Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev1

M, #6841, b. between 877 and 879, d. between 945 and 947
FatherRyurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod1,2 b. c 835, d. 879
MotherEfenda (?) of Novgorod1 b. 850, d. bt 880 - 944
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited28 Dec 2019
     Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev was born between 877 and 879.1,2,3 He married Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev between 930 and 935; Per Med Lands: "m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903[29]. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40]..."4,5,1,2,3
Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev died between 945 and 947 at near Iskorosten; killed; Weis [AR7] line line 241-2 says d. 947; Rurik 1 page says d. 945/946; Genealogics says d. 945.5,1,2
     Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev
Ingvar/Igor "the Old", konung of Novgorod and Kiev (912-945/6), *877, +killed nr Iskorosten 945/946; m.St.Helga/Olga (Vologa) of Pskov (*ca 903 +969), regent in Kiev (945-964)), she was baptised in Constantinople and received the name Elena.1 GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:128.2


Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev
Per Genealogics:
     "Igor was born about 875, the son of Ryurik, duke of Novgorod. With his wife Olga he had a son Svjatoslav I Igorjevitch who would succeed his father as grand duke of Kiev.
     "Information about Igor comes mostly from the _Primary Chronicle,_ which nominates 912 as the start of his reign. However, by drastically revising its chronology, Constantine Zuckerman argues that Igor actually reigned for three years, between summer 941 and his death in early 945. He explains the epic 33-year span of his reign in the Chronicle by its author's faulty interpretation of Byzantine sources.
     "Indeed none of Igor's activities are recorded in the Chronicle prior to 941. He twice besieged Constantinople, in 941 and 944, and in spite of part of his fleet being destroyed by Greek fire, concluded with the emperor a favourable treaty whose text is preserved in the Chronicle. In 913 and 944 the Rus' plundered the Arabs in the Caspian Sea during the Caspian expeditions of the Rus', but it is not clear whether Igor had anything to do with these campaigns.
     "Igor was killed while collecting tribute from the Drevlians in 945. They had bent down two birch trees to the prince's feet and tied them to his legs; then they let the trees straighten again, thus tearing the prince's body apart. The _Primary Chronicle_ blames his death on his own excessive greed, indicating that he was attempting to collect tribute a second time in a month. His death was avenged spectacularly by his widow Olga as regent of Kiev, but she changed the system of tribute gathering _(poliudie)_ in what may be regarded as the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe.2 Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev was also known as Igor (?) Grand Prince of Kiev.

Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev
Per Med Lands: "IGOR [Ingvar] ([877/79] or [910/20]-killed Iskorosten [=Korosten] [944/46], bur Dereva near Iskorosten). The Primary Chronicle names Igor as son of Rurik, adding that he was "very young" at his father´s death[19]. This suggests a birth date in [877/79] for consistency with the report about his supposed father´s death in the same source. However, the chronology of Igor´s son Sviatoslav, which is more robust as shown below, suggests that it is more likely that Igor was born in [910/20]. The Primary Chronicle records that Igor succeeded (his relative) Oleg in 912[20], but this chronology is also difficult to sustain. It is probably more accurate to suggest that Igor was established at Kiev by the end of the 930s[21]. The existence of Igor as a historical figure is nevertheless corroborated: Liudprand of Cremona records that "rex…Inger" came to Constantinople, during the reign of Emperor Romanos I, with "mille et eo amplius navibus"[22] (dated to 941 by Franklin & Shepard[23]), and the De administrando imperio names his son "Sphendosthlabus Ingor Russiæ principis filius"[24]. Franklin & Shepard also refer to an apparently corroborating Khazar text, in which the leader is named 'H-L-G-W' [=Oleg?] and is said to have died in the Caspian region[25]. Oleg negotiated privileged trading terms with Byzantium in [944], the text of which is incorporated into the Primary Chronicle[26]. The main terms of the treaty are corroborated by the De administrando imperio[27]. The Primary Chronicle records that Oleg was killed by Derevlian Slavs, who lived to the north-east of Kiev and were unwilling to submit to his rule[28]. m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903[29]. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40] as shown below. After her husband was killed, the Derevlian Slavs proposed her marriage to their own leader Mal, but the Primary Chronicle records that Olga exacted prompt and effective revenge for her husband's death after besieging the Derevlian capital of Iskorosten[30]. Olga was regent for her son [from 945 to 964]. Her centre of power was based around Kiev where she owned two halls[31]. The Primary Chronicle records that Olga was baptised in Constantinople in [957] by the emperor (Konstantinos VII), and took the name HELENA after the mother of Emperor Konstantinos the Great[32]. Cedrenus records that "Elga Rossorum principis uxor" came to Constantinople after her husband died, was baptised, and returned home[33]. The Continuator of Regino records that "legati Helenæ reginæ Rugorum", who had been baptised at Constantinople "sub Romano imperatore Constantinopolitano", visited Otto I King of Germany in 959, and that in 960 "Libutius ex cœnobitis sancti Albani" was consecrated "genti Rugorum episcopus" by "episcopo Adaldago" [archbishop of Bremen][34]. The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the arrival of "legati Rusciæ gentis ad regem Ottonem" in 960 and his sending "Adalbertum episcopum" to their country[35]. The difference in the two sources of the name of the supposed first bishop is not explained. The Primary Chronicle records that, during the invasion of the Pechenegs in 968, Olga shut herself in the city of Kiev with her grandsons Yaropolk, Oleg and Vladimir and that she died in 969[36]. She was later esteemed to be a saint, her feast day being 11 July."
Med Lands cites:
[19] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 870-879, p. 60.
[20] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 912, p. 71.
[21] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 112.
[22] Liudprandi Antapodosis, Lib. V, 15, MGH SS III, p. 331.
[23] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 114.
[24] Constantini Porphyrogeniti De Administrando Imperio, 9, p. 74.
[25] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 114.
[26] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 117.
[27] Constantini Porphyrogeniti De Administrando Imperio, 6, p. 71, and Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 120.
[28] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 945, p. 78. Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 115 and 117, and Chirovsky (1973), p. 141.
[29] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 903, p. 60.
[30] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 945, pp. 78-80.
[31] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 112.
[32] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 948-955, p. 82.
[33] Migne, J. P. (1889) Cedreni Historiarum Continuatio, Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Græca Tomus CXXII (Paris) ("Cedrenus II"), col. 62.
[34] Continuator Reginonis, 959. 960, MGH SS I, p. 624.
[35] Annales Quedlinburgenes, MGH SS I, p. 60.
[36] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 968, p. 85, and 969, p. 86.3


Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev
Per Wikipedia:
     "Igor I (Old East Slavic: ?????, Igor'; Old Norse: Ingvar Røriksen, died 945) was a Varangian ruler of Kievan Rus' from 912 to 945.
Biography
     "Information about Igor comes mostly from the Primary Chronicle. This document has Igor as the son of Rurik, the first ruler of Kievan Rus':
     "6378–6387 (870–879). On his deathbed, Rurik bequeathed his realm to Oleg, who belonged to his kin, and entrusted to Oleg's hands his son Igor', for he was very young.
     "6388–6390 (880–882). Oleg set forth, taking with him many warriors from among the Varangians, the Chuds, the Slavs, the Merians and all the Krivichians. He thus arrived with his Krivichians before Smolensk, captured the city, and set up a garrison there. Thence he went on and captured Lyubech, where he also set up a garrison. He then came to the hills of Kiev, and saw how Askold and Dir reigned there. He hid his warriors in the boats, left some others behind, and went forward himself bearing the child Igor'. He thus came to the foot of the Hungarian hill, and after concealing his troops, he sent messengers to Askold and Dir, representing himself as a stranger on his way to Greece on an errand for Oleg and for Igor', the prince's son, and requesting that they should come forth to greet them as members of their race. Askold and Dir straightway came forth. Then all the soldiery jumped out of the boats, and Oleg said to Askold and Dir, "You are not princes nor even of princely stock, but I am of princely birth." Igor' was then brought forward, and Oleg announced that he was the son of Rurik. They killed Askold and Dir, and after carrying them to the hill, they buried them there, on the hill now known as Hungarian, where the castle of Ol'ma now stands.[1]

     "Igor' twice besieged Constantinople, in 941 and 944, and although Greek fire destroyed part of his fleet, he concluded with the Eastern Roman Emperor Constantine VII a favourable treaty (945), the text of which the chronicle has preserved. In 913 and 944 the Rus' plundered the Arabs in the Caspian Sea during the Caspian expeditions of the Rus', but it remains unclear whether Igor had anything to do with these campaigns.
     "Igor was killed while collecting tribute from the Drevlians in 945. The Byzantine historian and chronicler, Leo the Deacon (born ca 950), describes how Igor met his death: "They had bent down two birch trees to the prince's feet and tied them to his legs; then they let the trees straighten again, thus tearing the prince's body apart."[2] Igor's wife, Olga of Kiev, avenged his death by punishing the Drevlians. The Primary Chronicle blames his death on his own excessive greed, indicating that he tried to collect tribute for a second time in a month. As a result, Olga changed the system of tribute gathering (poliudie) in what may be regarded as the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe.
Controversy
     "Drastically revising the chronology of the Primary Chronicle, Constantin Zuckerman argues that Igor actually reigned for three years, between summer 941 and his death in early 945. He explains the epic 33-year span of his reign in the chronicle to be the result of its author's faulty interpretation of Byzantine sources.[3] Indeed, none of Igor's activities are recorded in the chronicle before 941.
References
1. Translated and edited by Cross, S. H. and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, O. P. (1953). "The Russian Primary Chronicle: Laurentian Text" (PDF). Crimson Printing Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts. pp. 60–61. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
2. Tarasenko, Leonid (27 February 2008). "Korosten (Iskorosten): A small town with a great history". geocities.com. Archived from the original on 26 October 2009. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
3. Zuckerman, Constantin (1995). "On the Date of the Khazars' Conversion to Judaism and the Chronology of the Kings of the Rus Oleg and Igor: A Study of the Anonymous Khazar Letter from the Genizah of Cairo" (PDF). Volume 53. Revue des études byzantines (1): 237–270. doi:10.3406/rebyz.1995.1906. ISSN 0766-5598. Retrieved 5 July 2016."6 He was konung of Novgorod and Kiev (912-945/6) between 912 and 945.1 He was Prince of Kiev between 914 and 945.6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Igor|Ingvar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079369&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#_Toc481496211. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-2, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igor_of_Kiev. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svjatoslav I Igorjevitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079371&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#Sviatoslavdied972.

Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev1,2

F, #6842, b. circa 910, d. 969
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited28 Dec 2019
     Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev was born circa 910 at Pskov; Genealogy.EU (Rurik I) says b. ca 903; Genealogics says b. ca 910.1,2,3 She married Igor/Ingvar "the Old" (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Kiev, son of Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Efenda (?) of Novgorod, between 930 and 935; Per Med Lands: "m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903[29]. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40]..."4,5,1,6,7
Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev died in 969.1,7,2
     Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
Per Genealogics:
     "Olga, a Pskov woman of Varangian extraction, married Igor/Ingvar, the future grand duke of Kiev, son of Ryurik, duke Novgorodskij. The _Primary Chronicle_ gives 879 as her date of birth, which is rather unlikely given the fact that her only son was born probably some 65 years after that date. After Igor's death, she ruled Kievan Rus as regent from 945 to about 963 for their son Svjatoslav.
     "At the start of her reign, Olga went to great lengths to avenge her husband's death at the hands of the Drevlians, and succeeded in slaughtering many of them and interring some in a ship burial, while still alive. She is reputed to have scalded captives to death and another, probably apocryphal, story tells of how she destroyed a town hostile to her. She asked that each household present her with a dove as a gift, then tied burning papers to the legs of each dove which she then released to fly back to their homes. The avian incendiaries set fire to the thatched roofs of their respective homes and the town was destroyed. More importantly in the long term, Olga changed the system of tribute gathering (poliudie) in what may be regarded as the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe.
     "She was the first Rus ruler to convert to Christianity, either in 945 or in 957. The ceremonies of her formal reception in Constantinople were minutely described by Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos in his book _De Ceremoniis._ Following her baptism she took the Christian name Yelena, after the empress-consort Helena Lekapena. The Slavonic chronicles add apocryphal details to the account of her baptism, such as the story how she charmed and 'outwitted' Constantine and how she spurned his matrimonial proposals.
     "Seven Latin sources document Olga's embassy to Emperor Otto I in 959. The continuation of Regino of Prüm mentions that the envoys requested the emperor to appoint a bishop and priests for their nation. The chronicler accuses the envoys of lies, commenting that their trick was not exposed until later. Thietmar of Merseburg says that the first archbishop of Magdeburg, before being promoted to this high rank, was sent by Emperor Otto to the country of Rus (Rusciae) as a simple bishop but was expelled by pagans. The same data are duplicated in the annals of Quedlinburg and Hildesheim.
     "Olga was one of the first people of Rus to be proclaimed saint, for her efforts to spread the Christian religion in the country. However, she failed to convert her son Svjatoslav, and it was left to her grandson and pupil Vladimir I to make Christianity the lasting state religion. During her son's prolonged military campaigns she remained in charge of Kiev, residing in the castle of Vyshgorod together with her grandsons. She died in Kiev on 11 July 969, soon after the city's siege by the Pechenegs in 968."2

Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
St.Helga/Olga (Vologa) of Pskov (*ca 903 +969), regent in Kiev (945-964)), she was baptised in Constantinople and received the name Elena.1 GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30.

Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
Per Med Lands: "m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903[29]. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40] as shown below. After her husband was killed, the Derevlian Slavs proposed her marriage to their own leader Mal, but the Primary Chronicle records that Olga exacted prompt and effective revenge for her husband's death after besieging the Derevlian capital of Iskorosten[30]. Olga was regent for her son [from 945 to 964]. Her centre of power was based around Kiev where she owned two halls[31]. The Primary Chronicle records that Olga was baptised in Constantinople in [957] by the emperor (Konstantinos VII), and took the name HELENA after the mother of Emperor Konstantinos the Great[32]. Cedrenus records that "Elga Rossorum principis uxor" came to Constantinople after her husband died, was baptised, and returned home[33]. The Continuator of Regino records that "legati Helenæ reginæ Rugorum", who had been baptised at Constantinople "sub Romano imperatore Constantinopolitano", visited Otto I King of Germany in 959, and that in 960 "Libutius ex cœnobitis sancti Albani" was consecrated "genti Rugorum episcopus" by "episcopo Adaldago" [archbishop of Bremen][34]. The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the arrival of "legati Rusciæ gentis ad regem Ottonem" in 960 and his sending "Adalbertum episcopum" to their country[35]. The difference in the two sources of the name of the supposed first bishop is not explained. The Primary Chronicle records that, during the invasion of the Pechenegs in 968, Olga shut herself in the city of Kiev with her grandsons Yaropolk, Oleg and Vladimir and that she died in 969[36]. She was later esteemed to be a saint, her feast day being 11 July."
Med Lands cites:
[29] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 903, p. 60.
[30] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 945, pp. 78-80.
[31] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 112.
[32] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 948-955, p. 82.
[33] Migne, J. P. (1889) Cedreni Historiarum Continuatio, Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Græca Tomus CXXII (Paris) ("Cedrenus II"), col. 62.
[34] Continuator Reginonis, 959. 960, MGH SS I, p. 624.
[35] Annales Quedlinburgenes, MGH SS I, p. 60.
[36] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 968, p. 85, and 969, p. 86.7


Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
Per Wikipedia:
     "Saint Olga (Church Slavonic: ?????, Old Norse: Helga; born c. 890–925, in Pskov[1] – died 969 AD in Kiev) was a regent of Kievan Rus' for her son Svyatoslav from 945 until 960. Due to the imperfect transliteration between Old East Slavic and the English language, the name Olga is synonymous with Olha. Because of her Varangian origin, she also is known in Old Norse as Saint Helga.[2] She is known for her obliteration of the Drevlians, a tribe that had killed her husband Igor of Kiev. Even though it would be her grandson Vladimir that would convert the entire nation to Christianity, her efforts to spread Christianity through the Rus’ earned Olga veneration as a saint. She is venerated in the Russian Orthodox Church as an apostle-like saint. Remembrance day in Russia is the 11th of July.[3]
Life
Early life
     "While Olga's birthdate is unknown, it could be as early as 890 AD and as late as 925 AD.[4][5] According to the Primary Chronicle Olga was of Viking origin and born in Pskov. Little is known about her life before her marriage to Prince Igor I of Kiev and the birth of their son, Svyatoslav.[6] Igor was the son and heir of Rurik, founder of Rurik dynasty. After his father's death Igor was under guardianship of Oleg, who had consolidated power in the region, conquering neighboring tribes and establishing a capital in Kiev.[7][8] This loose tribal federation became known as Kievan Rus’, a territory covering what are now parts of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus.
     "The Drevlians were a neighboring tribe with which the growing Kievan Rus’ empire had a complex relationship. The Drevlians had joined Kievan Rus’ in military campaigns against the Byzantine Empire and paid tribute to Igor's predecessors. They stopped paying tribute upon Oleg's death and instead gave money to a local warlord. In 945, Igor set out to the Drevlian capital, Iskorosten (today known as Korosten in northern Ukraine), to force the tribe to pay tribute to Kievan Rus’.[7] Confronted by Igor's larger army, the Drevlians backed down and paid him. As Igor and his army rode home, however, he decided the payment was not enough and returned, with only a small envoy, seeking more tribute.[9] Upon his arrival in their territory, the Drevlians murdered Igor. According to the Byzantine chronicler Leo the Deacon, Igor's death was caused by a gruesome act of torture in which he was “captured by them, tied to tree trunks, and torn in two.”[10] D. Sullivan has suggested that Leo may have invented this sensationalist version of Igor's death, taking inspiration from Diodorus Siculus’ account of a similar killing method used by the robber Sinis, who lived near the Isthmus of Corinth and was killed by Theseus.[10]
Regency
     "Princess Olga meets the body of her husband. A sketch by Vasily Surikov.
After Igor's death in 945, Olga ruled Kievan Rus as regent on behalf of their son Svyatoslav.[11] Little is known about Olga’s tenure as ruler of Kiev, but the Primary Chronicle does give an account of her accession to the throne and her bloody revenge on the Drevlians for the murder of her husband as well as some insight into her role as civil leader of the Kievan people.
Drevlian Uprising
     "Romanov Imperial icon created in 1895 of St. Olga. Silver, gold, color enamel, tempera. Collection V.Logvinenko
After Igor’s death at the hands of the Drevlians, Olga assumed the throne because her three-year-old son Svyatoslav was too young to rule. The Drevlians, emboldened by their success in ambushing and killing the king, sent a messenger to Olga proposing that she marry his murderer, Prince Mal. Twenty Drevlian negotiators boated to Kiev to pass along their king’s message and to ensure Olga’s compliance. They arrived in her court and told the queen why they were in Kiev: “to report that they had slain her husband...and that Olga should come and marry their Prince Mal.”[12] Olga responded:
Your proposal is pleasing to me’ indeed, my husband cannot rise again from the dead. But I desire to honor you tomorrow in the presence of my people. Return now to your boat, and remain there with an aspect of arrogance. I shall send for you on the morrow, and you shall say, ‘We will not ride on horses nor go on foot’ carry us in our boat.’ And you shall be carried in your boat.[12]

     "When the Drevlians returned the next day, they waited outside Olga's court to receive the honor she had promised. When they repeated the words she had told them to say, the people of Kiev rose up, carrying the Drevlians in their boat. The ambassadors believed this was a great honor, as if they were being carried by palanquin. The people brought them into the court where they were dropped into the trench Olga had ordered dug the day before and buried alive. It is written that Olga bent down to watch them as they were buried and “inquired whether they found the honor to their taste.”[12]
     "Olga then sent a message to the Drevlians that they should send “their distinguished men to her in Kiev, so that she might go to their Prince with due honor.”[12] The Drevlians, unaware of the fate of the first diplomatic party, gathered another party of men to send “the best men who governed the land of Dereva.”[12] When they arrived, Olga commanded her people to draw them a bath and invited the men to appear before her after they had bathed. When the Drevlians entered the bathhouse, Olga had it set on fire from the doors, so that all the Drevlians within burned to death.[12]
     "Olga sent another message to the Drevlians, this time ordering them to “prepare great quantities of mead in the city where you killed my husband, that I may weep over his grave and hold a funeral feast for him.”[12] When Olga and a small group of attendants arrived at Igor's tomb, she did indeed weep and hold a funeral feast. The Drevlians sat down to join them and began to drink heavily. When the Drevlians were drunk, she ordered her followers to kill them, “and went about herself egging on her retinue to the massacre of the Drevlians.”[12] According to the Primary Chronicle, five thousand Drevlians were killed on this night, but Olga returned to Kiev to prepare an army to finish off the survivors.
     "The initial conflict between the armies of the two nations went very well for the forces of Kievan Rus’, who won the battle handily and drove the survivors back into their cities. Olga then led her army to Iskorosten (what is today Korosten), the city where her husband had been slain, and laid siege to the city. The siege lasted for a year without success, when Olga thought of a plan to trick the Drevlians. She sent them a message: “Why do you persist in holding out? All your cities have surrendered to me and submitted to tribute, so that the inhabitants now cultivate their fields and their lands in peace. But you had rather tide of hunger, without submitting to tribute.”[13] The Drevlians responded that they would submit to tribute, but that they were afraid she was still intent on avenging her husband. Olga answered that the murder of the messengers sent to Kiev, as well as the events of the feast night, had been enough for her. She then asked them for a small request: “Give me three pigeons...and three sparrows from each house.”[13] The Drevlians rejoiced at the prospect of the siege ending for so small a price, and did as she asked.
     "Olga then instructed her army to attach a piece of sulphur bound with small pieces of cloth to each bird. At nightfall, Olga told her soldiers to set the pieces aflame and release the birds. They returned to their nests within the city, which subsequently set the city ablaze. As the Primary Chronicle tells it: “There was not a house that was not consumed, and it was impossible to extinguish the flames, because all the houses caught fire at once.”[13] As the people fled the burning city, Olga ordered her soldiers to catch them, killing some of them and giving the others as slaves to her followers. She left the remnant to pay tribute.
Governance
     "Olga remained regent ruler of Kievan Rus with the support of the army and her people. She changed the system of tribute gathering (poliudie) in the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe. She continued to evade proposals of marriage, defended the city during the Siege of Kiev in 968, and saved the power of the throne for her son.
     "After her dramatic subjugation of the Drevlians, the Primary Chronicle recounts how Olga “passed through the land of Dereva, accompanied by her son and her retinue, establishing laws and tribute. Her trading posts and hunting-reserves are there still.”[13] As queen, Olga established trading-posts and collected tribute along the Msta and the Luga rivers. She established hunting grounds, boundary posts, towns, and trading-posts across the empire. Olga's work helped to centralize state rule with these trade centers, called pogosti, which served as administrative centers in addition to their mercantile roles. Olga's network of pogosti would prove important in the ethnic and cultural unification of the Russian nation, and her border posts began the establishment of national boundaries for the kingdom.
     "During her son's prolonged military campaigns, she remained in charge of Kiev, residing in the castle of Vyshgorod with her grandsons.
Christianity
     "The Primary Chronicle does not go into additional detail about Olga's time as regent, but does tell the story of her conversion to Christianity and subsequent effect on the acceptance of Christianity in Eastern Europe.
Conversion
     "In the 950s, Olga traveled to Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, to visit Emperor Constantine VII.[14] Once in Constantinople, Olga converted to Christianity with the assistance of the Emperor and the Patriarch. While the Primary Chronicle does not divulge Olga's motivation for her visit or conversion, it does go into great detail on the conversion process, in which she was baptized and instructed in the ways of Christianity:
The reigning Emperor was named Constantine, son of Leo. Olga came before him, and when he saw that she was very fair of countenance and wise as well, the Emperor wondered at her intellect. He conversed with her and remarked that she was worthy to reign with him in his city. When Olga heard his words, she replied that she was still a pagan, and that if he desired to baptize her, he should perform this function himself; otherwise, she was unwilling to accept baptism. The Emperor, with the assistance of the Patriarch, accordingly baptized her. When Olga was enlightened, she rejoiced in soul and body. The Patriarch, who instructed her in the faith, said to her, ‘Blessed art thou among the women of Rus’, for thou hast loved the light, and quit the darkness. The sons of Rus’ shall bless thee to the last generation of thy descendants.’ He taught her the doctrine of the Church, and instructed her in prayer and fasting, in almsgiving, and in the maintenance of chastity. She bowed her head, and like a sponge absorbing water, she eagerly drank in his teachings. The Princess bowed before the Patriarch, saying, ‘Through thy prayers, Holy Father, may I be preserved from the crafts and assaults of the devil!’ At her baptism she was christened Helena, after the ancient Empress, mother of Constantine the Great. The Patriarch then blessed her and dismissed her.[15]

