Vera Hudson1

F, #94921, b. 11 August 1917
FatherJennings Price Hudson Jr.1 b. 9 Apr 1858, d. 6 Jun 1924
MotherBertha Prats1 b. 30 Jan 1888
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Vera Hudson was born on 11 August 1917 at New Orleans, Orleans Co., Louisiana, USA.1 She married Clement F. Perschall on 23 December 1939 at New Orleans, Orleans Co., Louisiana, USA.1
     ; See DAR Application #576226 for Vera Hudson Perschall.1

Family

Clement F. Perschall b. 21 Sep 1910

Citations

  1. [S3624] DAR Application No. 576226 - Ancestor: Linn Banks, DAR No. A005724, unknown series. Hereinafter cited as DAR App #576226 Linn Banks 80892.

Clement F. Perschall1

M, #94922, b. 21 September 1910
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Clement F. Perschall was born on 21 September 1910.1 He married Vera Hudson, daughter of Jennings Price Hudson Jr. and Bertha Prats, on 23 December 1939 at New Orleans, Orleans Co., Louisiana, USA.1

Family

Vera Hudson b. 11 Aug 1917

Citations

  1. [S3624] DAR Application No. 576226 - Ancestor: Linn Banks, DAR No. A005724, unknown series. Hereinafter cited as DAR App #576226 Linn Banks 80892.

Serlon de Hauteville1

M, #94923, b. between 1002 and 1010, d. between 1027 and 1035
FatherTancrede de Hauteville Duke of Apulia1 b. c 970, d. c 1041
MotherMuriella (?) of Normandy1 b. c 990, d. c 1025
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Serlon de Hauteville was born between 1002 and 1010.1
Serlon de Hauteville died between 1027 and 1035.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "SERLON de Hauteville ([1005/10]-after [1027/35]). Malaterra names "Serlonem" fifth in order of Tancred's five sons by his first wife[81]. He is shown first in the list in the Annals of Romoald[82]. As Serlon remained in Normandy after his brothers went to Italy, it is more likely that he was the eldest son who remained at home to inherit his father's lands. At first sight this appears to be contradicted by Orderic Vitalis who records that Tancred d'Hauteville "passed on his whole inheritance to his son Goisfredus [Geoffrey]", advising the others "to seek their living by their strength and wits outside their native land"[83]. However, Malaterra records that Serlon fled to Brittany after committing murder, some time during the reign of Robert I Duke of Normandy, and from there launched raids against Normandy[84]. The departure of the other brothers for southern Italy is dated to [1035] in other sources (see below). It is possible therefore that Serlon's difficulties occurred at the same time and that this caused a last minute change of plans which involved the promotion of the second son Godefroi. Serlon's birth date range is estimated assuming that he was an adult when obliged to flee Normandy in [1027/35] and provides some support for the hypothesis that he was the oldest son.
     "m ([1027/35]) ---. This marriage took place after Serlon was pardoned by Duke Robert and returned to Normandy, according to Malaterra[85], so some time during Duke Robert's reign assuming the source is accurate."
Med Lands cites:
[81] Malaterra, I.4, p. 9.
[82] Romoaldi Annales 1057, MGH SS XIX, p. 405.
[83] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. II, Book III, pp. 99 and 101.
[84] Malaterra, Book I, c. 38.
[85] Malaterra I.39, p. 28.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#_Toc498671769. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Theodora di Salerno1

F, #94924
FatherPaldolfo di Salerno Lord of Capaccio1,2 d. 3 Jun 1052
MotherTeodoro di Palatini di Tusculo1,3 d. a 1068
Last Edited30 Aug 2020
     Theodora di Salerno married Godefroi/Godfrey de Hauteville Conte di Loritello, son of Tancrede de Hauteville Duke of Apulia and Muriella (?) of Normandy;
His 2nd wife.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GODEFROI de Hauteville, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his first wife Moriella --- ([1015/20]-Apr 1063). Malaterra names "Gaufredum" as fourth son of Tancred & his first (unnamed) wife[119]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Tancred d'Hauteville "passed on his whole inheritance to his son Goisfredus [Geoffrey/Godefroi]", advising the others "to seek their living by their strength and wits outside their native land[120]. This suggests that Godefroi was the oldest son. As explained in the document SICILY, COUNTS & KINGS, the career path of his brother Serlon suggests that there may have been a last minute change of plan which resulted in Godefroi being chosen to inherit their father's lands. For this reason, it is more likely that Godefroi was his father's second son. Amatus records that the brothers "Mauger, Geoffrey, William and Roger" arrived in Apulia from Normandy[121], dated from the context to [1054/57]. Malaterra records that the Capitanata had been held by "Gaufridum fratrem suum" before it was granted to Mauger[122]. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records that "Gaufredus comes" was awarded "Neritonum et Litium" after "Humphredus" defeated "Græcis circa Oriam" in 1055[123]. Conte di Loritello. The Chronicon Casauriense records that the monastery was "made subject to Count Robert of Loritello and after his death to Hugh Mamouzet" ("Roberto primo comiti de Rotello et post mortem eius Ugonis Malmazetto"), dated to 1064[124]. It is suggested that "Count Robert" is an error in this text for "Count Godefroi". Robert, son of Count Godefroi, would probably have been too young to have been concerned at the time, and in addition it is clear that he lived in the early years of the 12th century. No other "Count Robert of Loritello" has been identified. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records the death in Apr 1063 of "Gauffredus comes" and that "Goffridus filius eius" captured Taranto and "Castru Motule"[125].
     "m firstly ---. The name of Godefroi's first wife is not known.
     "m secondly THEODORA, daughter of PANDOLF di Salerno & his wife Theodora di Tusculanum. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1103 which records that "Grégoire fils de Pandulf fils du prince Gaimar" agreed a division with Cava abbey, acting with the consent of "son neveu Tancrède fils de Geoffroy de Hauteville et de Theodora sœur de Grégoire"[126]. A charter dated 1104 records that "Grégoire fils de Pandulf fils du prince Gaimar" agreed a division with Cava abbey, acting with the consent of "son neveu Tancrède fils de Theodora"[127].
     "Godefroi & his first wife had [six] children:
1. [GODEFROI (-after Jun 1063).
2. ROBERT (-shortly before 1107).
3. DROGO "Tasso" (-after 1103).
4. RAOUL (-[1096/1111]).
5. GUILLAUME.
6. EMMA (-before 1082).

     "Godefroi & his second wife had one child:
7. TANCRED (-after 1104)."

Med Lands cites:
[119] Pontiari, E. (ed.) (1927-8) De rebus gestis Rogerii Calabriæ et Siciliæ comitis et Roberti Guiscardi ducis fratris eius (Bologna) (“Malaterra”), I.4, p. 9.
[120] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, V, p. 88, translation Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book III, pp. 99 and 101.
[121] Amatus III.43, p. 101.
[122] Malaterra, I.15, p. 16.
[123] Chronicon Breve Nortmannicum, RIS V, p. 278.
[124] Chronicon Casauriense, Liber IV, RIS II.2, col. 863, and Chronicon Casauriensis, Book IV, p. 11.
[125] Chronicon Breve Nortmannicum, RIS V, p. 278.
[126] Stasser (2008), p. 427, citing Archives of Cava dei Tirreni, Abbazia di S. Trinita, Arca XVII 84 (1103).
[127] Stasser (2008), p. 427, citing Archives of Cava dei Tirreni, Abbazia di S. Trinita, Arca XVII 103 (1104).4


; Per Med Lands:
     "THEODORA . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1103 which records that "Grégoire fils de Pandulf fils du prince Gaimar" agreed a division with Cava abbey, acting with the consent of "son neveu Tancrède fils de Geoffroy de Hauteville et de Theodora sœur de Grégoire"[1156]. A charter dated 1104 records that "Grégoire fils de Pandulf fils du prince Gaimar" agreed a division with Cava abbey, acting with the consent of "son neveu Tancrède fils de Theodora"[1157].
     "m as his second wife, GODEFROI de Hauteville Conte di Loritello, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his first wife Moriella --- ([1015/20]-1063)."
Med Lands cites:
[1156] Stasser (2008), p. 427, citing Archives of Cava dei Tirreni, Abbazia di S. Trinita, Arca XVII 84 (1103).
[1157] Stasser (2008), p. 427, citing Archives of Cava dei Tirreni, Abbazia di S. Trinita, Arca XVII 103 (1104).1

Family

Godefroi/Godfrey de Hauteville Conte di Loritello b. bt 1015 - 1020, d. Apr 1063

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SOUTHERN%20ITALY,%20PRE-NORMAN.htm#TheodoraMGeoffroyHauteville. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SOUTHERN%20ITALY,%20PRE-NORMAN.htm#PandulfMTheodora.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20ITALY.htm#TheodoraTusculanumMPandulfSalerno
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20ITALY.htm#GodefroiHautevilledied1063B

