title of Heinrich VI of the Romans in 1169. He married Constance of Sicily in January 1186. In 1189, he claimed to be the heir of William II of Sicily, who died without issue. His wife's nephew, Tancred, however, also claimed the Sicilian throne. The English king, Richard I, supported Tancred, earning Heinrich's enmity. He was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 1191. In March 1193, he captured Richard I when returning from the Third Crusade, and demanded a heavy ransom for Richard's release. Pope Celestine III excommunicated him for imprisoning a fellow Crusader. In 1194, with the death of Tancred, he again moved to take the throne of Sicily and gained the title of King Heinrich of Sicily. That same year, his only son, the future Friedrich II, was born. He died, probably due to malaria, at the age of 31. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Friedrich I Barbarossa 1122–1190
          Beatrice de Bourgogne 1143–1184
     Spouse
          Constance of Sicily 1154–1198
     Siblings
          Agnes von Hohenstaufen unknown–1185
          Friedrich V of Swabia 1164–1170
          Otto von Hohenstaufen 1167–1200
          Konrad von Hohenstaufen 1173–1196
          Philipp of Swabia 1178–1208
     Children
          Frederic Emperor of Holy Roman Von Hohenstaufen 1194–1250
          Margherita of Swabia 1230–1298
     BURIAL     Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Dieter Birkenmaier
     Added: 8 Mar 2006
     Find a Grave Memorial 13566035.17
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 5.
2. The Kingdom in the Sun New York, 1970. , John Julius Norwich, Reference: page 346, 389.4


; Per Genealogics:
     “Heinrich VI was born in November 1165, the son of Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa and his second wife Beatrice de Bourgogne. On 27 January 1186 in Milan Heinrich married Costanza of Sicily, the daughter of Roger II, king of Sicily, and his second wife Béatrice de Vitry-Réthel. The marriage was intended to seal the peace between the Holy Roman Empire and Sicily. The pope did not approve of the marriage and rumours were circulated that Costanza was a nun and had been made to forswear her vows. She had indeed lived in a convent in Palermo and was religious, but she was not a nun. She was also heiress to her childless nephew Guglielmo II, king of Sicily.
     “Heinrich VI was eleven years younger than his bride of about thirty-one years, and he was regarded as 'not affable or benevolent with the peoples'. Costanza, who was tall and fair as well as wealthy, dutifully married him, and they were crowned with the historic crown of Lombardy.
     “The pope placed the officiating patriarch of Aquileia under the church's interdict, so Heinrich marched on Rome. However news came that Jerusalem had fallen to Saladin and then that the pope had died. Heinrich's father, the aged Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa went on crusade, but drowned in Asia Minor in 1190.
     “In 1189 Guglielmo II had died, making Costanza queen of Sicily and Heinrich king of Sicily in her right. Now that his father had died, Heinrich became emperor as well. However, the Sicilians wanted Tancred, an illegitimate member of the Sicilian royal family, as their king. The new pope wanted Sicily to be separated from the Holy Roman Empire.
     “In the spring of 1191, Heinrich and Costanza came to Rome for their coronation. In May, Heinrich besieged Naples. The city of Salerno asked Costanza to visit. When she did, the people came to realise what kind of man Heinrich was, so they handed her over to Tancred. He received her with honour and after several months sent her back to her husband.
     “Three years later, after Tancred's death, Heinrich resumed his attack on Sicily. He succeeded and with promises of a general amnesty he was invested with the royal regalia on 26 December 1194. The celebrations were barely ended when the Sicilian nobles and clergy still present were seized by Heinrich. Claiming that a conspiracy on behalf of Tancred's young son had been detected, he had the child blinded and castrated while all those nobles present at Tancred's coronation were burnt alive.
     “What Heinrich did not know was that, also on 26 December 1194, his forty-year-old wife had at last given birth to a child, the future Emperor Friedrich II. Costanza, hoping to give birth in Sicily, was on her way from Germany. However in Jesi near Ancona it became obvious that her time had come. To prevent rumours that she was not the mother (after all, at forty she was regarded to be too old to give birth to a first child) she had a tent erected in the market place and requested the matrons of the town to attend the birth.
     “Costanza then went to Sicily where she and Heinrich underwent another coronation, after which Heinrich set out for Germany, leaving Costanza as head of a regency council. The main reason for his journey was to have his baby son elected as his imperial successor. In this he succeeded, but his cruelty had left a difficult legacy for his wife in Sicily. When a rebellion broke out, Heinrich returned with an army he had raised for his crusade, and put it down. Again hostages were blinded while the rebellion's leaders were tortured in the presence of both Heinrich and Costanza.
     “Convinced that there would be no further rebellions, Heinrich was ready to sail for the Holy Land. However, the nobles did rise against him once more. This time he adopted a more conciliatory attitude and succeeded in regaining control. However, suspecting that his wife had played a part in this last revolt, he had her confined in the palace of Palermo. He may have considered even further cruelties, but suddenly, after a short illness, he died at Messina on 28 September 1197, aged only thirty-one.”.4 Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily was also known as Henry VI Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily.11,9,1,5 EDV-23.

; Per Med Lands (Ref #1):
     "HEINRICH von Staufen (Nijmegen Nov 1165-Castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). William of Tyre (Continuator) names him as son of Emperor Friedrich[563]. The Annales Stadenses name (in order) "Heinrici imperatoris et Conradi Suevi et Friderici ducis Sueviæ et Ottonis sine terra et Philippi" as sons of "Beatrix imperatrix" when recording her death[564]. He was crowned HEINRICH VI King of Germany at Aachen 15 Aug 1169. His father appointed him regent when he left on crusade in May 1189[565]. He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor HEINRICH V 15 Apr 1191, although he was obliged to return to Germany by illness. Emperor Heinrich's rival in Sicily, Tancredo Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancredo's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of King Richard from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, and entered Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. He was crowned as king of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supported followed. Heinrich proposed making the German succession hereditary, but this was turned down by a meeting of princes in Oct 1196[566]. After the overthrow of Emperor Isaakios II in 1195, Emperor Heinrich V threatened to intervene to avenge him. Emperor Alexios III was unable to raise sufficient funds to buy him off through his special "German" tax, and Heinrich started preparing to attack but died of fever before the preparations were complete[567]. The Continuatio Admuntensis records the death "apud Messanam urbem Apulie 4 Kal Oct 1197" of "Heinricus imperator sextus"[568]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "IV Kal Oct in Sicilia" of "imperator Henricus", specifying that it was said that he was poisoned by his wife[569].
     "m (Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) CONSTANCE of Sicily, daughter of ROGER II King of Sicily & his third wife Béatrice de Rethel (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo cathedral). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage "apud Mediolanum in natali Domini" of "Henricus filius imperatoris Frederici primi"[570]. The long-standing conflict between Sicily and Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" was ended in 1184 by the agreement for this marriage. She was declared heir by Guillaume II King of Sicily in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constance was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[571], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[572]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son."
Med Lands cites:
[563] WTC XXIV.IX, p. 118.
[564] Annales Stadenses 1185, MGH SS XVI, p. 351.
[565] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 10.
[566] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 185.
[567] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 60.
[568] Continuatio Admuntensis 1197, MGH SS IX, p. 587.
[569] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 875.
[570] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1187, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859.
[571] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[572] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.



Per Med Lands (Ref #2):
     "HEINRICH VI King of Germany, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany & his second wife Béatrice de Bourgogne (Nijmegen Nov 1165-castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of her nephew Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor 15 Apr 1191 but was obliged to return to Germany by illness. His rival in Sicily, Tancred Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancred's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of Richard I from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, entering Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. Crowned King of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supporters followed.
     "m (Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) CONSTANCE of Sicily, daughter of ROGER II King of Sicily & his third wife Béatrice de Rethel (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo Cathedral). The Annals of Romoald name "Constantiam" as the daughter of "rex Rogerius" & his third wife[653]. The Annales Casinenses record that a permanent peace was signed between "Romanorum imperium et regnum Siciliæ" in 1185, Guillaume II King of Sicily coming to Salerno where he agreed the marriage of "Constantiam amitam suam" to "regem Heinricum filium Frederic imperatoris"[654]. She was declared heir by King Guillaume II in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constanza was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[655], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[656]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son."
Med Lands cites:
[653] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[654] Annales Casinenses 1185, MGH SS XIX, p. 313.
[655] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[656] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.18,19


; Per Genealogy.EU (de Hauteville): “C6. Constance, *1154, +1198; m.Milan 1186 King Heinrich VI of Germany (*1165 +28.9.1197)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen): “E2. Heinrich VI, King of Germany (1190-97), cr 1169, King of Italy (1194-97), cr 1186, King of Sicily (1194-97), *Nijmegen 1165, +Messina 28.9.1197; m.Milan 1186 Constance de Hauteville (*1154 +1198)”.20,21

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONSTANCE of Sicily (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo Cathedral). The Annals of Romoald name "Constantiam" as the daughter of "rex Rogerius" & his third wife[543]. The Annales Casinenses record that a permanent peace was signed between "Romanorum imperium et regnum Siciliæ" in 1185, Guillaume II King of Sicily coming to Salerno where he agreed the marriage of "Constantiam amitam suam" to "regem Heinricum filium Frederic imperatoris"[544]. She was declared heir by King Guillaume II in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the Kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as Emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constanza was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[545], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[546]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son.
     "m (Betrothed Salerno 1185, Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) HEINRICH VI King of Germany, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany & his second wife Béatrice de Bourgogne (Nijmegen Nov 1165-castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). He was crowned Emperor at Rome 15 Apr 1191. He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of her nephew Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor 15 Apr 1191 but was obliged to return to Germany by illness. His rival in Sicily, Tancred Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancred's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of Richard I from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, entering Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. Crowned King of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supported followed."
Med Lands cites:
[543] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[544] Annales Casinenses 1185, MGH SS XIX, p. 313.
[545] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[546] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.
[547] Hugo Falcandus, 14, pp. 104-5.
[548] Ignoti Monachi Chronica, p. 28.16


; Per Racines et Histoire (de Hauteville): “3) Constance ° 1154 + 28/11/1198 (Palermo)
     ép. 27/01/1186 (Milan) Heinrich VI d’Allemagne (Hohenstauffen) ° 1165 + 28/09/1197 (Messine) Empereur (1191), Roi de Sicile”.22 He was King of Germany between 1190 and 1197.3 He was Holy Roman Emperor
See attached map of Holy Roman Empire and suzerian areas under Heinrich VI ca 1190. (From Wikipedia: By User:AlphathonUser:Ichthyovenator (derivative work) - Byzantine Empire 1190.svg, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=85504474) between 1190 and 1197.1,23,24 He was King of Sicily between 1194 and 1197.5,3,23 He was King of Italy between 1194 and 1197.3

Family

Constance de Hauteville Queen of Sicily b. 2 Nov 1154, d. 27 Nov 1198
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I Barbarossa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013542&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013538&tree=LEO
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I Barbarossa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013542&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013543&tree=LEO
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28417
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  11. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 86. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 217.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  14. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza of Sicily: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013539&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Constancedied1198A
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 02 July 2020), memorial page for Henry VI (Nov 1165–28 Sep 1197), Find a Grave Memorial no. 13566035, citing Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/13566035. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #1: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichVIGermanydied1168.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #2: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#EnricoIdied1197B
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Hauteville: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html#CR2
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Hauteville, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hauteville.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013538&tree=LEO
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_VI,_Holy_Roman_Emperor#/media/File:Henry_VI_HRE_suzerainty.png. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  25. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  26. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013463&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIIGermanydied1250B.

Constance de Hauteville Queen of Sicily1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #13807, b. 2 November 1154, d. 27 November 1198
FatherRoger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia1,3,4,6,7,8,9,10 b. bt 1095 - 1097, d. 26 Feb 1154
MotherBeatrice de Rethel11,4,6,7,9,10 b. bt 1130 - 1135, d. 31 Mar 1185
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Constance de Hauteville Queen of Sicily was buried at Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     2 Nov 1154, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     DEATH     27 Nov 1198 (aged 44), Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     Sicilian Monarch. The posthumous daughter of King Roger II of Sicily, she married Prince Heinrich in 1186. Heinrich's father Friedrich Barbarossa died in 1190 and Constance and Heinrich were crowned Emperor and Empress. In December 1194 she gave birth to a son who was named after his two grandfathers, Friedrich Roger. After Heinrich's death she went to Sicily and renounced her sons claims for the German kingship and empire and placed him under the protection of Pope Innocent III. She died one year later. Dante mentioned her in his work "Divine Comedy". Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Roger of Sicily 1095–1154
     Spouse
          Henry VI 1165–1197
     Siblings
          William of Sicily I 1122–1166
     Children
          Frederic Emperor of Holy Roman Von Hohenstaufen 1194–1250
     Children
          Frederic Emperor of Holy Roman Von Hohenstaufen 1194–1250
     BURIAL     Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Jan 2004
     Find a Grave Memorial 8283417.12 She was born on 2 November 1154; Born posthumously.3,4,6,9,10 She married Heinrich VI Von Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily, son of Friedrich I "Barbarossa" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Beatrix de Bourgogne Css Palatine de Bourgogne, on 27 January 1186 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy (now).1,3,13,4,14,6,7,9,10,15
Constance de Hauteville Queen of Sicily died on 27 November 1198 at Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy (now), at age 44.3,4,6,9,10
     ; Per Med Lands (Ref #1):
     "HEINRICH von Staufen (Nijmegen Nov 1165-Castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). William of Tyre (Continuator) names him as son of Emperor Friedrich[563]. The Annales Stadenses name (in order) "Heinrici imperatoris et Conradi Suevi et Friderici ducis Sueviæ et Ottonis sine terra et Philippi" as sons of "Beatrix imperatrix" when recording her death[564]. He was crowned HEINRICH VI King of Germany at Aachen 15 Aug 1169. His father appointed him regent when he left on crusade in May 1189[565]. He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor HEINRICH V 15 Apr 1191, although he was obliged to return to Germany by illness. Emperor Heinrich's rival in Sicily, Tancredo Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancredo's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of King Richard from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, and entered Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. He was crowned as king of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supported followed. Heinrich proposed making the German succession hereditary, but this was turned down by a meeting of princes in Oct 1196[566]. After the overthrow of Emperor Isaakios II in 1195, Emperor Heinrich V threatened to intervene to avenge him. Emperor Alexios III was unable to raise sufficient funds to buy him off through his special "German" tax, and Heinrich started preparing to attack but died of fever before the preparations were complete[567]. The Continuatio Admuntensis records the death "apud Messanam urbem Apulie 4 Kal Oct 1197" of "Heinricus imperator sextus"[568]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "IV Kal Oct in Sicilia" of "imperator Henricus", specifying that it was said that he was poisoned by his wife[569].
     "m (Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) CONSTANCE of Sicily, daughter of ROGER II King of Sicily & his third wife Béatrice de Rethel (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo cathedral). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage "apud Mediolanum in natali Domini" of "Henricus filius imperatoris Frederici primi"[570]. The long-standing conflict between Sicily and Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" was ended in 1184 by the agreement for this marriage. She was declared heir by Guillaume II King of Sicily in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constance was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[571], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[572]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son."
Med Lands cites:
[563] WTC XXIV.IX, p. 118.
[564] Annales Stadenses 1185, MGH SS XVI, p. 351.
[565] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 10.
[566] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 185.
[567] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 60.
[568] Continuatio Admuntensis 1197, MGH SS IX, p. 587.
[569] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 875.
[570] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1187, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859.
[571] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[572] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.



Per Med Lands (Ref #2):
     "HEINRICH VI King of Germany, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany & his second wife Béatrice de Bourgogne (Nijmegen Nov 1165-castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of her nephew Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor 15 Apr 1191 but was obliged to return to Germany by illness. His rival in Sicily, Tancred Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancred's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of Richard I from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, entering Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. Crowned King of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supporters followed.
     "m (Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) CONSTANCE of Sicily, daughter of ROGER II King of Sicily & his third wife Béatrice de Rethel (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo Cathedral). The Annals of Romoald name "Constantiam" as the daughter of "rex Rogerius" & his third wife[653]. The Annales Casinenses record that a permanent peace was signed between "Romanorum imperium et regnum Siciliæ" in 1185, Guillaume II King of Sicily coming to Salerno where he agreed the marriage of "Constantiam amitam suam" to "regem Heinricum filium Frederic imperatoris"[654]. She was declared heir by King Guillaume II in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constanza was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[655], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[656]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son."
Med Lands cites:
[653] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[654] Annales Casinenses 1185, MGH SS XIX, p. 313.
[655] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[656] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.16,17


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: vol II page 206.9

; This is the same person as:
”Constance, Queen of Sicily” at Wikipedia and as
”Constance de Hauteville” at Wikipédia (Fr.)18,19

; Per Genealogics:
     “Costanza was born on 2 November 1154, the daughter of Roger II, king of Sicily, and his second wife Béatrice de Vitry-Réthel. She was born after her father's death and was probably brought up in a convent away from the court of her half-brother King Guiglielmo I. In 1185 she was named possible heiress of Sicily by her nephew Guiglielmo II. On his death in 1189, however, the Sicilian nobles, wishing to prevent German rule in Sicily, chose Constance's nephew Tancredo, conte di Lecce, the natural son of her half-brother Roger, duke of Apulia, as Guiglielmo's successor. She was removed from the convent to marry the German king Heinrich VI, on 27 January 1186 in Milan. She was a religious woman and her married years with the harsh and cruel Heinrich could not have been easy for her.
     “In 1191 Heinrich conducted an unsuccessful campaign against Tancredo during which Costanza was captured but was released because she was pregnant. After Tancredo's death in 1194 they were crowned King and Queen of Sicily and she gave birth to her only child Friedrich, who would have progeny, and would become a Holy Roman Emperor like his father, who became emperor in 1191 on the death of his father Friedrich I Barbarossa. Costanza was named regent in the absence of her husband in 1195 but clearly considered herself to be the rightful heiress to the throne of Sicily and continued the forceful rule of her predecessor.
     “When her husband died in 1197 she was recognised as ruler of Sicily, from where she removed as many Germans as possible. She ruled alone for a year, but in order to save the throne of Sicily for her four-year-old son she had him crowned as king of Sicily, continuing to act as regent until her death on 27 November 1198. In her will she had named Pope Innocent III as Friedrich's guardian. As queen she used the titulature _Constancia dei gracia Romanorum imperatrix semper augusta et regina Sicilie,_ and as regent for her son she added the term _una cum carissimo filio suo Frederico eadem gracia rege Sicilie, ducatus Apulie et Principatus Capue._”.9 EDV-23.

; Per Racines et Histoire (de Hauteville): “3) Constance ° 1154 + 28/11/1198 (Palermo)
     ép. 27/01/1186 (Milan) Heinrich VI d’Allemagne (Hohenstauffen) ° 1165 + 28/09/1197 (Messine) Empereur (1191), Roi de Sicile”.20

; Per Genealogy.EU (de Hauteville): “C6. Constance, *1154, +1198; m.Milan 1186 King Heinrich VI of Germany (*1165 +28.9.1197)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen): “E2. Heinrich VI, King of Germany (1190-97), cr 1169, King of Italy (1194-97), cr 1186, King of Sicily (1194-97), *Nijmegen 1165, +Messina 28.9.1197; m.Milan 1186 Constance de Hauteville (*1154 +1198)”.21,22

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONSTANCE of Sicily (posthumously 2 Nov 1154-Palermo 28 Nov 1198, bur Palermo Cathedral). The Annals of Romoald name "Constantiam" as the daughter of "rex Rogerius" & his third wife[543]. The Annales Casinenses record that a permanent peace was signed between "Romanorum imperium et regnum Siciliæ" in 1185, Guillaume II King of Sicily coming to Salerno where he agreed the marriage of "Constantiam amitam suam" to "regem Heinricum filium Frederic imperatoris"[544]. She was declared heir by King Guillaume II in 1185, confirmed on his deathbed, but the crown was usurped by her nephew Tancredo di Lecce. Her husband invaded the Kingdom of Sicily to enforce her rights after his coronation as Emperor in Rome 15 Apr 1191, but he fell ill at the siege of Naples. Constanza was captured at Salerno by the forces of Tancredo[545], but escaped back to Germany while she was being sent to the Pope. She was made regent of Sicily by an assembly at Bari in Mar 1195, which also appointed Konrad von Urslingen as governor[546]. She succeeded her husband as Queen of Sicily in 1197, in the name of her son.
     "m (Betrothed Salerno 1185, Milan, Santo Ambrosio 27 Jan 1186) HEINRICH VI King of Germany, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany & his second wife Béatrice de Bourgogne (Nijmegen Nov 1165-castilo Favara, near Messina 28 Sep 1197, bur Palermo Cathedral). He was crowned Emperor at Rome 15 Apr 1191. He claimed his Sicilian inheritance, by right of his wife, on the death of her nephew Guillaume II King of Sicily in Nov 1189. His departure for Sicily was delayed by news of the death of his father, but in early 1191 he left for Rome where he was crowned Emperor 15 Apr 1191 but was obliged to return to Germany by illness. His rival in Sicily, Tancred Conte di Lecce, had gathered support, including that of Richard I King of England whose capture by Leopold V Duke of Austria removed an obstacle for the emperor. Tancred's death in 1194 opened the way for Heinrich, who marched south again in an expedition funded by the ransom paid by England for the release of Richard I from his prison in Austria. He deposed his wife's great nephew in Oct 1194, entering Palermo as ENRICO King of Sicily. Crowned King of Sicily at Palermo cathedral 25 Dec 1194, a brutal repression of Tancredo's supported followed."
Med Lands cites:
[543] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[544] Annales Casinenses 1185, MGH SS XIX, p. 313.
[545] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 181.
[546] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 183.
[547] Hugo Falcandus, 14, pp. 104-5.
[548] Ignoti Monachi Chronica, p. 28.10
She was Queen of Germany between 27 January 1186 and 28 September 1197.19 She was Emp;ress of tghe Holy Roman Empire between 14 April 1191 and 28 September 1197.19 She was Queen of Sicily between 25 December 1194 and 27 November 1198.19

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 86. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza of Sicily: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013539&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  7. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065040&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza of Sicily: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013539&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Constancedied1198A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Vitry-Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065041&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 02 July 2020), memorial page for Constance of Sicily (2 Nov 1154–27 Nov 1198), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8283417, citing Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8283417. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 217.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013538&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #1: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichVIGermanydied1168.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #2: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#EnricoIdied1197B
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance,_Queen_of_Sicily. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Constance de Hauteville: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_de_Hauteville. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Hauteville, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hauteville.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Hauteville: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html#CR2
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  23. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  25. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013463&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIIGermanydied1250B.

Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia1,2,3,4

M, #13808, b. between 1095 and 1097, d. 26 February 1154
FatherRoger I de Hauteville Count of Sicily5,3,4,6,7 b. 1031, d. 22 Jun 1101
MotherAdelaida (?) di Savona, Regent of Sicily3,8,4,6 b. 1072, d. 16 Apr 1118
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia was born between 1095 and 1097; Genealogy.EU (Hautvle page) says b. 22 Dec 1094/5; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1097; Med Lands says b. 22 Def 1095.3,4,9 He married Doña Elvira (?) de Castila, daughter of Alfonso VI "the Brave" (?) King of León & Castile and Zaida/Isabella (?) of Seville, in 1120; Genealogy.EU (Hauteville page) says m. bef 1118.4,10,6,11 Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia married Sibylle (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Hugues II Borel (?) Duc de Bourgogne and Mathilde/Maud de Mayenne, in 1150; Genealogy.EU (Capet 9 and Hautvle pages) say m. 1149.12,4,11 Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia married Beatrice de Rethel, daughter of Vuiton/Withier (?) Comte de Rethel, Chatelain de Vitry and Béatrice (?) de Namur, in 1151; his 3rd wife.13,4,14,9,15,11
Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia died on 26 February 1154 at Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy.12,3,4,9,15,16
Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia was buried after 26 February 1154 at Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     22 Dec 1095, Mileto, Provincia di Vibo-Valentia, Calabria, Italy
     DEATH     26 Feb 1154 (aged 58), Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     King of Sicily. Son of Roger Count of Sicily and his third wife Adelaide of Savona. He was the ruler of the brief but culturally diverse Norman Sicily. All groups were able to live together and flourish in this kingdom. Roger was also interested in the arts and sciences. Bio by: girlofcelje
     Family Members
     Parents
          Roger I of Sicily 1031–1101
          Adelaide del Vasto 1074–1118
     Spouse
          Elvira of Leon and Castile 1102–1135
     Siblings
          Felicia de Hauteville 1077–1102 (m. 1097)
     Children
          William of Sicily I 1122–1166
          Constance of Sicily 1154–1198
     BURIAL     Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 6 Aug 2003
     Find a Grave Memorial 7741112.16,17
     ; Per Genealogics
     "Roger was born in December 1095 or 1097, the son of Roger I, count of Sicily, and his third wife Adelaide de Savona. When his father died in 1101, his mother ruled Sicily until 1112 when Roger came of age. Adelaide then went to Palestine and married King Baudouin of Jerusalem.
     "Roger claimed the vacant duchies of Calabria and Apulia, which had belonged to his deceased cousin Guillaume II who had died in 1127 without progeny. With a show of his army he forced Pope Honorius II to invest him with these duchies. He then returned to Sicily, and in 1130 at Palermo he assumed the title King of Sicily and Italy, crowned by a representative of Anti-pope Anacletus. In 1133 the Lateran Council cancelled all actions of Anacletus. However in 1139 Roger captured Pope Innocent II and treated him with such reverence that the pope rewarded him with the titles of King of Sicily, Duke of Apulia, and Prince of Capua.
     "In 1140 Roger decreed that medicine was to be practiced only by physicians with a government license.
     "Roger then conquered Tripoli in North Africa while his admiral, George of Antioch, conquered Corfu, Thebes and Corinth and attacked Constantinople. Roger spent his last years in Palermo where he surrounded himself with learned Arabs, and literature in Sicily flourished.
     "Ruling with the assistance of a kind of parliament, Roger was tolerant towards his Saracen subjects, and the Moslem religion was practised. In public documents Greek, Latin and Arabic were used. As well, Saracen workmen were employed by him to build churches and the Palace of La Favara. In 1129 he had begun building the cathedral of Cefalu.
     "About 1120 Roger had married Elvira of Castile, daughter of Alfonso VI 'the Brave', king of Castile and León, and Zaida of Seville. They had five children of whom two sons would have progeny. Elvira died in 1135, and in 1150 Roger married Sibylle de Bourgogne who died the same year. In 1151 he married Beatrice de Vitry-Réthel, daughter of Vuiton/Withier, comte de Réthel, châtelain de Vitry, and Beatrice de Namur. They had a daughter Costanza who would have progeny.
     "Roger died in late January or February 1154, and was succeeded by his son Guglielmo I as king of Sicily, and by his son Roger as duke of Apulia."11

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966., Docteur Gaston Sirjean, Reference: 14.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 117.11


