Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria1,2,3

M, #10471, b. circa 1050, d. 12 October 1095
FatherErnst "the Bold" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria1,2,4,5,6,7 b. 1027, d. 9 Jun 1075
MotherAdelheid (?) von Wettin2,8,6,7 b. c 1040, d. 26 Jan 1071
ReferenceGAV28 EDV26
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria married Ida (?) von Ratelberg, daughter of Tiemo/Thiemo/Dietmar II von Formbach Graf im Schweinachgau and NN (?) von Braunschweig.9,1,2,10,6,7,11 Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria was born circa 1050.12,2,6
Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria died on 12 October 1095; Genealogy.EU (Babenberg page) says d. 1095/12.10.1102; Genealogics says d. 12 Oct 1095.1,2,6
     GAV-28 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Leopold, known as 'the Fair', was born about 1050, the son of Ernst, Markgraf von der Ostmark, and Adelheid der Ostmark. His year of birth is uncertain, sources giving it as early as about 1050 and as late as between 1058 and 1063. He was a Babenberg margrave of Austria ruling from 1075 onwards. He married Ida von Ratelberg, given by _Europäische Stammtafeln_ as the daughter of Tiemo von Formbach, and a daughter of Liudolf of Brunswick. They had a son Leopold III who would succeed his father and have progeny, as well as seven daughters who married dukes and counts from Carinthia, Bohemia and Germany. Their daughter Ita is recorded as having progeny.
     “In the Investiture Dispute, Leopold first sided with Emperor Heinrich IV, but in 1081 at the Diet of Tulln he switched sides under the influence of his wife Ida and Bishop Altmann of Passau. Subsequently he was deposed by the emperor, who gave the fief to Wratislaw II, king of Bohemia, who defeated Leopold in the Battle of Mailberg on 12 May 1082. Ultimately Leopold managed to retain his position, but he lost some territory in Southern Moravia. Leopold resided in Gars am Kamp.
     “In 1089 Leopold helped pay for the construction of Melk Abbey in eastern Austria by donating the land for the new abbey. A few miles away from Melk, in eastern Austria, are the ruins of the castle of Thunau am Kamp, once a summer residence of Leopold. He died on 12 October 1095.”.6 He was joined the first Crusade.3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 84.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 15.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6
Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria was also known as Liutpold II (?) Markgraf of Austria.7 Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria was also known as Leopold II (?) Markgraf von Ostmark.3

; This is the same person as ”Leopold II, Margrave of Austria” at Wikipedia and as ”Leopold II. (Österreich)” at Wikipedia (DE).13,14

; Per Med Lands:
     "LIUTPOLD ([1058/63]-12 Oct 1095, bur Gars). The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Liutpoldus filius eius [=Ernust] quintus marchio"[109]. His birth date range is estimated from the estimated birth dates of his mother and his son Markgraf Leopold. He succeeded his father in 1075 as LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria. The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[110]. It is assumed that this refers to Markgraf Liutpold II, although the reference to "filium Lucz" is unexplained. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[111]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[112]. The necrology of Melk records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus marchio qui monachum vitam hic instituit"[113]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus prior marchio"[114].
     "m IDA, daughter of --- (-Asia Minor [Sep] 1101 or after). The parentage of Markgräfin Ida is uncertain. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[115], she was Ida von Ratelberg, daughter of Thiemo [II] Graf [Formbach] & his wife ---, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. Wegener quotes a 12th century document concerning travel tolls at Schärding dated [1060/70] which names "filios Tiemonis Ekkebertum et Henricum et dominam Itam" as participating in the foundation of Suben monastery but he does not make the connection between this Ita and the Margräfin of Austria[116]. The chronology is not favourable for Ida having been the daughter of Graf Thiemo [II], whose death is recorded in 1040. If this paternity was correct, Ida would therefore have been about twenty years older than her husband, and at least in her early to mid-forties when she gave birth to her son Liutpold, which seems improbable. The primary source which confirms her name "von Ratelberg" has not yet been identified. The Auctarium Mariaecellense in 1100 records that "Ita marchionisse Austrie, Liupoldi marchionis relicta" left for Jerusalem[117]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[118]. The army was scattered after being defeated by the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor in [Sep] 1101. It is not known what happened to Markgräfin Ida, but she was presumably killed. Albert of Aix says that the fate of Ida is completely unknown, but adding that "some say that she was taken into permanent exile in the kingdom of Khorazan among the thousand women who were taken"[119]. According to later legend, she ended her days in a harem where she gave birth to the Muslim hero Zengi (which is chronologically impossible): the Historia Welforum records that "Itam comitissam, matrem Leopaldi marchionis orientalis" was kidnapped by "unus de principibus Sarracenorum…ex eaque Sanguinem illum sceleratissumum, ut aiunt, progenuit"[120]."
Med Lands cites:
[109] Auctarium Vindobonense 1075, MGH SS IX, p. 723.
[110] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89.
[111] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1095, MGH SS IX, p. 609.
[112] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562.
[113] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522.
[114] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[115] ES XVI 37.
[116] Vornbacher Traditionskodex, OÖ UB 1, p. 779, quoted in Wegener (1965/67), p. 137.
[117] Auctarium Mariaecellense 1100, MGH SS IX, p. 647.
[118] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[119] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XXXIX, p. 581.
[120] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 13, MGH SS XXI, p. 462.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Babenberg): “C1. [1m.] Mgve Leopold II of Austria (1075-96), *1050, +12.10.1102; m.Ida von Ratelberg”.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "IDA (-after 1101). The Codex Traditionum of Formbach monastery records a dispute with Suben monastery, and names "due…sorores Touta et Himildrud…nobilissimis" and "filios Meginhardi comitis Odalricum et Hermannum ac filios Tiemonis Ekkebertum et Heinricum et domnam Itam"[281]. same person as…? IDA von Ratelberg (-Asia Minor [Sep] 1101 or after). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[282], the wife of Luitpold II Markgraf of Austria was the daughter of Graf Thiemo [II], although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. The chronology is not favourable for this hypothesis in view of Graf Thiemo's death being recorded in 1040. If this paternity was correct, Ida would have been about twenty years older than her husband, and at least in her early to mid-forties when she gave birth to her son Luitpold, which seems improbable. The primary source which confirms her name "von Ratelberg" has not yet been identified. The Auctarium Mariaecellense in 1100 records that "Ita marchionisse Austrie, Liupoldi marchionis relicta" left for Jerusalem[283]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitissa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, when "Rodulfus…de Scegonges ortus, cognatus ipsius Willelmi principis" was killed and "Hardewinus…de Sancto Medardo" captured, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[284]. The army was scattered after being defeated by the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor in [Sep] 1101. It is not known what happened to Markgräfin Ida, but she was presumably killed. Albert of Aix says that "some say that she was taken into permanent exile in the kingdom of Khorazan[285]. According to later legend, she ended her days in a harem where she gave birth to the Muslim hero Zengi: the Historia Welforum records that "Itam comitissam, matrem Leopaldi marchionis orientalis" was kidnapped by "unus de principibus Sarracenorum…ex eaque Sanguinem illum sceleratissumum, ut aiunt, progenuit"[286].
     "m LUITPOLD II Markgraf of Austria, son of ERNST Markgraf of Austria & his first wife Adelheid von Meissen [Wettin] ([1058/63]-12 Oct 1095, bur Gars)."
Med Lands cites:
[281] Codex Traditionum Monasterii Formbacensis, CCCLVIII, Urkundenbuch des Landes ob der Enns, Vol. I, p. 729.
[282] ES XVI 37.
[283] Auctarium Mariaecellense 1100, MGH SS IX, p. 647.
[284] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[285] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XXXIX, p. 581.
[286] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 13, MGH SS XXI, p. 462.16
He was Margrave of Austria between 1075 and 1096.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leopold II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079791&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ernst 'the Brave': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079793&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#ErnstIdied1075B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leopold II 'the Fair': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079791&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#LiutpoldIIdied1095
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid von der Ostmark: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079794&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-26, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Ratelberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079792&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Ratelberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079792&tree=LEO
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28180
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_II,_Margrave_of_Austria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Leopold II. (Österreich): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_II._(%C3%96sterreich). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#ItaRatelbergdied1101MLeopoldIIAustria
  17. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32691

Ida (?) von Ratelberg1,2,3

F, #10472, b. before 1040, d. after 1101
FatherTiemo/Thiemo/Dietmar II von Formbach Graf im Schweinachgau4,5,2,3 d. 28 Aug 1040
MotherNN (?) von Braunschweig6,2,3
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Ida (?) von Ratelberg married Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria, son of Ernst "the Bold" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria and Adelheid (?) von Wettin.7,4,1,8,9,10,2 Ida (?) von Ratelberg was born before 1040.2
Ida (?) von Ratelberg died after 1101 at Heraclea.2,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "LIUTPOLD ([1058/63]-12 Oct 1095, bur Gars). The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Liutpoldus filius eius [=Ernust] quintus marchio"[109]. His birth date range is estimated from the estimated birth dates of his mother and his son Markgraf Leopold. He succeeded his father in 1075 as LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria. The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[110]. It is assumed that this refers to Markgraf Liutpold II, although the reference to "filium Lucz" is unexplained. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[111]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[112]. The necrology of Melk records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus marchio qui monachum vitam hic instituit"[113]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus prior marchio"[114].
     "m IDA, daughter of --- (-Asia Minor [Sep] 1101 or after). The parentage of Markgräfin Ida is uncertain. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[115], she was Ida von Ratelberg, daughter of Thiemo [II] Graf [Formbach] & his wife ---, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. Wegener quotes a 12th century document concerning travel tolls at Schärding dated [1060/70] which names "filios Tiemonis Ekkebertum et Henricum et dominam Itam" as participating in the foundation of Suben monastery but he does not make the connection between this Ita and the Margräfin of Austria[116]. The chronology is not favourable for Ida having been the daughter of Graf Thiemo [II], whose death is recorded in 1040. If this paternity was correct, Ida would therefore have been about twenty years older than her husband, and at least in her early to mid-forties when she gave birth to her son Liutpold, which seems improbable. The primary source which confirms her name "von Ratelberg" has not yet been identified. The Auctarium Mariaecellense in 1100 records that "Ita marchionisse Austrie, Liupoldi marchionis relicta" left for Jerusalem[117]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[118]. The army was scattered after being defeated by the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor in [Sep] 1101. It is not known what happened to Markgräfin Ida, but she was presumably killed. Albert of Aix says that the fate of Ida is completely unknown, but adding that "some say that she was taken into permanent exile in the kingdom of Khorazan among the thousand women who were taken"[119]. According to later legend, she ended her days in a harem where she gave birth to the Muslim hero Zengi (which is chronologically impossible): the Historia Welforum records that "Itam comitissam, matrem Leopaldi marchionis orientalis" was kidnapped by "unus de principibus Sarracenorum…ex eaque Sanguinem illum sceleratissumum, ut aiunt, progenuit"[120]."
Med Lands cites:
[109] Auctarium Vindobonense 1075, MGH SS IX, p. 723.
[110] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89.
[111] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1095, MGH SS IX, p. 609.
[112] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562.
[113] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522.
[114] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[115] ES XVI 37.
[116] Vornbacher Traditionskodex, OÖ UB 1, p. 779, quoted in Wegener (1965/67), p. 137.
[117] Auctarium Mariaecellense 1100, MGH SS IX, p. 647.
[118] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[119] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XXXIX, p. 581.
[120] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 13, MGH SS XXI, p. 462.10


; Per Genealogy.EU (Babenberg): “C1. [1m.] Mgve Leopold II of Austria (1075-96), *1050, +12.10.1102; m.Ida von Ratelberg”.11 Ida (?) von Ratelberg was also known as Ida (?) of Cham.12,1

; This is the same person as ”Ida of Formbach-Ratelnberg” at Wikipedia.13

; Per Genealogics:
     “The year of Ida's birth is uncertain, as is her parentage. _Europäische Stammtafeln_ give her as the daughter of Tiemo von Formbach and a daughter of Liudolf of Brunswick, though some doubts have been raised about the plausibility of this, given that she would have had to be born no later than early 1041 (Tiemo was killed in battle in August 1040). This would make her considerably older than her husband when she married. Ida was reputedly the most beautiful woman in Europe in her time.
     “She married Leopold II, Markgraf von der Ostmark, son of Ernst, Markgraf von der Ostmark, and Adelheid der Ostmark. They had a son Leopold III who would succeed his father and have progeny, as well as seven daughters who married dukes and counts from Carinthia, Bohemia and Germany. Their daughter Ita is recorded as having progeny.
     “In 1101, six years after the death of her husband, Ida went on the First Crusade, and in September of that year she was among those ambushed at Heraclea Cybistra by the sultan Kilij Arslan I. Ekkehard of Aura reports that Ida was killed in the fighting, but rumours persisted that she survived, and was carried off to the sultan's harem, where she had children by him whom the Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa met when he was on a later crusade. However this story seems unlikely, as in 1101 her son Leopold, born in 1073, was already 28.”.2 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 15.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 16:37.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2
Ida (?) von Ratelberg was also known as Ida (?) of Formbach-Ratelnberg.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "IDA (-after 1101). The Codex Traditionum of Formbach monastery records a dispute with Suben monastery, and names "due…sorores Touta et Himildrud…nobilissimis" and "filios Meginhardi comitis Odalricum et Hermannum ac filios Tiemonis Ekkebertum et Heinricum et domnam Itam"[281]. same person as…? IDA von Ratelberg (-Asia Minor [Sep] 1101 or after). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[282], the wife of Luitpold II Markgraf of Austria was the daughter of Graf Thiemo [II], although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. The chronology is not favourable for this hypothesis in view of Graf Thiemo's death being recorded in 1040. If this paternity was correct, Ida would have been about twenty years older than her husband, and at least in her early to mid-forties when she gave birth to her son Luitpold, which seems improbable. The primary source which confirms her name "von Ratelberg" has not yet been identified. The Auctarium Mariaecellense in 1100 records that "Ita marchionisse Austrie, Liupoldi marchionis relicta" left for Jerusalem[283]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitissa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, when "Rodulfus…de Scegonges ortus, cognatus ipsius Willelmi principis" was killed and "Hardewinus…de Sancto Medardo" captured, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[284]. The army was scattered after being defeated by the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor in [Sep] 1101. It is not known what happened to Markgräfin Ida, but she was presumably killed. Albert of Aix says that "some say that she was taken into permanent exile in the kingdom of Khorazan[285]. According to later legend, she ended her days in a harem where she gave birth to the Muslim hero Zengi: the Historia Welforum records that "Itam comitissam, matrem Leopaldi marchionis orientalis" was kidnapped by "unus de principibus Sarracenorum…ex eaque Sanguinem illum sceleratissumum, ut aiunt, progenuit"[286].
     "m LUITPOLD II Markgraf of Austria, son of ERNST Markgraf of Austria & his first wife Adelheid von Meissen [Wettin] ([1058/63]-12 Oct 1095, bur Gars)."
Med Lands cites:
[281] Codex Traditionum Monasterii Formbacensis, CCCLVIII, Urkundenbuch des Landes ob der Enns, Vol. I, p. 729.
[282] ES XVI 37.
[283] Auctarium Mariaecellense 1100, MGH SS IX, p. 647.
[284] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[285] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XXXIX, p. 581.
[286] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 13, MGH SS XXI, p. 462.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Ratelberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079792&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#ItaRatelbergdied1101MLeopoldIIAustria. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Tiemo von Formbach: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201834&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Braunschweig: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201835&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-26, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Ratelberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079792&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leopold II 'the Fair': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079791&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#LiutpoldIIdied1095
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28181
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_of_Formbach-Ratelnberg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32691

Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #10473, b. 2 June 1202, d. 10 February 1280
FatherBaudouin IXVI (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Graaf van Henegouwen , Emperor of Constantinople1,7,8,9,4,10,11,12,13 b. Jul 1171, d. 11 Jun 1205
MotherMarie (?) de Champagne1,8,3,5,14,12,13 b. c 1174, d. 9 Aug 1204
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited6 Dec 2020
     Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant was born on 2 June 1202 at Valenciennes, Hainaut, France (now).1,8,7,15,10,13 She married Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault, son of Jacques (?) seigneur d'Avesnes, Leuse, Conde and Guise and Adelvie/Ameline (?) de Guise, on 23 July 1212;
Her 1st husband; Weis (AR7, line 168-29) says m. ca 1212; Med Lands says "m before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]."16,1,17,8,15,10,18,19,7,13 Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant and Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault were divorced circa 1221; consanguinity.1,17,2,8,20,5,19,13 Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant married Guillaume II de Dampierre sn de Dampierre, Saint-Dizier et Noyel, son of Guy II de Dampierre seigneur de Dampierre, Saint-Just et Saint-Dizier, seigneur de Bourbon, de Montlucon and Mahaut/Maud I (?) Dame de Bourbon, between 18 August 1223 and 15 November 1223;      Her 2nd husband.1,21,22,23,15,10,13,24,25
Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant died on 10 February 1280 at age 77; Weis (AR7, line 168-29) says d. ca 1280.26,1,8,10,15,7,13
     ; This is the same person as:
”Margaret II, Countess of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as
”Marguerite de Constantinople” at Wikipédia (Fr.)27,28 EDV-21 GKJ-22. She was 20th Countess of Hainault at Hainaut, France.5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 36.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7


; Per Genealogics:
     “Margarethe was born about 1202, the younger daughter of Baudouin VI-IX, count of Flanders and Hainault, emperor of Constantinople, and Marie de Champagne. He left on the Fourth Crusade before she was born, and her mother left two years later, leaving Margarethe and her older sister Jeanne in the guardianship of their uncle Philippe of Namur.
     “After her mother died in 1204, and her father the following year, the now-orphaned Margarethe and the much older Jeanne remained under Philippe of Namur's guardianship until 1208, when he gave their wardship to King Philippe II August of France.
     “On 23 July 1212, aged only ten, she was married to her first husband Bouchard d'Avesnes, a prominent Hainault nobleman, son of Jacques d'Avesnes, seigneur d'Avesnes, Condé et de Leuze and Ameline de Guise. Given Margarethe's youth the marriage could not be consummated for some years. However it was apparently a love match, initially approved by Margarethe's sister Jeanne, who had herself recently married. The two sisters subsequently had a falling-out over Margarethe's share of their inheritance, which led Jeanne to attempt to get Margarethe's marriage dissolved. She alleged that the marriage was invalid, and without much inspection of the facts of the case Pope Innocent III condemned the marriage, though he did not formally annul it.
     “Bouchard and Margarethe continued as a married couple, having three sons, two of whom would play an important part in the War of the Succession of Flanders and Hainault: Jan I, later count of Hainault; and Baudouin, sire de Beaumont. Their first-born son, also called Baudouin, had died in infancy.
     “As the couple's conflict with Jeanne grew violent, Philippe II August advised Pope Innocent III to declare the marriage of Bouchard and Margarethe illegal. Innocent eventually excommunicated the couple on 19 January 1216. They took refuge in Luxembourg. In 1219 Bouchard was captured in combat and imprisoned in Ghent for two years. To obtain his liberation, Margarethe in 1221 accepted the dissolution of the marriage and Bouchard left for Italy to fight for the Holy See. Upon his return he was decapitated at Rupelmonde on 7 September 12144, on the orders of Jeanne.
     “While Bouchard was in Rome, Jeanne convinced Margarethe to re-marry, this time to Guillaume de Dampierre, son of Guy II de Dampierre, seigneur de Bourbon, de Montlucon, the constable of Champagne, and Mahaut I, dame de Bourbon. Margarethe and Guy had five children of whom two sons, Guy and Jean, would have progeny.
     “The situation caused something of a scandal, for the marriage was bigamous in some eyes, and violated the church's strictures on consanguinity as well. The disputes regarding the validity of the two marriages and the legitimacy of Margarethe's children by each husband continued for decades, becoming entangled in the politics of the Holy Roman Empire.
     “In 1246 King Louis IX of France, acting as an arbitrator, gave the right to inherit Flanders to the Dampierre children, and the rights to Hainault to the Avesnes children. This would seem to have settled the matter, but in 1253 problems arose again. The eldest son, Jan I d'Avesnes uneasy about his rights, convinced Willem II, count of Holland to seize Hainault and the parts of Flanders which were within the bounds of the empire. Willem was, as emperor-elect, overlord for these territories, and also Jan's brother-in-law. A civil war followed, which ended when Willem's brother Floris, regent of Holland, and Jan I d'Avesnes defeated the forces of Jan's mother Margarethe and her son Guy de Dampierre at the Battle of Walchered on 4 July 1253.
     “Following the death of Margarethe in 1280, the union of Flanders and Hainault was formally dissolved. Margarethe's son Guy de Dampierre succeeded to the countship of Flanders, and her grandson Jan II d'Avesnes became count of Hainault.”.7

; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Marguerite II de Flandres et de Hainaut ° 02/06/1202 (Valenciennes) + 10-11/02/1280 élevée à la Cour de France et mariée par le Roi, 20° comtesse de Flandres et de Hainaut (1244-1278 : elle abdique le 29/12/1278 en faveur de son fils Gui de Dampierre)
     ép. 1) avant 23/07/1212 (ann. par le Concile de Latran 1215 ; bulles papales d’excommunication d’Innocent III du 19/01/1215 & d’Honorius III des 17/07/1217 & 24/04/1219 ; sép. ~1221/23) Bouchard d’Avesnes ° ~1180/82 + 1244 seigneur de Beaumont-lès-Valenciennes ordonné prêtre avant son mariage (cause d’annulation) (fils de Jacques, seigneur d’Avesnes, Leuze et Condé et d’Adeline de Guise) capturé et retenu prisonnier par sa belle-soeur, la comtesse Jeanne, jusqu’à séparation des deux époux (1219-1221)
     ép. 2) entre 18/08 et 15/11/1223 Guillaume II de Dampierre ° après 1196 + 03/09/1231 seigneur de Dampierre et Saint-Dizier, vicomte de Troyes, Gouverneur de Flandres (fils cadet de Gui II, seigneur de Dampierre, sire de Bourbon, et de Mathilde de Bourbon, dame de Bourbon) (cf Avesnes, Hainaut & Dampierre, Flandres qui suit p.13)
     Arbitrage du Roi de France, Louis IX pour la succession : le comté de Flandres est attribué aux Dampierre, et celui de Hainaut aux Avesnes”.10

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 2): “E2. Css Margueritte II of Flanders and Hainault (1224-78), *Valenciennes 2.6.1202, +10.2.1280; 1m: before 23.7.1212 (div ca 1221) Bouchard d'Avesnes (*ca 1182 +1244); 2m: 1223 Guillaume II de Dampierre (*after 1196 +3.9.1231)”.29

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Flandre (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Iohannam et Margaretam" as the two daughters of "Balduinus"[592]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini records that "secunda filia Margareta" was born after her parents left on their travels[593]. On the other hand, according to Villehardouin Comtesse Marie stayed behind when her husband left on Crusade, gave birth, and afterwards left for Acre where she died[594]. After her father's death, she was sent to Paris with her sister on the orders of Philippe II King of France[595]. Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[596]. Her first marriage was arranged by King Philippe II, her husband being a noble from Hainaut whose family had long supported French interests. Her first husband demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance and, after complaining to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 on the grounds that Bouchard d'Avesnes had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law Ctss Jeanne in 1219. He was released two years later on condition he separate from his wife[597]. The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "Marghareta" and "Willelmo de Dampetra"[598]. Matthew of Paris names Guillaume as second husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[599]. The Annales Blandinienses record the succession in 1244 of "Margareta soror eius [=Iohanna comitissa"[600]. She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders and Ctss de Hainaut, both her husbands having died. Her children by her first marriage claimed their inheritance, but Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Hainaut should be given to the Avesnes children and Flanders to the Dampierre children[601]. She abdicated 29 Dec 1278 in favour of her son Guy de Dampierre. The Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Margarete Flandrie et Hanonie…comitisse"[602].
     "m firstly (before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]) BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, son of JACQUES Seigneur d'Avesnes, de Leuze et de Condé & his wife Adeline de Guise ([1180]-1244, bur Clairefontaine). Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[603].
     "m secondly ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) GUILLAUME [II] Seigneur de Dampierre, son of GUY [II] Seigneur de Dampierre, Seigneur de Bourbon & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon, dame de Bourbon (after 1196-3 Sep 1231)."
Med Lands cites:
[592] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Marchianensis, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[593] Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini auctore Iohanne Longo de Ipra 46.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 824.
[594] Villehardouin, 15, p. 111.
[595] Nicholas (1992), p. 151.
[596] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[597] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[598] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 574.
[599] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[600] Annales Blandinienses 1244, MGH SS V, p. 31.
[601] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[602] Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis, MGH SS XXI, p. 619.
[603] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.13


; Per Genealogy.EU (): “E4. Sn Bouchard d'Avesnes et d´Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault, Canon of St.Pierre de Lille, *Oizy, Namur ca 1180, +1244, bur Clairefontaine; m.III.1212/before 23.7.1212 (div 1221) Css Margareta of Flanders (*2.6.1202 +10.2.1280)”.17

; Per Racines et Histoire (Avesner): “Bouchard d’Avesnes ° ~1180 (Oisy, Namur) + 1244 seigneur d’Avesnes, Baumont et Etroen, Bailli de Hainaut, chanoine de Saint-Pierre de Lille
     ép. 23/08/1212 (mariage arrangé par le Roi Philippe II «Auguste» ; ann. 1215 (Concile du Latran) ; vie commune jusqu’en 1219 ; sép. définitive 1221 après sa défaite face à Jeanne de Flandres, sa belle-soeur) Marguerite II de Flandres ° 02/06/1202 + 10/02/1280 comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant (1244, succède à sa soeur Jeanne ; abdique 29/12/1278 en faveur de son fils Gui de Dampierre) (fille de Baudoin IX, comte de Flandres = B.VI, comte de Hainaut = B.1er, Empereur latin de Constantinople, et de Marie de Champagne ; ép. 2) 18/08-15/11/1223 Guillaume II, seigneur de Dampierre + 03/09/1241 - d’où des guerres de succession entre les Dampierre (Flandres) et les Avesnes (Hainaut))”.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, son of JACQUES Seigneur d'Avesnes, de Leuze et de Condé & his wife Adeline de Guise ([1180]-1244, bur Clairefontaine). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Buchardi Avenennsis" as brother of "Galteri comitis Blesensis", specifying that he married "Margareta"[859]. Seigneur d’Etroen. Bailli de Hainaut. Canon of Saint Pierre at Lille. After his marriage, which was arranged by Philippe II King of France, he demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance. After his sister-in-law Jeanne Ctss of Flanders complained to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 on the basis that Bouchard had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law in 1219. He was released two years later on condition that he separated from his wife[860].
     "m (before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Flandres, daughter of BAUDOUIN IX Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN VI Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marie de Champagne (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Iohannam et Margaretam" as the two daughters of "Balduinus"[861]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini records that "secunda filia Margareta" was born after her parents left on their travels[862]. On the other hand, according to Villehardouin Comtesse Marie stayed behind when her husband left on Crusade, gave birth, and afterwards left for Acre where she died[863]. After her father's death, she was sent to Paris with her sister on the orders of Philippe II King of France[864]. Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[865]. Her first marriage was arranged by King Philippe II, her husband being a noble from Hainaut whose family had long supported French interests. Her first husband demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance and, after complaining to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 as Bouchard d'Avesnes had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law Ctss Jeanne in 1219. He was released two years later on condition he separate from his wife[866]. Pope Gregory IX declared the marriage invalid 31 Mar 1237 and the children illegitimate[867]. She married secondly ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) Guillaume [II] Seigneur de Dampierre. The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "Marghareta" and "Willelmo de Dampetra"[868]. Matthew of Paris names Guillaume as second husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[869]. The Annales Blandinienses record the succession in 1244 of "Margareta soror eius [=Iohanna comitissa"[870]. She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders and Ctss de Hainaut, both her husbands having died. Her children by her first marriage claimed their inheritance, but Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Hainaut should be given to the Avesnes children and Flanders to the Dampierre children[871]. She abdicated 29 Dec 1278 in favour of her son Guy de Dampierre. The Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Margarete Flandrie et Hanonie…comitisse"[872]."
Med Lands cites:
[859] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis (Cod. Divion. et Cisterc. addunt), MGH SS IX, p. 308.
[860] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[861] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Marchianensis, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[862] Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini auctore Iohanne Longo de Ipra 46.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 824.
[863] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”),15, p. 111.
[864] Nicholas (1992), p. 151.
[865] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[866] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[867] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2489, p. 335.
[868] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 574.
[869] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[870] Annales Blandinienses 1244, MGH SS V, p. 31.
[871] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[872] Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis, MGH SS XXI, p. 619.19


; Per Racines et Histoire (Bourbon Ancein): “2) Guillaume II de Dampierre ° après 1196 + 03/09/1231 seigneur de Dampierre, Saint-Dizier et Noyel
     ép.1223 Marguerite II, comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes et d’Ostrevant ° 1202 + 1280 (fille de Bauduin 1er Empereur Latin de Constantinople)”


Per Racines et Histoire (Dampierre): “Guillaume II de Dampierre ° après 1196 + 03/09/1231 seigneur de Dampierre, Saint-Dizier et Noyel, vassal du comte de Champagne, Gouverneur de Flandres (signataire d’une charte de pacification du comte Thibaud du 31/12/1223)
     ép. entre le 18/08 et le 15/111223 Marguerite II de Flandres, comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes et d’Ostrevant (1244, succède à sa soeur Jeanne ; abdique le 29/12/1278 en faveur de son fils Gui) ° 02/06/1202 + 10-11/02/1280 (fille de Baudouin IX de Flandres (Baudouin VI de Hainaut, Baudouin 1er, Empereur latin de Constantinople), et de Marie de Champagne ; séparée (1223) de Bouchard d’Avesnes, seigneur de Beaumont + 1244)”.22,23

; Per Genealogy.EU (Daampierre - Flanders 4): “3. Guillaume II, sn de Dampierre, *after 1196, +3.9.1231; m.1223 Css Margaret of Flanders and Hainault (*2.6.1202 +10.2.1280)”.30

; Per Med Lands (Ref #1):
     "GUILLAUME [II] de Dampierre (after 1196-3 Sep 1231). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "primogenitus Erchenbaldus…secundus Guilelmus de Moyelen et de Dampetra…tertius Guido" as the three sons of "Guido de Dampetra", specifying that Guillaume married "Margaretam comitisse Flandrie quem Burchardus clericus de Avennis rapuerat"[67]. He succeeded as Seigneur de Dampierre. “Guillelmus dominus de Dampetra…ligius homo domini comitis Campanie” agreed peace terms with “dominum Theobaldum comitem Campanie” by charter dated 31 Dec 1223, which names “dominum Archembaudum fratrem meum, J. comitem de Carnoto, Matheum fratrem suum, dominum Guillelmum, dominum Drogonem de Merloto, avunculos meos, dominum Gobertum de Asperomonte”[68].
     "m ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, separated wife of BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, daughter of BAUDOUIN IX Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN VI Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marie de Champagne (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Iohannam et Margaretam" as the two daughters of "Balduinus"[69]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini records that "secunda filia Margareta" was born after her parents left on their travels[70]. On the other hand, according to Villehardouin Comtesse Marie stayed behind when her husband left on Crusade, gave birth, and afterwards left for Acre where she died[71]. After her father's death, she was sent to Paris with her sister on the orders of Philippe II King of France[72]. Matthew Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[73]. Her first marriage was arranged by King Philippe II, her husband being a noble from Hainaut whose family had long supported French interests. Her first husband demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance and, after complaining to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 as Bouchard d'Avesnes had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law Ctss Jeanne in 1219. He was released two years later on condition he separate from his wife[74]. The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "Marghareta" and "Willelmo de Dampetra"[75]. Matthew Paris names Guillaume as second husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[76]. The Annales Blandinienses record the succession in 1244 of "Margareta soror eius [=Iohanna comitissa]"[77]. She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders and Ctss de Hainaut, both her husbands having died. Her children by her first marriage claimed their inheritance, but Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Hainaut should be given to the Avesnes children and Flanders to the Dampierre children[78]. She abdicated 29 Dec 1278 in favour of her son Guy de Dampierre. The Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Margarete Flandrie et Hanonie…comitisse"[79]."
Med Lands cites:
[67] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1216, MGH SS XXIII, p. 904.
[68] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1619, p. 17.
[69] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Marchianensis, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[70] Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini auctore Iohanne Longo de Ipra 46.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 824.
[71] Villehardouin (1963), 15, p. 111.
[72] Nicholas (1992), p. 151.
[73] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[74] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[75] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 574.
[76] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[77] Annales Blandinienses 1244, MGH SS V, p. 31.
[78] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[79] Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis, MGH SS XXI, p. 619.



Per Med Lands (Ref #2):
     "GUILLAUME [II] de Dampierre, son of GUY [II] Seigneur de Dampierre, Seigneur de Bourbon & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon, dame de Bourbon (after 1196-3 Sep 1231). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "primogenitus Erchenbaldus…secundus Guilelmus de Moyelen et de Dampetra…tertius Guido" as the three sons of "Guido de Dampetra", specifying that Guillaume married "Margaretam comitisse Flandrie quem Burchardus clericus de Avennis rapuerat"[604]. He succeeded as Seigneur de Dampierre.
     "m ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, separated wife of BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, daughter of BAUDOUIN IX Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN VI Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marie de Champagne (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders, Ctss de Hainaut."
Med Lands cites: [604] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1216, MGH SS XXIII, p. 904.31,32 She was Countess of Flanders and Hainault between 1224 and 1278.1

Family 1

Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault b. bt 1180 - 1182, d. bt 7 Dec 1243 - 1244
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014201&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-ancien.pdf, p. 3.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 12.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 13.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014201&tree=LEO
  8. [S2121] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007: "the house of Avesnes, and the advocates of Tournai"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RWs6Dh0Y6uw/m/LdZiVfpelkoJ) to e-mail address, 4 Jan 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007."
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Bouchard d'Avesnes (1170-1244): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouchard_d%27Avesnes_(1170-1244).
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 12: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin VI-IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014198&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIXdied1205B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#MargueriteIIdied1280A.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Champagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014199&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-27, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014200&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#BouchardAvesnesdied1244B
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 5.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 4 page (Dampierre family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders4.html
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Première Maison de Bourbon (Bourbon ancien), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-ancien.pdf
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Dampierre, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Dampierre.pdf
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume de Dampierre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014204&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#GuillaumeIIDampierredied1231A
  26. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 168-29, p. 144.
  27. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_II,_Countess_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  28. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Marguerite de Constantinople: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_Constantinople. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  29. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dampierre Family (Flanders 4): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders4.html#G2
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #1: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#GuillaumeIIDampierredied1231A
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Ref #2: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#GuillaumeIIDampierredied1231B.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin d'Avesnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014202&tree=LEO
  34. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIHainautdied1257B
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012262&tree=LEO
  37. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014210&tree=LEO
  39. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders4.html
  40. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 6.
  41. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de Dampierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014207&tree=LEO
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de Dampierre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014207&tree=LEO
  43. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#GuyFlandersdied1305B.
  44. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Dampierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014211&tree=LEO
  45. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Dampierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014205&tree=LEO

Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault1,2,3,4

M, #10474, b. between 1180 and 1182, d. between 7 December 1243 and 1244
FatherJacques (?) seigneur d'Avesnes, Leuse, Conde and Guise1,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 b. c 1150, d. 7 Sep 1191
MotherAdelvie/Ameline (?) de Guise1,5,6,7,8,9,11,12 b. 1159, d. 1207
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault was born between 1180 and 1182 at Oisy, Namur; Racines et Histoire says b 1180/82.13,1,2,4,8,9 He married Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant, daughter of Baudouin IXVI (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Graaf van Henegouwen , Emperor of Constantinople and Marie (?) de Champagne, on 23 July 1212;
Her 1st husband; Weis (AR7, line 168-29) says m. ca 1212; Med Lands says "m before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]."14,13,1,5,6,7,8,9,15,16 Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault and Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant were divorced circa 1221; consanguinity.13,1,17,5,3,4,9,16
Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault died between 7 December 1243 and 1244 at Estroeungt.14,13,1,5,2,4,8,9
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Flandre (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Iohannam et Margaretam" as the two daughters of "Balduinus"[592]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini records that "secunda filia Margareta" was born after her parents left on their travels[593]. On the other hand, according to Villehardouin Comtesse Marie stayed behind when her husband left on Crusade, gave birth, and afterwards left for Acre where she died[594]. After her father's death, she was sent to Paris with her sister on the orders of Philippe II King of France[595]. Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[596]. Her first marriage was arranged by King Philippe II, her husband being a noble from Hainaut whose family had long supported French interests. Her first husband demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance and, after complaining to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 on the grounds that Bouchard d'Avesnes had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law Ctss Jeanne in 1219. He was released two years later on condition he separate from his wife[597]. The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "Marghareta" and "Willelmo de Dampetra"[598]. Matthew of Paris names Guillaume as second husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[599]. The Annales Blandinienses record the succession in 1244 of "Margareta soror eius [=Iohanna comitissa"[600]. She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders and Ctss de Hainaut, both her husbands having died. Her children by her first marriage claimed their inheritance, but Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Hainaut should be given to the Avesnes children and Flanders to the Dampierre children[601]. She abdicated 29 Dec 1278 in favour of her son Guy de Dampierre. The Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Margarete Flandrie et Hanonie…comitisse"[602].
     "m firstly (before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]) BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, son of JACQUES Seigneur d'Avesnes, de Leuze et de Condé & his wife Adeline de Guise ([1180]-1244, bur Clairefontaine). Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[603].
     "m secondly ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) GUILLAUME [II] Seigneur de Dampierre, son of GUY [II] Seigneur de Dampierre, Seigneur de Bourbon & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon, dame de Bourbon (after 1196-3 Sep 1231)."
Med Lands cites:
[592] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Marchianensis, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[593] Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini auctore Iohanne Longo de Ipra 46.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 824.
[594] Villehardouin, 15, p. 111.
[595] Nicholas (1992), p. 151.
[596] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[597] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[598] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 574.
[599] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[600] Annales Blandinienses 1244, MGH SS V, p. 31.
[601] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[602] Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis, MGH SS XXI, p. 619.
[603] MP, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.16


; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 2): “E2. Css Margueritte II of Flanders and Hainault (1224-78), *Valenciennes 2.6.1202, +10.2.1280; 1m: before 23.7.1212 (div ca 1221) Bouchard d'Avesnes (*ca 1182 +1244); 2m: 1223 Guillaume II de Dampierre (*after 1196 +3.9.1231)”.18

; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Marguerite II de Flandres et de Hainaut ° 02/06/1202 (Valenciennes) + 10-11/02/1280 élevée à la Cour de France et mariée par le Roi, 20° comtesse de Flandres et de Hainaut (1244-1278 : elle abdique le 29/12/1278 en faveur de son fils Gui de Dampierre)
     ép. 1) avant 23/07/1212 (ann. par le Concile de Latran 1215 ; bulles papales d’excommunication d’Innocent III du 19/01/1215 & d’Honorius III des 17/07/1217 & 24/04/1219 ; sép. ~1221/23) Bouchard d’Avesnes ° ~1180/82 + 1244 seigneur de Beaumont-lès-Valenciennes ordonné prêtre avant son mariage (cause d’annulation) (fils de Jacques, seigneur d’Avesnes, Leuze et Condé et d’Adeline de Guise) capturé et retenu prisonnier par sa belle-soeur, la comtesse Jeanne, jusqu’à séparation des deux époux (1219-1221)
     ép. 2) entre 18/08 et 15/11/1223 Guillaume II de Dampierre ° après 1196 + 03/09/1231 seigneur de Dampierre et Saint-Dizier, vicomte de Troyes, Gouverneur de Flandres (fils cadet de Gui II, seigneur de Dampierre, sire de Bourbon, et de Mathilde de Bourbon, dame de Bourbon) (cf Avesnes, Hainaut & Dampierre, Flandres qui suit p.13)
     Arbitrage du Roi de France, Louis IX pour la succession : le comté de Flandres est attribué aux Dampierre, et celui de Hainaut aux Avesnes”.7

; Per Genealogics:
     “Bouchard was born about 1181, the son of Jacques d'Avesnes, seigneur d'Avesnes, Condé et de Leuze, and Ameline de Guise. Bouchard began his career as a cantor and subdeacon in the church of Laon. In 1212 he was named bailiff of Hainault. In this capacity he served as tutor and guardian of the young Margarethe, daughter of Baudouin VI-IX, count of Flanders, emperor of Constantinople, and much younger sister of Jeanne, countess of Flanders and Hainault. Soon he married Margarethe, though she was only ten years old and the marriage could not be consummated for some years. Neither Jeanne nor her husband Ferrante of Portugal gave their consent.
     “Bouchard lived a war-like life. He invaded the territory of his elder brother Gautier II d'Avesnes, who had received most of their patrimony. He invaded Flanders and forced Jeanne and her husband Ferrante to recognise his marriage to Margarethe. He then fought at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214, under the (losing) Flemish banner. Philippe II August, king of France and victor of Bouvines, advised Pope Innocent III to declare the marriage of Bouchard and Margarethe illegal. Innocent eventually excommunicated the couple on 19 January 1216, on the ground that he had been a church deacon. They took refuge in Luxembourg. Bouchard was captured in combat and imprisoned in Ghent for two years. To obtain his liberation, Margarethe accepted the dissolution of the marriage and Bouchard left for Italy to fight for the Holy See. Upon his return, he was decapitated at Rupelmonde on 7 September 1244, on the orders of Jeanne; she herself died on 5 December of that year.
     “Bouchard gave Margarethe three children: Baudouin, who took refuge with his parents in Luxembourg, and died in infancy; Jan I, later count of Hainault; and Baudouin, sire de Beaumont.
     “In 1242 Emperor Friedrich II had legitimised the children. As a result their eldest surviving son Jan was declared heir in Hainault though not in Flanders. Jan I and his brother Baudouin would both have progeny and play an important part in the War of Succession of Flanders and Hainault.
     “Margarethe remarried and had more children.”.8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 36.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:50.
3. Kwartieren Greidanus-Jaeger in Stamreeksen, 1994, 's-Gravenhage, Wimersma Greidanus, Mr. G. J. J. van. 778.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.8