Altruda (?)1

F, #94925
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Altruda (?) married Dreu (Drogo) de Hauteville comte d’Apulia, Ascoli et Venosa, son of Tancrede de Hauteville Duke of Apulia and Muriella (?) of Normandy;
His 1st wife.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "DROGO de Hauteville ([1010/20]-murdered Castle of Monte Ilaro 10 Aug 1051, bur Venosa, Monastery of Santissima Trinità). The Chronica Mon. Casinensis names (in order) "Guilelmum, Drogonem et Humfridum Tancridi filios" when recording their recent arrival from Normandy with 300 other Normans[114]. According to the Annals of Romoald, Drogo was the third son, before "Guillelmus comes…Brachiferreus"[115]. The order in Malaterra order of succession of Guillaume, Drogo and Onfroi as Counts of Apulia reflected their relative seniority in the family, although it is of course not impossible that Guillaume was more junior among the brothers who left for Italy and that his initial appointment as count was due to personal ability rather than seniority. [Orderic Vitalis records that “Drogo quidam Normannus miles” left on pilgrimage to Jerusalem and, on his return, stopped "cum sociis suis Waimalchus dux [Guaimar IV Duke of Salerno] apud Psalernum", from where he expelled "Sarracenorum" who had been demanding tribute[116]. It is possible that this passage refers to another Drogo as “filiique Tancredi de Alta-Villa: Drogo...” are named in a later part of the text, without a reference back to the earlier Drogo.] Amatus records that "William son of Tancred [came] from Normandy [to Italy] with his two brothers Drogo and Humphrey"[117], probably dated to [1035]. Orderic Vitalis records “...filii...Tancredi de Alta-Villa: Drogo...atque Umfridus, Willermus et Hermannus, Rotbertus cognomento Wiscardus et Rogerius et sex fratres eorum” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[118]. Venosa was Drogo´s fiefdom from early 1042: Amatus records that "the Normans divided among themselves" the lands at Melfi, following their victories against the Byzantines dated to 1041, and that “William received Ascoli; Drogo had Venosa; Arnolin had Lavello; Hugh Toutebove had Monopoli; Rodulf had Canne; Walter, Civitate; Peter, Trani; Rodulf son of Bebena, Sant´Arcangelo; Tristan, Montepeloso; Hervey, Grumento; Asclettin, Acerenza; and Rainfroi, Malarbine”, adding that “Prince Guaimar of Salerno…invested each one of them”[119]. the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records the division of properties agreed at Melfi, dated to Feb 1042, as follows: "Guilelmo Asculum, Drogoni Venusiam, Arnolino Labellum, Ugoni Tutabovi Monopolim, Petro Tranum, Gualterio Civitatem, Rodulfo Cannim, Tristaino Montem pilosum, Herveo Grigentum, Asclittino Acerentiam, Rodulfo Sanctum Archangelum, Raimfrido Monerbinum"[120]. The Romoaldi Annales record that "Drogo Normannorum comes" captured and burnt "civitatem Bibinum" in 1045[121]. Lupus Protospatarius names "Drago" as brother of "Gulielmus", specifying that he succeeded the latter as count in 1046[122]. The Gesta Roberti Wiscardi records that "Unfredum…cum fratre Drogone" disputed the succession of their brother Guillaume with "Petrus consanguinitate propinquus"[123]. He succeeded his brother in 1046 as DROGO Conte di Apulia. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Constantiniensis Drogo filius Tancredi de Alta-villa” was made “princeps Normannorum in Apulia”[124]. Amatus records that "Drogo and Rainaulf" were "put into possession of their counties" by Emperor Heinrich III, dated to 1047[125]. A charter dated 1047 is the last time in which Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno is named with the title "Duke of Apulia and Calabria"[126]. The timing suggests that this may have followed Emperor Heinrich III´s confirmation of Drogo, who thereby presumably ceased to be Guaimar´s vassal. He received Benevento from Emperor Heinrich III in 1047, jointly with Rainulf II Conte di Aversa, after the latter confiscated it from the citizens who had refused to open its gates to him, although the Beneventans invited Pope Leo IX to take over the town. "Drogo…dux et magister Italie comesque Normannorum totius Apulie atque Calabrie" donated property for the souls of "fratris mei Guillelmi, Unfredi, Roberti" by charter dated 1053[127]. Chalandon discusses the possible spurious nature of this document but opts for its authenticity[128]. The Annals of Romoald record the death of "Drogo Normannorum comes" in Aug 1050[129]. Lupus Protospatarius records that "Drago" was killed in 1051 "in monte Ilari a suo compatre Concilio"[130]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Constantiniensis Drogo filius Tancredi de Alta-villa” was killed “dum vigilias in ecclesia beati Laurentii IV Id Aug” by “Wazo Neapolitanus comes”[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that Drogo was murdered by Waszo Count of Naples at the altar of the church of St Lawrence[132].
     "m firstly ALTRUDA, daughter of --- (before 1045). "Riccardus Senescalcus maximi comitis Drogonis filius" donated property to Cava, for the souls of "predicti patris mei et Roberti Guiscardi magnifici ducis et Rogerii…ducis et Boamundi filiorum eius et Altrude…coniugis mee atque Rocce…sororis mee et Altrude matris mee", by charter dated Mar 1115[133]. It is likely that she was Altruda, related to the comital family of Salerno of Conte Alfan son of Conte Petrus, as shown by the charter dated Aug 1079 under which "Alfanus filius quondam Petri comitis et Aloara uxor eius filie Castelmanni comitis" donated property to Cava, for the soul of "Riccardus…parenti illorum…filius fuit bene recordationis domni Drogonis comitis qui fuit germanus…domni nostri ducis"[134].
     "m secondly (1046) as her first husband, GAITELGRIMA di Salerno, daughter of GUAIMAR IV Prince of Salerno & his [second wife Purpura ---] ([before 1032]-after Jan 1087). Amatus records that "Guaimar" [Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno] gave Drogo his daughter in marriage "with a very grand dowry" after his succession[135]. "Domina Gaytelgrima comitissa filia…Robberti ducis" donated property to the monastery of La Trinità at Cava for the souls of "suprascripti domini Robberti et…domini Drogonis et domini Affridi comitum qui fuerunt viri sui" by charter dated Jan 1087[136], although the parentage attributed to her in this document is presumably a copyist's error. It is also curious that the document omits any reference to Gaitelgrima's second husband. This copy of the document appears to be defective as another copy records that "dominæ Gaytelgrimæ comitissæ filiæ bonæ recordationis domini Guaimarii…principis et ducis" donated property for the souls of "domini Drogonis et domini Roberti et domini Alfredi comitum qui fuerunt viri sui" and for the souls of "Purpure genitricis suæ et…Ricardi filii sui qui de ipso Roberto comite marito suo primogenitum habuit"[137]. Amatus records that "Guaimar" [Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno] gave Drogo his daughter in marriage "with a very grand dowry" after his succession[138]. The chronology of this family suggests that Gaitelgrima was still a child at the time of this marriage. She married secondly ([end 1051/May 1052]) Roberto di Lucera Conte di Gargano. Amatus records that Prince Guaimar gave "Count Drogo's [daughter]" to "Robert brother of Count Richard", the editor of the edition consulted speculating that "daughter" must be an error for "widow"[139]. She married thirdly Conte Affred.
Count Drogo & his first wife had three children:
a) RICHARD ([1047/51]-[1118/Sep 1125]).
b) ROCCA (-[Jul 1112/1115]).
c) EREMBURGA (-before 1101)."

Med Lands cites:
[114] Leonis Marsicani, Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 675.
[115] Romoaldi Annales 1057, MGH SS XIX, p. 405.
[116] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, III, pp. 53-4.
[117] Amatus II.8, p. 66.
[118] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, III, pp. 53-4.
[119] Amatus II.31, p. 77.
[120] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.
[121] Romoaldi Annales 1045, MGH SS XIX, p. 404.
[122] Lupus Protospatarius 1046, MGH SS V, p. 59.
[123] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi II, MGH SS IX, p. 254.
[124] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXX, p. 284.
[125] Amatus III.2, p. 87.
[126] Codex Diplomaticus Cavensis Tome VII, MLXXII, p. 24.
[127] Ménager, L. R. (ed.) (1980) Recueil des actes des Ducs Normands d'Italie 1046-1127, Tome I Les premiers ducs 1046-1087 (Bari) ("Actes des Ducs Normands d'Italie") I, 1, p. 20.
[128] Chalandon (1907), Tome I, p. 110, footnote 3, citing Ughelli, Italia Sacra, Tome VIII, p. 168.
[129] Romoaldi Annales 1050, MGH SS XIX, p. 404.
[130] Lupus Protospatarius 1051, MGH SS V, p. 59.
[131] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXX, p. 284.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Book VII c. [30].
[133] Guerrieri, G. (1899) Il conte normanno Riccardo Siniscalco (1081-1115) e i monastery benedettini cavesi in terra d´Otranto (sec. XI-XIV) (Trani), Diplomi e documenti, XXIV, p. 100.
[134] Stasser, T. (2008) Où sont les femmes? (Oxford), p. 129, quoting Codex Diplomaticus Cavensis Tome X, 122, p. 291.
[135] Amatus II.35, p. 80, footnote 62 stating that her name is known only from one later charter.
[136] Actes des Ducs Normands d'Italie I, 58, p. 198.
[137] Stasser (2008), p. 151, quoting Jahn, W. (1989) Untersuchungen zur normannischer Herrschaft in Süditalien 1040-1100 (Frankfurt), 7, p. 377.
[138] Amatus II.35, p. 80, footnote 62 states that her name is known only from one later charter.
[139] Amatus III.36, p. 99, footnote 54 speculating that "daughter" must be an error for "widow".1

Family

Dreu (Drogo) de Hauteville comte d’Apulia, Ascoli et Venosa b. c 1006, d. 10 Aug 1051
Child
  • Richard/Ricardo de Hauteville Pr of Salerno+ d. 1098; Rudt-Collenberg says that his mother was Maria di Sorrento (#48258), but Racines et Histoire says that his mother was Altrude (Gaitelgrima) de Salerne (#71464). Med Lands says his mother was Altruda, his father's 1st wife.2,1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Drogodied1051. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VI (A): The House of the Princes of Antiochia. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.