; Per Med Lands:
     "ROGER of Sicily, son of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his third wife Adelaida di Savona [Monferrato] ([22 Dec 1095]-Palermo 26 Feb 1154, bur Palermo Cathedral). The Annals of Romoald name "frater eius [=Symonis] Rogerus comes" when recording that he succeeded his brother[480]. His birth date is calculated back from Romuald recording his date of death 27 Feb 1154, at the age of 58 years, two months and 5 days according to the chronicle of Romuald of Salerno[481]. He succeeded his brother in 1105 as ROGER II Count of Sicily, under the joint regency of his mother and his brother-in-law Robert de Bourgogne. The De Rebus Gestis Rogerii Siciliæ Regis of Alessandro Abbot of Telese records that "frater primogenitus…Simon" succeeded his father, but died and was succeeded by his brother Roger under the tutelage of "genitrix illius Adalasia"[482]. Declared of age after 12 Jun 1112, the date of the last document issued jointly with his mother[483]. "Rogerius Sicilie atque Calabrie comes" confirmed a judgment relating to Bagnara by charter dated [Oct] 1116 witnessed by "Henricus avunculus comitis, Robertus Avenellus, Rainaldus de Tirone"[484]. He strengthened the Sicilian navy, which became one of the most powerful in the Mediterranean. As the price for assisting Guillaume Duke of Apulia to crush the rebellion of Jordan Conte di Ariano in 1122, Roger insisted on retaking Guillaume's half share in the cities of Palermo and Messina along with the whole of Calabria. In revenge for the Almoravid attack on Nicotera, on the coast of Calabria, in 1122, a Sicilian fleet sailed in Jul 1123 with the aim of attacking Mahdia on the north African coast, but the expedition was defeated by the Zirid emir al-Hassan. He seized Montescaglioso in 1124, claiming to succeed to his deceased sister Emma. Duke Guillaume promised to recognise Roger II as his heir at Messina in 1125, and when the former died in 1127 Roger acted swiftly to assert his rights, laid siege to Salerno and had himself acclaimed as Duke of Apulia at Reggio, ignoring the fact that the dukedom should have reverted to the Papacy according to the legal rules of fiefdom[485]. Pope Honorius II, as rival claimant, formally forbade Roger from assuming the title of Duke. The crisis escalated, with the two sides mustering troops on the River Bradano in the eastern Basilicata in the summer of 1128. The Pope conceded faced with the strength of the Sicilian forces, investing Roger as Duke 22 Aug 1128 outside the walls of Benevento. In 1129, Roger II expanded his area of authority in Apulia, capturing Taranto, Nardò and Bari, though failing to take Brindisi. He had all counts, bishops and abbots swear allegiance to him at a solemn court at Melfi in Sep 1129. His conquest of southern Italy was completed in 1130 when Robert II Prince of Capua submitted to him. He claimed the principality of Antioch in 1130 as the nearest male heir of Bohémond II, but was unable to press this due to his preoccupations in southern Italy. Taking advantage of the further weakness of the Papacy following the schism of Feb 1130, he pressured anti-Pope Anacletus II to invest him (by Papal Bull at Benevento 27 Sep 1130) as ROGER II King of Sicily, justified on the fiction that Sicily had once been a kingdom[486]. He was crowned at Palermo 25 Dec 1130. The duchy of Naples submitted to him in 1131. However, he was faced with rebellion by barons in Apulia, led by his brother-in-law Rainulf Conte di Alife, who defeated him at Nocera 25 Jul 1132. In 1133, Roger II exacted his revenge, capturing Venosa, Montepeloso, Acerenza, Bisceglie, Trani and Troia. With the arrival of Emperor Lothar in Italy, allied with Pope Innocent II, Roger suffered reverses, Salerno surrendering to Imperial forces 8 Aug 1137. Emperor Lothar and Pope Innocent II jointly invested Rainulf Conte di Alife as Duke of Apulia. Roger II re-entered Salerno in Oct 1137, but was defeated by Rainulf at Rignano near Monte Gargano, 30 Oct 1137. He unsuccessfully attempted to conciliate with Pope Innocent II after the death of Anacletus II in Jan 1138. Innocent II announced Roger's excommunication at the Second Lateran Council in Apr 1139, but with the death of Rainulf later the same month Roger was able to reassert control over the whole of southern Italy. He captured Pope Innocent II at San Germano (now Cassino) and obliged the Pope to crown him again 25 Jul 1139. Able now to turn his attention to north Africa, Roger II's fleet began plundering coastal towns taking advantage of the weakness of the Zirid emir. The capture of Tripoli in 1146 marked the start of a period of conquest, with Mahdia, Susa and Sfax falling in 1148. The area was settled by Sicilian colonists, the local Muslim inhabitants treated with tolerance, but Sicily's north African expansion was short-lived, falling to the Almohads after Roger II's death. In the meantime relations with Germany and Byzantium had grown tense, in part through the negotiations between Emperor Konrad III and Emperor Manuel I for the latter's marriage with the German Emperor's sister-in-law Bertha von Sulzbach, part of whose dowry was confirmed under the Treaty of Thessaloniki 1348 as the duchy of Apulia. Roger II launched attacks against Byzantium in 1147, partly to forestall any action on the part of the Byzantine/German alliance, and captured Corfu, Corinth and Thebes, although the Byzantine/Venetian alliance defeated the Sicilian fleet off Cape Malea in 1149 and soon recaptured Corfu. Robert of Torigny records the death "1154 IV Kal Mar" as "Rogerius rex Sicilie"[487]. The Annales Siculi record the death in 1154 of "Rogerius rex Siciliæ, ducatus Apuliæ et principatus Capuæ"[488].
     "m firstly ([1117]) Infanta doña ELVIRA de Castilla y León, daughter of ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León & his [fifth wife Isabel née Zaïda ---] ([1100/16 Mar 1104]-6 Feb 1135). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Sancha the wife of count Rodrigo and Elvira who married Duke Roger of Sicily" as the daughters of King Alfonso and his fourth "legitimate wife…Elisabeth"[489]. Both daughters are named in a charter dated 16 Mar 1104[490]. In view of the dates of their marriages, it is unlikely that they were born much before this date. This suggests that their mother may have been King Alfonso's fifth wife, formerly known by her Muslim name Zaïda, although if their estimated birth dates are correct there would have been an interval of several years between their births and the birth of their older brother Sancho, which seems surprising. In the case of Elvira, there is another factor which suggests that Zaïda may have been her mother, which is discussed below. The Annals of Romoald name "Albiriam filiam regis Yspanie" as wife of "rex Rogerius…cum esset comes et iuvenis"[491]. According to Reilly, Elvira daughter of King Alfonso by "Elisabeth" married Fernando Fernández[492]. If this was correct, it would mean that King Roger's wife was King Alfonso's daughter by Jimena Muñoz (see below), which seems unlikely given the estimated birth date of the older Elvira. It would also mean that King Roger's wife was the widow of Raymond de Saint-Gilles Comte de Toulouse. However, if that was the case, it would be surprising that the fact was not mentioned in contemporary chronicles, considering how widely Raymond's crusading exploits were recorded. Assuming that Zaïda was the mother of King Roger's wife, her half-Muslim extraction may have been a factor which favoured the marriage, as King Roger's good relations with the largely Muslim population of Sicily was fundamental to the success of his dynasty in the island. The De Rebus Gestis Rogerii Siciliæ Regis of Alessandro Abbot of Telese records the death of "Alberia regina", dated to [1134/35] from the context[493]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records the deaths of "Albyria…regina…et filia eius…Tarentinus princeps et Anfusus Capuanorum princeps et Henricus", recorded in a section dealing with 1145 although the text appears to be recapitalitive of earlier events[494].
     "m secondly (1149) SIBYLLE de Bourgogne, daughter of HUGUES II "Borel/le Pacifique" Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his wife Mathilde de Mayenne ([1126]-Salerno 16 Sep 1150, bur Monastery of the Trinity de la Cava de Tirreni). The Annals of Romoald name "Sibiliam sororem ducis Burgundie" as the second wife of "rex Rogerius", specifying that she died at Salerno soon after their marriage and was buried "apud Caveam"[495]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that King Roger married "Sibiliam sororem ducis Burgundiæ" and that she died soon after at Salerno and was buried "apud Caveam", dated from the context to after the death of the king´s oldest son (in 1149)[496]. A short anonymous Chronicle of Cassino records the death of "Sybilla regina" in 1150[497]. The Annales Casinenses record the death in 1151 of "Sibilla regina"[498]. Chalandon states that King Roger´s second wife died in childbirth, which he dates to 19 Sep 1151[499].
     "m thirdly (1151) BEATRICE de Rethel, daughter of ITHIER de Vitry Comte de Rethel & his wife Béatrice de Namur ([1130/32]-30 Mar 1185). The Annals of Romoald name "Beatricem filiam comitis de Reteste" as the third wife of "rex Rogerius"[500]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna names "Beatricem filiam comitis de Reteste" as the third wife of King Roger and mother of "filiam…Constantiam"[501]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Hugonem et Manassem cum aliis filiis et filiabus" children of "comitis Witeri de Retest", specifying that one daughter married "Rogerus rex Sicilie"[502]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Albertum Sancti Lamberti Leodiensis prepositum, comitem de Reytest Manasserum, castellanum Vitriaci Henricum et Hugonem et Balduinum…et tres sorores" as the children of "comiti Guithero Reytestensi" & his wife, naming the first daughter "regina Sicilie Beatrix"[503]. The Chronicon Hanoniense refers to the two daughters of "comitissa Retensis [filiam Godefridi comitis Namurcensi]", specifying that "rex Sicilie Rogerus" married one as his second wife[504].
     "Mistress (1): --- di Molise, daughter of [HUGUES [I] Conte di Molise & his wife ---]. The Ignoti Monachi Chronica records that in 1141 King Roger married "sororem comitis Ugonis de Molisio" by whom he had "filium Symonem, quem constituit principem Capue"[505]. Houben assumes that she was the mistress of King Roger[506], but assuming the date quoted in the Ignoti Monachi Chronica is correct, it is not impossible that the couple married as it is after his first wife´s death and well before his marriage with his known second wife.
     "Mistresses (2) and (-): ---. The names of King Roger's other mistresses are not known. "
Med Lands cites:
[480] Romoaldi Annales 1101, MGH SS XIX, p. 413.
[481] Houben (2002), p. 31.
[482] Alessandro of Telese´s De Rebus Gestis Rogerii Siciliæ Regis, I.III, p. 90.
[483] Houben (2002), p. 30.
[484] Rogerius II. Regis Diplomata Latina, 5, p. 13.
[485] Houben (2002), p. 42.
[486] Houben (2002), p. 52.
[487] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen) I, 1154, p. 283.
[488] Annales Siculi, Malaterra, p. 116.
[489] Chronicon Regum Legionensium: Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester UP), p. 87.
[490] Reilly, B. F. (1988) The Kingdom of León-Castilla under King Alfonso VI 1065-1109 (Princeton University Press), Chapter 14, p. 318, in the Library of Iberian Resources Online, consulted at (7 Dec 2002).
[491] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 421.
[492] Reilly, B. F. (1982) The Kingdom of León-Castilla under Queen Urraca 1109-1126 (Princeton University Press), Chapter 7, p. 218, in the Library of Iberian Resources Online [consulted at http://libro.uca.edu/urraca/urraca.htm (7 Dec 2002).
[493] Alessandro of Telese´s De Rebus Gestis Rogerii Siciliæ Regis, III.I, p. 129.
[494] Romualdo Guarna, 1145, p. 16.
[495] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[496] Romualdo Guarna, 1145, p. 16.
[497] Anonymi monachi Cassinensis breve chronicon ("Cassinensis breve chronicon"), Re, G. del (1845) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 1 (Naples), p. 467.
[498] Annales Casinenses 1151, MGH SS XIX, p. 310.
[499] Chalandon (1907), Tome II, p. 106, citing Necrol. Pan, in Forschungen, Tome XVIII, p. 474.
[500] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425.
[501] Romualdo Guarna, 1145, p. 16.
[502] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 9, MGH SS XIII, p. 253.
[503] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[504] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 508.
[505] Gaudenzi, A. (ed.) (1888) Ignoti monachi Cisterciensis S. Maria de Ferraria Chronica (Naples) ("Ignoti Monachi Chronica"), p. 28.
[506] Houben, p. 36 footnote 10.
[507] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 421.
[508] Houben (2002), p. 36 footnote 10.16


; Aso see Wikipédia (Fr.) for more information.18

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Roger II (22 December 1095[1] – 26 February 1154) was King of Sicily and Africa[2], son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon. He began his rule as Count of Sicily in 1105, became Duke of Apulia and Calabria in 1127, then King of Sicily in 1130 and King of Africa in 1148.[3] By the time of his death at the age of 58, Roger had succeeded in uniting all the Norman conquests in Italy into one kingdom with a strong centralized government.
Background
     "By 999, Norman adventurers had arrived in southern Italy.[4] By 1016, they were involved in the complex local politics where Lombards were fighting against the Byzantine Empire. As mercenaries they fought the enemies of the Italian city-states sometimes fighting for the Byzantines and sometimes against them, but in the following century they gradually became the rulers of the major polities south of Rome.
     "Roger I ruled the County of Sicily at the time of the birth of his youngest son, Roger, at Mileto, Calabria, in 1095.[5] Roger I's nephew, Roger Borsa, was the Duke of Apulia and Calabria, and his great nephew, Richard II of Capua, was the Prince of Capua. Alongside these three major rulers were a large number of minor counts, who effectively exercised sovereign power in their own localities. These counts at least nominally owed allegiance to one of these three Norman rulers, but such allegiance was usually weak and often ignored.[6]
     "When Roger I died in 1101, his young son, Simon of Hauteville, became Count, with his mother Adelaide del Vasto as regent. Simon died four years later in 1105, at the age of 12. Adelaide continued as regent to her younger son Roger, who was just nine years old.[7]
Reign
Rise to power in Sicily
     "Upon the death of his elder brother, Simon of Hauteville, in 1105, Roger inherited the County of Sicily under the regency of his mother, Adelaide del Vasto. His mother was assisted by such notables as Christodulus, the Greek emir of Palermo. In 1109, Byzantine Emperor Alexios I Komnenos, bestowed upon him the title of protonobilissimos, in recognition of his knowledge of the Byzantine court.[8] In the summer of 1110, Roger was visited by the Norwegian king Sigurd Jorsalfare, who was on his way to Jerusalem. at an unknown age [9] The story suggests that Sigurd gave Roger the name King of Sicily, twenty years before he actually obtained this title.
     "In 1112, at the age of sixteen, Roger began his personal rule, being named "now knight, now Count of Sicily and Calabria" in a charter document dated 12 June 1112.[1] In 1117, his mother, who had married Baldwin I of Jerusalem, returned to Sicily, since the Patriarch of Jerusalem had declared the marriage invalid. Roger seems to have felt the slight, and this might explain his later reluctance to go crusading.[b][10] Roger married his first wife, Elvira, daughter of Alfonso VI of Castile, and his fourth queen, Isabella, who may be identical to his former concubine, the converted Moor, Zaida, baptised Isabella.
     "In 1122, William II the Duke of Apulia, who was fighting with Count Jordan of Ariano, offered to renounce his remaining claims to Sicily as well as part of Calabria.[11] Roger, in exchange, provided William with 600 knights and access to money for his campaign.[11]
Rise to power in southern Italy
     "When William II of Apulia died childless in July 1127, Roger claimed all Hauteville family possessions in the peninsula as well as the overlordship of the Principality of Capua, which had been nominally given to Apulia almost thirty years earlier. However, the union of Sicily and Apulia was resisted by Pope Honorius II and by the subjects of the duchy itself.
Royal investiture
     "The popes had long been suspicious of the growth of Norman power in southern Italy, and at Capua in December, the pope preached a crusade against Roger, setting Robert II of Capua and Ranulf II of Alife (his own brother-in-law) against him. After this coalition failed, in August 1128 Honorius invested Roger at Benevento as Duke of Apulia.[12] The baronial resistance, backed by Naples, Bari, Salerno, and other cities whose aim was civic freedom, gave way. In September 1129 Roger was generally recognized as duke of Apulia by Sergius VII of Naples, Robert of Capua, and the rest. He began at once to enforce order in the duchy, where ducal power had long been fading.
     "On the death of Pope Honorius in February 1130 there were two claimants to the papal throne. Roger supported Antipope Anacletus II against Innocent II.[12] The reward was a crown,[12] and, on 27 September 1130, Anacletus' papal bull made Roger king of Sicily.[13] He was crowned in Palermo on Christmas Day 1130. Roger II's elaborate royal mantle bears the date 528 of the Islamic calendar (1133–34), therefore it could not have been used for his coronation.[14][15] It was later used as coronation cloak by the Holy Roman Emperors and is now in the Imperial Treasury (Schatzkammer) in Vienna.
Peninsular rebellions
     "This plunged Roger into a ten-year war. Bernard of Clairvaux, Innocent's champion, organized a coalition against Anacletus and his "half-heathen king." He was joined by Louis VI of France, Henry I of England, and Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor. Meanwhile, southern Italy revolted.
     "In 1130, the Duchy of Amalfi revolted and in 1131, Roger sent John of Palermo across the Strait of Messina to join up with a royal troop from Apulia and Calabria and march on Amalfi by land while George of Antioch blockaded the town by sea and set up a base on Capri.[16] Amalfi soon capitulated.
     "In 1132, Roger sent Robert II of Capua and Ranulf II of Alife to Rome in a show of force in support of Anacletus. While they were away, Roger's half-sister Matilda, Ranulf's wife, fled to Roger claiming abuse. Simultaneously, Roger annexed Ranulf's brother's County of Avellino. Ranulf demanded the restitution of both wife and countship. Both were denied, and Ranulf left Rome against orders, with Robert following.
     "First Roger dealt with a rebellion in Apulia, where he defeated and deposed Grimoald, Prince of Bari, replacing him with his second son Tancred. Meanwhile, Robert and Ranulf took papal Benevento. Roger went to meet them but was defeated at the Battle of Nocera on 25 July 1132. Roger retreated to Salerno.
     "The next year, Lothair III came down to Rome for his imperial coronation. The rebel leaders met him there, but they were refused help because Lothair's force was too small.[17] With the emperor's departure, divisions in his opponents' ranks allowed Roger to reverse his fortunes. By July 1134, Roger's troops had forced Ranulf, Sergius, and the other ringleaders to submit. Robert was expelled from Capua and Roger installed his third son, Alfonso of Hauteville as Prince of Capua. Roger II's eldest son Roger was given the title of Duke of Apulia.
     "Meanwhile, Lothair's contemplated attack upon Roger had gained the backing of Pisa, Genoa, and the Byzantine emperor John II, each of whom feared the growth of a powerful Norman kingdom. A Pisan fleet led by the exiled prince of Capua dropped anchor off Naples in 1135. Ranulf joined Robert and Sergius there, encouraged by news coming from Sicily that Roger was fatally ill or even already dead. The important fortress of Aversa, among others, passed to the rebels and only Capua resisted, under the royal chancellor, Guarin. On June 5, however, Roger disembarked in Salerno, much to the surprise of all the mainland provinces. The royal army, split into several forces, easily conquered Aversa and even Alife, the base of the natural rebel leader, Ranulf. Most of the rebels took refuge in Naples, which was besieged in July, but despite poor health conditions within the city, Roger was not able to take it, and returned to Messina late in the year.
Imperial invasion
     "In 1136, the long-awaited imperial army, led by Lothair and the duke of Bavaria, Henry the Proud, descended the peninsula to support the three rebels. Henry, Robert, and Ranulf took a large contingent of troops to besiege the peninsular capital of the kingdom, Salerno. Roger remained in Sicily, leaving its mainland garrisons helpless under the chancellor Robert of Selby, while even the Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus sent subsidies to Lothair. Salerno surrendered, and the large army of Germans and Normans marched to the very south of Apulia. There, in June 1137, Lothair besieged and took Bari. At San Severino, after the victorious campaign, he and the pope jointly invested Ranulf as duke of Apulia in August 1137, and the emperor then retired to Germany. Roger, freed from the utmost danger, immediately disembarked in Calabria, at Tropea, with 400 knights and other troops, probably mostly Muslims. After having been welcomed by the Salernitans, he recovered ground in Campania, sacking Pozzuoli, Alife, Capua, and Avellino. Sergius was forced to acknowledge him as overlord of Naples and switch his allegiance to Anacletus. This moment marked the fall of an independent Neapolitan duchy, and thereafter the ancient city was fully integrated into the Norman realm.
     "From there Roger moved to Benevento and northern Apulia, where Duke Ranulf, although steadily losing his bases of power, had some German troops plus some 1,500 knights from the cities of Melfi, Trani, Troia, and Bari, who were "ready to die rather than lead a miserable life." On 30 October 1137, at the Battle of Rignano (next to Monte Gargano), the younger Roger and his father, with Sergius of Naples, met the defensive army of Duke Ranulf. It was the greatest defeat of Roger II's career. Sergius died and Roger fled to Salerno. It capped Ranulf's meteoric career: twice victor over Roger. Anacletus II died in January 1138, but Innocent II refused to reconcile with the King.
     "In spring 1138, the royal army invaded the Principality of Capua, with the precise intent of avoiding a pitched battle and of dispersing Ranulf's army with a series of marches through difficult terrain. While the count of Alife hesitated, Roger, now supported by Benevento, destroyed all the rebels' castles in the region, capturing an immense booty. Ranulf himself, who had taken refuge in his capital Troia, died of malarial fever on 30 April 1139. Later, Roger exhumed his body from his grave in Troia cathedral and threw it in a ditch, only to repent subsequently and rebury him decently.
     "At this time, with Sergius dead, Alfonso was elected to replace him and together with his brother Roger went off to conquer the Abruzzi.
Consolidation of kingship
     "After the death of Anacletus in January 1138, Roger had sought the confirmation of his title from Innocent. However, the pope wanted an independent Principality of Capua as a buffer state between the Kingdom of Sicily and the Papal States, something Roger would not accept.[18] In the summer of 1139, Innocent II invaded the kingdom with a large army, but was ambushed at Galluccio on 22 July 1139,[19] southeast of present-day Cassino, by Roger's son and was captured. Three days later, by the Treaty of Mignano, the pope proclaimed Roger II rex Siciliae ducatus Apuliae et principatus Capuae (king of Sicily, duke of Apulia and commander of Capua). The boundaries of his regno were only later fixed by a truce with the pope in October 1144. These lands were for the next seven centuries to constitute the kingdoms of Naples and Sicily.
     "In 1139, Bari, the 50,000 inhabitants of which had remained unscathed behind its massive walls during the wars of the past year, decided to surrender. The excellentissimus princeps Jaquintus, who had led the rebellion of the city, was hanged, along with many of his followers, but the city avoided being sacked. Roger's execution of the prince and his counsellors was perhaps the most violent act of his life.
     "While his sons overcame pockets of resistance on the mainland, on 5 November 1139 Roger returned to Palermo to plan a great act of legislation: the Assizes of Ariano, an attempt to establish his dominions in southern Italy as a coherent state. He returned to check on his sons' progress in 1140 and then went to Ariano, a town central to the peninsular possessions (and a centre of rebellion under his predecessors). There he promulgated the great law regulating all Sicilian affairs. It invested the king and his bureaucracy with absolute powers and reduced the authority of the often rebellious vassals. While there, centralising his kingdom, Roger declared a new standard coinage, named after the duchy of Apulia: the ducat.
Economy
     "Roger’s reforms in laws and administration not only aimed to strengthen his rule but also to improve the economic standing of Sicily and southern Italy. He was "very concerned to gain money, but hardly very prodigal in expending it."[20]
     "In 1140 at his assembly at Ariano he introduced new coinage to make it easier to trade with the rest of the Mediterranean, as there were smaller denominations of the previous coins, to allow more accurate and efficient trading. However, although this new coinage made long distance trade easier it was very detrimental to local trade which spread "hatred throughout Italy."[20] By the 1150s most of this coinage was no longer in use and soon after, it disappeared altogether.
     "Nevertheless, the controversy over the coinage did not hinder the Kingdom’s prosperity. Roger II had not only acquired large wealth through his royal patrimony but also through his military campaigns and their financial rewards. For example, gold and silver were gained through the campaigns in Apulia in 1133 and Greece in 1147.[21]
     "Sicily's geographic situation at the centre of Mediterranean made it a brilliant location for trade with Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. Its primary export was durum wheat; others included foods like cheese and vine fruits. Unlike other states, Sicily also had a strong political and military standing so its merchants were supported and to some extent protected.[22] This standing allowed for an increase in internal trade and a stronger market which led to noticeable developments in agriculture.[23]
Later reign
     "Roger had now become one of the greatest kings in Europe. At Palermo, he gathered round him distinguished men of various races, such as the famous Arab geographer Muhammad al-Idrisi[24] and the Byzantine Greek historian Nilus Doxopatrius.[25] The king welcomed the learned and practised toleration towards the several creeds, races and languages of his realm. To administer his domain he hired many Greeks and Arabs, who were trained in long-established traditions of centralized government.[26] He was served by men of diverse nationality, such as the Englishman Thomas Brun, a kaid of the Curia and, in the fleet by two Greeks, first Christodulus and then George of Antioch, whom he made in 1132 ammiratus ammiratorum or "Emir of Emirs", in effect prime vizier. (This title later became the English word admiral). Roger made Sicily the leading maritime power in the Mediterranean. Roger II had a kingdom where a Muslim scholar such as al-Idrisi could draw from a variety of intellectual traditions, because Sicily is positioned in the center of the Mediterranean and was a major stopping point for people traveling across the Mediterranean. Sicily had been run by several different groups in its history and Sicily under Roger II was tolerant of other religions.[27]
     "A powerful fleet was built up under several admirals, or "emirs", of whom the greatest was George, formerly in the service of the Muslim prince of Mahdia. Mainly thanks to him, a series of conquests were made on the African coast (1146–1153). From 1135 Roger II started to conquer the coast of Tunisia and enlarge his dominions: Tripoli was captured in 1146 and Cape Bona in 1148. These conquests were lost in the reign of Roger's successor William, however, and never formed an integral part of the kingdom in southern Italy.
     "The Second Crusade (1147–1148) offered Roger an opportunity to revive attacks on the Byzantine Empire, the traditional Norman enemy to the East. It also afforded him an opportunity, through the agency of Theodwin, a cardinal ever-vigilant for Crusade supporters, to strike up a correspondence with Conrad III of Germany in an effort to break his alliance with Manuel I Comnenus. Roger himself never went on an expedition against Byzantium, instead handing command to the skillful George. In 1147, George set sail from Otranto with seventy galleys to attack Corfu. According to Nicetas Choniates, the island capitulated thanks to George's bribes (and the tax burden of the imperial government), welcoming the Normans as their liberators. Leaving a garrison of 1,000 men, George sailed on to the Peloponnesus. He sacked Athens and quickly moved on to the Aegean Islands. He ravaged the coast all along Euboea and the Gulf of Corinth and penetrated as far as Thebes, Greece, where he pillaged the silk factories and carried off the Jewish damask, brocade, and silk weavers, taking them back to Palermo where they formed the basis for the Sicilian silk industry. George capped the expedition with a sack of Corinth, in which the relics of Saint Theodore were stolen, and then returned to Sicily. In 1149, however, Corfu was retaken. George went on a punitive expedition against Constantinople, but could not land and instead defied the Byzantine emperor by firing arrows against the palace windows. Despite this act, his expedition left no enduring effects.
     "Roger died at Palermo on 26 February 1154 and was buried in the Cathedral of Palermo. He was succeeded by his fourth son, William.
     "Roger is the subject of King Roger, a 1926 opera by Polish composer Karol Szymanowski. The last months of his life are also featured in Tariq Ali's book A Sultan in Palermo. Studiorum Universitas Ruggero II, a private non-traditional university connected to Accademia Normanna was incorporated in the U.S. on April 30, 2001 in honor of this king.[28]
Family
     "Roger's first marriage was in 1117 to Elvira, a daughter of King Alfonso VI of Castile. When she died, rumors flew that Roger had died as well, as his grief had made him a recluse.[29] They had six children:
** Roger (b. 1118 – d. 12 May 1148), heir, Duke of Apulia (from 1135), possibly also Count of Lecce;
** Tancred (b. 1119 – d. 1138), Prince of Bari (from 1135).
** Alfonso (b. c. 1120 – d. 10 October 1144), Prince of Capua (from 1135) and Duke of Naples;
** A daughter (d. young in 1135);
** William (b. 1120/1121 – d. 7 May 1166), his successor, Duke of Apulia (from 1148)[30]
** Henry (b. 1135 – d. young).

     "Roger's second marriage was in 1149 to Sibylla, daughter of Hugh II, Duke of Burgundy.[31] They had two children:
** Henry (b. 29 August 1149 – d. young);
** Stillborn child (16 September 1150).[31]

     "Roger's third marriage was in 1151 to Beatrice of Rethel, a grandniece of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem.[31] They had one daughter:
** Constance (b. posthumously, 2 November 1154 – d. 28 November 1198),[31] who married Emperor Henry VI and was later Queen of Sicily.[32]

     "Roger also had five known illegitimate children:
     "—By a daughter of Hugues I, Count of Molise:
** Simon, who became Prince of Taranto in 1144.[31]

     "—With unknown mistresses:
** A daughter, wife of Rodrigo Garcés (later Henry, Count of Montescaglioso)
** A daughter, wife of the neapolitan nobleman Adam;
** Clemenza, married Hugues II, Count of Molise;
** Adelisa (d. aft. 1184/87) married firstly Joscelin, Count of Loreto, and secondly Robert of Bassonville, Count of Loritello;
** Marina, married the great admiral Margaritus of Brindisi.

