Vyacheslav I (?) Prince of Smolensk, Turov and Pereyaslavl, Grand Duke of Kiev1,2

M, #48301, b. 1083, d. 6 February 1154
FatherVladimir II Vsevolodich "Monomachus" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev1,2 b. 1053, d. 19 May 1125
MotherGytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex1,3 b. bt 1050 - 1055, d. 7 May 1107
Last Edited3 Jul 2020
     Vyacheslav I (?) Prince of Smolensk, Turov and Pereyaslavl, Grand Duke of Kiev was born in 1083.2
Vyacheslav I (?) Prince of Smolensk, Turov and Pereyaslavl, Grand Duke of Kiev died on 6 February 1154.1,2
     He was Vyacheslav I, Pr of Rostov and Suzdal (1096-1107), Pr of Smolensk (1113-25), Pr of Turov (1125-32)+(1142-46), Pr of Pereyaslav (1132-34), Great Pr of Kiev (1139, 8 days)+(1150)+(1151-54), *1083, +6.2.1154.2 He was Prince of Rostov and Suzdal between 1096 and 1107.2 He was Prince of Smolensk between 1113 and 1125.2 He was Prince of Turov between 1125 and 1132.2 He was Prince of Pereyaslavl between 1132 and 1134.2 He was Prince of Turov between 1134 and 1142.2 He was Grand Duke of Kiev - 8 days in 1139.2 He was Grand Duke of Kiev in 1150.2 He was Grand Duke of Kiev between 1151 and 1154.2

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirMonomachdied1125B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Andrei I Bogoliubski (the Pious) (?) 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal1,2,3

M, #48302, b. 1110, d. 30 June 1174
FatherYuri I Dolguruki "Longarm" (?) Prince of Rostow & Suzdal, Grand Duke of Kiev1 b. 1090, d. 15 May 1157
MotherHelene/Olga Comnena3 d. 1183
Last Edited15 Oct 2004
     Andrei I Bogoliubski (the Pious) (?) 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal married Ulita (?), daughter of Boyar Kuchko (?); his 1st wife.4,3 Andrei I Bogoliubski (the Pious) (?) 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal was born in 1110; Louda & Maclagan Table 102 says b. 1110; Rurik 8 page says b. 1111.4,3 He married unknown (?) in 1164; his 2nd wife.3
Andrei I Bogoliubski (the Pious) (?) 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal died on 30 June 1174 at Bogolyubovo Castle; Louda & Maclagan says murdered 1174; Enc. says d. ca 1175; Rurik 8 page says d. 29/30.6.1174.1,4,3
Andrei I Bogoliubski (the Pious) (?) 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal was buried after 30 June 1174 at Assumption Cathedral, Vladimir.3


     ; Andrei "Bogolyubsky" "the Pious", Pr of Rostov-Suzdal (1155-69), 1st Grand Pr of Vladimir-Suzdal (1169-75), settled in Vladimir from 1162, *1111, +assassinated Bogolyubovo Castle 29.6.1174, bur Assumption Cathedral in Vladimir.3 He was Prince of Vyshgorod in 1155.3 He was 1st Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal between 1169 and 1175 at Russia.1,4,3

Family 1

Ulita (?)

Family 3

unknown (?)

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 225. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 102: Russia - Grand Dukes of Vladimir and Moscow (House of Rurik).

Mikhail I (?) 2nd Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal1,2,3,4

M, #48303, b. 1151, d. 20 June 1176
FatherYuri I Dolguruki "Longarm" (?) Prince of Rostow & Suzdal, Grand Duke of Kiev1,2,4 b. 1090, d. 15 May 1157
MotherHelene/Olga Comnena4 d. 1183
Last Edited2 Mar 2020
     Mikhail I (?) 2nd Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal was born in 1151.4 He married Fevronia (?)4
Mikhail I (?) 2nd Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal died on 20 June 1176.1,2,3,4
     ; [2m.] Mikhail, Pr of Rostov-Suzdal (1154-55), 2nd Grand Pr of Vladimir-Suzdal (1175-76), *1151, +20.6.1176; m.Fevronia N (+5.8.1202.)4 He was Prince of Pereyaslavl.4 He was Prince of Rostov-Suzdal between 1154 and 1155.4 He was 2nd Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal between 1175 and 1176.1,3,4

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 225. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 102: Russia - Grand Dukes of Vladimir and Moscow (House of Rurik).
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#FebroniaMikhailovnaMVladimirSviatoNovgor. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Vsevolod III Iurievich "Balshoe Gniezdo" (?) Grand Duke of Kiev1,2,3,4,5

M, #48304, b. 1154, d. 14 April 1212
FatherYuri I Dolguruki "Longarm" (?) Prince of Rostow & Suzdal, Grand Duke of Kiev1,2,6,3,4 b. 1090, d. 15 May 1157
MotherHelene/Olga Comnena6,4,3 d. 1183
Last Edited2 Mar 2020
     Vsevolod III Iurievich "Balshoe Gniezdo" (?) Grand Duke of Kiev was born in 1154.7,4,3 He married Saint Maria (?) of Ossetia, daughter of unknown (?), between 1170 and 1172 at Tbilisi, Georgia (now); his 1st wife.7,4,8,3 Vsevolod III Iurievich "Balshoe Gniezdo" (?) Grand Duke of Kiev married Liubov Vasilkovna (?) of Vitebsk, daughter of Vasilko II Bryacheslavich (?) Prince of Vitebsk, in 1209; Louda & Maclagan Table 102 says m. 1207; Leo van de Pas says m. 1209; Rurik 8 page says m. 1209.7,4,9,3
Vsevolod III Iurievich "Balshoe Gniezdo" (?) Grand Duke of Kiev died on 14 April 1212.1,2,7,4,3
     ; [2m.] Vsevolod III "Balshoe Gniezdo" "the Great Nest", Grand Pr of Kiev (II.1173-III.1173), 3d Grand Pr of Vladimir (1176-1212), *1154, +15.4.1212, bur Assumption Cathedral, Vladimir; 1m: Tbilisi 1170/72 St.Maria of Ossetia (+Vladimir 19.3.1206); 2m: 1209 Lyubov of Vitebsk (+after 1212); all kids by 1m.3

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 95.4 He was Great Prince of Kiev between February 1173 and March 1173.3 He was 3rd Grand Prince of Vladimir between 1176 and 1212.3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 225. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wsewolod III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00081444&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirVsevolodichdied1229. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Youry Dolgoruki: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00081443&tree=LEO
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 102: Russia - Grand Dukes of Vladimir and Moscow (House of Rurik).
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marija von Osseten: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174517&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ljubov Vasilkovna von Witebsk: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174518&tree=LEO
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 271.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konstantin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00081445&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IuriiIIVsevolodichVladimirdied1238.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jaroslav II Vsevolodovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125092&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik10.html

Géza (?) Prince of Hungary1,2,3

M, #48305, b. between 940 and 945, d. 1 February 997
FatherTaksony (?) Prince of Hungary1,2,4,5 b. 931, d. bt 970 - 972
Mother(?) (?) Princess of the Kumans6 b. 932
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Géza (?) Prince of Hungary was born between 940 and 945.2,5,3 He married Sarolta (?) von Siebenburgen, daughter of Gyula (?) Fürst von Siebenburgen, circa 967;
His 1st wife.2,7,5,3 Géza (?) Prince of Hungary and Sarolta (?) von Siebenburgen were divorced after 975; repudiated.2,3 Géza (?) Prince of Hungary married Adelajda/Adleta (?) of Poland, daughter of Ziemoysl (?) Duke of the Polans, circa 985;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife. Genealogy.EU Pieast 1 page says m. 968; Med Lands says m. 985.2,8,9,5,3
Géza (?) Prince of Hungary died on 1 February 997.1,2,5,3
     ; Per Genealogics: "He became leader of the Hungarians and curbed the power of the tribal chieftains. Realizing that their pagan country was surrounded by Christian nations, he allowed missionaries into Hungary and had no objections when his own son, Stephan, was baptised."5


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:153.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 104.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): "Géza, Great Prince of Hungary (ca 972-997), *ca 945, +1.2.997; 1m: ca 967 Sarolta (repudiated shortly after 975, +after 988), dau.of Prince Gyula of Transylvania; 2m: ca 985 Adelajda (+after 997), widow of his brother Michael."2


; Per Med Lands:
     "GÉZA, son of TAKSONY Prince of Hungary & his wife --- [Pss of the Kumans] ([940/45]-1 Feb 997). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Geisa, pater B. Stephani, secundus…Michael dux" as the two sons of "Toxin"[257]. The Kronika W?giersko-Polska names "Geyzan, Mychlemum et caluum Ladislaum" as the three sons of "Thoxon"[258]. The Gestis Hungarorum Liber names "Geysam, quantum ducem Hungarie" as son of "dux Tocsun"[259]. He succeeded his father in [970] as Prince of Hungary. He sent ambassadors to the court of Emperor Otto I, with whom he established friendly relations. Géza was baptised in 974 as ISTVÁN [Stephen] by priests sent by Pilgrim Bishop of Passau, although he appears to have adopted Christianity more for political expediency than religious conviction as he never renounced his pagan beliefs entirely, declaring himself, according to Macartney, "rich enough to afford two gods" (although this alleged quote may represent an inaccurate report of comments by Thietmar, see below)[260]. He continued to use his pre-baptismal name Géza. He centralised Magyar government, based at Esztergom, where his bodyguard consisted of Bavarian knights. The alliance with Bavaria was confirmed after the accession in 985 of Duke Heinrich II, and sealed by the marriage of Duke Heinrich's daughter to Géza's heir in 996[261]. Thietmar names "Deuvix" as father of King István, describing him as "very cruel…when becoming a Christian…he turned his rage against his reluctant subjects [and] sacrificed both to the omnipotent God and to various false gods. When reproached by his priest for doing so, he maintained that the practice had brought him great wealth and power"[262]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 998 of "Geyza princeps Ungarorum"[263].
Per Med Lands:
     "m firstly ([967], repudiated shortly after 975) SAROLT of Transylvania, daughter of GYULA Prince of Transylvania & his wife --- ([954]-after 988). The Gestis Hungarorum Liber names "una…Caroldu et altera Saroltu" as the two daughters of "Geula", specifying that the Sarolt was mother of "sancti regis Stephani"[264]. Thietmar names "Beleknegini, the name means beautiful lady in Slavonic" as wife of "Deuvix", commenting that she "drank immoderately and rode a horse like a warrior" adding that "once in a fit of anger she killed a man"[265]. The primary source which confirms her name and parentage has not yet been identified. She had been baptised into the Orthodox faith by Bishop Hierotheos at her father's court[266]. Her marriage may have been arranged by her father to build an alliance against the more powerful Bulgars[267].
Per Med Lands:
     "m secondly ([985]) as her second husband, ADELAJDA [Adleta] of Poland, widow of his brother MIHÁLY of Hungary Duke between March and Gran, daughter of [ZIEMOMYS? Duke in Poland] & his [second wife ---] ([950/60]-after 997). The Annales Kamenzenses record that "Mesco…rex Polanorum…sororem…Atleydem" married "Iesse rex Ungarie" by whom she was mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie"[268]. The Breve chronicon Silesiæ names "Adilheidem" as sister of "primo dux Mesco", adding that she married "Jesse rex Ungarie" and that she was the mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie" born in 975[269]. The Kronika W?giersko-Polska records that "Iesse" married "sororem Meschonis ducis…Athleitam", adding that she was a Christian and converted her husband to Christianity[270]. The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[271], Adelajda was the daughter not sister of Mieszko I Prince of Poland, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. If this is correct, she was an otherwise unrecorded daughter by his first wife (name not known), assuming that Prince Mieszko's marriage to Dobroslawa of Bohemia is correctly dated to 965. Adelajda's birth date range is estimated from the supposed dates of birth of her two sons by her first husband (before his death in [976/78]) and of her three known daughters by her second marriage after [985]. The date range appears chronologically more consistent with her having been the daughter, rather than sister, of Mieszko, but this would be in direct contradiction to the sources quoted above. If she was Mieszko's sister, it is likely that they did not share the same mother, assuming that the estimated birth dates of Mieszko and Adelajda are both accurate. It is probable that her second marriage was arranged in accordance with the Magyar tradition that the oldest male relative should marry the widow of a deceased relative (originally polygamously) and take care of his children."
Med Lands cites:
[257] Chronicon Varadiense, 2, p. 251.
[258] Kronika W?giersko-Polska, De sancto rege Ladislao, p. 488.
[259] Gestis Hungarorum Liber 57, p. 54.
[260] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[261] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[262] Thietmar 8.4, p. 364.
[263] Endlicher, S. L. (ed.) (1849) Rerum Hungaricarum, Monumenta Arpadiana (Sangalli), Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[264] Gestis Hungarorum Liber 27, p. 26.
[265] Thietmar 8.4, p. 364.
[266] Kosztolnyik (2002), p. 34.
[267] Lázár (1996), p, 30.
[268] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 7.
[269] Breve chronicon Silesiæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 34.
[270] Kronika W?giersko-Polska, De sancto rege Ladislao, 3, pp. 498-9.
[271] ES II 153. She is not shown in ES II 120.3


; Per Enc. of World Histrory: "Geza, the organizer of the princely power. He began to reduce the tribal leaders and invited Christian missionaries from Germany (Pilgrin of Passau, 974; St. Adalbert of Prague, 993). Christianization had already begun from the east, and was furthered by large numbers of war prisoners."10
He was Prince of Hungary between 972 and 997.2,5

Family 1

Sarolta (?) von Siebenburgen b. c 954, d. 1008
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 226-7. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_970-997,_ISTV%C3%81N. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Taksony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020706&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geisa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020709&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_TAKSONY_955-970
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sarolt von Siebenburgen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00200285&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#_Toc481253515
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 226.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422405&tree=LEO
  12. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Stephen at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14287a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Istvan I, St.Stephan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020731&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_I_997-1038
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 227.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Orseolo page (Orseolo Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/orseolo.html

Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4

M, #48306, b. between 969 and 975, d. 5 August 1038
FatherGéza (?) Prince of Hungary1,5,6,7,8,3,4 b. bt 940 - 945, d. 1 Feb 997
MotherSarolta (?) von Siebenburgen5,9,3,4 b. c 954, d. 1008
ReferenceEDV31
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary was born between 969 and 975 at Esztergom, Esztergomi járás, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary (now).5,6,3,4 He married Gisela von Bayern, daughter of Heinrich II "der Zanker" (?) Duke of Bavaria and Gisela (?) de Bourgogne, Duchess of Bavaria, in 996.10,11,5,6,3,4,12,13
Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary died on 5 August 1038 at Buda (Budapest), Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary (now); Genealogics says d. 5 Agu 1038; Med Lands says d. 15 Aug 1038.1,5,3,4
Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary was buried after 15 August 1038 at Saint Stephen Basilica Ruins, Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave (Memorial #1):
     BIRTH     975, Esztergomi járás, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
     DEATH     15 Aug 1038 (aged 62–63), Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary
     The last of the Grand Princes and first King of Hungary. He was the only son of Geza, Grand Prince of Hungary and Sarolta of Transylvania. Born about 1975 in Esztergom. His mother is believed to be Saxons occupying Transylvania, Turkish or of the gyulas, the leaders of the Hungarian tribal federation.
     He married Gisela of Bavaria, from the Ottonian dynasty, in 995. she was the daughter of Duke Henry the Wrangler of Bavaria who was a nephew of Otto I, the Holy roman Emperor. Her mother was Gisela of Burgundy from the Welf dynasty. They had four children, one of which might have been Agatha, the bride of Edward Atherling. Imre (Henry or Emeric), Otto and another daughter were the other children.
     Both of Stephen's parents were baptized, while Stephen became the first family member to become devout. He was crowned at the favor and urging of Emperor Otto III, but the exact date is unknown., although legend has it that it occurred on the first day of the second millennium. His reign was, as the era dictated, full of uprisings, battles, wars and conflicts with the Holy Roman Empire. He was known as giving his kingdom ""forty years of relative peace and sound but unspectacular rule."
     Stephen assigned his autobiography to Hartvic who wrote that Stephens restrained the grief over the death of his children who died one by one with solace from the love of his one remaining son, Emeric, who died in 1031 from a hunting accident. Stephen never fully recovered from Emric's death was legend tells of how he would wash the feet of paupers for penance of his son's death.
     Stephen outlived all his children, and was buried in his new basilica in Székesfehérvár which was dedicated to the Holy Virgin. His death spun his territories into civil war for decades.
     Stephen was buried at Székesfehérvár and canonized along with his son by Pope Gregory VII in 1083, his feast day being the 20th of August. Bio by Anne Stevens
     Family Members
     Parents
          Sarlota of Transylvania 950–1008
     BURIAL     Saint Stephen Basilica Ruins, Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 12 Jul 2020
     Find a Grave Memorial 212852435

From Find A Grave (Memorial #2):
     BIRTH     c.975
     DEATH     15 Aug 1038 (aged 62–63), Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary
     Roman Catholic Saint, Hungarian Monarch. He was the Christian King of Hungary, crowned 1001. He was notable for his piety, learning and wisdom. His crown, with the famous crooked cross, still survives and is one of Hungary's most important national symbols. Canonized in 1083, when his relics were transferred to Buda. His feast day is 2nd September.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Gisela of Bavaria 985–1065
     Children
          Imre of Hungary 1005–1031
          Agatha Von Brunswick Aetheling 1018–1067
     BURIAL     Szent István-bazilika Lipótváros, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 28 May 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 9520.5,4,14,15
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 104.
2. The Penguin Dictionary of Saints, London, 1965 , Attwater, Donald. 314.3
EDV-31.

; Per Genealogics:
     “He was only a child when, together with his father, he was baptised. In 995 he married Gisela of Bavaria and in 997 succeeded his father as ruler of Hungary. He restored order and consolidated his position. As a result he received the royal crown from Pope Silvester II and, in 1001, was crowned the first king of Hungary. He worked hard for the conversion of his people while at the same time preventing the influence of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
     “He founded the abbey of Pannonhalma and established the primatial see of Esztergom. His methods with recalcitrant pagans were marked by the roughness of the age and place, and at times there was lively resistance in alliance with his political rivals.
     “Having taken much trouble with the education of his only son, Emmerich, it was a tragedy when, at the age of about twenty-four, his son was killed in a hunting accident. His last years were embittered by ill-health and the shameless quarrels among his relatives about the succession to the crown.
     “In 1083 his relics were solemnly enshrined together with those of his son who is also revered as a saint. St. Stephan holds an honoured place in Hungarian history and seems personally to have had a better entitlement to sainthood than some other royal and national heroes. (The Penguin Dictionary of Saints, by Donald Attwater)”.3 Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary was also known as Saint Istvan I King of Hungary.5

; This is the same person as ”Stephen I of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as ”Étienne Ier de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”I. István magyar király” at Wikipedia (DE).16,17,18

; Per Catholic Enc.: "St. Stephen - First King of Hungary, b. at Gran, 975; d. 15 August, 1038. He was a son of the Hungarian chief Géza and was baptized, together with his father, by Archbishop St. Adalbert of Prague in 985, on which occasion he changed his heathen name Vaik (Vojk) into Stephen. In 995 he married Gisela, a sister of Duke Henry of Bavaria, the future Emperor St. Henry II, and in 997 succeeded to the throne of Hungary. In order to make Hungary a Christian nation and to establish himself more firmly as ruler, he sent Abbot Astricus to Rome to petition Pope Sylvester II for the royal dignity and the power to establish episcopal sees. The pope acceded to his wishes and, in addition, presented him with a royal crown with which he was crowned at Gran on 17 August, 1001 (see HUNGARY.--History). He founded a monastery in Jerusalem and hospices for pilgrims at Rome, Ravenna, and Constantinople. He was a personal friend of St. Bruno of Querfurt and corresponded with Abbot St. Odilo of Cluny. The last years of his life were embittered by sickness and family troubles. When on 2 September, 1031, his only son, St. Emeric, lost his life on a bear hunt, his cherished hope of transferring the reins of government into the hands of a pious Christian prince were shattered. During his lifetime a quarrel arose among his various nephews concerning the right of succession, and some of them even took part in a conspiracy against his life. He was buried beside his son at Stuhlweissenburg, and both were canonized together in 1083. His feast is on 2 September, but in Hungary his chief festival is observed on 20 August, the day on which his relics were transferred to Buda. His incorrupt right hand is treasured as the most sacred relic in Hungary."6