Onfroi de Hauteville1

M, #94926, b. between 1015 and 1020, d. 1057
FatherTancrede de Hauteville Duke of Apulia1 b. c 970, d. c 1041
MotherMuriella (?) of Normandy1 b. c 990, d. c 1025
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Onfroi de Hauteville was born between 1015 and 1020.1 He married Gaitelgrima (?) after August 1051;
Her 2nd husband.2
Onfroi de Hauteville died in 1057.1
Onfroi de Hauteville was buried in 1057 at Abbey of the Holy Trinity, Potenza, Provincia DI Potenza, Basilicata, Italy.1


     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ONFROI de Hauteville ([1015/20]-spring 1057, bur Monastery of Santissima Trinità, Venosa). The Chronica Mon. Casinensis names (in order) "Guilelmum, Drogonem et Humfridum Tancridi filios" when recording their recent arrival from Normandy with 300 other Normans[197]. According to the Annals of Romoald, "Unfridus" was the fifth son[198]. The order in Malaterra is the same as in the Chronica Mon. Casinensis[199]. Onfroi is shown as fifth son here because it is considered more probable that the order of succession of Guillaume, Drogo and Onfroi as Counts of Apulia reflected their relative seniority in the family. While it is not impossible that, as explained above, Guillaume's initial appointment as count was due to personal ability rather than seniority, it is difficult to imagine that the order of succession of Drogo and Onfroi would have been decided by any factor other than age. Amatus records that "William son of Tancred [came] from Normandy [to Italy] with his two brothers Drogo and Humphrey"[200], probably dated to [1035]. Orderic Vitalis records “...filii...Tancredi de Alta-Villa: Drogo...atque Umfridus, Willermus et Hermannus, Rotbertus cognomento Wiscardus et Rogerius et sex fratres eorum” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[201]. Onfroi is not named as having received territories under the agreement reached at Melfi in Feb 1042 (which names his brothers Guillaume and Drogo, see above). The Gesta Roberti Wiscardi records that "Unfredum…cum fratre Drogone" disputed the succession of their brother Guillaume with "Petrus consanguinitate propinquus"[202]. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records that "Humphredus" captured "Trojam" and built "castrum in Bachareza" in 1048[203]. Malaterra records that "fratrem suum Umfredum Abagelardum comitem" was given "castrum…Lavel" by his brother Drogo[204]. "Unfredus comes…" subscribed the charter dated 1053 (misdated) under which "Drogo…dux et magister Italie comesque Normannorum totius Apulie atque Calabrie" donated property for the soul of "fratris mei Guillelmi, Unfredi, Roberti"[205]. He succeeded his brother 1051 as ONFROI Conte di Apulia. Lupus Protospatarius records that "Drago" was killed in 1051 "in monte Ilari a suo compatre Concilio" and succeeded by "frater eius Unfreda"[206]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Umfridus frater eius” succeeded “in principatus ei” after “Constantiniensis Drogo filius Tancredi de Alta-villa” was killed[207]. Pope Leo IX, faced with the increasing threat from the Normans to the stability in southern Italy, launched a holy campaign against them, but was defeated and captured at Civitate in 17 Jun 1053. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records that "Leone Papa et Principe Beneventano et Catapano imperiali" fought the Normans "in principatu Beneventu", but that "Rodulphus Princeps" escaped and Pope Leo was captured by "Humphredo et Northmannis" in Jun 1053[208]. He was only allowed to return to Rome 12 Mar 1054, and died there the following month. The Normans made the most of their advantage, capturing large parts of southern Italy. By end 1055, Oria, Nardon and Lecce had fallen to them. Lupus Protospatarius records the death in 1056 of "Umfreda", specifying that his brother "Robertus" succeeded as duke[209]. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records the death in 1056 of "Humphredus" and the succession of "comes Apuliæ Robertus qui dictus est Guiscardus"[210].
     "m (after Aug 1051) as her second husband, GAITELGRIMA di Sorrento, widow of RODOLFE Conte d´Aversa, daughter of --- di Sorrento & his wife --- ([1015/20]-). "Gaitelgrima…comitissa senatrix" donated property to the monastery of San Blasio, for the soul of "domni Rodolfi comiti seniori mei", by charter dated Mar 1048, dated to "comitante domno Guilielmo et domno Herimano in castro Aversum…anno primo"[211]. Amatus refers to the wife of Humphrey as "the Duke of Sorrento's sister"[212]. The fact that these references are to the same person is confirmed by the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi which names "genitus genetrice Hermannus [Comte di Canne] eadem Unfredi fuerat qua filius Abagelardus"[213], Abelard being the son of Onfroi and Herman presumably being the son of Rodolfe (who was reported as having received Canne under the treaty of Melfi in 1042[214]). Her birth date range is estimated based on her having had children by both her marriages."
Med Lands cites:
[197] Leonis Marsicani, Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 675.
[198] Romoaldi Annales 1057, MGH SS XIX, p. 405.
[199] Malaterra, I.4, p. 9.
[200] Amatus II.8, p. 66.
[201] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, III, pp. 53-4.
[202] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi II, MGH SS IX, p. 254.
[203] Chronicon Breve Nortmannicum, RIS V, p. 278.
[204] Malaterra, I.12, p. 14.
[205] Actes des Ducs Normands d'Italie I, 1, p. 20.
[206] Lupus Protospatarius 1051, MGH SS V, p. 59.
[207] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXX, p. 284.
[208] Chronicon Breve Nortmannicum, RIS V, p. 278.
[209] Lupus Protospatarius 1056, MGH SS V, p. 59.
[210] Chronicon Breve Nortmannicum, RIS V, p. 278.
[211] Stasser (2008), p. 246, quoting Gallo, A. (ed.) (1927) Codice diplomatico Normanno di Aversa (Naples), 49, p. 395.
[212] Amatus III.34, p. 98, footnote 52 postulating that this was the Duke displaced by Guido, brother of Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno, not Guido himself.
[213] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi IV, MGH SS IX, p. 290. Amatus, p. 165 footnote 7, states that Herman was half-brother of Abelard, citing the Gesta Roberti, but this does not emerge from the text.
[214] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "GAITELGRIMA ([1015/20]-). "Gaitelgrima…comitissa senatrix" donated property to the monastery of San Blasio, for the soul of "domni Rodolfi comiti seniori mei", by charter dated Mar 1048, dated to "comitante domno Guilielmo et domno Herimano in castro Aversum…anno primo"[2596]. Her title "senatrix" suggests descent from the Tusculo family of Rome (see the document SOUTHERN ITALY (2)). Amatus refers to the wife of Humphrey as "the Duke of Sorrento's sister"[2597]. Her birth date range is estimated based on her having had children by both her marriages. The fact that these references are to the same person is confirmed by the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi which names "genitus genetrice Hermannus [Comte di Canne] eadem Unfredi fuerat qua filius Abagelardus"[2598], and Abelard as the son of Onfroi and Herman presumably being the son of Rodolfe (who is reported in the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis as having received Canne under the treaty of Melfi in 1042[2599]).
     "m firstly RODOLFE, son of --- (-before Mar 1048). He succeeded in [1045] as Conte di Aversa. m secondly (after Aug 1051) ONFROI Conte di Apulia, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his first wife Moriella --- (-spring 1057, bur Monastery of Santissima Trinità, Venosa)."
Med Lands cites:
[2596] Stasser (2008), p. 246, quoting Gallo, A. (ed.) (1927) Codice diplomatico Normanno di Aversa (Naples), 49, p. 395.
[2597] Amatus III.34, p. 98, footnote 52 postulating that this was the duke who was displaced by Guido, brother of Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno, not Guido himself.
[2598] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi IV, MGH SS IX, p. 290. Amatus, p. 165 footnote 7, states that Herman was half-brother of Abelard, citing the Gesta Roberti, but this does not emerge from the text.
[2599] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.2

Family

Gaitelgrima (?) b. bt 1015 - 1020

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Onfroidied1057. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SOUTHERN%20ITALY,%20PRE-NORMAN.htm#GaitelgrimaSorrentoM1RodolfM2Onfroi.