; This is the same person as:
”Bouchard IV of Avesnes” at Wikipedia and as
”Bouchard d'Avesnes (1170-1244)” at Wikipédia (Fr.)19,20 EDV-21 GKJ-22. He was Canon of St. Pierre de Lille.14,1 He was Archdeacon of Laon.14

; Per Racines et Histoire (Avesner): “Bouchard d’Avesnes ° ~1180 (Oisy, Namur) + 1244 seigneur d’Avesnes, Baumont et Etroen, Bailli de Hainaut, chanoine de Saint-Pierre de Lille
     ép. 23/08/1212 (mariage arrangé par le Roi Philippe II «Auguste» ; ann. 1215 (Concile du Latran) ; vie commune jusqu’en 1219 ; sép. définitive 1221 après sa défaite face à Jeanne de Flandres, sa belle-soeur) Marguerite II de Flandres ° 02/06/1202 + 10/02/1280 comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant (1244, succède à sa soeur Jeanne ; abdique 29/12/1278 en faveur de son fils Gui de Dampierre) (fille de Baudoin IX, comte de Flandres = B.VI, comte de Hainaut = B.1er, Empereur latin de Constantinople, et de Marie de Champagne ; ép. 2) 18/08-15/11/1223 Guillaume II, seigneur de Dampierre + 03/09/1241 - d’où des guerres de succession entre les Dampierre (Flandres) et les Avesnes (Hainaut))”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD d'Avesnes, son of JACQUES Seigneur d'Avesnes, de Leuze et de Condé & his wife Adeline de Guise ([1180]-1244, bur Clairefontaine). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Buchardi Avenennsis" as brother of "Galteri comitis Blesensis", specifying that he married "Margareta"[859]. Seigneur d’Etroen. Bailli de Hainaut. Canon of Saint Pierre at Lille. After his marriage, which was arranged by Philippe II King of France, he demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance. After his sister-in-law Jeanne Ctss of Flanders complained to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 on the basis that Bouchard had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law in 1219. He was released two years later on condition that he separated from his wife[860].
     "m (before 23 Jul 1212, annulled 1215, separated [1221]) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Flandres, daughter of BAUDOUIN IX Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN VI Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marie de Champagne (2 Jun 1202-10 Feb 1280). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Iohannam et Margaretam" as the two daughters of "Balduinus"[861]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini records that "secunda filia Margareta" was born after her parents left on their travels[862]. On the other hand, according to Villehardouin Comtesse Marie stayed behind when her husband left on Crusade, gave birth, and afterwards left for Acre where she died[863]. After her father's death, she was sent to Paris with her sister on the orders of Philippe II King of France[864]. Matthew of Paris names Bouchard as first husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[865]. Her first marriage was arranged by King Philippe II, her husband being a noble from Hainaut whose family had long supported French interests. Her first husband demanded a share of his late father-in-law's inheritance and, after complaining to Pope Innocent III, the marriage was annulled by the Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 as Bouchard d'Avesnes had previously taken holy orders. The couple remained together until Bouchard was captured by his sister-in-law Ctss Jeanne in 1219. He was released two years later on condition he separate from his wife[866]. Pope Gregory IX declared the marriage invalid 31 Mar 1237 and the children illegitimate[867]. She married secondly ([18 Aug/15 Nov] 1223) Guillaume [II] Seigneur de Dampierre. The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "Marghareta" and "Willelmo de Dampetra"[868]. Matthew of Paris names Guillaume as second husband of Marguerite in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[869]. The Annales Blandinienses record the succession in 1244 of "Margareta soror eius [=Iohanna comitissa"[870]. She succeeded her sister in 1244 as MARGUERITE II Ctss of Flanders and Ctss de Hainaut, both her husbands having died. Her children by her first marriage claimed their inheritance, but Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Hainaut should be given to the Avesnes children and Flanders to the Dampierre children[871]. She abdicated 29 Dec 1278 in favour of her son Guy de Dampierre. The Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Margarete Flandrie et Hanonie…comitisse"[872]."
Med Lands cites:
[859] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis (Cod. Divion. et Cisterc. addunt), MGH SS IX, p. 308.
[860] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[861] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Marchianensis, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[862] Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini auctore Iohanne Longo de Ipra 46.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 824.
[863] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”),15, p. 111.
[864] Nicholas (1992), p. 151.
[865] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[866] Nicholas (1992), pp. 156-7.
[867] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2489, p. 335.
[868] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 574.
[869] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[870] Annales Blandinienses 1244, MGH SS V, p. 31.
[871] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[872] Necrologio Sanctæ Waldetrudis, MGH SS XXI, p. 619.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (): “E4. Sn Bouchard d'Avesnes et d´Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault, Canon of St.Pierre de Lille, *Oizy, Namur ca 1180, +1244, bur Clairefontaine; m.III.1212/before 23.7.1212 (div 1221) Css Margareta of Flanders (*2.6.1202 +10.2.1280)”.1

Family

Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant b. 2 Jun 1202, d. 10 Feb 1280
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 5.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 12.
  5. [S2121] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007: "the house of Avesnes, and the advocates of Tournai"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RWs6Dh0Y6uw/m/LdZiVfpelkoJ) to e-mail address, 4 Jan 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007."
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 12: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014200&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#BouchardAvesnesdied1244B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacques d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020643&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JacquesAvesnesdied1191
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ameline de Guise: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020644&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-27, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014201&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#MargueriteIIdied1280A.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014201&tree=LEO
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouchard_IV_of_Avesnes. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bouchard d'Avesnes (1170-1244): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouchard_d%27Avesnes_(1170-1244). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin d'Avesnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014202&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIHainautdied1257B
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012262&tree=LEO

Jean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault1,2

M, #10475, b. 1 May 1218, d. 24 December 1257
FatherBouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault1,3,4,5,6,7 b. bt 1180 - 1182, d. bt 7 Dec 1243 - 1244
MotherMarguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant1,8,3,4,6,9,10 b. 2 Jun 1202, d. 10 Feb 1280
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault was born on 1 May 1218 at Houffalize, Luxembourg; Genealogics says b. Apr 1218.1,2,4 He married Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland, daughter of Floris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland and Machtild/Mathilde (?) van Brabant, Graven van Holland, on 9 October 1246 at Frankfurt am Main, Germany (now); Genealogics says m. Sep 1246.11,1,12,2,13,14,3,4
Jean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault died on 24 December 1257 at Valenciennes, Hainaut, France (now), at age 39; Weis (AR7, line 168-30) says d. 1256.11,1,2,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 16.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Jean I, became Ct of Hainault 1246 (while Flanders went to his half-brother), *Houffalize, Luxembourg 1.5.1218, +Valenciennes 24.12.1257; m.Frankfurt a.M. 9.10.1246 Adeleide of Holand (*ca 1222 +1284.)1" EDV-20 GKJ-21.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Jan was born in Houffalize on 1 May 1218, the son of Bouchard d'Avesnes and Margarethe, countess of Flanders and Hainault, the daughter of Baudouin VI-IX, count of Flanders, emperor of Constantinople. As the marriage of Margarethe and Bouchard was dissolved by the pope in 1221, he and his younger brother Baudouin were considered illegitimate (an elder brother Baudouin had died in infancy).
     "In 1223 Jan's mother married Guillaume de Dampierre and bore more children who could claim her inheritance. Thus Jan and his brother Baudouin undertook to receive imperial recognition of their legitimacy and did so from Emperor Friedrich II in March 1243. On 5 December 1244 Margarethe inherited Flanders and Hainault and designated her eldest son by her second husband, Guillaume III de Dampierre, as her heir. Immediately a war, called the War of the Succession of Flanders and Hainault, started over the rights of inheritance, pitting Jan against Guillaume.
     "After two years of fighting, in 1246 Louis IX of France intervened to settle the conflict. He granted Hainault to Jan and Flanders to Guillaume. Nonetheless, conflict was reopened. Meanwhile, in September 1246 Jan married Aleida of Holland, daughter of Floris IV, count of Holland and Machteld of Brabant, and sister of Willem II, count of Holland. Jan and Aleida had seven children, of whom four sons had progeny: Jan II, Bouchard, Guy and Floris.
     "In 1250 Margarethe was forced to give over the government of Hainault to Jan. On 6 June 1251 Guillaume de Dampierre was assassinated at a joust and it was claimed that the Avesnes brothers had financed the crime. On 4 July 1253 Jan defeated the armies of his mother Margarethe and her second Dampierre son Guy at the battle of West-Capelle. Guy was imprisoned and Margarethe agreed to sell her rights to Hainault to Charles I Etienne, brother of Louis IX, if he would reconquer it from Jan. Jan's brother-in-law Willem II, count of Holland, the emperor-elect, was convinced to grant Hainault (an imperial fief) and those Flemish lands within the empire to Jan. Charles was defeated, and under the terms of the Treaty of Péronne of 1256 King Louis, returning from the Seventh Crusade, ordered his brother to abide by his arbitration of 1246. On 22 November 1257 Guy de Dampierre finally relinquished his claim to Hainault, but Jan died on Christmas Eve 1257 in Valenciennes. He was succeeded by his son Jan II."4

; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN d'Avesnes, son of BOUCHARD d'Avesnes & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders, Ctss de Hainaut (Apr 1218-24 Dec 1257, bur Valenciennes). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Iohannem et Balduinem" as the two sons of "Buchardi Avenennsis [et] Margaretæ"[429]. His date of birth is indicated by the charter dated Jan [1234/35] under which Louis IX King of France records that “Johannes, Burchardi de Avesnis militis filius” was 16 years old “mense aprili preterito”[430]. His parentage is recorded by Matthew of Paris in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[431]. He and his brother were brought up in France after his parents separated, considered illegitimate because of the Papal annulment of their marriage. After his mother succeeded in 1244 as Ctss of Flanders and Hainaut, Jean claimed his inheritance. Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Jean should receive Hainaut while Flanders should go to his Dampierre half-brother[432]. He therefore succeeded in 1246 as JEAN I Comte de Hainaut. He attempted unsuccessfully to obtain imperial recognition of his claim to Flanders but accepted the 1246 decision when Willem II Count of Holland received homage, as king of Germany, for imperial Flanders from Guillaume de Dampierre[433]. He and his brother were legitimated by the Pope in 1251, on the request of their mother[434]. His mother offered the county of Hainaut to Charles de France Comte d'Anjou in order to obtain his military intervention against Willem II Count of Holland. Comte Charles besieged Valenciennes, but a truce was negotiated between all parties 26 Jul 1254, which included an agreement to submit the dispute to Louis IX King of France for adjudication[435]. King Louis required his brother to renounce any claim to Hainaut in his judgment of 1256[436].
     "m (9 Oct 1246) ALEIDE of Holland, daughter of FLORIS IV Count of Holland & his wife Mathilde de Brabant (-1 Mar/7 Apr 1284). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Wilhelmum Romanorum regem, Florencium presidem, Adelheidim Hannonie, et Machtildim Hennenbergie comitissas" as children of Count Floris IV & his wife[437]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Willelmum regem Romanorum et Florentium et Aleydem comitissam Hanonie et Margaretam comitissam de Hinneberga" as children of "Florentius comes Hollandie" & his wife Mathilde[438]. Regent of Holland 1258-1263. The testament of "Aleidis germana felicis recordationis domini Willelmi Romanorum regis et uxor condam domini Johannis de Avennis" is dated 18 Oct 1271 and provides for religious donations[439]. "
Med Lands cites:
[429] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis (Cod. Divion. et Cisterc. addunt), MGH SS IX, p. 308.
[430] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2331, p. 280.
[431] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[432] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[433] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[434] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[435] Bayley, C. C. (1949) The Formation of the German College of Electors in the mid-Thirteenth Century (Toronto), p. 39.
[436] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[437] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannis de Beke (The Hague), 66a, p. 163, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[438] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[439] Fremery, J. de (1901) Oorkondenboek van Holland en Zeeland, Supplement (The Hague) ("Oorkondenboek Holland (Supplement)"), 163, p. 111.3


; Per Racines et Histoire (Avesnes): "Jean d’Avesnes, héritier de Hainaut ° 01/05/1218 (Houffalize, Luxembourg) + 24/12/1257 (Valenciennes) légitimé par le Pape (1251) et désigné comme héritier de Hainaut (1246) (Hennegau), comte titulaire (Jean 1er de Hainaut)
     ép. 09/10/1246 (Francfort/Main) Adelheide (Alix) de Hollande ° ~1222 + 1284 (fille de Floris VI, comte de Hollande, et de Mathilde de Brabant ; soeur de Guillaume, comte de Hollande, Roi des Romains) postérité des comtes de Hainaut qui suit (p.6) > cf. Hainaut"

Per Racines et Histoire (Hainaut): "1) Jean (1er) d’Avesnes héritier de Hainaut ° 01/05/1218 + 24/12/1257 légitimé 1251 par le Pape, comte titulaire de Hainaut (1246) et de Soissons ((d’abord considéré comme illégitime après la séparation de ses parents, ses prétentions aboutissent à l’arbitrage de Louis IX de France qui lui attribue le Hainaut comme légitime héritier 1246)
     ép. 09/10/1246 Aleide (alias Adelise) de Hollande + entre 01/03 et 07/04/1284 Régente du Comté de Hollande (1258-1263) (fille de Floris IV de Hollande et de Mathilde de Brabant.)9,15 " He was Count of Hainaut
See atached map of Hainaut ca 1200 between 1246 and 1257.1

Family 2

Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland b. c 1230, d. bt 1 Mar 1284 - 9 Apr 1284
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIHainautdied1257B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012262&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014200&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#BouchardAvesnesdied1244B
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  8. [S2121] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007: "the house of Avesnes, and the advocates of Tournai"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RWs6Dh0Y6uw/m/LdZiVfpelkoJ) to e-mail address, 4 Jan 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 4 Jan 2007."
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014201&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-30, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012263&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Aleidedied1284
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Hainaut, Hennegau, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hainaut.pdf
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 6.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan II d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012274&tree=LEO
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012249&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#GuyHainautLiegedied1317

Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland1,2,3

F, #10476, b. circa 1230, d. between 1 March 1284 and 9 April 1284
FatherFloris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland1,3,2,4,5,6 b. 24 Jun 1210, d. 19 Jul 1234
MotherMachtild/Mathilde (?) van Brabant, Graven van Holland1,3,2,4,6,7 b. c 1200, d. 22 Dec 1267
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland was born circa 1230 at Hertogenbosch.1,3 She married Jean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault, son of Bouchard (?) sn d'Avesnes et d'Etroen, Bailiff of Hainault and Marguerite II (?) comtesse de Flandres, Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes, Ostrevant, on 9 October 1246 at Frankfurt am Main, Germany (now); Genealogics says m. Sep 1246.8,9,1,3,2,4,10,11
Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland died between 1 March 1284 and 9 April 1284 at Valenciennes, Hainaut, France (now).8,1,12,3,4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN d'Avesnes, son of BOUCHARD d'Avesnes & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders, Ctss de Hainaut (Apr 1218-24 Dec 1257, bur Valenciennes). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Iohannem et Balduinem" as the two sons of "Buchardi Avenennsis [et] Margaretæ"[429]. His date of birth is indicated by the charter dated Jan [1234/35] under which Louis IX King of France records that “Johannes, Burchardi de Avesnis militis filius” was 16 years old “mense aprili preterito”[430]. His parentage is recorded by Matthew of Paris in his description of the background to the war in Flanders in 1254[431]. He and his brother were brought up in France after his parents separated, considered illegitimate because of the Papal annulment of their marriage. After his mother succeeded in 1244 as Ctss of Flanders and Hainaut, Jean claimed his inheritance. Louis IX King of France ruled in 1246 that Jean should receive Hainaut while Flanders should go to his Dampierre half-brother[432]. He therefore succeeded in 1246 as JEAN I Comte de Hainaut. He attempted unsuccessfully to obtain imperial recognition of his claim to Flanders but accepted the 1246 decision when Willem II Count of Holland received homage, as king of Germany, for imperial Flanders from Guillaume de Dampierre[433]. He and his brother were legitimated by the Pope in 1251, on the request of their mother[434]. His mother offered the county of Hainaut to Charles de France Comte d'Anjou in order to obtain his military intervention against Willem II Count of Holland. Comte Charles besieged Valenciennes, but a truce was negotiated between all parties 26 Jul 1254, which included an agreement to submit the dispute to Louis IX King of France for adjudication[435]. King Louis required his brother to renounce any claim to Hainaut in his judgment of 1256[436].
     "m (9 Oct 1246) ALEIDE of Holland, daughter of FLORIS IV Count of Holland & his wife Mathilde de Brabant (-1 Mar/7 Apr 1284). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Wilhelmum Romanorum regem, Florencium presidem, Adelheidim Hannonie, et Machtildim Hennenbergie comitissas" as children of Count Floris IV & his wife[437]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Willelmum regem Romanorum et Florentium et Aleydem comitissam Hanonie et Margaretam comitissam de Hinneberga" as children of "Florentius comes Hollandie" & his wife Mathilde[438]. Regent of Holland 1258-1263. The testament of "Aleidis germana felicis recordationis domini Willelmi Romanorum regis et uxor condam domini Johannis de Avennis" is dated 18 Oct 1271 and provides for religious donations[439]. "
Med Lands cites:
[429] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis (Cod. Divion. et Cisterc. addunt), MGH SS IX, p. 308.
[430] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2331, p. 280.
[431] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 434.
[432] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[433] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[434] Nicholas (1992), p. 157.
[435] Bayley, C. C. (1949) The Formation of the German College of Electors in the mid-Thirteenth Century (Toronto), p. 39.
[436] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[437] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannis de Beke (The Hague), 66a, p. 163, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[438] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[439] Fremery, J. de (1901) Oorkondenboek van Holland en Zeeland, Supplement (The Hague) ("Oorkondenboek Holland (Supplement)"), 163, p. 111.10


; Per Genealogics:
     "Aleida was the daughter of Floris IV, Graaf van Holland, and Machteld of Brabant. She was probably about sixteen when she married Jan d'Avesnes, the future count of Hainault, son of Bouchard d'Avesnes and Margarethe, countess of Flanders and Hainault. They had seven children of whom four sons would have progeny. However their marriage lasted only eleven years as her husband died in 1257. From 1258 until 1263 she was regent in Holland for her nephew Floris V, son of her brother Willem II, Graaf van Holland and emperor-elect. She founded the city of Schiedam, and in 1275 she gave it city rights. She died between 1 March and 9 April 1284 and was buried in Valenciennes."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 16.2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide of Holland (Dutch: Aleide (Aleidis); c.?1230 – buried 9 April 1284), Countess of Hainaut, was a Dutch regent. She was a daughter of Floris IV, Count of Holland and Matilda of Brabant.[1] She was also a sister of William II, Count of Holland and King of Germany. She acted as regent for her nephew Count Floris V during his minority.
Life
     "On 9 October 1246, Adelaide married John I of Avesnes, Count of Hainaut.[1] Like her mother, she was a patron of religious houses. Her religious interest is reflected in that three of her sons became bishops, and her one daughter became an abbess. She also insisted on a bilingual education for them.
     "Between 1258 and 1263, Adelaide was regent of Holland in the name of her nephew Floris V. She called herself Guardian of Holland and Zeeland (Tutrix de Hollandie et Zeelandie). After he came of age, she continued to advise him. She died in 1284 at Valenciennes, but in 1299, with the death of Floris' son John I, it was her own son John II who inherited Holland through her.
     "She gave Town privileges to Schiedam, which afterwards had the right to be called a city. In it she founded Huis te Riviere, which was then the second largest castle in Holland.
     "She ordered the construction of the Schielands Hoge Zeedijk, which today continues to protect 3 million inhabitants in a wide area around Rotterdam.
     "Jacob van Maerlant dedicated his first poem, Geesten, to Adelaide.
Issue
     "With John I, she had the following issue:
1. John II, Count of Hainaut and Holland (1247–1304)[1]
2. Baldwin (born after 1247, lived in 1299)
3. Joanna, abbess of Flines (died 1304)
4. Bouchard, Bishop of Metz (1251–1296)
5. Guy, Bishop of Utrecht (1253–1317)
6. William, Bishop of Cambrai (1254–1296)
7. Floris, stadholder of Zeeland and Prince of Achaea (1255–1297)

See also
** Counts of Hainaut family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_of_Hainaut
** Counts of Holland family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_of_Holland
References
1. Pollock 2015, p. xv.
Sources
** Pollock, M.A. (2015). Scotland, England and France after the loss of Normandy, 1204-1296. The Boydell Press.
External links
** Aleid van Holland at the Institute of Netherlands History (Dutch)
** Adelaide/Aleid of Holland collected and translated by Professor Joan Ferrante of Columbia University
** Women's Biography: Adelaide/Aleid of Holland, contains several letters to and from Adelaide."

Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Adelaïde de Hollande (~1230 - enterrée le 9 avril 1284) a été la régente de Hollande de 1258 à 1263. Fille de Florent IV de Hollande et de Mathilde de Brabant, sœur de Guillaume Ier du Saint-Empire, elle a gouverné en attente de la majorité de son neveu Florent V de Hollande.
Biographie
     "Le 9 octobre 1246, Adélaïde se marie à Jean Ier d'Avesnes, comte de Hainaut. Tout comme sa mère, elle soutient des organisations religieuses. Trois de ses fils deviendront évêques et sa fille unique deviendra abbesse.
     "De 1258 à 1263, Adélaïde est régente de Hollande au nom de son neveu Florent V de Hollande. Elle se présente comme gardienne de Hollande et de Zélandetrad 1. Elle donne des privilèges à Schiedam, où elle a fondé Huis te Riviere (nl), qui est à l'époque le deuxième plus grand château du comté de Hollande.
     "Après l'arrivée au pouvoir de Florent V, elle demeure conseillère de ce dernier.
     "Elle meurt en 1284 à Valenciennes.
Héritage
     "On lui reconnait sept enfants avec Jean I1 :
1. Jean Ier de Hainaut (1247-1304). En 1299, à la suite de la mort du fils de Florent V Jean Ier de Hollande, il devient comte de Hollande.
2. Baldwin (né après 1247, toujours vivant en 1299).
3. Jeanne, abbesse de l'Abbaye de Flines (morte en 1304).
4. Bouchard, évêque de Metz (1251–1296)
5. Gui d'Avesnes, évêque d'Utrecht (1253–1317)
6. William, évêque de Cambrai (1254–1296)
70. Florent de Hainaut, stadhouder de Zélande et prince d'Achaïe (1255–1297).

     "Jacob van Maerlant a dédié Geesten, son premier poème, à Adélaïde.
Notes et références
** (en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en anglais intitulé « Adelaide of Holland » (voir la liste des auteurs).
Notes
1. (nl) « Tutrix de Hollandie et Zeelandie »
Références
1. (en) « Ancestors of Paul Bailey MCBRIDE » [archive], Paul B. McBride's Genealogy (consulté le 11 novembre 2006)
Voir aussi
Liens externes
** Notices d'autorité : Fichier d’autorité international virtuelGemeinsame Normdatei
** (en) Women's Biography: Adelaide/Aleid of Holland [archive], comprenant notamment plusieurs lettres écrite à et par Adélaïde.
** (nl)Aleid van Holland [archive] sur le site de l'Institut d'histoire des Pays-Bas.
** (en)Adelaide/Aleid of Holland [archive], page traduite et gérée par le professeur Joan Ferrante de l'Université Columbia."13,14

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALEIDE (-[1 Mar/7 Apr] 1284). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Wilhelmum Romanorum regem, Florencium presidem, Adelheidim Hannonie, et Machtildim Hennenbergie comitissas" as children of Count Floris IV & his wife[542]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Willelmum regem Romanorum et Florentium et Aleydem comitissam Hanonie et Margaretam comitissam de Hinneberga" as children of "Florentius comes Hollandie" & his wife Mathilde[543]. "Mathildis comitissa Hollandiæ" donated property to Afflighem abbey, where she and "due filie mee…Aleidis et Margareta" elected their burial, by charter dated Sep 1244[544]. Regent of Holland 1258-1263. The testament of "Aleidis germana felicis recordationis domini Willelmi Romanorum regis et uxor condam domini Johannis de Avennis" is dated 18 Oct 1271 and provides for religious donations[545].
     "m (9 Oct 1246) JEAN d’Avesnes, son of BOUCHARD d'Avesnes & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders, Ctss de Hainaut (1 May 1218-24 Dec 1257, bur Valenciennes). He succeeded in 1246 as JEAN I Comte de Hainaut."
Med Lands cites:
[542] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 66a, p. 163.
[543] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[544] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 409, p. 218.
[545] Fremery, J. de (1901) Oorkondenboek van Holland en Zeeland, Supplement (The Hague) ("Oorkondenboek Holland (Supplement)"), 163, p. 111.4
EDV-20 GKJ-21.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Avesnes): "Jean d’Avesnes, héritier de Hainaut ° 01/05/1218 (Houffalize, Luxembourg) + 24/12/1257 (Valenciennes) légitimé par le Pape (1251) et désigné comme héritier de Hainaut (1246) (Hennegau), comte titulaire (Jean 1er de Hainaut)
     ép. 09/10/1246 (Francfort/Main) Adelheide (Alix) de Hollande ° ~1222 + 1284 (fille de Floris VI, comte de Hollande, et de Mathilde de Brabant ; soeur de Guillaume, comte de Hollande, Roi des Romains) postérité des comtes de Hainaut qui suit (p.6) > cf. Hainaut"

Per Racines et Histoire (Hainaut): "1) Jean (1er) d’Avesnes héritier de Hainaut ° 01/05/1218 + 24/12/1257 légitimé 1251 par le Pape, comte titulaire de Hainaut (1246) et de Soissons ((d’abord considéré comme illégitime après la séparation de ses parents, ses prétentions aboutissent à l’arbitrage de Louis IX de France qui lui attribue le Hainaut comme légitime héritier 1246)
     ép. 09/10/1246 Aleide (alias Adelise) de Hollande + entre 01/03 et 07/04/1284 Régente du Comté de Hollande (1258-1263) (fille de Floris IV de Hollande et de Mathilde de Brabant.)15,16 " She was Regent of Holland between 1258 and 1263.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012263&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Aleidedied1284. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012277&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIVdied1234
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Machteld of Brabant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012278&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-30, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIHainautdied1257B
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012262&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012263&tree=LEO
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Adélaïde de Hollande: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_de_Hollande. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Hainaut, Hennegau, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hainaut.pdf
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 6.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan II d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012274&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012249&tree=LEO
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’ Avesnes, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#GuyHainautLiegedied1317

Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #10477, b. circa 1247, d. 22 August 1304
FatherJean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault1,3,6,7,8 b. 1 May 1218, d. 24 Dec 1257
MotherAdelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland1,3,6,9,10 b. c 1230, d. bt 1 Mar 1284 - 9 Apr 1284
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited5 Nov 2020
     Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland was born circa 1247.1,3,5,6 He married Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg, daughter of Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon and Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois, circa 1265; Genealogics says m. ca 1270; Med Lands says m. 1265.11,1,12,2,3,6,13,14
Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland died on 22 August 1304 at Valenciennes, Hainaut, France (now); Genealogics says d. Sep 1304.11,1,3,5,6
Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland was buried after 22 August 1304 at Couvent des Cordelières, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1247
     DEATH     22 Aug 1304 (aged 56–57)
     Family Members
     Parents
          Jean d'Avesnes 1218–1257
          Aleide van Holland unknown–1280
     Spouse
          Philippe de Luxembourg 1252–1311
     Siblings
          Baudouin d'Avesnes 1251–1296
          Guy d'Avesnes 1253–1317
     Children
          Marguerite de Hainaut 1274–1342
          Marie de Hainaut 1280–1354
          Guillaume d'Avesnes 1286–1337
     Inscription
Cy gist le gentil Jehan de pris
Jadis eut dessous lui compris
Quatre pays de grand noblesse
Cest Haynault come bien appris
Zelande et Frise que mout prise
Et Hollande, plain de richesse
En son temps fut chief de prouesse
Fleur d'honneur, surion de noblesse
Mil trois cens et cincq fut pris
De la mort qui scet bien laddresse
Or prions Dieu que lame addresse
Combien que le corps ait mespris.

     Gravesite Details Tomb of black marble with effigies in white stone of Jean and Philippe, which was desecrated by Huguenots in 1566.
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordeliers, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 16 Jan 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 103668986.15
     Reference: Genalogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 38.
2. Les Ancêtres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. page 65.6


; Per Genalogics:
     "Jan II d'Avesnes was born about 1247, son of Jan I d'Avesnes, count of Hainault and Aleida of Holland. About 1270 he married Philippine of Luxembourg, daughter of Heinrich 'the Blond', Graf von Luxembourg und Namur, and Margarethe de Bar, dame de Ligny. They had nine children, of whom three would have progeny. He also fathered five illegitimate children.
     "In 1280 Jan succeeded his father as count of Hainault. Long a friend of Philippe IV, king of France, Jan influenced his cousin Floris V, Graaf van Holland, to end his long friendly relations with Edward I 'Longshanks', king of England and make an alliance with France, an action that was violently opposed by several Dutch nobles, who seized and murdered Floris.
     "Jan was then named governor of Holland and guardian of the 15-year-old son of Floris, after whose death in 1299 he became count of Holland as Jan II. Though the people of Holland accepted his leadership, he had to ward off a challenge by Albrecht I, the emperor-elect, subdue a rebellion in Zeeland, and fight the army of the Dampierres for two years before driving the Flemish from Holland and Zeeland in 1304. Jan died in September 1304."6

; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Hainaut, son of JEAN I Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleide of Holland (1247-22 Aug 1304). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the succession in 1299 of "Iohannes comes Hannoniensis filius Adelheydis sororis Wilhelmi regis" as Count of Holland[460]. He succeeded his paternal grandmother in 1280 as JEAN II Comte de Hainaut. He succeeded in 1299 as JAN II Count of Holland.
     "m ([1265]) PHILIPPINE de Luxembourg, daughter of HENRI II "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg & his wife Marguerite de Bar ([1252]-6 Apr 1311). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jean and "Philippam filiam comitis Lucemburgie"[461].
     "Comte Jean II & his wife had twelve children (the order of these children shown here is approximately as set out in Europäische Stammtafeln[462], although as will be seen this differs considerably from the order set out in the Chronologia Johannes de Beke which is quoted in full below)."
Med Lands cites:
[460] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255.
[461] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255.
[462] ES II 4.5


; Per Wikipedia:
     "John II of Avesnes (1247 – 22 August 1304) was Count of Hainaut, Holland, and Zeeland.
Life
     "John II, born 1247, was the oldest son of John I of Avesnes and Adelaide of Holland, daughter of Floris IV, Count of Holland.[1] He was Count of Hainaut from 1280 to his death and Count of Holland from 1299 until his death.[1] John continued the war between the House of Dampierre and the House of Avesnes against count Guy of Flanders for imperial Flanders.
     "He became Count of Holland in 1299 with the death of John I, Count of Holland,[2] through his mother Adelaide of Holland, heiress and regent of this county. The personal union he established between Hainaut and Holland–Zeeland lasted for another half-century.[2]
     "His cousin, Count Floris V, was fighting against Flanders for Zeeland.[3] He sought help of France against Flanders.[3] The French defeated the Flemish in 1300 and 1301. The rebels in Zeeland were defeated as well. John's brother, Guy of Avesnes, became Bishop of Utrecht.[4] So all his main enemies were gone.
     "The tide changed dramatically after a Flemish uprising and the defeat of the French army at the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302, where his eldest son was killed fighting for the French. Flemish patriots attacked Hainaut and Zeeland supported by the dissatisfied population there. Guy of Namur defeated John's son, William, in a battle on the island of Duiveland. Bishop Guy of Utrecht was taken prisoner. Guy of Namur and Duke John II of Brabant conquered most of Utrecht, Holland, and Zeeland. Guy of Namur was finally defeated in 1304 by the fleet of Holland and France at the naval Battle of Zierikzee. John II regained most of his authority when he died in the same year.
Family
     "In 1270, John married Philippa of Luxembourg,[5] daughter of Count Henry V of Luxembourg and Margaret of Bar. Their children were:
1. John, Lord of Beaumont, Count of Ostervant. Killed in battle (11 July 1302).[1]
2. Henry, a canon in Cambrai, (died 1303).[1]
3. William I, Count of Hainaut (c.?1286 – 7 June 1337) He succeeded his father in 1304. Married Joan of Valois, daughter of Charles, Count of Valois.[1]
4. John of Beaumont (1288 – 11 March 1356). He was married to Margaret, Countess de Soissons.[1]
5. Margaret (died 18 October 1342), married Robert II of Artois, who was killed at the Battle of the Golden Spurs, 11 July 1302.[1]
6. Alice or Alix (d. 26 October 1317), who married 1290 Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had no issue.[1]
7. Isabelle (died 1305), married Raoul de Clermont Lord of Nesle, who was killed in battle at the Battle of the Golden Spurs, 11 July 1302.[1]
8. Joan, a nun at Fontenelles.[1]
9. Mary of Avesnes (1280–1354), married Louis I, Duke of Bourbon.[1]
10. Matilda, Abbess of Nivelles.[1]
11. Willem de Cuser (illegitimate)[6]
12. Aleid van Zandenburg (illegitimate), who was married firstly to Wolfert II of Borselen, lord of Veere, and secondly to Otto III of Buren.[7]
See also
** Counts of Hainaut family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_of_Hainaut
** Counts of Holland family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_of_Holland
References
1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 22
2. Johan C H Blom, History of the Low Countries (New York: Berghahn Books, 2006), p. 58
3. Johan C H Blom, History of the Low Countries (New York: Berghahn Books, 2006), pp. 57–8
4. Elizabeth Moore Hunt, Illuminating the Borders of Northern French and Flemish Manuscripts, 1270 – 1310 (New York: Routledge, 2007), p. 125
5. M. A. Pollock, Scotland, England and France After the Loss of Normandy, 1204-1296, (The Boydell Press, 2015), xv.
6. Gary Boyd Roberts, The royal descents of 600 immigrants to the American colonies or the United States : who were themselves notable or left descendants notable in American history: with a 2008 addendum, coda, and final addition (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2008)[page needed]
7. Orlanda Lie and Joris Reynaert eds., Artes in context. Opstellen over het handschriftelijk milieu van Middelnederlandse artesteksten (Hilversum 2004), 67.
8. Instituut voor Nederlandse Geschiedenis, Aleid van Holland."16 EDV-21 GKJ-20.

; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPINE de Luxembourg ([1252]-6 Apr 1311). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jean and "Philippam filiam comitis Lucemburgie"[257].
     "m ([1265]) JEAN II d´Avesnes, son of JEAN I Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleide of Holland (1247-22 Aug 1304). He succeeded in 1280 as JEAN II Comte de Hainaut, and in 1299 as JAN II Count of Holland."
Med Lands cites: [257] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255.13 He was Comte d' Hainaut between 1280 and 1304 at Hainaut, France.1,16 He was Count of Holland and Zeeland between 1299 and 1304 at Netherlands (now).1,16

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  2. [S2076] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 2 June 2006: "Jan II d'Avesnes, Count of Holland & Hainault"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 2 June 2006."
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 8: pp. 655-9. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIIHainautdied1304B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan II d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012274&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIHainautdied1257B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012262&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012263&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Aleidedied1284
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-31, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 February 2020), memorial page for Philippe de Luxembourg (1252–6 Apr 1311), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103694027, citing Couvent des Cordeliers, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103694027/philippe-de-luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippine de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012275&tree=LEO
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 February 2020), memorial page for Jean d'Avesnes, II (1247–22 Aug 1304), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103668986, citing Couvent des Cordeliers, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103668986/jean-d_avesnes
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II,_Count_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 7.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#AleidHainautdied1351
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page (Dampierre family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008747&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#MargueriteHainautdied1342
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella d'Avesnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295610&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#IsabelleHainautdied1305
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00485312&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#AlixHainautdied1317
  27. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 65: France - House of Bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002074&tree=LEO
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#MarieHainautdied1354
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem III 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005766&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#_GUILLAUME_III_1304-1337,.
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanHainautBeaumontdied1356

Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg1,2,3,4

F, #10478, b. circa 1252, d. 6 April 1311
FatherHeinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon3,5,6,7,8,9 b. bt 1216 - 1217, d. 24 Dec 1281
MotherMarguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois3,4,6,7,10 b. c 1220, d. 23 Nov 1275
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg was born circa 1252 at Luxembourg.3,4,6,7 She married Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland, son of Jean I (?) d'Avesnes , Count of Hainault and Adelaide/Aleida (?) van Holland, circa 1265; Genealogics says m. ca 1270; Med Lands says m. 1265.11,2,3,12,4,13,14,7
Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg died on 6 April 1311 at Valenciennes, Hainaut, France (now).11,3,4,6,7
Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg was buried after 6 April 1311 at Couvent des Cordelières, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1252
     DEATH     6 Apr 1311 (aged 58–59)
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henri V de Luxembourg 1216–1281
          Marguerite de Bar 1220–1275
     Spouse
          Jean d'Avesnes 1247–1304
     Siblings
          Isabelle de Luxembourg unknown–1298
          Waleran de Luxembourg unknown–1288
          Henri de Luxembourg 1250–1288
     Children
          Marguerite de Hainaut 1274–1342
          Marie de Hainaut 1280–1354
          Guillaume d'Avesnes 1286–1337
     Inscription
Cy gist le gentil Jehan de pris
Jadis eut dessous lui compris
Quatre pays de grand noblesse
Cest Haynault come bien appris
Zelande et Frise que mout prise
Et Hollande, plain de richesse
En son temps fut chief de prouesse
Fleur d'honneur, surion de noblesse
Mil trois cens et cincq fut pris
De la mort qui scet bien laddresse
Or prions Dieu que lame addresse
Combien que le corps ait mespris.

     Gravesite Details Tomb of black marble with effigies in white stone of Jean and Philippe, which was desecrated by Huguenots in 1566.
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordeliers, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 17 Jan 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 103694027.14
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philippa of Luxembourg (1252 – 6 April 1311) was the daughter of Count Henry V of Luxembourg and his wife, Marguerite of Bar. She married John II, Count of Holland.[1] Two of her granddaughters were Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England, and Margaret II, Countess of Hainault in her own right and wife of Holy Roman Emperor Louis IV.
     "The children of John II of Holland and Philippa of Luxembourg included:
** John (died 1302)
** Henry (died 1303), a canon in Cambrai
** Simon
** William I, Count of Hainaut, father of Queen Philippa and Margaret II
** John (Jean) (1288–1356), Seigneur de Beaumont. Married Marguerite, Countess of Soissons.
** Margaret (died 1342), wife of Robert II of Artois
** Alix (died 1317), wife of Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk
** Isabelle (died 1305), wife of Raoul de Clermont, Seigneur de Nesle.
** Jeanne, nun at Fontenelles
** Mary of Avesnes (1280–1354), wife of Louis I, Duke of Bourbon
** Matilda, Abbess of Nivelles
** Willem de Cuser (born 1290, date of death unknown)

References
1. M. A. Pollock, Scotland, England and France After the Loss of Normandy, 1204-1296, (The Boydell Press, 2015), xv.
External links
** Philippa de Luxembourg: http://www.thepeerage.com/p359.htm#i3581."15

; Per Genealogy.DU: "A3. Philippa, *Luxemburg ca 1252, +Valenciennes 6.4.1311; m.1270 Jean II d´Avesnes, Ct of Hainault and Holland (*ca 1247 +22.8.1304.)3"

Reference: Genalogics cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 38.7

; Per Genalogics: "Philippine (or Philippa) was the daughter of Heinrich 'the Blond', Graf von Luxembourg and Namur and Margarete de Bar, dame de Ligny. About 1270 she married Jan II d'Avesnes, count of Holland and Hainault, son of Jan I d'Avesnes, count of Hainault and Aleida of Holland. Philippine and Jan had nine children of whom three had progeny: their youngest Marie who married Louis I, duc de Bourbon; Willem who succeeded Jan as count of Holland and married Jeanne de Valois, sister of Philippe VI, king of France; and Jan who married Marguerite de Nesle, comtesse de Soissons, dame de Chimay. Philippine outlived her husband by six years, dying on 6 April 1311."7 EDV-19 GKJ-20.

; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPINE de Luxembourg ([1252]-6 Apr 1311). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jean and "Philippam filiam comitis Lucemburgie"[257].
     "m ([1265]) JEAN II d´Avesnes, son of JEAN I Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleide of Holland (1247-22 Aug 1304). He succeeded in 1280 as JEAN II Comte de Hainaut, and in 1299 as JAN II Count of Holland."
Med Lands cites: [257] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255.14

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’Avesnes, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Philippinedied1311. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippine de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012275&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II 'the Blond': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026502&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#HenriIIdied1281A
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026503&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-31, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2076] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 2 June 2006: "Jan II d'Avesnes, Count of Holland & Hainault"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 2 June 2006."
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan II d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012274&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 February 2020), memorial page for Philippe de Luxembourg (1252–6 Apr 1311), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103694027, citing Couvent des Cordeliers, Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103694027/philippe-de-luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippa_of_Luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008747&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#MargueriteHainautdied1342
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella d'Avesnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295610&tree=LEO
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 7.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#IsabelleHainautdied1305
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan d'Avesnes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00485312&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanIIHainautdied1304B
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#AlixHainautdied1317
  25. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 65: France - House of Bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002074&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#MarieHainautdied1354
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 8: pp. 655-9. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem III 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005766&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#_GUILLAUME_III_1304-1337,.
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#JeanHainautBeaumontdied1356

Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #10479, b. between 1216 and 1217, d. 24 December 1281
FatherWalram/Waleran IV (?) Marquis d'Arlon, Duke of Limburg, Count of Luxemburg1,7,8,9,5,10,4,6 b. c 1180, d. 2 Jul 1226
MotherErmensinde (Eremansette) de Namur Comtesse de Luxembourg1,7,11,12,9,8,4,6 b. Jul 1186, d. 12 Feb 1247
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited6 Dec 2020
     Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon was born between 1216 and 1217; Genealogics says b. 1217.7,4,8,6 He married Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois, daughter of Henri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny and Philippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois, on 4 June 1240.13,1,14,7,15,4,8,6,16,17
Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon died on 24 December 1281 at Mainz, Germany (now).7,8,4,6
Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon was buried after 24 December 1281 at Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1216, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium
     DEATH     24 Dec 1281 (aged 64–65), Walloon Brabant, Belgium
     Henry V of Luxembourg, also call the the Blond or the Great, was the count of Luxembourg, Laroche and Arlon to his death and the count of Namur as Henry III. He was the son and successor of Waleran III of Limburg and Ermesinda of Luxembourg. In 1240 Henry married Margaret of Bar, daughter of Henry II of Bar and Philippa of Dreux who was the great-granddaughter of King Louis VI of France. Henry's marriage to Margaret brought him Ligny-en-Barrois as her dowry, though, by a clause in the marriage contract, it remained under the feudal suzerainty of the county of Bar. In contempt of this, Henry paid homage in 1256 to Theobald II of Navarre, in his capacity as Count of Champagne. Henry's brother-in-law, Theobald II of Bar, took advantage of the conflict then raging between Frederick III of Lorraine and the bishops of Metz. Henry V was a partisan of the duke and so Theobald took the side of the bishop. Henry was captured in battle at Prény on 14 September 1266. On 8 September 1268, King Louis IX arbitrated between the two counts and Henry was freed and repossessed of Ligny, but under the suzerainty of the Barrois.
     In 1256, Henry seized Namur while the reigning margrave, Baldwin II, was also reigning emperor in Constantinople. Baldwin relinquished his rights to Namur to Guy of Dampierre, Count of Flanders, who retook the margraviate from Henry. The two parties made peace and Guy married Henry's daughter.
     From Margaret he had the following issue:
** Henry VI (died 1288), Count of Luxembourg
** Waleran I (died 1288), Count of Ligny & Roussy
** Isabelle (1247–1298), married Guy of Dampierre
** Philippa (1252–1311), married John II, Count of Holland
** Margaret
** Felicitas
** Joanna (died 1310), Abbess of Clairefontaine

     He also had at least three bastard sons, including: Henry, bastard of Luxembourg (died 1288), married Isabelle of Houffalize, heiress of Houffalize
     Family Members
     Parents
          Waleran III of Limburg 1165–1226
          Ermesinde de Luxembourg 1186–1247
     Spouse
          Marguerite de Bar 1220–1275
     Siblings
          Gerhard Limburg 1223–1298
          Gaulus de Limburg 1225 – unknown
     Children
          Isabelle de Luxembourg unknown–1298
          Waleran de Luxembourg unknown–1288
          Henri de Luxembourg 1250–1288
          Philippe de Luxembourg 1252–1311
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium
     Maintained by: A.D.L
     Originally Created by: Kat
     Added: 30 Apr 2012.18
     ; This is the same person as ”Henry V, Count of Luxembourg” at Wikipedia and as ”Henri V de Luxembourg” at Wikipédia (FR).19,20

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 28 ; III/2 202.
2. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau Geldrop, 1965, G. F. de Roo van Alderwerelt, Reference: 346.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; Per Genealogics:
     “Henri, called 'the Blond', was born about 1217, the son of Walram IV, duke of Limburg, and his second wife Ermesinde de Namur, comtesse de Luxembourg. Also called 'the Great', he was the count of Luxembourg, Laroche and Arlon from 1247 to his death and count of Namur between 1256 and 1264 as Henri III.
     “On 4 June 1240 he married Margarethe de Bar, dame de Ligny, daughter of Henri II, comte de Bar, and Philippe de Dreux, dame de Torcy en Brie, et de Quincy. Of their seven children two sons and two daughters would have progeny. Margarethe brought him Ligny-en-Barrois as her dowry, though, by a clause in the marriage contract, it remained under the feudal suzerainty of the county of Bar. In contempt of this, Henri paid homage in 1256 to Thibaut V, king of Navarre, in his capacity as count of Champagne. Henri's brother-in-law Thibaud II, comte de Bar, took advantage of the conflict then raging between Frédéric III, duke of Lorraine, and the bishop of Metz. Henri was a partisan of the duke and so Thibaud took the side of the bishop. Henri was captured in battle at Prény on 14 September 1266. On 8 September 1268 King Louis IX arbitrated between the two counts and Henri was freed and Ligny was returned to him, but under the suzerainty of the Barrois.
     “In 1256 Henri seized Namur while the reigning margrave, Baudouin II de Courtenay, was also reigning emperor in Constantinople. Baudouin relinquished his rights to Namur to Guy de Dampierre, Graaf van Vlaanderen, who retook the margraviate from Henri. The two parties made peace and Guy married Henri's daughter Isabelle. Henri died on 24 December 1281, and was succeeded by his son Henri III.
     “Henri also had at least three illegitimate sons including Henri bâtard de Luxembourg, who married Isabelle de Houffalize, heiress of Houffalize, and had progeny. He was killed at the Battle of Woeringen (or Worringen on the outskirts of Cologne) on 5 June 1288 alongside his half-brothers Henri and Waleran. It is not recorded if they fought on the side of the victorious Jan I, duke of Brabant, or that of his rival for the duchy of Limburg, Reinald I, Graaf van Gelre en Zutphen.”.4 EDV-20. Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon was also known as Henri II "the Blond" (?) Count of Luxemburg.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Limbourg): “2) Hendrik van Limburg ° 1216/17 + 24/12/1281 (Mayence) marquis d’Arlon, comte de La Roche, Namur et Ligny puis Henri V dit «Le Blond» ou «Le Grand» de Luxembourg, comte de Luxembourg (1247-1281, du chef de sa mère à laquelle il succède), croisé avec Louis IX (1270) (adopte les armes du Limbourg sur un fond burelé) (perd Ligny devant son beau-frère Thibaut II de Bar (1266), battu & capturé à Preny (près Pont-à-Mousson, 06/09/1266) ; s’allie à Gérard de Durbuy et Jean de Brabant contre l’Evêque de Liège Jean et Gui, comte de Flandres pendant la «Guerre de la Vache» entre 1272 et 1276)
     ép. (fiancé 07/1231) (c.m.) 04/06/1240 & 1246 Marguerite de Bar (-Le-Duc) ° ~1220 + 23/11/1273 dame & comtesse de Ligny-en Barrois (1231, dot & douaire) (fille aînée d’Henri II, comte de Bar (55), et de Philippa de Dreux)
     X) liaisons avec ???
     postérité Luxembourg”

Per Racines et Histoire (Bar): “Marguerite de Bar ° ~1220 + 23/11/1273 dame de Ligny-en-Barrois
     ép. (c.m. 1230, 04/06/1240, 1246) Henri V «Le Blond», comte de Luxembourg ° 1216/17 + 24/12/1281 (Mainz) (fils de Waleran IV, duc de Limburg, et d’Ermesinde, comtesse de Luxembourg)
     postérité Luxembourg dont Philippa fl 1311 qui ép. ~1268 Jean II d’Avesnes + 1304 comte de Hainaut”.5,8

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENDRIK van Limburg, son of WALRAM III Duke of Limburg & his second wife Ermensende Ctss de Luxembourg ([1216/17]-Mainz 24 Dec 1281, bur Clairefontaine). Dietrich Archbishop of Trier, at the request of "Walerami ducis de Limburg et comitis de Lutzelimburg", granted "feodum suum…de Arluns et Luzelliburg" to "uxori sue et conmatri nostre Ermegardi, prolibusquoque suis Henrico, Gerardo filiis, Catharine etiam filie sue" by charter dated 23 Nov 1223[249]. "Henricus dominus de Luzzelinburg, marchio de Arle" acknowledged a loan from Konrad Archbishop of Köln, with the consent of "domine…comitisse de Luzzelinburch matris mee, Gerardi fratris mei", by charter dated 1 May 1246[250]. On reaching the age of majority in 1237, he assumed the title Comte de Luxembourg, and succeeded his mother in 1247 as HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg. He adopted the red lion of Limburg on a barred background as the arms of Luxembourg[251]. After his brother-in-law Thibaut II Comte de Bar seized Ligny in 1266, Comte Henri was defeated at Preny near Pont-à-Mousson 6 Sep 1266 and was captured and imprisoned at Mousson, although Ligny was restored after the mediation of Louis IX King of France[252]. "Henry cuens de Lucelbourg et de la Roche et Marchis d´Arlons" notified that “Walerans nostre filz” had become “hons liges à Henry son frere nostre ainey filz” for “Roussey...Liney”, which he had from his mother, by charter dated Apr 1270[253]. He joined the crusade of King Louis in 1270 and, after the king's death, he was proposed as the expedition's new leader by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet][254]. Comte Henri was allied with Gérard Seigneur de Durbuy and Jean Duke of Brabant, against Jean Bishop of Liège and Guy Count of Flanders, in the so-called "War of the Cow" from 1272 to 1276, when the death of a peasant convicted of stealing a cow triggered regional devastation[255].
     "m (Betrothed Jul 1231, contract 4 Jun 1240, 1246) MARGUERITE de Bar, daughter of HENRI II Comte de Bar & his wife Philippa de Dreux [Capet] (-23 Nov 1273, bur Clairefontaine). The marriage contract between "Ermesindis comitissa Lucelbergensis et marchionissa Arlunensis…Henricus dominus de Lucemburg filius meus" and "Margaretam filiam Henrici comitis Barrensis" is dated Jul 1231[256]. Her dowry was the seigneurie of Ligny-en-Barrois[257]. "Philippe comtesse de Bar" notified that she had given “Liney” to “Henry comte de Luxembourg en mariage avec Marguerite ma fille” by charter dated 4 Jun 1240[258]. An epitaph at Clairfontaine abbey near Arlon records the burial of "de Luxembourgh Marguerite...extrait de linaige de Bar et de Bretaigne..."[259]."
Med Lands cites:
[249] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, CXXV, p. 200.
[250] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1846) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 300, p. 156.
[251] Gade (1951), p. 97.
[252] Gade (1951), p. 98.
[253] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 84.
[254] Gade (1951), p. 100.
[255] Gade (1951), p. 101.
[256] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, CXLIV, p. 212.
[257] Gade (1951), p. 96.
[258] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 74.
[259] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 81.6


; Per Weis: “Heinrich II, Count of Luxembourg, b. 1216/7, d. 24 Dec. 1281; m. Margareta of Bar, d. 1273, dau. of Henry II, Count of Bar, b. 1190, d. 1239, by Philippa de Dreux, dau. of Robert II (135-28), Count of Dreux. (ES 1.2/231, 229, 227; Moriarity, 194).”.14

; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 8): “F4. [2m.] Henri V "Le Blond", inherited his mother's lands and became Ct Henry II of Luxemburg (1247-81), *1216/17/20, +Mainz 24.12.1281; m.4.6.1240/1246 Margaret of Bar (*ca 1220 +23.11.1275); for their descendants see: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html"

Per Genealogy.EU (Bar 1): “F6. Margaret, *ca 1220, +23.11.1275; m.4.6.1240 Cte Henry II de Luxembourg (*1217 +24.11.1281)”.2,3,21

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Bar (-23 Nov 1273, bur Clairefontaine). The marriage contract between "Ermesindis comitissa Lucelbergensis et marchionissa Arlunensis…Henricus dominus de Lucemburg filius meus" and "Margaretam filiam Henrici comitis Barrensis" is dated Jul 1231[231]. Her dowry was the seigneurie of Ligny-en-Barrois[232]. "Philippe comtesse de Bar" notified that she had given “Liney” to “Henry comte de Luxembourg en mariage avec Marguerite ma fille” by charter dated 4 Jun 1240[233]. An epitaph at Clairfontaine abbey near Arlon records the burial of "de Luxembourgh Marguerite...extrait de linaige de Bar et de Bretaigne..."[234].
     "m (contracts 1230[235] and 4 Jun 1240, 1246) HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg, son of WALRAM III Duke of Limburg & his second wife Ermensende Ctss de Luxembourg ([1216/17]-Mainz 24 Dec 1281, bur Clairefontaine)."
Med Lands cites:
[231] Ernst, S. P. (1847) Histoire de Limbourg, Tome VI (Liège), Tome VI, CXLIV, p. 212.
[232] Gade (1951), p. 96.
[233] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 74.
[234] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 81.
[235] Gade (1951), p. 96.17

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 276. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg8.html#HL
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II 'the Blond': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026502&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Duché de Limbourg, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Limbourg.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#HenriIIdied1281A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg8.html
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LIMBURG.htm#WaleranIVdied1226B
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walram IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026504&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermesinde de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026501&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 234B-26, p. 213. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026503&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#Margueritedied1275
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 12 October 2020), memorial page for Henri V de Luxembourg (1216–24 Dec 1281), Find a Grave Memorial no. 89372384, citing Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium; Maintained by A.D.L (contributor 47895058), https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89372384/henri_v-de_luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_V,_Count_of_Luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Henri V de Luxembourg: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_V_de_Luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html#MH2B
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Felicitas de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064512&tree=LEO
  23. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 263. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page (Chabot Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012415&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#HenriVIdied1288B
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walram I de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050315&tree=LEO
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 13.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014209&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Isabelledied1298
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  32. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs d’Avesnes, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Philippinedied1311
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippine de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012275&tree=LEO

Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois1,2,3,4,5

F, #10480, b. circa 1220, d. 23 November 1275
FatherHenri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny2,6,7,3,8,5 b. 1190, d. 13 Nov 1239
MotherPhilippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois2,9,10,8,3,5 b. 1192, d. 17 Mar 1242
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited6 Dec 2020
     Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois was born circa 1220.2,3 She married Heinrich V/II "le Grand, le Blond" (?) Comte de Luxembourg, Namur, et de la Roche, Marquis d'Arlon, son of Walram/Waleran IV (?) Marquis d'Arlon, Duke of Limburg, Count of Luxemburg and Ermensinde (Eremansette) de Namur Comtesse de Luxembourg, on 4 June 1240.2,1,11,12,13,14,8,15,3,5
Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois died on 23 November 1275.1,2,16,3,5
Marguerite (?) de Bar-le-Duc, Dame de Ligny-en-Barrois was buried after 23 November 1275 at Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1220
     DEATH     23 Nov 1275 (aged 54–55)
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry of Bar 1190–1239
          Philippa De Dreux 1192–1242
     Spouse
          Henri V de Luxembourg 1216–1281
     Siblings
          Theobald De Bar 1221–1291
     Children
          Isabelle de Luxembourg unknown–1298
          Waleran de Luxembourg unknown–1288
          Henri de Luxembourg 1250–1288
          Philippe de Luxembourg 1252–1311
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 30 Aug 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 116294351.17
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENDRIK van Limburg, son of WALRAM III Duke of Limburg & his second wife Ermensende Ctss de Luxembourg ([1216/17]-Mainz 24 Dec 1281, bur Clairefontaine). Dietrich Archbishop of Trier, at the request of "Walerami ducis de Limburg et comitis de Lutzelimburg", granted "feodum suum…de Arluns et Luzelliburg" to "uxori sue et conmatri nostre Ermegardi, prolibusquoque suis Henrico, Gerardo filiis, Catharine etiam filie sue" by charter dated 23 Nov 1223[249]. "Henricus dominus de Luzzelinburg, marchio de Arle" acknowledged a loan from Konrad Archbishop of Köln, with the consent of "domine…comitisse de Luzzelinburch matris mee, Gerardi fratris mei", by charter dated 1 May 1246[250]. On reaching the age of majority in 1237, he assumed the title Comte de Luxembourg, and succeeded his mother in 1247 as HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg. He adopted the red lion of Limburg on a barred background as the arms of Luxembourg[251]. After his brother-in-law Thibaut II Comte de Bar seized Ligny in 1266, Comte Henri was defeated at Preny near Pont-à-Mousson 6 Sep 1266 and was captured and imprisoned at Mousson, although Ligny was restored after the mediation of Louis IX King of France[252]. "Henry cuens de Lucelbourg et de la Roche et Marchis d´Arlons" notified that “Walerans nostre filz” had become “hons liges à Henry son frere nostre ainey filz” for “Roussey...Liney”, which he had from his mother, by charter dated Apr 1270[253]. He joined the crusade of King Louis in 1270 and, after the king's death, he was proposed as the expedition's new leader by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet][254]. Comte Henri was allied with Gérard Seigneur de Durbuy and Jean Duke of Brabant, against Jean Bishop of Liège and Guy Count of Flanders, in the so-called "War of the Cow" from 1272 to 1276, when the death of a peasant convicted of stealing a cow triggered regional devastation[255].
     "m (Betrothed Jul 1231, contract 4 Jun 1240, 1246) MARGUERITE de Bar, daughter of HENRI II Comte de Bar & his wife Philippa de Dreux [Capet] (-23 Nov 1273, bur Clairefontaine). The marriage contract between "Ermesindis comitissa Lucelbergensis et marchionissa Arlunensis…Henricus dominus de Lucemburg filius meus" and "Margaretam filiam Henrici comitis Barrensis" is dated Jul 1231[256]. Her dowry was the seigneurie of Ligny-en-Barrois[257]. "Philippe comtesse de Bar" notified that she had given “Liney” to “Henry comte de Luxembourg en mariage avec Marguerite ma fille” by charter dated 4 Jun 1240[258]. An epitaph at Clairfontaine abbey near Arlon records the burial of "de Luxembourgh Marguerite...extrait de linaige de Bar et de Bretaigne..."[259]."
Med Lands cites:
[249] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, CXXV, p. 200.
[250] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1846) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 300, p. 156.
[251] Gade (1951), p. 97.
[252] Gade (1951), p. 98.
[253] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 84.
[254] Gade (1951), p. 100.
[255] Gade (1951), p. 101.
[256] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, CXLIV, p. 212.
[257] Gade (1951), p. 96.
[258] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 74.
[259] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 81.15


; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 8): “F4. [2m.] Henri V "Le Blond", inherited his mother's lands and became Ct Henry II of Luxemburg (1247-81), *1216/17/20, +Mainz 24.12.1281; m.4.6.1240/1246 Margaret of Bar (*ca 1220 +23.11.1275); for their descendants see: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html"

Per Genealogy.EU (Bar 1): “F6. Margaret, *ca 1220, +23.11.1275; m.4.6.1240 Cte Henry II de Luxembourg (*1217 +24.11.1281)”.18,19,20

; Per Weis: “Heinrich II, Count of Luxembourg, b. 1216/7, d. 24 Dec. 1281; m. Margareta of Bar, d. 1273, dau. of Henry II, Count of Bar, b. 1190, d. 1239, by Philippa de Dreux, dau. of Robert II (135-28), Count of Dreux. (ES 1.2/231, 229, 227; Moriarity, 194).”.11

; This is the same person as ”Margaret of Bar” at Wikipedia and as ”Marguerite de Bar” at Wikipédia (FR).21,22

; Per Genealogics:
     “Margarethe was born about 1220, the eldest of seven children of Henri II, comte de Bar, and Philippe de Dreux, dame de Torcy en Brie, de Quincy. On 4 June 1240 she married Henri 'the Blond', comte de Luxembourg et Namur, son of Walram IV, duke of Limburg, and his second wife Ermesinde de Namur, comtesse de Luxembourg. Margarethe was twenty years old and Henri twenty-four. Of their seven children two sons and two daughters would have progeny.
     “Margarethe brought Henri Ligny-en-Barrois as her dowry; however, by a clause in the marriage contract it remained under the feudal suzerainty of the county of Bar. In contempt of this, Henri paid homage in 1256 to Thibaut V, king of Navarre, in his capacity as count of Champagne. Margarethe's brother Thibaud II, comte de Bar, took advantage of the conflict then raging between Frédéric III, duke of Lorraine (their cousin) and the bishops of Metz. Henri was a partisan of the duke and so Thibaud took the side of the bishop. Henri was captured in battle at Prény on 14 September 1266. On 8 September 1268 King Louis IX arbitrated between the two counts and Henri was freed and repossessed Ligny, but under the suzerainty of the Barrois.
     “Margarethe and Henri made peace with Guy de Dampierre, Graaf van Vlaanderen, to resolve the issue of suzerainty over Namur by giving him their daughter Isabelle in marriage. Their other daughter Philippine married Jan II d'Avesnes, Graaf van Holland en Henegouwen. Both daughters would have progeny.
     “Margarethe died on 23 November 1275, six years before her husband.”.3 EDV-20.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau Geldrop, 1965, G. F. de Roo van Alderwerelt, Reference: 347.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 147.3


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Bar (-23 Nov 1273, bur Clairefontaine). The marriage contract between "Ermesindis comitissa Lucelbergensis et marchionissa Arlunensis…Henricus dominus de Lucemburg filius meus" and "Margaretam filiam Henrici comitis Barrensis" is dated Jul 1231[231]. Her dowry was the seigneurie of Ligny-en-Barrois[232]. "Philippe comtesse de Bar" notified that she had given “Liney” to “Henry comte de Luxembourg en mariage avec Marguerite ma fille” by charter dated 4 Jun 1240[233]. An epitaph at Clairfontaine abbey near Arlon records the burial of "de Luxembourgh Marguerite...extrait de linaige de Bar et de Bretaigne..."[234].
     "m (contracts 1230[235] and 4 Jun 1240, 1246) HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg, son of WALRAM III Duke of Limburg & his second wife Ermensende Ctss de Luxembourg ([1216/17]-Mainz 24 Dec 1281, bur Clairefontaine)."
Med Lands cites:
[231] Ernst, S. P. (1847) Histoire de Limbourg, Tome VI (Liège), Tome VI, CXLIV, p. 212.
[232] Gade (1951), p. 96.
[233] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 74.
[234] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 81.
[235] Gade (1951), p. 96.5