Controversial accounts
     "Some said that Roger put his daughter Constance to a convent due a prediction that she would destroy Sicily. However this is impossible as Constance was born after the death of Roger.
Notes
a. Houben quoting Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, written in the 1220s. According to the Fagrskinna, Roger was Jarl Rogeirr.[9]
b. Houben quoting William of Tyre, Chronicon xi.29[10]
References
1. Houben 2002, p. 30.
2. Abulafia, "Norman Kingdom", 41: Dominus noster Sycilie et Ytalie nec non et tocius Africe serenissimus et invictissimus rex a Deo coronatus pius felix triumphator semper augustus. The definitive source of Sicilian diplomas is K. A .Kehr, Die Urkunden der normannisch-sizilischen Könige (Innsbruck, 1902).
3. Abulafia, "Norman Kingdom", 35, quoting Ibn al-Ath?r.
4. Barber 2004, p. 209.
5. Houben 2002, p. xvii.
6. Matthew 1992, p. 21.
7. Houben 2002, p. 24.
8. Britt 2007, p. 24.
9. Houben 2002, p. 26.
10. Houben 2002, p. 29.
11. Houben 2002, p. 37.
12. Britt 2007, p. 25.
13. Chibnall 2006, p. 86.
14. Bauer 2004, p. 115-123.
15. Bauer 2004, p. 85-95.
16. Houben 2002, p. 60.
17. Houben 2002, p. 63.
18. Houben 2002, p. 71.
19. Robinson 1990, p. 386.
20. Houben 2002, p. 159.
21. Houben 2002, p. 161.
22. Houben 2002, p. 164.
23. Houben 2002, p. 163.
24. Houben 2002, p. 106.
25. Matthew 1992, p. 190.
26. Takayama 1993, p. 37.
27. Brotton, Jerry (2013), A History of the World in Twelve Maps, Viking, ISBN 9780670023394, OCLC 864745260
28. "The Ruggero II University".
29. Houben 2002, p. 65.
30. Luscombe & Riley-Smith 2004, p. 760.
31. Houben 2002, p. 96.
32. Shipa 1957, p. 131.
Sources
** Alexander of Telese, The Deeds of Roger.
** Alio, Jacqueline (2018). Queens of Sicily 1061-1266: The queens consort, regent and regnant of the Norman-Swabian era of the Kingdom of Sicily. Trinacria.
** Aubé, Pierre. Roger II de Sicile. 2001.
** Barber, Malcolm (2004). The Two Cities: Medieval Europe 1050-1320. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-17415-5.
** Bauer, Rotraud (2004). "Der Mantel Rogers II. und die siculo-normannischen Gewänder aus den königlichen Hofwerkstätten in Palermo". In Seipel, Wilfried (ed.) Nobiles Officinae. Die königlichen Hofwerkstätten zu Palermo zur Zeit der Normannen und Staufer im 12. und 13. Jahrhundert (in German). Milano.
** Britt, Karen C. (2007). "Roger II of Sicily: Rex, Basileus, and Khalif? Identity, Politics, and Propaganda in the Cappella Palatina". Mediterranean Studies. Penn State University Press. 16.
** Chibnall, Marjorie (2006). The Normans. Wiley & Sons.
** Hamel, Pasquale L'invenzione del regno, dalla conquista normanna alla fondazione del Regnum Siciliae (1061/1154) (Palermo, 2009)
** Holmes, George, The Oxford IllustratedHistory of Medieval Europe. OUP, 1988.
** Houben, Hubert (2002). Roger II of Sicily: Ruler between East and West. Translated by Loud, Graham A; Milburn, Diane. Cambridge University Press.
** Luscombe, David; Riley-Smith, Jonathan, eds. (2004). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 4, C.1024-c.1198. Part II. Cambridge University Press.
** Matthew, Donald (1992). The Norman Kingdom of Sicily. Cambridge Medieval Textbooks.
** Mendola, Louis (2015). The Kingdom of Sicily 1130-1860. Trinacria.
** Alex Metcalfe The Muslims of Medieval Italy (Edinburgh, 2009)
** Francois Neveux. The Normans, Constable & Robinson, London, 2008 (translated by Howard Curtis).
** Norwich, John Julius. The Normans in the South 1016-1130. Longmans: London, 1967.
** Norwich, John Julius. The Kingdom in the Sun 1130-1194. Longman: London, 1970.
** Robinson, Ian Stuart (1990). The Papacy, 1073-1198: Continuity and Innovation. Cambridge University Press.
** Rowe, John Gordon. "The Papacy and the Greeks (1122-1153) (Part II)." Church History, Vol. 28, No. 3. (Sep., 1959), pp 310–327.
** Schipa, Michaelangelo (1957). "Italy and Sicily under Frederick II". In Tanner, J.R; Previté-Orton, C. W; Brooke, Zachary Nugent (eds.) The Cambridge Medieval History. Vol. IV. Cambridge University Press.
** Takayama, Hiroshi (1993). The Administration of the Norman Kingdom of Sicily. E.J. Brill.
** Wieruszowski, Helen. "Roger II of Sicily, Rex-Tyrannus, In Twelfth-Century Political Thought." Speculum, Vol. 38, No. 1. (Jan., 1963), pp 46–78.
External links
** Adrian Fletcher’s Paradoxplace – Palermo and the First Normans – Photos: https://web.archive.org/web/20060822161507/http://www.paradoxplace.com/Perspectives/Sicily%20%26%20S%20Italy/Montages/Sicily/Palermo/Palermo%20%26%20First%20Normans.htm
** Al-Idrisi And Roger’s Book , written by Frances Carney Gies: https://archive.aramcoworld.com/issue/197704/al-idrisi.and.roger.s.book.htm
** Assizes of Ariano Both codices in Latin: http://www.jacquelinealio.com/AssizesArianoLatin.pdf."19 He was King of Sicily.2 EDV-24. Roger II (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Calabria, Duke of Apulia was also known as Roger II (?) King of Sicily.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B1. [3m.] Roger II, Duke of Apulia (1097/98-1154), King of Sicily (1130-54), *22.12.1094/95, +Palermo 26.2.1154; 1m: shortly before 1118 Elvira de Castile (*ca 1100 +8.2.1135); 2m: 1149 Sibylle de Bourgogne (*1126 +1150); 3m: 1151 Beatrix de Rethel (*ca 1135 +30.3.1185.)20"

; Per Racines et Histoire: "3) Roger II «Le Jeune» ° 22/12/1094/95 + 26/02/1154 (Palerme) duc d’Apulie (1097/98, 1127-1154), Prince de Capoue, Salerne, Aversa, Naples, Bénévent et Amalfi, seigneur de Corfou, comte de Tripoli, comte (1105) puis Roi de Sicile (Roger 1er ) (1130-1154, couronné 25/12/1130 par l’anti-pape Anaclet, confirmé par le Pape Innocent II 1139)
ép. 1) ~1118/20 Elvira de Castilla Infante de Castille °~1100/03 + 06-08/02/1135 (fille d’Alphonse VI de Castille)
ép. 2) 1149 Sibylle de Bourgogne ° 1126 + 19/09/1150 (Salerne, en couches) (fille d’Hugues II, duc de Bourgogne)
ép. 3) 1151 Béatrix de Réthel ° ~1135 + 30/03/1185 (fille de Gonthier de Réthel et de Béatrice de Namur.)21" He was Duke of Apulia and Calabria between 1098 and 1134.4,19 He was Count of Sicily between 1105 and 1130.19 He was Prince of Taranto between 1128 and 1132.19 He was King of Sicily - See attached map of southern Italy ca 1112 (from Wikipedia: By MapMaster - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1466670)

Per Enc. of World History:
     "The Norman count Roger II of Sicily succeeded the Norman duke William of Apulia (1111-27) and assumed the title of king of Sicily, Apulia, and Capua with the approval of the antipope Anacletus II. Excommunicated by Pope Innocent II (1139) for his alliance with Anacletus, he defeated Innocent (1140), took him prisoner, and forced recognition of his title. By skillful diplomacy he prevented a joint invasion of Sicily by the Greek and Roman emperors. Planning a Mediterranean commercial empire, Roger established an extensive North African holding (at its maximum, 1153).
     "Roger II's cosmopolitan court and generous patronage of the learned produced a brilliant circle that included the Arab geographer Edrisi, Eugenius, the translator of Ptolemy's Optics, and Henry Aristippus, translator of Plato's Phaedo and Book IV of Aristotle's Meterologica.
     "1147-58: War with Roger of Sicily. The Norman fleets ravaged Euboea and Attica, took and plundered Thebes and Corinth, carried away large numbers of the silk workers, who were established at Palermo. The emperor, having neglected the Byzantine fleet, was obliged to buy the aid of Venice with extensive trading rights (1148). The Venetians helped to reconquer Corfu (1149) and paved the way for the Byzantine conquest of Ancona (1151). But efforts to extend the Greek power in Italy met with failure (1154), and Manuel in the end had to agree to an inconclusive peace (1158)." between 1130 and 1154.22,4,19,23

Family 1

Children

Family 3

Sibylle (?) de Bourgogne b. 1126, d. 19 Sep 1150

Family 4

Beatrice de Rethel b. bt 1130 - 1135, d. 31 Mar 1185
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 86. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065040&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  5. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 217. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  6. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080258&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Savona: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080261&tree=LEO
  9. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065040&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Vitry-Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065041&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel2.html
  15. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  16. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#RogerIIdied1154B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 April 2020), memorial page for Roger of Sicily (22 Dec 1095–26 Feb 1154), Find a Grave Memorial no. 7741112, citing Cattedrale di Palermo, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7741112/roger-of_sicily. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Roger II de Sicile: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_II_de_Sicile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_II_of_Sicily. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Hauteville, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hauteville.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  22. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 216.
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_II_of_Sicily#/media/File:Southern_Italy_1112.svg
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry,_Count_of_Montescaglioso.
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Adelisadied11841187
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guglielmo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065050&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00093483&tree=LEO
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7.
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Rogerdied1148
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Costanza of Sicily: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013539&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Constancedied1198A

Agnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #13809, b. 1176, d. 9 May 1204
FatherKonrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein1,7,4,5,6 b. 1135, d. 8 Nov 1195
MotherErmengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg1,8,4,9,5,6 b. bt 1146 - 1147, d. 15 Jul 1197
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Agnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein was born in 1176.2,4,3,5,6 She married Heinrich V ''der Ältere' von Braunschweig Duke of Saxony, Pfalzgraf bei Rhine, son of Heinrich XII 'der Löwe' (?) Duke of Bavaria & Saxony and Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony, between December 1193 and January 1194 at Burg Stahleck, Germany (now);
His 1st wife. Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen page) says m. 1193.1,2,10,11,12,5,6
Agnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein died on 9 May 1204 at Stade, Landkreis Stade, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany.2,4,5,6
Agnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein was buried after 9 May 1204 at St. Marien, Stade, Landkreis Stade, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1176
     DEATH     9 May 1204 (aged 27–28), Stade, Landkreis Stade, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     She was the daughter of Count Palatine Conrad of the Rhine and from 1195 to 1204 Countess Palatine of the Rhine, as the wife of Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine. Agnes' father, Conrad, Count Palatine of the Rhine and the half-brother of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, was a politician, who aimed for peace and reconciliation in the kingdom. Even before 1180, he had betrothed his daughter to Henry, the eldest son of Henry the Lion, in order to defuse the re-emerging conflict between the Houses of Hohenstaufen and Welf. In 1193, Barbarossa's son, Emperor Henry VI, wanted to created a political alliance with King Philip II of France and wanted to give Agnes, who was his cousin, to Philip II as his wife. When the young Henry the Welf heard of this plan, he contacted Agnes' parents. Her father avoided definitive statements on her bethrothal, because he preferred a marriage with the French king, but he did not want to offend Henry, whom Agnes revered fanatically.
     Agnes' mother, Irmengard of Henneberg (d. 1197) has continued to advocate a marriage of her daughter with the Guelphs. A little later they took advantage of the absence of her husband, who was at Henry VI's court, to thwart the Emperor's plan. She invited the young Welf to Stahleck Castle, where he married Agnes in January or February 1194. Henry VI felt betrayed and demanded that Conrad immediately annul the marriage. Conrad, however, dropped his initial resistance to the marriage and, seeing as it had already been blessed in Church, chose to convince Henry VI of the domestic political benefits of this marriage. Conrad's sons had died young and Henry VI could assure the succession of the Palatinate of the Rhine by enfeoffing Henry the Welf. Additionally, Conrad and Agnes convinced the emperor to pardon Henry the Lion, who had been outlawed by Barbarossa.
     The reconciliation between Henry VI and Henry the Lion was held in March 1194 at Tilleda Castle. Agnes and her husband Henry had done their bit to prepare for this major domestic event with their unscheduled marriage at Stahleck Castle. Henry VI wanted to settle the conflict with the House of Welf, so he could have peace in the Holy Roman Empire and enforce the claim on Sicily he had after the death of Tancred of Lecce on 20 February 1194.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Konrad von Hohenstaufen 1134–1195
     Spouse
          Henry V of Brunswick 1173–1227
     Siblings
          Konrad von Hohenstaufen unknown–1187
          Gottfried von Hohenstaufen 1157–1187
     Children
          Heinrich II von Sachsen 1196–1214
          Irmengard von Braunschweig 1200–1260
          Agnes von Braunschweig 1201–1267
     BURIAL     St. Marien, Stade, Landkreis Stade, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     Created by: Mademoiselle
     Added: 29 Dec 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 122408066.13
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH von Sachsen, son of HEINRICH "der Löwe" ex-Duke of Saxony and Bavaria [Welf] & his second wife Matilda of England ([1173/74]-Braunschweig 28 Apr 1227, bur Braunschweig Cathedral). The Chronicon Montis Serreni names (in order) "Heinricum comitem Palatinum Reni, Othonem imperatorem, Willehelmus de Luneburch, Luderum" as children of "Heinricus dux de Bruneswich" & his wife "soror Rikardi regis Anglie"[36]. He accompanied his parents to England in 1182[37]. Vogt of Gotzlar 1204. He campaigned with Heinrich VI King of Germany in Italy in 1190, but deserted in southern Italy and was outlawed at Worms in May 1192[38]. He was restored to favour by the Emperor in Jan 1194 at Würzburg following his marriage[39]. He succeeded in 1195 as HEINRICH I Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. He was deposed in 1212. Herzog von Braunschweig-Lüneburg 1213. The Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii records the death in Apr 1227 of "Hinricus dux Saxonie et comes palatine Reni"[40]. The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis records that "Heinricum…palatinum Reni" was buried "Bruneswic…in ecclesie beati Blasii"[41].
     "m firstly (Burg Stahleck [Dec 1193/Jan 1194]) AGNES von Staufen, daughter of KONRAD von Staufen Pfalzgraf bei Rhein & his second wife Irmgard von Henneberg (1176-Stade 9/10 May 1204, bur Stade St Marien). The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis names "filiam Conradi palatini fratris Friderici imperatoris, Agnetam" as wife of "Heinricum…palatinum Reni", specifying that she was buried "in ecclesie beate Virginis apud Stadium"[42]. Heiress of the Pfalzgrafschaft. Her marriage was arranged by her mother who wanted to avoid a marriage with Philippe II King of France[43]. Although opposed by her cousin Emperor Heinrich VI, it presented an opportunity for a reconciliation between the Welf and Staufen families[44]. The Annales Stadenses records the death of "Agnes uxor Heinrici ducis et palatini comitis" and her burial "in ecclesia beatæ Virginis apud Stadium"[45]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "VI Id Mai" of "Agnes palatina Reni"[46].
     "m secondly (1211) AGNES von Wettin, daughter of KONRAD von Landsberg Graf von Groitzsch und Sommerschenburg [Wettin] & his wife Elžbieta of Poland (-1 Jan 1248, bur Wienhausen). The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Machtildem…et Agnetem" as the two daughters of "Conradus marchio filius Dedonis" & his wife, specifying that Agnes married "Heinricus palatinus Reni frater Othonis imperatoris"[47]."
Med Lands cites:
[36] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1195, MGH SS XXIII, p. 166.
[37] Jordan (1986), p. 183.
[38] Jordan (1986), pp. 192-4.
[39] Jordan (1986), p. 197.
[40] Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 825.
[41] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 397.
[42] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 396-7.
[43] Jordan (1986), p. 196.
[44] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 182.
[45] Annales Stadenses 1204, MGH SS XVI, p. 354.
[46] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360.
[47] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 230.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 2): “E4. [2m.] Heinrich I, Pfgf bei Rhein (1195-1227), *ca 1173/74, +Braunschweig 28.4.1227; 1m: Burg Stahleck 1193/94 Agnes von Staufen (*1176 +Stade 9.5.1204); 2m: 1211 Agnes von Landsberg (+1.1.1248); all kids were by 1m.”.10

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 5.5

; This is the same person as ”Agnes of Hohenstaufen” at Wikipedia and as ”Agnes von Staufen (Pfalzgräfin)” at Wikipedia (DE).14,15 EDV-23.

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES von Staufen (1176-Stade 9/10 May 1204, bur Stade St Marien). The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis names "filiam Conradi palatini fratris Friderici imperatoris, Agnetam" as wife of "Heinricum…palatinum Reni", specifying that she was buried "in ecclesie beate Virginis apud Stadium"[31]. Heiress of the Pfalzgrafschaft. Her marriage was arranged by her mother who wanted to avoid a marriage with Philippe II King of France[32]. Although her marriage was opposed by her cousin Emperor Heinrich VI, it presented an opportunity for a reconciliation between the Welf and Staufen families[33]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "VI Id Mai" of "Agnes palatina Reni"[34]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "VI Id Mai" of "Agnes palatina Reni"[35].
     "m (Burg Stahleck end 1193) as his first wife, HEINRICH von Sachsen, son of HEINRICH "der Löwe" ex-Duke of Saxony and Bavaria & his second wife Matilda of England ([1173]-Braunschweig 28 Apr 1227, bur Braunschweig cathedral). He succeeded in 1195 as HEINRICH I Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. Herzog von Braunschweig-Lüneburg 1213."
Med Lands cites:
[31] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 396-7.
[32] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 196.
[33] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 182.
[34] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360.
[35] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen): “E4. [2m.] Agnes, *1176, +Stade 9.5.1204, bur St-Blasien, Stade; m.Burg Stahleck (5.11.) 1193 Heinrich I Welf (*ca 1173 +28.4.1227)”.16

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020507&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Agnesdied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027035&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard von Henneberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027036&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Konraddied1195
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html#H1
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020506&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#HeinrichIRheindied1227
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 11 October 2020), memorial page for Agnes Of Hohenstaufen (1176–9 May 1204), Find a Grave Memorial no. 122408066, citing St. Marien, Stade, Landkreis Stade, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; Maintained by Mademoiselle (contributor 46591139), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122408066/agnes-of-hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Agnes von Staufen (Pfalzgräfin): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_von_Staufen_(Pfalzgr%C3%A4fin). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html#AK
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012345&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#HeinrichIIRheindied1214
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmengard am Rhein: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106343&tree=LEO

Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein1,2,3,4

M, #13810, b. 1135, d. 8 November 1195
FatherFriedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia5,1,6,2 b. c 1090, d. 6 Apr 1147
MotherAgnes (?) von Saarbrücken5,7,2 d. a 1147
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein was born in 1135; Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen page) and Med Lands say b. 1134/6.2,1,8 He married Elisabeth von Sponheim, daughter of Gottfried II von Sponheim Graf von Sponheim, in June 1156 at Würzburg, Germany (now);
His 1st wife.1,8 Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein married Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg, daughter of Berthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg and Bertha von Putelendorf, in 1161;
His 2nd wife. Med Lands says m. 1161.3,4,9,2,1,10,8
Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein died on 8 November 1195.4,2,1,8
Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein was buried after 8 November 1195 at Cistercian Kloster Schönau, near Heidelberg, Germany (now).1,8


     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Konrad, Pfgf bei Rhein (1156-95), *1134-36, +26.7./8.11.1195, bur Cistercian Kloster Schönau nr Heidelberg; 1m: Würzburg VI.1156 Elisabeth von Stahleck (+ca 1159/60); 2m: ca 1161 Irmgard von Henneberg (*1146/47 +15.7.1197, bur Schönau), dau.of Ct Berthold I von Henneberg by Bertha von Putelendorf."1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 5.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:14.11


; Per Med Lands:
     "KONRAD von Staufen, son of FRIEDRICH II Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his second wife Agnes von Saarbrücken ([1134/36]-8 Nov 1195, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg). The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising names "Conradum, qui palatinus comes Rheni…et Clariciam, Ludewici Thuringiæ comitis uxorem" as the two children of Duke Friedrich & his second wife[28]. The Urspergensium Chronicon names "Cuonradum" as son of "Friedrich I pater ipsius" & his second wife[29]. He was appointed KONRAD Pfalzgraf [von Lothringen] in 1156, but appears to have held jurisdiction in a territory in the Rhineland unlike his predecessors. As he appears to have had no connection with Lotharingia, it is more appropriate to consider him as Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. Vogt of Worms cathedral. Vogt of Lorsch.
     "m firstly --- von Sponheim, daughter of GOTTFRIED I Graf von Sponheim & his wife --- (-[1159/60]). The primary source which confirms the identity of Konrad’s first wife has not been identified.
     "m secondly ([1161]) IRMGARD von Henneberg, of BERTHOLD [I] Graf von Henneberg & his wife Bertha --- (-15 Jul 1197, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg). “Bobpo comes de Hennenberc...genetrix nostra Berhda comitissa...et germane nostre...Irmingardis palatina Rheni et Lwggardis palatina de Saxonia” donated property “in Hindirnahe” to Kloster Vessra, to take effect after the death of their mother, by undated charter[30]."
Med Lands cites:
[28] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.21, MGH SS XX, p. 362.
[29] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 345.
[30] Schoettgen, C., & Kreysig, G. C. (1760) Diplomataria et Scriptores Historiæ Germanicæ Medii Aevi (Altenburg), Tome III, D III, p. 532.8


; Per Genealogics:
     "Konrad, Pfalzgraf am Rhein, was born about 1135, the son of Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen, Herzog von Schwaben, and his second wife Agnes von Saarbrücken. Young Konrad, the only half-brother of Friedrich I Barbarossa, received the family's possessions around Franconia and Rhineland, particularly those of his mother's ancestry.
     "In 1156 on the occasion of the Reichstag at Worms, Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa conferred upon his half-brother the dignity of Pfalzgraf (count palatine, of the Rhine), the stewardship of Schönau Abbey and of the chapter of Worms Cathedral, as well as the Staufen family estates in the regions of Speyer and Worms.
     "Konrad first married a daughter, whose name is not known, of Graf Gottfried I von Sponheim. She probably died about 1159. By her he had a son Gottfried who died without progeny probably in 1187 or 1188. Soon after his first wife's death Konrad married Irmgard von Henneberg, daughter of Berthold I, Graf von Henneberg, Burggraf von Würzburg, and Bertha von Putelendorf. This brought him the possession of the Vogtei of Lorsch Abbey. His endeavours to extend his area of influence brought him into conflict with the bishops of Trier and Cologne. With Irmgard he had two sons, Friedrich and Konrad, and a daughter Agnes. Only Agnes would have progeny.
     "Konrad died on 8 November 1195. He and both his wives were buried in Schönau Abbey near Heidelberg. His inheritance passed to his daughter Agnes and her husband Heinrich, son of Heinrich 'the Lion', Herzog von Sachsen und Bayern. Her husband became Pfalzgraf am Rhein in her name. Their heiress Agnes would, through her marriage to Otto II 'der Erlauchte', Herzog von Bayern, pass the inheritance to the Wittelsbach dynasty who thereby became the well-known lords of the Palatinate and electors palatine.
     "A charming legend is associated with Konrad's foundation of Heidelberg. In ancient times a witch named Jetta lived on the hill of Jettenbühel, which towered over the left bank of the Neckar. She ruled over the animals in the forest and the nymphs in the river. However Konrad built his residence on this hill in 1155. The town of Heidelberg, which developed at the foot of the castle, became the capital of the Rhenish Palatinate. It expanded and grew rich, founding Germany's first university as well as an extensive and labyrinthine castle that romantics dubbed 'the German Alhambra'."11 EDV-24. Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein was also known as Conrad of Swabia, Count Palatine of the Rhine.3,4

; Per Med Lands:
     "IRMGARD (-15 Jul 1197, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg). “Bobpo comes de Hennenberc...genetrix nostra Berhda comitissa...et germane nostre...Irmingardis palatina Rheni et Lwggardis palatina de Saxonia” donated property “in Hindirnahe” to Kloster Vessra, to take effect after the death of their mother, by undated charter[362].
     "m ([1161]) as his second wife, KONRAD Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of FRIEDRICH II Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his second wife Agnes von Saarbrücken ([1134/36]-8 Nov 1195, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg)."
Med Lands cites: [362] Schoettgen & Kreysig (1760), Tome III, D III, p. 532.10 He was Pfalsgraf bei Rhein between 1156 and 1195.1

Family 1

Elisabeth von Sponheim d. bt 1159 - 1160
Child

Family 2

Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg b. bt 1146 - 1147, d. 15 Jul 1197
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027035&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Saarbrücken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064952&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Konraddied1195. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard von Henneberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027036&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#IrmgardHennebergdied1197
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027035&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106049&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020507&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Agnesdied1204

Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg1,2,3

F, #13811, b. between 1146 and 1147, d. 15 July 1197
FatherBerthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg1,4,2,3,5 b. c 1130, d. 18 Oct 1159
MotherBertha von Putelendorf6,3,7 d. 1190
Last Edited28 Oct 2020
     Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg was born between 1146 and 1147.3 She married Konrad von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf am Rhein, son of Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia and Agnes (?) von Saarbrücken, in 1161;
His 2nd wife. Med Lands says m. 1161.1,4,2,8,3,9,10
Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg died on 15 July 1197.4,3,9
Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) von Henneberg was buried after 15 July 1197 at Cistercian Kloster Schönau, near Heidelberg, Germany (now).3,9


     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 5; III 75.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "IRMGARD (-15 Jul 1197, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg). “Bobpo comes de Hennenberc...genetrix nostra Berhda comitissa...et germane nostre...Irmingardis palatina Rheni et Lwggardis palatina de Saxonia” donated property “in Hindirnahe” to Kloster Vessra, to take effect after the death of their mother, by undated charter[362].
     "m ([1161]) as his second wife, KONRAD Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of FRIEDRICH II Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his second wife Agnes von Saarbrücken ([1134/36]-8 Nov 1195, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg)."
Med Lands cites: [362] Schoettgen & Kreysig (1760), Tome III, D III, p. 532.9

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard von Henneberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027036&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BertholdIHennebergdied1159. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Putelendorf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033284&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard von Henneberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027036&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027035&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#IrmgardHennebergdied1197
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Konraddied1195
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106049&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020507&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Agnesdied1204

Berthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg1,2,3,4

M, #13812, b. circa 1130, d. 18 October 1159
FatherGotebold II von Heinsberg Herr von Heinsberg7,6 d. 1144
MotherLiutgard (?) von Hohenberg5,6 d. a 16 Aug 1110
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited13 Nov 2020
     Berthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg married Bertha von Putelendorf, daughter of Friedrich IV von Putelendorf Pfalzgraf von Sachsen and Agnes von Limburg.8,6,9,10 Berthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg was born circa 1130.11
Berthold I von Henneberg Graf von Henneberg, Burgrave of Würzburg died on 18 October 1159; Genealogics says d. 1157; Med Lands & Wikipedia (Henneberg) say d. 18 Oct 1159.6,9,11
     EDV-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: III 75.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHOLD [I] (-18 Oct [1159]). The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiæ names (in order) "Bopponem et Bertoldum comites, Gebehardum Wirzeburgensem Guntherum Spirensem episcopus" as the four sons of "Goteboldus"[348]. “Goteboldus comes et duo filii eius Boppo et Bertoldus...” witnessed the charter dated 1132 under which Heinrich Bishop of Würzburg confirmed the donation made by “Meinherus...de Ascaba”[349]. "Comes Godebaldus et filii eius Bobbo et Berchdoldus, comes Harimannus, comes Gozmarus, Bobbo et frater suus Godebaldus..." witnessed the charter dated 22 Sep 1137 under which Embricho Bishop of Würzburg exchanged property with Kloster Vessra[350]. "…Comites…Godeboldus de Henneberg et filii eius Poppo et Bertoldus…" witnessed a charter dated 25 Jul 1139 under which Adalbert [II] Archbishop of Mainz confirmed his predecessor's grants to Kloster Jechaburg[351]. Embricho Bishop of Würzburg exchanged property with “Bobbonis de Hennenbergk...comiti” by charter dated 20 Oct 1144, witnessed by “Bobbo comes de Hennenberk, Berthold frater eius...”[352]. The Chronicon Laureshamense names "Ludwicus provinciales comes…Bobbo comes et frater eius Bertholdus…" as lay witnesses to a document dated "1147 III Kal Feb"[353], the inclusion of "Ludwicus provinciales comes" indicating a connection with Thuringia. Graf von Henneberg. “Bertholdus prefectus Herb., Ludwycus de Franckensteyn et Goteboldus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1156 under which Gebhard Bishop of Würzburg confirmed donations to Kloster Wechterswinkel[354]. The dating clause of a charter dated 1156, under which Gebhard Bishop of Würzburg exchanged property with Kloster Langheim, records “imperante...romanorum imperatore...Friderico, Berhtoldo urbis prefecto”, the charter witnessed by “Laici liberi: Berctoldus urbis prefectus, de Hennenberch...”[355]. “Laici...Bertoldus prefectus urbis...” witnessed the charter dated 6 Jun 1158, under which Gebhard Bishop of Würzburg confirmed a donation made to Würzburg by “Manegoldus de Tuncdorff”[356].
     "m BERTHA, daughter of --- (-after 1182, bur Trostadt). According to Spangenberg, Bertha was “eine geborne Pfalgräfin zu Sachsen” (without citing the primary source on which he bases this statement)[357]. If this origin is correct, from a chronological point of view she could have been Bertha von Putelendorf, daughter of Friedrich [IV] von Putelendorf Pfalzgraf von Sachsen & his wife Agnes van Limburg, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[358]. It should be emphasised that no primary source has been identified which confirms Bertha’s family origin. “Bobpo comes de Hennenberc...genetrix nostra Berhda comitissa...et germane nostre...Irmingardis palatina Rheni et Lwggardis palatina de Saxonia” donated property “in Hindirnahe” to Kloster Vessra, to take effect after the death of their mother, by undated charter[359]. Hermann Bishop of Münster records a donation made by “Bobpo comes cognatus noster...cum matre Berhda” by charter dated 1182[360].
     "Graf Berthold [I] & his wife had three children."
Med Lands cites:
[348] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiæ 4, MGH SS XXIV, p. 820.
[349] Schoettgen & Kreysig (1755), Tome II, A, p. 586.
[350] Hennebergisches Urkundenbuch, Theil V, I, p. 1.
[351] Mainz Urkunden 12th Century, 21, p. 23.
[352] Gruner (1761), Vol. II, Diplomata, V, p. 289.
[353] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 440.
[354] Ussermann (1794), Codex Probationum, XLI, p. 40.
[355] Schultes, J. A. (1814) Coburgische Landesgeschichte des Mittel-Alters (Coburg), Urkundenbuch, III, p. 4.
[356] Schultes (1814), Urkundenbuch, IV, p. 5.
[357] Spangenberg, C. (1599) Hennebergische Chronica (Strasbourg), p. 92.
[358] ES XVI 144.
[359] Schoettgen & Kreysig (1760), Tome III, D III, p. 532.
[360] Gruner (1761), Vol. II, Diplomata, VII, p. 294.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "[BERTHA (-after 1182, bur Trostadt). According to Spangenberg, Bertha wife of Berthold [I] Graf von Henneberg was “eine geborne Pfalgräfin zu Sachsen” (without citing the primary source on which he bases this statement)[90]. If this origin is correct, from a chronological point of view she could have been the daughter of Friedrich [IV] von Putelendorf Pfalzgraf von Sachsen, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[91]. It should be emphasised that no primary source has been identified which confirms Bertha’s family origin. “Bobpo comes de Hennenberc...genetrix nostra Berhda comitissa...et germane nostre...Irmingardis palatina Rheni et Lwggardis palatina de Saxonia” donated property “in Hindirnahe” to Kloster Vessra, to take effect after the death of their mother, by undated charter[92]. Hermann Bishop of Münster records a donation made by “Bobpo comes cognatus noster...cum matre Berhda” by charter dated 1182[93].
     "m BERTHOLD [I] Graf von Henneberg, son of GOTEBOLD [II] Graf von Henneberg & his wife Liutgard --- (-18 Oct [1159]).]"
Med Lands cites:
[90] Spangenberg, C. (1599) Hennebergische Chronica (Strasbourg), p. 92.
[91] ES XVI 144.
[92] Schoettgen, C., & Kreysig, G. C. (1760) Diplomataria et Scriptores Historiæ Germanicæ Medii Aevi (Altenburg), Tome III, D III, p. 532.
[93] Gruner, J. F. (1761) Opuscula ad illustrandam historiam Germaniæ (Coburg), Vol. II, Diplomata, VII, p. 294.10

; See Wikipedia entry on the House of Henneberg for more information.11 He was Graf von Henneberg between 1156 and 1159.2,11

Family

Bertha von Putelendorf d. 1190
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033283&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgard von Hohenberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033281&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033283&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godebold/Gotwald: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033280&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Putelendorf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033284&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BertholdIHennebergdied1159. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#Berthadiedafter1182
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Henneberg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#LiutgardHennebergdied1220
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard von Henneberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027036&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poppo VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033286&tree=LEO

Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein1,2,3,4

F, #13813, b. 1201, d. 16 August 1267
FatherHeinrich V ''der Ältere' von Braunschweig Duke of Saxony, Pfalzgraf bei Rhine1,5,6,7 b. c 1173, d. 28 Apr 1227
MotherAgnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein1,2,7,8 b. 1176, d. 9 May 1204
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein was born in 1201.1,2,3 She married Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria, son of Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein and Ludmila (?) of Bohemia, on 24 March 1225 at Worms, Germany (now).1,9,2,3
Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein died on 16 August 1267 at Munich (München), Stadtkreis München, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now); Charlemagne Desc. says d. 1262; Welf 2 page says d. 16.8.1267.1,2,3
     ; Agnes, *ca 1201, +München 16.8.1267, bur Scheyern; m.Worms 24.3.1225 Duke Otto II of Bavaria (*1206 +1253.)2 EDV-22.

Family

Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria b. 7 Apr 1206, d. 29 Nov 1253
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#LudwigIIDukedied1294. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020506&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html#H1
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#HeinrichIRheindied1227
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020507&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#ElisabethBayerndied1273
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013385&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020776&tree=LEO

Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria1,2,3

M, #13814, b. 7 April 1206, d. 29 November 1253
FatherLudwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein1,4,3,5 b. 23 Dec 1173, d. 15 Sep 1231
MotherLudmila (?) of Bohemia1,3,5 b. c 1170, d. 4 Aug 1240
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria was born on 7 April 1206 at Kelheim, Bavaria, Germany (now).3,5 He married Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein, daughter of Heinrich V ''der Ältere' von Braunschweig Duke of Saxony, Pfalzgraf bei Rhine and Agnes von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein, on 24 March 1225 at Worms, Germany (now).1,3,6,5
Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria died on 29 November 1253 at Landshut, Bavaria, Germany (now), at age 47.1,3,5
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 26
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: 59.3

; Duke Otto II "der Erlauchte" Bavaria (1231-53), Pfgf (1227-53), *Kelheim 7.4.1206, +Landshut 29.11.1253, bur Scheyern; m.Worms 1222 Pfgfn Agnes bei Rhein (*after 1201 +1267.)5 He was Pfgf of Bavaria between 1227 and 1253.5 He was Duke of Bavaria between 1231 and 1253.7,3,5

Family

Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein b. 1201, d. 16 Aug 1267
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020282&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#ElisabethBayerndied1273. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013385&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#LudwigIIDukedied1294
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020776&tree=LEO

Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein1,2,3

M, #13815, b. 23 December 1173, d. 15 September 1231
FatherOtto I 'der Rotkopf' (?) Pfalzgraf von Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria3,4,5 b. c 1117, d. 11 Jul 1183
MotherAgnes (?) von Looz3,6,5 b. 1150, d. 26 Mar 1191
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein was born on 23 December 1173 at Kelheim, Bavaria, Germany (now); Leo van de Pas says b. 23 Dec 1174.2,3 He married Ludmila (?) of Bohemia, daughter of Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia and Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary, in October 1204; her 2nd husband.1,2,7,3
Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein died on 15 September 1231 at Kelheim, Bavaria, Germany (now), at age 57; murdered on the Kelheimer Bridge.2,3
Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein was buried after 15 September 1231 at Scheyern, Bavaria, Germany (now).2


     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: 59
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 26.3

; Duke Ludwig I of Bavaria (1183-1231), Pfgf bei Rhein (1214-31), *Kelheim 23.12.1173, +murdered on the Kelheimer Bridge 15.9.1231, bur Scheyern; m.1204 Ludmila of Bohemia (*ca 1170 +4.8.1240.)5 He was Duke of Bavaria between 1183 and 1231.2 He was Pfgf bei Rhein between 1214 and 1231.2

Family

Ludmila (?) of Bohemia b. c 1170, d. 4 Aug 1240
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020282&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036556&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Looz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036536&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO

Ludmila (?) of Bohemia1,2,3

F, #13816, b. circa 1170, d. 4 August 1240
FatherBedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia3 b. bt 1141 - 1142, d. 25 Mar 1189
MotherElizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary3 b. bt 1144 - 1145, d. a 12 Jan 1190
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Ludmila (?) of Bohemia was born circa 1170.4 She married Adalbert III (?) Graf von Bogen; her 1st husband.1,3 Ludmila (?) of Bohemia married Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein, son of Otto I 'der Rotkopf' (?) Pfalzgraf von Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and Agnes (?) von Looz, in October 1204; her 2nd husband.1,2,3,5
Ludmila (?) of Bohemia died on 4 August 1240.4

Family 2

Ludwig I (?) Duke of Bavaria, Pfgf bei Rhein b. 23 Dec 1173, d. 15 Sep 1231
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page (The House of Wittelsbach): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020282&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO

Beatrix de Faucigny Dame d'Aubonne1

F, #13817, d. after May 1279
FatherAymon II (?) Sire de Faucigny1,2 d. Sep 1253
MotherBeatrix (?) d'Auxonne-Bourgogne1,3,4 d. 11 Apr 1260
Last Edited15 Jun 2020
     Beatrix de Faucigny Dame d'Aubonne married Etienne II (?) Sire de Thoire et de Villars.5
Beatrix de Faucigny Dame d'Aubonne died after May 1279.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 192.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix de Faucigny: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065917&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aymon II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00048709&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice d'Auxonne-Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026598&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#AimonFaucignydied1253. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065916&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkbresse.htm#HumbertIIIThoiredied1301

Adalbert III (?) Graf von Bogen1,2

M, #13818
Last Edited10 Aug 2003
     Adalbert III (?) Graf von Bogen married Ludmila (?) of Bohemia, daughter of Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia and Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary; her 1st husband.1,2
Adalbert III (?) Graf von Bogen died in 1197.

Family

Ludmila (?) of Bohemia b. c 1170, d. 4 Aug 1240

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html

Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine1,2,3,4,5

M, #13819, b. 13 April 1229, d. 2 February 1294
FatherOtto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria2,6,4,5,7 b. 7 Apr 1206, d. 29 Nov 1253
MotherAgnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein2,4,5,7 b. 1201, d. 16 Aug 1267
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine was born on 13 April 1229 at Heidelberg, Bavaria, Germany (now).2,8,4,9,5,7 He married Marie (?) of Brabant, daughter of Hendrik II (?) Duke of Brabant and Maria (?) von Hohenstaufen, Princess of Germany, on 2 August 1254 at Landshut, Bavaria, Germany (now);
His 1st wife.8,4,5,7,10 Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine and NN (?) of Cornwall were engaged on 26 November 1256 at Bacharach, Germany (now).11 Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine married Anna (?) von Glogau, daughter of Konrad I (?) Duke Glogowsko-Bytomski and Salomea (?) of Poland, on 24 August 1260;
His 2nd wife.12,9,5,7 Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine married Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg, daughter of Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor and Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg, on 24 October 1273 at Aachen (Aix La Chapelle), Stadtkreis Aachen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany (now);
His 3rd wife.2,13,3,14,4,5,7
Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine died on 2 February 1294 at Heidelberg, Bavaria, Germany (now), at age 64.2,8,4,9,5
Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine was buried after 2 February 1294 at Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     13 Apr 1229, Heidelberg, Stadtkreis Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     2 Feb 1294 (aged 64)
     The young Louis supported in 1246 his brother-in-law King Conrad IV of Germany against the usurpation of Heinrich Raspe. In 1251 Louis was at war again against the bishop of Regensburg.
     Louis succeeded his father Otto as Duke of Bavaria in 1253. When the Wittelsbach country was divided in 1255 among Otto's sons, Louis received the Palatinate and Upper Bavaria, while his brother duke Henry XIII of Bavaria received Lower Bavaria. This partition was against the law and therefore caused the anger of the bishops in Bavaria who allied themselves with king Otakar II of Bohemia in 1257. In August 1257 Ottokar invaded Bavaria, but Louis and Henry managed to repulse the attack. It was one of the rare concerted and harmonious actions of the two brothers, who often argued.
     Louis resided in Munich and Heidelberg Castle. As one of the Prince-electors of the empire he was strongly involved in the royal elections for forty years. During the German interregnum after King William's death in 1256 Louis supported King Richard of Cornwall. Together with his brother Louis also aided his young Hohenstaufen nephew Conradin in his duchy of Swabia, but it was not possible to enforce Conradin's election as German king. As a result of his support for the Hohenstaufen, Louis was banned by the pope in 1266. In 1267 when his nephew crossed the Alps with an army, Louis accompanied Conradin only to Verona. After the young prince's execution in Naples in 1268, Louis inherited some of Conradin's possessions in Swabia and supported the election of the Habsburg Rudolph I against Ottokar II in 1273. On 26 August 1278 the armies of Rudolph and Louis met Otakar's forces on the banks of the River March in the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen where Otakar was defeated and killed. In 1289 the electoral dignity of Bavaria passed to Bohemia again, but Louis remained an elector as Count Palatine of the Rhine. After Rudolph's death in 1291 Louis could not enforce the election of his Habsburg brother-in-law Albert I against Adolf of Nassau.
     Louis died at Heidelberg. His eldest surviving son Rudolf succeeded him, with Adolf of Nassau becoming his father-in-law a few months later. Louis was buried in the crypt of Fürstenfeld Abbey.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Otto II von Bayern 1206–1253
          Agnes von Braunschweig 1201–1267
     Spouse
          Matilde von Habsburg unknown–1304 (m. 1273)
     Siblings
          Elisabeth of Bavaria 1227–1273
          Heinrich I von Niederbayern 1235–1290
          Agnes von Wittelsbach 1240–1306
     Children
          Agnes von Bayern 1262–1269
          Ludwig Elegans von Bayern 1267–1290
     BURIAL     Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Maintained by: Mad
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 25 Jul 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 55431742.15
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Duke Ludwig II "der Strenge" of Upper Bavaria (1253-94), Pfgf bei Rhein (1253-94), *Heidelberg 13.4.1229, +there 2.2.1294, bur Fürstenfeld; 1m: 1254 Maria of Brabant (*1226 +beheaded at Donauwörth 1256, bur there); 2m: 1260 Anna of Glogau (*1250/52, +1271, bur Fürstenfeld); 3m: Aachen 24/27.10.1273 Mechtild von Habsburg (*1251/53 +23.12.1304, bur Fürstenfeld.)5"

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 26.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 60.
3. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: page 64.
4. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:91.16


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ludwig I or Louis I of Upper Bavaria (German: Ludwig II der Strenge, Herzog von Bayern, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein) (13 April 1229 – 2 February 1294) was Duke of Upper Bavaria and Count Palatine of the Rhine from 1253. He is known as Ludwig II or Louis II as Duke of Bavaria, and also as Louis the Strict. Born in Heidelberg, he was a son of duke Otto II and Agnes of the Palatinate. She was a daughter of the Welf Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine, her grandfathers were Henry XII the Lion and Conrad of Hohenstaufen.
Biography
     "In 1246, the young Louis supported his brother-in-law King Conrad IV of Germany against the usurpation of Heinrich Raspe. In 1251, Louis was at war again against the bishop of Regensburg.
     "Louis succeeded his father Otto as Duke of Bavaria in 1253. When the Wittelsbach country was divided in 1255 among Otto's sons, Louis received the Palatinate and Upper Bavaria making him the duke of Upper Bavaria, while his brother duke Henry XIII of Bavaria received Lower Bavaria making him the duke of Lower Bavaria. This partition was against the law and therefore caused the anger of the bishops in Bavaria who later allied themselves with king Ottokar II of Bohemia in 1257. During the German interregnum, after King William's death in 1256, Louis supported King Richard of Cornwall. In August 1257 King Ottokar finally invaded Bavaria, but Louis and Henry managed to repulse the attack. It was one of the rare concerted and harmonious actions of the two brothers, who often argued.
     "The main residences of Louis were at Alter Hof located at the very north-eastern part of Munich and Heidelberg Castle. As one of the Prince-electors of the empire, he was strongly involved in the royal elections for forty years. Together with his brother, Louis also aided his young Hohenstaufen nephew Conradin in his duchy of Swabia, but it was not possible to enforce Conradin's election as German king. As a result of his support for the Hohenstaufen, Louis was banned by the pope in 1266. In 1267 when his nephew crossed the Alps with an army, Louis accompanied Conradin only to Verona. After the young prince's execution in Naples in 1268, Louis inherited some of Conradin's possessions in Swabia and supported the election of the Habsburg Rudolph I against Ottokar II in 1273. On 26 August 1278, the armies of Rudolph and Louis met Ottokar's forces on the banks of the River March in the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen where Ottokar was defeated and killed. In 1289, the electoral dignity of Bavaria passed to Bohemia again, but Louis remained an elector as Count Palatine of the Rhine. After Rudolph's death in 1291, Louis could not enforce the election of his Habsburg brother-in-law Albert I against Adolf of Nassau.
     "Louis died at Heidelberg on 2 February 1294. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son Rudolf I who had Adolf of Nassau as his father-in-law a few months later. Louis was buried in the crypt of Fürstenfeld Abbey.
Family and children
     "Louis II was married three times.
The execution of Maria of Brabant
     "He had his first wife Maria of Brabant—a daughter of Henry II, Duke of Brabant and Marie of Hohenstaufen—beheaded in 1256, on suspicion of adultery. Any actual guilt on her part could never be validated. As expiation, Louis founded the Cistercian friary Fürstenfeld Abbey (Fürstenfeldbruck) near Munich.
     "Different sources tell varying tales about how this happened: In 1256, Louis had been away from home for an extended time due to his responsibilities as a sovereign in the area of the Rhine. His wife wrote two letters, one to her husband, and another to the count of Kyburg at Hunsrück, a vassal of Louis. Details about the actual content of the second letter vary, but according to the chroniclers, the messenger who carried the letter to Ludwig had been given the wrong one, and Louis came to the conclusion that his wife had a secret love affair.
     "Over time a great many tales of folklore sprang up around Louis' deed, most of them written long after his death: Ballad-mongers embellished the tale into a murderous frenzy during which Louis allegedly not only killed his wife after having ridden home for five days and nights, but also stabbed the messenger who brought him the wrong letter; then upon entering his castle, stabbed his own castellan and a court lady and threw his wife's maid from the battlements, before he massacred his wife either by stabbing her or cutting off her head.
     "Several more restrained chronicles support the account of Marie's execution on 18 January 1256 at Mangoldstein Castle in Donauwörth by ducal decree for alleged adultery, but nothing beyond that.
Later marriages
     "Louis married his second wife Anna of Glogau in 1260. They had the following children:
1. Maria (b. 1261), a nun in Marienberg abbey at Boppard.
2. Agnes (1262 – 21 October 1269).
3. Ludwig (13 September 1267 – 23 November 1290, killed at a tournament at Nuremberg).

     "He married his third wife Matilda of Habsburg, one of king Rudolph's daughters, on 24 October 1273.[1] Their children were:
1. Rudolf I (4 October 1274, Basle – 12 August 1319).[2]
2. Mechthild (1275 – 28 March 1319, Lüneburg), married 1288 to Duke Otto II of Brunswick-Lüneburg.
3. Agnes (ca. 1276/78 – 22 July 1345), married firstly in 1290 Landgrave Henry "the Younger" of Hesse and secondly 1298/1303 Henry I "Lackland", Margrave of Brandenburg.
4. Anna (b. 1280), a nun in Ulm.
5. Ludwig IV (1 April 1282, Munich – 11 October 1347, Puch -now a district of Fürstenfeldbruck-).[2]

     "Louis II was succeeded by his eldest surviving son Rudolf I.
References
1. Earenfight 2013, p. 173.
2. Thomas 2010, p. 387.
Sources
** Earenfight, Theresa (2013). Queenship in Medieval Europe. Palgrave Macmillan.
** Thomas, Andrew L. (2010). A House Divided: Wittelsbach Confessional Court Cultures in the Holy Roman Empire, c.1550-1650. Brill.
External links
** German wiki entry for Ludwig II. (Ludwig der Strenge): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_der_Strenge
** Genealogy of Ludwig II. (compilation of various sources, in German): https://web.archive.org/web/20081008092854/http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/wittelsbacher_oberbayern/ludwig_2_der_strenge_herzog_von_bayern_+_1294.html.17 "

; Per Genealogics:
     "Ludwig II 'der Strenge', Herzog von Bayern, was born on 13 April 1229, the elder son of Otto II, duke of Bavaria, and Agnes, Pfalzgräfin am Rhein. In his younger years he already experienced warfare, in 1246 with King Konrad IV against the landgrave of Thuringia and 1251 against the bishop of Regensburg. In 1253 Ludwig II began his reign as duke of Bavaria on the death of his father. On 28 March 1255 he divided the rule of Bavaria with his brother Heinrich XIII; Heinrich received Lower Bavaria and Ludwig Upper Bavaria - where he made Munich the residence - and the Palatinate. The ostensible conflicts between them were really disputes between their followers.
     "His epithet 'der Strenge' stems from the fact that he allowed his first wife Maria of Brabant to be beheaded in 1256, because he falsely suspected her of adultery. As atonement for this deed, Ludwig founded the monastery of Fürstenfeld. His second marriage was to Anna Glogowski, daughter of Konrad I, duke Glogowsko-Bytomski, and Salomea of Poland. There were no offspring from his first marriage, and the three children of his second marriage had no progeny.
     "Ludwig was a guardian for his nephew Konradin von Hohenstaufen. He arranged the dukedom of Swabia for him, and accompanied him on his Italian campaign of 1267 as far as Verona. His withdrawal meant that he was not involved in the destruction of Konradin, executed in Naples in 1268. However he profited materially from Konradin's death, as Konradin had appointed him as his successor and left him the so-called 'Konradin estates' in the Upper Palatinate, around Sulzbach, in southwest Bavaria and in Bavarian Swabia. Ludwig received confirmation of these acquisitions from Rudolf von Habsburg in exchange for his support in the election for German king. He also received the hand of Rudolf's daughter Mathilde as his third wife; they had five children, of whom four would have progeny: his sons Rudolf I ('der Stammler') and Ludwig IV ('der Bayer', the future emperor), and daughters Matilde and Agnes. With this marriage to Mathilde, Ludwig became a supporter of the Habsburgs, siding with his father-in-law against Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia. In 1276 he received his electorate, and in 1278 he took part in the battle of Dürnkrut (also known as the Battle on the Marchfeld) in which Ottokar II was killed.
     "After the death of his father-in-law in 1291 he could not push through the election of his brother-in-law Albrecht von Habsburg as German king (emperor-elect). Albrecht was forced to accept the election of Adolf of Nassau as German king (but in 1298 he mustered sufficient allies to defeat Adolf at Gelnheim (also called Gollheim), near Worms and Spiers).
     "While Ludwig was able to keep the electorate of the Palatinate, the Bavarian electorate reverted to Bohemia in 1289. Ludwig received considerable new estates for his dukedom - also in the Palatinate - and strongly built up his ducal power. He died on 2 February 1294 in his Palatinate residence in Heidelberg. His successor was his son Rudolf I from his third marriage with Mathilde von Habsburg."16

; Per Med Lands:
     "LUDWIG von Bayern (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 2 Feb 1294, bur Kloster Fürstenfeld). The Altahenses Annales record the birth "1229 Id Apr" of "Agnes ducissa Bawarie filium…Ludwicus"[452]. "Otto…Comes Palatini Reni Dux Bawarie" exchanged property with the abbot of Niederaltaich, naming "Ludovico filio nostro…et Heinrico fratre suo et sororibus suis Elysabet, Sophya et Agnete", by charter dated 17 Oct 1244[453]. He succeeded his father in 1253 as LUDWIG II "der Strenge" joint Duke of Bavaria, jointly with his brother Heinrich I. After joint rule became unworkable, he and his brother agreed a division of the family's territories in 1255, under which Ludwig became Duke of Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern) and Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" supported the candidature of "Rikardum comitem Cornubie, fratrem regis Anglie" as king of Germany by charter dated 26 Nov 1256[454]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig founded "abbaciam in Furstenfeld ordinis Cisterciensis" in 1263[455]. Rudolf I King of Germany appointed Duke Ludwig to preside over the implementation of his policy of return to the empire of all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274[456]. Duke Ludwig objected to his brother's claim to an electoral vote, confirmed in a 29 May 1276 agreement between the two designed to settle some of their differences[457]. The Notæ Altahenses record the death "1294 IV Non Feb" of "Ludwicus dux Bawarie"[458]. The Ratisponensis Annales record the death "1294 apud Haidelberch Kal Feb" of "Ludwicus comes palatinus Reni dux Bawarie"[459].
     "m firstly (2 Aug 1254) MARIE de Brabant, daughter of HENRI II Duke of Brabant & his first wife Maria von Staufen (-beheaded Donauwörth 1256, bur Donauwörth Heiliges Kreuz Stift). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names (in order) "Mechtildim comitissam Atrebatensem et Sancti Pauli, Mariam comitissam palatinam Reni, Beatricem lantgraviam Thuringie postea comitissam Flandrie, et Margaretam sanctiomonialem, postea abbatissam in Valle Ducis" as the daughters of "Henricus secundus et quintus dux Brabancie" and his first wife Marie[460]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria" as second of the four daughters of "Henricus…secundus dux" and his wife Maria, and her husband "duci Bavarie", specifying that he "impie et crudeliter" killed her[461]. The Annales Mellicenses in 1256 record that "Lodwicus Reni comes palatinus" had "Mariam uxorem suam, filiam ducis Brabancie" beheaded by her jailers "apud Werdam"[462]. The Continuatio Lambacensis clarifies that she was killed because of her adultery[463]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig beheaded his wife "Mariam ducissam Brabancie" in "castro Werde Suevico"[464]. The necrology of Freising Weihenstephan records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Maria palatine Reni decollate a sponse eius Ludovico palatino Reni"[465].
     "Betrothed (Bacharach 26 Nov 1256) to --- of Cornwall, daughter of RICHARD Earl of Cornwall & his second wife Sancha de Provence (-after 26 Nov 1256). "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" confirmed his betrothal "cum filia fratris…regis Anglie", or in case of impossibility "cum filia sororis eiusdem", by charter dated 25 Nov 1256[466]. This betrothal was arranged to confirm Duke Ludwig's agreement to support the candidature of Richard Earl of Cornwall as king of Germany, her dowry being 12,000 marks[467]. Duke Ludwig´s support for Earl Richard is confirmed in a charter dated 26 Nov 1256[468]. It is assumed that this daughter, concerning whom no other record has yet been found, was born from her father´s second marriage, as daughters from his first marriage would probably have been considered to old for betrothal at that date.
     "m secondly (24 Aug 1260) ANNA von Glogau, daughter of KONRAD I Duke of Glogau [Piast] & his first wife Salomea of Poland [Piast] ([1250/52]-25 Jun 1271, bur Fürstenfeld). The Altahenses Annales record the marriage in 1260 of "Ludwicus palatinus Rehni dux Bawarie" and "Annam filiam Chunradi ducis Polonie"[469]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1271 VI Kal Iul" of "Anna ducissa Bawarie"[470]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that the mother of Duke Ludwig died "1271 V Kal Iun" and was buried at Fürstenfeld[471].
     "m thirdly (Aachen 24 Oct 1273) MECHTILD von Habsburg, daughter of RUDOLF I King of Germany Graf von Habsburg & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg [Zollern] (Rheinfelden [1253]- Munich 22 or 23 Dec 1304, bur Fürstenfeld Cistercian Convent). The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses name "rex Rudolfus filiam suam…Mechthildam" as third wife of Duke Ludwig[472]. This third marriage was arranged to secure Duke Ludwig’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany, with a dowry of 10,000 marks. The Hermanni Altahenses Annales record that "1302…in vigilia Iohannis baptiste Rudolfus" captured "Mechtildem matrem suam, relictam Ludwici ducis…et Conradum de Oteling" at "castro Schilperg" and took them to Munich where Konrad von Oteling was beheaded "in die sancte Margarete…propter quondam infamiam"[473]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record the death "1304 10 Kal Ian" of "Mechthildis mater Rudolfi et Ludovici" and her burial at Fürstenfeld[474]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1305 11 Kal Ian" of "Methildis ducissa Bawaie"[475]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "XII Kal Jan" of "domina Mehtildis uxor Ludwici ducis Bawarie"[476]."
Med Lands cites:
[452] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1229, MGH SS XVII, p. 391.
[453] Monumenta Boica Vol. XI, LXXVI, p. 217.
[454] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.
[455] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[456] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), pp. 94-5.
[457] Bayley (1949), p. 188.
[458] Notæ Altahenses 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 422.
[459] Eberhardi Archidiaconi Ratisponensis Annales 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 594.
[460] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 65.
[461] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 8, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[462] Annales Mellicenses 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 509.
[463] Continuatio Lambacensis 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 559.
[464] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[465] Necrologium Weihenstephanense, Freising Necrologies, p. 203.
[466] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 63, p. 157.
[467] Bayley (1949), p. 66.
[468] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.
[469] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1260, MGH SS XVII, p. 399.
[470] Notæ Diessenses 1271, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[471] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[472] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[473] Hermanni Altahensis continuation tertia 1302, MGH SS XXIV, p. 56.
[474] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.7