Gaitelgrima (?)1

F, #94927, b. between 1015 and 1020
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Gaitelgrima (?) married Rudolphe/Raoul Capellus (?) Conte di Aversa;
Her 1st husband.2 Gaitelgrima (?) was born between 1015 and 1020.1 She married Onfroi de Hauteville, son of Tancrede de Hauteville Duke of Apulia and Muriella (?) of Normandy, after August 1051;
Her 2nd husband.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GAITELGRIMA ([1015/20]-). "Gaitelgrima…comitissa senatrix" donated property to the monastery of San Blasio, for the soul of "domni Rodolfi comiti seniori mei", by charter dated Mar 1048, dated to "comitante domno Guilielmo et domno Herimano in castro Aversum…anno primo"[2596]. Her title "senatrix" suggests descent from the Tusculo family of Rome (see the document SOUTHERN ITALY (2)). Amatus refers to the wife of Humphrey as "the Duke of Sorrento's sister"[2597]. Her birth date range is estimated based on her having had children by both her marriages. The fact that these references are to the same person is confirmed by the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi which names "genitus genetrice Hermannus [Comte di Canne] eadem Unfredi fuerat qua filius Abagelardus"[2598], and Abelard as the son of Onfroi and Herman presumably being the son of Rodolfe (who is reported in the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis as having received Canne under the treaty of Melfi in 1042[2599]).
     "m firstly RODOLFE, son of --- (-before Mar 1048). He succeeded in [1045] as Conte di Aversa. m secondly (after Aug 1051) ONFROI Conte di Apulia, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his first wife Moriella --- (-spring 1057, bur Monastery of Santissima Trinità, Venosa)."
Med Lands cites:
[2596] Stasser (2008), p. 246, quoting Gallo, A. (ed.) (1927) Codice diplomatico Normanno di Aversa (Naples), 49, p. 395.
[2597] Amatus III.34, p. 98, footnote 52 postulating that this was the duke who was displaced by Guido, brother of Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno, not Guido himself.
[2598] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi IV, MGH SS IX, p. 290. Amatus, p. 165 footnote 7, states that Herman was half-brother of Abelard, citing the Gesta Roberti, but this does not emerge from the text.
[2599] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "RODOLPHE [Raoul] Capellus (-[1046/Mar 1048]). His parentage is confirmed by the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis which records that "Rodulfus cognomento Cappellus" succeeded "Asclittinus qui cognominatus est Comes iuvenis" as conte di Aversa (another manuscript calling him "R. filius Oddonis c. C.")[633]. Lord of Canne from early 1042: Amatus records that "the Normans divided among themselves" the lands at Melfi, following their victories against the Byzantines dated to 1041, and that “William received Ascoli; Drogo had Venosa; Arnolin had Lavello; Hugh Toutebove had Monopoli; Rodulf had Canne; Walter, Civitate; Peter, Trani; Rodulf son of Bebena, Sant´Arcangelo; Tristan, Montepeloso; Hervey, Grumento; Asclettin, Acerenza; and Rainfroi, Malarbine”, adding that “Prince Guaimar of Salerno…invested each one of them”[634]. The Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records the division of properties agreed at Melfi, dated to Feb 1042, as follows: "Guilelmo Asculum, Drogoni Venusiam, Arnolino Labellum, Ugoni Tutabovi Monopolim, Petro Tranum, Gualterio Civitatem, Rodulfo Cannim, Tristaino Montem pilosum, Herveo Grigentum, Asclittino Acerentiam, Rodulfo Sanctum Archangelum, Raimfrido Monerbinum"[635]. Conte di Aversa. Amatus records that, after the death of Asclettin Count of Aversa in 1045, Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno appointed "a man called Rodulf as Count of Aversa without the agreement of the people"[636]. An alternative manuscript of the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records that "R. filius Oddonis c. C." was expelled from Aversa after a short time and replaced by "Rodulfum Trincanocte"[637]. Amatus records that he was expelled from Aversa by Rainulf "Tricanocte", nephew of Rainulf (above), after which "he was called Count Capellus"[638].
     "m as her first husband, GAITELGRIMA di Sorrento, daughter of --- di Sorrento & his wife --- ([1015/20]-). "Gaitelgrima…comitissa senatrix" donated property to the monastery of San Blasio, for the soul of "domni Rodolfi comiti seniori mei", by charter dated Mar 1048, dated to "comitante domno Guilielmo et domno Herimano in castro Aversum…anno primo"[639]. Her birth date range is estimated based on her having had children by both her marriages. She married secondly (after Aug 1051) Onfroi Conte di Apulia. Amatus refers to the wife of Humphrey as "the Duke of Sorrento's sister"[640]. The fact that these references are to the same person is confirmed by the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi which names "genitus genetrice Hermannus [Comte di Canne] eadem Unfredi fuerat qua filius Abagelardus"[641], Abelard being the son of Onfroi and Herman presumably being the son of Rodolfe (who was reported as having received Canne under the treaty of Melfi in 1042[642])."
Med Lands cites:
[633] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676, and note r.
[634] Amatus II.31, p. 77.
[635] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.
[636] Amatus II.33, p. 78.
[637] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676 note r.
[638] Amatus II.36, pp. 80-1.
[639] Stasser (2008), p. 246, quoting Gallo, A. (ed.) (1927) Codice diplomatico Normanno di Aversa (Naples), 49, p. 395.
[640] Amatus III.34, p. 98, footnote 52 postulating that this was the Duke displaced by Guido, brother of Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno, not Guido himself.
[641] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi IV, MGH SS IX, p. 290. Amatus, p. 165 footnote 7, states that Herman was half-brother of Abelard, citing the Gesta Roberti, but this does not emerge from the text.
[642] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.2

Family 1

Rudolphe/Raoul Capellus (?) Conte di Aversa d. bt 1046 - Mar 1048

Family 2

Onfroi de Hauteville b. bt 1015 - 1020, d. 1057

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SOUTHERN%20ITALY,%20PRE-NORMAN.htm#GaitelgrimaSorrentoM1RodolfM2Onfroi. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RodolfeAversadied1048

Rudolphe/Raoul Capellus (?) Conte di Aversa1

M, #94928, d. between 1046 and March 1048
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Rudolphe/Raoul Capellus (?) Conte di Aversa married Gaitelgrima (?);
Her 1st husband.1
Rudolphe/Raoul Capellus (?) Conte di Aversa died between 1046 and March 1048.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "RODOLPHE [Raoul] Capellus (-[1046/Mar 1048]). His parentage is confirmed by the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis which records that "Rodulfus cognomento Cappellus" succeeded "Asclittinus qui cognominatus est Comes iuvenis" as conte di Aversa (another manuscript calling him "R. filius Oddonis c. C.")[633]. Lord of Canne from early 1042: Amatus records that "the Normans divided among themselves" the lands at Melfi, following their victories against the Byzantines dated to 1041, and that “William received Ascoli; Drogo had Venosa; Arnolin had Lavello; Hugh Toutebove had Monopoli; Rodulf had Canne; Walter, Civitate; Peter, Trani; Rodulf son of Bebena, Sant´Arcangelo; Tristan, Montepeloso; Hervey, Grumento; Asclettin, Acerenza; and Rainfroi, Malarbine”, adding that “Prince Guaimar of Salerno…invested each one of them”[634]. The Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records the division of properties agreed at Melfi, dated to Feb 1042, as follows: "Guilelmo Asculum, Drogoni Venusiam, Arnolino Labellum, Ugoni Tutabovi Monopolim, Petro Tranum, Gualterio Civitatem, Rodulfo Cannim, Tristaino Montem pilosum, Herveo Grigentum, Asclittino Acerentiam, Rodulfo Sanctum Archangelum, Raimfrido Monerbinum"[635]. Conte di Aversa. Amatus records that, after the death of Asclettin Count of Aversa in 1045, Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno appointed "a man called Rodulf as Count of Aversa without the agreement of the people"[636]. An alternative manuscript of the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records that "R. filius Oddonis c. C." was expelled from Aversa after a short time and replaced by "Rodulfum Trincanocte"[637]. Amatus records that he was expelled from Aversa by Rainulf "Tricanocte", nephew of Rainulf (above), after which "he was called Count Capellus"[638].
     "m as her first husband, GAITELGRIMA di Sorrento, daughter of --- di Sorrento & his wife --- ([1015/20]-). "Gaitelgrima…comitissa senatrix" donated property to the monastery of San Blasio, for the soul of "domni Rodolfi comiti seniori mei", by charter dated Mar 1048, dated to "comitante domno Guilielmo et domno Herimano in castro Aversum…anno primo"[639]. Her birth date range is estimated based on her having had children by both her marriages. She married secondly (after Aug 1051) Onfroi Conte di Apulia. Amatus refers to the wife of Humphrey as "the Duke of Sorrento's sister"[640]. The fact that these references are to the same person is confirmed by the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi which names "genitus genetrice Hermannus [Comte di Canne] eadem Unfredi fuerat qua filius Abagelardus"[641], Abelard being the son of Onfroi and Herman presumably being the son of Rodolfe (who was reported as having received Canne under the treaty of Melfi in 1042[642])."
Med Lands cites:
[633] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676, and note r.
[634] Amatus II.31, p. 77.
[635] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.
[636] Amatus II.33, p. 78.
[637] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676 note r.
[638] Amatus II.36, pp. 80-1.
[639] Stasser (2008), p. 246, quoting Gallo, A. (ed.) (1927) Codice diplomatico Normanno di Aversa (Naples), 49, p. 395.
[640] Amatus III.34, p. 98, footnote 52 postulating that this was the Duke displaced by Guido, brother of Guaimar IV Prince of Salerno, not Guido himself.
[641] Gesta Roberti Wiscardi IV, MGH SS IX, p. 290. Amatus, p. 165 footnote 7, states that Herman was half-brother of Abelard, citing the Gesta Roberti, but this does not emerge from the text.
[642] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.66, MGH SS VII, p. 676.1