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 276. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026503&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#Margueritedied1275. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026216&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#ThibautIBardied1214
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026217&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#PhilippaDreuxdied1242
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 234B-26, p. 213. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg8.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II 'the Blond': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026502&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#HenriIIdied1281A
  16. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 168-31, p. 159.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 12 October 2020), memorial page for Marguerite de Bar (1220–23 Nov 1275), Find a Grave Memorial no. 116294351, citing Abbaye de Clairefontaine, Arlon, Arrondissement d'Arlon, Luxembourg, Belgium; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116294351/marguerite-de-bar. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg8.html#HL
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html#MH2B
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Bar. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  22. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Marguerite de Bar: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_Bar. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Felicitas de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064512&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page (Chabot Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012415&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#HenriVIdied1288B
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walram I de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050315&tree=LEO
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 13.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014209&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Isabelledied1298
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  32. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 6.
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Philippinedied1311
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippine de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012275&tree=LEO

Henri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny1,2,3

M, #10481, b. 1190, d. 13 November 1239
FatherThibault/Theobald I (Jean) (?) Comte de Bar-le-Duc, Mousson, Briey, Stenay, Longwy et Ligny4,2,5,6,7 b. bt 1158 - 1160, d. 13 Feb 1214
MotherErmesinde/Isabelle de Brienne4,2,8,6,7 d. c 1211
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited5 Nov 2020
     Henri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny was born in 1190.1,2,3,6,9 He married Philippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois, daughter of Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy and Yolande de Coucy, circa 27 December 1219; Med Lands says contract 6 Nov 1219; marriage 21/27 Dec 1219; Genealogics says f. 12 Nov 1218.10,4,1,2,3,6,9,11,12
Henri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny died on 13 November 1239 at Gaza, Palestine.10,1,2,3,6,9
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Henri was born about 1190, the son of Thibaud I, comte de Bar et Luxembourg, and Ermesinde de Bar. He appeared in charters from 1202 and was associated with the rule of the county of Bar from 1210. In 1211 he participated in the Albigensian Crusade, in 1214 he succeeded his father and on 27 July that year he fought for Philippe II August, king of France, in the French victory over a German-Flemish-English alliance at the Battle of Bovines.
     "On 12 November 1218 Henri married Philippe de Dreux, dame de Torcy en Brie, daughter of Robert II, comte de Dreus et Braine, and Yolande de Coucy. Of their four sons and three daughters, Margarethe, Thibaut II and Johanna would have progeny.
     "During the war over the succession in Champagne (1215-1222), Henri actively supported Thibaut IV, son of Thibaut III, comte de Champagne, over his cousin Philippe de Champagne and her husband Erard I de Brienne. A friendship continued for several years between Henri and Thibaut IV, and on the death of King Louis VIII in 1226, Thibaut involved Henri in his rebellion against the regency of Blanche of Castile. However they submitted to her at Vendôme on 2 March 1227.
     "About 1229 Thibaut and Henri fell out. Thibaut joined forces with Mathieu II, duke of Lorraine, and Henri allied with Hugues II de Vaudémont and the bishop of Toul, and ravaged Lorraine in January 1230. In response Thibaut IV and Simon de Joinville invaded and ravaged Bar, then Hugues IV, duke of Burgundy, invaded Champagne. Blanche of Castile had to intervene to restore de peace, which was signed in 1232.
     "As an ally of Metz and of Mathieu II, duke of Lorraine, Henri opposed Jean I d'Apremont, bishop of Verdun, in the so-called Friends' War of 1231-1234.
     "Although Henri had given the lordship of Ligny-en-Barrois as the dowry of his daughter Margarethe on her marriage in 1240 to Henri 'the Blond', comte de Luxembourg et Namur, it was understood that the lordship would remain under the feudal suzerainty of Bar. However in 1256 Henri of Luxembourg paid homage for Ligny to Thibaut IV, comte de Champagne, now king of Navarre as Thibaut V. A war broke out, and following the arbitration of King Louis IX of France, the overlord of the counts of Champagne and of Bar, the original suzerainty of the county of Bar over Ligny was confirmed.
     "Henri founded several abbeys, and made significant donations to others. He took the cross in 1239 and accompanied Thiebaut, count of Champagne and king of Navarre, and Hugues IV, duke of Burgundy, to the Holy Land. He was killed at the Battle of Gaza on 13 November 1239.6

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Henry II of Bar in French Henri II de Bar, in German Heinrich II von Bar (1190–13 November 1239) was a Count of Bar who reigned from 1214 to 1239. He was son of Count Theobald I of Bar and his first wife, Ermesinde of Bar-sur-Seine.[1] Henry was killed on 13 November 1239 during the Barons' Crusade, when he diverted several hundred crusaders from the main army under Theobald I of Navarre to fight a force of Ayyubid Muslims at Gaza.[2]
Spouse and children
     "In 1219 he married Philippa de Dreux (1192–1242),[3] the daughter of Robert II of Dreux.
Children:
** Margaret of Bar (1220–1275), in 1240 she married Henry V of Luxembourg[4]
** Thiébaut II of Bar (c. 1221–1291),[5] Succeeded his father as Count of Bar
** Henry, 1249
** Jeanne (1225–1299), married first Frédéric de Blamont who died in 1255, and second Louis V, Count of Chiny
** Renaud (died 1271)
** Erard (died 1335)
** Isabelle (died 1320)
See also
** Umm al-Naser Mosque: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_al-Nasr_Mosque
References
1. Péporté 2011, p. 81.
2. Burgtorf 2011, p. 332.
3. Lower 2005, p. 48.
4. Gade 1951, p. 96.
5. Richard 1983, p. xxviii.
Sources
** Burgtorf, Jochen (2011). "Battle of Gaza (1239)". In Mikaberidze, Alexander (ed.) Conflict and Conquest in the Islamic World: A Historical Encyclopedia. Vol. I. ABC-CLIO.
** Gade, John A. (1951). Luxemburg in the Middle Ages. E.J. Brill.
** Lower, Michael (2005). The Barons' Crusade: A Call to Arms and Its Consequences. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Péporté, P. (2011). Historiography, Collective Memory and Nation-Building in Luxembourg. Brill.
** Richard, Jean (1983). Lloyd, Simon (ed.) Saint Louis, Crusader King of France. Translated by Birrell, Jean. Cambridge University Press."13 EDV-23.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 6:147.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 166.
3. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. 247.
4. La Maison Ducale de Bar, Rupt-sur-Moselle, 1977. , Poull, Georges. 167.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI de Bar (1190-killed in battle Gaza 13 Nov 1239). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comes Barrensis Henricus" as son of "comes Barri Theobaldus" & his second wife[211]. He succeeded his father as HENRI II Comte de Bar. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comitis Barrensis" was captured by "Iohanne Cabilonensi filio comitis Stephani" and "Henrico Viennensi frater Gerardi iam defuncti" in 1225 "ante natale Domini"[212]. He took part in the Crusade of 1239, led by Thibaut de Champagne King of Navarre, and landed at Acre 1 Sep 1239. He marched south to attack the Egyptian outposts of Ascalon and Gaza, where they were defeated and Comte Henri was killed[213]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Henris le cuens de Bar-le-Duc" among those who took part in the crusade from France which landed at Acre in 1239 and in a later passage records that he was killed[214].
     "m (contract 6 Nov 1219, [21/27] Dec 1219) PHILIPPA de Dreux, daughter of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux [Capet] & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1192]-17 Mar 1242). Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, de Quincy et de Longueville-en-Tardenois. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1219 of "comes Barri Henricus" and "filiam comitis Roberti de Brana…Philippam", a more precise date being deduced from the same source specifying that her father died during the same week as the marriage[215]. "Henricus comes Barrensis" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde, for the soul of "uxoris mee Philippe", by charter dated Apr 1239[216]. "Arnoux cuens de Los et de Chisni" acknowledged "Phelippe contesse de Bar…et Thiebaut son fil" as his suzerains in respect of "la terre de Chisni…que je tieng de par ma femme Jehanne la contesse" by charter dated Feb 1240[217]. "Philippe contesse de Bar et Thiebaus mon fils" confirmed a donation property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde by charter dated 23 Jan 1242[218]."
Med Lands cites:
[211] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 899.
[212] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1225, MGH SS XXIII, p. 915.
[213] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 3, pp. 212-13.
[214] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") Contiuator (“WTC”) XXXIII.XLIV, pp. 413 and 415.
[215] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 909.
[216] Jacob, A. (ed.) (1882) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Sainte-Hoïlde (Bar-le-Duc) ("Sainte-Hoïlde") LXXVIII, p. 67.
[217] Jeantin, M. (1851) Les chroniques de l´Ardenne et des Woëpvres, Tome I (Paris, Nancy), p. 264.
[218] Sainte-Hoïlde XLI, p. 38.9
He was Crusader with thibaud de Champagne, roi de Navarre, deparquent at Acre 1 Sept. 1239 in 1239.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 272. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaud I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026498&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026216&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermesinde de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026500&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#ThibautIBardied1214. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-31, p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026217&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#PhilippaDreuxdied1242
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II,_Count_of_Bar. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 6.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026503&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#Margueritedied1275
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaud II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026206&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 13.

Philippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois1,2,3

F, #10482, b. 1192, d. 17 March 1242
FatherRobert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1154, d. 28 Dec 1218
MotherYolande de Coucy2,7,3,6 b. c 1164, d. 18 Mar 1222
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited7 Nov 2020
     Philippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois was born in 1192.2,8,3,6 She married Henri II de Bar Comte de Bar, seigneur de Ligny, son of Thibault/Theobald I (Jean) (?) Comte de Bar-le-Duc, Mousson, Briey, Stenay, Longwy et Ligny and Ermesinde/Isabelle de Brienne, circa 27 December 1219; Med Lands says contract 6 Nov 1219; marriage 21/27 Dec 1219; Genealogics says f. 12 Nov 1218.9,1,2,8,3,10,11,12,6
Philippe de Dreux Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, Quincy et Longueville-en-Tardenois died on 17 March 1242.9,8,3,12,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI de Bar (1190-killed in battle Gaza 13 Nov 1239). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comes Barrensis Henricus" as son of "comes Barri Theobaldus" & his second wife[211]. He succeeded his father as HENRI II Comte de Bar. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comitis Barrensis" was captured by "Iohanne Cabilonensi filio comitis Stephani" and "Henrico Viennensi frater Gerardi iam defuncti" in 1225 "ante natale Domini"[212]. He took part in the Crusade of 1239, led by Thibaut de Champagne King of Navarre, and landed at Acre 1 Sep 1239. He marched south to attack the Egyptian outposts of Ascalon and Gaza, where they were defeated and Comte Henri was killed[213]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Henris le cuens de Bar-le-Duc" among those who took part in the crusade from France which landed at Acre in 1239 and in a later passage records that he was killed[214].
     "m (contract 6 Nov 1219, [21/27] Dec 1219) PHILIPPA de Dreux, daughter of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux [Capet] & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1192]-17 Mar 1242). Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, de Quincy et de Longueville-en-Tardenois. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1219 of "comes Barri Henricus" and "filiam comitis Roberti de Brana…Philippam", a more precise date being deduced from the same source specifying that her father died during the same week as the marriage[215]. "Henricus comes Barrensis" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde, for the soul of "uxoris mee Philippe", by charter dated Apr 1239[216]. "Arnoux cuens de Los et de Chisni" acknowledged "Phelippe contesse de Bar…et Thiebaut son fil" as his suzerains in respect of "la terre de Chisni…que je tieng de par ma femme Jehanne la contesse" by charter dated Feb 1240[217]. "Philippe contesse de Bar et Thiebaus mon fils" confirmed a donation property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde by charter dated 23 Jan 1242[218]."
Med Lands cites:
[211] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 899.
[212] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1225, MGH SS XXIII, p. 915.
[213] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 3, pp. 212-13.
[214] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") Contiuator (“WTC”) XXXIII.XLIV, pp. 413 and 415.
[215] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 909.
[216] Jacob, A. (ed.) (1882) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Sainte-Hoïlde (Bar-le-Duc) ("Sainte-Hoïlde") LXXVIII, p. 67.
[217] Jeantin, M. (1851) Les chroniques de l´Ardenne et des Woëpvres, Tome I (Paris, Nancy), p. 264.
[218] Sainte-Hoïlde XLI, p. 38.11


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philippa of Dreux, Dame de Coucy (1192–1242) was a daughter of Robert II of Dreux and his second wife Yolande de Coucy.[1]
Family
     "Philippa was the fifth of seven children born to her parents, Robert II of Dreux and his second wife Yolande de Coucy.
Spouse and children
     "In 1219 she married Henry II of Bar (1190–1239),[1] the son of Theobald I of Bar.
Children
** Margaret of Bar (1220–1275), in 1240 she married Henry V of Luxembourg
** Thiébaut II of Bar (c. 1221-1291), Succeeded Henry II as Count of Bar.[1]
** Henry of Bar (died 1249)
** Jeanne of Bar (1225–1299), married first Frédéric de Blamont who died in 1255, and later married Louis V, Count of Chiny.
** Renaud of Bar (died 1271)
** Erard of Bar (died 1335)
** Isabelle of Bar (died 1320)

References
1. Richard 1983, p. xxviii.
Sources
** Richard, Jean (1983). Lloyd, Simon (ed.) Saint Louis, Crusader King of France. Translated by Birrell, Jean. Cambridge University Press."13

Reference: Genealogics cites: Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. 247.12

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Philippe, Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, etc, *1192, +17.3.1242; m.1219 Cte Henri II de Bar (*1190 +1239.)2"

; Per Med Lands: "PHILIPPA de Dreux ([1192]-17 Mar 1242). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names one of the seven daughters (mentioned fourth in the list) of "comiti de Brana Roberto" and his wife Yolande as "Philippa Barrensis uxor comitis Henrici"[98]. Dame de Torcy-en-Brie, de Quincy et de Longueville-en-Tardenois. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1219 of "comes Barri Henricus" and "filiam comitis Roberti de Brana…Philippam", a more precise date being deduced from the same source specifying that her father died during the same week as the marriage[99]. "Henricus comes Barrensis" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde, for the soul of "uxoris mee Philippe", by charter dated Apr 1239[100]. "Arnoux cuens de Los et de Chisni" acknowledged "Phelippe contesse de Bar…et Thiebaut son fil" as his suzerains in respect of "la terre de Chisni…que je tieng de par ma femme Jehanne la contesse" by charter dated Feb 1240[101]. "Philippe contesse de Bar et Thiebaus mon fils" confirmed a donation property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde by charter dated 23 Jan 1242[102]. m (contract 6 Nov 1219, [21/27] Dec 1219) HENRI II Comte de Bar, son of THIBAUT I Comte de Bar & his second wife Ermesende de Bar-sur-Seine [Brienne] (1190-killed in battle Gaza 13 Nov 1239)."
Med Lands cites:
[98] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[99] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 909.
[100] Sainte-Hoïlde LXXVIII, p. 67.
[101] Jeantin (1851), p. 264.
[102] Sainte-Hoïlde XLI, p. 38.6
EDV-23.

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 272. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013796&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Dreux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#PhilippaDreuxdied1242. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013798&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 168-31, p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026216&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#ThibautIBardied1214
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026217&tree=LEO
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippa_of_Dreux
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 6.
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026503&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#Margueritedied1275
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaud II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026206&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 13.

Floris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland1,2,3

M, #10483, b. 24 June 1210, d. 19 July 1234
Floris IV, Count of Holland
Photograph by Hendrik van Heessel (†1470)
FatherWillem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand2,4,5,6,7 b. c 1170, d. 4 Feb 1222
MotherAdelaide van Gelre2,8,6,7 b. 1185, d. 4 Feb 1218
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited24 Nov 2020
     Floris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland was born on 24 June 1210 at The Hague (Den Haag), Den Haag Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands.2,6 He married Machtild/Mathilde (?) van Brabant, Graven van Holland, daughter of Henri I "The Warrior" (?) Duke of Brabant and Lorraine and Mathilde de Boulogne Duchess of Brabant, on 6 December 1224;
Her 2nd husband.9,10,2,3,7,11,12
Floris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland died on 19 July 1234 at Noyon ou Corbie, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France (now), at age 24; killed jousting; Genealogy.EU (Holland 2 page) says d. 19 July 1234; Leo van de Pas says d. 19 July 1234; Weis [AR7] line 100-28, says d. 1245.9,2,6
Floris/Florent IV (?) Count of Holland and Zeeland was buried after 19 July 1234 at Abdij van Rijnsburg, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     24 Jun 1210, The Hague (Den Haag), Den Haag Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     DEATH     19 Jul 1234 (aged 24), Corbie, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France
     Family Members
     Parents
          William I of Holland 1167–1222
          Adelheid of Guelders 1185–1218
     Spouse
          Mathilde de Brabant 1195–1267 (m. 1224)
     Children
          Aleide van Holland unknown–1280
          Willem II of Holland 1228–1256
          Floris of Holland 1230–1258
          Margarete of Holland 1234–1276
     BURIAL     Abdij van Rijnsburg, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 9 May 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 89857772.13
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MATHILDE de Brabant (-22 Dec 1267, bur Loosduinen Cistercian Abbey). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names "Mariam, conthoralem Ottonis Quartus Romanorum imperatoris, Aleydam comitssam Auernie, Margaretam comitissam Gerardi comitis Ghelrie et Mechteldim, primo quidem comitissam Palatinam Rheni, postea…comitissam Hollandie" as the daughters of "Henricus…primus, dux Lotharingie" and his wife "Mechteldim, filiam Mathei Boloniensis comitis"[276]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Machtildem [uxor] Florentius comes Hollandie" as the fourth of the four daughters of "Henricus dux" and his wife Mathilde[277]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris IV and "Machtildim filiam Henrici ducis Brabancie"[278]. The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not so far been identified. The marriage contract of "Mathildam filiam Henrici ducis Lotharingiæ" and "filium Willelmi comitis Hollandiæ Florentium primogenitum" is dated 5 Nov 1214[279]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1267 VI Kal Ian" of "Machtildis comitissa" and her burial "apud puellæ cystersiensis ordinis Losdunensis monasterii"[280].
     "m firstly (Aachen end Nov 1212) HEINRICH II Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of HEINRICH Herzog von Braunschweig, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein & his first wife Agnes von Staufen ([1196]-25 Apr 1214, bur Kloster Schönau bei Heidelberg).
     "m secondly (Betrothed 5 Nov 1214, 5 Dec 1224) FLORIS IV Count of Holland, son of WILLEM I Count of Holland & his first wife Adelheid van Gelre (24 Jun 1210-Noyon or Corbie 19 Jul 1234, bur Rijnsburg)."
Med Lands cites:
[276] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 62.
[277] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[278] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[279] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 64, "Extraicts des registres de Brabant".
[280] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 69b, p. 183.12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Brabant 2): “F6. [1m.] Mathilde of Brabant, *ca 1200, +22.12.1267; 1m: Aachen 1212 Pfgf Heinrich II bei Rhein (+1214); 2m: 6.12.1224 Ct Florenz IV of Holland (*24.6.1210 +19.7.1234)”.14

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 16.6

; Per Genealogics:
     “Floris was born on 24 June 1210, the son of Willem I, count of Holland, and his first wife Aleida van Gelre. Floris succeeded his father on Willem's death in 1222. During his minority, his second cousin Boudewijn I, Graf von Bentheim, Burggraaf van Utrecht, acted as regent.
     “Floris purchased a piece of land an hour's ride from Loosduinen, and built a house on a dune next to a small lake that still exists and is called 'the Court Pound' (Hofvijver). The house of Floris IV was probably a stone building surrounded by wooden houses for his people and stables. Around them all were defensive walls and possibly a canal. The house and its surrounding area was called 'Haga', meaning both 'Hague' and 'land surrounded by walls'. In later centuries 'Haga' became 'Haag Ambacht', which evolved to Den Haag or 's-Gravenhage (Graven is Dutch for 'counts').
     “Before 6 December 1224 Floris married Machteld of Brabant, daughter of Hendrik I, duke of Brabant and Mathilde de Boulogne. Machteld's sister Maria was the second wife of Floris' father Willem I. Machteld herself was the widow of Heinrich II, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein. Floris and Machteld had five children of whom three, Willem II, Aleida and Margaretha, would have progeny.
     “Floris was in continual dispute with the bishop of Utrecht, Otto of Lippe, but helped him against the peasants of Drente in 1227. Floris added Altena to Holland, and in 1234 he participated in the crusade against the Stedingers north of Bremen. In the same year he was accidentally killed in a tourney at Corbie in France. His eventual successor was his son Willem II, for whom first Floris IV's brother Willem, then Floris IV's widow Machteld, acted as regent of Holland until Willem II came of age.”.6