; Per Med Lands:
     "MECHTILD (Rheinfelden [1253]-Munich 22 or 23 Dec 1304, bur Fürstenfeld Cistercian Convent). The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses name "rex Rudolfus filiam suam…Mechthildam" as third wife of Duke Ludwig[376]. This third marriage was arranged to secure Duke Ludwig’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany, with a dowry of 10,000 marks. The Hermanni Altahenses Annales record that "1302…in vigilia Iohannis baptiste Rudolfus" captured "Mechtildem matrem suam, relictam Ludwici ducis…et Conradum de Oteling" at "castro Schilperg" and took them to Munich where Konrad von Oteling was beheaded "in die sancte Margarete…propter quondam infamiam"[377]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record the death "1304 X Kal Ian" of "Mechthildis mater Rudolfi et Ludovici" and her burial at Fürstenfeld[378]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1305 XI Kal Ian" of "Methildis ducissa Bawaie"[379]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "XII Kal Jan" of "domina Mehtildis uxor Ludwici ducis Bawarie"[380].
     "m (Aachen 24 Oct 1273) as his third wife, LUDWIG II Duke of Upper Bavaria and Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 1/2 Feb 1294, bur Fürstenfeld)."
Med Lands cites:
[376] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[377] Hermanni Altahensis continuation tertia 1302, MGH SS XXIV, p. 56.
[378] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[379] Notæ Diessenses 1305, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[380] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIE de Brabant (-beheaded Donauwörth 18 Jan 1256, bur Donauwörth Heilige Kreuz-Stift). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names (in order) "Mechtildim comitissam Atrebatensem et Sancti Pauli, Mariam comitissam palatinam Reni, Beatricem lantgraviam Thuringie postea comitissam Flandrie, et Margaretam sanctiomonialem, postea abbatissam in Valle Ducis" as the daughters of "Henricus secundus et quintus dux Brabancie" and his first wife Marie[308]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria" as second of the four daughters of "Henricus…secundus dux" and his wife Maria, and her husband "duci Bavarie", specifying that he "impie et crudeliter" killed her[309]. The betrothal of one of the daughters of Henri II Duke of Brabant to Edward of England is recorded by Matthew Paris[310]. It is not certain that Marie was the daughter in question. However, she is the most likely candidate as her two older sisters were already married and her younger half-sister was only an infant at the time. The Annales Mellicenses in 1256 record that "Lodwicus Reni comes palatinus" had "Mariam uxorem suam, filiam ducis Brabancie" beheaded by her jailers "apud Werdam"[311]. The Continuatio Lambacensis clarifies that she was killed because of her adultery[312]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig beheaded his wife "Mariam ducissam Brabancie" in "castro Werde Suevico"[313]. The necrology of Freising Weihenstephan records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Maria palatine Reni decollate a sponse eius Ludovico palatino Reni"[314].
     "Betrothed (1247) to EDWARD of England, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey). He succeeded his father in 1372 as EDWARD I “Longshanks” King of England.
     "m (2 Aug 1254) as his first wife, LUDWIG II "der Strenge" joint Duke of Bavaria, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 1/2 Feb 1294, bur Fürstenfeld)."
Med Lands cites:
[308] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 65.
[309] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 8, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[310] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (London) (“MP”), Vol, IV, 1247, pp. 623 and 645.
[311] Annales Mellicenses 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 509.
[312] Continuatio Lambacensis 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 559.
[313] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[314] Necrologium Weihenstephanense, Freising Necrologies, p. 203.19


; Per Med Lands:
     "[daughter (-after 25 Nov 1256). "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" confirmed his betrothal "cum filia fratris…regis Anglie", or in case of impossibility "cum filia sororis eiusdem", by charter dated 25 Nov 1256[259]. This betrothal was arranged to confirm Duke Ludwig's agreement to support the candidature of Richard Earl of Cornwall as king of Germany, her dowry being 12,000 marks[260]. Duke Ludwig’s support for Earl Richard is confirmed in a charter dated 26 Nov 1256[261]. It is assumed that this daughter, concerning whom no other record has yet been found, was born from her father’s second marriage, as daughters from his first marriage would probably have been considered to old for betrothal at that date.
     "Betrothed (Bacharach 26 Nov 1256) to LUDWIG II "der Strenge" Duke of Bavaria, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 2 Feb 1294, bur Kloster Fürstenfeld).]"
Med Lands cites:
[259] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 63, p. 157.
[260] Bayley (1949), p. 66.
[261] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.11
He was Duke of Bavaria between 1253 and 1255 at Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).17 He was Count Palatine of the Rhine between 1253 and 1294.17 He was Pfgf bei Rhein between 1253 and 1294.5 He was Duke of Upper Bavaria between 1255 and 1294.5,17

Family 1

Marie (?) of Brabant b. c 1226, d. 18 Jan 1256

Family 2

NN (?) of Cornwall d. a 25 Nov 1256

Family 3

Anna (?) von Glogau b. bt 1250 - 1252, d. 26 Jun 1271
Children

Family 4

Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg b. 1253, d. 23 Dec 1304
Children

Citations

  1. Eldest son and heir.
  2. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013385&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020285&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#LudwigIIDukedied1294. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant3.html
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast7.html
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_of_Brabant,_Duchess_of_Bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#dauRichardCornwallBetLudwigIIBavaria
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna Glogowski: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036537&tree=LEO
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013548&tree=LEO
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 January 2020), memorial page for Louis II of Bavaria (13 Apr 1229–2 Feb 1294), Find A Grave Memorial no. 55431742, citing Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/55431742/louis_ii-of_bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013385&tree=LEO
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_II,_Duke_of_Bavaria.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Mechtilddied1304
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#MarieBrabantdied1256.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036539&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036540&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Duke Ludwig of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027484&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I 'der Stammler': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027172&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008766&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig IV 'der Bayer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013549&tree=LEO

Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg1,2,3,4

F, #13820, b. 1253, d. 23 December 1304
FatherRudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,5,4,6,7 b. 1 May 1218, d. 15 Jul 1291
MotherGertrud/Anna von Hohenberg1,2,8,4,6,7 b. 1225, d. 16 Feb 1281
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg was born in 1253 at Rheinfelden, Landkreis Lörrach, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).2,4,3,6,9 She married Ludwig II "der Strenge" (?) Duke of Bavaria, Count and Elector Palatine of the Rhine, son of Otto II "der Erlauchte/the Illustrious" (?) Duke of Bavaria and Agnes von Braunschweig Pfgfn bei Rhein, on 24 October 1273 at Aachen (Aix La Chapelle), Stadtkreis Aachen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany (now);
His 3rd wife.1,2,4,3,10,11,12
Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg died on 23 December 1304 at Munich (München), Stadtkreis München, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).2,3,4,6
Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg was buried after 23 December 1304 at Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Landkreis Lörrach, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     23 Dec 1304, Munich (München), Stadtkreis München, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Mathilde was born in Rheinfelden about 1253, the daughter of Rudolf I von Habsburg, the emperor-elect, king of the Germans, and Gertrud von Hohenberg. On 24 October 1273 at Aachen she became the third wife of Ludwig II 'der Strenge', Herzog von Bayern, son of Otto II, Herzog von Bayern, and Agnes, Pfalzgräfin am Rhein. They had five children, of whom four would have progeny; their sons Rudolf I ('der Stammler') and Ludwig IV ('der Bayer', the future emperor), and daughters Matilde and Agnes.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Rudolf I of Habsburg 1218–1291
          Gertrud Anna von Hohenberg 1225–1281
     Spouse
          Louis II of Bavaria 1229–1294 (m. 1273)
     Siblings
          Albrecht I 1255–1308
          Katharina von Habsburg 1256–1282
          Agnes Gertrud von Habsburg 1257–1322
          Clementina of Habsburg 1262–1293
          Rudolf II of Habsburg 1270–1290
          Jutta of Habsburg 1271–1297
          Karl von Habsburg 1276–1276
     BURIAL     Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Created by: Anonymous
     Added: 7 Feb 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 142321591.9
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "LUDWIG von Bayern (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 2 Feb 1294, bur Kloster Fürstenfeld). The Altahenses Annales record the birth "1229 Id Apr" of "Agnes ducissa Bawarie filium…Ludwicus"[452]. "Otto…Comes Palatini Reni Dux Bawarie" exchanged property with the abbot of Niederaltaich, naming "Ludovico filio nostro…et Heinrico fratre suo et sororibus suis Elysabet, Sophya et Agnete", by charter dated 17 Oct 1244[453]. He succeeded his father in 1253 as LUDWIG II "der Strenge" joint Duke of Bavaria, jointly with his brother Heinrich I. After joint rule became unworkable, he and his brother agreed a division of the family's territories in 1255, under which Ludwig became Duke of Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern) and Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" supported the candidature of "Rikardum comitem Cornubie, fratrem regis Anglie" as king of Germany by charter dated 26 Nov 1256[454]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig founded "abbaciam in Furstenfeld ordinis Cisterciensis" in 1263[455]. Rudolf I King of Germany appointed Duke Ludwig to preside over the implementation of his policy of return to the empire of all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274[456]. Duke Ludwig objected to his brother's claim to an electoral vote, confirmed in a 29 May 1276 agreement between the two designed to settle some of their differences[457]. The Notæ Altahenses record the death "1294 IV Non Feb" of "Ludwicus dux Bawarie"[458]. The Ratisponensis Annales record the death "1294 apud Haidelberch Kal Feb" of "Ludwicus comes palatinus Reni dux Bawarie"[459].
     "m firstly (2 Aug 1254) MARIE de Brabant, daughter of HENRI II Duke of Brabant & his first wife Maria von Staufen (-beheaded Donauwörth 1256, bur Donauwörth Heiliges Kreuz Stift). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names (in order) "Mechtildim comitissam Atrebatensem et Sancti Pauli, Mariam comitissam palatinam Reni, Beatricem lantgraviam Thuringie postea comitissam Flandrie, et Margaretam sanctiomonialem, postea abbatissam in Valle Ducis" as the daughters of "Henricus secundus et quintus dux Brabancie" and his first wife Marie[460]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria" as second of the four daughters of "Henricus…secundus dux" and his wife Maria, and her husband "duci Bavarie", specifying that he "impie et crudeliter" killed her[461]. The Annales Mellicenses in 1256 record that "Lodwicus Reni comes palatinus" had "Mariam uxorem suam, filiam ducis Brabancie" beheaded by her jailers "apud Werdam"[462]. The Continuatio Lambacensis clarifies that she was killed because of her adultery[463]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig beheaded his wife "Mariam ducissam Brabancie" in "castro Werde Suevico"[464]. The necrology of Freising Weihenstephan records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Maria palatine Reni decollate a sponse eius Ludovico palatino Reni"[465].
     "Betrothed (Bacharach 26 Nov 1256) to --- of Cornwall, daughter of RICHARD Earl of Cornwall & his second wife Sancha de Provence (-after 26 Nov 1256). "L…comes palatinus Rheni, dux Bawarie" confirmed his betrothal "cum filia fratris…regis Anglie", or in case of impossibility "cum filia sororis eiusdem", by charter dated 25 Nov 1256[466]. This betrothal was arranged to confirm Duke Ludwig's agreement to support the candidature of Richard Earl of Cornwall as king of Germany, her dowry being 12,000 marks[467]. Duke Ludwig´s support for Earl Richard is confirmed in a charter dated 26 Nov 1256[468]. It is assumed that this daughter, concerning whom no other record has yet been found, was born from her father´s second marriage, as daughters from his first marriage would probably have been considered to old for betrothal at that date.
     "m secondly (24 Aug 1260) ANNA von Glogau, daughter of KONRAD I Duke of Glogau [Piast] & his first wife Salomea of Poland [Piast] ([1250/52]-25 Jun 1271, bur Fürstenfeld). The Altahenses Annales record the marriage in 1260 of "Ludwicus palatinus Rehni dux Bawarie" and "Annam filiam Chunradi ducis Polonie"[469]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1271 VI Kal Iul" of "Anna ducissa Bawarie"[470]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that the mother of Duke Ludwig died "1271 V Kal Iun" and was buried at Fürstenfeld[471].
     "m thirdly (Aachen 24 Oct 1273) MECHTILD von Habsburg, daughter of RUDOLF I King of Germany Graf von Habsburg & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg [Zollern] (Rheinfelden [1253]- Munich 22 or 23 Dec 1304, bur Fürstenfeld Cistercian Convent). The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses name "rex Rudolfus filiam suam…Mechthildam" as third wife of Duke Ludwig[472]. This third marriage was arranged to secure Duke Ludwig’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany, with a dowry of 10,000 marks. The Hermanni Altahenses Annales record that "1302…in vigilia Iohannis baptiste Rudolfus" captured "Mechtildem matrem suam, relictam Ludwici ducis…et Conradum de Oteling" at "castro Schilperg" and took them to Munich where Konrad von Oteling was beheaded "in die sancte Margarete…propter quondam infamiam"[473]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record the death "1304 10 Kal Ian" of "Mechthildis mater Rudolfi et Ludovici" and her burial at Fürstenfeld[474]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1305 11 Kal Ian" of "Methildis ducissa Bawaie"[475]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "XII Kal Jan" of "domina Mehtildis uxor Ludwici ducis Bawarie"[476]."
Med Lands cites:
[452] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1229, MGH SS XVII, p. 391.
[453] Monumenta Boica Vol. XI, LXXVI, p. 217.
[454] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.
[455] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[456] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), pp. 94-5.
[457] Bayley (1949), p. 188.
[458] Notæ Altahenses 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 422.
[459] Eberhardi Archidiaconi Ratisponensis Annales 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 594.
[460] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 65.
[461] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 8, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[462] Annales Mellicenses 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 509.
[463] Continuatio Lambacensis 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 559.
[464] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[465] Necrologium Weihenstephanense, Freising Necrologies, p. 203.
[466] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 63, p. 157.
[467] Bayley (1949), p. 66.
[468] Wittelsbach Urkundenbuch, I, 64, p. 158.
[469] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1260, MGH SS XVII, p. 399.
[470] Notæ Diessenses 1271, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[471] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[472] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[473] Hermanni Altahensis continuation tertia 1302, MGH SS XXIV, p. 56.
[474] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.12


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 60.
2. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: page 64.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.1.41.7


; Per Genealogics: "Mathilde was born in Rheinfelden about 1253, the daughter of Rudolf I von Habsburg, the emperor-elect, king of the Germans, and Gertrud von Hohenberg. On 24 October 1273 at Aachen she became the third wife of Ludwig II 'der Strenge', Herzog von Bayern, son of Otto II, Herzog von Bayern, and Agnes, Pfalzgräfin am Rhein. They had five children, of whom four would have progeny; their sons Rudolf I ('der Stammler') and Ludwig IV ('der Bayer', the future emperor), and daughters Matilde and Agnes. Mathilde died at Munich on 23 December 1304, ten years after her husband."7

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Matilda of Habsburg or Melchilde (1253 in Rheinfelden[1] – 23 December 1304 in Munich, Bavaria) was the eldest daughter of Rudolph I of Germany and Gertrude of Hohenburg. She was regent of Bavaria in the minority of her son.
Marriage
     "On 24 October 1273, Matilda married Louis II, Duke of Bavaria, in Aachen, she was his third and final wife. There was a large age difference, Louis was twenty three years older than Matilda.
     "Matilda and Louis had the following children:
1. Agnes (d. 1345), married to:
     1. 1290 in Donauwörth Landgrave Henry the Younger of Hesse;
     2. 1298/1303 Henry I "Lackland", Margrave of Brandenburg.
2. Rudolf I (4 October 1274, Basle – 12 August 1319).
3. Mechthild (1275 – 28 March 1319, Lüneburg), married 1288 to Duke Otto II of Brunswick-Lüneburg.
4. Louis IV (1 April 1282, Munich – 11 October 1347 in Puch, near Fürstenfeldbruck).

Widowhood and regency
     "On her husband's death in 1294, Matilda acted as regent for her young son Rudolf. A decision was made for Matilda to take part of the duchy and her son to take the other part. Matilda took a large part of Upper Bavaria while her son took the cities such as: Ingolstadt, Langenfeld and Rietberg. Within a couple of years her son came of age and ruled the kingdom by himself.
     "Though Matilda had her younger son, Louis partly educated in Vienna and became co-regent of his brother Rudolf I in Upper Bavaria in 1301 with the support of Matilda and her brother King Albert I, he quarreled with the Habsburgs from 1307 over possessions in Lower Bavaria. A civil war against his brother Rudolf due to new disputes on the partition of their lands was ended in 1313, when peace was made at Munich.
     "Matilda and Rudolf continued to be at odds and in 1302 Matilda was arrested by Rudolf and brought to Munich, where she signed an agreement promising never to interfere in the government again, but as soon as she was outside the borders of Bavaria, Matilda declared the agreement null and void, and got the support of her brother, Albert, Louis the Bavarian and others.[2]
     "Matilda's son, Louis, defeated his Habsburg cousin Frederick the Handsome. Originally, he was a friend of Frederick, with whom he had been raised. However, armed conflict arose when the tutelage over the young Dukes of Lower Bavaria (Henry XIV, Otto IV and Henry XV) was entrusted to Frederick. On 9 November 1313, Frederick was beaten by Louis in the Battle of Gamelsdorf and had to renounce the tutelage.[3]
     "Matilda died on 23 December 1304 at Munich, Bavaria.
References
1. Cawley, Charles (13 March 2008), Austria: Mechtild died 1304, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
2. "Matilda of Habsburg's entry at Women in power 1250-1300". guide2womenleaders.com.
3. Marek, Miroslav. "A listing of descendants of Rudolph I of Germany". Genealogy.EU.[self-published source][better source needed]"13 Mathilda (?) von Hapsburg was also known as Mechtild von Hapsburb.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "MECHTILD (Rheinfelden [1253]-Munich 22 or 23 Dec 1304, bur Fürstenfeld Cistercian Convent). The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses name "rex Rudolfus filiam suam…Mechthildam" as third wife of Duke Ludwig[376]. This third marriage was arranged to secure Duke Ludwig’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany, with a dowry of 10,000 marks. The Hermanni Altahenses Annales record that "1302…in vigilia Iohannis baptiste Rudolfus" captured "Mechtildem matrem suam, relictam Ludwici ducis…et Conradum de Oteling" at "castro Schilperg" and took them to Munich where Konrad von Oteling was beheaded "in die sancte Margarete…propter quondam infamiam"[377]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record the death "1304 X Kal Ian" of "Mechthildis mater Rudolfi et Ludovici" and her burial at Fürstenfeld[378]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1305 XI Kal Ian" of "Methildis ducissa Bawaie"[379]. The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "XII Kal Jan" of "domina Mehtildis uxor Ludwici ducis Bawarie"[380].
     "m (Aachen 24 Oct 1273) as his third wife, LUDWIG II Duke of Upper Bavaria and Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 1/2 Feb 1294, bur Fürstenfeld)."
Med Lands cites:
[376] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[377] Hermanni Altahensis continuation tertia 1302, MGH SS XXIV, p. 56.
[378] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[379] Notæ Diessenses 1305, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[380] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360.6

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013548&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013544&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Mechtilddied1304. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013548&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Hohenberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013545&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 January 2020), memorial page for Matilde von Habsburg (unknown–23 Dec 1304), Find A Grave Memorial no. 142321591, citing Klosterkirche Fürstenfeld, Furstenfeldbruck, Landkreis Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany ; Maintained by Anonymous (contributor 47882760), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/142321591/matilde-von-habsburg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013385&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#LudwigIIDukedied1294
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I 'der Stammler': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027172&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008766&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig IV 'der Bayer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013549&tree=LEO

Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #13821, b. 1 May 1218, d. 15 July 1291
FatherAlbrecht IV 'the Wise' von Habsburg Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf in Elzas3,5,8,6,9 b. c 1188, d. 13 Dec 1240
MotherHeilwig (?) von Kyburg3,6,10,5 d. 30 Apr 1260
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor was born on 1 May 1218 at Burg Limburg am Rhein, Oberhein, Germany (now).3,5,6,11 He married Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg, daughter of Burchard V von Zollern Graf von Hohenberg and Mechtild (?) von Tübingen, in 1245;
His 1st wife. Med Lands says m. 1243 or 1245.1,3,5,7,12,13 Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor married Isabelle/Agnes (?) de Bourgogne, comtesse de Nevers, Dame de Vieux-Chateau et d´Aigney-le Duc, daughter of Hugues IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte de Châlons, titular King of Thessalonica and Béatrix (?) de Champagne, Dame de l'Isle-sous-Montréal, in May 1284 at Basel, Switzerland; his 2nd wife, her 1st husband.3,4,6,5,7
Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor died on 15 July 1291 at Germersheim near Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany (now), at age 73.3,6,5,11
Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 15 July 1291 at Cathedral of Speyer (Kaiser Dom), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 May 1218, Landkreis Emmendingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     15 Jul 1291 (aged 73), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Royalty. Born at the Limburg Castle as eldest son of Albrecht IV von Habsburg and Heilwig von Kyburg. He was elected german king in 1273 succeeding Alfonso of Castile and Richard of Cornwall.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Gertrud Anna von Hohenberg 1225–1281
     Children
          Matilde von Habsburg unknown–1304
          Albrecht I 1255–1308
          Katharina von Habsburg 1256–1282
          Agnes Gertrud von Habsburg 1257–1322
          Clementina of Habsburg 1262–1293
          Rudolf II of Habsburg 1270–1290
          Jutta of Habsburg 1271–1297
          Karl von Habsburg 1276–1276
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Jun 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial 27500983.14
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Rudolf was born on 1 May 1218, the son of Albrecht IV 'the Wise', Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf in Elzas, and Heilwig von Kyburg. In 1245 he married Gertrud von Hohenberg, daughter of Burchard V, Graf von Hohenberg, and Mechtild von Tübingen. They had ten children of whom two sons and five daughters would have progeny.
     "In 1272, after the 'Great Interregnum' of over twenty years confusion following the death of Emperor Friedrich II' son Conrad IV, Pope Gregory X ordered the German electors to restore order and elect an emperor. With the pope's approval they elected Rudolf, by then 54 years old, not because he was strong but exactly the opposite, as this would enable them to give or deny support at will.
     "Rudolf was trying to quell a rebellion in Basel when the news of his election was brought to him by a Hohenzollern who was the first to pay homage to him as emperor elect. The bishop of Basel, who had engineered the uprising, took fright and exclaimed: 'Sit fast, Lord God, or Rudolf will also have Thy throne!'
     "By the time of his election, Rudolf had spent most of his years fighting bandits in an effort to restore peace in his territories. In these campaigns he was not only brave but also ingenious. Once while besieging a castle he realised that at regular times a party of foragers on grey horses would venture into the surrounding countryside. He found about the same number of grey horses for some of his own men whom he dressed similarly, and at the appropriate time had them approach the castle while being pursued by his soldiers. The guards of the castle, presuming them to be their own, opened the gate to them and were killed, so that Rudolf's army was able to enter and capture the castle.
     "Another contender for the imperial crown had been King Ottokar Przemysl of Bohemia. Rich and powerful, he was not willing to accept Rudolf, and it was this resentment that forged Austria as the Habsburg stronghold. Ottokar Przemysl had obtained parts of Austria when the Babenbergs died out simply by moving in his soldiers. Rudolf brought his army to Vienna; again realising that a lengthy siege could only harm both sides he asked the Viennese to open their gates for their emperor or else he would destroy their considerable vineyards. Vienna gave in as apparently did Ottokar Przemysl, as he then allowed two of his children to be betrothed to two of Rudolf's. In 1278 Ottokar Przemysl arrived with a large army intending to re-take Vienna. Emperor Rudolf was outnumbered but he attacked first, making use of surprise. He shattered the Bohemians and Ottokar Przemysl was killed. Now in his position as emperor, he transferred the Austrian lands to his family. Having removed the Slavs from Austria, the Germans would from now on dominate the centre of Europe.
     "Gertrud died in 1281, and about 1284 Rudolf married the young Isabelle de Bourgogne, dame de Vieux-Château et d'Aigney-le-Duc, daughter of Hugues IV, duke of Burgundy, and his second wife Béatrix de Champagne, dame de L'Isle-sous-Montréal. This marriage did not result in progeny, but by an unnamed mistress Rudolf had a son Albrecht who would have progeny. Rudolf died at Spiers on 15 July 1291."6

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Gf Rudolf IV von Habsburg, Gf von Kyburg, Ldgf von Thurgau, German King (1.10.1273-91) =Rudolf I -cr Aachen 24.10.1273, Duke of Austria and Stiria (1276-82), *Burg Limburg am Rhein, Oberrhein 1.5.1218, +Speyer 15.7.1291, bur Speyer Dom; 1m: 1245 Gertrud von Hohenberg (*1225 +Vienna 1281); 2m: Basel 1284 Isabelle=Agnes de Bourgogne (*1270 +1323)"; for his issue see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html.5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 16.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 118.
3. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966., Docteur Gaston Sirjean, Reference: page 23.
4. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: page 64.
5. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:38.15