Family

Gaitelgrima (?) b. bt 1015 - 1020

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RodolfeAversadied1048. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Domenico Silvio1

M, #94929, d. after October 1081
FatherDomenico Silvio Doge of Venice1 d. a 1084
MotherTheodora Ducaena1 b. b 1059, d. a 1075
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Domenico Silvio and NN di Principatu were engaged in October 1081.2,1
Domenico Silvio died after October 1081.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "DOMENICO Silvio (-after Oct 1081). A charter dated Jul 1079 records a judgment against the abbey of Cluny and in favour of the monastery of SS. Trinità e S. Michele di Brondolo relating to property at Fogolana and names "dominus noster Dominicus Silvius…dux et imperialis prothophendius…Dominicum Silvium filium suum"[142].
     "Betrothed (Oct 1081) to --- di Principatu, daughter of GUILLAUME de Hauteville Conte di Principato & his wife [Maria] di Conza-Salerno. Malaterra refers to the betrothal of "dux…neptem" (referring to a Venetian named Dominico) and "filiam fratris sui Guilielmi Principatus comitis" at the time of the siege of Durazzo, dated to Oct 1081[143]."
Med Lands cites:
[142] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 257, p. 282.
[143] Pontiari, E. (ed.) (1927-8) De rebus gestis Rogerii Calabriæ et Siciliæ comitis et Roberti Guiscardi ducis fratris eius (Bologna) (“Malaterra”), III.28, p. 74.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter . Malaterra refers to the betrothal of "dux…neptem" (referring to a Venetian named Dominico) and "filiam fratris sui Guilielmi Principatus comitis" at the time of the siege of Durazzo, dated to Oct 1081[742].
     "Betrothed (Oct 1081) to DOMENICO Silvio, son of DOMENICO Silvio Doge of Venice & his wife ---."
Med Lands cites:
[742] Malaterra, III.28, p. 74.2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/VENICE.htm#DomencioIISilvio. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#dauGuillaumePrincipatuBetDominicoSilvio

NN di Principatu1

F, #94930
FatherGuillaume de Hauteville Conte di Principato1 b. 1025, d. 1080
MotherMaria di Conza-Salerno1 d. c 1085
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     NN di Principatu and Domenico Silvio were engaged in October 1081.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "DOMENICO Silvio (-after Oct 1081). A charter dated Jul 1079 records a judgment against the abbey of Cluny and in favour of the monastery of SS. Trinità e S. Michele di Brondolo relating to property at Fogolana and names "dominus noster Dominicus Silvius…dux et imperialis prothophendius…Dominicum Silvium filium suum"[142].
     "Betrothed (Oct 1081) to --- di Principatu, daughter of GUILLAUME de Hauteville Conte di Principato & his wife [Maria] di Conza-Salerno. Malaterra refers to the betrothal of "dux…neptem" (referring to a Venetian named Dominico) and "filiam fratris sui Guilielmi Principatus comitis" at the time of the siege of Durazzo, dated to Oct 1081[143]."
Med Lands cites:
[142] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 257, p. 282.
[143] Pontiari, E. (ed.) (1927-8) De rebus gestis Rogerii Calabriæ et Siciliæ comitis et Roberti Guiscardi ducis fratris eius (Bologna) (“Malaterra”), III.28, p. 74.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter . Malaterra refers to the betrothal of "dux…neptem" (referring to a Venetian named Dominico) and "filiam fratris sui Guilielmi Principatus comitis" at the time of the siege of Durazzo, dated to Oct 1081[742].
     "Betrothed (Oct 1081) to DOMENICO Silvio, son of DOMENICO Silvio Doge of Venice & his wife ---."
Med Lands cites:
[742] Malaterra, III.28, p. 74.1

Family

Domenico Silvio d. a Oct 1081

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#dauGuillaumePrincipatuBetDominicoSilvio. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/VENICE.htm#DomencioIISilvio

Furtun ibn Musa (?)1

M, #94931, d. 801
FatherMusa ibn Fortún (?)1 b. b 740, d. bt 789 - 802
ReferenceGAV37
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Furtun ibn Musa (?) died in 801.1
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: GAV-37.
; See the attached chart of the early generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.”.1,2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Banu Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).

Musa ibn Fortún (?)1

M, #94932, b. before 740, d. between 789 and 802
FatherFortún ibn Qasi (?)1,2,3,4 b. b 713
ReferenceGAV38
Last Edited11 Aug 2020
     Musa ibn Fortún (?) was born before 740; Wikipedia (ES) says b. bef 740; Med Lands says b. 745.5,4
Musa ibn Fortún (?) died between 789 and 802 at Zaragoza, Provincia de Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain (now).1,4
     ; This is the same person as ”Musa ibn Fortún” at Wikipedia (ES). GAV-38.
; See the attached chart of the early generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.”.1,6 He was Leader of the Banu Qasi
See the attached map of the Bani Qasi region in the 8th century. (from Wikipedia; De Rowanwindwhistler - Trabajo propioProjection: EPSG 4326Coast, land: Natural EarthRivers: © Ministerio de Agricultura y Pesca, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente (MAPAMA) (free to use if properly atttributed), CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=65431315) between 740 and 789.7

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Fortún ibn Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort%C3%BAn_ibn_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#MusaibnFortun
  5. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Musa ibn Fortún: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musa_ibn_Fort%C3%BAn
  6. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Banu Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi
  7. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi#/media/Archivo:BanuQasi.svg

Fortún ibn Qasi (?)1

M, #94933, b. before 713
FatherConde Casio/Casius (?)2,3 d. a 714
ReferenceGAV39
Last Edited11 Aug 2020
     Fortún ibn Qasi (?) was born before 713.3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "FORTÚN ibn Qasi ([before 713]-). Ibn Hazm names "Fortun, Abu Tawr, Abu Salama, Yunus y Yahya" as the sons of "Qasi"[389]. His parentage is confirmed by Al-Udri when he names his descendant "Muhammad ibn Lubb ibn Muhammad ibn Musa ibn Musa ibn Fortun ibn Garsiya"[390]. Cañada Juste suggests that his Navarrese name "Fortún", in contrast to the Muslim names of Qasi´s other recorded children, indicates that Fortún was probably born before his father´s conversion[391]."
Med Lands cites:
[389] De la Granja 'La Marca superior en la obra de al-Udri', Apéndice, "la "Yamharat ansab al-arab" de Ibn Hazm", p. 86.
[390] De la Granja 'La Marca superior en la obra de al-Udri', 171, p. 75.
[391] Cañada Juste 'Los Banu Qasi', p. 6, citing Sánchez Albornoz ´La auténtica batalla de Clavijo´, Cuadernos de Historia de España, IX (1948), p. 97 (not yet consulted).3
GAV-39. Fortún ibn Qasi (?) was also known as Furtun (?)2
; See the attached chart of the early generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.”.2,4 He was Leader of the Banu Qasi
See the attached map of the Bani Qasi region in the 8th century. (from Wikipedia; De Rowanwindwhistler - Trabajo propioProjection: EPSG 4326Coast, land: Natural EarthRivers: © Ministerio de Agricultura y Pesca, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente (MAPAMA) (free to use if properly atttributed), CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=65431315) between 715 and 740.4

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Fortún ibn Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort%C3%BAn_ibn_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Banu Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#MusaibnFortun

Conde Casio/Casius (?)1,2

M, #94934, d. after 714
ReferenceGAV40
Last Edited4 Aug 2020
     Conde Casio/Casius (?) died after 714.2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "[CASIUS], son of --- (-after 714). A Visigoth from around the Ebro delta, he converted to Islam in 714, adopted the name QASI, and acquired a position of power in Tudela. The Visigothic origin of this family is confirmed by the Chronicle of Alfonso III which records Qasi´s great-grandson "Musa a Goth by birth…"[386]. Ibn Hazm names "Qasi…el conde [qumis] de la Marca en la época de los godos" adding that he converted to Islam in Damascus "en presencia de al-Walid ibn Abd al-Malik" [Caliph Walid I, who reigned from 705-715] after the Muslim conquest of Spain[387]. Cañada Juste records that the name "Casius" was first used by Sánchez-Albornoz in 1948[388], presumably in an attempt to "latinise" the name Qasi.
     "Qasi had five children:
1. FORTÚN ibn Qasi ([before 713]-).
2. ABU TAWR ibn Qasi .
3. ABU SALAMA ibn Qasi .
4. YUNUS ibn Qasi .
5. YAHYA ibn Qasi ."