     "While the Primary Chronicle notes that Olga was christened with the name “Helena” after the ancient Saint Helena (the mother of Constantine the Great), Jonathan Shepard argues that Olga's baptismal name comes from the contemporary emperor's wife, Helena.[16] The observation that Olga was “worthy to reign with him in his city” suggests that the emperor was interested in marrying her. While the Chronicle explains Constantine's desire to take Olga as his wife as stemming from the fact that she was “fair of countenance and wise as well,” marrying Olga could certainly have helped him gain power over Rus’. The Chronicle recounts that Olga asked the emperor to baptize her knowing that his baptismal sponsorship, by the rules of spiritual kinship, would make marriage between them a kind of spiritual incest.[17] Though her desire to become Christian may have been genuine, this request was also a way for her to maintain political independence. After the baptism, when Constantine repeated his marriage proposal, Olga answered that she could not marry him since Church law forbade a goddaughter to marry her godfather:
After her baptism, the Emperor summoned Olga and made known to her that he wished her to become his wife. But she replied, ‘How can you marry me, after yourself baptizing me and calling me your daughter? For among Christians that is unlawful, as you yourself must know.’ Then the Emperor said, ‘Olga, you have outwitted me.’ He gave her many gifts of gold, silver, silks, and various vases, and dismissed her, still calling her his daughter.[15]

     "Francis Butler argues that the story of the proposal was a literary embellishment, describing an event that is highly unlikely to have ever actually occurred.[18] In fact, at the time of her baptism, Constantine already had an empress. In addition to uncertainty over the truth of the Chronicle’s telling of events in Constantinople, there is controversy over the details of her conversion to Christianity.[19] According to Russian sources, she was baptized in Constantinople in 957. Byzantine sources, however, indicate that she was a Christian prior to her 957 visit. It seems likely that she was baptized in Kiev around 955 and, following a second christening in Constantinople, took the Christian name Helen. Olga was not the first person from Rus’ to convert from her pagan ways-- there were Christians in Igor's court who had taken oaths at the St. Elias Church in Kiev for the Rus'–Byzantine Treaty in 945--but she was the most powerful Rus’ individual to undergo baptism during her life.[20]
Efforts to Christianize Kievan Rus'
     "The Primary Chronicle reports that Olga received the Patriarch's blessing for her journey home, and that once she arrived, she unsuccessfully attempted to convert her son to Christianity:
Now Olga dwelt with her son Svyatoslav, and she urged him to be baptized, but he would not listen to her suggestion, though when any man wished to be baptized, he was not hindered, but only mocked. For to the infidels, the Christian faith is foolishness. They do not comprehend it, because they walk in darkness and do not see the glory of God. Their hearts are hardened, and they can neither hear with their ears nor see with their eyes. For Solomon has said, ‘The deeds of the unrighteous are far from wisdom. Inasmuch as I have called you, and ye heard me not, I sharpened my words, and ye understood not. But ye have set at nought all my counsel, and would have none of my reproach. For they have hated knowledge, and the fear of Jehovah they have not chosen. They would none of my counsel, but despised all my reproof.[15]

     "This passage highlights the hostility towards Christianity in Kievan Rus’ in the tenth century. In the Chronicle, Svyatoslav declares that his followers would “laugh” if he were to accept Christianity.[15] While Olga tried to convince her son that his followers would follow his example if he converted, her efforts were in vain. However, her son agreed not to persecute those in his kingdom who did convert, which marked a crucial turning point for Christianity in the area.[21] Despite the resistance of her people to Christianity, Olga built churches in Kiev, Pskov, and elsewhere.[22]
Relations with the Holy Roman Emperor
     "Seven Latin sources document Olga's embassy to Holy Roman Emperor Otto I in 959. The continuation of Regino of Prüm mentions that the envoys requested the emperor to appoint a bishop and priests for their nation. The chronicler accuses the envoys of lies, commenting that their trick was not exposed until later. Thietmar of Merseburg says that the first archbishop of Magdeburg, Saint Adalbert of Magdeburg, before being promoted to this high rank, was sent by Emperor Otto to the country of the Rus' (Rusciae) as a simple bishop but was expelled by pagan allies of Svyatoslav I. The same data is repeated in the annals of Quedlinburg and Hildesheim.
Death
     "According to the Primary Chronicle, Olga died from illness in 969, soon after the Pechenegs' siege of the city.[23] When Svyatoslav announced plans to move his throne to the Danube region, the ailing Olga convinced him to stay with her during her final days. Only three days later, she passed away and her family and all of Kievan Rus’ wept:
Svyatoslav announced to his mother and his boyars, ‘I do not care to remain in Kiev, but should prefer to live in Perya-slavets on the Danube, since that is the centre of my realm, where all riches are concentrated; gold, silks, wine, and various fruits from Greece, silver and horses from Hungary and Bohemia, and from Rus’ furs, wax, honey, and slaves.’ But Olga made reply, ‘You behold me in my weakness. Why do you desire to depart from me?’ For she was already in precarious health. She thus remonstrated with him and begged him first to bury her and then to go wheresoever he would. Three days later Olga died. Her son wept for her with great mourning, as did likewise her grandsons and all the people. They thus carried her out, and buried her in her tomb. Olga had given command not to hold a funeral feast for her, for she had a priest who performed the last rites over the sainted Princess.[24]

     "Although he disapproved of his mother's Christian tradition, Svyatoslav heeded Olga's request that her priest, Gregory, conduct a Christian funeral without the ritual pagan burial feast.[25] Her tomb remained in Kiev for over two centuries, but was destroyed by the Mongolian-Tatar armies of Batu Khan in 1240.[25]
Legacy
Sainthood
     "At the time of her death, it seemed that Olga's attempt to make Kievan Rus’ a Christian territory had been a failure. Nonetheless, Olga's Christianizing mission would be brought to fruition by her grandson, Vladimir, who officially adopted Christianity in 988.[25] The Primary Chronicle highlights Olga's holiness in contrast to the pagans around her during her life as well as the significance of her decision to convert to Christianity:
Olga was the precursor of the Christian land, even as the day-spring precedes the sun and as the dawn precedes the day. For she shone like the moon by night, and she was radiant among the infidels like a pearl in the mire, since the people were soiled, and not yet purified of their sin by holy baptism. But she herself was cleansed by this sacred purification…. She was the first from Rus’ to enter the kingdom of God, and the son of Rus’ thus praise her as their leader, for since her death she has interceded with God in their behalf.[24]

     "In 1547, nearly 600 years after her 969 death, the Russian Orthodox Church named Olga a saint.[21] Because of her proselytizing influence, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church, and the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church call Saint Olga by the honorific Isapóstolos, "Equal to the Apostles". She is also a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Olga's feast day is July 11th, the date of her death.[26] In keeping with her own biography, she is the patron of widows and converts.[27]
     "Olga is venerated as Saint in East Slavic-speaking countries where churches uses the Byzantine Rite: Eastern Orthodox Church (especially in Russian Orthodox Church), Greek Catholic Church (especially in the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church), in churches with Byzantine Rite Lutheranism[28], in Roman Catholic Church in Russia (Latin rite)[29]
Churches and Monuments
** Cathedral of St. Olga, Kiev (inaugurated 2010)
** Church of Sts. Olha and Elizabeth, Lviv
** Church of Volodymyr and Olha, Khodoriv
** Church of Sts. Volodymyr and Olha, Podusiv, Peremyshliany Raion
** Saint Vladimir and Olha church, Staryi Dobrotvir, Kamenka-Buzky Raion
** Church of Saints Volodymyr and Olha, Birky, Yavoriv Raion
** Church of Saints Volodymyr and Olha, Horodok, Lviv Oblast
** Saint Olga Orthodox church in Korosten, Zhytomyr Oblast
** Sts. Volodymyr and Olha Ukrainian Catholic Church, Chicago
** Saints Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral and Parish Hall, Winnipeg, Manitoba[30]
** Saints Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Church, Dauphin, Manitoba[31]
** Saints Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Church, Windsor, Ontario
** Saints Volodymyr and Olha Church, Woodville, South Australia
Modern Reception
     "As an important figure in the history of Christianity, Olga's image as a saint lives on. But the question of Olga as a historical figure and character in the Primary Chronicle has been taken up in recent years.
     "Olga's historical characterization as a vengeful princess, juxtaposed with her estimation within the Orthodox tradition as a saint, has produced a variety of modern interpretations of her story. Scholars tend to be more conservative with their interpretations, focusing on what the Primary Chronicle makes explicit: Olga's role in the spread of Christianity to Eastern Europe and Russia. These texts, generally speaking, focus on Olga's role as advisor to her son, whose decision not to persecute Christians in the Kievan Rus' was a pivotal moment in the religious history of Russia and its neighboring lands. Academic work on Olga tends not to dwell on the narrative twists and turns of her story, instead focusing on extracting historical facts from the story.
     "Modern publications, however, have focused on her as an historical character. Journalists have penned articles with titles ranging from “Saint Olga of Kiev is the Best Warrior Princess You Never Knew”[32] to “Meet the Murderous Viking Princess Who Brought the Faith to Eastern Europe.”[6] These texts, written for a broader audience, tend to focus on Olga's exploits as a sort of historical drama. Her Viking heritage is always brought up, and often used as an explanation for her fiery spirit and military accomplishments. Authors focus on the most dramatic details of her story: her murder of two Drevlian negotiating groups, her wily deception of the Drevlian ruler, and her ultimate conquest of his people. A number of sources make her out to be a proto-feminist figure, a woman who did not allow contemporaneous expectations of gender roles to lock her out of the leadership role. Because there is little evidence to support the idea that Olga's rule was ever questioned by her people, this characterization of her rule is a medievalism — that is, an assumption made about history based not on facts but on preconceptions about the past, in this case the rigid relationship between gender and medieval rulership.
     "Though a number of these contemporary sources refer to Olga as a “warrior princess,” there is little evidence to suggest she actually participated in the fighting and killing of her enemies. Based on historical precedent, it is more likely that she was a commander of troops, a sort of general or commander-in-chief, than a warrior of particular skill. These assertions have still made their way into the public imagination, however, as evidenced by the appropriation of her image in the Eastern European heavy metal scene.
     "This duality of Olga's character — on the one hand a venerated saint, on the other a bloodthirsty commander of troops — has made her an attractive figure for subversive artists. Her image has been taken up in the heavy metal scene in some cases, most notably as the muse and cover figure for A Perfect Absolution, a concept album by French band Gorod about Olga of Kiev.
References
1. Vernadsky 1948, p. 39.
2. "Saint Olga | Biography, Facts, & Patron Saint of". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-05-01.
3. "?????? ??????? ?????". ??????? ???? (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-08-08.
4. Michael S. Flier, "St Olga," in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, ed. Robert E. Bjork (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010).
5. "Princess Olga of Kiev," Russiapedia, https://russiapedia.rt.com/prominent-russians/history-and-mythology/princess-olga-of-kiev/.
6. Addison Nugent, "Meet the Murderous Viking Princess Who Brought the Faith to Eastern Europe," OZY, January 22, 2018, https://www.ozy.com/flashback/meet-the-murderous-viking-princess-who-brought-the-faith-to-eastern-europe/83251.
7. Thomas J. Craughwell, Saints Behaving Badly: The Cutthroats, Crooks, Trollops, Con Men, and Devil-Worshippers Who Became Saints (New York: Doubleday, 2006), 83.
8. Thomas Noonan, "European Russia, C. 500–c. 1050," in The New Cambridge Medieval History, ed. Timothy Reuter (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), 508.
9. Craughwell, Saints Behaving Badly: The Cutthroats, Crooks, Trollops, Con Men, and Devil-Worshippers Who Became Saints, 84.
10. Talbot, Alice-Mary; Sullivan, Dennis F., eds. (2005), The History of Leo the Deacon: Byzantine Military Expansion in the Tenth Century, Washington: Dumbarton Oaks, pp. 156, 157 (esp. note 99), ISBN 978-0-88402-324-1
11. Clements 2012, p. 7.
12. Cross, Samuel Hazzard, Olgerd P. Sherbowitz-Wetzor, and Nestor. The Russian Primary Chronicle: Laurentian Text. Mediaeval Academy of America No. 60. Cambridge, Mass.: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1953. 79-80 (line 6453).
13. Primary Chronicle 80-1 (line 6454).
14. Thomas J. Craughwell, Saints Behaving Badly: The Cutthroats, Crooks, Trollops, Con Men, and Devil-Worshippers Who Became Saints, 86.
15. Primary Chronicle 82.
16. Jonathan Shepard, "The Origins of Rus’ (c.900–1015)," ed. Maureen Perrie (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 58.
17. Francis Butler, "Ol'Ga's Conversion and the Construction of Chronicle Narrative," The Russian Review 67, no. 2 (April 2008): 240.
18. Francis Butler, "Ol'Ga's Conversion and the Construction of Chronicle Narrative," 234.
19. Omeljan Pritsak, "When and Where Was Ol'ga Baptized?" Harvard Ukrainian Studies 9, no. 1/2 (June 1985): 5-24.
20. "Olga (c. 890–969)," Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia, 2002, https://www.encyclopedia.com/women/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/olga-c-890-969.
21. Addison Nugent, "Meet the Murderous Viking Princess Who Brought the Faith to Eastern Europe."
22. Craughwell, Saints Behaving Badly: The Cutthroats, Crooks, Trollops, Con Men, and Devil-Worshippers Who Became Saints, 88.
23. Ciaran Conliffe, "Saint Olga, Queen of Kiev," HeadStuff, May 10, 2016, https://www.headstuff.org/culture/history/saint-olga-queen-of-kiev/.
24. Primary Chronicle 86.
25. "Olga (c. 890–969)," Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia, 2002, https://www.encyclopedia.com/women/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/olga-c-890-969.
26. Michael S. Flier, "St Olga," in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, ed. Robert E. Bjork (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010).
27. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica, "St. Olga," Encyclopædia Britannica, January 01, 2019, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Saint-Olga.
28. |url=http://www.resurrectionpeople.org/saints.html |title=Notable Lutheran Saints |website=Resurrectionpeople.org
29. |url=http://svyat-olga-lyublino.ru/ourchurch%7Ctitle=??????-???????????? ?????? ?????? ?????|trans-title=St. Olga Roman Catholic Parish|accessdate=September 15, 2019|quote=founded in 1991
30. "Historic Sites of Manitoba: Sts. Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral and Parish Hall (115 McGregor Street, Winnipeg)". www.mhs.mb.ca. Retrieved 2019-05-01.
31. "Historic Sites of Manitoba: Sts. Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Church (Valley River, RM of Dauphin)". www.mhs.mb.ca. Retrieved 2019-05-01.
3. Natasha Sheldon, "Saint Olga of Kiev Is the Best Warrior Princess You Never Knew," HistoryCollection.co, February 12, 2018, https://historycollection.co/saint-olga-kiev-best-warrior-princess-never-knew/.
Sources
** Vernadsky, George (1948). Kievan Russia. Yale University Press.
External links
** Olga of Kiev - OrthodoxWiki : https://orthodoxwiki.org/Olga_of_Kiev28 Dec 2019."3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Russian Chronicles, London, 1990.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:128.2



Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
Princess Olga, wife of 10th-century Kievan Prince Igor, was a meek, retiring wife until a rival Drevlianian chief murdered her husband. Acting as regent for her young son Sviatoslav, Olga's first priority was to exact revenge. The opportunity unexpectedly presented itself when the Drevlianian chief dispatched 20 envoys to ask Olga to marry him and unite their rival people.

Olga agreed to receive the envoys only if they arrived at the palace by boat. The envoys agreed to this strange request, and upon arriving, they were easily surrounded, thrown into a specially-dug pit, and buried alive. Insisting she now sought peace, Olga convinced the Drevlianians to send 20 more men, "the best governing the land," to discuss the marriage proposal, offering them luxurious baths before greeting her. Once the envoys were inside the bathhouse, her troops nailed the doors shut, set the building ablaze and burned the enemy alive. With the Drevlianians seriously weakened, Olga sent her troops to conquer their main city, slay its most important citizens, and enslave the rest.

Having avenged her husband's murder, Princess Olga began grooming her son to rule. To set an example of just rule, she abolished the corrupt system of tribute that encouraged exploitation of minority tribes and levied taxes on everyone in the realm.

Olga eventually proved herself to be one of the most skilled of all Kievan rulers, but her greatest legacy came from her conversion to Christianity in AD 957. She campaigned tirelessly to deliver Kievans from paganism, and although Sviatoslav refused to accept his mother's new faith, Olga scored a far greater coup after the murder of Sviatoslav brought her grandson Vladimir to the throne.

As Grand Prince of Kiev, Vladimir I controlled the first Russian state, a powerful federation of five million people, second in area only to the Holy Roman Empire. He pleased his grandmother not only by converting to Christianity but also by proclaiming it the state religion. In her odyssey from avenging wife and regent to Christian missionary, Princess Olga had helped alter the course of Russian history.8 Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev was also known as Olga/Vologa (?) of Pskov.1 Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev was also known as Saint Olga (?)

Saint Olga (?) Regent of Kiev
Prince Oleg, who transferred his residence to Kiev on the Dnieper River. Kiev remained the capital of Kievan Russia, a loose federation of territories, until 1169. Oleg also united the eastern Slavs, freed them from Khazar control, and signed a commercial treaty with the Byzantine Empire.

The Russians again appeared at Constantinople and extracted trade privileges from the Byzantine emperor. Trade became a leading occupation of the Russian princes, who, with their followers (druzhina), protected the merchant ships. On the other hand, private property appears to have been less developed among the eastern Slavs than in the West.

Further trade agreements with the Greek Empire testify to ever closer economic connections and no doubt to an increasing cultural contact.

The Russian princess Olga visited Constantinople and was converted to the Christian faith. This was, however, a personal conversion and may in fact have been Olga's second.9

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Olga: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079370&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olga_of_Kiev. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-2, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Igor|Ingvar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079369&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#_Toc481496211. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1421] History Book Club FYI, "History Book Club FYI Ancient & Medieval History Newsletter: "The Brutal Revenge of Princess Olga"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to Greg Vaut, 31 Jan 2003. Hereinafter cited as "History Book Club FYI 31 Jan 2003."
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 224. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svjatoslav I Igorjevitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079371&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#Sviatoslavdied972.

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod

M, #6843, b. circa 835, d. 879
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited28 Dec 2019
     Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod was born circa 835.1 He married Efenda (?) of Novgorod between 863 and 877; WFT Est.2
Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod died in 879.3,1
     Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
Per Genealogics:
     "Rurik (also known as Riurik or Rörek) was born about 835. He was a Varangian chieftain who gained control of Ladoga in 862, built the Holmgard settlement near Novgorod, and founded the Ryurik dynasty which ruled Kievan Rus and then Russia until the 16th century. According to the 12th-century Russian _Primary Chronicle,_ Ryurik was one of the Rus, a Varangian tribe likened by the chronicler to Danes, Swedes, English and Gotlanders. In the 20th century, archaeologists partly corroborated the chronicler's version of events. It was discovered that the settlement of Ladoga, whose foundation has been ascribed to Ryurik, was actually established in the mid-8th century. Earthenware, household utensils, and types of buildings from the period of Ryurik's rule correspond to patterns then prevalent in Jutland.
     "There is a debate over how Ryurik came to control Ladoga and Novgorod. The only information about him is contained in the _Primary Chronicle,_ which stated that Chuds, Slavs, Merias, Veses and Krivichs '... drove the Varangians back beyond the sea, refused to pay them tribute, and set out to govern themselves'. Afterwards the tribes started fighting each other and decided to invite Ryurik to re-establish order.
     "Some Slavic historians argue that the account of Ryurik's invitation was borrowed by a pro-Scandinavian chronicler from a hypothetical Norse document. For instance, the _Primary Chronicle_ states that Ryurik arrived to Slavic lands with his two brothers, Sineus and Truvor, and sent them to rule the towns of Beloozero and Izborsk, respectively. Instead of connecting Sineus to Signjotr and Truvor to Torvald, they suggest that the chronicler had read a hypothetical Scandinavian document and misinterpreted the Norse words 'sine hus' (with house) and 'tru voring' (with loyal guard) as the names of Ryurik's brothers (hence 'Sineus' and 'Truvor').
     "There is another theory that Ryurik, on account of common intermarriages between Varangians and Slavic women, was of mixed Slavic-Varangian descent. This theory is based on the information of the first modern historian of Russia, Vassily Tatishchev, who claimed that Ryurik was of Wendish extraction.
     "Ryurik remained in power until his death in 879. His successors (the Ryurik dynasty) moved the capital to Kiev and founded the state of Kievan Rus, which lasted until 1240, the time of Mongol invasion. A number of princely families are patrilineally descended from Ryurik, although the last descendant to rule Russia, Vassili IV, died in 1612."1

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
a Danish viking.

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
Genealogy.EU Rurik 1 page shows the parents of Rurik to have been: "Godoslav, Pr of Bodrits (?), fl 808; m.Umila, dau.of Gostomysl, Pr of Novgorod."2

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
Rurik, konung of Novgorod and Ladoga (862-879), +879; since the 18th century many scholars have identified him with Roerik of Dorestad [see page norway1.html]; m.Efanda/Sfandra/Ingrid of Norway, sister of Helgu/Oleg (+912), konung of Novgorod and Kiev.2

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
Per Wikipedia:
     "Rurik (also Riurik; Old Church Slavonic ?????? Rjurik?, from Old Norse Hrørík?; c. 830 – 879), according to the 12th-century Primary Chronicle, was a Varangian chieftain of the Rus' who in the year 862 gained control of Ladoga, and built the Holmgard settlement near Novgorod. He is the founder of the Rurik dynasty, which ruled the Kievan Rus' and its successor states, including the Grand Duchy of Moscow and the Tsardom of Russia, until the 17th century.[1]
Life
     "The only information about Rurik is contained in the 12th-century Primary Chronicle written by one Nestor, which states that Chuds, Eastern Slavs, Merias, Veses, and Krivichs "...drove the Varangians back beyond the sea, refused to pay them tribute, and set out to govern themselves". Afterwards the tribes started fighting each other and decided to invite the Varangians, led by Rurik, to reestablish order. Rurik came in 860-862 along with his brothers Sineus and Truvor and a large retinue.
     "According to the Primary Chronicle, Rurik was one of the Rus', a Varangian tribe likened by the chronicler to Danes, Swedes, Angles, and Gotlanders. Sineus established himself at Beloozero (now Belozersk), on the shores of lake Beloye, and Truvor at Izborsk (or at Pskov). Truvor and Sineus died shortly after the establishment of their territories, and Rurik consolidated these lands into his own territory.
     "According to the entries in the Radzivil and Hypatian Chronicles[2] under the years 862–864, Rurik’s first residence was in Ladoga. He later moved his seat of power to Novgorod, a fort built not far from the source of the Volkhov River. The meaning of this place name in medieval Russian is 'new fortification', while the current meaning ('new city') developed later.
     "Rurik remained in power until his death in 879. On his deathbed, Rurik bequeathed his realm to Oleg, who belonged to his kin, and entrusted to Oleg's hands his son Igor, for he was very young. His successors (the Rurik dynasty) moved the capital to Kiev and founded the state of Kievan Rus', which persisted until the Mongol invasion in 1240. A number of extant princely families are patrilineally descended from Rurik, although the last Rurikid to rule Russia, Vasily IV, died in 1612.
Historicity debate
Archaeological evidence
     "In the 20th century, archaeologists partly corroborated the chronicle's version of events. It was discovered that the settlement of Ladoga, whose foundation has been ascribed to Rurik, was actually established in the mid-9th century, although doubt is now cast on this by the dendrochronological evidence that Ladoga existed by the mid-8th century.[citation needed] Earthenware, household utensils, and types of buildings from the period of Rurik's purported foundation correspond to patterns then prevalent in Jutland.[citation needed] but mostly the excavations denied most of the chronicle's data about Rurik's arrival when it was apparent that the old settlement stretched to the mid-8th century and the excavated objects were mostly of Finno-Ugric and Slavic origin, dated to the mid-8th century, which showed the settlement was not Scandinavian from the beginning.[3][page needed]
Hypothesis of identity with Rorik of Dorestad
     "The name Rurik is accepted to be a form of the Old Norse name Hrærekr. This has been taken as evidence that Rurik was in some way ethnically Scandinavian.[4] The only similarly named figure described in the Carolingian Annales Fuldenses and Annales Bertiniani was Rorik of Dorestad (also spelled Rørik, Rörik, Roerik, Hrörek, etc.), a Germanic king from the royal Scylding house of Haithabu in the Jutland Peninsula. Since the 19th century, there have been attempts to identify him with the Rurik of Russian chronicles.
     "Rorik of Dorestad was a member of one of two competing families reported in the Frankish chroniclers as having ruled the nascent Danish kingdom at Hedeby, and was likely nephew of king Harold Klak. He is mentioned as receiving lands in Friesland from Emperor Louis I. This was not enough for him, and he started to plunder neighbouring lands: he took Dorestad in 850, attacked Hedeby in 857, and looted Bremen in 859, yet his own lands were ravaged in his absence. The Emperor was enraged and stripped him of all his possessions in 860. After that, Rorik disappears from the Western sources for a considerable period of time, while only two years later, in 862, the Russian chronicle's Rurik arrives in the eastern Baltic, builds the fortress of Ladoga, and later moves to Novgorod.
     "Rorik of Dorestad reappeared in Frankish chronicles in 870, when his Friesland demesne was returned to him by Charles the Bald; in 882 Rorik of Dorestad is mentioned as dead (without a date of death specified). The Russian chronicle places the death of Rurik of Novgorod at 879, a three year gap prior than the Frankish chronicles. According to Western sources, the ruler of Friesland was converted to Christianity by the Franks. This may have parallels with the Christianization of the Rus', as reported by Patriarch Photius in 867.
     "The idea of identifying the Rurik of Nestor's chronicle with Rorik of Dorestad of the Carolingian chronicles was revived by the anti-Normanists Boris Rybakov and Anatoly H. Kirpichnikov in the mid-20th century,[5] while modern scholars like Alexander Nazarenko object to it.[6] The hypothesis of their identity currently lacks support among scholars,[7] though support for a "Normannic" (i.e. Norse, rather than Slavic) origin of the Rus' has increased.
Folklore
     "In Estonian folklore there is a tale of three brothers, who were born as sons of a peasant, but through great bravery and courageousness later became all rulers in foreign countries. The brothers were called Rahurikkuja (Troublemaker), Siniuss (Blue snake) and Truuvaar (Loyal man)(estonianized names for Rurik and his brothers Sineus and Truvor), names given to them by their childhood friend, a blue snake.[8]
Legacy
     "The Rurik dynasty (or Rurikids) went on to rule the Kievan Rus', and ultimately the Tsardom of Russia, until 1598, and numerous noble Russian and Ruthenian families claim a male-line descent from Rurik. Vasily Tatishchev (a Rurikid himself) claimed that Rurik was of Wendish extraction and went so far as to name Rurik's wife, Efanda of Norway (Edvina); mother, Umila; his maternal grandfather, Gostomysl; and a cousin, Vadim (apparently basing his account on the lost Ioachim Chronicle).[citation needed]
References
1. Christian Raffensperger and Norman W. Ingham, "Rurik and the First Rurikids," The American Genealogist, 82 (2007), 1–13, 111–19.
2. Ipat’ievskaia letopis’ 1962:14; Radzivilovskaia letopis’ 1989:16
3. Kirpichnikov, Anatoliy N. (2004). "A Viking Period workshop in Staraya Ladoga, excavated in 1997" (PDF). Journal of Swedish Antiquarian Research. Retrieved 17 September 2015.
4. Omeljan Pritsak, "Rus'", in Medieval Scandinavia: An Encyclopedia, ed. by Phillip Pulsiano (New York: Garland, 1993), pp. 555-56.
5. Kirpichnikov, Anatoly H. "???????? ? ????????? ???????. ?????? ? ??????????? ?????????". ?????? ????????????? ??????, ???; 1997; ch. 7–18.
6. Nazarenko, Alexander. "Rjurik ? Riis Th., Rorik", Lexikon des Mittelalters, VII; Munich, 1995; pp. 880, 1026.
7. Andrei Mozzhukhin (5 October 2014). «????? — ??? ???????» ["Rurik – is a legend"] (in Russian). Russian Planet. Retrieved 12 November 2014. Interview with Igor Danilevsky.
8. Kampmaa, Mihkel. Majaussi kaswandikud. Tähelepanemise wäärt Eesti muinasjutt. Sakala, no 20, 09.06.1890."4

Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod
Per Med Lands: "RURIK [Roric] (-[879]). According to the Primary Chronicle 860/62, following a call to "the Varangian Russes [=Scandinavians]…to come to rule and reign over us", Rurik and his two brothers migrated to settle, Rurik the oldest brother settling in Novgorod[15]. Franklin & Shephard comment that "the story [in the Primary Chronicle]…remains highly controversial"[16]. The initial Scandinavian settlements seem to have been at Gorodishche, the town of Novgorod (as its name implies) being a new settlement which was probably established nearby in the 950s[17]. The Primary Chronicle records Rurik´s death in 879[18]. This chronology is dubious when compared with the more robust dates attributable to his supposed grandson Sviatoslav (see below). m ---. The name of Rurik´s wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[15] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 860-862, p. 59.
[16] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 38-9.
[17] Franklin & Shepard (1998), p. 38-9.
[18] Russian Primary Chronicle, 870-879, p. 60.5
GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:128.
2. Ancestors of Leo Tolstoi, 2006 , Berejnova, Maria.1



Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod and Roerik (?) King of Dorestand and Sylt
Note on identity of Rurik, konung of Novgorod and Ladoga (by Andrey Alexandrovich Frizyuk)

Roerik of Dorestad (see HERE)was born about 810/20. Frankish chroniclers mention that he received lands in Friesland from the Emperor Louis I. This was not enough for him, and he started to plunder neighbouring lands: he took Dorestad in 850, captured Haithabu in 857, looted Bremen in 859... The Emperor was enraged and stripped him of all his possessions in 860. After that Roerik disappears from the Western sources for a considerable period of time.

The first Russian chronicle, that of Nestor, says that in 862 one Rurik arrived to Slavic lands with his kin from the land of "rus" (identified by Adam of Bremen with Jutland) in 862, built the fortress of Ladoga, and then ruled in Novgorod. Nestor wrong translated Scandinavian words 'sine hus' (with house) and 'tru voring' (with loyal guard) as the names of Rorik's brothers: Sineus and Truvor. Archaeologists discovered that the settlement of Ladoga was really built about this time, and that earthenware, household utensils, etc were imported from Jutland! These facts led many scholars to identify the Viking prince Rurik of Russian chronicles with Roerik of Dorestad.

Roerik of Dorestad reappeared in Frankish chronicles in 870, when his Friesland demesne was returned to him by Charles the Bold; in 882 he is already mentioned as dead. Nestor places the death of Russian Rurik at 879. Quite striking for a coincidence!
Last updated 22nd October 2003.6 Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod was Ruler of Novgorod: The eastern Slavs settled on the territory of present-day European Russia from the 5th to the 8th century A.D. In the 8th century some of the eastern Slavs were under the protectorate of the Khazars, an Altaic people who established a strong and prosperous state along the lower Volga. After the end of the 8th century, the northern part of Russia began to be penetrated by the Scandinavian Vikings, called in the old Russian chronicles Varangians or Rus (hence the name of Russia). In the course of the 9th century, the Varangians constantly moved southward along the main waterway leading from the Baltic to the Black Sea, gradually establishing domination over the Slav communities. According to tradition, the Scandinavian chieftain Rurik ruled in Novgorod in the 860s. Later he was recognized as the founder of the Russian princely dynasty. between 862 and 879.7

Family

Efenda (?) of Novgorod b. 850, d. bt 880 - 944
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ryurik: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079368&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-1, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rurik. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#_Toc481496211. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Note on identity of Rurik, konung of Novgorod and Ladoga (by Andrey Alexandrovich Frizyuk): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/note/rurik.html
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 224. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Igor|Ingvar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079369&tree=LEO

Efenda (?) of Novgorod

F, #6844, b. 850, d. between 880 and 944
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited8 Sep 2004
     Efenda (?) of Novgorod was born in 850.1 She married Ryurik (Rurik) (?) Grand Duke of Novgorod between 863 and 877; WFT Est.2
Efenda (?) of Novgorod died between 880 and 944; WFT Est.1
     Efenda (?) of Novgorod
Efanda/Sfandra/Ingrid of Norway, sister of Helgu/Oleg (+912), konung of Novgorod and Kiev.2 GAV30 EDV-30 GKJ-31. Efenda (?) of Novgorod was also known as Efanda/Sfandra/Ingrid (?) of Norway.2

Citations

  1. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html

Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne1,2,3,4

M, #6845, b. between 1090 and 1095, d. 27 September 1155
FatherEtienne I "Tete-Hardi" (?) Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Count de Vienne et de Macon5,1,2,3 b. c 1065, d. 27 May 1102
MotherBeatrix (?) de Lorraine1,6,2,3 b. c 1058, d. a 1117
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited15 Dec 2019
     Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne married Ponce/Poncette de Traves, daughter of Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne and Alix/Alice (?);
Her 2nd?? husband.1,2,7,8,3 Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne was born between 1090 and 1095; Med Lands says b. bef 1102.2,3
Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne died on 27 September 1155.9,1,2,3
     Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne
Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME [III] de Mâcon, son of ETIENNE [I] "Tête-Hardi" Comte de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Beatrix of Lotharingia (before 1102-27 Sep 1155). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comes Renaldus [de Burgundia] fratrem comitem Guilelmum" when recording his marriage[164]. He succeeded in 1120 as Comte de Mâcon. Comte d'Auxonne 1127. He joined the Second Crusade 1147-1149. Guillaume enjoyed some influence in Vienne as shown by the following document: Konrad III King of Germany confirmed the rights of the archbishop and chapter over Vienne, specifying that he removed (“alienamus”) “Willelmum Matisconensem comitem” [Guillaume [III] Comte de Mâcon] from “predicta urbe”, by charter dated 6 Jan 1146[165]. “Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[166]. Regent of Bourgogne-Comté for his niece Beatrix, whom he attempted to deprive of her inheritance: one of Sigebert’s continuators records, when recording Beatrix’s marriage, that “filiam comitis Burgundionum Reinaldi” had been imprisoned by “patruus suus comes Wilhelmus” after her father died[167]. “Comes Stephanus...et fratrem meum comitem Gerardum” settled disputes with Charlieu abbey, with the consent of “matris nostræ...comitis Willelmi patris nostri et avi nostri domini Theobaldi de Treva”, by charter dated 28 Oct 1157[168].
     "m PONCE de Traves Dame de Traves, daughter of THIBAUT Seigneur de Traves & his wife Alix --- (-15 Apr after 1157). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aleyde comitissa qui fuit unica heres de Treva, relicta Theobaldi de Rogemont" as wife of "comitem Guilelmum"[169]. Bouchard points out that Thibaut [I] Seigneur de Rougemont was still alive when Comte Guillaume is alleged to have married Ponce de Traves and suggests that the chronicle confused her with her mother[170]. It is more likely that Alberic confused Ponce with her sister Alix, who is reported to have married Thibaut [II] Seigneur de Rougemont. "Willelmus Masticonensis comes et Burgundie" donated "abbatiam de Balma" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jun 1147, confirmed by "Poncia comitissa uxore mea et filiis meis Stephano et Gerardo"[171]. The necrology of La Charité records the death “XVII Kal Mai” of “Poncia comitissa Burgundiæ”[172].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Comte Guillaume's mistress is not known. The name of her son suggests that she was Italian.
Med Lands cites:
[163] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1190, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863.
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1190, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863.
[165] MGH DD K III, 145, p. 262.
[166] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 122.
[167] Sigeberti Auctarium Affligemense, MGH SS VI, 1156, p. 403.
[168] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, p. 95.
[169] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1190, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863.
[170] Bouchard (1987), p. 277.
[171] Cluny, Tome V, 4122, p. 465.
[172] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 128.3


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 27.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 80.10


Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne
Per Genealogics: "Guillaume was born about 1094, the son of Etienne I 'Tete-Hardi' de Bourgogne, comte de Mâcon, and his wife Beatrix. He was count of Mâcon from 1102 to his death, count of Auxonne from 1127, count of Vienne and regent of the county of Burgundy from 1148. With his wife Poncette de Traves, widow of Thiébaut I de Rougemont and daughter of Thibault de Traves, connétable de Bourgogne, and his wife Alice, he had two sons, Etienne II and Gérard I, who would both have progeny. Guillaume is mainly known for his attempt to abduct his niece Béatrice de Bourgogne, daughter of his brother Renaud III, comte de Mâcon, comte de Bourgogne, but Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa prevented him and married Béatrice in 1156. Guillaume died about 1155."10

Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne
Per Wikipedia:
     "William III of Mâcon (1088–1156), also known as William IV of Burgundy, was count of Mâcon (1102–1156), count of Auxonne (1127–1156), count of Vienne (1148–1156) and regent of the county of Burgundy (1148–1156). He was a younger son of Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, and of Beatrice of Lorraine. After the death of his brother, Renaud III, he took control of the county of Burgundy in the name of his niece Beatrice. He was recognized as count by the emperor Frederick Barbarossa by 1152. He died in 1156 while on Crusade in the Holy Land, and Frederick married Beatrice and took over the county.[1]
     "William married Adelaide-Pontia (Poncette), heiress of Lord Theobald of Traves, and had the following issue:[1]
** Stephen II, who succeeded to Auxonne, Trier and the title Count of Burgundy. His son was:
     "Stephen III of Auxonne
** Girard I, who succeeded to Mâcon, Vien. Among his children were:
     "Beatrice of Viennois (died 8.4.1230) married c. 1175 to Umberto III, Count of Savoy (born 1136 - died 1189).
** Malaspina, possibly illegitimate[1].