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Rudolf I, also known as Rudolf of Habsburg (German: Rudolf von Habsburg, Czech: Rudolf Habsburský; 1 May 1218 – 15 July 1291), was Count of Habsburg from about 1240 and King of Germany from 1273 until his death.
     "Rudolf's election marked the end of the Great Interregnum in the Holy Roman Empire after the death of the Hohenstaufen emperor Frederick II in 1250. Originally a Swabian count, he was the first Habsburg to acquire the duchies of Austria and Styria in opposition to his mighty rival, the P?emyslid king Ottokar II of Bohemia, whom he defeated in the 1278 Battle on the Marchfeld. The territories remained under Habsburg rule for more than 600 years, forming the core of the Habsburg Monarchy and the present-day country of Austria.
     "Rudolf was the first king of the Romans of the Habsburg dynasty, and he played a vital role in raising the comital house to the rank of Imperial princes. He was also the first of a number of late medieval count-kings, so called by the historian Bernd Schneidmüller, from the rival noble houses of Habsburg, Luxembourg, and Wittelsbach, all striving after the Roman-German royal dignity, which ultimately was taken over by the Habsburgs in 1438.
Early life
     "Rudolf was born on 1 May 1218 at Limburgh Castle near Sasbach am Kaiserstuhl in the Breisgau region of present-day southwestern Germany.[1] He was the son of Count Albert IV of Habsburg and of Hedwig, daughter of Count Ulrich of Kyburg.[2] Around 1232, he was given as a squire to his uncle, Rudolf I, Count of Laufenburg, to train in knightly pursuits.
Count of Habsburg
     "At his father's death in 1239, Rudolf inherited from him large estates around the ancestral seat of Habsburg Castle in the Aargau region of present-day Switzerland as well as in Alsace. Thus, in 1240[3] in order to quell the rising power of Rudolf and in an attempt to place the important "Devil’s Bridge" (Teufelsbrücke) across the Schöllenenschlucht under his direct control, Emperor Frederick II, granted Schwyz Reichsfreiheit in the Freibrief von Faenza.
     "In 1242, Hugh of Tuffenstein provoked Count Rudolf through contumelious expressions.[clarification needed] In turn, the Count of Habsburg had invaded his domains, yet failed to take his seat of power. As the day passed on,[clarification needed] Count Rudolf bribed the sentinels of the city and gained entry, killing Hugh in the process. Then in 1244, to help control Lake Lucerne and restrict the neighboring forest communities of Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden, Rudolf built near its shores Neuhabsburg Castle.[3] In 1245 Rudolf married Gertrude, daughter of Count Burkhard III of Hohenberg. He received as her dowry the castles of Oettingen, the valley of Weile, and other places in Alsace, and he became an important vassal in Swabia, the former Alemannic German stem duchy. That same year, Emperor Frederick II was excommunicated by Pope Innocent IV at the Council of Lyon. Rudolf sided against the Emperor, while the forest communities sided with Frederick. This gave them a pretext to attack and damage Neuhabsburg. Rudolf successfully defended it and drove them off. As a result, Rudolf, by siding with the Pope, gained more power and influence.[3]
     "Rudolf paid frequent visits to the court of his godfather, the Hohenstaufen emperor Frederick II, and his loyalty to Frederick and his son, King Conrad IV of Germany, was richly rewarded by grants of land. In 1254, he engaged with other nobles of the Staufen party against Bertold II, Bishop of Basle. When night fell, he penetrated the suburbs of Basle and burnt down the local nunnery, an act for which Pope Innocent IV excommunicated him and all parties involved. As a penance, he took up the cross and joined Ottokar II, King of Bohemia in the Prussian Crusade of 1254. Whilst there, he oversaw the founding of the city of Königsberg, which was named in memory of King Ottokar.
Rise to power
     "The disorder in Germany during the interregnum after the fall of the Hohenstaufen dynasty afforded an opportunity for Count Rudolf to increase his possessions. His wife was a Hohenberg heiress; and on the death of his childless maternal uncle Count Hartmann IV of Kyburg in 1264, Rudolf seized Hartmann's valuable estates. Successful feuds with the Bishops of Strasbourg and Basel further augmented his wealth and reputation, including rights over various tracts of land that he purchased from abbots and others.
     "These various sources of wealth and influence rendered Rudolf the most powerful prince and noble in southwestern Germany (where the tribal Duchy of Swabia had disintegrated, enabling its vassals to become completely independent). In the autumn of 1273, the prince-electors met to choose a king after Richard of Cornwall had died in England in April 1272. Rudolf's election in Frankfurt on 1 October 1273,[4] when he was 55 years old, was largely due to the efforts of his brother-in-law, the Hohenzollern burgrave Frederick III of Nuremberg. The support of Duke Albert II of Saxony and Elector Palatine Louis II had been purchased by betrothing them to two of Rudolf's daughters.
     "As a result, within the electoral college, King Ottokar II of Bohemia (1230–1278), himself a candidate for the throne and related to the late Hohenstaufen king Philip of Swabia (being the son of the eldest surviving daughter), was almost alone in opposing Rudolf. Other candidates were Prince Siegfried I of Anhalt and Margrave Frederick I of Meissen (1257–1323), a young grandson of the excommunicated Emperor Frederick II, who did not yet even have a principality of his own as his father was still alive. By the admission of Duke Henry XIII of Lower Bavaria instead of the King of Bohemia as the seventh Elector,[5] Rudolf gained all seven votes.
King of the Germans
     "Rudolf was crowned in Aachen Cathedral on 24 October 1273. To win the approbation of the Pope, Rudolf renounced all imperial rights in Rome, the papal territory, and Sicily, and promised to lead a new crusade. Pope Gregory X, despite the protests of Ottokar II of Bohemia, not only recognised Rudolf himself, but persuaded King Alfonso X of Castile (another grandson of Philip of Swabia), who had been chosen German (anti-)king in 1257 as the successor to Count William II of Holland, to do the same. Thus, Rudolf surpassed the two heirs of the Hohenstaufen dynasty whom he had earlier served so loyally.
     "In November 1274, the Imperial Diet at Nuremberg decided that all Crown estates seized since the death of the Emperor Frederick II must be restored, and that King Ottokar II must answer to the Diet for not recognising the new king. Ottokar refused to appear or to restore the duchies of Austria, Styria and Carinthia together with the March of Carniola, which he had claimed through his first wife, a Babenberg heiress, and which he had seized while disputing them with another Babenberg heir, Margrave Hermann VI of Baden. Rudolf refuted Ottokar's succession to the Babenberg patrimony, declaring that the provinces reverted to the Imperial crown due to the lack of male-line heirs. King Ottokar was placed under the imperial ban; and in June 1276 war was declared against him.
     "Having persuaded Ottokar's former ally Duke Henry XIII of Lower Bavaria to switch sides, Rudolf compelled the Bohemian king to cede the four provinces to the control of the royal administration in November 1276. Rudolf then re-invested Ottokar with the Kingdom of Bohemia, betrothed one of his daughters to Ottokar's son Wenceslaus II, and made a triumphal entry into Vienna. Ottokar, however, raised questions about the execution of the treaty, and procured the support of several German princes, again including Henry XIII of Lower Bavaria. To meet this coalition, Rudolf formed an alliance with King Ladislaus IV of Hungary and gave additional privileges to the Viennese citizens. On 26 August 1278, the rival armies met at the Battle on the Marchfeld, where Ottokar was defeated and killed. The Margraviate of Moravia was subdued and its government entrusted to Rudolf's representatives, leaving Ottokar's widow Kunigunda of Slavonia in control of only the province surrounding Prague, while the young Wenceslaus II was again betrothed to Rudolf's youngest daughter Judith.
     "Rudolf's attention next turned to the possessions in Austria and the adjacent provinces, which were taken into the royal domain. He spent several years establishing his authority there but found some difficulty in establishing his family as successors to the rule of those provinces. At length the hostility of the princes was overcome. In December 1282, at the Hoftag (imperial diet) in Augsburg, Rudolf invested his sons, Albert and Rudolf II, with the duchies of Austria and Styria and so laid the foundation of the House of Habsburg. Additionally, he made the twelve-year-old Rudolf Duke of Swabia, a merely titular dignity, as the duchy had been without an actual ruler since Conradin's execution.[citation needed] The 27-year-old Duke Albert, married since 1274 to a daughter of Count Meinhard II of Gorizia-Tyrol (1238–95), was capable enough to hold some sway in the new patrimony.
     "In 1286, King Rudolf fully invested Albert's father-in-law Count Meinhard with the Duchy of Carinthia, one of the conquered provinces taken from Ottokar. The Princes of the Empire did not allow Rudolf to give everything that was recovered to the royal domain to his own sons, and his allies needed their rewards too. Turning to the west, in 1281 he compelled Count Philip I of Savoy to cede some territory to him, then forced the citizens of Bern to pay the tribute that they had been refusing. In 1289 he marched against Count Philip's successor, Otto IV, compelling him to do homage.
     "In 1281, Rudolf's first wife died. On 5 February 1284, he married Isabella, daughter of Duke Hugh IV of Burgundy, the Empire's western neighbor in the Kingdom of France.
     "Rudolf was not very successful in restoring internal peace. Orders were indeed issued for the establishment of landpeaces[clarification needed] in Bavaria, Franconia and Swabia, and afterwards for the whole Empire. But the king lacked the power, resources, and determination to enforce them, although in December 1289 he led an expedition into Thuringia, where he destroyed a number of robber castles. In 1291, he attempted to secure the election of his son Albert as German king. The electors refused, however, claiming inability to support two kings, but in reality, perhaps, wary of the increasing power of the House of Habsburg. Upon Rudolf's death they elected Count Adolf of Nassau.
Death
     "Rudolf died in Speyer on 15 July 1291 and was buried in Speyer Cathedral. Although he had a large family, he was survived by only one son, Albert, afterwards the German king Albert I. Most of his daughters outlived him, apart from Katharina who had died in 1282 during childbirth and Hedwig who had died in 1285/6.
     "Rudolf's reign is most memorable for his establishment of the House of Habsburg as a powerful dynasty in the southeastern part of the realm. In the other territories, the centuries-long decline of Imperial authority since the days of the Investiture Controversy continued, and the princes were largely left to their own devices.
     "In the Divine Comedy, Dante finds Rudolf sitting outside the gates of purgatory with his contemporaries and berates him as "he who neglected that which he ought to have done".[6]
Family and children
     "Rudolf was married twice. First, in 1251, to Gertrude of Hohenberg[7] and second, in 1284, to Isabelle of Burgundy, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy.[7] All children were from the first marriage.
1. Matilda (c. 1253, Rheinfelden – 23 December 1304, Munich), married 1273 in Aachen to Louis II, Duke of Bavaria[8] and became mother of Rudolf I, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor.
2. Albert I of Germany (July 1255 – 1 May 1308), Duke of Austria and also of Styria.
3. Catherine (1256 – 4 April 1282, Landshut), married 1279 in Vienna to Otto III, Duke of Bavaria[8] who later (after her death) became the disputed King Bela V of Hungary and left no surviving issue.
4. Agnes [Gertrude] (ca. 1257 – 11 October 1322, Wittenberg), married 1273 to Albert II, Duke of Saxony[8] and became the mother of Rudolf I, Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg.
5. Hedwig (c. 1259 – 26 January 1285/27 October 1286), married 1270 in Vienna to Otto VI, Margrave of Brandenburg-Salzwedel and left no issue.[8]
6. Clementia (c. 1262 – after 7 February 1293), married 1281 in Vienna to Charles Martel of Anjou, the Papal claimant to the throne of Hungary[8]
7. Hartmann (1263, Rheinfelden – 21 December 1281), drowned in Rheinau.
8. Rudolf II, Duke of Austria and Styria (1270 – 10 May 1290, Prague), titular Duke of Swabia, father of John the Parricide of Austria.
9. Judith of Habsburg (Jutte/Bona) (13 March 1271 – 18 June 1297, Prague), married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anne of Bohemia (1290–1313), duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330), countess of Luxembourg.
10. Samson (before 19 Oct 1275 – died young).
11. Charles (14 February 1276 – 16 August 1276).

Rudolf's last legitimate agnatic descendant was Maria Theresa, Holy Roman Empress (1717–1780), by Albert I of Germany's fourth son Albert II, Duke of Austria.
See also
** Kings of Germany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_tree_of_the_German_monarchs
References
Citations
1. Coxe 1847, p. 5.
2. Emerton 1917, p. 76.
3. Encyclopædia Britannica. 26. 1911, pp. 247
4. Die Habsburger. Eine Europäische Familiengeschichte, Brigitte Vacha, Sonderausgabe 1996, Zeittafel p. 16
5. Vacha, "1273 wurde Rudolf von Habsburg von den sieben Kurfürsten zum König gewählt" - "statt dem Böhmenkönig dem bayerischen Herzogtum die siebente Kurstimme übertragen wurde", pp. 32-33
6. Dante. The Divine Comedy; Purgatorio: Canto VII. He who sits highest, and the semblance bears Of having what he should have done neglected, And to the others’ song moves not his lips, Rudolph the Emperor was, who had the power To heal the wounds that Italy have slain, So that through others slowly she revives.
7. Duggan 1997, p. 108.
8. Earenfight 2013, p. 173.
Bibliography
** Abbott, John S. C. (1877). Austria: It's Rise and Present Power. World's Best Histories. New York: The Cooperative Publication Society.
** Chisholm, Hugh (ed.) Rudolf I King of Germany. Encyclopædia Britannica. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
** Coxe, William (1847). History of the House of Austria. 1. London: Henry G. Bohn.
** Duggan, Anne J., ed. (1997). Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe. The Boydell Press.
** Earenfight, Theresa (2013). Queenship in Medieval Europe. Palgrave Macmillan.
** Emerton, Ephraim (1917). The Beginnings of Modern Europe (1250-1450). Ginn and Company.
** Kohlrausch, Frederick (1847). History of Germany. New York: D. Appleton & Co.
External links
** Encyclopedia of Austria: http://www.aeiou.at/aeiou.encyclop.r/r920415.htm;internal&action=_setlanguage.action?LANGUAGE=en."16

; Per Med Lands:
     "RUDOLF von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Ellenhardi Chronicon names "Ruodolfus rex Romanorum" as son of "Alberti comitis in Habichburg…lantgravius Alsatie superioris"[353]. The Chronicon Colmarense records the birth "1218 Kal Mai" of "comes Rudolfus de Habisburch", specifying that he was "de progenie ducis Zeringie"[354]. He succeeded his father in 1240 as Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf von Thurgau, at which time the family’s territories extended from the left bank of the Rhine at Lake Constance to the Vosges. He was one of the few Swabian noblemen who remained loyal to Konrad IV King of Germany against the papal party and the anti-king Willem II Count of Holland, but defected to the papal side in 1251[355]. Landgraf von Kiburg, after the death of his maternal uncle Graf Hartmann in 1264. He was elected RUDOLF I King of Germany 1 Oct 1273 at Frankfurt-am-Main, with the support especially of Werner von Eppenstein Archbishop of Mainz and of Friedrich Burggraf von Nürnberg, defeating the rival candidate P?emysl Otakar II King of Bohemia and Duke of Austria. He was crowned at Aachen 24 Oct 1273. King Rudolf immediately implemented the policy of return to the empire of all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274[356]. This included the return of the duchies of Austria and Styria from P?emysl Otakar II King of Bohemia, against whom Rudolf declared war. A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[357]. Rudolf became Duke of Austria and Steiermark (Styria) after King Otakar’s abdication under the temporary peace of 21 Nov 1276, confirmed by treaty 6 May 1277. Rudolf's position was confirmed definitively after he defeated King Otakar at the battle of Marchfeld near Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278. Duke Rudolf abdicated in Austria and Styria in favour of his sons Albrecht I and Rudolf II in Dec 1282. Negotiations were underway with Pope Gregory X for Rudolf’s coronation as emperor 2 Feb 1276, but these were suspended by the Pope’s death 10 Jan 1276. The premature deaths of the three succeeding Popes prevented finalisation of the negotiations, although Rudolf renounced all claims over the Romagna 14 Feb 1279 as part of the deal proposed with Pope Nicolas III. Pope Honorius IV set 2 Feb 1287 for the ceremony but Rudolf postponed the date as he was unable to arrive in Rome in time. German/Papal rivalry over the extent of the papal powers over the German clergy resulted in further postponements. King Rudolf died during the papacy of Nicolas IV without the coronation ever having taken place. The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "Id Jul 1290" of "dominus Ruod Romanorum rex"[358]. The Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ records that King Rudolf was buried at Speyer[359].
     "m firstly (1243 or 1245) GERTRUD [Anna] von Hohenberg, daughter of BURCHARD V Graf von Hohenberg [Zollern] & his wife Mechtild von Tübingen ([1230/35]-Vienna 16 Feb 1281, bur Basel Münster). The Chronicon Colmarense records that "comitissa uxor regis Rudolfi" was "filia comitis Burkardi de Hohenberg"[360]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "regina Rudolfi" was "filia sororis comitis Rudolfi de Tuwingen"[361]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Feb 1271 under which her husband "Rudolfus…de Kiburch et de Hapsburch comes nec non Alsacie Lantgravius" sold property "pro dote nobilis mulieris Gerdrudis uxoris nostre" to Kloster St Märgen auf dem Schwarzwald, with the consent of "fratrum suorum Alberti, Burchardi et Ulrici Comitum de Hohinberg", by charter dated 27 Feb 1271[362]. The Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses name "Anna uxor domini Rudolfi regis de Hapsburg" as sister of "comitem de Heigerloch"[363]. Heiress of Schlettstadt in Alsace. A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[364]. The Ratisponensis Annales record the death in 1281 of "uxor Rudolfi Romanorum regis Anna"[365]. The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record the death in 1281 of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis" in Bohemia and her burial "in Basilea"[366]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record the death "1281 in vigilia Matthiæ" of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis in Wina" and her burial "in Basilea"[367]. The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIII Kal Mar" of "Anna regina Romanorum consors…Ruodolfi Romanorum regis"[368].
     "m secondly (Rumarico monte 5 Feb 1284 or Basel [28 May/24 Jun] 1284 or [5 Feb or 6 Mar] 1285) AGNES [Isabelle] de Bourgogne, daughter of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Béatrice de Champagne (-after 20 Nov 1294). The Ellenhardi Chronicon records the marriage in 1284 "in civitate Basilicasi…intra festum Pentecostes et festum Iohannis baptiste" of King Rudolf and "Elisabetam filiam ducis Ottonis senioris Burgundie dicti de Tygun apud Rymilisberg"[369]. The Annales Colmarienses record the marriage "in Rumarico monte in festo sancte Agate" of "rex Ruodolphus" and "uxorem Gallicam" in 1284[370]. She adopted the name AGNES in 1284. The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas”[371]. Dame de Vieux-Château et d´Aigney-le Duc by grant 20 Nov 1294[372]. According to Du Chesne, Isabelle married “Pierre de Chambly le jeune seigneur de Chambly”[373]. This statement is proved incorrect by a document dated May 1321 which records that “Pierre de Chambli seigneur de Neaufle fils de Pierre seigneur de Chambli” had married “Isabeau fille de Jean de Bourgogne fils de Hugues de Vienne et d´Alis de Méranie comtesse palatine de Bourgogne” and that Isabelle “sœur de Henri de Bourgogne fils du susdit Jean” was present when the latter reached agreement with Jeanne Queen of France regarding “le château de Montrond près de Besançon”[374].
     "Mistress (1): ITA, daughter of --- (-before 1287). Her relationship with King Rudolf is confirmed by the charter dated 1287 under which [her son] “Albertus comes de Lewenstein” donated “jus patronatus ecclesie in Erstetten Spirensis diœceseos” to Kloster Lichtenstern in return for a mass on the anniversary of “matris nostre domine Ite prie memorie”[375], read together with the source quoted below which names Albrecht Graf von Löwenstein as King Rudolf´s son."
Med Lands cites:
[354] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 240.
[355] Bayley (1949), pp. 32 and 34.
[356] Leuschner (1980), pp. 94-5.
[357] Gingins-la-Sarra, F. de and Forez, F. (eds.) (1846) Recueil des Chartes, Statuts et Documents concernant l'ancien évêché de Lausanne (Lausanne) (“Lausanne Bishopric”) XXVI, p. 60.
[358] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357.
[359] Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ, MGH SS XVII, p. 134.
[360] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244.
[361] Annales Sindelfingenses 1277, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[362] Monumenta Hohenbergica 60, p. 37.
[363] Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses 1297, MGH SS XVII, p. 434.
[364] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60.
[365] Eberhardi Archidiaconi Ratisponensis Annales 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 594.
[366] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104.
[367] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[368] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357.
[369] Ellenhardi Chronicon, Gesta Invictissim domini Rudolfi Romanorum regis 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 127.
[370] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 211.
[371] Prost, B. and Bougenot, S. (eds.) (1904) Cartulaire de Hugues de Chalon (1220-1319) (Lon-le-Saunier) (“Hugues de Chalon”), 547, p. 414.
[372] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 580.
[373] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), p. 84.
[374] Depoin, J. ‘La maison de Chambly sous les capétiens direct’, Bulletin philologique et historique (1914), available at (25 Feb 2013), p. 153, quoting analysis by Dom Villevieille, Ms. fr. 31908, fol. 76.
[375] Kremer, C. J. ´Abhandlung von den graven von Loewenstein´, Acta Academiæ Theodoro-Palatinæ (1766), Vol. I, Urkunden, IV, p. 355.11


; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD [Anna] ([1230/35]-Vienna 16 Feb 1281, bur Basel Münster). The Chronicon Colmarense records that "comitissa uxor regis Rudolfi" was "filia comitis Burkardi de Hohenberg"[551]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "regina Rudolfi" was "filia sororis comitis Rudolfi de Tuwingen"[552]. The Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses name "Anna uxor domini Rudolfi regis de Hapsburg" as sister of "comitem de Heigerloch"[553]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Feb 1271 under which her husband "Rudolfus…de Kiburch et de Hapsburch comes nec non Alsacie Lantgravius" sold property "pro dote nobilis mulieris Gerdrudis uxoris nostre" to Kloster St Märgen auf dem Schwarzwald, with the consent of "fratrum suorum Alberti, Burchardi et Ulrici Comitum de Hohinberg", by charter dated 27 Feb 1271[554]. Heiress of Schlettstadt in Alsace. The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record the death in 1281 of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis" in Bohemia and her burial "in Basilea"[555]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record the death "1281 in vigilia Matthiæ" of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis in Wina" and her burial "in Basilea"[556].
     "m (1243 or 1245) as his first wife, RUDOLF Graf von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral). He was elected RUDOLF I King of Germany in 1273, and succeeded as Duke of Austria and Steiermark in 1276. "
Med Lands cites:
[551] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244.
[552] Annales Sindelfingenses 1277, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[553] Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses 1297, MGH SS XVII, p. 434.
[554] Monumenta Hohenbergica 60, p. 37.
[555] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104.
[556] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.13
He was Count of Habsburg between 1239 and 1291.16 He was King of Germany between 1273 and 1291.16 He was Holy Roman Emperor, RUDOLF I. The election fell to Rudolf of Habsburg (b. 1218), who ranked as a prince and wished to restore and retain in his family the duchy of Swabia. The Habsburgs or Hapsburgs (from Habichts-Burg, or Hawk-Castle; 10th century) of the district of Brugg (junction of the Aar and Reuss) had steadily expanded their lands in the Breisgau, Alsace, and Switzerland, emerging as one of the leading families of Swabia.

Indifferent to the Roman tradition, he concentrated on the advancement of his dynasty, and founded the power of the Habsburgs on territorial expansion of the family holdings and dynastic marriages. Edicts for the abolition of private war and support of local peace compacts (Landfrieden).

1276-1278: Struggle with Ottokar, king of Bohemia, over the usurped imperial fiefs of Austria, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola. Rudolf expelled Ottokar from Austria by force (1276), but allowed him to retain Bohemia and Moravia (after homage) as a buffer against Slavdom. Ottokar was ultimately defeated and killed (Aug. 26, 1278, Battle of the Marchfeld); investiture of Rudolf's sons with the imperial fiefs of Austria, Styria, and Carniola (1282) established the Habsburgs on the Danube.

Rudolf yielded the last remnants of Frederick II's great imperial fabric: confirmation of papal rights in Italy and Angevin rights in southern Italy (1275); renunciation of all imperial claims to the Papal States and Sicily (1279). between 1273 and 1291.17 He was Duke of Carinthia and Carniola between 1276 and 1286.16 He was Duke of Austria & Styria between 1278 and 1282.16

Family 1

Ita (?) d. b 1287
Child

Family 2

Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg b. 1225, d. 16 Feb 1281
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 259, 262. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg1.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013544&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht IV 'the Wise': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060861&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AlbrechtIVdied1240. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heilwig von Kyburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060862&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#RudolfIGermanydied1291B
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Hohenberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013545&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#GertrudAnnaHohenburgMRudolfIAustria
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 19 January 2020), memorial page for Rudolf I of Habsburg (1 May 1218–15 Jul 1291), Find A Grave Memorial no. 27500983, citing Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27500983/rudolf_i-of_habsburg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013544&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_I_of_Germany. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 259.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#AlbrechtISchenkenbergdied1304
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Gutadied1297
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Mechtilddied1304
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013548&tree=LEO
  22. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 262.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026220&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#AlbrechtIdied1308B
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katharina von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348879&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030037&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heilwig (Hedwig) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371547&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Klementia von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027065&tree=LEO
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#KlementiaHabsburgdied1295
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hartmann von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371546&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00341951&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#RudolfIIdied1290
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371545&tree=LEO

Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg1,2,3,4,5

F, #13822, b. 1225, d. 16 February 1281
FatherBurchard V von Zollern Graf von Hohenberg3,4,6,7 b. 1200, d. 14 Jul 1253
MotherMechtild (?) von Tübingen8,4,9
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg was born in 1225; Med Lands says b. 1230/3.5.10,4,5 She married Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor, son of Albrecht IV 'the Wise' von Habsburg Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf in Elzas and Heilwig (?) von Kyburg, in 1245;
His 1st wife. Med Lands says m. 1243 or 1245.1,3,11,10,4,5
Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg died on 16 February 1281.10,4,5
Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg was buried after 16 February 1281 at Stift Sankt Paul im Lavanttal, Basel, Wolfsberg Bezirk, Carinthia (Kärnten), Austria,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1225
     DEATH     16 Feb 1281 (aged 55–56)
     German queen. The daughter of Burchard III of Hohenberg was born around 1225 in Swabia. She married Rudolf of Habsburg around 1253 in Alsace and bore him ten children of which only her youngest didn't survive to adulthood. She is considered the progenitrix of the Habsburg family. She died in Vienna and, following her last wish, was buried in the cathedral of Basel. Later her body was transferred to the monastery of Sankt Blasien in the Black Forest. When this monastery was secularized she and the bodies of 15 other Habsburgs were moved to St Paul.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Burchard III von Hohenberg 1200–1253
     Spouse
          Rudolf I of Habsburg 1218–1291
     Siblings
          Albert II von Hohenberg 1235–1298
     Children
          Matilde von Habsburg unknown–1304
          Albrecht I 1255–1308
          Katharina von Habsburg 1256–1282
          Agnes Gertrud von Habsburg 1257–1322
          Clementina of Habsburg 1262–1293
          Rudolf II of Habsburg 1270–1290
          Jutta of Habsburg 1271–1297
          Karl von Habsburg 1276–1276
     BURIAL     Stift Sankt Paul im Lavanttal, Sankt Paul im Lavanttal, Wolfsberg Bezirk, Carinthia (Kärnten), Austria
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 6 Oct 2009
     Find A Grave Memorial 42764183.5,12
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "RUDOLF von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Ellenhardi Chronicon names "Ruodolfus rex Romanorum" as son of "Alberti comitis in Habichburg…lantgravius Alsatie superioris"[353]. The Chronicon Colmarense records the birth "1218 Kal Mai" of "comes Rudolfus de Habisburch", specifying that he was "de progenie ducis Zeringie"[354]. He succeeded his father in 1240 as Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf von Thurgau, at which time the family’s territories extended from the left bank of the Rhine at Lake Constance to the Vosges. He was one of the few Swabian noblemen who remained loyal to Konrad IV King of Germany against the papal party and the anti-king Willem II Count of Holland, but defected to the papal side in 1251[355]. Landgraf von Kiburg, after the death of his maternal uncle Graf Hartmann in 1264. He was elected RUDOLF I King of Germany 1 Oct 1273 at Frankfurt-am-Main, with the support especially of Werner von Eppenstein Archbishop of Mainz and of Friedrich Burggraf von Nürnberg, defeating the rival candidate P?emysl Otakar II King of Bohemia and Duke of Austria. He was crowned at Aachen 24 Oct 1273. King Rudolf immediately implemented the policy of return to the empire of all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274[356]. This included the return of the duchies of Austria and Styria from P?emysl Otakar II King of Bohemia, against whom Rudolf declared war. A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[357]. Rudolf became Duke of Austria and Steiermark (Styria) after King Otakar’s abdication under the temporary peace of 21 Nov 1276, confirmed by treaty 6 May 1277. Rudolf's position was confirmed definitively after he defeated King Otakar at the battle of Marchfeld near Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278. Duke Rudolf abdicated in Austria and Styria in favour of his sons Albrecht I and Rudolf II in Dec 1282. Negotiations were underway with Pope Gregory X for Rudolf’s coronation as emperor 2 Feb 1276, but these were suspended by the Pope’s death 10 Jan 1276. The premature deaths of the three succeeding Popes prevented finalisation of the negotiations, although Rudolf renounced all claims over the Romagna 14 Feb 1279 as part of the deal proposed with Pope Nicolas III. Pope Honorius IV set 2 Feb 1287 for the ceremony but Rudolf postponed the date as he was unable to arrive in Rome in time. German/Papal rivalry over the extent of the papal powers over the German clergy resulted in further postponements. King Rudolf died during the papacy of Nicolas IV without the coronation ever having taken place. The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "Id Jul 1290" of "dominus Ruod Romanorum rex"[358]. The Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ records that King Rudolf was buried at Speyer[359].
     "m firstly (1243 or 1245) GERTRUD [Anna] von Hohenberg, daughter of BURCHARD V Graf von Hohenberg [Zollern] & his wife Mechtild von Tübingen ([1230/35]-Vienna 16 Feb 1281, bur Basel Münster). The Chronicon Colmarense records that "comitissa uxor regis Rudolfi" was "filia comitis Burkardi de Hohenberg"[360]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "regina Rudolfi" was "filia sororis comitis Rudolfi de Tuwingen"[361]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Feb 1271 under which her husband "Rudolfus…de Kiburch et de Hapsburch comes nec non Alsacie Lantgravius" sold property "pro dote nobilis mulieris Gerdrudis uxoris nostre" to Kloster St Märgen auf dem Schwarzwald, with the consent of "fratrum suorum Alberti, Burchardi et Ulrici Comitum de Hohinberg", by charter dated 27 Feb 1271[362]. The Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses name "Anna uxor domini Rudolfi regis de Hapsburg" as sister of "comitem de Heigerloch"[363]. Heiress of Schlettstadt in Alsace. A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[364]. The Ratisponensis Annales record the death in 1281 of "uxor Rudolfi Romanorum regis Anna"[365]. The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record the death in 1281 of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis" in Bohemia and her burial "in Basilea"[366]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record the death "1281 in vigilia Matthiæ" of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis in Wina" and her burial "in Basilea"[367]. The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIII Kal Mar" of "Anna regina Romanorum consors…Ruodolfi Romanorum regis"[368].
     "m secondly (Rumarico monte 5 Feb 1284 or Basel [28 May/24 Jun] 1284 or [5 Feb or 6 Mar] 1285) AGNES [Isabelle] de Bourgogne, daughter of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Béatrice de Champagne (-after 20 Nov 1294). The Ellenhardi Chronicon records the marriage in 1284 "in civitate Basilicasi…intra festum Pentecostes et festum Iohannis baptiste" of King Rudolf and "Elisabetam filiam ducis Ottonis senioris Burgundie dicti de Tygun apud Rymilisberg"[369]. The Annales Colmarienses record the marriage "in Rumarico monte in festo sancte Agate" of "rex Ruodolphus" and "uxorem Gallicam" in 1284[370]. She adopted the name AGNES in 1284. The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas”[371]. Dame de Vieux-Château et d´Aigney-le Duc by grant 20 Nov 1294[372]. According to Du Chesne, Isabelle married “Pierre de Chambly le jeune seigneur de Chambly”[373]. This statement is proved incorrect by a document dated May 1321 which records that “Pierre de Chambli seigneur de Neaufle fils de Pierre seigneur de Chambli” had married “Isabeau fille de Jean de Bourgogne fils de Hugues de Vienne et d´Alis de Méranie comtesse palatine de Bourgogne” and that Isabelle “sœur de Henri de Bourgogne fils du susdit Jean” was present when the latter reached agreement with Jeanne Queen of France regarding “le château de Montrond près de Besançon”[374].
     "Mistress (1): ITA, daughter of --- (-before 1287). Her relationship with King Rudolf is confirmed by the charter dated 1287 under which [her son] “Albertus comes de Lewenstein” donated “jus patronatus ecclesie in Erstetten Spirensis diœceseos” to Kloster Lichtenstern in return for a mass on the anniversary of “matris nostre domine Ite prie memorie”[375], read together with the source quoted below which names Albrecht Graf von Löwenstein as King Rudolf´s son."
Med Lands cites:
[354] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 240.
[355] Bayley (1949), pp. 32 and 34.
[356] Leuschner (1980), pp. 94-5.
[357] Gingins-la-Sarra, F. de and Forez, F. (eds.) (1846) Recueil des Chartes, Statuts et Documents concernant l'ancien évêché de Lausanne (Lausanne) (“Lausanne Bishopric”) XXVI, p. 60.
[358] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357.
[359] Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ, MGH SS XVII, p. 134.
[360] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244.
[361] Annales Sindelfingenses 1277, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[362] Monumenta Hohenbergica 60, p. 37.
[363] Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses 1297, MGH SS XVII, p. 434.
[364] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60.
[365] Eberhardi Archidiaconi Ratisponensis Annales 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 594.
[366] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104.
[367] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[368] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357.
[369] Ellenhardi Chronicon, Gesta Invictissim domini Rudolfi Romanorum regis 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 127.
[370] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 211.
[371] Prost, B. and Bougenot, S. (eds.) (1904) Cartulaire de Hugues de Chalon (1220-1319) (Lon-le-Saunier) (“Hugues de Chalon”), 547, p. 414.
[372] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 580.
[373] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), p. 84.
[374] Depoin, J. ‘La maison de Chambly sous les capétiens direct’, Bulletin philologique et historique (1914), available at (25 Feb 2013), p. 153, quoting analysis by Dom Villevieille, Ms. fr. 31908, fol. 76.
[375] Kremer, C. J. ´Abhandlung von den graven von Loewenstein´, Acta Academiæ Theodoro-Palatinæ (1766), Vol. I, Urkunden, IV, p. 355.13


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 118.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:126.14


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Gertrude Anne of Hohenberg (c.?1225 – 16 February 1281) was German queen from 1273 until her death, by her marriage with King Rudolf I of Germany.[1] As queen consort, she became progenitor of the Austrian House of Habsburg.
Biography
     "Gertrude was born in Deilingen, Swabia to Count Burkhard V of Hohenberg (died 1253) and his wife Matilda (Mechtild), daughter of Count Palatine Rudolf II of Tübingen. The comital Hohenberg dynasty, a cadet branch of the Swabian House of Hohenzollern, then ruled over extended estates in southwestern Germany. Citing contemporary sources, Gertrude's descent was questioned by the Swiss historian Aegidius Tschudi (1505–1572), who postulated a Frohburg lineage; nevertheless, his objections have been disproved.
     "About 1251 in Alsace, Gertrude married Rudolf (1218–1291), son of Count Albert IV of Habsburg and Heilwig of Kyburg. She went on to live with her husband as a comital couple in Rheinfelden. They had eleven children:
     1. Matilda (c. 1253, Rheinfelden – 23 December 1304, Munich), married 1273 in Aachen to Louis II, Duke of Bavaria and became mother of Rudolf I, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor.
2. Albert I of Germany (July 1255 – 1 May 1308), Duke of Austria and also of Styria.
3. Catherine (1256 – 4 April 1282, Landshut), married 1279 in Vienna to Otto III, Duke of Bavaria who later (after her death) became the disputed King Bela V of Hungary and left no surviving issue.
4. Agnes [Gertrude] (c. 1257 – 11 October 1322, Wittenberg), married 1282 to Albert II, Duke of Saxony and became the mother of Rudolf I, Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg.
5. Hedwig (c. 1259 – 26 January 1285/27 October 1286), married 1279 in Vienna to Otto VI, Margrave of Brandenburg-Salzwedel and left no issue.
6. Clementia (c. 1262 – after 7 February 1293), married 1281 in Vienna to Charles Martel of Anjou, the Papal claimant to the throne of Hungary and mother of king Charles I of Hungary, as well as of queen Clementia of France, herself the mother of the baby king John I of France.
7. Hartmann (1263, Rheinfelden – 21 December 1281), drowned in Rheinau.
8. Rudolf II, Duke of Austria and Styria (1270 – 10 May 1290, Prague), titular Duke of Swabia, father of John the Patricide of Austria.
9. Judith of Habsburg (Jutte/Bona) (13 March 1271 – 18 June 1297, Prague), married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anne of Bohemia (1290–1313), duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330), countess of Luxembourg.
10. Samson (before 19 Oct 1275 – died young).
11. Charles (14 February 1276 – 16 August 1276).
     "Gertrude's husband was elected King of the Romans (as Rudolf I) in Frankfurt on 29 September 1273. The election was largely due to the efforts of her cousin Burgrave Frederick III of Nuremberg. Rudolf was crowned in Aachen Cathedral on 24 October 1273. As "Queen Anne" (Anna Regina) she served as his consort for the following eight years. Reluctant to interfere in politics, she witnessed Rudolf's struggles to secure his rule against the rivalling King Ottokar II of Bohemia, as well as his fruitless efforts to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor.
     "Gertrude died early in 1281 at her husband's residence in Vienna after a short severe illness. According to her will, she was buried in Basel Minster, alongside her youngest son Charles. King Rudolf, though he had engaged in lengthy conflicts with the Prince-Bishops of Basel, gave his consent to the funeral which took place on March 20. Centuries later, her mortal remains were solemnly transferred to Saint Blaise Abbey in 1770; today they rest at Saint Paul's Abbey in Carinthia.
     "King Rudolf remained a widower for three years and proceeded to marry Isabella of Burgundy.
References
1. Anne J. Duggan (2002). Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995. Boydell Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-85115-881-5.
External links
** Cawley, Charles, A listing of Swabian nobility, including the Dukes of Hohenberg, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GertrudAnnaHohenburgMRudolfIAustria
** Her profile at Royalty Pages
** A listing of descendants of Rudolph I of Germany: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html."15

; Per Genealogics:
     "Gertrud von Hohenberg was born in 1225, the eldest daughter of Burchard V, Graf von Hohenberg, and Mechtild von Tübingen. In 1245 she married Rudolf I von Habsburg, the future emperor-elect, son of Albrecht IV 'the Wise', Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf in Elzas, and Heilwig von Kyburg. They had ten children of whom two sons and five daughters would have progeny.
     "Her husband was elected King of Germany in Frankfurt on 1 October 1273, largely due to the efforts of her cousin Friedrich III, Burggraf von Nürnberg. Rudolf was crowned in Aachen on 24 October 1273, after which she styled herself Queen Anna. She served as his queen consort for the following eight years.
     "Gertrud died in Vienna on 16 February 1281. Her sarcophagus lies in the choir of the Basel Münster, together with that of her youngest son Karl who died as an infant. Her remains were moved in 1770 to the Benedictine abbey of St. Bastein in the Black Forest. Today they lie in the abbey of St. Paul in the Lavanttal in Carinthia.
     "Rudolf remained a widower for three years and then married Isabelle de Bourgogne, dame de Vieux-Château et d'Aigney-le-Duc, with whom he did not have progeny."14 EDV-22.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD [Anna] ([1230/35]-Vienna 16 Feb 1281, bur Basel Münster). The Chronicon Colmarense records that "comitissa uxor regis Rudolfi" was "filia comitis Burkardi de Hohenberg"[551]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "regina Rudolfi" was "filia sororis comitis Rudolfi de Tuwingen"[552]. The Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses name "Anna uxor domini Rudolfi regis de Hapsburg" as sister of "comitem de Heigerloch"[553]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Feb 1271 under which her husband "Rudolfus…de Kiburch et de Hapsburch comes nec non Alsacie Lantgravius" sold property "pro dote nobilis mulieris Gerdrudis uxoris nostre" to Kloster St Märgen auf dem Schwarzwald, with the consent of "fratrum suorum Alberti, Burchardi et Ulrici Comitum de Hohinberg", by charter dated 27 Feb 1271[554]. Heiress of Schlettstadt in Alsace. The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record the death in 1281 of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis" in Bohemia and her burial "in Basilea"[555]. The Annales Sindelfingenses record the death "1281 in vigilia Matthiæ" of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis in Wina" and her burial "in Basilea"[556].
     "m (1243 or 1245) as his first wife, RUDOLF Graf von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral). He was elected RUDOLF I King of Germany in 1273, and succeeded as Duke of Austria and Steiermark in 1276. "
Med Lands cites:
[551] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244.
[552] Annales Sindelfingenses 1277, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.
[553] Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses 1297, MGH SS XVII, p. 434.
[554] Monumenta Hohenbergica 60, p. 37.
[555] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104.
[556] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302.5
She was Queen consort of Germany between 29 September 1273 and 16 February 1281.15

Family

Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor b. 1 May 1218, d. 15 Jul 1291
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 262. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Hohenberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013545&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#GertrudAnnaHohenburgMRudolfIAustria. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Burchard V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013546&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#BurchardVdied1253B
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ancestors of Emperor of Charles IV: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ancest/karl4emp.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mechtild von Tübingen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060863&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg1.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 19 January 2020), memorial page for Gertrud Anna von Hohenberg (1225–16 Feb 1281), Find A Grave Memorial no. 42764183, citing Stift Sankt Paul im Lavanttal, Sankt Paul im Lavanttal, Wolfsberg Bezirk, Carinthia (Kärnten), Austria ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/42764183/gertrud_anna-von_hohenberg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#RudolfIGermanydied1291B
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Hohenberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013545&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_of_Hohenberg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Gutadied1297
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Mechtilddied1304
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013548&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026220&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#AlbrechtIdied1308B
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katharina von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348879&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030037&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heilwig (Hedwig) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371547&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Klementia von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027065&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#KlementiaHabsburgdied1295
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hartmann von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371546&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00341951&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#RudolfIIdied1290
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371545&tree=LEO

Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany1,2,3

M, #13823, b. circa 1255, d. 2 July 1298
FatherWalram II (?) Graf von Nassau4,3 b. 1220, d. 24 Jan 1276
MotherAdelheid/Mechtild von Katzenelnbogen4,3 d. 22 Feb 1288
Last Edited5 Feb 2020
     Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany was born circa 1255; Genealogy.EU & Med Lands says b. ca 1255; Genealogics says b. ca 1250.2,3,5 He married Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg, daughter of Gerlach I von Isenburg Lord of Limburg and der Lahn and Imagina von Blieskastel, circa 1271.1,2,3,6,5
Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany died on 2 July 1298 at near Göllheim, Germany (now); killed in battle.2,3,5
Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany was buried after 2 July 1298 at Cathedral of Speyer (Kaiser Dom), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1255
     DEATH     2 Jul 1298 (aged 42–43), Gollheim, Donnersbergkreis, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Count of Nassau and from 1292 until 1298 german king. He was first buried at the Kloster Rosenthal and was moved to Speyer in 1309 beside his successor Albrecht. He was married to Imagina of Isenburg who bore him 8 children.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Imagina von Isenburg-Limburg von Nassau
     Children
          Mechtild von Nassau unknown–1328
          Adelheid von Nassau unknown–1338
          Gerlach I von Nassau 1288–1361
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Jun 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial 27500992.2,7
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ADOLF von Nassau ([1255]-killed in battle near Göllheim 2 Jul 1298). A manuscript dated to end 13th/early 14th century records "…filii Henrici comitis…Walleramus, Methildis comitissa et filius eius Adolfus rex, Otto et uxor eius Agnes…"[102]. He succeeded his father in 1276 as Graf von Nassau at Wiesbaden. "Adolphus comes de Nassowe et Ymagina nostra collateralis" exchanged property with the church of Weilburg by charter dated 27 Feb 1284[103]. He was elected ADOLF King of Germany at Frankfurt am Main 5 May 1292, crowned at Aachen 24 Jun 1292. King Adolf provoked the open hostility of his electors because of his neutrality towards England, his opposition to France and his efforts to consolidate his family's position in Germany. He was charged with offences which included desecration of churches, breaches of oath and failure to keep the peace, tried in his absence and deposed 23 Jun 1298 in Mainz Cathedral by the electors. A new conflict with the papacy followed as the Pope had not been consulted[104]. King Adolf refused to accept the ruling and was killed in battle by Albrecht I Duke of Austria who had been elected to succeed as King of Germany. The Notæ Altahenses record that "Adolfus rex Romanorum" was killed in battle "1298 5 Non Iul"[105]. The necrology of Arnstein an der Lahn records the death 2 Jul 1198 of "Adolphus…Romanorum rex"[106].
     "m ([1271]) IMAGINA von Isenburg-Limburg, daughter of GERLACH [I] von Isenburg in Limburg an der Lahn & his wife Imagina von Blieskastel (-29 Aug, after 1317, bur Klarenthal). "Adolphus comes de Nassowe et Ymagina nostra collateralis" exchanged property with the church of Weilburg by charter dated 27 Feb 1284[107]. “Agnes etzewanne...wirtin was des...Hern Henriches von Westirburg” requested service from “rittere Hern Johanne von Beldirsehm”, with the consent of “unsir sune Johannis und Renhartis...Kuneginnen vrowen...Kunig Adulvis...Greven Gerlaches und Greven Walrabin irre sune...Hn Gerlaches von Limpurg”, by charter dated 1316[108]. Adolf & his wife had eight children."
Med Lands cites:
[102] Arnstein an der Lahn Necrologium, Abschnitt IV, folio 3, p. 14.
[103] Arnstein an der Lahn, 49, p. 45.
[104] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), p. 99.
[105] Notæ Altahenses 1298, MGH SS XVII, p. 423.
[106] Arnstein an der Lahn Necrologium, p. 133.
[107] Arnstein an der Lahn, 49, p. 45.
[108] Lehmann, J. G. (1866) Geschichte und Genealogie der Dynasten von Westerburg (Wiesbaden) (“Lehmann, Westerburg (1866)”), Urkundenbuch Westerburg, 15, p. 124.3


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adolf (c. 1255 – 2 July 1298) was Count of Nassau from about 1276 and elected King of Germany (King of the Romans) from 1292 until his deposition by the prince-electors in 1298. He was never crowned by the Pope, which would have secured him the title of Holy Roman Emperor. He was the first physically and mentally healthy ruler of the Holy Roman Empire ever to be deposed without a papal excommunication. Adolf died shortly afterwards in the Battle of Göllheim fighting against his successor Albert of Habsburg.
     "He was the second in the succession of so-called count-kings of several rivalling comital houses striving after the Roman-German royal dignity.
     "His last agnatic dynastic descendant was William IV of Luxembourg.
Family
     "Adolf was the reigning count of a small German state. He was born about 1255 and was the son of Walram II, Count of Nassau and Adelheid of Katzenelnbogen. Adolf’s brother was Dieter of Nassau [de], who was appointed Archbishop of Trier in 1300.
     "Adolf was married in 1270 to Imagina of Isenburg-Limburg (died after 1313) and they had eight children. Agnes of Isenburg-Limburg, the sister of Imagina, was married to Henry (Heinrich) of Westerburg, the brother of Siegfried II of Westerburg, the Archbishop of Cologne.
Career as Count of Nassau
     "In 1276 or 1277, Adolf followed his father as Count of Nassau. From his father, he inherited the family’s lands south of the Lahn River in the Taunus Mountains. These included Wiesbaden and Idstein, as fiefdoms, and the Vogtship in Weilburg under the Bishopric of Worms. He also shared ownership of the family homelands around the castles of Nassau and Laurenburg.
     "Around 1280, Adolf became involved in the Nassau-Eppstein Feud [de] with the Lords of Eppstein, in which the city of Wiesbaden was devastated and Sonnenberg Castle destroyed. The feud was settled in 1283, after which the city and the castle were rebuilt. Sonnenberg, along with Idstein, became Adolf’s residence. He granted Idstein town privileges in 1287 and built its fortifications.
     "Through his uncle, Eberhard I of Katzenelnbogen, Adolf came to the court of King Rudolf I of Habsburg. King Rudolf awarded him with the Burghauptmannamt (Castle Lordship) of Kalsmunt Castle in Wetzlar and a year later that of Gutenfels Castle near Kaub (where he became a vassal of the Counts Palatine of the Rhine).
     "Before his election, Adolf’s political activities had been limited to his role as Bundesgenosse of the Archbishop of Cologne. Adolf had no particular office, but likely became known through his involvement with the Archbishops of Cologne and Mainz in the politics of the Middle Rhine and Mainz areas. He spoke German, French, and Latin, which was rare at that time for nobles.
     "After his election, King Adolf of Nassau would only rarely be in his home country, having transferred the government there to his burgmen. On 17 January 1294, he purchased Weilburg for 400 pounds from the Bishopric of Worms. He granted Weilburg town privileges on 29 December 1295. He also established the Clarisse abbey of Klarenthal near Wiesbaden in 1296.
Election as King of the Romans
     "Rudolf I of Habsburg died on 15 July 1291. For many years before his death, Rudolf had tried to secure the election of his eldest son Albert (Albrecht) as his successor. He was thwarted, however, by the opposition of the Archbishop of Cologne, Siegfried II of Westerburg, and the King of Bohemia, Wenceslaus (Václav/Wenzel) II. Only the Count Palatine Louis II of Upper Bavaria "the Rigorous" promised to choose Albert. Wenceslaus, despite Rudolf's recognition of his electoral vote, refused to support Albert because he would not cede Carinthia to him. He took the side of the nobles in the core Habsburg areas of Swabia and in their newly acquired territories in Austria, with whom Albert was unpopular. Wenceslaus was supported by Duke Otto III of Lower Bavaria, whose family were traditional enemies of the Habsburgs.[1] Wenceslaus succeeded in bringing the Electors of Brandenburg and Saxony over to his side: Albert II of Saxony signed an elector pact on 29 November 1291 that he would vote the same as Wenceslaus; Otto IV of Brandenburg made a similar commitment.
     "Archbishop Siegfried believed that the Emperor should not receive the crown as an inheritance from his father, but should be freely selected by the College of Electors. He convinced the Archbishop of Mainz, Gerard II of Eppstein [de], to select a king who would principally serve their interests. Gerard in turn recruited the new Archbishop of Trier, Bohemund I. Thereupon, the Count Palatine was forced to submit to the majority of the College of Electors. Siegfried therefore proposed to the Elector College to select Adolf of Nassau as king. They were ready to elect him, provided he make extensive concessions to the Electors and follow their political demands.
     "A few days before the election, on 27 April 1292, the first of the electors, Archbishop Siegfried issued the Treaty of Andernach, stating that for Adolf to be chosen king he must promise a long list of acknowledgments of possession (including the imperial cities of Dortmund and Duisburg, and the Vogtship of Essen), pledges of imperial cities and castles, and a sum of 25,000 marks in silver. Furthermore, Adolf promised assistance against specifically listed opponents, but also the general promise that he would not admit any enemy of Siegfried II into his council. After the election, Adolf had to give the archbishop sufficient collateral for the fulfilment of the promise; otherwise he would lose his throne. The last clause is evidence of the fact that the end of the 13th century, the coronation of the king as the constitutive moment of his rule was still very critical. Adolf promised the archbishop to ask him first for his coronation when he had raised the agreed-upon collateral.
     "The other electors extracted similar concessions from Adolf, but only after the election. Among the most far-reaching were the concessions to King Wenceslaus of Bohemia on 30 June 1292. Adolf promised Wenceslaus to remove the two duchies of Austria and Styria from Albert of Habsburg. This was to be done as the previous King Rudolf had removed these territories from King Ottokar II of Bohemia, the father of Wenceslaus. Albert would be charged to agree to this arrangement at a court hearing. If Albert would not bend, the decision of the court would be executed by force within a year. Wenceslaus would then recover the lost territories of his father. Gerhard, the Archbishop of Mainz would receive the imperial cities of Mühlhausen and Nordhausen, which corresponded with the interests of Mainz in the Thuringian region. Furthermore, Gerhard received financial benefits. Like his counterpart in Cologne, the Mainz elector also forbade the presence of his opponents in Adolf’s court. In comparison to the benefits the Mainz, Cologne and Bohemian electors received, the donations to the Count Palatine and the Archbishop of Trier were modest.
     "On 5 May 1292 in Frankfurt am Main, the Archbishop of Mainz, in the name of all the electors, elected Adolf King of the Germans (Emperor-Elect).[2] He was crowned in Aachen on 24 June by the Archbishop of Cologne.
Reign
     "Adolf had neither influence nor power, and was elected Rex Romanorum because of the electors' preference for a weak king. His power was limited from the outset because of the commitments he made.
     "As he had agreed with the Archbishop of Cologne, Adolf remained in his dominion for four months after his election. The archbishop awaited from the king a revision of the results of the Battle of Worringen in 1288. He had hoped to again win a greater influence in the city of Cologne. But despite the tight specifications, Adolf soon emancipated himself from his Electors and concluded pacts with their opponents. Thus, for example, he confirmed the rights of the nobles and the city of Cologne, who had turned against their ruler, and even extended these rights.
     "Adolf also very quickly broke the promises concerning the Duchies of Austria and Styria. As a clever diplomat, Albert of Habsburg avoided a confrontation with the new king. In exchange for his surrender of the Imperial Regalia, which he still had in his possession, he received, in November 1292 a formal enfeoffment with Austria, Styria, the Windic March, and the Lordship of Pordenone. The disposition of the prestigious insignia and relics of the empire was an additional and important sign for the legitimacy of the reign of the king, but not a mandatory prerequisite. With each new document, Adolf moved a little farther away from his promises, without having to open himself up to breach of contract accusations.
     "Adolf acted as a self-assured ruler in other ways as well. His court was an attraction for all who sought protection from the powerful emerging territorial lords. He held numerous court days. At the beginning of his reign, he renewed the general public peace (Landfrieden) of Rudolf I for another ten years, and brought about at least two regional peaces.
     "Adolf used the feudal system as one of his major tools of power. He demanded from the spiritual princes a payment, called Lehnsware, for their enfeoffment with regalian rights, and increased this demand to the level of a nuisance. Many of Adolf’s contemporaries considered this action to be simony. Many of today's historians, however, view it as an innovative way to open up new state revenue sources, as other Western European kings did. Also, the recovery and management of imperial property was important to him. So he succeeded, through clever marriage policy, to bring former imperial properties back under the control of the emperor.
Alliance with England
     "In 1294, when Adolf’s rule was at its height, he concluded an alliance with the King Edward I of England against France and was awarded 60,000 pounds sterling, which corresponded to 90,000 gold marks. The pact had been preceded by attempts by Philip IV of France to conquer the Duchy of Burgundy and the County of Flanders. The Count of Flanders, Guy of Dampierre, mediated, therefore, the alliance between Edward I and Adolf for his protection against France. That the alliance was construed by his contemporaries as purely mercenary, and the fact that Adolf did not comply with its obligations, damaged his reputation, but this was initially without consequences.
     "Adolf began recruiting troops in the empire for a war against France. On 31 August 1294, he sent a declaration of war to the French king, alleging he had seized rights and possessions of the empire. King Philip responded contemptuously on 9 March 1295.[3] Pope Boniface VIII, however, ordered peace in 1295 and threatened to commence the excommunication of Adolf in the event of an outbreak of war.
Policies in Thuringia
     "A little later Adolf intervened in war-torn Thuringia, where fighting had erupted between Landgrave Albert the Degenerate and his sons Frederick and Theodoric IV of Lusatia. He bought the Landgraviate from Albert in his capacity as king and probably using the payments from England. Legally, it was perfectly acceptable for Adolf to induce the feudal lord to abandon his fief and to bring the land under the empire. Furthermore, he seized the Margraviate of Meissen as an imperial fief, since it had been literally ownerless after the extinction of a collateral line of the House of Wettin and had been occupied by a son of Albert the Degenerate.
     "This purchase and the Margraviate of Meissen, however, affected the interests of four of the electors. The Archbishop of Mainz asserted that a part of Thuringia was not an imperial fief, but rather a fief of the Archdiocese of Mainz. Wenceslaus II of Bohemia was not thrilled by the growing power of the emperor on his northern border, especially since Adolf had promised to give him the Margraviate of Meissen. Also, all the electors hoped to profit from the turmoil in Thuringia. In addition to the ostensible return of imperial fiefs to the empire, it can not be ruled out that Adolf was anxious to build a dynastic power base (albeit a small one).
     "First, Adolf succeeded in securing his acquisitions diplomatically and provoking the Margrave of Brandenburg toward active support and the Archbishop of Mainz and the Duke of Saxony toward at least acquiescence of the purchase. Two bloody campaigns against the sons of Albert the Degenerate were necessary to secure the acquisitions and a peace assured the achievements. Two years later, in the summer of 1296, Adolf proudly announced on the invitation to a court day that he had by his actions significantly increased the possessions of the empire.
Deposition as King
     "The electors probably did not plan from the beginning to depose the king, but as events unfolded this result became more inevitable. The reason for the clashes was Adolf’s Thuringia policy. On Pentecost 1297 the Elector of Brandenburg, Duke of Saxony, and King of Bohemia joined together to enforce their interests. The Elector of Cologne, Gerhard II, was associated with this group.
     "In February 1298, the situation became alarming for Adolf because Wenceslaus II and Albert of Habsburg put aside their years of disputes over Austria and Styria, and reached an agreement in the event that Adolf was deposed and Albert elected in his place. There may have been a meeting of the electors as early as the coronation of King Wenceslaus of Bohemia, on 2 June 1297. In January 1298, through the efforts of the Archbishop of Mainz, Albert of Habsburg was brought to testify before an imperial court in order to find a compromise between Adolf and Albert. This did not happen; the two came close to battle in the Upper Rhine Valley and the matter was not resolved.
     "On 1 May 1298, the Archbishop of Mainz invited the king to his court, so that the dispute could be decided there. Archbishop Gerhard claimed he was authorised to do so as imperial arch-chancellor of Germany, according to an old legal principle.[4] However, the King, as a party to the conflict, could not at the same time act as judge and saw these charges as a provocation given that Albert was raising arms against him, the rightful king. Therefore, the meeting planned for 15 June, at which the dispute was to be resolved, did not take place.
     "A meeting between the Archbishop of Mainz, Count Albrecht of Saxony-Wittenberg, and three Margraves of Brandenburg on 23 June 1298 then led to a lawsuit against the king himself. The Archbishop of Cologne and the King of Bohemia had previously authorised the Archbishop of Mainz to act in their names. In these proceedings Adolf was charged with numerous crimes, including the continued breach of the peace in Thuringia and the breaking of the promises he had made to the Archbishop of Mainz. Adolf was deemed unworthy of his office and had forfeited his royal dignity.
     "It is remarkable that Adolf was not excommunicated by the Pope before being deposed. The pope was probably not even included in the deposition procedure. The princes, it is true, did try to formulate their arguments similar to Innocent IV’s statement in the deposition of Frederick II, but the process was unheard of for this time. Because Adolf had been elected and crowned, the contemporary understanding was that he had been chosen by God to be the ruler and that the princes were breaking their oath in which they swore loyalty to the king. Therefore, included in the list of charges were some that, at first glance, appear peculiar today, such as the desecration of communion wafers and the simonistic extortion of money. Furthermore, there was no imperial legal procedure for the ousting of the king. Therefore, the princes relied on their right to vote, from which also they derived their right to oust a king. This argument was problematic insofar as the deposition of Frederick II was already a precedent for this case. According to church law, only the Pope had the power to depose a king.
Election of Albert and Death of Adolf
     "Following Adolf’s deposition came the election of Albert I of Habsburg as the new king. How this election took place is not very clear today, as the chroniclers have little to report. The question is open, for example, whether Albert actually initially did not want to accept the choice, as he would later assert against Pope Boniface VIII.
     "To depose Adolf was one thing; it was another to enforce the decision against him. Adolf refused to accept this decision, but the conflict between him and the princely opposition was soon decided on the battlefield. On 2 July 1298 the armies of Adolf and Albert met at the Battle of Göllheim.[5] The small village of Göllheim is situated in northern Rhineland-Palatinate between Kaiserslautern and Worms in present-day Donnersbergkreis. After violent attacks, Adolf fell together with his standard-bearers and a few faithful.[5] Adolf’s army turned to flee and quickly dispersed.
     "Albert did not allow the followers of Adolf to bury the body of the fallen king in the Kaiserdom, the Imperial Cathedral of Speyer. Therefore, Adolf was initially buried in the Cistercian monastery of Rosenthal Abbey [de] in present-day Kerzenheim and was only later transferred to Speyer.[5]
Historical legacy
     "On 29 August 1309, Albert I’s successor, Emperor Henry VII transferred Adolf’s remains to the Speyer Cathedral, where he was buried next to Albert, who had been murdered in 1308. In 1824, Duke William of Nassau built a grave monument in the vestibule of the cathedral. Leo von Klenze was commissioned with the design, which shows King Adolf in armor kneeling in prayer.
     "Probably in the 19th century, the legend arose that Adolf was a count from the Nuremberg area. This misconception was probably based on confusion with Emich I of Nassau-Hadamar, who after his marriage to Anne of Nuremberg around 1300 was the holder of Kammerstein Castle.
     "In 1841 Duke Adolf of Nassau commissioned a portrait of Adolf by the Düsseldorf painter Heinrich Mücke. In 1843 this painting was hung in the Frankfurt Kaisersaal (Hall of Kings). The picture depicts King Adolf with chest armor, a white coat; and wearing an iron crown with an "implied spiked helmet”; in his right hand he holds a sword and in the left a shield with an eagle. It also bears the Latin phrase "Praestat vir sine pecunia quam pecunia sine viro" (Better a man without money than money without a man). Since no contemporary images of the King exist, the portrait is an idealized representation by the artist in the spirit of historicism. It is not based on previous portraits, since Mücke considered other representations, such as the one attributed to Georg Friedrich Christian Seekatz, to be too moderate[6]
     "On 8 May 1858, Duke Adolf of Nassau established a Military and Civil Order of Merit for the Duchy. It was named for King Adoph as the most important representative of Walram line of the House of Nassau. Although the Duchy of Nassau was annexed by Prussia in 1866, Duke Adolf maintained and renewed the Order when he became Grand Duke of Luxembourg. Until today, it is a respected Order of Merit of the House of Nassau.[7]
     "Thomas Carlyle calls him "a stalwart but necessitous Herr".
Marriage and children
     "He married Imagina of Isenburg-Limburg,[8] daughter of Gerlach IV of Isenburg-Limburg and Imagina of Blieskastel. Their children were:
1. Henry (Heinrich), died young.
2. Robert (Ruprecht) (died 2 December 1304), betrothed to Agnes, daughter of Wenceslaus II of Bohemia[2]
3. Gerlach I, Count of Nassau-Wiesbaden.
4. Adolf (1292–1294).
5. Walram III of Nassau-Wiesbaden.
6. Adelheid, Abbess of Klarenthal Abbey, died 26 May 1338.
7. Imagina, died young.
8. Matilda (before 1280 – 19 June 1323, Heidelberg), married Rudolf I "the Stammerer", Duke of Upper Bavaria.