Med Lands cites:
[386] Chronicle of Alfonso III, 25, pp. 176-7.
[387] De la Granja, F. 'La Marca superior en la obra de al-Udri', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón VIII (1967), available as an extract at (8 Feb 2011), Apéndice, "Principales familias árabes mencionadas en la obra de al-Udri, según la "Yamharat ansab al-arab" de Ibn Hazm (ed. Lévi-Provençal, Cairo, 1948)", p. 86.
[388] Cañada Juste 'Los Banu Qasi', p. 7.2


; See the attached chart of the early generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.”.3,4 GAV-40.

; Per Med Lands:
     "Descendants of a Visigoth who converted to Islam and assumed the name "Qasi" soon after the Moorish invasion in 711/12, this family rose to considerable prominence during the 9th and early 10th centuries in north-western Spain in the area adjacent to the Carolingian "March" of Spain. The sources which are quoted below show participation by the Banu Qasi family in various conflicts with their Carolingian neighbours, and it is likely that such talented local Muslim leaders represented the best hope of the emirate of Córdoba for further territorial expansion to the north. Indeed, the Muslim historian Al-Udri records that at one time (probably dated to the 850s) Muhammad Emir of Córdoba appointed Musa ibn Musa, great-grandson of the original Qasi, as "gobernador de la Marca", implying wide territorial responsibility[384], although the appointment was later withdrawn and was not repeated among Musa´s descendants. This passage should, however, probably not be taken as indicating that the emirate of Córdoba established its own "March" on the northern borders of its territories. Al-Udri´s works were written some two centuries after these events and, as a resident of Zaragoza, he must have been familiar with the local concept of "la Marca", probably using it in his writing as a convenient geographical descriptive term rather to indicate an established political entity on the Muslim side of the divide.
     "Various members of the Banu Qasi family were appointed as "wali" (governor, but sometimes translated as king, in the sense of "local" king) of the cities of Tudela and Zaragoza by the emirs of Córdoba during the second half of the 9th and early 10th centuries. However, they were unruly vassals, and the sources reveal numerous rebellions against the central authority of the emirate, especially by Musa ibn Musa and, after his death, his sons. The sources also show temporary alliances agreed, throughout the same period, between the Banu Qasi and the local Christian magnates to fight the emir or other rival local Muslim leaders. As will be seen below, these alliances were confirmed by several marriages, mainly with the family of the rulers of Pamplona, but also including single cases of intermarriage with the kings of Asturias and the counts of Pallars/Ribagorza.
     "The Arabic sources record four cases of members of the Banu Qasi family converting back to Christianity in the early 10th century: Fortun ibn Lubb, Fortun ibn Abd Allah, and the brothers Abd Allah and Ismail ibn Mutarif. There is no information on their descendants, but it is likely that some or all of these individuals were ancestors of nobility in the kingdom of Navarre. In this respect, the names "Fortun" and "Lubb" are particularly significant, the former being recorded frequently among Navarrese nobility and the latter presumably being transformed into the equally common "Lope" and its Basque equivalent "Ochoa" (see the document NAVARRE NOBILITY).
     "Numerous references to the Banu Qasi family are found in the works of 10th to 13th century Muslim Spanish historians, corroborated by passages in Christian sources such as the Chronicle of Alfonso III, the Chronicon Sebastiani, the Chronicon Albeldense, and the Codex de Roda. The main primary source for reconstructing the family is the 11th century historian al-Udri. The family was studied in detail in 1980 by Alberto Cañada Juste, who compares the information extracted from all relevant sources and places the Banu Qasi in their proper historical context[385]. The recent work by Jesús Lorenzo Jiménez includes a useful appendix of Spanish translations of relevant extracts from Arabic language sources, some of which are difficult to obtain elsewhere."
Med Lands cites:
[384] De la Granja 'La Marca superior en la obra de al-Udri', 32, p. 25.
[385] Cañada Juste, A. 'Los Banu Qasi (714-924)', Principe de Viana 41 (1980), p. 7. [available at (6 Feb 2011]2
Conde Casio/Casius (?) was also known as Count Cassius.3

; This is the same person as ”Count Cassius” at Wikipedia and as ”Conde Casio” at Wikipedia (ES).5,1 He was Funder and Leader of the Banu Qasi
See the attached map of the Bani Qasi region in the 8th century. (from Wikipedia; De Rowanwindwhistler - Trabajo propioProjection: EPSG 4326Coast, land: Natural EarthRivers: © Ministerio de Agricultura y Pesca, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente (MAPAMA) (free to use if properly atttributed), CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=65431315) between 713 and 715.4,5

Citations

  1. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Conde Casio: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conde_Casio. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Banu Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_Cassius
  6. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Abu Taur de Huesca: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Taur_de_Huesca

Abu-Tawr (?) de Huesca1

M, #94935
FatherConde Casio/Casius (?)1,2,3,4 d. a 714
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Abu-Tawr (?) de Huesca was living between 774 and 790.1

Citations

  1. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Abu Taur de Huesca: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Taur_de_Huesca. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  2. [S4760] Wikipedia (ES), online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Conde Casio: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conde_Casio
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_Cassius. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Abu Salama (?)1

M, #94936
FatherConde Casio/Casius (?)1,2 d. a 714
Last Edited2 Aug 2020

Citations

  1. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Conde Casio: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conde_Casio. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Zahir ibn Fortún (?)1

M, #94937
FatherFortún ibn Qasi (?)1,2 b. b 713
Last Edited2 Aug 2020

Citations

  1. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Fortún ibn Qasi: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort%C3%BAn_ibn_Qasi. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MOORISH%20SPAIN.htm#_Toc371931142. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Muhammad ibn Lubb (?)1

M, #94938, d. 898
FatherLubb ibn Musa (?)1 d. 875
MotherAyab Al-Bilatiyya (?)1
ReferenceGAV34
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Muhammad ibn Lubb (?) died in 898.1,2
     ; See the attached chart of the later generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.“.1 GAV-34.

; This is the same person as ”Muhammad ibn Lubb” at Wikipedia.2

Lubb ibn Muhammad ibn Lubb (?) Walil of Tudela and Larida1

M, #94939, d. 907
FatherMuhammad ibn Lubb (?)1,2 d. 898
Last Edited2 Aug 2020
     Lubb ibn Muhammad ibn Lubb (?) Walil of Tudela and Larida died in 907.2,1
     ; See the attached chart of the later generations of the Banu Qasi, before and descending from Musa Ibn Musa (from Wikipedia article). See the article for further details on the Banu Qasi and their Hispano-Roman origins.“.2

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lubb_ibn_Muhammad. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banu_Qasi

Konrad von Hohenstaufen1

M, #94940, b. February 1167, d. 19 January 1191
FatherFriedrich I "Barbarossa" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor1 b. c 1122, d. 10 Jun 1190
MotherBeatrix de Bourgogne Css Palatine de Bourgogne1,2 b. c 1145, d. 15 Nov 1184
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Konrad von Hohenstaufen was born in February 1167 at Modigliana.1 He and Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary were engaged in 1189.1
Konrad von Hohenstaufen died on 19 January 1191 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now), at age 23.1
Konrad von Hohenstaufen was buried after 19 January 1191 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now).1

Family

Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary b. c 1180, d. 6 Dec 1240

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013543&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Dietho von Ravensburg1