; Per Med Lands:
     "VAJK, son of GÉZA Prince of Hungary & his [first wife Sarolt of Transylvania] (Esztergom [967/75]-Buda 15 Aug 1038, bur Székesfehérvár). The Gesta Hungarorum records the birth in 967 of "Geicha dux [filium] regem Stephanum"[293]. The sources are contradictory regarding the identity of his mother. The Gestis Hungarorum Liber names "una…Caroldu et altera Saroltu" as the two daughters of "Geula", specifying that the Sarolt was mother of "sancti regis Stephani"[294]. On the other hand, the Annales Kamenzenses record that "Mesco…rex Polanorum…sororem…Atleydem" married "Iesse rex Ungarie" by whom she was mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie"[295], and the Breve chronicon Silesiæ names "Adilheidem" as sister of "primo dux Mesco", adding that she married "Jesse rex Ungarie" and that she was the mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie"[296]. Both these Polish sources record the birth of István in 975, which is more consistent with his having been the son of his father´s first marriage. It is possible that the Hungarian source is more accurate, as the Polish sources may have misrepresented the facts in order to fabricate what could have been seen as a prestigious family relationship between the Polish kings and the first king of Hungary. Thietmar names "Waik brother-in-law of Duke Heinrich of the Bavarians"[297]. He was baptised as ISTVÁN [Stephen]. He succeeded his father in 997 as Prince of Hungary. His succession was challenged on grounds of seniority by his older cousin Koppány, whose rebellion was suppressed at Veszprem in 998 with the help of Bavarian cavalry[298]. Prince István received a royal crown from Pope Sylvester II and was crowned ISTVÁN I King of Hungary 25 Dec 1000 or 1 Jan 1001. He was also granted an apostolic cross, symbolic of the status and authority of the Hungarian church which was responsible to the Pope alone[299]. Rodulfus Glaber records that King István encouraged pilgrims to Jerusalem to cross Hungary rather than travel by sea, making "the road safe for everyone"[300]. "Stephanus…Ungrorum Rex" founded the monastery of St Martin "in monte supra Pannoniam sito" by charter dated 1001[301]. His army attacked his supposed maternal uncle Gyula Prince in Transylvania in 1002 and incorporated Transylvania into his domains[302]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Emeram "in…castro nostro Nitra" by charter dated to 1006[303]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Michael, Veszprém by charter dated 1009[304]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" founded the church of St Adrian, Zala by charter dated 1019, and donated further property by charter dated 1024[305]. His authority was challenged unsuccessfully in south-eastern Hungary by Ohtum [Ajtony], maybe a Khazar prince. King István confirmed the privileged 'freeman' status of the descendants of the original Magyar conquerors who, in return for providing military support, were exempt from taxes other than church tithes[306]. He reformed the Magyar legal system, enacting many new laws particularly relating to ecclesiastical matters. The first Hungarian constitution is dated to 1030[307]. He was the author of a Book of Exhortations [Intelmek könyve] to his son, the first known Hungarian literary work, which emphasises the ecclesiastical basis for the king's authority[308]. "Stephanus…Ungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Maurice, Bakonbél by charter dated 1037[309]. The necrology of Tegernsee records the death "XVIII Kal Sep" of "Stephanus rex Ungarorum"[310]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1038 of "Stephanus rex"[311]. According to the Gesta Hungarorum, he died in the 46th year of his reign and was buried in "Albæ [Székesfehérvár] in ecclesia Beatæ Virginis"[312]. He was canonised in 1083 by the Catholic church (“Szent István”), his feast-day being 4 Nov.
     "m (996) GISELA of Bavaria, daughter of HEINRICH II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria and Carinthia [Germany] & his wife Gisela of Burgundy ([985]-Passau 7 May 1065, bur Passau Kloster Niedernburg). Herimannus names "Gisela, huius soror [=Heinricus imperator]" as wife of "Stephano regi Ungariorum"[313]. The Annalista Saxo states that "mater ipsius [Stephanus Ungariorum rex] Gisla" was sister of "Heinrici inperatoris Babenbergensis", when recording her husband's death[314], but clearly the text misstates "mater" for "uxor". This marriage was agreed by Gisela's brother Duke Heinrich IV and István's father to confirm the Hungarian/Bavarian alliance[315]. According to the legends of St Stephen, she founded Veszprém Cathedral and the convent of Veszprémvölgy[316]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Kysla regina" sent "comitem Sebus" to blind Vazúl, whom her husband wished to appoint as his successor after the death of their son Imre, and have moulten lead poured into his ears[317]. Bak suggests that Queen Gisela was blamed because of anti-German feeling in the Hungarian court[318]. According to another Hungarian chronicle, Queen Gisela took council from "an evil man named Buda" concerning her husband's plan to name his nephew Vazúl as his heir and sent Buda's son Egiruth to do the deed[319]. After her husband died, she was robbed of her possessions by her husband's successor and left Hungary, becoming abbess of Niedernburg."
Med Lands cites:
[293] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 43, p. 101.
[294] Gestis Hungarorum Liber 27, p. 26.
[295] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 7.
[296] Breve chronicon Silesiæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 34.
[297] Thietmar 4.59, p. 193.
[298] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[299] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[300] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) III.2, p. 97.
[301] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome I, p. 280.
[302] Lázár (1996), p. 30.
[303] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 285.
[304] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 289.
[305] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, pp. 304 and 307.
[306] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[307] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 316.
[308] Lázár (1993), Chapter 4, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[309] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 327.
[310] Necrologium Tegernseense, Freising Necrologies, p. 136.
[311] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[312] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 45, p. 107.
[313] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 995, MHG SS V, p. 117.
[314] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[315] Macartney.
[316] Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 224 footnote 6.
[317] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 44, pp. 103-5.
[318] Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.
[319] Domanovszky, A. (ed.) Chronici Hungarici compositio sæculi XIV, c. 69, SRH, I, 320, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1): “D4. [1m.] Saint István I (Stephen I), Prince of Hungary (997-1000), in 1000 became King of Hungary (1000-38) and the first Hungarian ruler to become a Christian, cr 25.12.1000/1.1.1001, canonised 20.8.1083, *969/75, +15.8.1038, bur Székesfehérvár; m.996 Gisela of Bavaria (*985, +7.5.1065)”

Per Genealogy.EU (Liudolfing): “E4. Gisela, *977/985, +7.5.1065; m.995 King Stephan I of Hungary (+1038)”.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "GISELA ([985]-Passau 7 May 1065, bur Passau Kloster Niedernburg). Herimannus names "Gisela, huius soror [=Heinricus imperator]" as wife of "Stephano regi Ungariorum"[268]. The Annalista Saxo states that "mater ipsius [Stephanus Ungariorum rex] Gisla" was sister of "Heinrici inperatoris Babenbergensis", when recording her husband's death[269], but clearly the text misstates "mater" for "uxor". This marriage was agreed by Gisela's brother Duke Heinrich IV and István's father to confirm the Hungarian/Bavarian alliance[270]. According to the legends of St Stephen, she founded Veszprém Cathedral and the convent of Veszprémvölgy[271]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Kysla regina" sent "comitem Sebus" to blind Vazul, whom her husband wished to appoint as his successor after the death of their son Imre, and have moulten lead poured into his ears[272]. Bak suggests that Queen Gisela was blamed because of anti-German feeling in the Hungarian court[273]. According to another Hungarian chronicle, Queen Gisela took council from "an evil man named Buda" concerning her husband's plan to name his nephew Vazúl as his heir and sent Buda's son Egiruth to do the deed[274]. After her husband died, she was robbed of her possessions by her husband's successor and left Hungary, becoming Abbess of Niedernburg.
     "m (996) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of GÉZA Prince of Hungary & his first wife Sarolta of Transylvania (Esztergom [969/75]-Buda 15 Aug 1038, bur Székesfehérvár). He succeeded his father in 997 as Prince of Hungary. He was crowned ISTVÁN I King of Hungary in 1000."
Med Lands cites:
[268] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 995, MHG SS V, p. 117.
[269] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[270] Macartney, C. A. (1962) Hungary: A Short History (Edinburgh University Press), 1, Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at (20 Jul 2003).
[271] Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 224 footnote 6.
[272] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP) 44, pp. 103-5.
[273] Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.
[274] Domanovszky, A. (ed.) Chronici Hungarici compositio sæculi XIV, c. 69, SRH, I, 320, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.13
He was King of Hungary, St. Stephen (I), greatest ruler of the Arpad dynasty. He suppressed eastern Christianity by force and crusaded against paganism, which was still favored by the tribal chiefs. Stephen allied with the west, married a Bavarian princess, called in Roman churchmen and monks, and endowed them with huge tracts of land. With the help of the clergy, he broke the power of the tribal chieftains, took over their land as royal domain, administered through counts (föispán) placed over counties (vármegyék). The counts and high churchmen formed a royal council. Every encouragement was given to agriculture and trade, and a methodical system of frontier defense was built up (large belt of swamps and forests, wholly uninhabited and protected by regular frontier guards; as time went on this frontier was gradually extended).

1001: Stephen was crowned with a crown sent by the pope. He was canonized in 1083.

1002: Stephen defeated an anti-Christian insurrection in Transylvania.

1038-77: A period of dynastic struggles over the succession, every member of the Arpad family claiming a share of the power and sometimes calling in the Germans for support. between 997 and 1038 at Hungary.1

Family

Gisela von Bayern b. c 985, d. 7 May 1065
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 226. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html#S1
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Istvan I, St.Stephan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020731&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_I_997-1038. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  6. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Stephen at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14287a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geisa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020709&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_970-997,_ISTV%C3%81N.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sarolt von Siebenburgen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00200285&tree=LEO
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 227.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020732&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#GiselaMIstvanHungarydied1038
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Memorial #1: Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 07 December 2020), memorial page for Stephen I of Hungary (975–15 Aug 1038), Find a Grave Memorial no. 212852435, citing Saint Stephen Basilica Ruins, Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/212852435. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Memorial #2: Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 07 December 2020), memorial page for Stephen I (c.975–15 Aug 1038), Find a Grave Memorial no. 9520, citing Szent István-bazilika, Lipótváros, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9520
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_I_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne Ier de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_Ier_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, I. István magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/I._Istv%C3%A1n_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020737&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#HedwigMEberhardIVZurichgau
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Emmerich of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020733&tree=LEO

Gisela von Bayern1,2

F, #48307, b. circa 985, d. 7 May 1065
FatherHeinrich II "der Zanker" (?) Duke of Bavaria3,4,5,1,2 b. 951, d. 28 Aug 995
MotherGisela (?) de Bourgogne, Duchess of Bavaria3,6,5,1,2 b. 955, d. 21 Jul 1006
ReferenceEDV31
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Gisela von Bayern was born circa 985 at Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now); Genealogy.EU (Liudolfer page) says b. 977/985; Genealogics and Med Lands say b. 985.7,3,1,2,8 She married Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary, son of Géza (?) Prince of Hungary and Sarolta (?) von Siebenburgen, in 996.9,3,7,10,11,12,1,2
Gisela von Bayern died on 7 May 1065 at Passau, Stadtkreis Passau, Bavaria (Bayern), Austria.3,1,2,8
Gisela von Bayern was buried after 7 May 1065 at Kloster Niedernburg, Passau, Stadtkreis Passau, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now),

; From Find A Grave (Memorial #1):
     BIRTH     985
     DEATH     7 May 1060 (aged 74–75)
     Royalty. She was born as the third child of Heinrich II and Gisela of Burgundy. She was raised in Regensburg where she was a student of St. Wolfgang von Regensburg. Around 995 she was married to Stephan of Hungary, to strengthen the peace between Bavaria and the Hungarians. She played a fundamental role in spreading Christianity in Hungary, where she founded several monasteries and churches, which earned her enmity of the pagans. After Stephens death, she was imprisoned by his successor Peter Orseolo. In 1042, she was freed by King Heinrich III and returned to Bavaria. She became a nun and later joined the Kloster Niedernburg in Passau where she died as Abbess. Her husband and son were canonized in 1083, an honour that has been denied to her. She was beatified in 1975 by Paul VI. A bone from her arm and a bone from Stephens right hand were brought to Veszprém, and are on display in the cathedral there.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich II von Bayern 951–995
          Gisela of Burgundy 955–1007
     Siblings
          Heinrich II 973–1024
          Gisela of Bavaria 985–1065
     Children
          Imre of Hungary 1005–1031
     BURIAL     Kloster Niedernburg, Passau, Stadtkreis Passau, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 22 Mar 2020
     Find a Grave Memorial 208299719

From Find A Grave (Memorial #2):
     BIRTH     985, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     DEATH     7 May 1065 (aged 79–80), Passau, Stadtkreis Passau, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Gisela also known as Blessed Gisela of Hungary, was born about 985 and died on May 7, 1065. She was a Hungarian Roman Catholic saint, and the first queen consort of Hungary as the spouse of Saint Stephen of Hungary. Gisela was a daughter of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria and Gisela of Burgundy. She married King Stephen I of Hungary in 995 as a part of Hungary's policy of opening up to the West. The couple had a son, Saint Emeric. She lived a respectable life and helped Christianize the Hungarian people. After the death of her husband Stephen, she was forced to leave Hungary. She lived in the nunnery of Niedernburg in Passau, where she died. Her grave is a well-known holy place. Her canonisation was attempted in the 18th century but failed. She was declared Blessed in 1975. Her memorial days are May 7 and February 1.
     Gisela and her husband were not buried together, and nearly a thousand years later on the weekend of May 4, 1996 their bodies as well as their spirits were reunited. They preserved the remains of King Stephen's right hand and it was brought back together with a bone taken from the arm of Gisela. Both are now safely protected in glass and gold cases and are now displayed in the basilica in the western town of Veszprém, where Gisela once lived.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich II von Bayern 951–995
     Gisela of Burgundy 955–1007
     Spouse
          Stephen I 975–1038
     Siblings
          Heinrich II 973–1024
          Gisela von Bayern 985–1060
     Children
          Agatha Von Brunswick Aetheling 1018–1067
     BURIAL     Cathedral of St. Michael, Veszprém, Veszprémi járás, Veszprém, Hungary
     PLOT     one forearm bone
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 11 Jul 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 93466215.13,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "VAJK, son of GÉZA Prince of Hungary & his [first wife Sarolt of Transylvania] (Esztergom [967/75]-Buda 15 Aug 1038, bur Székesfehérvár). The Gesta Hungarorum records the birth in 967 of "Geicha dux [filium] regem Stephanum"[293]. The sources are contradictory regarding the identity of his mother. The Gestis Hungarorum Liber names "una…Caroldu et altera Saroltu" as the two daughters of "Geula", specifying that the Sarolt was mother of "sancti regis Stephani"[294]. On the other hand, the Annales Kamenzenses record that "Mesco…rex Polanorum…sororem…Atleydem" married "Iesse rex Ungarie" by whom she was mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie"[295], and the Breve chronicon Silesiæ names "Adilheidem" as sister of "primo dux Mesco", adding that she married "Jesse rex Ungarie" and that she was the mother of "Stephanum regem Ungarie"[296]. Both these Polish sources record the birth of István in 975, which is more consistent with his having been the son of his father´s first marriage. It is possible that the Hungarian source is more accurate, as the Polish sources may have misrepresented the facts in order to fabricate what could have been seen as a prestigious family relationship between the Polish kings and the first king of Hungary. Thietmar names "Waik brother-in-law of Duke Heinrich of the Bavarians"[297]. He was baptised as ISTVÁN [Stephen]. He succeeded his father in 997 as Prince of Hungary. His succession was challenged on grounds of seniority by his older cousin Koppány, whose rebellion was suppressed at Veszprem in 998 with the help of Bavarian cavalry[298]. Prince István received a royal crown from Pope Sylvester II and was crowned ISTVÁN I King of Hungary 25 Dec 1000 or 1 Jan 1001. He was also granted an apostolic cross, symbolic of the status and authority of the Hungarian church which was responsible to the Pope alone[299]. Rodulfus Glaber records that King István encouraged pilgrims to Jerusalem to cross Hungary rather than travel by sea, making "the road safe for everyone"[300]. "Stephanus…Ungrorum Rex" founded the monastery of St Martin "in monte supra Pannoniam sito" by charter dated 1001[301]. His army attacked his supposed maternal uncle Gyula Prince in Transylvania in 1002 and incorporated Transylvania into his domains[302]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Emeram "in…castro nostro Nitra" by charter dated to 1006[303]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Michael, Veszprém by charter dated 1009[304]. "Stephanus…Hungarorum Rex" founded the church of St Adrian, Zala by charter dated 1019, and donated further property by charter dated 1024[305]. His authority was challenged unsuccessfully in south-eastern Hungary by Ohtum [Ajtony], maybe a Khazar prince. King István confirmed the privileged 'freeman' status of the descendants of the original Magyar conquerors who, in return for providing military support, were exempt from taxes other than church tithes[306]. He reformed the Magyar legal system, enacting many new laws particularly relating to ecclesiastical matters. The first Hungarian constitution is dated to 1030[307]. He was the author of a Book of Exhortations [Intelmek könyve] to his son, the first known Hungarian literary work, which emphasises the ecclesiastical basis for the king's authority[308]. "Stephanus…Ungarorum Rex" donated property to the church of St Maurice, Bakonbél by charter dated 1037[309]. The necrology of Tegernsee records the death "XVIII Kal Sep" of "Stephanus rex Ungarorum"[310]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1038 of "Stephanus rex"[311]. According to the Gesta Hungarorum, he died in the 46th year of his reign and was buried in "Albæ [Székesfehérvár] in ecclesia Beatæ Virginis"[312]. He was canonised in 1083 by the Catholic church (“Szent István”), his feast-day being 4 Nov.
     "m (996) GISELA of Bavaria, daughter of HEINRICH II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria and Carinthia [Germany] & his wife Gisela of Burgundy ([985]-Passau 7 May 1065, bur Passau Kloster Niedernburg). Herimannus names "Gisela, huius soror [=Heinricus imperator]" as wife of "Stephano regi Ungariorum"[313]. The Annalista Saxo states that "mater ipsius [Stephanus Ungariorum rex] Gisla" was sister of "Heinrici inperatoris Babenbergensis", when recording her husband's death[314], but clearly the text misstates "mater" for "uxor". This marriage was agreed by Gisela's brother Duke Heinrich IV and István's father to confirm the Hungarian/Bavarian alliance[315]. According to the legends of St Stephen, she founded Veszprém Cathedral and the convent of Veszprémvölgy[316]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Kysla regina" sent "comitem Sebus" to blind Vazúl, whom her husband wished to appoint as his successor after the death of their son Imre, and have moulten lead poured into his ears[317]. Bak suggests that Queen Gisela was blamed because of anti-German feeling in the Hungarian court[318]. According to another Hungarian chronicle, Queen Gisela took council from "an evil man named Buda" concerning her husband's plan to name his nephew Vazúl as his heir and sent Buda's son Egiruth to do the deed[319]. After her husband died, she was robbed of her possessions by her husband's successor and left Hungary, becoming abbess of Niedernburg."
Med Lands cites:
[293] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 43, p. 101.
[294] Gestis Hungarorum Liber 27, p. 26.
[295] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 7.
[296] Breve chronicon Silesiæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 34.
[297] Thietmar 4.59, p. 193.
[298] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[299] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[300] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) III.2, p. 97.
[301] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome I, p. 280.
[302] Lázár (1996), p. 30.
[303] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 285.
[304] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 289.
[305] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, pp. 304 and 307.
[306] Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[307] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 316.
[308] Lázár (1993), Chapter 4, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 1.
[309] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 327.
[310] Necrologium Tegernseense, Freising Necrologies, p. 136.
[311] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[312] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 45, p. 107.
[313] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 995, MHG SS V, p. 117.
[314] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[315] Macartney.
[316] Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 224 footnote 6.
[317] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 44, pp. 103-5.
[318] Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.
[319] Domanovszky, A. (ed.) Chronici Hungarici compositio sæculi XIV, c. 69, SRH, I, 320, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1): “D4. [1m.] Saint István I (Stephen I), Prince of Hungary (997-1000), in 1000 became King of Hungary (1000-38) and the first Hungarian ruler to become a Christian, cr 25.12.1000/1.1.1001, canonised 20.8.1083, *969/75, +15.8.1038, bur Székesfehérvár; m.996 Gisela of Bavaria (*985, +7.5.1065)”

Per Genealogy.EU (Liudolfing): “E4. Gisela, *977/985, +7.5.1065; m.995 King Stephan I of Hungary (+1038)”.14 Gisela von Bayern was also known as Gisela of Bavaria.9,15,3

; This is the same person as ”Gisela of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as ”Gisèle de Bavière” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Gisela von Bayern” at Wikipedia (DE).16,17,18 EDV-31.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 3.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 104.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "GISELA ([985]-Passau 7 May 1065, bur Passau Kloster Niedernburg). Herimannus names "Gisela, huius soror [=Heinricus imperator]" as wife of "Stephano regi Ungariorum"[268]. The Annalista Saxo states that "mater ipsius [Stephanus Ungariorum rex] Gisla" was sister of "Heinrici inperatoris Babenbergensis", when recording her husband's death[269], but clearly the text misstates "mater" for "uxor". This marriage was agreed by Gisela's brother Duke Heinrich IV and István's father to confirm the Hungarian/Bavarian alliance[270]. According to the legends of St Stephen, she founded Veszprém Cathedral and the convent of Veszprémvölgy[271]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Kysla regina" sent "comitem Sebus" to blind Vazul, whom her husband wished to appoint as his successor after the death of their son Imre, and have moulten lead poured into his ears[272]. Bak suggests that Queen Gisela was blamed because of anti-German feeling in the Hungarian court[273]. According to another Hungarian chronicle, Queen Gisela took council from "an evil man named Buda" concerning her husband's plan to name his nephew Vazúl as his heir and sent Buda's son Egiruth to do the deed[274]. After her husband died, she was robbed of her possessions by her husband's successor and left Hungary, becoming Abbess of Niedernburg.
     "m (996) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of GÉZA Prince of Hungary & his first wife Sarolta of Transylvania (Esztergom [969/75]-Buda 15 Aug 1038, bur Székesfehérvár). He succeeded his father in 997 as Prince of Hungary. He was crowned ISTVÁN I King of Hungary in 1000."
Med Lands cites:
[268] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 995, MHG SS V, p. 117.
[269] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[270] Macartney, C. A. (1962) Hungary: A Short History (Edinburgh University Press), 1, Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at (20 Jul 2003).
[271] Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 224 footnote 6.
[272] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP) 44, pp. 103-5.
[273] Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.
[274] Domanovszky, A. (ed.) Chronici Hungarici compositio sæculi XIV, c. 69, SRH, I, 320, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 225.2

Family

Saint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary b. bt 969 - 975, d. 5 Aug 1038
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020732&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#GiselaMIstvanHungarydied1038. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II 'der Zanker': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080211&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#HeinrichIIBavariadied995
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080212&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Memorial #2: Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 07 December 2020), memorial page for Gisela of Bavaria (985–7 May 1065), Find a Grave Memorial no. 93466215, citing Cathedral of St. Michael, Veszprém, Veszprémi járás, Veszprém, Hungary; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93466215. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  10. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Stephen at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14287a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Istvan I, St.Stephan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020731&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_I_997-1038
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Memorial #1: Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 07 December 2020), memorial page for Gisela von Bayern (985–7 May 1060), Find a Grave Memorial no. 208299719, citing Kloster Niedernburg, Passau, Stadtkreis Passau, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/208299719
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html#S1
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020732&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gisela_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gisèle de Bavière: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gis%C3%A8le_de_Bavi%C3%A8re. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Gisela von Bayern: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gisela_von_Bayern. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020737&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#HedwigMEberhardIVZurichgau
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Emmerich of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020733&tree=LEO

Saint Emeric/Emmerich/Imre (?)1,2,3

M, #48308, b. 1007, d. 2 September 1031
FatherSaint Stephen I (Vajk) (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4,5 b. bt 969 - 975, d. 5 Aug 1038
MotherGisela von Bayern1,2,3,5,6 b. c 985, d. 7 May 1065
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Saint Emeric/Emmerich/Imre (?) was born in 1007.2,3 He married Agatha (2?) (?) of Poland, daughter of Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland and Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland, circa 1022; Guido & Ravilious [2012:84-87] Have a long discussion concerning the theory that Imre had a Polish wife and the possibility that this wife might have been Agatha, dau. of Mieszko II.7,8
Saint Emeric/Emmerich/Imre (?) died on 2 September 1031; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1 page) says d. 2 Nov 1031; Catholic Encyclopedia says d. 2 Sept. 1031; Leo van de Pas agrees with Catholic Encyclopedia.2,9,3
     ; N. B. It is known that Imre/Emeric married in 1022 (when he was 15 years old). There is dispute as to the name of his wife.
     Genealogy.EU posits a marriage by Imre/Emeric to an "Argyra, dau. of Emperor Romanus III of Byzantium."
     Wikiepedia says: "He married in the year 1022.[3] The identity of his wife is disputed. Some say it was Irene Monomachina, a relative of Byzantine emperor Constantine IX Monomachos,[4] or a female member of the Argyros family to which Byzantine emperor Romanos III Argyros belonged. Other say it was Patricissa of Croatia, the daughter of Krešimir III of Croatia. Another possible person may have been Adelaide/Rixa of Poland or one of her unnamed sisters."
     More recently, Guido & Ravilious [2012] have shown that the Byzantine and Croatian proposals are inadequate and have presented new evidence from Polish Archives that Emeric/Imre was betrothed to a daughter of Mieszko III and then show that this was probably Agatha, who eventually married Eadward the Atheline (the Exile). The full text of the Guido & Ravilious [2012] article is available on line (paid subscription). I have attached here images of pp. 84-87 and 116, which present the argument regarding the marriage of Emeric/Imre to Agatha. The rest of the article presents convincing evidence that this duaghter of Mieszko was in fact the famous Agatha who m. Eadward. G. A. Vaut.10,2,7,11