; This is the same person as ”Floris IV, Count of Holland” at Wikipedia and as ”Floris IV van Holland” at Wikipedia (NL).15,16 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 2): “A1. Ct Floris IV of Holland (1222-34), *The Hague 24.6.1210, +Noyon ou Corbie (in France) 19.7.1234; m.before 6.12.1214 Mechtild of Brabant (*ca 1200 +21.12.1267)”.17

; Per Weis: “Florent IV, Count of Holland, d. 2345; m. bef. Dec. 1224, Mechtild of Brabant, dau. of Henry I (155-26), Duke of Brabant, by Mathiilde of Boulogne, dau. of Matthew of Alsace, Count of Boulogne.”.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "FLORIS (24 Jun 1210-Corbie 19 Jul 1234, bur Rijnsburg). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Florencium Hollandie comitem, Ottonem Traiectensem pontificem, Wilhelmum presidium, Adam abbatissan Rinesburgensem et Richardim…monialem" as the children of Count Willem & his first wife[526]. He succeeded his father in 1222 as FLORIS IV Count of Holland. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Claromontensis comes" killed Count Floris "in Corbiaco XIV Kal Aug"[527]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records that "Florentius IV comes Hollandie tredecimus" was killed "XIV Kal Aug" in 1234 and buried "Reynsburch"[528].
     "m (Betrothed 5 Nov 1214, 5 Dec 1224) as her second husband, MATHILDE de Brabant, widow of HEINRICH II Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, daughter of HENRI I Duke of Brabant & his first wife Mathilde de Flandre (-22 Dec 1267, bur Loosduinen Cistercian Abbey). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names "Mariam, conthoralem Ottonis Quartus Romanorum imperatoris, Aleydam comitssam Auernie, Margaretam comitissam Gerardi comitis Ghelrie et Mechteldim, primo quidem comitissam Palatinam Rheni, postea…comitissam Hollandie" as the daughters of "Henricus…primus, dux Lotharingie" and his wife "Mechteldim, filiam Mathei Boloniensis comitis"[529]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Machtildem [uxor] Florentius comes Hollandie" as the fourth of the four daughters of "Henricus dux" and his wife Mathilde[530]. The marriage contract of "Mathildam filiam Henrici ducis Lotharingiæ" and "filium Willelmi comitis Hollandiæ Florentium primogenitum" is dated 5 Nov 1214[531]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris IV and "Machtildim filiam Henrici ducis Brabancie"[532]. "…Machtildis comitissa, Richard soror comitis" witnessed the charter dated 1231 under which Floris IV Count of Holland confirmed rights of Rijnsburg abbey[533]. "Mathildis comitissa Hollandiæ" donated property to Afflighem abbey, where she and "due filie mee…Aleidis et Margareta" elected their burial, by charter dated Sep 1244[534]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1267 VI Kal Ian" of "Machtildis comitissa" and her burial "apud puellæ cystersiensis ordinis Losdunensis monasterii"[535]"
Med Lands cites:
[526] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[527] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 69b, p. 183.
[528] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110.
[529] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 62.
[530] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[531] Butkens, C. (1724) Trophées tant sacrés que profanes du duché de Brabant (The Hague), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 64, "Extraicts des registres de Brabant".
[532] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[533] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 333, p. 187.
[534] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 409, p. 218.
[535] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 69b, p. 183.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 2): “A1. Ct Floris IV of Holland (1222-34), *The Hague 24.6.1210, +Noyon ou Corbie (in France) 19.7.1234; m.before 6.12.1214 Mechtild of Brabant (*ca 1200 +21.12.1267)”.19 He was Count of Holland and Zeeland; Genealogics says m. bef 6 Dec 1224 between 1222 and 1234.1,2,6

Family

Machtild/Mathilde (?) van Brabant, Graven van Holland b. c 1200, d. 22 Dec 1267
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012277&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013570&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#WillemIdied1222B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012277&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIVdied1234
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013571&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 100-28, pp. 96-97. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Machteld of Brabant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012278&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#Mathildedied1267.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 31 July 2020), memorial page for Floris IV of Holland (24 Jun 1210–19 Jul 1234), Find a Grave Memorial no. 89857772, citing Abdij van Rijnsburg, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89857772. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#MBH1
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_IV,_Count_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4777] Wikipedia - De vrije encyclopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Floris IV van Holland: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_IV_van_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NL).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  18. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 100-28, p. 103. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Machteld of Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104750&tree=LEO
  21. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 410 (Chart 22). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013289&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris 'the Regent': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104751&tree=LEO
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012263&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Aleidedied1284
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033293&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Margaretadied1277

Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand1,2,3

M, #10484, b. circa 1170, d. 4 February 1222
FatherFloris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross1,4,5,6,7 b. c 1140, d. 1 Aug 1190
MotherAda/Aleida de Huntingdon1,8,4,5,7,9 b. bt 1140 - 1146, d. a 11 Jan 1204
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited11 Nov 2020
     Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand was born circa 1170.10,1,4 He married Adelaide van Gelre, daughter of Otto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen and Richardis (?) von Scheyern-Wittelsbach, in 1197 at Stavoren, Frisia (Friesland), Netherlands (now);
His 1st wife.11,4,1,12,13,5 Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand married Marie (?) de Brabant, daughter of Henri I "The Warrior" (?) Duke of Brabant and Lorraine and Mathilde de Boulogne Duchess of Brabant, in July 1220;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1,10,4,5,14
Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand died on 4 February 1222; Leo van de Pas says d. 4 Feb 1222; Genealogy.EU (Holland 1 page) says d. 4 Feb. 1222; Weis [AR7] line 100-27 says d. 4 Feb. 1223/4; Med Lands says d. 4 Feb 1222.11,10,4,1,5
Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand was buried after 4 February 1222 at Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1167, The Hague (Den Haag), Den Haag Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     DEATH     4 Feb 1222 (aged 54–55)
     William I was the Count of Holland from 1203 to 1222. He was the younger son of Floris III and Ada of Scotland. William was raised in Scotland. He started a revolt against his brother, Dirk VII and became count in Friesland after a reconciliation. Friesland was considered as a part of Holland by the Counts of Holland. His niece, Ada, eventually inherited Holland in 1203, but William couldn't accept this. After a civil war, which lasted for several years, William won the war. Louis and Ada were supported by the bishop of Liège and bishop of Utrecht, and the count of Flanders. William was supported by the duke of Brabant and by the majority of the Hollanders.
     Emperor Otto IV acknowledged him as count of Holland in 1203, because he was a supporter of the Welfs. He and many others changed allegiance to emperor Frederick II after the battle of Bouvines in 1214. He took part in a French expedition against king John of England. The pope excommunicated him for this.
Possibly because of this, William then became a fervent crusader. He campaigned in Prussia and joined in the conquest of Lisbon. In Europe, he came to be called William the Crazy for his chivalric and reckless behaviour in battle. William conquered the city of Damietta during the Fifth Crusade.
     There were great changes in the landscape of Holland in the end of the 12th and during the 13th century. Many colonists bought land to turn the swamps into polders. Most of the swamps had been sold, and irrigation had started during the reign of William. Huge infrastructural works were done; the island called Grote Waard was enclosed with dikes all around and a dam was built at Spaarndam. New governmental bodies were created, the so-called waterschappen and hoogheemraadschappen, which were charged with the task of protecting the polders against ever-present threat of flooding. Count William granted city rights to Geertruidenberg in 1213, to Dordrecht in 1217, to Middelburg in 1220 and perhaps also to Leiden. In this way he gave an impulse to trade.
     Count William was married twice. First, he was married in 1197 at Stavoren to Adelheid of Guelders, daughter of Otto I, Count of Guelders and Richarde of Bavaria. Adelheid died on 12 February 1218 while William was away on crusade. On his return he married secondly, in July 1220, Marie of Brabant, daughter of Henry I, Duke of Brabant and Maud of Boulogne and Alsace. She was the widow of Emperor Otto IV. William and his first wife Adelaide had the following children:
1. Floris IV, Count of Holland (24 June 1210 The Hague–19 July 1234, Corbie, France).
2. Otto (d. 1249), Regent of Holland in 1238-1239, Bishop of Utrecht.
3. Willem (d. 1238), Regent of Holland in 1234-1238.
4. Richardis (d. 1262).
5. Ada (d. 1258), Abbess at Rijnsburg 1239.

     Family Members
     Parents
          Floris III of Holland 1141–1190
          Ada of Huntingdon 1139–1206
     Spouse
          Adelheid of Guelders 1185–1218
     Siblings
          Dirk VII of Holland 1163–1203
     Children
          Floris IV of Holland 1210–1234
     BURIAL     Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 9 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 89856123.15
     He was Crusader.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Willem was born about 1170, the second son of Floris III, count of Holland, and Aleida of Scotland. When his father died on crusade in 1190 he was succeeded by his eldest son Dirk VII. Willem, who was raised in Scotland, started a revolt against Dirk. After a reconciliation he became count in Friesland, which was considered a part of Holland by the counts of Holland.
     "In 1198 Willem married Aleida van Gelre, daughter of Otto I, count of Gelre and Richardis von Scheyern-Wittelsbach. He and Aleida had five children, of whom two sons, Floris IV and Otto, had progeny.
     "On the death of Dirk VII in 1203, his daughter Ada, Willem's niece, inherited the county of Holland in her own right. In November of that year she married Lodewijk II, count of Loon, to strengthen her position. Willem did not accept her right to the county, and civil war broke out. Willem had the support of the population who resented a woman as their lord, especially when she had apparently so callously married a foreigner when her father had just died. Lodewijk and Ada were supported by the bishops of Liege and Utrecht and the count of Flanders. Willem had the support of the duke of Brabant and the majority of Hollanders.
     "Ada was quickly captured by Willem's supporters and taken to the citadel of Leiden. She was later taken to England. Lodewijk managed to win Ada's freedom in 1207, but she had to accept the loss of her county in exchange. Ada and Lodewijk did not keep their promise and continued the fight.
     "The civil war in Holland became part of a major international war between France and the Hohenstaufen dynasty on one side and England and the Welf dynasty on the other. Willem managed to gain the county of Holland through clever manoeuvring between the two sides, and Lodewijk and Ada had to surrender their claims to it.
     "Willem first became an ally of King John of England. The Welf Emperor Otto IV had acknowledged Willem as count of Holland in 1203, as he was a supporter of the Welfs. However Willem and many others changed allegiance to the Hohenstaufen Emperor Friedrich II after the coalition of John and Emperor Otto IV was defeated by the French under Philippe II August at the Battle of Bouvines on 27 July 1214. Willem took part in a French expedition against King John, who understandably did not approve of this and reminded the pope of Lodewijk's rights to the county of Holland, asking for these rights to be endorsed. The pope obligingly placed the Church's ban on Willem, forbidding him to attend church or even take part in any kind of church service. Possibly to release himself from this ban, Willem became a fervent crusader. He campaigned in Prussia and joined the conquest of Lisbon. In Europe he was called Willem 'the Crazy' for his chivalric behaviour. He was involved in the unsuccessful siege of the city of Damietta in Egypt during the Fifth Crusade.
     "There was an enormous change in the landscape of Holland in the end of the 12th and during the 13th century. Many colonists bought land to turn the swamps into polders. Most of the swamps had been sold, and irrigation had started during Willem's reign. Huge infrastructure projects were undertaken. Dikes were constructed around the island of Grote Waard, and a dam was built at Spaarndam. New constitutional bodies were created, the 'waterschappen, and 'hoogheemraadschappen', which were meant to protect the polders against the sea. Willem encouraged trade by giving city rights to Middelburg, Dordrecht, Geertruidenberg and possibly also to Leiden.
     "Willem's first wife Aleida died in 1218, and in 1220 he married Maria of Brabant, daughter of Hendrik I, duke of Brabant and Mathilde de Boulogne. There was no issue from this marriage.
     "Willem died on 12 February 1222, and was succeeded by his son Floris IV."4

; Per Geneaology.EU: "Ct Willem I of Holland (1203-22), *The Hague ca 1167, +4.2.1222; 1m: 1197 Adelaide of Geldern (*ca 1187 +4.2.1218), dau.of Otto I of Geldern; 2m: 1220 Maria of Brabant (+1260); for his descendants see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html."1

; Per Wikipedia:
     "William I (c. 1167 – 4 February 1222), Count of Holland from 1203 to 1222. He was the younger son of Floris III and Ada of Huntingdon.
Life
     "William was born in The Hague, but raised in Scotland. He started a revolt against his brother, Dirk VII and became count in Friesland after a reconciliation. Friesland was considered as a part of Holland by the Counts of Holland. His niece, Ada, Countess of Holland inherited Holland in 1203, but William couldn't accept this. After a war of succession, known as the Loon War (1203–1206), William won the county. Ada and her husband, Louis II, were supported by the bishop of Liège and bishop of Utrecht, and the count of Flanders. William was supported by the duke of Brabant and by the majority of the Hollanders.
     "Emperor Otto IV acknowledged him as count of Holland in 1203, because he was a supporter of the Welfs. He and many others changed allegiance to emperor Frederick II after the battle of Bouvines in 1214. He took part in a French expedition against king John of England. The pope excommunicated him for this.
     "Possibly because of this, William then became a fervent crusader and by this his excommunication was lifted. He campaigned in Prussia and joined in the conquest of Alcácer do Sal. In Europe, he came to be called William the Crazy for his chivalric and reckless behaviour in battle. William conquered the city of Damietta during the Fifth Crusade.
Evolution of the county
     "There were great changes in the landscape of Holland in the end of the 12th and during the 13th century. Many colonists bought land to turn the swamps into polders. Most of the swamps had been sold, and irrigation had started during the reign of William. Huge infrastructural works were done; the island called Grote Waard was enclosed with dikes all around and a dam was built at Spaarndam. New governmental bodies were created, the so-called water boards, which were charged with the task of protecting the polders against ever-present threat of flooding. Count William granted city rights to Geertruidenberg in 1213, to Dordrecht in 1217, to Middelburg in 1220 and perhaps also to Leiden. In this way he gave an impulse to trade.
Family
     "Count William was married twice. First, he was married in 1197 at Stavoren to Adelaide of Guelders, daughter of Otto I, Count of Guelders and Richarde of Bavaria. They had the following children:
1. Floris IV, Count of Holland (24 June 1210 The Hague–19 July 1234, Corbie, France).
2. Otto (d. 1249), Regent of Holland in 1238–1239, Bishop of Utrecht.
3. William (d. 1238), Regent of Holland in 1234–1238.
4. Richardis (d. 1262).
5. Ada van Holland (died 1258), Abbess at Rijnsburg 1239.[1]

     "Adelaide died on 12 February 1218 while William was away on crusade. In 1220 Count William remarried with Marie of Brabant, second wife of Emperor Otto IV, daughter of Henry I, Duke of Brabant and Maud of Boulogne and Alsace, while soon after his death in 1222 his son Floris married Mathilde of Brabant, her ten year younger sister.
References
** De Boer, Dick; Cordfunke, Erik (1995), Graven van Holland : portretten in woord en beeld (880-1580), Zwolle: Walburg Pers, pp. 29–30, ISBN 978-90-6011-915-0
1. djr (2019-09-17). "Digitaal Vrouwenlexicon van Nederland". resources.huygens.knaw.nl (in Dutch). Retrieved 2019-10-05: http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/vrouwenlexicon/lemmata/data/AdavanHollandvanRijnsburg
2. Count Holland and Frisia, Chapter 2. COUNTS OF HOLLAND (900)-1299: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm."16

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 15.4 EDV-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLEM of Holland, son of FLORIS III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland (-4 Feb 1222). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum succedentem comitem Hollandie, Wilhelmum comitem Orientalis Frisie, Florencium prepositum Traiecetensis ecclesie, Robertum presidium Kenemarie, Beatricem, Elizabeth, Adelheydim et Margaretam comitissam Clivie" as the children of Count Floris III & his wife[507]. "Theodericus Hollandie comes…comitis Florentii et Ade comitisse filius" donated property at Poeldijk bij Naaldwijk to the church of St Maria, Utrecht by charter dated 1198, in the presence of "Ada mater mea, Willelmus frater meus comes Frisie, Margareta soror mea, Florentius frater meus…"[508]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmum comitem" was received "in Orientalis Frisia" after his marriage[509]. The Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium names "Theodericum comitem Hollandie fratrem suum Wilhelmum" when recording the disagreement between the two brothers[510]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmus comes Orientalis Frisie" conspired after the death of his brother Count Dirk VII in 1203, with the support of "Florencius frater suus Traiectensis prepositus, Otto comes de Benthem ipsius patruus" and others, against "Ludovicum comitem de Loon…ac Adelheidim Hollandie viduam"[511]. He succeeded his niece in 1203 as WILLEM I Count of Holland. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmus comes Orientalis Frisie" conspired after the death of his brother Count Dirk VII in 1203, with the support of "Florencius frater suus Traiectensis prepositus, Otto comes de Benthem ipsius patruus" and others, against "Ludovicum comitem de Loon…ac Adelheidim Hollandie viduam", in a later passage recording that "Ludovicus comes de Loen" was defeated and expelled from Holland, after which Willem succeeded as count[512]. Matthew Paris records that “duos...capitaneos Willelmum...Houlandiæ ducem et comitem de Weiz Georgium” besieged “Alchaciam” after landing at Lisbon in 1217[513]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1223 II Non Feb" of Count Willem[514].
     "m firstly (Stavoren, Friesland 1197) ADELHEID van Gelre, daughter of OTTO I Graf van Gelre & his wife Richardis of Bavaria (-4 Feb 1218, bur Rijnsburg). The Annales Egmundani record the marriage in 1197 of "Wilhelmum fratrem Theoderici comitis" and "filiam comitis Ottonis [Pictavis Aquisgrani]"[515]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of "Wilhelmum comitem" and "Otto comes…Adelheidem suam filiam", specifying that it was celebrated "in Stavria"[516]. The Gesta Epsicoporum Traiectensium records the marriage of "Wilhelmum" and "Otto comes Gelrensis…filiam"[517]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1219 II Id Feb" of "comitissa" and her burial at Rijnsburg[518]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "pridie Id Feb" 1218 of "Aleidis uxor prima Wilhelmi primi comitis XII"[519].
     "m secondly (Jul 1220) as her second husband, MARIE de Brabant, widow of Emperor OTTO IV King of Germany, daughter of HENRI I Duke of Brabant & his first wife Mathilde de Flandre ([1191]-[9 Mar/14 Jun] 1260, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre). The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "Henricus dux Brabancie…filiam suam Ottoni in uxorem dare promisit"[520]. The Chronicæ Regiæ Coloniensis record the marriage in 1214 of "Otto imperator" and "filiam ducis Brabantie"[521]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria imperatrix Romanorum" as the eldest of the four daughters of "Henricus dux" & his wife Mathilde[522]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Willem married secondly "Mariam", but does not state her origin[523]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Willem married secondly "Mariam", but does not state her origin[524]. The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that Marie was buried "Lovanii…in ecclesia Sancti Petri" with her husband[525].
     "Count Willem & his first wife had five children"
Med Lands cites:
[507] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 57a, p. 117.
[508] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 177, p. 109.
[509] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[510] Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium 13, MGH SS XXIII, p. 407.
[511] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 63b, p. 149.
[512] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 63b and 63c, pp. 149 and 157.
[513] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (“MP”), Vol. III, 1217, p. 32.
[514] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[515] Annales Egmundani 1197, MGH SS XVI, p. 472.
[516] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[517] Gesta Episcoporum Traiectensium, MGH SS XXIII, p. 408.
[518] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[519] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110.
[520] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia II, 7, MGH SS X, p. 392.
[521] Chronicæ Regiæ Coloniensis Continuatio Prima 1214, MGH SS XXIV, p. 18.
[522] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[523] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[524] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[525] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 64.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID (-4 Feb 1218, bur Rijnsburg). The Annales Egmundani record the marriage in 1197 of "Wilhelmum fratrem Theoderici comitis" and "filiam comitis Ottonis [Pictavis Aquisgrani]"[1033]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of "Wilhelmum comitem" and "Otto comes…Adelheidem suam filiam", specifying that it was celebrated "in Stavria"[1034]. The Gesta Epsicoporum Traiectensium records the marriage of "Wilhelmum" and "Otto comes Gelrensis…filiam"[1035]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1219 II Id Feb" of "comitissa" and her burial at Rijnsburg[1036].
     "m (Stavoren, Friesland 1197) as his first wife, WILLEM of Holland, son of FLORIS III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland (-4 Feb 1222). He succeeded in 1203 as WILLEM I Count of Holland. "
Med Lands cites:
[1033] Annales Egmundani 1197, MGH SS XVI, p. 472.
[1034] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[1035] Gesta Episcoporum Traiectensium, MGH SS XXIII, p. 408.
[1036] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.12
He was Count of Holland between 1203 and 1222.2,1

Family 2

Marie (?) de Brabant b. c 1191, d. a 9 Mar 1260

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013570&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013570&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#WillemIdied1222B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015379&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIIIdied1190
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida of Scotland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015380&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida of Scotland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015380&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 100-27. p. 96. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Adelheiddied1218
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013571&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#Mariedied1260.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for William I of Holland (1167–4 Feb 1222), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89856123, citing Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89856123/william_i-of_holland. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I,_Count_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013573&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104744&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104745&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104746&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012277&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIVdied1234