Notes
1. Constance Brittain Bouchard, Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980–1198 (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1987), pp. 277–78."4 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25. Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne was also known as William III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne.4 He was Comte de Mâcon between 1102 and 1156.4 He was Comte de Auxonne between 1127 and 1156.4 He was Regent of the county of Burgundy between 1148 and 1156. He was Comte de Vienne between 1148 and 1156.4

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027399&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GuillaumeIIIMacondied1155B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_M%C3%A2con. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne I 'Tete-Hardi' de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026533&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027403&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poncette de Traves: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027400&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#PonceTravesMGuillaumeVienne
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29138
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027399&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne II de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026466&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027396&tree=LEO

Ponce/Poncette de Traves1,2,3

F, #6846, b. 1090
FatherThibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne1,2,4,3 b. 1064, d. c 1122
MotherAlix/Alice (?)5,3
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited15 Dec 2019
     Ponce/Poncette de Traves married Guillaume III (?) Comte de Mâcon, Aixonne et de Vienne, son of Etienne I "Tete-Hardi" (?) Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Count de Vienne et de Macon and Beatrix (?) de Lorraine;
Her 2nd?? husband.1,6,2,3,7 Ponce/Poncette de Traves married Thiébaut I de Rougemont; NG This marriage is doubtful. Genealogics shows this first marriage for Ponce. Wikipedia only shows her mariage to Guillaume IV de Bourgogne. Med Lands says that a marriage to Thiébaut is doubtful.8,9,10,11 Ponce/Poncette de Traves was born in 1090.12
Ponce/Poncette de Traves died after 15 April 1156.13,3
     GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 27.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 80.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XV 153.9



Ponce/Poncette de Traves
Per Wikipedia article "Liste des seigneurs de Traves":
     "Ponce/Pontia/Poncia/Poncette, (vers 1090 - 15 avril 1156/66), dame de Traves : elle épouse vers 1120 Guillaume IV de Bourgogne-III de Mâcon, (1088 - 1157), comte de Mâcon, d'Auxonne et de Vienne, régent du comté de Bourgogne. De son mariage elle a :
     "Gérard Ier (1124-1184) comte de Mâcon et de Vienne, seigneur de Traves, sire de Salins par son union avec Maurette fille de Gaucher III de Salins ; leurs fils sont:
** Guillaume IV de Mâcon et de Vienne, † 1224 : la Maison de Vienne est issue de sa fille Béatrix,
** et Gaucher IV (1153-1219), sire de Salins et de Traves, dont la fille Marguerite (vers 1190-1259 ; fille de sa première femme Mathilde Ire de Bourbon) vendra Salins au duc Hugues IV de Bourgogne en 1225 (en 1237, par échange contre Chalon et Auxonne, le comte Jean l'Antique ci-après acquiert Salins et Ornans du duc Hugues), et dont la veuve et deuxième épouse, Alix de Dreux arrière-petite-fille de Louis VI, transmettra sa part de Traves à son deuxième mari, Renard II de Choiseul ci-dessous,
** et leurs filles (toutes avec postérité) : Béatrice (1160-1230 ; x 1177 le comte Humbert III de Savoie) ; Alexandrine (1164-1242 ; x Ulric V de Bâgé) ; Ide (1162-1224 ; x Humbert II de Coligny) ;

     "et Étienne Ier-II, † 1173, comte d'Auxonne et sire de Traves, qui épouse Judith de Lorraine fille du duc Mathieu Ier : parents d'Étienne II-III, lui-même père de Jean de Chalon l'Antique d'où viendra la suite des comtes de Bourgogne ;
Sources (See original Wikipedia article for links to some of these sources)
** Jean Baptiste Guillaume, Histoire généalogique des sires de Salins au comté de Bourgogne, C.F. Mourgeon, 1757 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 92 à 109
** Louis Moreri, Le grand dictionnaire historique ou Le melange curieux de l'Histoire sacrée et profane, libraires associés Le Mercier, Desaint et Saillant, Jean-Thomas Herissant, Boudet, Vincent, Le Prieur, 1759 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 656
** François-Ignace Dunod de Charnage, Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire du comté de Bourgogne, contenant l'idée générale de la noblesse et le nobiliaire du dit comté, J.-B. Charmet, 1740 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 232 à 234
** Léopold Niepce, Histoire de Sennecey, de ses seigneurs, du canton de Sennecey-le-grand et de ses dix-huit communes, Dejussieu, 1866 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 316 à 317
** Médiéval Généalogie : [1] [archive]
Notes et références
1. Cartulaire de l'Abbaye Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon, Charte XXXI, vers 1073-87.
2. Cité par Albert d'Aix au siège de Siège de Nicée : "Robertus filius Gerardi…Milo…cognomine Louez…Walterus de Domedart et eius filius Bernardus…Ruthardus filius Godefridi…Rodulfus ditissimus copiarum…Gisilbertus de Treva (Traves) unus de principibus Burgundiæ…Oliverus de castro Jussi…Achar de Montmerla…Walterus de Verveis, Arnulfus de Tyr, Johannes de Namecca…"
3. Charte du 28 octobre 1157 : "Comes Stephanus...et fratrem meum comitem Gerardum" termine une dispute avec l'abbaye de Cherlieu, avec le consentement de "matris nostræ...comitis Willelmi patris nostri et avi nostri domini Theobaldi de Treva", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive]).
4. Le nécrologe de l'abbaye de la Charité enregistre le décès de "Alaida domina de Treva fundatrix huius domus", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive])
5. "Renardus de Choiseul domicellus (le seigneur Renard de Choiseul) filius domni Roberti de Choiseul (fils du seigneur Robert de Choiseul) domini de Trove (seigneur de Traves) et Margareta eius uxor domicella (son épouse Marguerite), filia quondam domini Henrici domini Branciduni (fille du seigneur Henri de Brancion)", Médiéval Généalogie, Raynard de Choiseul (lire en ligne [archive])."11 Ponce/Poncette de Traves was also known as Alice Traves.

Family 1

Thiébaut I de Rougemont d. a 15 Apr 1107

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poncette de Traves: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027400&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#PonceTravesMGuillaumeVienne. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibault de Traves: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027401&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027402&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027399&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GuillaumeIIIMacondied1155B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thiébaut I de Rougemont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00163600&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poncette de Traves: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027400&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#ThibautIRougemont
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_seigneurs_de_Traves. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29139
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne II de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026466&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027396&tree=LEO

Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne1

M, #6847, b. 1064, d. circa 1122
FatherEtienne/Guy de Traves Seigneur de Traves2 b. c 1040, d. a 1098
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited15 Dec 2019
     Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne married Alix/Alice (?)3,1,4 Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne was born in 1064.5
Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne died circa 1122; Genealogics says d. ca 1122; Med Lands says d. aft 28 Oct 1157.6,4
     Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne
Per Genealogics:
     "Thibault was born about 1064, the son of Etienne/Guy de Traves. With his wife Alice he had a daughter Poncette who would have progeny, and possibly a daughter Alix, who would also have progeny. _Europäische Stammtafeln_ gives only Poncette and indicates that she was married twice, to Thiébaut I de Rougemont and Guillaume IV de Bourgogne, comte d'Auxonne et Maçon, and had progeny with both. Other sources indicate that Poncette married Guillaume IV de Bourgogne about 1120, and that Alix married Thiébaut I de Rougemont.
     "Poncette/Alix brought the lordship of Traves to Thiébaut I, which then remained with the house of Rougemont until it passed to the house of Choiseul with the marriage of Sibille de Rougemont, daughter of Thiébaut III, to Robert de Choiseul, sire de Traves de Scey-sur-Saone, before 1259.
     "Thibault de Traves was constable of Burgundy, which could have been connected to his daughter's marriage to Guillaume IV de Bourgogne. He died about 1122."6

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 80.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XV 153.6



Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne
Per Med Lands: "THIBAUT de Traves (-after 28 Oct 1157). Constable of the county of Bourgogne. “Comes Stephanus...et fratrem meum comitem Gerardum” settled disputes with Charlieu abbey, with the consent of “matris nostræ...comitis Willelmi patris nostri et avi nostri domini Theobaldi de Treva”, by charter dated 28 Oct 1157[1062]. m ALIX, daughter of --- (-23 Jan ----). The necrology of La Charité records the death “X Kal Feb” of “domina Alaida domina de Treua fundatrix huiusdomus”[1063]. Thibaut & his wife had [two] children:
a) PONCE de Traves (-15 Apr after 1156)
b) [ALIX de Traves"

Med Lands cites:
[1062] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, p. 95.
[1063] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 128.4


Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne
Per Wikipedia article "Liste des seigneurs de Traves":
     "Thibaud de Traves, (1064 - 1122), seigneur de Traves3, connétable de Bourgogne.
Mariage et succession :
     "Il épouse Alice/Alix4 de qui il a :
** Ponce/Pontia/Poncia/Poncette, (vers 1090 - 15 avril 1156/66), dame de Traves : elle épouse vers 1120 Guillaume IV de Bourgogne-III de Mâcon, (1088 - 1157), comte de Mâcon, d'Auxonne et de Vienne, régent du comté de Bourgogne. De son mariage elle a :
     "**Gérard Ier (1124-1184) comte de Mâcon et de Vienne, seigneur de Traves, sire de Salins par son union avec Maurette fille de Gaucher III de Salins ; leurs fils sont :
     "Guillaume IV de Mâcon et de Vienne, † 1224 : la Maison de Vienne est issue de sa fille Béatrix,
     "et Gaucher IV (1153-1219), sire de Salins et de Traves, dont la fille Marguerite (vers 1190-1259 ; fille de sa première femme Mathilde Ire de Bourbon) vendra Salins au duc Hugues IV de Bourgogne en 1225 (en 1237, par échange contre Chalon et Auxonne, le comte Jean l'Antique ci-après acquiert Salins et Ornans du duc Hugues), et dont la veuve et deuxième épouse, Alix de Dreux arrière-petite-fille de Louis VI, transmettra sa part de Traves à son deuxième mari, Renard II de Choiseul ci-dessous,
     "et leurs filles (toutes avec postérité) : Béatrice (1160-1230 ; x 1177 le comte Humbert III de Savoie) ; Alexandrine (1164-1242 ; x Ulric V de Bâgé) ; Ide (1162-1224 ; x Humbert II de Coligny) ;

     "**et Étienne Ier-II, † 1173, comte d'Auxonne et sire de Traves, qui épouse Judith de Lorraine fille du duc Mathieu Ier : parents d'Étienne II-III, lui-même père de Jean de Chalon l'Antique d'où viendra la suite des comtes de Bourgogne ;
** Alix, dame de Traves : épouse Thibaud II de Rougemont vicomte de Besançon : leur arrière-arrière-petite-fille Isabelle/Sibylle de Rougemont épouse Robert de Choiseul ci-dessous. (NB See original Wikipedia artifcle for information on the Famille de Choiseul)

Sources (See original Wikipedia article for links to some of these sources)
** Jean Baptiste Guillaume, Histoire généalogique des sires de Salins au comté de Bourgogne, C.F. Mourgeon, 1757 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 92 à 109
** Louis Moreri, Le grand dictionnaire historique ou Le melange curieux de l'Histoire sacrée et profane, libraires associés Le Mercier, Desaint et Saillant, Jean-Thomas Herissant, Boudet, Vincent, Le Prieur, 1759 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 656
** François-Ignace Dunod de Charnage, Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire du comté de Bourgogne, contenant l'idée générale de la noblesse et le nobiliaire du dit comté, J.-B. Charmet, 1740 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 232 à 234
** Léopold Niepce, Histoire de Sennecey, de ses seigneurs, du canton de Sennecey-le-grand et de ses dix-huit communes, Dejussieu, 1866 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 316 à 317
** Médiéval Généalogie : [1] [archive]
Notes et références
1. Cartulaire de l'Abbaye Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon, Charte XXXI, vers 1073-87.
2. Cité par Albert d'Aix au siège de Siège de Nicée : "Robertus filius Gerardi…Milo…cognomine Louez…Walterus de Domedart et eius filius Bernardus…Ruthardus filius Godefridi…Rodulfus ditissimus copiarum…Gisilbertus de Treva (Traves) unus de principibus Burgundiæ…Oliverus de castro Jussi…Achar de Montmerla…Walterus de Verveis, Arnulfus de Tyr, Johannes de Namecca…"
3. Charte du 28 octobre 1157 : "Comes Stephanus...et fratrem meum comitem Gerardum" termine une dispute avec l'abbaye de Cherlieu, avec le consentement de "matris nostræ...comitis Willelmi patris nostri et avi nostri domini Theobaldi de Treva", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive]).
4. Le nécrologe de l'abbaye de la Charité enregistre le décès de "Alaida domina de Treva fundatrix huius domus", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive])
5. "Renardus de Choiseul domicellus (le seigneur Renard de Choiseul) filius domni Roberti de Choiseul (fils du seigneur Robert de Choiseul) domini de Trove (seigneur de Traves) et Margareta eius uxor domicella (son épouse Marguerite), filia quondam domini Henrici domini Branciduni (fille du seigneur Henri de Brancion)", Médiéval Généalogie, Raynard de Choiseul (lire en ligne [archive])."7 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26. Thibault de Traves Connétable de Bourgogne was also known as Renaud de Traves.8