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 104.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "
IMRE [Heinrich] ([1007]-killed Bihar 2 Nov 1031). The Gesta Hungarorum records that "rex Stephanus" had several sons of whom "Emricum" stood out[321]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hemericum" as the only son of "sanctus rex de Ungaria Stephanus primus", specifying that he died before his father[322]. The Annales Hildesheimenses name "Heinricus, Stephani regis filius, dux Ruizorum" when recording his death[323]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "rege Stephano" wished to renounce his crown in favour of "Emrico duci suo filio" but was prevented from doing so by the latter's early death[324]. He was killed by a wild boar while hunting. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1031 of "Henricus filius Stephani regis"[325]. The Altahense Annales record the death in 1033 of "Heinricus filius Stephani Regis Ungarie"[326]. He was canonised together with his father (“Szent Imre”).
[m --- (-after 1031). Sources are contradictory regarding the possible marriage of Imre. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[327], she was --- Argyre, daughter of Emperor Romanos III. Kosztolnyik refers to (unnamed) Byzantine sources which record the Byzantine marriage of Imre[328], suggesting that "the terminology of the Greek text of the founding charter of the monastery for women at Veszprém" supports the position[329]. It is not clear whether these sources specify that she was a member of the Argyre family, but this appears unlikely to be correct. If Prince Imre did marry a Byzantine princess, the marriage may have been arranged by Emperor Basileios II. Although Romanos Argyros (later Emperor Romanos III) held office during the later years of the emperor's reign (he was city prefect of Constantinople), the absence of detailed information in Greek primary sources about the Argyros family suggests that it was not at that time especially prominent among the noble families of the empire. If that is correct, a member of the Argyros family would seem a surprising choice as bride for the heir to the Hungarian throne. This difficulty would not arise if the marriage took place after the accession of Emperor Romanos in 1028. If this Byzantine marriage is correct, it is possible that her father-in-law founded the Greek monastery in Veszprém valley for his son's wife[330]. An alternative possibility is that Imre's wife was --- of Poland, daughter of Mieszko II Lambert King of Poland & his wife Richeza [Ezzonen], as the Annales Sanctæ Crucis Polonici record that "Stephanus rex…filium…Emrich" married "Meszkone rege Polonie…filiam"[331]. However, this report in the Annales may have been due to confusion with the marriage of another of King Miesko's daughters, reported in the Gesta Hungarorum as having married the future Béla I King of Hungary while he was in exile in Poland[332]. It does not appear likely that King István's political relations with Poland would have been sufficiently close for him to have arranged a Polish marriage for his heir. The king's main political alliance was with Germany, whose relations with Poland were tense during the reigns of Emperor Heinrich II and Emperor Konrad II. A third possibility is provided by the Chronicle of Joannes Archidiaconus Goricensis which suggests that Imre was not married at all when he died, recording that "sancto Stephano" betrothed "Emerici ducis Sclavoniæ" to "filia Cresimiri" but that the future bridegroom died the following year[333]. His betrothed would have been --- of Croatia, daughter of Krešimir III King of Croatia & his wife ---.]"
Med Lands cites:
[321] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 43, p. 101.
[322] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1041, MGH SS XXIII, p. 786.
[323] Annales Hildesheimenses 1031, MGH SS III, p. 98.
[324] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 44, pp. 103-5.
[325] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[326] Ekkehardi, Altahense Annales 1033, MGH SS XVII, p. 364.
[327] ES II 153.
[328] Kosztolnyik (2002), p. 179.
[329] Moravcsik, G. (ed.) (1984) Fontes Byzantini historiæ Hungaricæ ævo ducum et regem ex stirpe Árpád descendentium: Az Árpád-kori Magyar törtenet bizánci forrásai (Budapest), cited in Kosztolnyik (2002), pp. 179 and 192.
[330] Kosztolnyik (2002), p. 179, referring to the Greek text of the founding charter of the monastery.
[331] Annales Sanctæ Crucis Polonici, MGH SS XIX, p. 678.
[332] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 52, p. 121.
[333] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1878) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb) ("Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium"), Vol. VII, 230, p. 472, quoting Joannes archidiaconus goricensis, scriptor aæculi XIV, Kr?eli?, B. De regnis Dalmatiæ, Croatiæ et Sclavoniæ notitiæ præliminares, pp. 101-2.13


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Saint Emeric (Hungarian: Szent Imre herceg) also Henricus, Emery, Emerick, Emmerich, Emericus or Americus (c. 1007 – 2 September 1031) was the son of King St. Stephen I of Hungary and Giselle of Bavaria.
Life
Family
     "Emeric is assumed[2] to be the second son of Stephen I. Named after his uncle, St. Henry II, he was the only one of Stephen's sons who reached adulthood.
Education
     "Emeric was educated in a strict and ascetic spirit by the Benedictine monk from Venice, Gerard from the age of 15 to 23. He was intended to be the next monarch of Hungary, and his father wrote his Admonitions to prepare him for this task. His father tried to make Emeric co-heir still in his lifetime.
     "He married in the year 1022.[3] The identity of his wife is disputed. Some say it was Irene Monomachina, a relative of Byzantine emperor Constantine IX Monomachos,[4] or a female member of the Argyros family to which Byzantine emperor Romanos III Argyros belonged. Other say it was Patricissa of Croatia, the daughter of Krešimir III of Croatia. Another possible person may have been Adelaide/Rixa of Poland or one of her unnamed sisters.
Death and sainthood
     "The succession plans of Emeric's father could never be fulfilled: on 2 September 1031, at age 24, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. It is assumed[2] that this happened in Hegyközszentimre (presently Sântimreu, Romania). He was buried in the Székesfehérvár Basilica. Several wondrous healings and conversions happened at his grave, so on 5 November 1083 King Ladislaus I unearthed Emeric's bones in a large ceremony, and Emeric was canonised for his pious life and purity along with his father and Bishop Gerard of Csanád by Pope Gregory VII.
     "St. Emeric is most often pictured in knight's armour with crown and lily. It is believed by some Hungarians that Amerigo Vespucci, the Italian explorer and the namesake of the Americas, was named after the saint.[5]
References
1. Stracke, Richard (2015-10-20). "Hungarian Saints: Adalbert, Martin, Stanislas, Emeric and Stephen". Christian Iconography.
2. Sauser E, Biographisch-bibliograophisches Kirchenlexikon (German, title transl. "Biographic-bibliographic encyclopaedia of the Roman Catholic church") Vol XXI, pub. Bautz, 2003, ISBN 3-88309-038-7
3. Charles Cawley. "HUNGARY KINGS". Medieval Lands. Foundation of Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 12 June 2010.
4. W. Swoboda, Emeryk, S?ownik Staro?ytno?ci S?owia?skich, t. 8, cz. 1, 1998, s. 112
5. Jonathan Cohen. "THE NAMING OF AMERICA: FRAGMENTS WE'VE SHORED AGAINST OURSELVES". Retrieved 1 April 2013."10

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Saint Emmerich (Imre), canonised 5.11.1083, *1007, +2.11.1031; m.ca 1022 Argyra (+after 1031), dau.of Emperor Romanos III of Byzantium."2
; NB: There are various theories about the parents of the Agatha who m. Edward Aetheling and other about who the Polish wife of Imre of Hungary were.
     Guido & Ravilious [2012:84-87] have a long discussion concerning the theory that Imre had a Polish wife and the possibility that this wife might have been an Agatha, dau. of Mieszko II. They propose that the same dau. of Mieszko that m. Edward Aetheling also m. Imre.
     Med Lands (Ref #1) shows and unnamed dau. of Mieszko marrying Imre. As for Edward, Med Lands (Ref #2) only shows that he m. a wife named Agatha, and then presents a synopsis of the various theories concerning her parentage.(but not the Polish one reviewed by Guido and Ravilious, op. cit.) Med Lands (Ref #3) discusses the possibility that Imre might have m. a dau. of Mieszko II, without naming her and in reviewing several competing theories for her origin.
Conclusion: For the present, I have created a second Agatha "(2?)" as wife of Imre and sister to Agatha 1, wife of Exward GA Vaut.7,14,15,8,16,17

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Emmerich of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020733&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Istvan I, St.Stephan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020731&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_I_997-1038. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020732&tree=LEO
  7. [S4750] Michael Anne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret of Scotland: A study of Agatha's ancestry", Foundations IV:81-121 (Vol. IV, 2012): pp. 84-87, 116. Hereinafter cited as "From Theophanu to St. Margaret."
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #1: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#dauMieszkoMImreHungary
  9. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Stephen at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14287a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Emeric_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 2 Dec. 2019; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Emmerich of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020733&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Imredied1031
  14. [S1549] Gregory A. Vaut, "GA Vaut Comment", 12 May 2020.
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/agath000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #2: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #3: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Imredied1031

unknown (?) of Hungary1,2,3

F, #48309
FatherGéza (?) Prince of Hungary1 b. bt 940 - 945, d. 1 Feb 997
MotherAdelajda/Adleta (?) of Poland2 b. c 955, d. a 997
Last Edited28 Dec 2019
     Unknown (?) of Hungary married Shaba (?)4

Family

Shaba (?) d. a 1001
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_970-997,_ISTV%C3%81N. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Shabadiedafter1001

Samuel Aba (?) King of Hungary1,2

M, #48310, d. circa August 1044
FatherShaba (?)3 d. a 1001
Motherunknown (?) of Hungary3
Last Edited28 Dec 2019
     Samuel Aba (?) King of Hungary died circa August 1044; murdered.1,2,3
     ; Per Med Lands: "ABA (-murdered Feldebrö [Jul/Aug] 1044, bur Sáros Abbey). His ancestry is indicated by the Gestis Hungarorum Liber which records that "dux Arpad" gave large territories to "Edunec et Edumernec" in "silva Matra", where "Pota nepos eorum" later built a castle, and that "rex Samuel…qui pro sua pietate Oba vocabatur" was descended from him[202]. He was baptised SÁMUEL. He succeeded in 1041 as SÁMUEL King of Hungary, after deposing his first cousin King Péter. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Petrus rex" was expelled in 1041 and replaced by "Abba"[203]. The Annalium Hildesheimensium records that King Péter was expelled and fled to Heinrich III King of Germany, while the Hungarians chose "Ovonem" as king[204]. The Gesta Hungarorum names "comitem…Aba, sororium sancti regis Stephani" when recording that he was installed as king after the first deposition of King Péter[205]. A violent man, he was, like his predecessor, faced with internal opposition. In 1044, troops from Emperor Heinrich III invaded Hungary and defeated King Sámuel at Ménfö near Györ 5 Jul 1044. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Abba rex" was killed in 1044 and that "Petrus rex" was restored[206]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that ex-king Péter "cum Henrico cæsare" marched against King Aba in the third year of his reign, the latter counter-attacking against Austria and Carinthia[207]. The Gesta records that the Germans invaded Hungary and defeated King Aba at Ménf?, after which the king fled towards the river Tisza and was strangled "in an old storeroom"[208]. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "Ovonem cum uxore et filiis" were executed by King Péter in 1044[209]. The Aba family in Hungary descended from King Sámuel[210]. m ---. The name of King Sámuel Aba's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[202] Gestis Hungarorum Liber 32, p. 29.
[203] Endlicher, S. L. (ed.) (1849) Rerum Hungaricarum, Monumenta Arpadiana (Sangalli), Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[204] Annalium Hildesheimensium Continuatio 1042, MGH SS III, p. 103.
[205] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 47, p. 111.
[206] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[207] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 48, p. 113.
[208] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 50, p. 119.
[209] Bernoldi Chronicon 1044, MGH SS V, p. 425.
[210] ES II 153, although no details of this descent are shown.3
He was King of Hungary between 1041 and 1044 at Hungary.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Shabadiedafter1001. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary1,2,3,4,5

F, #48311, b. 989, d. 1026
FatherGéza (?) Prince of Hungary2,3,6,7 b. bt 940 - 945, d. 1 Feb 997
MotherAdelajda/Adleta (?) of Poland1,7 b. c 955, d. a 997
Last Edited10 May 2020
     Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary was born in 989.7 She married Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice in 1009.1,2,3,7
Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary died in 1026.1,3,7
     ; Maria, +1026; m.1009 Otone Orseolo, Doge of Venice.1

; Per Med Lands: "daughter ([989]-1026). Her parentage is confirmed by Herimannus who names "Petrum, sororis suæ [=Stephanus Ungariorum rex] filium, de Venetia natum" when recording his accession in 1038[289]. Chronology suggests that she was the daughter of Prince Géza's second marriage but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. Her marriage is confirmed by the Gesta Hungarorum which names "Petrum Venetum filium sororis suæ…cuius pater dux fuerat Venetorum" as successor to King István[290]. As Pietro Orseolo was Doge from 1009 to the early 1020s, he is the only possible Venetian ruler to whom this can relate. Andrea Dandulo´s Chronicon Venetum records the marriage "Otto Ursiolo dux" and "filiam Geyzæ regis Hungarorum et sororem Stephani", dated to 1009 from the context[291]. m (1009) PIETRO OTTONE Orseolo, son of PIETRO Orseolo II Doge of Venice & his wife Maria --- ([989]-Constantinople 1031)."
Med Lands cites:
[289] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1038, MHG SS V, p. 123.
[290] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 45, p. 107.
[291] Andreæ Danduli Chronicon Venetum, Liber IX, Cap. II, Pars I, RIS XIV, col. 235.7

Family

Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice b. 989, d. 1031
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Orseolo page (Orseolo Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/orseolo.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frozza_Orseolo. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria|Grimelda of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00200288&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geisa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020709&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_970-997,_ISTV%C3%81N. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Froizza Orseolo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00200283&tree=LEO

Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice1,2,3

M, #48312, b. 989, d. 1031
Last Edited10 May 2020
     Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice was born in 989.4 He married Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary, daughter of Géza (?) Prince of Hungary and Adelajda/Adleta (?) of Poland, in 1009.3,1,2,5
Otone Orseolo Doge of Venice died in 1031 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium.4
     ; Per Med Lands: "PIETRO Orseolo ([989]-Constantinople 1031). The Chronicon Venetum names "Otho" as third son of "Petrus dux"[103]. Confirmed as "OTTONE" at Verona 996, Emperor Otto III subsequently acting as his sponsor[104]. His father associated him with the Dogeship after the death of his oldest son. He was elected Doge in 1009 in succession to his father. Andrea Dandulo´s Chronicon Venetum records the succession in 1009 of "Otto Ursiolo dux" after the death of his father[105]. Following Byzantium's grant to Venice in 998 of increased authority over its Dalmatian outpost towns, Venice increased its involvement in the area to turn this theoretical right into real control. It extracted oaths of loyalty from several of the Byzantine-controlled towns, then turned its attention to the Croatian-controlled ports, imposing itself as overlord in Biograd. A major Venetian offensive took place in 1018, obliging Kresimir III King of Croatia to turn to Byzantium for support[106]. Unpopular in Venice for aggrandizing his family, he was forced to flee the city for Istria in [1022/23], but soon recalled by the Venetians after the sacking of Grado by Poppo von Treffen Patriarch of Aquileia. These difficulties in Venice enabled both King Kresimir to regain control over the Croatian towns in Dalmatia and Byzantium to reassert its authority over its own Dalmatian towns[107]. However, following further scandals over church appointments Doge Otto was deposed 1026 and sent to Constantinople. Andrea Dandulo´s Chronicon Venetum records that "Dux" was sent to Constantinople in exile[108]. A charter dated Jul 1079 records a judgment against the abbey of Cluny and in favour of the monastery of SS. Trinità e S. Michele di Brondolo relating to property at Fogolana, and recalls sales of property by "Anna comitissa relicta domini Vidonis comitis" to "Petrum ducem Venetiarum filium bonum [memorie] Petrus dux" and by "Vitalis et Aichelda filii boni [memorie] Petr ducis" to "fratrum eorum Petrum ducem Venetiarum"[109]. m ([1009]) --- of Hungary, daughter of GÉZA Prince of Hungary & his second wife Adelajda of Poland ([989]-1026). Her parentage is confirmed by Herimannus who names "Petrum, sororis suæ [=Stephanus Ungariorum rex] filium, de Venetia natum" when recording his accession in 1038[110]. Chronology suggests that she was the daughter of Prince Géza's second marriage but the primary source which confirms this has not so far been identified. Her marriage is confirmed by the Gesta Hungarorum which names "Petrum Venetum filium sororis suæ…cuius pater dux fuerat Venetorum" as successor to King István[111]. As Pietro Orseolo was Doge from 1009 to the early 1020s, he is the only possible Venetian ruler to whom this can relate. Andrea Dandulo´s Chronicon Venetum records the marriage "Otto Ursiolo dux" and "filiam Geyzæ regis Hungarorum et sororem Stephani", dated to 1009 from the context[112]."
Med Lands cites:
[103] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 37.
[104] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 30.
[105] Andreæ Danduli Chronicon Venetum, Liber IX, Cap. II, RIS XII, col. 235.
[106] Fine (1991), p. 276.
[107] Fine (1991), pp. 277-78.
[108] Andreæ Danduli Chronicon Venetum, Liber IX, Cap. II, Pars XVI, RIS XII, col. 239.
[109] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 257, p. 282.
[110] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1038, MHG SS V, p. 123.
[111] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 45, p. 107.
[112] Andreæ Danduli Chronicon Venetum, Liber IX, Cap. II, Pars I, RIS XII, col. 235.4
He was Doge of Venice; abdicated between 1008 and 1026.2

Family

Maria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary b. 989, d. 1026
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Orseolo page (Orseolo Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/orseolo.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/VENICE.htm#PietroOttoneOrseolodied1031. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_970-997,_ISTV%C3%81N.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Froizza Orseolo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00200283&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary1,2,3

M, #48313, b. 1011, d. 30 August 1059
FatherOtone Orseolo Doge of Venice1,2 b. 989, d. 1031
MotherMaria/Grimelda (?) of Hungary1,2 b. 989, d. 1026
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary married Tuta von Formbach, daughter of Thiemo I (?) Graf im Schweinachgau, Graf in Reichenhall, Graf im Salzburggau;
His 1st wife.4,5 Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary was born in 1011 at Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy (now).2,6 He married Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt, daughter of Heinrich I von Schweinfurt Herzog von Schweinfurt, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau and Gerberge von Hammerstein, on 11 April 1055;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.2,7,8
Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary died on 30 August 1059 at Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary.2,6
Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary was buried after 30 August 1059 at Cathedral of Pécs, Pécs, Pécsi járás, Baranya, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy
     DEATH     unknown, Székesfehérvár, Fejér, Hungary
     Pietro Orseolo, or Peter the Venetian (Hungarian: Velencei Péter; 1010 or 1011 – 1046, or late 1050s), was King of Hungary twice.
     Peter was born in Venice, the only son of Otto Orseolo, Doge of Venice. His mother was a sister of Stephen I, the first king of Hungary.
     In 1026, the Venetians rose up and deposed Otto Orseolo, who fled to the Byzantine court in Constantinople. Peter did not follow his father, going instead to Hungary, where his uncle Stephen I appointed him commander of the royal army.
     Emeric, Stephen's only son to survive infancy, died in an accident in 1031. Stephen's cousin Vazul had the strongest claim to the throne, but the King overlooked him and named Peter as his heir. On Stephen's order, Vazul was blinded shortly thereafter and his three sons – Levente, Andrew and Béla – exiled.
     Peter succeeded Stephen I, who died on 15 August 1038, and adopted an active foreign policy. Hungarian troops plundered Bavaria in 1039 and 1040, and invaded Bohemia in 1040 to assist …
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Judith von Schweinfurt unknown–1058
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Pécs, Pécs, Pécsi járás, Baranya, Hungary
     Created by: Marti Utter
     Added: 5 Jul 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 148727757.2,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH (-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[1093]. In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav. The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihn?v and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[1094]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[1095]. The marriage is not mentioned in Wegener, although he refers cryptically to "Lui von Frizberg, I. Tuta Regina. II. Judith von Schweinfurt"[1096].
     "m [firstly] (after 1021) B?ETISLAW of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit). He succeeded in 1034 as B?ETISLAW I Duke of Bohemia.
     "[m secondly ([1055]) as his second wife, PÉTER Orseolo King of Hungary, son of PIETRO OTTONE Orseolo Doge of Venice & his wife Maria [Grimelda] of Hungary ([Venice] [1010/15]- Székesfehérvár late 1046[1097], bur Pécs, St Peter's Cathedral). As referred to above, this marriage is mentioned in the Annalista Saxo but is impossible assuming King Péter's death date is correct.]"
Med Lands cites:
[1093] Annalista Saxo 1021.
[1094] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[1095] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78.
[1096] Wegener (1965/67), p. 141 footnote 2, quoting a manuscript "Haus Frizberg (Post Wildon) 1955, S. 1-26".
[1097] According to ES II 153, King Péter died 30 Aug 1059, although the source on which this is based has not yet been identified.8

; Per Genealogy.EU (Wittel 19): “D3. Judith von Schweinfurt, *ca 990, +2.8.1058; 1m: ca 1030 Bretislav I of Bohemia (*1005 +1055); 2m: 11.4.1055 Pietro Orseolo (*1011 +1059)”.7

; Peter Urseolo, son of Stephen's sister and the doge of Venice, succeeded to the throne. Peter was overthrown in the course of a great pagan rising of the tribal chiefs, who massacred the Christians and destroyed the churches. This was the last serious revolt.9

; Pietro, King of Hungary (1044-46) as Pétér, -cr 1038, *1011, +30.8.1059, bur Pécs; 1m: Tuta, dau.of Gf Ruprecht von Regensburg (+after 1046); 2m: V.1055 Judith (+2.8.1058, bur St.Vit, Prague), dau.of Gf Heinrich von Schweinfurt by Gerberga von Gleisberg.2 Pietro Orseolo King of Hungary was also known as Péter King of Hungary.3 He was King of Hungary between 1037 and 1041.1 He was King of Hungary between 1041 and 1046.1

Family 1

Tuta von Formbach d. a 1070

Family 2

Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt b. c 990, d. 2 Aug 1058

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Orseolo page (Orseolo Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/orseolo.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_PETER_1038-1041/1044-1046. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#TutaFormbachMHungary
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#PeterI
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 December 2019), memorial page for Pietro Orseolo (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 148727757, citing Cathedral of Pécs, Pécs, Pécsi járás, Baranya, Hungary ; Maintained by Marti Utter (contributor 47720777). at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/148727757/pietro-orseolo. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel19.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#JudithSchweinfurtdied1058
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 226.