M, #94941
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Dietho von Ravensburg married Adelaide von Vohbourg Duchess of Swabi, Queen of Germanu, daughter of Diepold III (?) von Geiengen, Markgraf von Vohburg and Kunigunde (?) von Beichlingen, after 1153;
Her 2nd husband.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELA (-19 Feb ----). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "Adelam" as daughter of "marchionem Theobaldum"[183]. As it is assumed that Adela must have been younger than her husband, it is likely that she was either the youngest daughter of her father's first marriage or his daughter by his second wife. The Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ names (in order) "filium…Diepoldum et quatuor filias…Adelam imperatricem, Sophiam de Leksmunde, Eufemiam de Assel, Iuttam uxorem advocati Ratisponensis" as children of "Marchio Dietpoldus" and his wife "de Polonia"[184]. The Annales Herbipolenses name "Etenim filiam Theobaldi marchionis de Voheburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa"[185]. The Urspergensium Chronicon names "Adilam filiam marchionis Diepoldi de Vohburc" as first wife of Emperor Friedrich I, and records her second marriage to "Dietho de Ravensburc ministerialis"[186]. The Annales Magdeburgenses record the separation of "Friedericus" and his first wife by "coram legatis apostolici" in 1153[187], the Annales Sancti Diibodi specifying Konstanz as the place of the separation[188]. Heiress of Egerland. The necrology of Isny records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Adelhaidis regina benefactrix"[189].
     "m firstly (Eger before 2 Mar 1147, divorced Konstanz Mar 1153) as his first wife, FRIEDRICH III Duke of Swabia, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" von Staufen Duke of Swabia & his first wife Judith of Bavaria (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190, bur Tarsus [entrails], Antioch St Peter [flesh], Tyre Cathedral [legs]). He was elected FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany in 1152, crowned Emperor FRIEDRICH I in 1155.
     "m secondly DIETHO von Ravensburg, welfische Ministerialer (-1180 or after)."
Med Lands cites:
[183] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[184] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 76.
[185] Annales Herbipolenses 5 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[186] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 346.
[187] Annales Magdeburgenses 1153 1, MGH SS XVI, p. 191.
[188] Annales Diibodi Continuatio 1156, MGH SS XVI, p. 29.
[189] Necrologium Isnense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 177.1
Dietho von Ravensburg was welfische Ministerialer (an unfree knight.)1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AdelaVohburgM1FriedrichIEmp. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Manna (?)1

F, #94945
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Manna (?) and Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor, King of Jerusalem were associated; Mistress.1

Family

Friedrich II/IV Roger (?) Holy Roman Emperor, King of Jerusalem b. 26 Dec 1194, d. 13 Dec 1250
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIIGermanydied1250B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ida (Oda) de Reynel1

F, #94946, d. 5 June 1254
FatherArnoul de Reynel sn de Pierrefitte et de Cirey1,2 d. c 1228
MotherIda de Brienne1,3
Last Edited18 Aug 2020
     Ida (Oda) de Reynel married Balian I (?) Lord of Sidon, Regent/Bailli of Jerusalem, son of Reynold/Renaud (?) Lord of Sidon and Beaufort and Helvis d'Ibelin, in 1218;
His 2nd wife.1,4
Ida (Oda) de Reynel died on 5 June 1254.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:673.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida (Oda) de Reynel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139848&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnoul de Reynel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139849&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Brienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139850&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139847&tree=LEO
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XI (I.): The House of Ibelin. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem.

NN von Gleiberg1

M, #94947, d. before 1000
Last Edited4 Aug 2020
     NN von Gleiberg married Irmtrud von Lahngau Gräfin von Gleiberg, daughter of Heribert I (?) Graf von Gleiberg im Kinziggau und von der Wetterau and Irmentrude/Imiza (?);
Her 1st husband.1
NN von Gleiberg died before 1000.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter ([970/85]-). The parentage of the wife of Graf Friedrich is suggested by the Vita Adelheidis which names "Irminthrudis, Alverad [et] Berthrada" as the three sisters of Adelheid, and daughters of "Megengoz" and his wife, specifying that Irminthrudis was grandmother of [three of the sons of Graf Friedrich, shown below] "Heinrici magnifici ducis et Adhelberonis Metensis episcopi, Friderici ducis"[339]. The possibility of this person´s earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage is suggested by the Genealogia Welforum which names [this person´s daughter] "Salice---de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf [II] Graf von Altdorf (see below)[340]. The reference to “Glizperch” represents the earliest indication of a relationship between the Luxembourg family and the Grafen von Gleiberg (see the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY). One possibility is that the wife of Graf Friedrich was heiress of Gleiberg. However, Irmtrud/Imiza is the only one of the siblings shown below in relation to whom a reference to Gleiberg has been found. This raises the interesting possibility that Irmtrud/Imiza, while sharing the same mother as the three brothers named in the Genealogia Welforum, may have been born from a different father who presumably held Gleiberg. It should be emphasised that this suggestion is highly speculative. Another indication of a Gleiberg/Luxembourg family connection is provided by Bernold´s Chronicon which records in 1059 that “Fridericus et fratres eius de Glichberga” rebelled against “Heinrico regi”[341]. It is not known which of Friedrich´s brothers may have been “von Gleiberg”. Another possible indication of the family origin of the wife of Graf Friedrich is provided by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which records that "comes Letardus de Longui pater Manegaudi et Gislebertus comes de Luscelenburch" were "nepotes" of Emperor Konrad II[342]. The precise family relationships between these three persons have not been traced, but it is possible that Giselbert was related to the emperor through his mother´s family, which had many Franconian connections.
     "[m firstly --- von Gleiberg, son of ---.]
     "m [secondly] FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau, son of SIEGFRIED Comte [de Luxembourg] & his wife Hedwig --- (-6 Oct 1019)."
Med Lands cites:
[339] Vita Adelheidis abbatissæ Vilicensis 3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 757.
[340] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[341] Bernoldi Chronicon, 1059, MGH SS V, p. 427.
[342] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "[--- von Gleiberg (-[before 1000]). The existence of this person, and the possibility of his marriage, is highly speculative (as explained below) but it would provide one explanation for the close relationship which evidently existed between the Luxembourg and Gleiberg families.
     "m [as her first husband,] --- [von Hammerstein], daughter of HERIBERT Graf im Kinziggau Pfalzgraf [Konradiner] & his wife Imiza [Irmintrudis] --- ([970/85]-). The parentage of the wife of Graf Friedrich is suggested by the Vita Adelheidis which names "Irminthrudis, Alverad [et] Berthrada" as the three sisters of Adelheid, and daughters of "Megengoz" and his wife, specifying that Irminthrudis was grandmother of [three of the sons of Graf Friedrich, shown below] "Heinrici magnifici ducis et Adhelberonis Metensis episcopi, Friderici ducis"[64]. The possibility of this person´s earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage is suggested by the Genealogia Welforum which names [this person´s daughter] "Salice---de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf [II] Graf von Altdorf (see below)[65]. The reference to “Glizperch” represents the earliest indication of a relationship between the Luxembourg family and the Grafen von Gleiberg (see the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY). One possibility is that the wife of Graf Friedrich was heiress of Gleiberg. However, Irmtrud/Imiza is the only one of the siblings shown below in relation to whom a reference to Gleiberg has been found. This raises the interesting possibility that Irmtrud/Imiza, while sharing the same mother as the three brothers named in the Genealogia Welforum, may have been born from a different father who presumably held Gleiberg. It should be emphasised that this suggestion is highly speculative. Another indication of a Gleiberg/Luxembourg family connection is provided by Bernold´s Chronicon which records in 1059 that “Fridericus et fratres eius de Glichberga” rebelled against “Heinrico regi”[66]. It is not known which of Friedrich´s brothers may have been “von Gleiberg”. She married [secondly] Friedrich Graf im Moselgau.]"
Med Lands cites:
[64] Vita Adelheidis abbatissæ Vilicensis 3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 757.
[65] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[66] Bernoldi Chronicon, 1059, MGH SS V, p. 427.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HESSEN.htm#GleibergMHammerstein. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#dauHeribertdiedafter985MFriedrichMoselga