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibault de Traves: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027401&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne|Guy de Traves: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00633266&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027402&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#PonceTravesMGuillaumeVienne. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibault de Traves: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027401&tree=LEO
  7. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_seigneurs_de_Traves. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (Fr).
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30105
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poncette de Traves: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027400&tree=LEO

Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins1

M, #6848, b. 1088, d. 15 August 1175
FatherHumbert III (?) Sire de Salins2,3 b. bt 1075 - 1080, d. b 1149
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited30 Dec 2019
     Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins married Unknown (?); Per Med Lands: "m as her second husband, ---, widow of ---, daughter of --- (-after 1172.)4" Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins was born in 1088.5 He was born circa 1110.1
Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins died on 15 August 1175 at St. Dyan.1,3
Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins was buried after 15 August 1175 at Cathedral Saint-Étienne de Besançon, Besançon, Departement du Doubs, Franche-Comté, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     15 Aug 1175
     BURIAL     Cathedral Saint-Étienne de Besançon, Besancon, Departement du Doubs, Franche-Comté, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 23 Aug 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 151119832.6
     GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins
Per Med Lands:
     " GAUCHER [IV] de Salins (-15 Aug 1175, bur Besançon Saint-Etienne). "Humbertus de Salinis" donated property to Romainmotier, with the consent of "filioque meo Walcherio", by undated charter[1003]. Seigneur de Salins. “Dominus Valcherius filius domini Humberti Salinensis” donated property to Besançon Saint-Paul, for the souls of “patris sui Humberti et avi sui Valcheri”, by charter dated 1133, witnessed by “...Stephanus vicecomes Bisuntinus...”[1004]. “Gaucherius Salinensis” donated property to the canons of Alaize, with the consent of “Rodulphus de Valbertivillare nepos eius”, by charter dated 1145[1005]. “Gaulcherius Salinensis” donated property to the canons of Montbenoît by charter dated 18 Jun 1148, witnessed by “Rodulphus nepos meus, Bartholomæus et Guillelmus milites de Cicun...”[1006]. Emperor Friedrich I granted “Quingiacum, Lislam, Lobium”, as held by “comes Reinaldus in vita sua”, and “villam juxta Dolam...Campus-Pagani” to “Odo Campaniensis...Beatricis...consortis nostræ consanguineus”, by charter dated 26 Jul 1166, witnessed by “...Galcherus de Salins, Wido abbas, Girardus de Fontvens...Gislebertus vicecomes Visulii...Gaymarus de Cycun...”[1007]. “Walcherius Salinensis dominus” confirmed donations made to Balerne abbey by “pater meus Humbertus et avus meus Walcherius”, with the consent of “comitissa filia mea et filiis eius...domina Salinensi et Nicoleta filia eius”, by charter dated 1172, witnessed by “Dominus Hugo præpositus Sancti Anatolii, Stephanus frater eius, Petrus Grossus, Willermus Turellus frater eius...”[1008]. “Gualcherius Salinensis dominus” granted “casamentum donni Pontii de Cuisello” to “comiti Girardo et filiæ meæ uxori eius”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hugo de Tramelay conestabulus...” which also refers to a dispute between “Simon de Commarcey” and “comitem Girardum”[1009]. “Gualcherius Salinensis dominus” donated property “in villa de Sup” to Besançon Saint-Etienne, and to “Guido nepos meus Salinensis archidiaconus...in vita sua”, confirmed by “comes Girardus et Maura comitissa et domina de Salinis” by charter dated 1175 witnessed by “...Hugo de Tremelay, Guido frater eius...Wuillelmus de Cicum, Odilo de Cicum”[1010]. The necrology of Besançon church records the death “XIX Kal Sep” of “Valterus dominus Salinensis” and his donation of “villam de Sup”[1011].
     "m as her second husband, ---, widow of ---, daughter of --- (-after 1172). Her two marriages, and her daughter by her first marriage, are confirmed by the charter dated 1172 under which “Walcherius Salinensis dominus” confirmed donations made to Balerne abbey by “pater meus Humbertus et avus meus Walcherius”, with the consent of “comitissa filia mea et filiis eius...domina Salinensi et Nicoleta filia eius”[1012]"
Med Lands cites:
[1003] Romainmotier, p. 469.
[1004] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 44.
[1005] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 45.
[1006] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 46.
[1007] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 50.
[1008] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 52.
[1009] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 53.
[1010] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 54.
[1011] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 55.
[1012] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 52.3
Gauthier IV (?) Sire de Salins was also known as Gaucher III de Salins.

Family

Unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29140
  2. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I29141
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#GaucherIISalinsMbefore1044AremburgeB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkcounty.htm#GuyonneSalins1200A
  5. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 December 2019), memorial page for Gaucher de Salins, IV (unknown–15 Aug 1175), Find A Grave Memorial no. 151119832, citing Cathedral Saint-Étienne de Besançon, Besancon, Departement du Doubs, Franche-Comté, France ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/151119832/gaucher-de-salins. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html

Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève1

M, #6849, b. circa 1070, d. between 1125 and 1128
FatherGerold I (?) Comte de Genève2,1 b. c 1012, d. c 1045
MotherThietburga (?) of Savoy3,1
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève married Ida (Itha) (?) de Faucigny, daughter of Louis (?) Sire de Faucigny and (?) de Glane.4,5,1,6 Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève married Unknown (?);
His 2nd wife?
Per Med Lands. "[m secondly ---. The chronology of this family suggests that Comte Amédée [I]6 may have been his father’s son by an otherwise unrecorded second marriage.]" Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève was born circa 1070.4,1
Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève died between 1125 and 1128; Weis says d. 1125-1128; Genealogics says bd. bef 1128.4,1
     Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève
Per Genealogics:
     "Aimon was the son of Gerold I, comte de Genève, and his second wife Tetberga, whom some sources give as a daughter of the emperor-elect Rudolf von Rheinfelden, Herzog von Schwaben. Aimon's mother had been married to Louis, sire de Faucigny, with whom she had a number of children. Aimon married Ita de Faucigny, daughter of Louis by his second wife a daughter of the de Glane family. They had three children of whom Amédée I would have progeny.
     "In Aimon's conflict with the bishops of Geneva he suffered a setback with the Treaty of Seyssel of 1124, in which he gave up his temporal claim to the city of Geneva in favour of Bishop Humbert de Grammont. He transferred the capital of the county of Geneva to Annecy. Aimon died in 1128."1 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-24.

Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève
Per Med Lands:
     "AIMON [I] de Genève, son of GERAUD Comte de Genève & his [second] wife Tetberga --- ([1060/65]-12 May [1125/28]). "Patris Geraldi et fratris Cononis, comes Aymo successor" donated property to the church of Leman, at the request of "fratris Burchardi monachi", by undated charter[38]. Comte de Genève. Vassal of the bishop of Geneva. Avoué of St Victor, Geneva. "Aymo comes Gebennensis et filius meus Giroldus" founded the priory of Chamonix by undated charter, dated to [1088/99], signed by "uterini fratres comitis, Willelmus Fulciniacus et Amedeus…"[39]. "Aymo…Genevensium comes" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Eugendi by charter dated 1090, signed by "Itæ uxoris eius, Geraldi filii eius"[40]. "Aymo comes Gebennensis et Amadeus filius eius" renounced rights to certain property in favour of the church of Saint-Martin by undated charter[41]. "Aymone…comite" approved the donation by Guy Bishop of Geneva of the church of Saint-Jean de Genève to the monastery of Ainay, near Lyon, by charter dated 1113[42]. A charter dated 1124 records an agreement between Humbert Bishop of Geneva and "Aymone comite"[43]. The necrology of Saint-Claude records the death "IV Id Mai" of "Aymo comes Gebennensis"[44].
     "m [firstly] ITA, daughter of --- (-after 1090). "Aymo…Genevensium comes" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Eugendi by charter dated 1090, signed by "Itæ uxoris eius, Geraldi filii eius"[45].
     "[m secondly ---. The chronology of this family suggests that Comte Amédée [I] may have been his father’s son by an otherwise unrecorded second marriage.]"
Med Lands cites:
[38] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, LXIX, p. 293.
[39] Besson (1759), Preuves, 8, p. 346.
[40] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, XLVI, p. 257.
[41] Mallet (1843), Tome II, Documents, VII, p. 23.
[42] Mallet (1845), Tome IV, Documents, I, p. 11.
[43] Spon (1730) Histoire de Genève (Geneva), Tome II, Preuves, I, p. 3.
[44] Obituaires de Lyon I, Diocèse de Lyon, Abbaye de Saint-Claude, p. 282.
[45] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, XLVI, p. 257.6

Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève was educated; Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 11:158.1 Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève was also known as Aymon I (?) Comte de Genève.7

Family 2

Unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aimon I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030565&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerold I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027360&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Tetberga: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027362&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 133-23, p. 118. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ita de Faucigny: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030566&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#AimonIGenevadied1128A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_I_of_Geneva. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Ida (Itha) (?) de Faucigny1

F, #6850
FatherLouis (?) Sire de Faucigny b. b 1030, d. 1060
Mother(?) de Glane2
Last Edited17 Dec 2019
     Ida (Itha) (?) de Faucigny married Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève, son of Gerold I (?) Comte de Genève and Thietburga (?) of Savoy.3,1,4,5
Ida (Itha) (?) de Faucigny died circa 1098; Genealogics says d. bef. 1091, but her sometime attributed son, Amedeo I was born ca 1098.1,5
     Ida (Itha) (?) de Faucigny
Per Med Lands: "m [firstly] ITA, daughter of --- (-after 1090). "Aymo…Genevensium comes" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Eugendi by charter dated 1090, signed by "Itæ uxoris eius, Geraldi filii eius"[45]."
Med Lands cites: [45] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, XLVI, p. 257.5

Reference: Genealgocis cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 11:158.1

Family

Aimon I (?) Comte de Genève b. c 1070, d. bt 1125 - 1128

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ita de Faucigny: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030566&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Glane: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00593159&tree=LEO
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 133-23, p. 118. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aimon I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030565&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#AimonIGenevadied1128A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ermenrad (?)1

M, #6851
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     GAV-27.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 70.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermenrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141244&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Gerold II (?) of Geneva

M, #6852, b. 1058, d. 1080
FatherGerold I (?) Comte de Genève b. c 1012, d. c 1045
MotherGisela (?) Countess of Geneva b. c 1020, d. bt 1038 - 1104
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Gerold II (?) of Geneva was born in 1058.1
Gerold II (?) of Geneva died in 1080.

Citations

  1. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Thietburga (?) of Savoy1,2

F, #6853
FatherAmadeus I "Coda" (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana2 b. 1016, d. a 18 Dec 1051
MotherAdelaide (?) d'Albon2
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     Thietburga (?) of Savoy married Louis (?) Sire de Faucigny, son of Ermenrad (?), circa 1053;      His 1st wife.3,4,1,2 Thietburga (?) of Savoy married Gerold I (?) Comte de Genève, son of Bertha (?) Countess of Flanders, in 1061; his 2nd wife.3,5,1
     GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-25.

Thietburga (?) of Savoy
Leo van de pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XI 158.1

Thietburga (?) of Savoy
Thietburga; 1m: ca 1053 Sire Louis I de Faucigny (+1060); 2m: Cte Gerold II of Geneva (+1080.)2 Thietburga (?) of Savoy was also known as Thietburga (?) of Savoy.