Salamon (?) King of Hungary1,2,3

M, #48314, b. between 1051 and 1053, d. 1087
FatherAndrás/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary1,2,4,5,3 b. bt 1014 - 1015, d. b 6 Dec 1060
MotherAnastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary1,2,6,5,7 b. c 1023, d. a 1074
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Salamon (?) King of Hungary was born between 1051 and 1053.2,5,8 He married Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia, daughter of Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress, in 1063;
Her 1st husband.9,10,5
Salamon (?) King of Hungary died in 1087; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says killed in battle in the Balkans in 1087; Enc. of World History (p. 227) says d. ca 1074; Genealogics says d. in battle in 1087.1,2,5,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96]). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[403]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[404]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[405]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[406]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name "Iudite"[407]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[408]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[409]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[410].
     "[Betrothed ([1055/59]) to PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[411]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.]
     "m firstly (betrothed 1059, early 1063) SALOMON King of Hungary, son of ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-killed in battle 1087).
     "m secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102)."
Med Land cites:
[403] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[404] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[405] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[406] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[407] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[408] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[409] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[410] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 319.
[411] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.11


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 4.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 104.5


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Solomon, also Salomon (Hungarian: Salamon; 1053 – 1087) was King of Hungary from 1063. Being the elder son of Andrew I, he was crowned king in his father's lifetime in 1057 or 1058. However, he was forced to flee from Hungary after his uncle, Béla I, dethroned Andrew in 1060. Assisted by German troops, Solomon returned and was again crowned king in 1063. On this occasion he married Judith, sister of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor. In the following year he reached an agreement with his cousins, the three sons of Béla I. Géza, Ladislaus and Lampert acknowledged Solomon's rule, but in exchange received one-third of the kingdom as a separate duchy.
     "In the following years, Solomon and his cousins jointly fought against the Czechs, the Cumans and other enemies of the kingdom. Their relationship deteriorated in the early 1070s and Géza rebelled against him. Solomon could only maintain his rule in a small zone along the western frontiers of Hungary after his defeat in the Battle of Mogyoród on 14 March 1074. He officially abdicated in 1081, but was arrested for conspiring against Géza's brother and successor, Ladislaus.
     "Solomon was set free during the canonization process of the first king of Hungary, Stephen I, in 1083. In an attempt to regain his crown, Solomon allied with the Pechenegs, but King Ladislaus defeated their invading troops. According to a nearly contemporaneous source, Solomon died on a plundering raid in the Byzantine Empire. Later legends say that he survived and died as a saintly hermit in Pula (Croatia).
Early life
     "Solomon was a son of King Andrew I of Hungary and his wife, Anastasia of Kiev.[1] His parents were married in about 1038.[2] He was born in 1053[3] as his parents' second child and eldest son.[4]
     "His father had him crowned king in 1057 or 1058.[4][5] Solomon's coronation was a fundamental condition of his engagement to Judith, a sister of Henry IV, King of Germany.[4][6] Their engagement put an end to the more than ten-year-long period of armed conflicts between Hungary and the Holy Roman Empire.[4][7][8] However, Solomon's coronation provoked his uncle, Béla, who had until that time held a strong claim to succeed his brother Andrew according to the traditional principle of seniority.[5][6][8] Béla had, since around 1048, administered the so-called ducatus or duchy, which encompassed one-third of the kingdom.[9]
     "According to the Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle, a 14th-century chronicle:
Because carnal love and ties of blood are wont to prove a hindrance to truthfulness, in King Andreas love for his son overcame justice, so that he broke the treaty of his promise, which in kings should not be; in the twelfth year of his reign, when he was worn out with age, he caused his son Salomon, who was still a child of five years, to be anointed and crowned king over all Hungary. He pretended that he did this to prevent injury to his kingdom, for the Emperor would not have given his daughter to his son Salomon unless he had crowned him. When therefore they sang at Salomon's coronation: "Be lord over thy brethren," and it was told to Duke Bela by an interpreter that the infant Salomon had been made king over him, he was greatly angered.[10]

     "According to the Illuminated Chronicle, in order to secure Solomon's succession, his father arranged a meeting with Duke Béla at the royal manor in Tiszavárkony.[6][7] The king proposed that his brother choose between a crown and a sword (which were the symbols of royal and ducal power, respectively), but had previously commanded his men to murder the duke if Béla picked the crown.[6][7]
     "The duke, whom a courtier had informed of the king's plan, chose the crown, then left Hungary after the meeting.[6][7] He sought the assistance of Duke Boleslaus the Bold of Poland and returned with Polish reinforcements.[5][8] Béla emerged the victor in the ensuing civil war, during which Solomon's father was mortally injured in a battle.[8] Solomon and his mother fled to the Holy Roman Empire and settled in Melk in Austria.[4][8][11]
     "Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060,[5] but the young German king's advisors, who were staunch supporters of Solomon (the fiancé of their monarch's sister), refused to conclude a peace treaty with him.[12] In the summer of 1063, the assembly of the German princes decided to invade Hungary in order to restore Solomon.[13] Solomon's uncle died in an accident on 11 September, before the imperial army arrived.[14] His three sons—Géza, Ladislaus and Lampert—left for Poland.[11]
Reign
     "Accompanied back to Hungary by German troops, Solomon entered Székesfehérvár without resistance.[4] He was ceremoniously "crowned king with the consent and acclamation of all Hungary"[15] in September 1063, according to the Illuminated Chronicle.[16] The same source adds that the German monarch "seated" Solomon "upon his father's throne",[15] but did not require him to take an oath of fealty.[4][5][16] Solomon's marriage with Henry IV's sister, Judith—who was six years older than her future husband[4]—also took place on this occasion.[12] Judith, along with her mother-in-law Anastasia, became one of her young husband's principal advisors.[3]
     "Solomon's three cousins - Géza and his brothers - returned after the German troops had been withdrawn from Hungary.[16] They arrived with Polish reinforcements and Solomon sought refuge in the fortress of Moson at the western border of his kingdom.[17] The Hungarian prelates began to mediate between them in order to avoid a new civil war.[16]
     "Solomon and his cousins eventually reached an agreement, which was signed in Gy?r on 20 January 1064.[5] Géza and his brothers acknowledged Solomon as lawful king, and Solomon granted them their father's one-time ducatus.[16][18] In token of their reconciliation, Duke Géza put a crown on Solomon's head in the cathedral of Pécs on Easter Sunday.[16][18] Their relationship remained tense; when the cathedral burned down during the following night, they initially accused each other of arson.[18] The episode is described in the Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle as follows:
[Sudden] flames seized that church and the palaces and all nearby buildings, and they collapsed in one devastating conflagration. Everyone was gripped with fear at the shock of the roaring flames and the terrible shattering of the bells as they fell from the towers; and none knew where to turn. The King and the Duke were in an amazed stupor; terrified by the suspicion of foul work, each went his separate way. In the morning they were apprised through faithful messengers that in truth there had not been on either side any evil intention of treachery, but that the fire had been happening of chance. The King and the Duke came together again in the goodness of peace.[19]

     "The king and his cousins closely cooperated in the period between 1064 and 1071.[20][21] Both Solomon and Géza were, in 1065 or 1066, present at the consecration of the Benedictine Zselicszentjakab Abbey, established by Palatine Otto of the Gy?r clan, a partisan of the king.[21][22] They invaded Bohemia together after the Czechs had plundered the region of Trencsén (present-day Tren?ín, Slovakia) in 1067.[20][23] During the following year, nomadic tribes broke into Transylvania and plundered the regions, but Solomon and his cousins routed them at Kerlés (present-day Chirale?, Romania).[20][24] The identification of the marauders is uncertain: the Annales Posonienses and Simon of Kéza write of Pechenegs, the 14th-century Hungarian chronicles refer to Cumans, and a Russian chronicle mentions the Cumans and the Vlachs.[25]
     "Pecheneg troops pillaged Syrmia (now in Serbia) in 1071.[20][23] As the king and the duke suspected that the soldiers of the Byzantine garrison at Belgrade incited the marauders against Hungary, they decided to attack the fortress.[20] The Hungarian army crossed the river Sava, although the Byzantines "blew sulphurous fires by means of machines"[26] against their boats.[27] The Hungarians took Belgrade after a siege of three months.[28] However, the Byzantine commander, Niketas, surrendered the fortress to Duke Géza instead of the king; he knew that Solomon "was a hard man and that in all things he listened to the vile counsels of Count Vid, who was detestable in the eyes both of God and men",[29] according to the Illuminated Chronicle.[30]
     "Division of the war-booty caused a new conflict between Solomon and his cousin, because the king granted only a quarter of the booty to the duke, who claimed its third part.[31] Thereafter the duke negotiated with the Byzantine Emperor's envoys and set all the Byzantine captives free without the king's consent.[32] The conflict was further sharpened by Count Vid; the Illuminated Chronicle narrates how the count incited the young monarch against his cousins by saying that as "two sharp swords cannot be kept in the same scabbard", so the king and the duke "cannot reign together in the same kingdom".[33] [34]
     "The Byzantines reoccupied Belgrade in the next year.[35] Solomon decided to invade the Byzantine Empire and ordered his cousins to accompany him.[34][36] Only Géza joined the king; his brother, Ladislaus, remained with half of their troops in the Nyírség.[34][36] Solomon and Géza marched along the valley of the river Great Morava as far as Niš.[35][27] Here the locals made them "rich gifts of gold and silver and precious cloaks"[37] and Solomon seized the arm of Saint Procopius of Scythopolis.[35][27] He donated the relic to the Orthodox monastery of Syrmium (present-day Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia).[35][27]
     "After their return from the campaign, both Solomon and Géza began to make preparations for their inevitable conflict and were seeking assistance from abroad.[38] They concluded a truce, which was to last "from the feast of St Martin until the feast of St George", from 11 November 1073 until 24 April 1074.[35] However, Solomon chose to attack his cousin as soon as the German troops sent by his brother-in-law arrived in Hungary.[38] The royal army crossed the river Tisza and routed the troops of Géza, who had been abandoned by many of his nobles before the battle, at Kemej on 26 February 1074.[38][39]
     "A strong army soon arrived in Hungary, headed by Géza's brother-in-law, Duke Otto I of Olomouc.[39] In the decisive battle, which was fought at Mogyoród on 14 March 1074, Solomon was defeated and forced to flee from the battlefield.[39]
Abdication
     "After the battle of Mogyoród, Duke Géza's soldiers pursued Solomon and his men "from dawn to dusk",[40] but they managed to take refugee in Moson, where his mother and wife had been staying.[41] According to the Illuminated Chronicle, the queen mother blamed her son for the defeat, which filled Solomon with so much anger that he wanted to "strike his mother in the face".[42] His wife held him back by catching his hand.[41]
     "Thereafter, Solomon preserved only Moson and the nearby Pressburg (Bratislava, Slovakia). Other parts of the kingdom accepted the rule of Géza, who had been proclaimed king after his victory.[43][44]
     "Solomon sent his envoys to Henry IV and promised "six of the strongest fortified cities in Hungary" if his brother-in-law would help him to depose Géza.[45] He was even ready to accept the German monarch's suzerainty.[43]
     "Henry IV invaded Hungary in August.[45] He marched as far as Vác, but soon withdrew from Hungary without defeating Géza.[46] Nevertheless, the German invasion strengthened Solomon's rule in the region of his two fortresses,[45][46] where he continued to exercise all royal prerogatives, including coinage.[41] His mother and wife left him and followed Henry IV to Germany.[41] According to Berthold of Reichenau's Chronicle:
     "That summer [Henry IV] undertook an expedition into Hungary to help King Salomon, who also because of his insolent and shameful crimes had been deposed from his office by his father's brother (sic) and the other magnates of the kingdom, for whose counsels he cared little. [Henry IV], however, was able to achieve nothing of what he wished there, namely to restore Salomon. Finally, bringing back his sister, Queen Judith, the wife of Salomon, he returned home to Worms[47]
     "Solomon attempted to convince Pope Gregory VII to support him against Géza.[48] However, the pope condemned him for having accepted his kingdom "as a fief from the king of the Germans"[49] and claimed suzerainty over Hungary.[50] Thereafter it was Henry IV's support which enabled Solomon to resist Géza's all attempts at taking Moson and Pressburg.[51] The German monarch even sent one of his main opponents, Bishop Burchard II of Halberstadt, into exile to Solomon in June 1076.[52] Solomon's wife, Queen Judith, who was about to return to her husband, undertook to take the imprisoned bishop to Hungary, but the prelate managed to escape.[52]
     "Géza decided to start new negotiations with Solomon.[53] However, he died on 25 April 1077 and his partisans proclaimed his brother, Ladislaus, king.[54] The new king occupied Moson in 1079, thus Solomon could preserve only Pressburg.[55] In 1080[55] or 1081,[51] the two cousins concluded a treaty, according to which Solomon acknowledged Ladislaus as king in exchange for "revenues sufficient to bear the expenses of a king".[56][57]
Later life
     "Solomon did not give up his ambitions even after his abdication. He was arrested for plotting against his cousin,[57][58] then held in captivity in Visegrád.[57] He was released "on the occasion of the canonization of King St. Stephen and the blessed Emeric the confessor"[59] around 17 August 1083.[58][55] According to Hartvik's Legend of King Saint Stephen, King Ladislaus ordered Solomon's release, because nobody could open the grave of the saintly king while Solomon was held in captivity.[60]
     "Having been liberated, Solomon first visited his wife in Regensburg, "although she was not grateful for this",[61] according to the nearly contemporaneous Bernold of St Blasien.[51] From Germany, Solomon fled to the "Cumans"—in fact Pechenegs, according to the historians Gyula Kristó and Pál Engel—who were dwelling in the regions east of the Carpathian Mountains and north of the Lower Danube.[51][58] Solomon promised one of their chiefs, Kutesk, that "he would give him the right of possession over the province of Transylvania and would take his daughter as wife"[59] if Kutesk and his people would help him to regain his throne.[51][60] They invaded the regions along the Upper Tisza "with a great multitude"[59] of the "Cumans", but King Ladislaus routed and forced them to withdraw from Hungary.[60][62]
     "At the head of "a large contingent of Dacians"[63] (Hungarians), Solomon joined a huge army of Cumans and Pechenegs who invaded the Byzantine Empire in 1087.[64] The Byzantines routed the invaders in the mountains of Bulgaria.[64] Solomon seems to have died fighting in the battlefield, because Bernold of St. Blasien narrates that he "died courageously after an incredible slaughter of the enemy after he bravely undertook an enterprise against the King of the Greeks" in 1087.[65][66]
     "Reports of later sources prove that Solomon became the subject of popular legends.[67] For instance, the Illuminated Chronicle writes that Solomon "repented of his sins, so far as human understanding may reach" after the battle, and passed the last years of his life "in pilgrimage and prayer, in fastings and watchings, in labour and contrition".[68][66][67] According to these sources, Solomon died in Pula on the Istrian Peninsula[60] where he was venerated as a saint.[69] However, he was never officially canonized.[67] His alleged tombstone is now in a local museum.[69] Simon of Kéza wrote in his Gesta Hunnorum et Hungarorum:
[Solomon] was now completely at a loss, and after returning to his queen at Admont he spent a few days with her before returning to Székesfehérvár in monk's habit. There, the story goes, his brother (sic) Ladislas was distributing alms to the poor with his own hands on the porch of the church of the Blessed Virgin, and Solomon was among the recipients. When Ladislas looked closely he realised who it was. After the distribution was over Ladislas made careful inquiries. He intended Solomon no harm, but Solomon assumed he did, and quit Székesfehérvár, making for the Adriatic. There he passed the rest of his days in complete poverty in a city named Pula; he died in destitution and was buried there, never having returned to his wife.[70]

Family
     "Solomon's wife, Judith, who was born in 1048, was the third daughter of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and his second wife, Agnes de Poitou.[73] Their wedding took place in Székesfehérvár in June 1063.[4] The marriage remained childless.[74] They first separated from each other around 1075.[41] According to Bernold of St. Blasien, neither Solomon nor his wife had "kept the marriage contract: on the contrary, they had not been afraid, in opposition to the apostle, to defraud each other."[75][51] Having been informed on Solomon's death, Judith married Duke W?adys?aw I Herman of Poland in 1088.[74] In contrast with all contemporaneous sources, the late 13th-century Simon of Kéza writes that Judith "spurned all suitors" after her husband's death, although "many princes in Germany sought her hand".[76][74]
     "The following family tree presents Solomon's ancestors and some of his relatives who are mentioned in the article.[71][73] (See original Wikipedia article for chart of Salomon's ancestors)
References (See original Wiipedia article for detailed references: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon,_King_of_Hungary)
Sources
Primary sources
** Anna Comnena: The Alexiad (Translated by E. R. A. Sewter) (1969). Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-044958-7.
** "Bernold of St Blasien, Chronicle" (2008). In Robinson, I. S. Eleventh-Century Germany: The Swabian Chronicles. Manchaster University Press. pp. 245–337. ISBN 978-0-7190-7734-0.
** "Berthold of Reichenau, Chronicle: Second Version" (2008). In Robinson, I. S. Eleventh-Century Germany: The Swabian Chronicles. Manchaster University Press. pp. 108–244. ISBN 978-0-7190-7734-0.
** "Pope Gregory VII's letter to King Solomon of Hungary, claiming suzerainty over that kingdom". In The Correspondence of Pope Gregory: Selected Letters from the Registrum (Translated with and Introduction and Notes by Ephraim Emerton). Columbia University Press. pp. 48–49. ISBN 978-0-231-09627-0.
** Simon of Kéza: The Deeds of the Hungarians (Edited and translated by László Veszprémy and Frank Schaer with a study by Jen? Sz?cs) (1999). CEU Press. ISBN 963-9116-31-9.
** The Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle: Chronica de Gestis Hungarorum (Edited by Dezs? Dercsényi) (1970). Corvina, Taplinger Publishing. ISBN 0-8008-4015-1.
Secondary sources
** Bartl, Július; ?i?aj, Viliam; Kohútova, Mária; Letz, Róbert; Segeš, Vladimír; Škvarna, Dušan (2002). Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Slovenské Pedegogické Nakladatel'stvo. ISBN 0-86516-444-4.
** Curta, Florin (2006). Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500–1250. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-89452-4.
** Engel, Pál (2001). The Realm of St Stephen: A History of Medieval Hungary, 895–1526. I.B. Tauris Publishers. ISBN 1-86064-061-3.
** Érszegi, Géza; Solymosi, László (1981). "Az Árpádok királysága, 1000–1301" [The Monarchy of the Árpáds, 1000–1301]. In Solymosi, László (ed.) Magyarország történeti kronológiája, I: a kezdetekt?l 1526-ig [Historical Chronology of Hungary, Volume I: From the Beginning to 1526] (in Hungarian). Akadémiai Kiadó. pp. 79–187. ISBN 963-05-2661-1.
** Klaniczay, Gábor (2002). Holy Rulers and Blessed Princes: Dynastic Cults in Medieval Central Europe. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-42018-0.
** Kontler, László (1999). Millennium in Central Europe: A History of Hungary. Atlantisz Publishing House. ISBN 963-9165-37-9.
** Kosztolnyik, Z. J. (1981). Five Eleventh Century Hungarian Kings: Their Policies and their Relations with Rome. Boulder. ISBN 0-914710-73-7.
** Kristó, Gyula; Makk, Ferenc (1996). Az Árpád-ház uralkodói [Rulers of the House of Árpád] (in Hungarian). I.P.C. Könyvek. ISBN 963-7930-97-3.
** Makk, Ferenc (1994). "Salamon". In Kristó, Gyula; Engel, Pál; Makk, Ferenc (eds.) Korai magyar történeti lexikon (9-14. század) [Encyclopedia of the Early Hungarian History (9th-14th centuries)] (in Hungarian). Akadémiai Kiadó. p. 591. ISBN 963-05-6722-9.
** Robinson, I. S. (1999). Henry IV of Germany, 1056–1106. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-54590-0.
** Spinei, Victor (2009). The Romanians and the Turkic Nomads North of the Danube Delta from the Tenth to the Mid-Thirteenth century. Koninklijke Brill NV. ISBN 978-90-04-17536-5.
** Stephenson, Paul (2000). Byzantium's Balkan Frontier: A Political Study of the Northern Balkans, 900–1204. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-02756-4.
** Vernadsky, George (1948). A History of Russia, Volume II: Kievan Russia. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-01647-6."12

; Per Med Lands:
     "SALAMON (1053-killed in battle 1087, bur Pula). The Chronicon Posoniense records the birth in 1053 of "Samson filius Andree regie"[413]. The Gesta Hungarorum names "filium suum Salomonem adhuc puerulum" when recording that his father declared him heir to the throne in the twelfth year of his reign[414]. Salamon and his mother took refuge at the court of his brother-in-law Heinrich IV King of Germany when his paternal uncle Béla usurped the throne in 1060. After King Béla I died in 1063, he was installed as SALAMON King of Hungary with support from King Heinrich IV, whose suzerainty he recognised. Following continuing raids on Hungarian territory by Pechenegs, the Hungarians invaded Byzantine territory along the Danube in [1068], suspecting that the imperial governor of Beograd was sponsoring the Pechenegs. They captured Beograd in [1071/72] but did not retain it. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Salomon rex" invaded "bulgarense regnum" in 1072[415]. The dispute with Byzantium was settled by treaty in 1074[416]. Although King Salamon had made peace with his cousin Géza, relations deteriorated between them and open warfare broke out in 1074. The Chronicon Posoniense records disputes in 1071 between "Salomon rex" and "duce magno Geyza Ungarorum"[417]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King Salomon was defeated at "Munorod [Mogyoród]" and fled across the Danube to "Musunium [Moson]", before moving his household to the monastery of Admont in Styria[418]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Salomon" was deposed in 1074[419]. "Heinricus…rex" donated property to Freising church by charter dated 26 Nov 1074 at the request of "Salomon rex Ungarorum"[420], presumably as part of the arrangements agreed for Salamon's exile in Germany. Ex-King Salamon returned from Germany and conspired against his cousin King László I after the latter's accession in 1077, but he was confined to the Tower of Visegrád. He was released in 1083 and returned to his wife in Regensburg, but she refused to receive him. Salamon invaded Hungary again with Pecheneg forces from Moldavia, but was defeated. He was killed fighting in Byzantine territory. His death is recorded in the Annalista Saxo in 1087[421]. A different version of his final years is recorded in the Gesta Hungarorum which states that ex-King Salomon retired to Pula on the Adriatic where he lived in complete poverty and was buried, never having returned to his wife[422]. The Chronicon Varadiense records that "Salamon rex" died "in Pola civitate Styriæ"[423].
     "m (betrothed 1059, early 1063) as her first husband, JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[424]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[425]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[426]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. She married secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?adys?aw I Herman Prince of Poland ([1043]-4 Jun 1102). Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[427]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name as "Iudite"[428]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[429]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[430]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[431]."
Med Lands cites:
[413] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[414] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131.
[415] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[416] Fine (1991), p. 211.
[417] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[418] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 60 and 61, p. 135.
[419] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[420] D H IV 276, p. 353.
[421] Annalista Saxo 1087.
[422] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 61, p. 137.
[423] Chronicon Varadiense, 7, p. 253.
[424] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[425] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[426] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.
[427] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[428] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[429] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[430] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.12
He was King of Hungary between 1063 and 1074.1,2

Family

Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia b. 1047, d. bt 1093 - 1095
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AdelaidaMVratislavIIBohemia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, András I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020694&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salomon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020755&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020695&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnastasiaIaroslavnadied10741096.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon,_King_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027255&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#JudithMariaM1SalomonHungaryM2WladyslawI.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#SalamonI

Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #48315, b. 1245, d. 9 September 1285
FatherRostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria1,2,4,7,8,9,6 b. 1225, d. c 1263
MotherAnna/Agnes (?) of Hungary1,2,7,8,10,11,6 b. bt 1226 - 1227, d. a 1270
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited23 Nov 2020
     Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz was born in 1245.3,7,8 She married Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia, son of Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia and Kunigunde (?) von Hohenstaufen, on 25 October 1261 at Pressburg;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.1,3,2,12,7,8,6 Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz married Záviš (?) von Rosenberg zu Falkenstein und Skalitz on 2 June 1284 at Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now);
Her 2nd husband; his 1st or 2nd wife.2,13,7,8,6
Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz died on 9 September 1285.3,7,8
Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz was buried after 9 September 1285 at Erlöserkirche, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).8


     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Kunhata was born about 1245, the daughter of Rosztiszlo, grand duke of Kiev, king of Bulgaria, and Anna of Hungary. She was probably born in Ruthenia, in the domains of her paternal grandfather Michail 'the Saint', grand duke of Kiev. After the death of Michail, Kunhata's family relocated to Hungary, where her mother's father Béla IV, king of Hungary, made her father governor of certain Serbian-speaking regions in the Danube Valley. Her father proclaimed himself Emperor of Bulgaria in 1256 but did not stay there to defend his title.
     "On 25 October 1261 in Pressburg, Kunhata was married - as a token of alliance from her maternal grandfather Béla IV - to Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia, following his divorce from Margarethe of Austria, who was unable to provide heirs for the king. Kunhata, 41 years younger than Margarethe, bore Ottokar several children of whom Wenceslas II, Kunigunde and Agnes would have progeny. However the peace between Bohemia and Hungary ended after 10 years, when Kunhata's uncle Stephan V came to power as the king of Hungary.
     "In 1278 King Ottokar tried to recover the lands he lost to Rudolf I von Habsburg, the emperor-elect, in 1276. He made allies and collected a large army, but he was defeated by Rudolf and killed at the Battle of Dürnkrut on 26 August 1278. Moravia was subdued and its government entrusted to Rudolf's representatives, leaving Kunhata, now queen regent of Bohemia, in control of only the province surrounding Prague, while the young Wenceslas II was betrothed and married to one of Rudolf's daughters, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg.
     "On 2 June 1284 in Prague, Kunhata married a Bohemian magnate Zavis z Falkenstejna, Burggraf of Falkstejna and Rozmberka, son of Budivoj z Krumlova. However she died without further progeny on 9 September 1285. Zavis survived her and married Elisabeth of Hungary. He was executed on the orders of his step-son King Wenceslas II on 24 August 1290."7

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch erloschener böhmischer Herrenstandsfamilien Neustadt an der Aisch, 1973, Roman Freiherr von Procházka, Reference: 173.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 131.
3. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 91.7
EDV-22. Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz was also known as Kunhata (?) of Slavonia and Machva.7

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Kunigunda Rostislavna (1245 – 9 September 1285; Czech: Kunhuta Uherská or Kunhuta Hali?ská) was Queen consort of Bohemia and its Regent from 1278 until her death. She was a member of the House of Chernigov, and a daughter of Rostislav Mikhailovich.
Family
     "She was presumably born in Ruthenia, in the domains of her paternal grandfather Michael of Chernigov. Her grandfather was the last Grand Prince of Kiev, who was deposed not by a more powerful prince but by the Mongol Empire. Her parents were Rostislav Mikhailovich, future ruler of Belgrade and Slavonia, and his wife Anna of Hungary. After the death of her father's father, Kunigunda's family relocated to Hungary, where her mother's father, Béla IV of Hungary, made her father governor of certain Serbian-speaking regions in the Danube Valley. Her father proclaimed himself Emperor of Bulgaria in 1256 but did not stay there to defend his title.
Marriage
     "Kunigunda was married – as a token of alliance from her maternal grandfather Béla – to King Ottokar II of Bohemia (ca. 1233 – 1278) in Pressburg (now Bratislava) on 25 October 1261. Ottokar was paternally a member of the P?emyslid dynasty whose marriage to Margaret, Duchess of Austria (ca. 1204 – 1266) was annulled.
     "Kunigunda, 41 years Margaret's junior, bore Ottokar several children including:
** Kunigunde of Bohemia (January, 1265 – 27 November 1321). Married Boleslaus II of Masovia.
** Agnes of Bohemia (5 September 1269 – 17 May 1296). Married Rudolf II, Duke of Austria.
** Wenceslaus II of Bohemia (17 September 1271 – 21 June 1305).

Queen and regent of Bohemia
     "However, the peace between Bohemia and Hungary ended after 10 years, when Kunigunda's uncle Stephen came to power as the King of Hungary.
     "In 1278, King Ottokar tried to recover his lands lost to Rudolph I of Germany in 1276. He made allies and collected a large army, but he was defeated by Rudolph and killed at the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen on the March on 26 August 1278.
     "Moravia was subdued and its government entrusted to Rudolph's representatives, leaving Kunigunda, now Queen Regent of Bohemia in control of only the province surrounding Prague, while the young Wenceslaus was betrothed and married to one of Rudolph's daughters, Judith.
     "Kunigunda married secondly a Bohemian magnate Záviš, Lord of Falkenštejn, in Prague in 1285. However, she died only a few months later. Záviš survived her and married again to the Hungarian Princess Elisabeth. He was executed on behalf of the King on 24 August 1290.
     "Kunigunda's son Wenceslaus II kept the Kingdom of Bohemia, and also succeeded in obtaining Poland and Hungary although not very sustainably. Ultimately, she is one of the pivotal ancestresses of both the House of Luxembourg and the Habsburgs.
Literature
** Kate?ina Charvátová (2007). Václav II.: král ?eský a polský. ISBN 978-80-7021-841-9.
** Gabriela V. Šarochová (2004). Radostný úd?l vdovský: královny-vdovy p?emyslovských ?ech. ISBN 80-86569-24-1."5

; Per Med Lands:
     "KUNIGUNDA [Kunguta] Rostislavna (1245-9 Sep 1285, bur Prague Erlöserkirche). The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ records the marriage "VIII Kal Nov 1261" of "Cunegundem filiam Hostislai ducis Bulgarorum" and the king "in castello Ungarias…Possen"[347]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the second marriage of "Rex Przsemysl" and "Chungundam, Regis de Mazouia filiam"[348]. The Altahenses Annales record the marriage in 1261 of "Otaker rex" and "Chunigundem filiam Regis Ruscie, neptem Bele regis Ungarie ex filia"[349].
     "m firstly (Pressburg 25 Oct 1261) as his second wife, OTAKAR P?EMYSL II King of Bohemia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).
     "m secondly (Prague 2 Jun 1284) as his second wife, ZAVIŠ von Rosenberg zu Skalitz und Falkenstein, son of BUDIWOJ von Krumau [Rosenberg] & his wife Perchta von Skalitz (-beheaded Schloß Frauenberg 24 Aug 1290, bur Hohenfurt)."
Med Lands cites:
[347] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1261, MGH SS IX, p. 178.
[348] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 24.
[349] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1261, MGH SS XVII, p. 402.8

; Per Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 2): "King PREMYSL II OTAKAR of Bohemia (1253-78), Margrave of Moravia (1247-78), Duke of Austria (1251-78), *ca 1233, +k.a.Dürnkrut 26.8.1278, bur Znojmo, then St.Veit, Prague; 1m: Hainburg 11.2.1252 (div 1264) [19189] Margarete of Austria (+2.10.1267); 2m: Pressburg 25.10.1261 [48315] Kunigunde of Halicz (*1245 +9.9.1285), -cr Queen of Bohemia 24.12.1261; he also had several illegitimate kids by Margarete (?Agnes) von Chuenring, for whom see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia3.html."3 She was Queen consort of Bohemia between 1261 and 1278.5 She was Queen of Bohemia on 24 December 1261.3

Family 1

Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia b. 1233, d. 26 Aug 1278
Children

Family 2

Záviš (?) von Rosenberg zu Falkenstein und Skalitz b. c 1250, d. 24 Aug 1290

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik6.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  4. [S2101] Tony Hoskins, "Hoskins email 21 Oct 2006: "Kunigunda Rostislavna, Queen of Bohemia: Rurikid gateway to     the West"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Oct 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Hoskins email 21 Oct 2006."
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunigunda_of_Halych. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#KunigundaRostislavnadied1285. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunhata of Slavonia and Machva: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RostislavMikhailovichdied1263B.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosztiszlo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027046&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020722&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AnnaMRostislavIBulgaria
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Przemysl Ottokar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020292&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zavis z Falkenstejna: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00152828&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunigunde of Halicz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Kunigundedied1321
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Agnesdied1296
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 223, 227.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#WenzelIIdied1305

Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary1,2,3,4

F, #48316, b. 1175, d. after 1223
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1,2,4,5,6,7,8 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
MotherAgnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary1,2,4,9,6,7,8 b. c 1154, d. 1184
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary was born in 1175.2,7,8 She married Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium, son of Andronikos Dukas Angelos and Euphrosyne Kastamonnitissa, in 1185;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.10,2,11,4,7,8,12,13 Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary married Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, in May 1204 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now);
His 3rd wife, her 2nd husband.14,2,4,15,16,17,7,8 Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary married Nicolas I de Saint-Omer Seigneur de Bootien, Lord of Thebes, son of Guillaume IV de Saint-Omer Chatelain de Saint-Omer, seigneur de Fauquembergues and Ida (?) d'Avesnes, after September 1207;
Her 3rd husband.2,4,7,8
Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary died after 1223; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2) and Genealogics say d. aft 1223; Med Lands says d. aft 3 Mar 1229.2,7,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ISAAKIOS Angelos ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204). Niketas Choniates names "Isaacius et Alexius" as sons of "Andronicus Angelus"[798]. As leader of the aristocrats against whom Emperor Andronikos I had struggled, he succeeded in 1185 on the latter's downfall as Emperor ISAAKIOS II. He immediately attacked the Normans, his general Alexios Branas defeating them at Mosynopolis and Dimitritsa 7 Nov 1185, which resulted in their expulsion from Thessaloniki, Durazzo and Corfu[799]. Isaakios also made peace with Béla III King of Hungary, sealed by the emperor's second marriage with the king's daughter. In 1186, he was faced with the rebellion of Alexios Branas, who had been sent to quell the Bulgarian rebellion of the brothers Ivan Asen and Teodor but, having penetrated rebel territory, used the army for his own interests and led it to Adrianople where he was proclaimed emperor. Branas marched on Constantinople, but was put to flight and killed by loyal forces[800]. Emperor Isaakios led his army personally against Bulgarian rebels, successfully driving them across the Danube. This was followed by further campaigns in Sep 1187 and 1188, but the emperor was forced to recognise Bulgarian independence under a peace treaty signed in 1188[801]. Tensions developed with Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa", leader of the Third Crusade, who had received a warm welcome in Serbia and had crossed into Byzantine territory at Brani?evo. Anxious to protect his interests, Isaakios signed a treaty of alliance with Saladin, which worsened the situation. After taking Philippopolis [Plovdiv] and Adrianople, as well as threatening Constantinople, Emperor Friedrich forced Emperor Isaakios to give him provisions and ships to cross into Asia Minor[802]. In Sep 1190, Byzantine troops defeated the Serbs at the Morava River, but although the Byzantines regained Niš, Beograd and northern Macedonia including Skopje, under the ensuing peace treaty, they were obliged to recognise Serb independence and Nemanja's right to rule Zeta, southern Dalmatia, Trebinje and Hum[803]. In retaliation for Bulgarian raids on Philippopolis, Sardika [Sofija] and Adrianople, Emperor Isaakios attacked Bulgaria but was heavily defeated in [1194] near Arcadiopolis[804]. The reign of Emperor Isaakios saw a major weakening of Byzantium and was marked by a rapid revival of corruption and administrative abuses, especially increased taxes to establish his luxurious court[805]. He was deposed 8 Apr 1195 by his older brother Alexios while preparing a further campaign against Bulgaria, and blinded. He was restored as emperor 17 Jul 1203 when the crusading army captured Constantinople and his brother Alexios III had fled, his son being named as co-emperor. Isaakios was deposed end-Jan 1204 in an anti-Latin revolt which broke out in Constantinople, and imprisoned once more. The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[806].
     "m firstly (before [1181]) [EIRENE] Tornikaina, daughter of DEMETRIOS Tornikes & his wife --- Malakissa (-[18 Nov] [1183/85]). The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[807]. Bearing in mind the estimated date of death of Emperor Isaakios (see above), it is possible that 18 Nov commemorates the death of [Eirene], although it is also possible that the date commemorates some other family event. There remains some doubt about whether "Eirene" can have been the name of Isaakios's first wife as the original baptismal name of her daughter, "Maria regina", is also recorded as Eirene, the Byzantine naming practice not normally being to name children after their parents. One possibility is that [Eirene] died while giving birth to Eirene/Maria, as naming a child after a parent appears to have been acceptable practice in those circumstances. If that is correct, it is unlikely that [Eirene] died later than [1184] considering her daughter’s first marriage in 1192. Her relationship with the Tornikes family is indicated by a document at Patmos which names Konstantinos Tornikes as uncle ("?????") of Emperor Alexios IV, dated to Dec 1203[808]. While the passage would not exclude Konstantinos being the husband either of a maternal or paternal aunt of the emperor, or indeed a more remote relation as the word "?????" could indicate a family relationship which is more distant than "uncle". Don Stone and Charles Owens, in their detailed analysis of all the relevant sources, argue convincingly that the most likely interpretation is that Konstantinos Tornikes was Emperor Alexios’s maternal uncle[809].
     "m secondly (1185) as her first husband, MARGIT of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[810]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry[811]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[812]. The special wedding tax levied to finance her elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[813]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[814]. She married secondly (May 1204) as his second wife, Bonifazio I Marchese di Monferrato, who wished thereby to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[815]. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[816]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[817]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[818]. She married thirdly (after Sep 1207) Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes. She was regent of Thessaloniki in 1207. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[819]."
Med Lands cites:
[798] Niketas Choniates, Imperium Alexii Comneni Porphyrogeniti Manuelis filii, 9, p. 319.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 9.
[800] Fine (1994), p. 14.
[801] Fine (1994), p. 15.
[802] Fine (1994), p. 24-25.
[803] Fine (1994), pp. 25-26.
[804] Fine (1994), p. 27.
[805] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[806] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[807] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[808] "Konstantinos 216" in PBW (2006.2), citing Branouse, E. and Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou, M. (1980) ????????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? 1. ?????????????, 2. ???????? ?????????? (Athens) Vol. 2, p. 131.14.
[809] Stone & Owens ‘[Eirene?]’, pp. 349-69.
[810] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[811] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[812] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[813] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[814] Villehardouin, 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[815] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[816] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[817] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[818] Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[819] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Byzant 4): “C2. ISAAKIOS II Angelos, Emperor of Byzantium (1185-95)+(1203-04), *1155, +Constantinople 12.4.1204 in prison; 1m: NN; 2m: 1185 Margaret of Hungary (*1175 +after 1223)”.18

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 104.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 200; III 623.7


; This is the same person as:
”Margaret of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as
”Marguerite de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Margherita d'Ungheria (1175-1223)” at Wikipedia (Es.)19,20,21

; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “E2. Margit, *1175, +after 1223; 1m: 1185 Emperor Isaac II Angelos of Byzantium (*ca 1155 +12.4.1204); 2m: 1204 Mgve Boniface I of Montferrat, King of Thessalonica (*1150 +4.9.1207); 3m: ca 1210 Nicolas de Saint-Omer (+1217/19)”.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGIT (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[789]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[790]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo/Barancs and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[791]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[792]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[793]. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[794]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[795]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[796]. Her second marriage was arranged by Bonifazio to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[797], but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin Count of Flanders who was considered a less powerful candidate. Her second husband installed her as regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[798]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the emperor in 1209[799]. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[800].
     "m firstly (1185) as his second wife, Emperor ISAAKIOS II, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204).
     "m secondly (1204) as his third wife, BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato King of Thessaloniki, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). King of Thessaloniki 1204.
     "m thirdly (after Sep 1207) NICOLAS de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes, son of GUILLAUME IV Châtelain de Saint-Omer, Seigneur de Fauquembergues & his first wife Ida d'Avesnes (-[1217/19])."
Med Lands cites:
[789] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[790] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[791] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[792] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[793] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[794] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[795] Bekkerus, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[796] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[797] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[798] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[800] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.8

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “Bonifacio 1er di Monferrato ° 1150 +X 04/09/1207 (guerre contre les Bulgares) marquis de Montferrat (1192-1207), Roi de Thessalonique (1204-1207)
     ép. 1) ~1170 Hélène di Busca ° ~1150 + ~1200/04
     ép. 2) Sofia (Alice) di Savoia + 1202
     ép. 3) 1205 Marguerite Arpad de Hongrie ° 1175 + ~1240 (fille de Bela III, Roi de Hongrie, et d’Agnès de Châtillon)”.22
; Per Med Lands:
     "BONIFAZIO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[149]. Regent of Monferrato 1191. He succeeded his brother in 1192 as BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato. He assisted Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in his conquest of Sicily in 1194[150]. A charter dated 13 Jun 1199 records an agreement between the communes of Alessandria, Asti and Vercelli and "dominum Bonifacium marchionem Montisferrati et Gulielmum filius eius"[151]. He joined the movement for a Fourth Crusade, and was elected leader on the death of Thibaut III Comte de Champagne[152], a decision which was ratified at Soissons in Aug 1201[153]. "Bonifatius marchio Montisferrati" granted the right to wood in "bosco Lucedii" to the church of Casale by charter dated 21 Jul 1202[154]. Under the terms of the partition of the Byzantine Empire agreed in March 1204 between Venice and the crusading armies, approximately 3/8 of the territory of the former empire was to be distributed between the crusaders. Bonifazio, as leader of the crusade, expected to be installed as emperor of the newly formed Latin Empire of Constantinople. He married the widow of ex-Emperor Isaakios II in order to advance his claims, but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin IX Count of Flanders whom he considered a less powerful candidate[155]. Bonifazio was assigned a large fief in Anatolia, but demanded Thessaloniki which he claimed belonged as of right to his family since Emperor Manuel I had granted his brother Ranieri a large estate there. At a meeting with Venetian representatives at Adrianople 12 Aug 1204, he ceded the island of Crete (which he claimed had been given as a fief to his brother Ranieri by Emperor Manuel I) to Venice and bought Venice's rights to Thessaloniki[156]. Bonifazio captured Demotika and besieged Adrianople to press his claim. Peace was soon mediated, and Emperor Baudouin exchanged Demotika for Thessaloniki, where Bonifazio declared himself King of Thessaloniki. He extended his kingdom northwards to include Macedonia and southwards into Thessaly[157]. His fiefs were Othon de la Roche (for Attika and Boetia, later to form the duchy of Athens), Guillaume de Champlitte and, after his death, Geoffroy de Villehardouin (for the principality of Achaia or Morea in Peloponese). He was faced with continual threats from the north from the Bulgarians and, against this common threat, allied himself with Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople, confirmed by the marriage of his daughter to the emperor[158]. He was killed by a small Bulgarian raiding party, his head being sent as a trophy to Kalojan Tsar of Bulgaria[159]. The Cronica of Sicardi Bishop of Cremona records the death in 1207 of "Bonifacius marchio Montis-ferrati" killed in battle[160].
     "m firstly (before 1171) ELENA di Bosco, daughter of ---. The Chronica Jacobi de Aquis, dated to 1334, names "la figliola del Marchese del Bosco" as the first wife of "Bonifacio"[161]. The primary source which confirms her name and the name of her father has not yet been identified. 1179.
     "m secondly ([late 1186/early 1187]) ---. According to Niketas Choniates, Bonifazio had remarried in late 1186-early 1187[162]. The identity of his second wife is not known. The following source suggests that she was Jeanne de Châtillon, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch. The reasons noted below suggest that this is unlikely to be correct. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e[ Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Jeanne married "el re de Salonichio" and died without heirs[163]. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, "el re de Salonichio" can only refer to Bonifazio di Monferrato. If the date of this marriage is correctly reported by Niketas, Jeanne would have been considerably younger than her sister Agnes. In addition, Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Bonifazio's third wife which suggests problems of affinity and the consequent difficulty of obtaining Papal dispensation for that later marriage.]
     "m thirdly (May 1204) as her second husband, MARGIT of Hungary, widow of Emperor ISAAKIOS II, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[164]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[165]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[166]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[167]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[168]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[169]. Her husband installed her as Regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[170]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the Emperor in 1209[171]. She married thirdly Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes (-[1217/19]). Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[172]. "
Med Lands cites:
[149] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[150] Sturdza (1999), p. 537.
[151] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars I, col. 122.
[152] WTC XXVII.XXIV, p. 246.
[153] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 110-11.
[154] Casale Monferrato, Vol. I, LXIII, p. 95.
[155] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 124-5.
[156] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[157] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[158] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[159] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[160] Sicardi Episcopi Cremonensis Cronica, MGH SS XXXI, p. 179.
[161] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars II, Historiam Aquensem,Monferratensem ac Pedemontanam, col. 176.
[162] Dieten, van (ed.) (1975) Niketas Choniates Historia (Berlin and New York), Vol. 1, p. 382, (English translation: Magoulias, H. (1984) O City of Byzantium (Detroit), p. 210), information provided by Dr Marianne Gilchrist in a private email to the author dated 10 Feb 2007.
[163] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[165] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[166] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[167] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[168] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), 8, p. 15.
[169] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 13, p. 96.
[170] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[171] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[172] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.16
She was Empress Consort of the Byzantine Empire between 1185 and 1195 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now).19 She was Empress Consort of the Byzantine Empire between 1203 and 1204 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now).19 She was Marchesa consorte del Monferrato between 1204 and 1207.21 She was Queen Consort of Thessalonika between 1205 and 1207.19

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020752&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014173&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020752&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MargitM1IsaakiosIIByzM2BonifMonferrato
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Antioch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014174&tree=LEO
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 227, 232.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isaakios II Angelos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027070&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IsaakiosIIdied1204
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boniface I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027073&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225A.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boniface_I,_Marquis_of_Montferrat. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html#I2
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Hungary
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Marguerite de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Margherita d'Ungheria (1175-1223): https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margherita_d%27Ungheria_(1175-1223). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Demetrius de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020755&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page - Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html

Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #48317, b. circa 1180, d. 6 December 1240
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
MotherAgnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary1,2,5,4 b. c 1154, d. 1184
Last Edited8 Dec 2020
     Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary was born circa 1180.2 She and Konrad von Hohenstaufen were engaged in 1189.6 Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary married Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia, son of Vladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia and Jutta/Judith (?) of Thuringia, in 1198.7,2,8
Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary died on 6 December 1240.2

Family 1

Konrad von Hohenstaufen b. Feb 1167, d. 19 Jan 1191

Family 2

Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia b. c 1155, d. 15 Dec 1230
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014173&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Antioch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014174&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B.
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 223, 227.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030717&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Annadied1265

Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia1,2,3

M, #48318, b. circa 1155, d. 15 December 1230
FatherVladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia3 b. c 1110, d. 18 Jan 1174
MotherJutta/Judith (?) of Thuringia3,4 d. 9 Sep 1174
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia was born circa 1155.3 He married Adelheid (?) von Meissen, daughter of Otto II "der Reiche" (?) Markgraf von Meissen and Hedwig (?) von Brandenburg, in 1187; his 1st wife.5,3 Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia married Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary, daughter of Béla III (?) King of Hungary and Agnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary, in 1198.1,2,3 Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia and Adelheid (?) von Meissen were divorced between 1198 and 1199.5,3
Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia died on 15 December 1230.1,3
Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia was buried after 15 December 1230 at St. Veit, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).3


     EDV-23.