[Ingibiog] Eiriksdottir (?) av Orkney1

F, #94948
FatherEirik|'Eric' Stagbrellir|Slagbrellir (?) 'lord of the Dale'2,3
MotherIngerid Rognvaldsdottir av Orkney (?) heiress of Caithness & Orkney2,4 b. b 1140
Last Edited15 Oct 2020
     [Ingibiog] Eiriksdottir (?) av Orkney married Gillebride (?) Earl of Angus in 1156;
His 2nd wife.1,5,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GILLBRIDE, son of --- (-[1187]). Earl of Angus [1135]. David I King of Scotland granted protection to the clerics of Deer by undated charter witnessed by "Donchado comite de Fib et Malmori d’Athotla et Ggillebrite comite d’Engus et Ghgillcomded Mac Aed…"[10]. He fought at the battle of the Standard 22 Aug 1138. "…Comite Duncano, Gillebrid comite de Anegus, M. comite de Ethoel, Gillecrist comite de Meneteth, Gillberto filio comitis Ferteth, Merlefwano Adam filio comitis de Anegus…" witnessed the charter dated 1164 under which "Malcolmus rex Scottorum" confirmed the foundation of Scone abbey[11]. He was one of the hostages for William "the Lion" King of Scotland in 1174[12]. "…Gylbride comite de Anegus…" witnessed the charter dated to [1187/89] under which William King of Scotland granted the churches of Elgin and Eren to the bishopric of Moray[13].
     "m [firstly] [--- of Dunbar, daughter of GOSPATRICK Earl & his wife ---. The Complete Peerage says that Gillbride “seems to have married a daughter of Gospatrick Earl of Dunbar” but does not specify the primary source on which this is based[14]. Although it does not specify which Earl Gospatrick was her father, it is more likely from a chronological viewpoint that, if the information is correct, he was the Gospatrick who died in 1166.]
     "m secondly --- of Caithness, daughter of ERIK Slagbrellir & his wife Ingigerd Kalisdatter. According to the Complete Peerage, Gillbride Earl of Angus married as his second wife "the heiress of the earls of Caithness", in another passage stating that she wa[s "sister of Harald Ungi Earl of Caithness"[15]. No primary source is cited in support of these statements and it is possible that this marriage, and the supposed parentage of the bride, are entirely speculative, in an attempt to explain the transmission of the half of the earldom of Caithness to Earl Magnus (see below). Skene says that "the probability is that the half of Caithness which belonged to the Angus family was that half possessed by the earls of the line of Erlend, and was given by King Alexander with the title of Earl to Magnus, as the son of one of Earl Harald "Ungi"‘s sisters" and that "the Norwegian name of Magnus indicates that [Earl Magnus] had a Norwegian mother"[16]. He cites no primary source either, and the implication is that Skene is speculating on all the points which he makes. Concerning the supposed parentage of Earl Magnus’s mother, it appears unlikely that Magnus’s right to Caithness was derived from the junior branch of the comital family of Orkney/Caithness, to which Erik Slagbrellir belonged, as it ceased to hold any interest in the county after 1198, while Magnus’s grant appears to be dated to the 1230s (as discussed more fully below). A more sensible suggestion is that, assuming Magnus’s right to Caithness was inherited from his mother, she was related to the last Earl John, who died in 1232, and whose rights would have been divided between his two heiresses.]"
Med Lands cites:
[10] Early Scottish Charters CCXXIV, p. 181.
[11] Scone, 5, p. 5.
[12] CP I 145.
[13] Innes, C. N. (ed.) (1837) Registrum Episcopatus Moraviensis (Edinburgh) ("Moray Bishopric"), 42, p. v and 38.
[14] CP I 145.
[15] CP I 145 and CP II 475.
[16] Skene, W. F. (1890) Celtic Scotland 2nd Edn (Edinburgh), Vol. III, Appendix V, p. 450.6


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol I page 145.
2. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: page 93.1


; Per Genealogics: "her parentage only 'probable' ... genealogically, she is held to be the Madadhams of the Dale”.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "[daughter . According to the Complete Peerage, Gillbride Earl of Angus married as his second wife "the heiress of the earls of Caithness", in another passage stating that she was "sister of Harald Ungi Earl of Caithness"[954]. No primary source is cited in support of these statements and it is possible that this marriage, and the supposed parentage of the bride, are entirely speculative, in an attempt to explain the transmission of the half of the earldom of Caithness to Earl Gillbride’s son Magnus. Skene says that "the probability is that the half of Caithness which belonged to the Angus family was that half possessed by the earls of the line of Erlend, and was given by King Alexander with the title of Earl to Magnus, as the son of one of Earl Harald "Ungi"‘s sisters" and that "the Norwegian name of Magnus indicates that [Earl Magnus] had a Norwegian mother"[955]. He cites no primary source either and the implication is that Skene is speculating on all the points which he makes. Concerning the supposed parentage of Earl Magnus’s mother, it appears unlikely that Magnus’s right to Caithness was derived from the junior branch of the comital family of Orkney/Caithness, to which Erik Slagbrellir belonged, as they ceased to hold any interest in the county after 1198, while Magnus’s grant appears to be dated to the 1230s (as discussed more fully below). A more sensible suggestion is that, assuming Magnus’s right to Caithness was inherited from his mother, she was related to the last Earl John, who died in 1232, and whose rights would have been divided between his two heiresses.
     "m as his second wife, GILLBRIDE Earl of Angus, son of --- (-[1187]).]"
Med Lands cites:
[954] CP I 145 and CP II 475.
[955] Skene, W. F. (1890) Celtic Scotland 2nd Edn (Edinburgh), Vol. III, Appendix V, p. 450.2

Family

Gillebride (?) Earl of Angus b. c 1120, d. c 1187
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, [Ingibiog] Eiriksdottir av Orkney: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332923&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#dauErikMGillbrideAngus. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirik|'Eric' Stagbrellir|Slagbrellir: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00544688&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingerid Rognvaldsdottir av Orkney: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00544689&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#GillbrideAngusdied1187
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc359671967
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, earl Magnus II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332924&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#MagnusCaithness1239B

Magnus II (?) mormaer of Caithness, jarl of Orkney1

M, #94949, b. circa 1180, d. 1239
FatherGillebride (?) Earl of Angus1,3,2 b. c 1120, d. c 1187
Mother[Ingibiog] Eiriksdottir (?) av Orkney1,2,3,4
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Magnus II (?) mormaer of Caithness, jarl of Orkney was born circa 1180; Genealogics says b. ca 1180; Med Lands says b. 1175/85.1,3
Magnus II (?) mormaer of Caithness, jarl of Orkney died in 1239.1,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 10:App A p28-9.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "MAGNUS of Angus, son of [GILLBRIDE Earl of Angus & his [second] wife ---] ([1175/85]-1239). His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was the father of his successor, Earl Gillbride/Gibbon/Gilbert (see below). "Domino Magnus filio Comitis…domino Anegus filio Comitis…" witnessed the charter, dated to [1226/39], which confirmed the donation of "terra de Othirlony…terram de Kenny" to Aberbrothoc by "Valterum filium Turpini"[245]. A charter dated 1351 which confirmed the donation of "terram de Kenny" to Aberbrothoc by "Walterum filium Turpini" quotes a document witnessed by "Domino Magno filio Comitis…Domino Anegus filio Comitis…"[246]. He was apparently installed as Earl of (part) Caithness . There appears to be no surviving contemporary evidence concerning the grant of the earldom. However, Balfour Paul refers to a charter "noted in an old Inventory of Oliphant writs, made about 1594, and preserved in the General Register House" which states that King Alexander II granted "the erledom of South Kaythnes" to "Magnus sone to Gylcryst sum tyme erle of Angus"[247]. The inventory note does not date the charter in question. However, the grant, if the report is accurate, must have taken place after 1231, the date of the death of Earl John, last of the previous lines of earls of Orkney and Caithness. It was presumably after 7 Oct 1232, the date of a charter under which Alexander II King of Scotland donated revenue from mills in Invernarn to the bishopric of Moray which was witnessed by "…M comite de Anegus et Katania…"[248]. Although the name of the witness is given only in abbreviated form, the reference to the county of Angus suggests that it must be Malcolm Earl of Angus who is shown above. It is assumed therefore that Earl Malcolm resigned Caithness, or his claims thereto, in favour of Magnus. The precise parentage of Earl Magnus has been the subject of considerable speculation. According to the Complete Peerage, "Magnus Jarl of Orkney and Earl of Caithness is stated to have been the son of Gillbride Earl of Angus by his second wife sister of Harald Ugni, to whom Magnus, though an infant, was apparently recognised as successor in his half of the Earldom"[249]. It does not cite the source on which this statement is based and, as discussed further above under the possible second wife of Earl Gilbride, the hypothesis appears to be entirely speculative. Balfour Paul’s Scots Peerage says that "Magnus…is usually designed son of Gillebride Earl of Angus", adding that the "statement was first made by Sir James Dalrymple in his Collections, but he gives no proof"[250]. The Complete Peerage says that "it seems…quite probable that [Magnus] was the same person as Malcolm Earl of Angus, son of Duncan, son of Gilchrist, son of Gillbride…[who] is named as Earl of Angus and Caithness in 1232 [see above]", although conceding that "the whole matter is, however, very obscure"[251]. The separate primary source references to an individual named Magnus indicate that this suggestion is probably incorrect. From a chronological point of view, Magnus’s estimated birth date range as shown above suggests that he was either the son of Gillbride Earl of Angus by a second marriage or that he was the son of Earl Gilchrist. The fact that Magnus’s successor was named [Gillbride] suggests that this was the name of Magnus’s father. The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1239 of "Magni comitis Orcadensis"[252]."
Med Lands cites:
[245] Aberbrothoc, 306, pp. xix and 262.
[246] Aberbrothoc, Appendix, VIII, p. 334.
[247] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. I, Angus, p. 163, quoting Ms Inventory in H. M. Reg. Ho.
[248] Moray Bishopric, 110, p. v and 122.
[249] CP II 475.
[250] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. II, Caithness, p. 317.
[251] CP II 475.
[252] Annales Islandici, 1239, p. 113.3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, earl Magnus II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00332924&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#GillbrideAngusdied1187. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#MagnusCaithness1239B
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#dauErikMGillbrideAngus
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00722177&tree=LEO

Gilbert I (?) jarl of Orkney, mormaer of Caithness1

M, #94950, b. circa 1210, d. 1256
FatherMagnus II (?) mormaer of Caithness, jarl of Orkney1 b. c 1180, d. 1239
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Gilbert I (?) jarl of Orkney, mormaer of Caithness was born circa 1210.1
Gilbert I (?) jarl of Orkney, mormaer of Caithness died in 1256.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 10:App A p29.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00722177&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Orkney, of Caithness: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140247&tree=LEO