See also
** German monarchs family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_tree_of_the_German_monarchs
References
1. Herde 2000, p. 515-516.
2. Herde 2000, p. 516.
3. Herde 2000, p. 517.
4. Herde 2000, p. 518.
5. Herde 2000, p. 519.
6. Even (1998).
7. Jean Scoos: Orden und Ehrenzeichen in Herzogtum Nassau 1806–1866 (Orders and decorations in the Duchy of Nassau 1806-1866), p. 95.
8. Roest 2013, p. 140.
Literature
** Gerlich, Alois (1994). "Adolf von Nassau (1292 - 1298) - Aufstieg und Sturz eines Königs, Herrscheramt und Kurfürstenfronde". Nassauische Annalen (in German). Wiesbaden. 105: 17–78.
** Even, Pierre (1998). "Das Bildnis König Adolfs von Nassau im Frankfurter Kaisersaal (The Portrait of King Adolf of Nassau in the Frankfurt Hall of Emperors)". Nassauische Annalen (in German). Wiesbaden. 109: 73–89.
** Jeep, John M. (2001). Medieval Germany: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. p. 928. ISBN 0-8240-7644-3.
** Prietzel, Malte (2004). Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (The Holy Roman Empire in the Late Middle Ages) (in German). Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. ISBN 3-534-15131-3.
** Reinle,Christine (2003). "Adolf von Nassau", in Bernd Schneidmüller; Stefan Weinfurter, eds. (2003). Die deutschen Herrscher des Mittelalters, Historische Porträts von Heinrich I. bis Maximilian I. (The German rulers of the Middle Ages, Historical Portraits of Henry I to Maximilian I) (in German). München: Verlag C.H. Beck. ISBN 3-406-50958-4., pp. 360–371
** Thomas, Heinz (1983). Deutsche Geschichte des Spätmittelalters (German History of the Late Middle Ages) (in German). Stuttgart., pp. 86 ff.
** Herde, Peter (2000). "From Adolf of Nassau to Lewis of Bavaria, 1292-1347". In Jones, Michael (ed.) The New Cambridge Medieval History: c. 1300-c. 1415. Vol. VI. Cambridge University Press.
** von Wegele, Franz Xaver (1875). "Adolf, Graf von Nassau". Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (in German). Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot. 1: 89–92.
** Roest, Bert (2013). Order and Disorder: The Poor Clares between Foundation and Reform. Brill.
Literature from Wikimedia Commons
** [[commons:Image:Hasenbühl cover.jpg|Johann Geissel; Die Schlacht am Hasenbühl und das Königskreuz zu Göllheim (The Battle of Hasenbühl and the King's Cross of Göllheim); 1835. (in German)]]
** [[commons:Image:JPGundlingB1 038.jpg|Hektor Wilhelm von Günderode; Geschichte des Römischen Königs Adolphs nach denen Urkunden und gleichzeitigen Geschichtsschreibern (History of the Roman King Adolph from his Documents and Contemporary Historians); 1779. (in German)]]
External links
** Bibliography of King Adolf of Nassau (1292-1298). (in German): http://historik-hirschmann.de/de-koenig-adolf-von-nassau.html?adnau
** Samanek, Vincenz (1948). "Adolf von Nassau 1291-1298". Regesta Imperii (in German). Innsbruck: Univ.-Verlag Wagner. 6 (2). Retrieved 2009-02-07: https://regesta-imperii.digitale-sammlungen.de/band/ri06_sam1948
** "Adolf of Germany". Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) (in German)..
** Genealogies of the Middle Ages. (in German): https://web.archive.org/web/20080522161948/http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/deutschland_koenige_2/adolf_von_nassau_deutscher_koenig_1298_nassauer/adolf_1_von_nassau_deutscher_koenig_%2B_1298.html
** Andreas Marchetti: Works on the Deposed Adolf of Nassau. (in German). (PDF): https://web.archive.org/web/20110605015740/http://www.uni-bonn.de/~uzswac/marchetti-adolfvonnassau.pdf."8

; Per Genealogics:
     "Adolf, Graf von Nassau, was born in 1255, the son of Walram II, Graf von Nassau, and Gräfin Adelheid von Katzenelnbogen. About 1270 he married Gräfin Imagina von Limburg a.d.Lahn, daughter of Gerlach I von Isenburg in Limburg and Imagina von Bliescastel. They had eight children of whom their son Gerlach and daughter Mathilde would have progeny.
     "Belonging to minor nobility with neither power nor influence, Adolf was elected to become Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire as the prince-electors preferred a weak emperor. The elector-archbishops of Mainz and Köln were mainly instrumental in having him elected. He was crowned Emperor-Elect 24 June 1292 in Aachen. A later crowning by the pope, who would have given him the title of Emperor, did not transpire. In 1296 he founded the convent of Klarenthal near Wiesbaden.
     "Realising his military weakness, Adolf tried to strengthen his position by establishing territorial claims in Thuringia, but this turned his supporters against him. Accusing him of injustice, they elected Albrecht von Habsburg instead. Adolf rejected their decision and went into battle against Albrecht. In this battle, on 2 July 1298 at Gelnheim (also called Göllheim) near Spiers and Worms, he was killed in action. He was first buried at the Cistercian Abbey of Rosenthal in the Palatinate, but in 1309 his son Gerlach brought his remains from there to be buried in the Cathedral of Speyer."5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie van het Vorstenhuis Nassau, Zaltbommel, 1970 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 17.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:61.5


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Gf Adolf von Nassau (1276-98), German King (5.5.1292-23.6.1298), *ca 1255, +k.a.nr Göllheim 2.7.1298, bur Kaiser Dom, Speyer; m.ca 1271 Imagina von Limburg (fl 1279/1317, +29.9.after 1313.)2" He was Graf von Nassau between 1276 and 1298.2 He was Graf von Nassau between 1276 and 1298.8 He was King of Germany between 5 May 1292 and 23 June 1298.2,8

Family

Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg d. a 29 Aug 1317
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Nassau 1 page (The House of Nassau): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/nassau/nassau1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#Adolfdied1298. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#WalramIIdied1276B
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00017745&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#ImaginaIsenburgMAdolfNassau
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for Adolf of Nassau (1255–2 Jul 1298), Find A Grave Memorial no. 27500992, citing Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27500992/adolf-of_nassau. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolf_of_Germany. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Mathilde von Nassau: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00017752&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerlach: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008767&tree=LEO

Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg1,2,3

F, #13824, d. after 29 August 1317
FatherGerlach I von Isenburg Lord of Limburg and der Lahn1,2,4,5 b. b 1227, d. Jan 1289
MotherImagina von Blieskastel2,6,5
Last Edited11 Oct 2020
     Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg married Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany, son of Walram II (?) Graf von Nassau and Adelheid/Mechtild von Katzenelnbogen, circa 1271.1,7,8,5,9
Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg was buried after 29 August 1317 at Kloster Klarenthal, Wiesbaden, Stadtkreis Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     28 Sep
     She died after 1313. Daughter of Gerlach von Isenburg-Limburg and Imagina von Blieskastel
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Adolf of Nassau 1255–1298
     Children
          Mechtild von Nassau unknown–1328
          Adelheid von Nassau unknown–1338
          Gerlach I von Nassau 1288–1361
     BURIAL     Kloster Klarenthal, Wiesbaden, Stadtkreis Wiesbaden, Hessen, Germany
     Created by: FS
     Added: 22 Nov 2009
     Find A Grave Memorial 44680190.5,3
Imagina/Imogene von Isenburg-Limburg died after 29 August 1317.2,5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "IMAGINA von Isenburg-Limburg (-29 Aug, after 1317, bur Klarenthal). "Adolphus comes de Nassowe et Ymagina nostra collateralis" exchanged property with the church of Weilburg by charter dated 27 Feb 1284[852]. “Agnes etzewanne...wirtin was des...Hern Henriches von Westirburg” requested service from “rittere Hern Johanne von Beldirsehm”, with the consent of “unsir sune Johannis und Renhartis...Kuneginnen vrowen...Kunig Adulvis...Greven Gerlaches und Greven Walrabin irre sune...Hn Gerlaches von Limpurg”, by charter dated 1316[853].
     "m ([1271]) ADOLF von Nassau, son of WALRAM II Graf von Nassau in Wiesbaden & his wife Adelheid von Katzenelnbogen ([1255]-killed in battle near Göllheim 2 Jul 1298). He was elected ADOLF King of Germany in 1292."
Med Lands cites:
[852] Arnstein an der Lahn, 49, p. 45.
[853] Lehmann, Westerburg (1866), Urkundenbuch Westerburg, 15, p. 124.5


; Imagina, fl 1279, +ca 1318, bur Klarenthal; m.ca 1271 Gf Adolf von Nassau, German King (+k.a.1298.)2 She was living in 1279.2

Family

Adolf (?) Graf von Nassau, Emperor of Germany b. c 1255, d. 2 Jul 1298
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Isenburg 1 page (Isenburg family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/isenburg/isenburg1.html
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for Imagina von Isenburg-Limburg von Nassau (unknown–28 Sep), Find A Grave Memorial no. 44680190, citing Kloster Klarenthal, Wiesbaden, Stadtkreis Wiesbaden, Hessen, Germany ; Maintained by FS (contributor 47055176), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/44680190/imagina-von_nassau. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#GerlachIsenburgLimburgdied1289. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#ImaginaIsenburgMAdolfNassau
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Imagina von Blieskastel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079805&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Nassau 1 page (The House of Nassau): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/nassau/nassau1.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#Adolfdied1298
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00017745&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Mathilde von Nassau: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00017752&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerlach: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008767&tree=LEO

Gerlach I von Isenburg Lord of Limburg and der Lahn1,2

M, #13825, b. before 1227, d. January 1289
FatherHeinrich I von Isenburg in Grenzau5,4 d. b 1227
MotherIrmengard (?) von Büdingen3,4 d. bt 6 Jan 1213 - 30 Jan 1218
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Gerlach I von Isenburg Lord of Limburg and der Lahn was born before 1227.2,6 He married Imagina von Blieskastel, daughter of Heinrich von Blieskastel Graf von Blieskastel and Agnes von Sayn Gräfin von Sayn.2,6,7,8
Gerlach I von Isenburg Lord of Limburg and der Lahn died in January 1289; Genealogics says d. Jan 1289; Med Lands says d. bef 11 Aug 1289.2,6,8
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Gerlach I von Isenburg in Limburg an der Lahn, fl 1227/89; m.Imagina von Blieskastel."2


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie van het Vorstenhuis Nassau, Zaltbommel, 1970 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 17.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 17:59,71.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6


; Per Genealogics:
     "Gerlach I von Isenburg in Limburg was born before 1227, the son of Heinrich I von Isenburg in Grenzau and Irmengard von Büdingen. With his wife Imagina von Blieskastel, daughter of Heinrich, Graf von Blieskastel, and Gräfin Agnes von Sayn, he had at least five children, of whom Johann I, Agnes and Imagina would have progeny.
     "After the death of his father in 1227 Gerlach ruled jointly with his brother Heinrich II. From 1247 Gerlach held the title of Lord of Limburg. On 22 May 1258 the division of the house of Isenburg was finally settled; Gerlach became ruler of Limburg, and Heinrich II came into sole possession of the county of Isenburg.
     "From a visit to Italy around 1231, Gerlach brought back Franciscan monks whom he encouraged to build an abbey in Limburg. It would be one of the oldest abbeys of this order in Germany. The abbey was later extended by the house of Limburg.
     "As lord of Limburg, Gerlach joined the opponents of the Hohenstaufen family. He was probably involved in a looting of Worms in 1243/44. After the Interregnum, Gerlach supported King Rudolf von Habsburg. In 1276 he was instructed by the king to confirm the counts of Diez in their imperial fiefs.
     "In 1279 the citizens of the town of Limburg revolted, and Gerlach was expelled. He was only able to return to his castle above the town after lengthy negotiations, and had to grant it far reaching freedoms. These included cessation of the lifting taxes, the town's own jurisdiction over its citizens, and freedoms relating to marriage ceremonies and housing. A jury from the city of Frankfurt was to adjudicate between the house of Limburg and the town. After his return, Gerlach had the castle of Limburg renovated; the residential tower built by him still stands.
     "To secure his position Gerlach sought out dynastic links with neighbouring rulers, including Nassau, Westerburg and Diez. About 1267 his daughter Agnes married Heinrich I, Herr von Westerburg. About 1270 his daughter Imagina married Graf Adolf von Nassau, the future King of the Germans. In 1287 Gerlach was appointed by Adolf as administrator of the imperial castle of Kalsmunt near Wetzlar. On 5 June 1288 Gerlach fought in the Battle of Woeringen together with Adolf von Nassau and Heinrich von Westerburg, in support of Heinrich's brother, the Cologne archbishop Siegfried von Westerburg. Their defeat in the battle had no immediate major consequences for Gerlach.
     "Gerlach died in January 1289 while on campaign with King Rudolf von Habsburg in the Black Forest. His son Johann I took over the rule in Limburg."6


; Per Med Lands:
     "GERLACH von Isenburg, son of HEINRICH [I] von Isenburg & his wife --- (-before 11 Aug 1289). "Heinricus et Gerlacus fratres de Ysenburc, advocati Limpurgiensis ecclesie" acknowledged rights of the archbishop of Mainz by charter dated 3 Nov 1232[784]. "Gerlacus dominus de Ysenburg…" witnessed the charter dated 18 Dec 1265 which records an agreement between "Walramus frater comitis Juliacensis et Megthildis uxor sua" and Konrad Archbishop of Köln[785]. "Gerlacus dominus de Lympurg, Ymagina uxor nostra et Johannes filius noster primogenitus” donated “castrum Schauenburg...partem” and “in Birlebach et Crampurg villis” to Engelbert [II] Archbishop of Köln by charter dated 26 Sep 1266[786]. Co-heir of Bliescastel: “H. comes de Salmis, G. dominus de Limpurg, C. de Blankenheim et L. de Arnesperc coheredes comitatus de Castris [Bliescastel] castrorum et urbium...Putelinga et Geb---berc” reached agreement concerning their inheritance, with the advice of “H. comitis Geminipontis, H. et Jo. comitum de Spanheim et E. comitis Siluestris”, by charter dated [May/Jun] 1275[787].
     "m IMAGINA von Bliescastel, daughter of HEINRICH Graf von Bliescastel & his wife Agnes von Sayn (-5 Nov, before Apr 1298). "Gerlacus dominus de Lympurg, Ymagina uxor nostra et Johannes filius noster primogenitus” donated “castrum Schauenburg...partem” and “in Birlebach et Crampurg villis” to Engelbert [II] Archbishop of Köln by charter dated 26 Sep 1266[788]. "Dominus Joannes de Lympurgh ac Oda uxor nostra legitima" founded a chapel "in castro nostro de Lympurgh", for the souls of "Gerlaci patris nostri ac Imagine matris nostre, Elisabeth prime nostre legitime", by charter dated Apr 1298[789]. The necrology of Limburg Franciscan monastery records the death 5 Nov of "Imyna domina in Lymporgh"[790]."
Med Lands cites:
[784] Codex diplomaticus Nassoicus, Band I, Part 1, 444, p. 298.
[785] Kremer (1781), Band III, Urkunden Jülich, CII, p. 122.
[786] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 565, p. 329.
[787] Grüsner (1775), Vol. II, p. 55.8
He was living between 1227 and 1289.2

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Isenburg 1 page (Isenburg family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/isenburg/isenburg1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmengard von Büdingen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00101759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#HeinrichIIsenburgdied1232B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I von Isenburg in Grenzau: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00101758&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerlach I von Isenburg in Limburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079804&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Imagina von Blieskastel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079805&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#GerlachIsenburgLimburgdied1289
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NASSAU.htm#ImaginaIsenburgMAdolfNassau
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann I von Isenburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106327&tree=LEO

Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine1,2,3

M, #13826, b. 27 September 1300, d. 29 January 1327
FatherRudolf I 'der Stammler' (?) Duke of Upper-Bavaria, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein1,4,2,3 b. 9 Oct 1274, d. 12 Aug 1319
MotherMathilde (?) Gräfin von Nassau1,5,2,3 b. b 1280, d. 19 Jun 1323
Last Edited24 Nov 2004
     Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine was born on 27 September 1300 at Wolfratshausen, Germany (now); Charlemagne Descendants says b. 27 Sep 1306.1,2,3 He married Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen, daughter of Ludwig/Louis VI (?) Graf von Oettingen, in August 1320.1,2,3
Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine died on 29 January 1327 at Neustadt a.d.Hardt, Germany (now), at age 26; Charlemagne Descendants says b. 17 Feb 1327.1,2,3
Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine was buried after 29 January 1327 at Kloster Schönau, Heidelberg, Germany (now).3


     ; Leo van de pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 31.2

; Adolf, Pfgf bei Rhein (1317-27), *Wolfratshausen 27.9.1300, +Neustadt a.d.Hardt 29.1.1327, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg; m.VIII.1320 Gfn Irmengard von Öttingen (*ca 1304, +6.11.1399.)3 He was Pfalzgraf bei Rhein between 1319 and 1327.2,3

Family

Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen b. c 1304, d. 6 Nov 1399
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027173&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html1
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I 'der Stammler': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027172&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Mathilde von Nassau: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00017752&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027174&tree=LEO

Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen1

F, #13827, b. circa 1304, d. 6 November 1399
FatherLudwig/Louis VI (?) Graf von Oettingen1
Last Edited24 Nov 2004
     Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen was born circa 1304.2 She married Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine, son of Rudolf I 'der Stammler' (?) Duke of Upper-Bavaria, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein and Mathilde (?) Gräfin von Nassau, in August 1320.1,3,2
Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen died on 6 November 1399.2

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html1
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027173&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027174&tree=LEO

Ludwig/Louis VI (?) Graf von Oettingen1

M, #13828
Last Edited11 Dec 2003
     Ludwig/Louis VI (?) Graf von Oettingen married Jutta (?) of Austria, daughter of Albrecht I von Habsburg Duke of Austria, Holy Roman Emperor and Elizabeth von Görz-Tirol, on 26 April 1319 at Baden, Germany (now).2,3,4

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Jutta (?) of Austria b. c 1303, d. Mar 1329

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jutta of Austria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371548&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060594&tree=LEO
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html

Ruprecht II "the Little" (?) Kurfürst von der Pfalz, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein1,2,3,4,5

M, #13829, b. 12 May 1325, d. 14 February 1398
FatherAdolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine2,4,6,5 b. 27 Sep 1300, d. 29 Jan 1327
MotherIrmengarde (?) von Oettingen2,4,5 b. c 1304, d. 6 Nov 1399
Last Edited24 Jan 2020
     Ruprecht II "the Little" (?) Kurfürst von der Pfalz, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein was born on 12 May 1325 at Amberg, Germany (now).3,4,5 He married Beatrix (?) of Sicily-Aragon, daughter of Pietro/Pierre II (?) d'Aragon, King of Sicily and Elizabeth (?) of Carinthia, Regent of Sicily, in October 1348; Leo van de Pas says 1345.2,3,5,7,8
Ruprecht II "the Little" (?) Kurfürst von der Pfalz, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein died on 14 February 1398 at age 72; Leo van de Pas says d. 6 Jan 1398.2,3,5
     ; Ruprecht II, Pfgf bei Rhein (1390-98) u.in der Oberpfalz 1329, *Amberg 12.5.1325, +Amberg 6.1.1398, bur Schönau; m.before X.1348 Beatrix of Sicily (*1326 +12.10.1365, bur Schönau.)3

; Leo van de pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 31.5

Citations

  1. Only son and heir.
  2. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona3.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027174&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027173&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix of Sicily-Aragon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027175&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html1
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pfalzgräfin Anna bei Rhein: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027170&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Annadied1415. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I, p. 91.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht III genannt Clem: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004897&tree=LEO

Beatrix (?) of Sicily-Aragon1,2,3,4

F, #13830, b. 1326, d. 12 October 1365
FatherPietro/Pierre II (?) d'Aragon, King of Sicily1,2,3 b. 1304, d. 15 Aug 1342
MotherElizabeth (?) of Carinthia, Regent of Sicily1,2,5,3 b. c 1298, d. a 1347
Last Edited24 Jan 2020
     Beatrix (?) of Sicily-Aragon married John Henry (?) Count of Goritz.1 Beatrix (?) of Sicily-Aragon was born in 1326.2,3,4 She married Ruprecht II "the Little" (?) Kurfürst von der Pfalz, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of Adolf "the Simple" (?) Elector Palatine of the Rhine and Irmengarde (?) von Oettingen, in October 1348; Leo van de Pas says 1345.1,2,6,3,4
Beatrix (?) of Sicily-Aragon died on 12 October 1365.2,3,4
     ; Leo van de pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 45.3

Family 1

John Henry (?) Count of Goritz

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 90. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix of Sicily-Aragon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027175&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel2.html1
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Kärnten: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013526&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027174&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pfalzgräfin Anna bei Rhein: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027170&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#Annadied1415. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I, p. 91.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht III genannt Clem: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004897&tree=LEO