; PREMYSL I OTAKAR, Duke of Bohemia (1192-93)+(1197-98), King of Bohemia (1198-1230), Margrave of Moravia (1192-93)+(1222-24), *ca 1155, +15.12.1230, bur St.Veit, Prague; 1m: 1187 (div 1198) Adelheid of Meissen (+1211); 2m: ca 1198 Constance of Hungary (*ca 1180 +6.12.1240.)3 Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia was also known as Premysl Ottokar I (?) King of Bohemia.6 He was Margrave of Moravia between 1192 and 1193.3 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1192 and 1193.3 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1197 and 1198.3 He was King of Bohemia: OTTOKAR I. He took full advantage of the struggles for the succession that began to wrack the German Empire. Siding now with one party, now with another, he made the Bohemian king (an imperial elector since the early 12th century) one of the decisive powers in German affairs. On the other hand, a long-drawn conflict with the clergy (1214-21) led to the almost complete independence of the Church.

1212: The Golden Bull of Frederick II recognized the right of the Bohemian nobility to elect its own ruler. between 1198 and 1230.7,3 He was Margrave of Moravia between 1222 and 1224.3

Family 1

Adelheid (?) von Meissen d. 1 Feb 1211
Children

Family 2

Constantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary b. c 1180, d. 6 Dec 1240
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 223, 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jutta von Thüringen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020279&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wettin 1 page (The House of Wettin): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin1.html
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 16. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 223.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030717&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Annadied1265. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia1,2

M, #48319, b. 1205, d. 23 September 1253
FatherPrzemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia1,2 b. c 1155, d. 15 Dec 1230
MotherConstantia/Konstancia (?) of Hungary1,2 b. c 1180, d. 6 Dec 1240
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia was born in 1205.3,2 He married Kunigunde (?) von Hohenstaufen, daughter of Philip II (?) Duke of Swabia, Holy Roman Emperor and Irini Maria Angelina Queen of Sicily, in 1224.3,2,4
Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia died on 23 September 1253 at Pocaply.1,3,2
Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia was buried after 23 September 1253 at Na Frantisku monastry, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).2


     EDV-23. Vaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia was also known as Wenceslas (Vaclav) I King of Bohemia.1 He was King of Bohemia, WENCESLAS (VACLAV) I. His reign was marked by an acceleration of German immigration that was encouraged by the ruler, possibly to counteract the growing power of the nobility. Germans began to open up large forested tracts and to build cities, which were given practical autonomy under German (Magdeburg) law.

1247-1250: Rising of the nobility against the king, possibly in protest against the favor shown the Germans.

1251: The Austrian estates, after the death of the last Babenberg duke, elected Ottokar, son of Wenceslas, as duke. between 1230 and 1253.1,2 He was Margrave of Moravia between 1239 and 1246.2

Family

Kunigunde (?) von Hohenstaufen b. 1200, d. 13 Sep 1248
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 223, 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstauf page (Hohenstaufen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Beatrixdied1290. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030636&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Przemysl Ottokar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020292&tree=LEO

Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia1,2,3,4

M, #48320, b. 1233, d. 26 August 1278
FatherVaclav (Wenceslas) I (?) King of Bohemia1,3,4 b. 1205, d. 23 Sep 1253
MotherKunigunde (?) von Hohenstaufen5,3,4 b. 1200, d. 13 Sep 1248
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited23 Nov 2020
     Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia was born in 1233; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1230.2,6,4 He married Margarethe (?) von Babenberg, daughter of Leopold VI "the Glorious/der Glorreiche" (?) Duke of Austria and Styria and Theodora Angelina, on 8 April 1252 at Hainburg, Austria;
Her 2nd husband, his 1st wife; Genealogicws says m. 8 Apr 1252; Med Lands says "m secondly Hainburg 11 Feb 1252, dispensation 5 Jul 1253, repudiated 1261."2,5,7,3,8,4,9 Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia and Margarethe (?) von Babenberg were divorced between 1260 and 1261; Leo van de Pas says divorced 1264.7,8,4,9 Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia married Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz, daughter of Rostislav Mikhailovich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Prince of Novgorod, Galitzia, Lutsk and Chernigov, Tsar of Bulgaria and Anna/Agnes (?) of Hungary, on 25 October 1261 at Pressburg;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.10,6,11,4,12,13,14
Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia died on 26 August 1278 at Battle on the Marchfeld, Dürnkrut, Austria.1,6,4
Przemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia was buried after 26 August 1278 at Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now),

; From Find a Grave:
     BIRTH     1233, Mestec Kralove, Okres Nymburk, St?edo?eský (Central Bohemia), Czech Republic
     DEATH     26 Aug 1278 (aged 44–45), Durnkrut, Gänserndorf Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria
     King of Bohemia, 1253-1278
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Kunigunde von Halitsch 1245–1285
     Children
          Kunigunde of Bohemia 1265–1321
          Agnes of Bohemia 1269–1296
          Wenzel II of Bohemia 1271–1305
     BURIAL     Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: David Conway
     Added: 23 Oct 2002
     Find A Grave Memorial 6871805.6,15
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "KUNIGUNDA [Kunguta] Rostislavna (1245-9 Sep 1285, bur Prague Erlöserkirche). The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ records the marriage "VIII Kal Nov 1261" of "Cunegundem filiam Hostislai ducis Bulgarorum" and the king "in castello Ungarias…Possen"[347]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the second marriage of "Rex Przsemysl" and "Chungundam, Regis de Mazouia filiam"[348]. The Altahenses Annales record the marriage in 1261 of "Otaker rex" and "Chunigundem filiam Regis Ruscie, neptem Bele regis Ungarie ex filia"[349].
     "m firstly (Pressburg 25 Oct 1261) as his second wife, OTAKAR P?EMYSL II King of Bohemia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).
     "m secondly (Prague 2 Jun 1284) as his second wife, ZAVIŠ von Rosenberg zu Skalitz und Falkenstein, son of BUDIWOJ von Krumau [Rosenberg] & his wife Perchta von Skalitz (-beheaded Schloß Frauenberg 24 Aug 1290, bur Hohenfurt)."
Med Lands cites:
[347] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1261, MGH SS IX, p. 178.
[348] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 24.
[349] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1261, MGH SS XVII, p. 402.13
EDV-21.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia, was born about 1230, the second son of King Wenceslas I of the Premyslid dynasty; through his mother Kunigunde he was related to the Hohenstaufen family, being a grandson of the German king, Philipp von Hohenstaufen. After the death of his older brother Wladislaw in 1247 he became the only heir to the throne of Bohemia.
     "During his father's lifetime he ruled Moravia, but when in 1248 some discontented Bohemian nobles acknowledged him as their sovereign, trouble arose between him and his father, and for a short time Ottokar was imprisoned. However in 1251 the young prince secured his election as duke of Austria, where he strengthened his position by marrying the 30 years older Margarethe of Austria, sister of Duke Friedrich II 'der Streitbare', the last of the Babenberg rulers of the duchy, and herself widow of the German king Heinrich VII von Hohenstaufen. Some years later he repudiated Margarethe and married the young Kunigunde of Halicz, who was the granddaughter of his rival, the Hungarian king Béla IV. She became the mother of his children, the youngest of them being his only legitimate son Wenceslas (Vaclav).
     "Both before and after he became king of Bohemia in succession to his father in September 1253, Ottokar was involved in a dispute with Béla IV over the possession of the duchy of Styria, which had formerly been united with Austria. By an arrangement made in 1254 he surrendered part of it to Béla, but when the dispute was renewed he defeated the Hungarians in July 1260 near Kressenbrunn and secured the whole of Styria for himself, owing his formal investiture with Austria and Styria to King John of England's son Richard, earl of Cornwall, who was emperor-elect.
     "Ottokar also led two expeditions (crusades) against the Prussians and founded Königsberg (Královed in Czech), later the capital of Prussia, named after him as king.
     "Ottokar began the construction of Krivoklát Castle (Krivoklát Hrad) but it was finished by his successor Wenceslas II. It is located just 48 km west of Prague.
     "In 1269 he inherited Carinthia and part of Carniola, and having made good his claim, contested by the Hungarians, on the field of battle, he was the most powerful prince within the empire when an election for the German throne took place in 1273. But Ottokar was not the successful candidate. He refused to acknowledge his victorious rival, Rudolf von Habsburg, and urged the pope to adopt a similar attitude. Meanwhile, at a convention of the Reichstag at Frankfurt in 1274, Rudolf decreed that all imperial lands seized since the death of Emperor Friedrich II must be returned to the crown. This would have deprived Ottokar of Styria, Austria, and Carinthia. Matters reached a climax in 1276. Placing Ottokar under the ban of the empire, Rudolf besieged Vienna and compelled Ottokar in November 1276 to sign a treaty by which he gave up Austria and the neighbouring duchies, retaining for himself only Bohemia and Moravia. Ottokar's son Wenceslas was betrothed to Rudolf's daughter Judith, and an uneasy peace was made. Two years later the Czech king tried to recover his lost lands. He found allies and collected a large army, but he was defeated by Rudolf and killed at the Battle of Dürnkrut (also known as the Battle of the Marchfeld) on 26 August 1278.
     "Ottokar was a founder of towns and a friend of law and order, while he assisted trade and welcomed German immigrants. He is a famous figure both in history and in legend. He was called the 'Iron and Gold King' throughout Europe. In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Ottokar outside the gates of Purgatory, in amiable companionship with his imperial rival Rudolf. He is also the protagonist of a tragedy by the 19th century playwright Franz Grillparzer. His successor was his son Wenceslas II."4

; This is the same person as ”Ottokar II of Bohemia” at Wikipedia and as ”P?emysl Otakar II.” at Wikipedia (CZ).16,17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 24.
2. Castles of the World 2010 , Saigal, Malini ; Nirad Grover. details of Krivoklat castle.18


; Per Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 2): "King PREMYSL II OTAKAR of Bohemia (1253-78), Margrave of Moravia (1247-78), Duke of Austria (1251-78), *ca 1233, +k.a.Dürnkrut 26.8.1278, bur Znojmo, then St.Veit, Prague; 1m: Hainburg 11.2.1252 (div 1264) [19189] Margarete of Austria (+2.10.1267); 2m: Pressburg 25.10.1261 [48315] Kunigunde of Halicz (*1245 +9.9.1285), -cr Queen of Bohemia 24.12.1261; he also had several illegitimate kids by Margarete (?Agnes) von Chuenring, for whom see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia3.html."6 He was Margrave of Moravia between 1247 and 1278.6 He was Duke of Austria and Styria between 1251 and 1276.6,16 He was
From Enc. of World History:
     "King of Bohemia, OTTOKAR II (the Great) whose reign marked the widest expansion of Bohemian power and was characterized by great prosperity (opening of the famous silver mines, which made Bohemia one of the wealthiest countries in the later Middle Ages).
     "1255: Ottokar carried on a successful campaign in support of the Teutonic Knights against the heathen Prussians.
     "1260: After defeating the Hungarians, Ottokar took from them the province of Styria.
     "1269: Ottokar, taking advantage of the interregnum in the German Empire, extended his power over Carinthia, Carniola, and Istria.
     "1273: Election of Rudolf of Habsburg as king of Germany. Ottokar refused to recognize him. The Diet of Regensburg (1274) therefore declared all Ottokar's acquisitions void. The king, supported by the Hungarians and by some of the Bohemian nobility, attacked Ottokar, who agreed to give up all but Bohemia and Moravia, and to recognize Rudolf's suzerainty even over these.
     "1278: New war between Rudolf and Ottokar. Ottokar was decisively defeated on the Marchfeld (Aug. 26) and killed.
(See attached map of Ottokar II's realm (from Wikipedia: By Maximilian Dörrbecker (Chumwa) - Own work, usingthis background map by Alexrk2this and this map for the area of influencethis map for the borders of Silesia in that time, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30193831) between 1253 and 1278.1,6,16 He was Duke of Carinthia, Margrave of Carniola between 1269 and 1276.16

Family 1

Margarethe (?) von Babenberg d. 2 Oct 1267

Family 2

"Palczierzik" (?)
Child

Family 3

Kunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz b. 1245, d. 9 Sep 1285
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 223, 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Przemysl Ottokar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020292&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe of Austria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046527&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Margaretadied1267. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 227.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik6.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunhata of Slavonia and Machva: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RostislavMikhailovichdied1263B.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#KunigundaRostislavnadied1285.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 February 2020), memorial page for King Otakar II (1233–26 Aug 1278), Find A Grave Memorial no. 6871805, citing Katedrála svatého Víta Václava a Vojt?cha, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6871805/king-otakar_ii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottokar_II_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S4781] Wikipedie - Otevrená encyklopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, P?emysl Otakar II.: https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C5%99emysl_Otakar_II.. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedie (CZ).
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Przemysl Ottokar II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020292&tree=LEO
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia3.html
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Kunigundedied1321
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Agnesdied1296
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#WenzelIIdied1305

Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland1,2

M, #48321, b. 17 September 1271, d. 21 June 1305
FatherPrzemysl II Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia1,2,3,4 b. 1233, d. 26 Aug 1278
MotherKunigunda Rostislavna (?) of Halicz1,2,5,4 b. 1245, d. 9 Sep 1285
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was born on 17 September 1271.1,6,2,4 He and Judith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland were engaged in 1278; Date of contract.4 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland married Judith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland, daughter of Rudolf I (?) von Habsburg, Holy Roman Emperor and Gertrud/Anna von Hohenberg, on 24 January 1285 at Eger, Hungary (now);
His 1st wife.7,6,2,8,9,10,4 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland and Ryksa Elzbieta (?) of Poland were engaged in July 1300.4,11 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland married Ryksa Elzbieta (?) of Poland, daughter of Przemysl/Przemislaw II (?) King of Poland and Richeza/Rixa (?) of Sweden, on 26 May 1303;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband.2,12,13,4,11
Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland died on 21 June 1305 at Old Town, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now), at age 33; murdered.1,6,2,4
Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was buried after 21 June 1305 at Königsaal, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     17 Sep 1271, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     DEATH     21 Jun 1305 (aged 33), Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Royalty. King of Bohemia and Poland. He was the only surviving son of P?emysl Ottokar II and Kunigunde von Halicz.
     Family Members
     Parents
          King Otakar II 1233–1278
          Kunigunde von Halitsch 1245–1285
     Spouses
          Eliška Rej?ka 1286–1335 (m. 1300)
          Jutta of Habsburg 1271–1297
     Siblings
          Kunigunde of Bohemia 1265–1321
          Agnes of Bohemia 1269–1296
     Children
          Wenceslaus III of Bohemia 1289–1306
          Eliska I of Bohemia 1292–1330
          Agnieszka Przemy?lidka 1305–1337
     BURIAL     Kostel Svatého Jakuba V?tšího, Zbraslav, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Aug 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 96242691.4,14
Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was buried after 21 June 1305 at Cistercian monastery, Zbraslav, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).2


     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Wenceslaus II P?emyslid (Czech: Václav II; Polish: Wac?aw II Czeski; 27 September[2] 1271 – 21 June 1305) was King of Bohemia (1278–1305), Duke of Cracow (1291–1305), and King of Poland (1300–1305).
     "He was the only son of King Ottokar II of Bohemia and Ottokar's second wife Kunigunda.[3] He was born in 1271, ten years after the marriage of his parents. Kunigunda was the daughter of Rostislav Mikhailovich, lord of Slavonia, son of a Grand Prince of Kiev, and Anna of Hungary, daughter of Béla IV of Hungary. His great-grandfather was the German king Philip of Swabia. Wenceslaus II was the grandfather of the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles IV. He was a member of the P?emyslid dynasty.
Early years
     "In 1276 Rudolf I, King of the Romans, placed Ottokar under the ban of the empire and besieged Vienna. This compelled Ottokar in November 1276 to sign a new treaty by which he gave up all claims to Austria and the neighbouring duchies, retaining for himself only Bohemia and Moravia. Ottokar's son Wenceslaus was also betrothed to Rudolph's daughter Judith. It was an uneasy peace. Wenceslaus's father died on 26 August 1278 in the Battle on the Marchfeld shortly before Wenceslaus' seventh birthday.
     "Before Wenceslaus became of age, the government was handled by Otto V, Margrave of Brandenburg, who is said to have held Wenceslaus captive in several locations. He returned to Bohemia in 1283, at the age of twelve. His mother's second husband, Záviš of Falkenštejn, ruled instead of him for a few years.
     "On 24 January 1285, Wenceslaus married Judith of Habsburg, daughter of Rudolf I, to whom he had been betrothed since 1276. In 1290, Wenceslaus had Záviš beheaded for alleged treason and began ruling independently.
King of Bohemia and Poland
     "In 1291, Przemys? II, High Duke of Poland, ceded the sovereign Duchy of Kraków to Wenceslaus. Kraków was associated with the overlordship of Poland, but Przemys? held the other duchies and in 1295 was crowned King of Poland. After Przemys?'s death in 1296, Wenceslaus became overlord of Poland and in 1300, and had himself crowned King of Poland.[4]
Silver in Kutná Hora
     "In 1298, silver was discovered at Kutná Hora in Central Bohemia. Wenceslaus took control of the mine by making silver production a royal monopoly and issued the Prague groschen, which became the most popular of the early Groschen-type coins. Kutná Hora was one of the richest European silver strikes ever: between 1300 and 1340 the mine may have produced as much as 20 tons of silver a year.
     "In 1300, Wenceslaus issued the new royal mining code Ius regale montanorum. This was a legal document that specified all administrative as well as technical terms and conditions necessary for the operation of mines.[5]
The Crown of Hungary and death
     "Queen Judith died in 1297. Wenceslaus' second wife was Elisabeth Richeza, daughter of Przemys? II, King of Poland (1295–1296). Later she remarried to Rudolph of Habsburg, duke of Austria, who also became king of Bohemia for a brief period in those unruly years.
     "In 1301, Wenceslaus' kinsman Andrew III of Hungary died and the Árpád dynasty became extinct in the male line. Wenceslaus was one of the relatives who claimed the throne, and he accepted it from a party of Hungarians on behalf of his young son, betrothed to Andrew's only child, Elizabeth. On 27 August 1301, his son was crowned in Székesfehérvár as King of Hungary under the name Ladislaus V (Hungarian: László,[6] Czech, Slovak and Croatian: Ladislav).
     "At that time the Kingdom of Hungary was split into several de facto principalities, and young Wenceslaus was only accepted as the King of Hungary by the rulers in Upper Hungary (Matthew III Csák), in modern day Burgenland (the Güssings [K?szegis]) and on territory around the capital, Buda. But the Abas and Matthew Csák switched sides in 1303 and started to support Wenceslaus' rival Charles Robert of Anjou. Consequently, the young Wenceslaus, in Ofen (Buda), became afraid and wrote to his father in Prague for help. His father took a large army and invaded Buda, but having considered the situation, he took his son and the Hungarian crown and returned to Bohemia (1304). Ivan K?szegi was named to represent Wenceslaus III in Hungary.
     "Wenceslaus II died on 21 June 1305, at the age of 33,[7] probably of tuberculosis. He was succeeded by his son, Wenceslaus III (Václav III.), the last of the P?emyslid kings in the male line.
Review of government of Wenceslaus II
     "Wenceslaus II is considered as one of the most important Czech Kings. He built a great empire stretching from the Baltic Sea to the Danube river and established numerous cities, such as Plze? in 1295. He won for his family three royal crowns (Bohemia, Hungary and Poland). The Kingdom of Bohemia was the largest producer of silver in Europe in his time. He created the penny of Prague, which was an important European currency for centuries.
     "During his reign, there was great urban development. He planned to build the first university in Central Europe. The power and wealth of the Kingdom of Bohemia gave rise to great respect, but also to the hostility of European royal families. His son King Wenceslaus III was unable to maintain a mighty empire, and soon after the untimely death of Wenceslaus II, his empire began to crumble.[8]
Family
     "In 1285 in Eger (Cheb), he married Judith of Habsburg (1271–1297), daughter of Rudolph I of Germany and his wife Gertrude of Hohenburg.[9] She died shortly after their 10th child was born:
1. P?emysl Otakar (6 May 1288 – 19 November 1288).
2. Wenceslaus III (6 October 1289 – 4 August 1306); King of Bohemia, King of Hungary and King of Poland.
3. Agnes (6 October 1289 – soon after 6 August 1296), twin of Wenceslaus; married in 1296 to Rupert, eldest surviving son of German King Adolf of Nassau.[2]
4. Anne (10 October 1290 – 3 September 1313), married in 1306 to Henry of Carinthia.
5. Elisabeth (20 January 1292 – 28 September 1330), married in 1310 to John of Luxembourg.
6. Guta (3 March 1293 – 3 August 1294).
7. John (26 February 1294 – 1 March 1295).
8. John (21 February 1295 – 6 December 1296).
9. Margaret (21 February 1296 – 8 April 1322), married in 1308 to Boles?aw III the Generous, Duke of Wroc?aw.
10. Guta (born and died 21 May 1297).
     "In 1300, he married Elisabeth Richeza (1286–1335), daughter of Przemys? II. They had one child:
1. Agnes (25 June 1305 – before 4 January 1337), married to Henry I, Duke of Jawor.
     "Wenceslaus has also numerous illegitimate children, including Jan Volek (?? – 27 September 1351), bishop of Olomouc
References
1. "The Royal Route". Královská cesta. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
2. K. Charvátová, Václav II. Král ?eský a polský, Prague 2007, p. 18.
3. Jean W Sedlar, East Central Europe in the Middle Ages, 1000-1500, Vol. III, (University of Washington Press, 1994), 443.
4. Bohemia to the Extinction of the Premyslids, Kamil Krofta, The Cambridge Medieval History: Victory of the Papacy, Vol. VI, ed. J.R. Tanner, C.W. Previt-Orton and Z.N. Brook, (Cambridge University Press, 1957), 440.
5. "Town history". Retrieved 2007-03-07.
6. This name is not recognized in contemporary Hungarian historiography; the king is usually named simply Vencel and the fifth ordinal number is allocated to Ladislaus the Posthumous (V. László)
7. Jones 1995, p. 526.
8. "Václav II. ?eský král".
9. "Bella gerant alii" Laodamia's Sisters, Habsburg Brides: Leaving Home for the Sake of the House, Joseph F. Patrouch, Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities, ed. Anne J. Cruz, Maria Galli Stampino, (Routledge, 2013), 30.
Sources
** Jones, Michael (1995). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 6, C.1300-c.1415. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0521362900."15 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was also known as Waclaw II (?) King of Poland.4