Family 1

Louis (?) Sire de Faucigny b. b 1030, d. 1060
Child

Family 2

Gerold I (?) Comte de Genève b. c 1012, d. c 1045
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Tetberga: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027362&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 133-22, p. 118. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027363&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerold I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027360&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vullielme I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141245&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aimon I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030565&tree=LEO

George Harrison

M, #6854
FatherJohn Harrison b. c 1490, d. c 1538
Last Edited29 May 2001
     George Harrison
(an unknown value.)1

Citations

  1. [S642] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0902 (n.p.: Release date: September 15, 1997, unknown publish date).

Hugh Harrison

M, #6855
FatherJohn Harrison b. c 1490, d. c 1538
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Hugh Harrison
(an unknown value.)1

Citations

  1. [S642] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0902 (n.p.: Release date: September 15, 1997, unknown publish date), gives three sons for John: Peter, George and Hugh.

Robert Lee

M, #6856, b. circa 1380, d. WFT Est. 1397-1470
FatherRoger Lee of Coton and Nordley Regis b. 1360
MotherMargaret de Astley b. 1354, d. 1423
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Robert Lee married Petronella Lee WFT Est. 1397-1430.1
Robert Lee died WFT Est. 1397-1470.1 He was born circa 1380 at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England.1
     Robert Lee
(an unknown value.)1

Family

Petronella Lee b. WFT Est. 1376-1396, d. WFT Est. 1397-1480

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Petronella Lee

F, #6857, b. WFT Est. 1376-1396, d. WFT Est. 1397-1480
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Petronella Lee was born WFT Est. 1376-1396.1 She married Robert Lee, son of Roger Lee of Coton and Nordley Regis and Margaret de Astley, WFT Est. 1397-1430.1
Petronella Lee died WFT Est. 1397-1480.1
     Petronella Lee
(an unknown value.)1

Family

Robert Lee b. c 1380, d. WFT Est. 1397-1470

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Sir Thomas Lee

M, #6858, b. circa 1554
FatherSir John Lee Esq., of Coton b. 1530, d. 1588
MotherJoyce Romney b. 1538, d. 1609
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Sir Thomas Lee was born circa 1554 at Shropshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

William Lee

M, #6859, b. circa 1556
FatherSir John Lee Esq., of Coton b. 1530, d. 1588
MotherJoyce Romney b. 1538, d. 1609
Last Edited29 May 2001
     William Lee was born circa 1556 at England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Edward Lee

M, #6860, b. circa 1558
FatherSir John Lee Esq., of Coton b. 1530, d. 1588
MotherJoyce Romney b. 1538, d. 1609
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Edward Lee was born circa 1558 at England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Gilbert Lee

M, #6861, b. circa 1560
FatherSir John Lee Esq., of Coton b. 1530, d. 1588
MotherJoyce Romney b. 1538, d. 1609
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Gilbert Lee was born circa 1560 at England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Jasper Lee

M, #6862, b. December 1561
FatherSir John Lee Esq., of Coton b. 1530, d. 1588
MotherJoyce Romney b. 1538, d. 1609
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Jasper Lee was born in December 1561 at Alveley Parish, Shropshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Robert Lee

M, #6863, b. circa 1602
FatherRichard Lee of Coton, Gent. b. 1563, d. 1621
MotherElizabeth Bendy b. c 1593
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Robert Lee was born circa 1602 at England.1

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Ann Mason1

F, #6864, b. circa 1667, d. before 28 July 1704
Last Edited4 Aug 2019
     Ann Mason was born circa 1667 at Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, USA.2 She married Capt. William II Kendall, son of Col. William Kendall and Mary (Susannah) Baker, circa 1683 at Northampton Co., Virginia, USA.1,3
Ann Mason died before 28 July 1704 at Northampton Co., Virginia, USA.2
     Ann Mason
(an unknown value.)4

Family

Capt. William II Kendall b. 1663, d. c Jul 1696

Citations

  1. [S2244] Arlis Herring Genealogy Database, online http://arlisherring.com/tng/index.php, Capt. William Kendall II: http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I004387&tree=Herring. Hereinafter cited as ArlisHerring.com.
  2. [S3744] Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties, online <http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/>, https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I028492&tree=Tree1. Hereinafter cited as Early Settlers of So Md and VA Northern Neck.
  3. [S3744] Early Settlers of So Md and VA Northern Neck, online http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/, https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I025174&tree=Tree1
  4. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Capt. William II Kendall1

M, #6865, b. 1663, d. circa July 1696
FatherCol. William Kendall2,3 b. c 1620, d. 28 Jul 1686
MotherMary (Susannah) Baker3 b. c 1625, d. a 1687
Last Edited4 Aug 2019
     Capt. William II Kendall was born in 1663 at Northampton Co., Virginia, USA.4,3 He married Ann Mason circa 1683 at Northampton Co., Virginia, USA.1,3
Capt. William II Kendall died circa July 1696 at Northampton Co., Virginia, USA.4,3
     Reference:
"Early Colonial Settlers" cites: The Storied Kendalls with historical and genealogical records of Scottish and allied families, 1947, 209 pgs
     "URL (Click on link) http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=482&last=&g_p=P6&collec tion=LO Patent
Title Kendall, William.
Publication 28 October 1672.
Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
Related See also the following surname(s): Kindall.
Note Location: Accomack County.
Grantee(s): Kendall, William and Kendall, Mary (son and daughter of William Kendall).
Description: 6000 acres beg.g at a right line drawne from Crooked Creek joining land of Colo. Edmund Scarburgh and Mr. Henry Smith.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 482 (Reel 6).
     "http://www.esva dot net/ghotes/
Kendall, Anne A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, John (of William III) A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, John A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, Mary A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, Mason A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, Sarah (Matthews) A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, Susannah Savage A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, William I A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, William II A147- A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area
Kendall, William III A147- North Accomack County, Inland, Temperanceville area.3


Capt. William II Kendall
per Herring: [quote]Son of Colonel William Kendall (q. v.), was a member of the house of burgesses for Northampton county in 1688 and 1692-1693. He made his will January 29, 1695, which was proved July 28, 1696. He left two sons William and John, and three daughters.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I
IV--Burgesses and Other Prominent Persons[end quote].4,1

Family

Ann Mason b. c 1667, d. b 28 Jul 1704

Citations

  1. [S2244] Arlis Herring Genealogy Database, online http://arlisherring.com/tng/index.php, Capt. William Kendall II: http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I004387&tree=Herring. Hereinafter cited as ArlisHerring.com.
  2. [S2244] ArlisHerring.com, online http://arlisherring.com/tng/index.php, William Kendall: http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I030257&tree=Herring
  3. [S3744] Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties, online <http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/>, https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I025174&tree=Tree1. Hereinafter cited as Early Settlers of So Md and VA Northern Neck.
  4. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.

Col. John Armistead1

M, #6866, b. circa 1640, d. after 1688
FatherWilliam Armistead2,3 b. c 1610, d. b 1666
MotherAnne Ellis (?)4,3 b. c 1612, d. WFT Est. 1648-1707
Last Edited27 Feb 2019
     Col. John Armistead was born circa 1640 at Elizabeth City, Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA.1 He married Judith Hone, daughter of Theophilus Hone, circa 1670 at Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA;
Roberts doesn't give Judith's surname. Garber [1910:30]: "The family name of Judith, whom John Armistead married, is uncertain, but the will of Christopher Robinson...might indicatre that her name was Robinson. He calls Col. John Armistead "my loving brother-in-law," and Judith, "My loving sister, Mrs. Judith Armistead."
     However Roberts [2015:4] identifies her as Judith HONE, dau. of Theophilus Hone.5,6,3
Col. John Armistead died after 1688 at Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA.1
     Col. John Armistead
John, of "Hesse", was in Caroline County, VA in 1685 in the House of Burgess. He is found
in the 1971 book "Prominent Families In America With British Ancestry" on page 2541.7

Family

Judith Hone b. c 1649, d. 1699
Children

Citations

  1. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 19, line 78.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, p. 19, line 156.
  3. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond, VA: Whisttet & Shepperson Printers, 1910), p. 29. Hereinafter cited as Garber [1910] The Armistead Family.
  4. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, p. 19, line 157.
  5. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, p. 19, lines 78 & 79.
  6. [S4511] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, 2012 Edition (with revisions and updates): Additions and Corrections to the 2012 reprint (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, November 2015), p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Roberts [2015] Corrections to Ancestors of Am Pres.
  7. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.
  8. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, Garber [1910] The Armistead Family, p. 30.

Judith Hone1

F, #6867, b. circa 1649, d. 1699
FatherTheophilus Hone1 b. c 1621
Last Edited27 Feb 2019
     Judith Hone was born circa 1649 at Yorkshire, England.1 She married Col. John Armistead, son of William Armistead and Anne Ellis (?), circa 1670 at Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA;
Roberts doesn't give Judith's surname. Garber [1910:30]: "The family name of Judith, whom John Armistead married, is uncertain, but the will of Christopher Robinson...might indicatre that her name was Robinson. He calls Col. John Armistead "my loving brother-in-law," and Judith, "My loving sister, Mrs. Judith Armistead."
     However Roberts [2015:4] identifies her as Judith HONE, dau. of Theophilus Hone.2,1,3
Judith Hone died in 1699.1
     Judith Hone
Judith was from Cliesby in Yorkshire.4

Family

Col. John Armistead b. c 1640, d. a 1688
Children

Citations

  1. [S4511] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, 2012 Edition (with revisions and updates): Additions and Corrections to the 2012 reprint (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, November 2015), p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Roberts [2015] Corrections to Ancestors of Am Pres.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 19, lines 78 & 79.
  3. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond, VA: Whisttet & Shepperson Printers, 1910), p. 29. Hereinafter cited as Garber [1910] The Armistead Family.
  4. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.
  5. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, p. 19, line 79.

William Armistead

M, #6868, b. circa 1610, d. before 1666
FatherAnthony Armistead1,2 b. c 1587
MotherFrances Thompson1,2 b. c 1588, d. WFT Est. 1630-1683
Last Edited3 Aug 2019
     William Armistead was born circa 1610 at Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.3 He was baptized on 3 August 1610 at All Saints Church, Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.3,4,5 He married Anne Ellis (?) in 1632.4
William Armistead died before 1666 at Giggleswick, Yorkshire, England.3,4,5
     William Armistead immigrated to Virginia, USA.6

William Armistead
William was the emigrant of the family. He came to VA in 1635. He received land grants in Elizabeth City, VA, & later moved to Gloucester County, VA.
His christening record is with All Saints Church.3

Family

Anne Ellis (?) b. c 1612, d. WFT Est. 1648-1707
Children

Citations

  1. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 19, line 312.
  2. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond, VA: Whisttet & Shepperson Printers, 1910), p. 17. Hereinafter cited as Garber [1910] The Armistead Family.
  3. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.
  4. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition, p. 19, line 156.
  5. [S3359] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, 2012 Edition (with revisions and updates) (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), p. 30. Hereinafter cited as Roberts [2012] Ancestors of Am Pres.
  6. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, Garber [1910] The Armistead Family, p. 19.
  7. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, Garber [1910] The Armistead Family, p. 29.
  8. [S3744] Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties, online <http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/>, https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I055150&tree=Tree1. Hereinafter cited as Early Settlers of So Md and VA Northern Neck.

Anthony Armistead

M, #6869, b. circa 1587
Last Edited8 Apr 2018
     Anthony Armistead was born circa 1587 at Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.1,2 He married Frances Thompson circa 1608 at Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.1,2
     Anthony Armistead
The name means "place of abode" - Hermit Stead became 'Armit-stead.1

Family

Frances Thompson b. c 1588, d. WFT Est. 1630-1683
Children

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 19, line 312.
  3. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond, VA: Whisttet & Shepperson Printers, 1910), p. 17. Hereinafter cited as Garber [1910] The Armistead Family.

Frances Thompson

F, #6870, b. circa 1588, d. WFT Est. 1630-1683
Last Edited8 Apr 2018
     Frances Thompson died WFT Est. 1630-1683.1 She was born circa 1588 at Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.1 She married Anthony Armistead circa 1608 at Kirkdeighton, Yorkshire, England.1,2
     Frances Thompson
(an unknown value.)1

Family

Anthony Armistead b. c 1587
Children

Citations

  1. [S643] Unknown compiler, GEDCOM file imported on 9 Oct 2000. World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Family #0756., CD-ROM (n.p.: Brøderbund Software, Inc., Release date: September 15, 1997). Hereinafter cited as WFT E1-0756.
  2. [S661] Compiled by Gary Boyd Roberts, Ancestors of American Presidents, First Authoritative Edition (n.p.: Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California, 1995, 1995), p. 19, line 312.
  3. [S4129] Virginia Armistead Garber, The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond, VA: Whisttet & Shepperson Printers, 1910), p. 17. Hereinafter cited as Garber [1910] The Armistead Family.