; Per Genealogy.EU: "King VÁCLAV II of Bohemia and Poland (1278-1305), Margrave of Moravia (1278/83-1305), *17.9.1271, +murdered Old Town, Prague 21.6.1305, bur Cistercian monastery, Zbraslav, Prague; 1m: 1287 Jutta von Habsburg (*1271 +18.6.1297); 2m: 26.5.1303/1300 Elzbieta Ryksa of Poland (+18.10.1335.)2" EDV-21. Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was also known as Wenceslas (Vaclav) II (?) King of Hungary and Bohemia.1 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was also known as Wenceslas II (?) King of Bohemia and Poland.16 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was also known as Wenzel II (?) King of Bohemia.4 Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland was also known as Waclaw II Czeski (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "WENZEL of Bohemia, son of OTOKAR P?EMYSL II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunigunde [Kunguta] Rostislavna of Ma?va [Rurikid] (17 Sep 1271-21 Jun 1305, bur Prague Königsaal). The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Cozmæ et Damiani" in 1271 of "Wencezslaus…Rex Boemiæ"[349]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et…domni Wencezlai in regno Boemiæ tutor" confirmed properties of Kloster Goldenkron by charter dated 6 Jan 1281[350]. He succeeded in 1283 as WENZEL II [Václav] King of Bohemia. "Vencezlaus…dominus et hæres regni Boemiæ et marchionatus Moraviæ" confirmed the foundation of Kloster Goldenkron by "domini Otakari quondam regis Boemiæ patris nostri" by charter dated 10 Jan 1284[351]. Rudolf I King of Germany issued a royal declaration 4 Mar 1289 confirming the Bohemian king's right to an electoral vote[352]. King Wenzel sought domination over Poland: he claimed suzerainty over the lands of Heinrich IV "Probus" Duke of Breslau, Prince of Krakow who had been murdered in 1290, obtained from Przemys? II Prince of Greater Poland his renunciation of claims to the duchy of Krakow in 1291, and gained the feudal allegiance of several other Silesian princes. He was accepted by the population as Duke of Krakow and Sandomir, and captured Wladys?aw "Lokietek" and forced him to renounce his claims to the duchy[353]. He was crowned King of Bohemia 2 Jun 1297. In early 1300, he occupied Greater Poland, Pomorze and Kujavia, forcing Wladys?aw "Lokietek" into exile[354]. After obtaining support from Albrecht I King of Germany and arranging his own betrothal to the daughter of the previous Polish king, he was crowned at Gniezno in Sep 1300[355] as WACLAW King of Poland. Pope Boniface VIII ordered him to renounce the title 10 Jun 1302, denying him the right to the crown[356]. The Notæ Altahenses record the death "1305 XIII Kal Iul" of "Wenzeslaus Bohemorum rex"[357]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XI Kal Iul" in 1305 of King Wenzel and his burial "in Aula Regia"[358].
     "m firstly (contract Iglau 1278, Eger 24 Jan 1285) GUTA von Habsburg, daughter of RUDOLF I King of Germany Duke of Austria & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg (13 Mar 1271-Prague 18 Jun 1297, bur Prague St Veit). The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1278 of a daughter of King Rudolf I to "regina Bohemiæ…filius"[359]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiæ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiæ"[360]. The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "circa festum beatæ Gerdrudis" in 1271 of "Dominam Gutam Reginam Boemiæ"[361]. It appears that Guta used her good influence to try to improve relations between her husband and her brother Albrecht I. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XIV Kal Jul" in 1297 of "Domina Guta Regina" in childbirth and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi circa sepulchrum Regis Ottakari"[362].
     "m secondly (betrothed Jul 1300, 26 May 1303) as her first husband, RYKSA EL?BIETA of Poland, daughter of PRZEMYS? I Prince of Poznan, Kalisch and Gniezien [Piast] & his wife Elisabeth von Schlesien [Piast] (1 Sep 1288-Königgrätz 19 Oct 1335, bur Brno, Cistercian Kloster Marienkirche). The Annales Polonorum record the birth "1288 in die sancti Egidii" of a daughter to "ducissa Polonie nomine Richca, uxor ducis Primislii secundi"[363]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Elizabet filia ducis Kalisiensis" as the second wife of "Wenczeslai regis Bohemie"[364]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1300, and the marriage three years later, of King Wenzel and "Elizabeth filia Regis Poloniæ", aged 13[365]. She married secondly (shortly after 8 Sep 1306, maybe 6 Oct 1306) as his second wife, Rudolf III Duke of Austria and Steiermark. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage of "Albertus Rex Romanorum…Rudolphus filius suus" and "Elizabeth relictam Regis Wencezslai"[366]. After Wenzel III King of Bohemia was murdered in 1306, Rudolf’s father forced his succession 18 Jan 1307 as RUDOLF King of Bohemia, at which time he abdicated as Duke of Austria and Steiermark in favour of his younger brother. She [married] thirdly (1319) Heinrich de Lipa. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the relationship in 1319 between "Henricus de Lipa" and "Dominam Elizabeth novercam…Reginæ", adding that they caused much scandal[367].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of King Wenzel's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[349] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11.
[350] Goldenkron, V, p. 21.
[351] Goldenkron, VIII, p. 29.
[352] Bayley (1949), p. 188.
[353] Knoll, P. W. (1972) The Rise of the Polish Monarchy: Piast Poland in East Central Europe 1320-1370 (University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London), p. 18.
[354] Knoll (1972), p. 22.
[355] Knoll (1972), p. 22.
[356] Knoll (1972), p. 24.
[357] Notæ Altahenses 1305, MGH SS XVII, p. 423.
[358] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 68.
[359] Chronicon Colmariense, MGH SS XVII, p. 252.
[360] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28.
[361] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11.
[362] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 54.
[363] Annales Polonorum I 1288, MGH SS XIX, p. 650.
[364] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) Chronicon principum Poloniæ, (“Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I”) I, p. 123.
[365] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 58.
[366] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 73.
[367] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 121-2.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "GUTA (13 Mar 1271-Prague 18 Jun 1297, bur Prague, St Veit’s Cathedral). The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1278 of a daughter of King Rudolf I to "regina Bohemiæ…filius"[411]. The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "circa festum beatæ Gerdrudis" in 1271 of "Dominam Gutam Reginam Boemiæ"[412]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiæ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiæ"[413]. It appears that Guta used her good influence to try to improve relations between her husband and her brother Albrecht I. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XIV Kal Jul" in 1297 of "Domina Guta Regina" in childbirth and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi circa sepulchrum Regis Ottakari"[414].
     "m (Betrothed Iglau 1278, Eger 24 Jan 1285) as his first wife, WENZEL II King of Bohemia, son of OTAKAR P?EMYSL II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunguta [Kunigunde] Rostislavna of Ma?va [Rurikid] (17 Sep 1271-21 Jun 1305, bur Prague Königsaal). King of Poland 1300."
Med Lands cites:
[411] Chronicon Colmariense, MGH SS XVII, p. 252.
[412] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11.
[413] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28.
[414] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 54.10
He was Margrave of Moravia between 1278 and 1305.2 He was King of Bohemia (See attached map from Wikipedia: By WenceslausIImap-cs.png: Mozzanderivative work: Mozzan (talk) - WenceslausIImap-cs.png, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15845812) between 1278 and 1305.1,2,15

; Rule of Wenceslas (Vaclav) II, a boy of seven, for whom Otto of Brandenburg at first acted as regent. He was King of Poland (See attached map from Wikipedia: By WenceslausIImap-cs.png: Mozzanderivative work: Mozzan (talk) - WenceslausIImap-cs.png, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15845812) between 1300 and 1305.1,15 He was King of Hungary (See attached map from Wikipedia: By WenceslausIImap-cs.png: Mozzanderivative work: Mozzan (talk) - WenceslausIImap-cs.png, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15845812) between 1301 and 1304.1

Family 1

Judith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland b. 13 Mar 1271, d. 18 Jun 1297
Children

Family 2

Ryksa Elzbieta (?) of Poland b. 1 Sep 1288, d. 19 Oct 1335
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 223, 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Przemysl Ottokar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020292&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#WenzelIIdied1305. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunigunde of Halicz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020293&tree=LEO
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 262.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Gutadied1297
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#RyskaElzbietadied1335
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ryksa Elzbieta of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026876&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 January 2020), memorial page for Wenzel II of Bohemia (17 Sep 1271–21 Jun 1305), Find A Grave Memorial no. 96242691, citing Kostel Svatého Jakuba V?tšího, Zbraslav, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/96242691/wenzel_ii-of_bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wenceslaus_II_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wenceslas II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020294&tree=LEO
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 227.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004091&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Eliskadied1330
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030747&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Margaretadied1322
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Princess Agnes of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371297&tree=LEO

Vaclav III (Wenceslas) (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary1

M, #48322, b. 6 October 1289, d. 4 August 1306
FatherVaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland2,1 b. 17 Sep 1271, d. 21 Jun 1305
MotherJudith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland1,3 b. 13 Mar 1271, d. 18 Jun 1297
Last Edited20 Jan 2020
     Vaclav III (Wenceslas) (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary was born on 6 October 1289.1 He married Duchess Viola Elisabeth (?) von Schlesien, daughter of Mieszko I (?) Duke of Schlesien in Cieszyn and Auschwitz, on 5 October 1305; her 1st husband.4,1,5
Vaclav III (Wenceslas) (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary died on 4 August 1306 at Olomouc, Czech Republic (now), at age 16.2,1
Vaclav III (Wenceslas) (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary was buried after 4 August 1306 at Cistercian monastery, Zbraslav, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now),

; bur Olomouc, then Cistercian monastery, Zbraslav, Prague.1
     ; King VÁCLAV III of Bohemia and Poland (1305-06), King of Hungary (1301-05) as Vencel -cr 27.8.1301, resigned 9.10.1305, Margrave of Moravia (1305-06), *6.10.1289, +murdered Olomouc 4.8.1306, bur Olomouc, then Cistercian monastery, Zbraslav, Prague; m.1305 Viola of Teschen (+21.9.1317.)1 Vaclav III (Wenceslas) (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary was also known as Wenceslas (Vaclav) III (?) King of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary.2,1 He was King of Hungary, Wenceslas (Vaclav) III. He gave up the claim to Hungary and was murdered while en route to Poland to suppress a revolt of the nobles. End of the Premyslid line. between 1305 and 1306.2,1 He was King of Bohemia and Poland between 1305 and 1306.1

Family

Duchess Viola Elisabeth (?) von Schlesien b. bt 1287 - 1291, d. 21 Sep 1317

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 223, 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast8.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Duchess Viola Elisabeth von Schlesien: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064914&tree=LEO

Anna (?) of Bohemia1,2

F, #48323, b. 15 October 1290, d. 3 September 1313
FatherVaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland1,2 b. 17 Sep 1271, d. 21 Jun 1305
MotherJudith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland2,3 b. 13 Mar 1271, d. 18 Jun 1297
Last Edited20 Jan 2020
     Anna (?) of Bohemia was born on 15 October 1290.2 She married Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol, son of Meinhard IV-II (?) Herzog von Kärnten, Graf von Görz und Tirol and Elisabeth (?) von Bayern, on 13 February 1306; his 1st wife.1,2,4
Anna (?) of Bohemia died on 3 September 1313 at age 22.2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Gorz page (Görz): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/gorz.html

Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol1,2

M, #48324, b. circa 1270, d. circa 4 April 1335
FatherMeinhard IV-II (?) Herzog von Kärnten, Graf von Görz und Tirol3,4,2,5 b. c 1238, d. 1 Nov 1295
MotherElisabeth (?) von Bayern3,6,2,7,8 b. c 1227, d. 9 Oct 1273
Last Edited13 Feb 2020
     Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol was born circa 1270.3 He married Anna (?) of Bohemia, daughter of Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland and Judith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland, on 13 February 1306; his 1st wife.1,9,3 Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol married Adelheid (?) von Brauschweig-Grubenhagen, daughter of Heinrich I (?) Duke of Braunschweig-Grubenhagen and Agnes (?) von Meissen, Landgräfin von Thüringen, on 15 September 1315 at Innsbruck, Austria; his 2nd wife.3,10,2 Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol married Beatrice (?) of Savoy, daughter of Amadeus V "il Grande" (?) Count of Savoy and Aosta, Imperial Vicar of Lombardy and Maria (?) of Brabant, on 8 June 1328; his 3rd wife; Leo van de Pas says m. Feb 1328.11,3,2
Heinrich VI (?) Duke of Carinthia, King of Bohemia, Count of Tirol died circa 4 April 1335.3,2
     ; Heinrich, King of Bohemia (1306)+(1307-10), Duke of Carinthia and Ct of Tirol (1310-35), *ca 1270, +2/4.4.1335; 1m: 13.2.1306 [48323] Anna of Bohemia (*15.10.1290 +3.9.1313); 2m: Innsbruck 1315 Adelheid von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen (*1285 +18.8.1320); 3m: 1328 Beatrix of Savoy (*1310 +20.12.1331.)3

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 182
2. Nachkommen Gorms des Alten 1978. , S. Otto Brenner, Reference: 853.2 He was King of Bohemia between 1306 and 1310.1,3 He was Count of Tirol between 1310 and 1335.3 He was Duke of Carinthia between 1310 and 1335.3

Family 1

Anna (?) of Bohemia b. 15 Oct 1290, d. 3 Sep 1313

Family 3

Beatrice (?) of Savoy b. 1310, d. 20 Dec 1331

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027349&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Gorz page (Görz): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/gorz.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Meinhard V-IV-II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028107&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Meinhard V-IV-II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028107&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bavaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027212&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#ElisabethBayerndied1273. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf3.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy2.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete Maultasch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371300&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Duchess Margarete Maultasch of Kärnten: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00371300&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Gorz page (Görz): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/gorz.html

Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #48325, b. between 20 January 1292 and 4 March 1292, d. 28 September 1330
FatherVaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland1,7,8,5 b. 17 Sep 1271, d. 21 Jun 1305
MotherJudith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland7,9,4,5 b. 13 Mar 1271, d. 18 Jun 1297
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia was born between 20 January 1292 and 4 March 1292 at Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now); Genealogy.EU Bohemia 2 page says b. between 20 Jan and 4 March 1292; Genealogics and Med Lands say b. 20 Jan 1292.7,4,5 She married Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia, son of Heinrich IV/VII (?) Holy Roman Emperor, Graf von Luxembourg and Margarethe (?) of Brabant, on 1 September 1310 at Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany;
His 1st wife; Genealogics says m. 31 Aug 1310; Med Lands says m. 30 Aug 1310.1,7,10,4,5,11,12
Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia died on 28 September 1330 at Vysehrad (Prague), Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).7,4,5
Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia was buried after 28 September 1330 at Kostel Svatého Jakuba Vetšího, Zbraslav, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     20 Jan 1292, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     DEATH     28 Sep 1330 (aged 38)
     Germanic Monarch. She was the Queen of Bohemia, daughter of king Wenceslaus II and Jutta von Habsburg. She was wife of John of Luxemburg, and mother of king of Bohemia Charles IV. Bio by: MC
     Family Members
     Parents
          Wenzel II of Bohemia 1271–1305
          Jutta of Habsburg 1271–1297
     Spouse
          John of Luxembourg 1296–1346
     Siblings
          Wenceslaus III of Bohemia 1289–1306
     Half Siblings
          Agnieszka Przemy?lidka 1305–1337
     Children
          Margarethe of Bohemia 1313–1341
          Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
          Charles IV of Bohemia 1316–1378
          Otokar of Bohemia 1318–1320
          Anna of Bohemia 1319–1338
          Johann Heinrich of Bohemia 1322–1375
          Elisabeth of Bohemia 1323–1323
     BURIAL     Kostel Svatého Jakuba V?tšího, Zbraslav, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: MC
     Added: 20 Nov 2005
     Find a Grave Memorial 12419011.13
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 25.
2. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1991 485.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.2:178.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; Per Genealogics:
     “Elisabeth of Bohemia was born on 20 January 1292, the daughter of Wenceslas II, king of Bohemia and Poland, and Guta (Bona) von Habsburg. Elisabeth's mother died when she was five years old. Of Guta's ten children only four lived to adulthood: Wenceslaus, Anna, Elisabeth and Margarete. Elisabeth and her siblings also had a half-sister Agnes from their father's second marriage to Ryksa Elzbieta of Poland from the Piast dynasty. With this marriage he gained the crown of Poland.
     “Several notable events occurred during Elisabeth's youth: a devastating fire at Prague Castle in 1303, the death of her father and the assassination of her brother Wenceslaus. Elisabeth was orphaned by the age of thirteen and lived with her sister Anna. Her sister Margarete had been married at the age of seven to Boleslaw III 'the Generous', Herzog von Breslau, Liegnitz und Brieg, after he had come to the court of Bohemia with his mother Elisabeth von Kalisch. Elisabeth went to live with her aunt Kunigunde of Bohemia in a convent near Prague Castle. In the absence of her mother she was strongly influenced by her aunt.
     “Her sister-in-law Viola Elisabeth von Schlesien (Cieszyn) as well as her step-mother Ryksa Elzbieta of Poland came to live with Anna and Elisabeth until the relationship between the sisters deteriorated.
     “In 1306, after the murder of Elisabeth's brother Wenceslaus, Elisabeth's brother-in-law Heinrich VI, Herzog von Kärnten, Anna's husband, became king of Bohemia. Elisabeth was now the only single princess in the family. She was fourteen, a good age to marry, and she became one of the key players in the power disputes over the kingdom of Bohemia.
     “The quarrels over the Bohemian throne between Heinrich of Bohemia and Rudolf III von Habsburg resulted in Rudolf taking Bohemia and marrying Ryksa Elisabeth of Poland (Elisabeth's stepmother). Elisabeth went to live in Prague Castle with her brother's widow Viola Elisabeth von Schlesien. However in 1307 the throne returned to her brother-in-law and sister, following Rudolf's death. For political reasons they wanted Elisabeth to marry the lord of Bergova (Otto von Lobdaburg). Elisabeth refused to marry Otto, which led to a falling out between Elisabeth and Anna. An opposition group formed against Heinrich and Anna, with Elisabeth as its figurehead.
     “In Spiers on 31 August 1310, Elisabeth married Johann of Luxembourg, the son of Emperor Heinrich VII and Margarethe of Brabant. Johann had invaded Bohemia, and Heinrich and Anna fled to Carinthia, where Anna died in 1313. The coronation of Johann and Elisabeth took place on 7 February 1311.
     “The marriage initially was a disaster. Elisabeth needed to give birth to a son to forestall the inheritance of the descendants of her sisters Margarete and Agnes. She did not have a son until six years into the marriage, when she gave birth to Karl IV, the future Holy Roman Emperor. In all they had seven children of whom two sons and two daughters would have progeny.
     “Elisabeth grew increasingly jealous of Johann, who had listened to her but whose political views differed. In 1319 a plot was uncovered which had planned to dispose of Elisabeth and Johann and replace them with their eldest son Karl. Johann had the culprits punished, but Elisabeth locked herself away at Melnik Castle and took her children with her.
     “To prevent his wife from interfering in the education of their children, Johann took the three eldest children, Margarete, Judith and Karl, away from her. Totally isolated and abandoned by all, Elisabeth left Bohemia in 1323 and lived in exile in Bavaria. There she gave birth to her last children, twin daughters Anna and Elisabeth. Johann sent Elisabeth funds during her exile.
     “When Elisabeth returned to Bohemia in 1325 she was ill, but she lived for another five years. She died in Prague to tuberculosis on 28 September 1330, aged thirty eight.”.4

; This is the same person as:
”Elizabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330)” at Wikipedia, as
”Élisabeth de Bohême (1292-1330)” at Wikipédia (FR),
and as ”Eliška P?emyslovna” at Wikipedia (CZ).14,15,6

; Per Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 2): “F7. Elizabeth, *Prague 20.1./4.3.1292, +Vysehrad 28.9.1330; m.Speyer 1.9.1310 Duke Johann of Luxemburg (*10.8.1296 +26.8.1346); Bohemia was inherited by their descendants”.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "ELISKA [Elisabeth] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal). The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Fabiani et Sebastiani" in 1292 of "Elizabeth filia" to King Wenzel and his wife[379]. The Chronicon Francisci records that "sororem suam Elizabeth" returned the body of "Wencezslaus Boemiæ, Ungariæ et Poloniæ Rex" for reburial after he was killed[380]. The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiæ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[381]. The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiæ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[382]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth"[383]. Her marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[384]. Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[385].
     "m (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) as his first wife, JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred 1346 to Luxembourg St Marie). He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311. Titular King of Poland. He succeeded his father 1313 as Comte de Luxembourg."
Med Lands cites:
[379] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12.
[380] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[381] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[382] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7.
[383] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79.
[384] Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[385] Gade, J. A. (1951) Luxemburg in the Middle Ages (Leiden), pp. 136-7.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame). The Chronicon Francisci names "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius" when recording his marriage[402]. He was raised in France from [1305]. He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311 at Prague. He was named Vicar General of the empire by his father in 1312. He continued to claim the Polish throne after his accession as Bohemian king, as successor to King Václav II. He succeeded his father in 1313 as JEAN Comte de Luxembourg, but confided the government of the county to his uncle Baudouin Archbishop of Trier[403]. His appointment of German officials in Bohemia triggered the discontent of the Bohemian nobles, headed by Henry of Lipa who was imprisoned. King Jan absented himself from Bohemia to support Emperor Ludwig in his war against Friedrich Duke of Austria, leaving his wife as regent[404]. King Jan invaded Silesia in early 1327 and imposed Bohemian suzerainty on most of the Silesian dukes between 1327 and 1329[405]. Peace with Poland was reached at Tren?in 24 Aug 1335 under which King Jan renounced his claim to the Polish crown and Kazimierz III King of Poland recognised Bohemian suzerainty over Silesia[406]. He was named Captain General and Lieutenant of the King of France in Languedoc at Estrepilly after 30 Nov 1338. He was created Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvres by the king of France. A failed operation to restore his failing sight left him completely blind in 1340[407]. The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the death "in Anglia…in vigilia sancti Rufi" in 1346 of "Rex Iohannes"[408].
     "m firstly (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) ELISKA [Elisabeth] of Bohemia, daughter of WENZEL II King of Bohemia & his first wife Guta of Austria [Habsburg] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal). The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiæ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[409]. The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiæ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[410]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth "[411]. This marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[412]. Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[413]. The necrology of Raitenhaslach records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Elisabeth regine Bohemie"[414].
     "m secondly (contract Château du Bois de Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335) as her first husband, BEATRIX de Bourbon, daughter of LOUIS de Clermont Duc de Bourbon, Comte de Clermont & his wife Marie de Hainaut [Avesnes] (-Danvillers 15 Dec 1383, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. She married secondly (Grandvillers en Lorraine [1347]) as his second wife, Eudes [VI] Seigneur de Grancey.
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of King Jan's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[402] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[403] Gade (1951), p. 136.
[404] Gade (1951), p. 136.
[405] Knoll (1972), pp. 61-2.
[406] Knoll (1972), p. 73.
[407] Gade (1951), pp. 153-4, and Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[408] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 451.
[409] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[410] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7.
[411] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79.
[412] Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[413] Gade (1951), pp. 136-7.
[414] Necrologium Raitenhaslacense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 260.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 9): “C1. Ct JEAN of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia (1310-46) =Jan, cr 7.2.1311, *Luxemburg 10.8.1296, +k.a.Crécy 26.8.1346; 1m: Speyer 1.9.1310 Elisabeth=Eliska of Bohemia (*20.1.1292 +28.9.1330); 2m: XII.1334 Beatrix de Bourbon (*1320 +23.12.1383)”.10

Family

Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia b. 10 Aug 1296, d. 26 Aug 1346
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004091&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Eliskadied1330. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4781] Wikipedie - Otevrená encyklopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Eliška P?emyslovna: https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eli%C5%A1ka_P%C5%99emyslovna. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedie (CZ).
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004091&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guta (Bona) von Habsburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020295&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean|Johann 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004090&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#JanIdied1346
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 16 July 2020), memorial page for “Elisabeth” Eliska I of Bohemia (20 Jan 1292–28 Sep 1330), Find a Grave Memorial no. 12419011, citing Kostel Svatého Jakuba V?tšího, Zbraslav, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12419011. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_Bohemia_(1292%E2%80%931330). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Élisabeth de Bohême (1292-1330): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89lisabeth_de_Boh%C3%AAme_(1292-1330). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028604&tree=LEO
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 263.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonne_of_Luxembourg
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Juttadied1349
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007881&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ottokar of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028607&tree=LEO
  23. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 73: Austria - House of the Hapsburgs in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028599&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann Heinrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00152824&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028608&tree=LEO

Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia1,2,3,4,5

M, #48326, b. 10 August 1296, d. 26 August 1346
FatherHeinrich IV/VII (?) Holy Roman Emperor, Graf von Luxembourg6,4,5,7,8,9 b. bt 12 Jul 1274 - 1275, d. 24 Aug 1313
MotherMargarethe (?) of Brabant6,4,5,7,9,10 b. 4 Oct 1276, d. 14 Dec 1311
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia was born on 10 August 1296 at Luxembourg.3,11,4,5 He married Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia, daughter of Vaclav (Wenceslas) II (?) King of Hungary, Bohemia & Poland and Judith/Gutta/Jutta/Bona (?) of Hapsburg, Queen Consort of bohemia & Poland, on 1 September 1310 at Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany;
His 1st wife; Genealogics says m. 31 Aug 1310; Med Lands says m. 30 Aug 1310.1,12,4,13,14,5,7 Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia married Beatrice de Bourbon Queen of Bohemia, daughter of Louis I "le Boiteux" (?) Duc de Bourbon, Cte de Clermont, de la March et de Castres and Marie (?) of Holland and Hainault, in December 1334 at Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband. Med Lands says "contract Château du Bois de Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335."11,4,15,5,7,16,17
Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia died on 26 August 1346 at Battle of Crécy, Crecy-en-Ponthieu, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France (now), at age 50; killed in battle.18,3,11,4,5,7,19
Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia was buried after 26 August 1346 at Cathedral of Our Lady, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     10 Aug 1296, Luxembourg
     DEATH     26 Aug 1346 (aged 50), Crecy-en-Ponthieu, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France
     King of Bohemia, Count of Luxembourg. Born Jean de Luxembourg, the only son of Henri VII de Luxembourg, Holy Roman Emperor and Marguerite de Brabant. In 1310, he married Elisabeth of Bohemia, and succeeded to the titles of Comte de Luxembourg and King of Bohemia. He was also the titular King of Poland. Resented as a perceived foreigner, he gave up administration of Bohemia to travel, fighting against against the duke of Brabant; he also led the knights of the Teutonic Order against Lithuania and Pomerania. He attacked the Poles and brought Silesia under his control. He obtained Tyrol by marrying his eldest son their heiress, and assisted the emperor in the defeat and capture Frederick the Fair at the battle of Miihldorf in 1322. After 1333, King Casimir III of Poland exchanged all claims to Silesia in exchange for John's waiver of the Polish throne. Widowed, he married a second time in 1334 to Beatrice de Bourbon. He allied himself with the kings of Hungary and Poland, fought against the emperor and his Austrian allies, in 1337 he allied with Phillipe VI France and served as governor of Languedoc from 1338 to 1340 at about which time his vision failed. Apparently, his activities slowed little, and he secured the election of his son, Charles, Margrave of Moravia, as German king, in July 1346. He then journeyed to France to assist Philippe of France against the English. He fought at the battle of Crécy, the bridles from a pair of his knight's horses to tied to his horse so that the blind king could be led into the battle where he was killed at age 50. His body was found and taken to Montreuil for burial. Charles, his son by his first wife, became the King of Bohemia and eventually, Holy Roman Emperor. His son by his second wife, Wenceslas, succeeded as Duc de Luxembourg. In 1946 his remains were removed from Crécy and taken to Luxembourg where they were interred in the Cathedral of Our Lady. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich VII of Luxemburg 1274–1313
          Marguerite de Brabant 1276–1311
     Spouses
          Eliska I of Bohemia 1292–1330
          Béatrice de Bourbon 1320–1383
     Siblings
          Maria of Luxembourg 1304–1324
          Beatrix of Luxembourg 1305–1319 (m. 1318)
     Children
          Margarethe of Bohemia 1313–1341
          Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
          Charles IV of Bohemia 1316–1378
          Otokar of Bohemia 1318–1320
          Anna of Bohemia 1319–1338
          Johann Heinrich of Bohemia 1322–1375
          Elisabeth of Bohemia 1323–1323
          Wenzel I of Luxemburg 1337–1383
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Our Lady, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 23 Feb 2001
     Find a Grave Memorial 20422.19
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ELISKA [Elisabeth] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal). The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Fabiani et Sebastiani" in 1292 of "Elizabeth filia" to King Wenzel and his wife[379]. The Chronicon Francisci records that "sororem suam Elizabeth" returned the body of "Wencezslaus Boemiæ, Ungariæ et Poloniæ Rex" for reburial after he was killed[380]. The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiæ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[381]. The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiæ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[382]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth"[383]. Her marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[384]. Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[385].
     "m (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) as his first wife, JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred 1346 to Luxembourg St Marie). He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311. Titular King of Poland. He succeeded his father 1313 as Comte de Luxembourg."
Med Lands cites:
[379] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12.
[380] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[381] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[382] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7.
[383] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79.
[384] Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[385] Gade, J. A. (1951) Luxemburg in the Middle Ages (Leiden), pp. 136-7.14


; Per Genealogics:
     “Johann 'the Blind', king of Bohemia, was born on 10 August 1296, the eldest son of Emperor Heinrich VII and Margaretha of Brabant. He was French by education, but deeply involved in the politics of Germany. On 31 August 1310 he married Elisabeth of Bohemia, heiress of Bohemia, daughter of Wenceslas II, king of Bohemia and Poland, and sister of Wenceslas III, king of Hungary, Bohemia and Poland, of the Premyslid dynasty. He thereby became king of Bohemia and hence one of the seven prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire.
     “In the face of hostility by the Czech nobility, Johann gave up the administration of Bohemia and embarked on a life of travel, spending time in Luxembourg and the French court. In the struggle between Austria and Bavaria for the imperial crown, he gained a victory for the Bavarians at Mühldorf in 1322. In 1333-1335 he was warring in Italy for the Guelph party. His travels took him to Silesia, Poland, Lithuania, Tyrol, Northern Italy, Papal Avignon, and Languedoc, where he was governor from 30 November 1338 to November 1340. In 1340 he lost his eyesight from opthalmia, while crusading in Lithuania with the Teutonic order.
     “Johann and Elisabeth had seven children, of whom four would have progeny. He retained his crown even after Elisabeth's death in 1330. In December 1334 he married Beatrice de Bourbon, daughter of Louis I, duc de Bourbon, comte de Clermont and Marie of Holland and Hainault. They had a son Wenzel who would have progeny.
     “Johann was killed while fighting alongside the French against the English at the Battle of Crécy on 26 August 1346. The chronicler Froissart left the following account of Johann's last actions:
     “'...for all that he was nigh blind, when he understood the order of the battle, he said to them about him: 'Where is the lord Charles my son?' His men said: 'Sir, we cannot tell; we think he be fighting.' Then he said: 'Sirs, ye are my men, my companions and friends in this journey: I require you bring me so far forward, that I may strike one stroke with my sword.' They said they would do his commandment, and to the intent that they should not lose him in the press, they tied all their reins of their bridles each to other and set the king before to accomplish his desire, and so they went on their enemies. The lord Charles of Bohemia his son, who wrote himself king of Almaine and bare the arms, he came in good order to the battle; but when he saw that the matter went awry on their party, he departed, I cannot tell you which way. The king his father was so far forward that he strake a stroke with his sword, yea and more than four, and fought valiantly and so did his company; and they adventured themself so forward, that they were all slain, and the next day they were found in the place about the king, and all their horses tied to each other.'

     “After the battle, legend states that Johann's personal crest (a pair of black wings) and motto _Ich dien_ ('I serve') were adopted in slightly modified form by Edward, the Black Prince, and since then they have been part of the badge of the Prince of Wales. Johann was succeeded as king of Bohemia by his eldest son Karl (later Karl IV, Holy Roman Emperor). In Luxembourg, he was succeeded by Wenzel, his son by his second wife.”.5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 25.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 28.
3. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1991 485.
4. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:82.
5. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.5
Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia was also known as Jean «L’Aveugle» (?) Roi de Bohême, comte de Luxembourg. Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia was also known as Johann "the Blind" King of Bohemia.20

; This is the same person as:
”John of Bohemia (1292–1330)” at Wikipedia, as
”Jean Ier de Bohême (1292-1330)” at Wikipédia (FR),
and as ”Jan Lucemburský” at Wikipedia (CZ).21,22,23

; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame). The Chronicon Francisci names "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius" when recording his marriage[402]. He was raised in France from [1305]. He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311 at Prague. He was named Vicar General of the empire by his father in 1312. He continued to claim the Polish throne after his accession as Bohemian king, as successor to King Václav II. He succeeded his father in 1313 as JEAN Comte de Luxembourg, but confided the government of the county to his uncle Baudouin Archbishop of Trier[403]. His appointment of German officials in Bohemia triggered the discontent of the Bohemian nobles, headed by Henry of Lipa who was imprisoned. King Jan absented himself from Bohemia to support Emperor Ludwig in his war against Friedrich Duke of Austria, leaving his wife as regent[404]. King Jan invaded Silesia in early 1327 and imposed Bohemian suzerainty on most of the Silesian dukes between 1327 and 1329[405]. Peace with Poland was reached at Tren?in 24 Aug 1335 under which King Jan renounced his claim to the Polish crown and Kazimierz III King of Poland recognised Bohemian suzerainty over Silesia[406]. He was named Captain General and Lieutenant of the King of France in Languedoc at Estrepilly after 30 Nov 1338. He was created Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvres by the king of France. A failed operation to restore his failing sight left him completely blind in 1340[407]. The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the death "in Anglia…in vigilia sancti Rufi" in 1346 of "Rex Iohannes"[408].
     "m firstly (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) ELISKA [Elisabeth] of Bohemia, daughter of WENZEL II King of Bohemia & his first wife Guta of Austria [Habsburg] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal). The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiæ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[409]. The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiæ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[410]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth "[411]. This marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[412]. Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[413]. The necrology of Raitenhaslach records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Elisabeth regine Bohemie"[414].
     "m secondly (contract Château du Bois de Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335) as her first husband, BEATRIX de Bourbon, daughter of LOUIS de Clermont Duc de Bourbon, Comte de Clermont & his wife Marie de Hainaut [Avesnes] (-Danvillers 15 Dec 1383, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. She married secondly (Grandvillers en Lorraine [1347]) as his second wife, Eudes [VI] Seigneur de Grancey.
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of King Jan's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[402] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[403] Gade (1951), p. 136.
[404] Gade (1951), p. 136.
[405] Knoll (1972), pp. 61-2.
[406] Knoll (1972), p. 73.
[407] Gade (1951), pp. 153-4, and Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[408] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 451.
[409] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7.
[410] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7.
[411] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79.
[412] Leuschner (1980), p. 104.
[413] Gade (1951), pp. 136-7.
[414] Necrologium Raitenhaslacense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 260.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 9): “C1. Ct JEAN of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia (1310-46) =Jan, cr 7.2.1311, *Luxemburg 10.8.1296, +k.a.Crécy 26.8.1346; 1m: Speyer 1.9.1310 Elisabeth=Eliska of Bohemia (*20.1.1292 +28.9.1330); 2m: XII.1334 Beatrix de Bourbon (*1320 +23.12.1383)”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "BEATRIX de Clermont (-Danvillers 25 Dec 1383, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). Her father gave her Creil as dowry for her first marriage. After her second marriage, she retained the title "Queen of Bohemia". "Jeanne de Bourbon comtesse de Forez" donated to “Louis duc de Bourbonnais son neveu” all her rights in the succession of “sa sœur Béatrix de Bourbon jadis reine de Bohême” in the “comté de Chiny qu’ailleurs hors du royaume de France” by charter dated 8 Aug 1394[167]. Betrothed (contract Paris 29 May 1321) to PHILIPPE di Tarento, Despot of Romania, son of PHILIPPE of Sicily Principe di Tarento [Anjou] & his first wife Thamar [Caterina] Angela Comnena Despota of Epirus (1297-17 May 1330).
     "m firstly (contract Château du Bois de Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335) as his second wife, JAN King of Bohemia, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame).
     "m secondly (Grandvillers en Lorraine [1347]) as his second wife, EUDES [VI] Seigneur de Grancey, son of EUDES [V] Seigneur de Grancey & his wife Isabelle de Blâmont (-27 Jul 1389)."
Med Lands cites:
[167] Huillard-Bréholles (1874), Tome II, 3969, p. 68.17


; Per Racines et Histoire (Duché de Bourbon ): “Béatrix de Bourbon dite «Reine de Bohème» ° 1314 + 25/12/1383 (Danvillers) dame de Creil fiancée (c.m.) 29/05/1321, Paris) à Philippe de Tarente, Despote de Romanie ° 1297 + 17/05/1330 (fils de Philippe de Sicile-Anjou, et de Thamar (Caterina) Angela Comnena, Despote d’Epire)
     ép. 1) (c.m.) 12/1334 (Vincennes) (disp. 09/01/1335, Avignon) Jean «L’Aveugle» ° 10/08/1296 (Luxembourg) +X 26/08/1346 (Crécy), Roi de Bohême (1310-1346) (fils d’Henri VII, comte de Luxembourg puis Empereur, et de Marguerite de Brabant)
     ép. 2) ~1347 (Grandvillers, Lorraine) Eudes II de Grancey + après 27/07/1380 (1389 ?) seigneur de Grancey et de Pierrepont (fils d’Eudes 1er et d’Isabelle de Blamont) ”.24

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 22): “B8. Beatrix, *1320, +Danvillers 23.12.1383; 1m: Vincennes 1334 Jean of Luxembourg, King of Bohemia (+1346); 2m: ca 1347 Eudes II de Grancey (+1389)”.15 He was King of Bohemia
See attache map of land ruled by Jean/John (from Wikipedia: By Unknown author - František Kurfürst: Vále?né d?jiny ?eskoslovenské, Šolc a Šimá?ek, Praha, 1937, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8042015) between 1310 and 1346.6,4,20,21,25

Family 1

Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia b. bt 20 Jan 1292 - 4 Mar 1292, d. 28 Sep 1330
Children

Family 2

Children

Family 3

Beatrice de Bourbon Queen of Bohemia b. c 1320, d. 23 Dec 1383
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean|Johann 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004090&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 263.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#JanIdied1346. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012411&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Katharinadied1323
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe of Brabant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012412&tree=LEO
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004091&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Eliskadied1330
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourbon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002162&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#BeatrixClermontdied1383
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 227, 244.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 16 July 2020), memorial page for John of Luxembourg (10 Aug 1296–26 Aug 1346), Find a Grave Memorial no. 20422, citing Cathedral of Our Lady, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/20422. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann 'the Blind': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004090&tree=LEO
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  22. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Jean Ier de Bohême: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Ier_de_Boh%C3%AAme. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  23. [S4781] Wikipedie - Otevrená encyklopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Jan Lucemburský: https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Lucembursk%C3%BD. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedie (CZ).
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison & Duché de Bourbon, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-duche.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  25. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Bohemia#/media/File:N%C3%A1b%C4%9Bh_Jana_Lucembursk%C3%A9ho_k_zalo%C5%BEen%C3%AD_%C4%8Desk%C3%A9_velmoci_v_druh%C3%A9_t%C5%99etin%C4%9B_stolet%C3%AD_XIV.jpg
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028604&tree=LEO
  27. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonne_of_Luxembourg
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Juttadied1349
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007881&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ottokar of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028607&tree=LEO
  32. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 73: Austria - House of the Hapsburgs in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028599&tree=LEO
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann Heinrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00152824&tree=LEO
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028608&tree=LEO
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wenzel von Luxemburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148831&tree=LEO

Francois I (?) Duc de Lorraine1,2

M, #48327, b. 1517, d. 12 June 1545
FatherAntoine II "the Good" (?) Duc de Lorraine2 b. 4 Jun 1489, d. 14 Jun 1544
MotherRenee de Bourbon Dame de Mercoeur2 b. 1494, d. 26 May 1539
Last Edited28 May 2004
     Francois I (?) Duc de Lorraine was born in 1517 at Nancy, Lorraine, France (now).1,3 He married Christina (?) of Denmark, daughter of Christian II (?) King of Denmark and Sweden, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein and Isabella (?) Archduchess of Austria, on 10 July 1541 at Brussels, Belgium (now).1,3,4
Francois I (?) Duc de Lorraine died on 12 June 1545 at Remiremont/Plombiéres, France (now).1,3
Francois I (?) Duc de Lorraine was buried after 12 June 1545 at Convent des Cordeliers, Nancy, France (now).3


     He was Duke of Lorraine.1

; Duke François I of Lorraine (1544-45), *Nancy 1517, +Remiremont/Plombiéres 12.6.1545, bur Nancy, Convent des Cordeliers; m.Brussels 10.7.1541 *[48936] Pss Christine of Denmark (*1521 +10.12.1590.)3

Family

Christina (?) of Denmark b. 1521, d. 10 Dec 1590
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 19: Denmark and Norway - House of Oldenburg until the eighteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine4.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 38 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet38.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Oldenburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/oldenburg/oldenburg2.html

Sara van der Vlucht1

F, #48328, b. before 1636, d. before 6 November 1687
Last Edited14 Mar 2002
     Sara van der Vlucht married Jan Tibaut.1 Sara van der Vlucht was born before 1636.1
Sara van der Vlucht died before 6 November 1687.1

Family

Jan Tibaut b. b 1636

William Waldron1

M, #48329, b. circa 20 September 1589, d. before 1639
FatherJohn Waldron b. c 1560, d. 1609/10
MotherJoan (?)1 d. 1610
ChartsAncestors - John M. Jones, III
ReferenceGKJ9
Last Edited22 Feb 2003
     William Waldron was born circa 20 September 1589 at Goodworth Clatford Parish, co. Hampshire, England.1 He married Ruth Walker, daughter of Edward Walker, after 29 August 1615 at Amsterdam, Netherlands.2
William Waldron died before 1639 at Amsterdam, Netherlands.1
     ; Per Richardson:
     "Douglas Richardson Mar 26, 2006, 11:58:40 AM
     "Duke Heinrich of Bavaria & Saxony (nicknamed the Lion), died 1195, referred in a charter dated before ?1190 to his late kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, founder of Marienthal monastery ["... quam pie memorie Frithericus palatinus, fundator ipsius coenobii, cognatus noster") [Reference: Die Urkunden Heinrichs des Löwen Herzogs von Sachsen und Bayern (Monumenta Germaniae Historica, 500-1500) (1941): 181-182].
     "Charting their respective ancestries, I find that three of Count Friedrich II's great-grandparents are unknown, which makes it difficult at best to be certain how the two men were related. Regardless, I find that one of Count Friedrich's great-grandparents, Bernard II, Count of Hövel, was in fact uncle to the ancestral line of Duke Heinrich. If this is the kinship intended, the two men were related in the 4th and 7th degrees of kindred, or if you prefer third cousins thrice removed, by virtue of common descent from Gerbege (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, but by different husbands, as charted below.
1. Gerberga (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (2nd) Herman II, Duke of Swabia.
2. Gisele of Swabia, married Bruno II, Count of Brunswick.
3. Liudolf, Count of Brunswick, died 1038.
4. Egbert, Count of Brunswick, died 1067/68.
5. Gertrud of Brunswick, married Heinrich, Count Northeim, Duke of Saxony.
6. Richensa of Northeim, Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor.
7. Gertrud of Lotharinia, married Henry X, Duke of Bavaria & Saxony.
8. Heinrich "the Lion," Duke of Bavaria and Saxony, died 1195.

1. Gerberge (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (1st) Bernard I, Count of Werl.
2. Bernard II, Count of Hövel, died after 1030.
3. Ida von Werl-Hövel, married Heinrich II, Count of Lauffen.
4. Adelheid of Lauffen, married (2nd) Friedrich I, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg.
5. Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, died 1162.

     "For additional information on Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg (died 1162), see the following website:
http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/sommerschenburger_pfalzgrafen_von_sachsen/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_1162/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_+_1162.html
     "This post is part of a systematic, exhaustive study into the nature of kinship among high born medieval European families.
     "Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
     "Website: www.royalancestry.net“.3

; "See: Jan, Apr and July issues of 1995 New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, "The European Origin and Ancestry of Joseph and Resolved Waldron" by Douglas Richardson. (fully sourced and contains much information about the family, including Resolved's parents (Willam Waldron baptised 20 Sept. 1589 in Hampshire England and Ruth Walker) and grandparents (John Waldron/Walderne b. ca 1560 Eng. and Joan). The author has provided many primary documents detailing the lives of William Waldron and his father John." Source: Lorine McG. Schulze, The Olive Tree Genealogy [http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com], posted above at DCML.1 GKJ-9.

Family

Ruth Walker b. 1595, d. b 1639
Children

Citations

  1. [S1225] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=joanfran, Joan Scholl Francis (unknown location), downloaded updated 13 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=joanfran&id=I06394
  2. [S1225] e-mail address, updated 13 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=joanfran&id=I07777
  3. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 27 Mar 2006: "Ducal Kinsfolk: Duke Henry of Bavaria & Saxony's kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ) to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006."
  4. [S1225] e-mail address, updated 13 March 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=joanfran&id=I01548

Ruth Walker1

F, #48330, b. 1595, d. before 1639
FatherEdward Walker2
ChartsAncestors - John M. Jones, III
ReferenceGKJ9
Last Edited22 Aug 2002
     Ruth Walker was born in 1595 at Market Overton, Rutland, England.1 She married William Waldron, son of John Waldron and Joan (?), after 29 August 1615 at Amsterdam, Netherlands.1
Ruth Walker died before 1639 at Amsterdam, Netherlands.1
     GKJ-9.

Family

William Waldron b. c 20 Sep 1589, d. b 1639
Children