Adelaide van Gelre

F, #10485, b. 1185, d. 4 February 1218
FatherOtto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen1,2,3,4 b. c 1150, d. c 11 Oct 1207
MotherRichardis (?) von Scheyern-Wittelsbach5,6,3,4 b. c 1173, d. 7 Dec 1231
ReferenceEDV24 GKJ23
Last Edited11 Nov 2020
     Adelaide van Gelre was born in 1185.7 She married Willem/William I (?) Count of Holland and Zealand, son of Floris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross and Ada/Aleida de Huntingdon, in 1197 at Stavoren, Frisia (Friesland), Netherlands (now);
His 1st wife.1,8,9,3,4,10
Adelaide van Gelre died on 4 February 1218 at Zuid-Holland, Netherlands (now).1,3,7
Adelaide van Gelre was buried after 4 February 1218 at Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1185
     DEATH     1218 (aged 32–33), Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     Adelaide was the daughter of Count Otto I of Guelders and his wife, Richarda, the daughter of Duke Otto I of Bavaria and Agnes of Loon. Adelaide died in 1218, while her husband was away on the Fifth Crusade. She was buried in Rijnsburg Abbey. In 1197 in Stavoren, she married Count William I of Holland. They had five children:
** Floris IV (24 June 1210 in The Hague–19 July 1234 in Corbie, France), succeeded his father as Count of Holland
** Otto (d. 1249), Regent of Holland in 1238–1239, Bishop of Utrecht
** William (d. 1238), Regent of Holland in 1234–1238.
** Richarda (d. 1262)
** Ada (d. 1258), Abbess at Rijnsburg from 1239 until her death

     Family Members
     Parents
          Otto I von Geldern 1150–1207
          Richardis of Scheyern 1173–1231
     Spouse
          William I of Holland 1167–1222
     Siblings
          Gerhard IV von Geldern 1185–1229
          Mechtild van Geldre von Nassau 1196–1230
     Children
          Floris IV of Holland 1210–1234
     BURIAL     Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 11 Jul 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 93467460.7
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLEM of Holland, son of FLORIS III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland (-4 Feb 1222). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum succedentem comitem Hollandie, Wilhelmum comitem Orientalis Frisie, Florencium prepositum Traiecetensis ecclesie, Robertum presidium Kenemarie, Beatricem, Elizabeth, Adelheydim et Margaretam comitissam Clivie" as the children of Count Floris III & his wife[507]. "Theodericus Hollandie comes…comitis Florentii et Ade comitisse filius" donated property at Poeldijk bij Naaldwijk to the church of St Maria, Utrecht by charter dated 1198, in the presence of "Ada mater mea, Willelmus frater meus comes Frisie, Margareta soror mea, Florentius frater meus…"[508]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmum comitem" was received "in Orientalis Frisia" after his marriage[509]. The Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium names "Theodericum comitem Hollandie fratrem suum Wilhelmum" when recording the disagreement between the two brothers[510]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmus comes Orientalis Frisie" conspired after the death of his brother Count Dirk VII in 1203, with the support of "Florencius frater suus Traiectensis prepositus, Otto comes de Benthem ipsius patruus" and others, against "Ludovicum comitem de Loon…ac Adelheidim Hollandie viduam"[511]. He succeeded his niece in 1203 as WILLEM I Count of Holland. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmus comes Orientalis Frisie" conspired after the death of his brother Count Dirk VII in 1203, with the support of "Florencius frater suus Traiectensis prepositus, Otto comes de Benthem ipsius patruus" and others, against "Ludovicum comitem de Loon…ac Adelheidim Hollandie viduam", in a later passage recording that "Ludovicus comes de Loen" was defeated and expelled from Holland, after which Willem succeeded as count[512]. Matthew Paris records that “duos...capitaneos Willelmum...Houlandiæ ducem et comitem de Weiz Georgium” besieged “Alchaciam” after landing at Lisbon in 1217[513]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1223 II Non Feb" of Count Willem[514].
     "m firstly (Stavoren, Friesland 1197) ADELHEID van Gelre, daughter of OTTO I Graf van Gelre & his wife Richardis of Bavaria (-4 Feb 1218, bur Rijnsburg). The Annales Egmundani record the marriage in 1197 of "Wilhelmum fratrem Theoderici comitis" and "filiam comitis Ottonis [Pictavis Aquisgrani]"[515]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of "Wilhelmum comitem" and "Otto comes…Adelheidem suam filiam", specifying that it was celebrated "in Stavria"[516]. The Gesta Epsicoporum Traiectensium records the marriage of "Wilhelmum" and "Otto comes Gelrensis…filiam"[517]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1219 II Id Feb" of "comitissa" and her burial at Rijnsburg[518]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "pridie Id Feb" 1218 of "Aleidis uxor prima Wilhelmi primi comitis XII"[519].
     "m secondly (Jul 1220) as her second husband, MARIE de Brabant, widow of Emperor OTTO IV King of Germany, daughter of HENRI I Duke of Brabant & his first wife Mathilde de Flandre ([1191]-[9 Mar/14 Jun] 1260, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre). The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "Henricus dux Brabancie…filiam suam Ottoni in uxorem dare promisit"[520]. The Chronicæ Regiæ Coloniensis record the marriage in 1214 of "Otto imperator" and "filiam ducis Brabantie"[521]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria imperatrix Romanorum" as the eldest of the four daughters of "Henricus dux" & his wife Mathilde[522]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Willem married secondly "Mariam", but does not state her origin[523]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Willem married secondly "Mariam", but does not state her origin[524]. The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that Marie was buried "Lovanii…in ecclesia Sancti Petri" with her husband[525].
     "Count Willem & his first wife had five children"
Med Lands cites:
[507] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 57a, p. 117.
[508] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 177, p. 109.
[509] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[510] Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium 13, MGH SS XXIII, p. 407.
[511] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 63b, p. 149.
[512] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 63b and 63c, pp. 149 and 157.
[513] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (“MP”), Vol. III, 1217, p. 32.
[514] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[515] Annales Egmundani 1197, MGH SS XVI, p. 472.
[516] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[517] Gesta Episcoporum Traiectensium, MGH SS XXIII, p. 408.
[518] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[519] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110.
[520] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia II, 7, MGH SS X, p. 392.
[521] Chronicæ Regiæ Coloniensis Continuatio Prima 1214, MGH SS XXIV, p. 18.
[522] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[523] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[524] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.
[525] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 64.10
EDV-24 GKJ-23.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 15.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide of Guelders (c.?1182 – 1218) was the daughter of Count Otto I of Guelders and his wife, Richardis, the daughter of Duke Otto I of Bavaria and Agnes of Loon. Also known as Adelaide of Bellich or Alice of Guelders.
     "In 1197 in Stavoren, she married Count William I of Holland. They had five children:
1. Floris IV (24 June 1210 in The Hague–19 July 1234 in Corbie, France), succeeded his father as Count of Holland
2. Otto (d. 1249), Regent of Holland in 1238–1239, Bishop of Utrecht
3. William (d. 1238), Regent of Holland in 1234–1238.
4. Richarda (d. 1262)
5. Ada (d. 1258), Abbess at Rijnsburg from 1239 until her death

     "Adelaide died in 1218, while her husband was away on the Fifth Crusade. She was buried in Rijnsburg Abbey."11 Adelaide van Gelre was also known as Adelheid van Gelre.11 Adelaide van Gelre was also known as Aleida van Gelre.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID (-4 Feb 1218, bur Rijnsburg). The Annales Egmundani record the marriage in 1197 of "Wilhelmum fratrem Theoderici comitis" and "filiam comitis Ottonis [Pictavis Aquisgrani]"[1033]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of "Wilhelmum comitem" and "Otto comes…Adelheidem suam filiam", specifying that it was celebrated "in Stavria"[1034]. The Gesta Epsicoporum Traiectensium records the marriage of "Wilhelmum" and "Otto comes Gelrensis…filiam"[1035]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1219 II Id Feb" of "comitissa" and her burial at Rijnsburg[1036].
     "m (Stavoren, Friesland 1197) as his first wife, WILLEM of Holland, son of FLORIS III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland (-4 Feb 1222). He succeeded in 1203 as WILLEM I Count of Holland. "
Med Lands cites:
[1033] Annales Egmundani 1197, MGH SS XVI, p. 472.
[1034] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141.
[1035] Gesta Episcoporum Traiectensium, MGH SS XXIII, p. 408.
[1036] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65b, p. 163.3

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 100-27. p. 96. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104742&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Adelheiddied1218. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013571&tree=LEO
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10606
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis von Scheyern-Wittelsbach: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104743&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for Adelheid of Guelders (1185–1218), Find A Grave Memorial no. 93467460, citing Rijnsburg Abbey, Rijnsburg, Katwijk Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93467460/adelheid-of_guelders. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013570&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#WillemIdied1222B
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Guelders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013573&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland2.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104744&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104745&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104746&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012277&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIVdied1234

Otto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen1,2,3,4

M, #10486, b. circa 1150, d. circa 11 October 1207
FatherHendrik (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zutphen5,6,7,4,8 b. c 1117, d. bt 27 May 1182 - 10 Sep 1182
MotherAgnes von Arnstein9,6,4,8 b. 1122, d. b 1179
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Otto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen was born circa 1150.8 He married Richardis (?) von Scheyern-Wittelsbach, daughter of Otto I 'der Rotkopf' (?) Pfalzgraf von Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and Agnes (?) von Looz, between 1184 and 1185.10,2,3,8,4
Otto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen died circa 11 October 1207; Weis (AR7, line 100-27) says d. 1207; Genealogics says d. aft 30 Apr 1207; Med Lands says d. 11 Oct 1207.11,8,2,3,4
Otto I (?) Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen was buried circa 11 October 1207 at Kloster Kamp, Rheinberg, Kreis Wesel, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1150
     DEATH     22 Oct 1207 (aged 56–57)
     Son of Heinrich II and Agnes of Arnstein.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich I von Geldern 1117–1182
          Agnes von Arnstein van Geldre 1122–1179
     Spouse
          Richardis of Scheyern 1173–1231
     Children
          Adelheid of Guelders 1185–1218
          Gerhard IV von Geldern 1185–1229
          Mechtild van Geldre von Nassau 1196–1230
     BURIAL     Kloster Kamp, Rheinberg, Kreis Wesel, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 21 Dec 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 140284734.4,12
     EDV-23.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Otto I was born about 1150, the son of Hendrik, Graaf van Gelre, Graaf van Zutphen, and Agnes von Arnstein. In 1184 he married Richardis von Scheyern-Wittelsbach, the daughter of Otto I 'der Rotkopf', Herzog von Bayern, and Agnes von Looz. Their son Gerhard and three daughters would have progeny. Their son Otto would be bishop of Utrecht from 1212 to 1215.
     "Otto joined Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa on the Third Crusade (1189-1192), and helped the crusader army to capture Iconium. After the death of Friedrich in June 1190, some of the crusaders left for home, but Otto joined one of the groups continuing to Syria and Palestine. After arriving in the Holy Land, Otto joined the army of Guy de Lusignan, the king of Jerusalem, who was besieging the city of Acre. Further hardships decimated the army of the late Friedrich, and by the spring of 1191 most of them had left for home. Otto was the only survivor from the Low Countries, and returned home later in 1190. He is mentioned in that year as the first count of the combined area of Gelre and Zutphen. He died after 30 April 1207."8

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Otto I of Guelders (1150–1207) was a Count of Guelders and Zutphen from 1182 until his death in 1207. He was a son of Duke Hendrik of Guelders and Agnes of Arnstein. He married Richardis of Bavaria in 1184. Richardis was a daughter of Otto I Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria.
Life
     "Otto I of Guelders joined his Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa on the Third Crusade (1189–1192) during which he aided the Crusader army in the taking of Iconium. After the death of Frederick I Barbarossa, some of the crusaders in the army left for home but Otto joined one of the groups that went on towards Syria and Palestine. After arriving in the Holy Land, Otto joined the army of Guy of Lusignan, the King of Jerusalem, who was besieging the city of Acre. Further hardships decimated the army of the late Frederick, and by the spring of 1191 most of them had left for home. Otto was the only survivor from the Low Countries, and returned home in 1190.[1]
     "He is mentioned as the first Count of the combined area of Guelders and Zutphen in 1190. One of his sons was Otto, Bishop of Utrecht from 1212 until 1213.
Family
     "Otto I of Guelders was a son of Duke Hendrik of Guelders and Agnes of Arnstein.
     "He married Richardis of Bavaria in 1184. Richardis was a daughter of Otto I Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and Agnes of Loon. Otto and his wife Richardis had 5 children:[2]
** Henry of Guelders (?–1198). Was betrothed to Aleidis of Holland in 1197, the daughter of Dirk VII, Count of Holland. Henry died in 1198, before the wedding could take place.
** Gerard III, Count of Guelders (1185–1229).
** Adelaide of Guelders (?–1218), married William I, Count of Holland.[3]
** Otto (1193–1213), was Bishop of Utrecht
** Irmgard of Guelders, married Adolf, Count of Altena and Mark, son of Frederick I, Count of Berg-Altena and his wife Alveradis.
** Margaret of Guelders, married Lothar III, Count of Hochstadt
** Matilda of Guelders, married Henry II, Count of Nassau.

References
1. Jonathan Riley-Smith: "The Crusades - A Short History." The Athlone Press Ltd., London (1990), pp 112-113.
2. Medieval Lands
3. Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141."13

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 15.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 26.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 6:25.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "OTTO (-22 Oct 1207, bur Kloster Kamp). The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop names "Gherrit und…Otte" as the two sons of "Henderick…grave van Gelre"[1019]. He succeeded in 1182 as OTTO I Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen. "Otto…comes Gelrensis…cum uxore nostra Richarda" granted customs privileges to Kloster Altenburg by charter dated to [1188][1020]. “Otto...Gelre comes” donated property to Bedbur, with the consent of “Richardis uxoris mee et heredum meorum...Gerardi, Ottonis sive Lodevici”, by charter dated 1203, witnessed by “...Theodericus frater comitis...”[1021].
     "m ([1185]) RICHARDIS of Bavaria, daughter of OTTO I Graf von Wittelsbach Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes van Looz (-Roermond 21 Sep 1231, bur Roermond). The Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariæ refers to, but does not name, the fourth of the five daughters of "Otto dictus de Schiren…dux Bawarie" as wife of "Otto comes de Gelre", specifying that they had three sons[1022]. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto…grave van Gelre" married "des graven docter van Gullick…Richgerda"[1023], which misstates her origin. Her name is further confirmed by the charter dated 1250 under which her grandson "Otto…comes Gelrensis" names "avia mea domina Richardis…avi mei Ottonis comitis"[1024]. "Otto…comes Gelrensis…cum uxore nostra Richarda" granted customs privileges to Kloster Altenburg by charter dated to [1188][1025]. “Otto...Gelre comes” donated property to Bedbur, with the consent of “Richardis uxoris mee et heredum meorum...Gerardi, Ottonis sive Lodevici”, by charter dated 1203[1026]. “Gerhardus comes Gelrie et Zutphanie” donated property to the church of Zutphen St Walburgis, for the soul of “patris mei Ottonis”, with the consent of “matris mee Richardis et fratrum meorum Ottonis, Xanctensis prepositi, et Lodewici”, by charter dated 1207[1027]. Abbess of the Munster Abbey at Roermond. Otto I & his wife had eight children."
Med Lands cites:
[1019] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 109.
[1020] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 513, p. 360.
[1021] Sloet (1872), 404, p. 413.
[1022] Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariæ et Agnetis Ducissæ, MGH SS XVII, p. 376.
[1023] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 110.
[1024] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 365, p. 193.
[1025] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 513, p. 360.
[1026] Sloet (1872), 404, p. 413.
[1027] Sloet (1872), 421, p. 428.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "RICHARDIS (-Roermond 21 Sep 1231, bur Roermond). The Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariæ refers to, but does not name, the fourth of the five daughters of "Otto dictus de Schiren…dux Bawarie" as wife of "Otto comes de Gelre", specifying that they had three sons[407]. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto…grave van Gelre" married "des graven docter van Gullick…Richgerda"[408], which misstates her origin. Her name is further confirmed by the charter dated 1250 under which her grandson "Otto…comes Gelrensis" names "avia mea domina Richardis…avi mei Ottonis comitis"[409]. "Otto…comes Gelrensis…cum uxore nostra Richarda" granted customs privileges to Kloster Altenburg by charter dated to [1188][410]. Abbess of the Munster Abbey at Roermond.
     "m ([1185]) OTTO I Graaf van Gelre en Zütphen, son of HENDRIK Graaf van Gelre & his wife Agnes von Arnstein (-22 Oct 1207, bur Kloster Kamp)."
Med Lands cites:
[407] Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariæ et Agnetis Ducissæ, MGH SS XVII, p. 376.
[408] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, p. 110.
[409] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1846) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 365, p. 193.
[410] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1840) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band I (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 513, p. 360.14
He was Graaf van Gelre between 1182 and 1207.13

Family

Richardis (?) von Scheyern-Wittelsbach b. c 1173, d. 7 Dec 1231
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104742&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 1 page - The House of Wittelsbach: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel1.html1
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Geldern page - The House of Geldern-Heinsberg: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/geldern.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#OttoGelderndied1207. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10605
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#HendrikGelderndied1182B
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hendrik: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120760&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104742&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Arnstein: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120761&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis von Scheyern-Wittelsbach: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104743&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 100-27. p. 96. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 February 2020), memorial page for Otto I von Geldern (1150–22 Oct 1207), Find A Grave Memorial no. 140284734, citing Kloster Kamp, Rheinberg, Kreis Wesel, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/140284734/otto_i-von_geldern. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_I,_Count_of_Guelders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#Richardisdied1231
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#IrmgardGeldernMAdolfIAltena
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard of Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050063&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#MechteldGeldernMHeinrichIINassau
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mechteld van Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00021624&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#MargaretaGeldernMLotharAre
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerhard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121845&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#GerhardIIIGelderndied1229
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Adelheiddied1218
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida van Gelre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013571&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#OttoGelreUtrechtdied1213

Floris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross1,2,3

M, #10487, b. circa 1140, d. 1 August 1190
Floris III, Count of Holland
Photograph by Hendrik van Heessel (†1470)
FatherDirk/Dietrich VI (?) Count of Holland2,4,5,6,7 b. c 1114, d. 5 Aug 1157
MotherSophia (?) von Rheineck, heiress of Bentheim2,6,8,4,7 b. c 1115, d. 26 Sep 1176
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited28 Oct 2020
     Floris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross was born circa 1140 at The Hague, Netherlands; Genealogics says ca 1140; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 1141; Med Lands says b. 1140.2,4,7 He married Ada/Aleida de Huntingdon, daughter of Henry de Huntingdon Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, on 28 August 1162.9,2,10,11,4,7,12,13
Floris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross died on 1 August 1190 at Antioch, Antakya, Turkey (now).9,1,2,3,7
Floris/Florent III (?) Count of Holland, Earl of Ross was buried after 1 August 1190 at Church of Saint Peter Cemetery, Antioch (Antakya), Hatay, Turkey,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1141, Netherlands
     DEATH     1 Aug 1190 (aged 48–49), Turkey
[Text copied from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Parents
          Dirk VI Count of Holland 1114–1157
     Spouse
          Ada of Huntingdon 1139–1206
     Children
          Dirk VII of Holland 1163–1203
          William I of Holland 1167–1222
     BURIAL     Church of Saint Peter Cemetery, Antioch, Hatay, Turkey
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 8 May 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 89799591.14,15
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ADA ([1146/48]-11 Jan after 1205, bur Middleburg Monastery). The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1162 of "Malcolm king of Scotland…his second sister Ada to Florence earl of Hoilande"[544]. Her birth date is estimated assuming that she was the second daughter of Earl Henry, and bearing in mind the estimated birth dates of his other children as shown above. The Annales Egmundani record the marriage in 1162 of "Florentius comes Hollandiæ" and "sororem Regis Scottorum…Ada"[545]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris III and "Adam filiam Henrici prepotentis regis Scottorum"[546]. "Florentius tertius…comes Hollandie" donated the church of Vlaardingen, held by "patris mei Theoderici", to Egmond abbey by charter dated 28 Aug 1162, the dating clause of which refers to "anno primo…matrimonii nostri quo sororem regis Scotie Ade duxit uxorem"[547]. "Theodericus Hollandie comes…comitis Florentii et Ade comitisse filius" donated property at Poeldijk bij Naaldwijk to the church of St Maria, Utrecht by charter dated 1198, in the presence of "Ada mater mea, Willelmus frater meus comes Frisie, Margareta soror mea, Florentius frater meus…"[548]. "Ada…marchionissa de Brandebrug" donated land "on Pole" to Rijnsburg abbey, with the consent of "Wilhelmi comitis et Florentii fratrum meorum et Ade comitisse matris mee et Ade neptis mee", by charter dated 1205[549]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "III Id Ian" of "Ada quidam Hollandie comitissa regie stirpis" and her burial in Middleburg monastery[550]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "Id Jan" of "Ada comitissa filia Heynrici regis Scothorum"[551].
     "m (1162, before 28 Aug[552]) FLORIS III Count of Holland, son of DIRK VI Count of Holland & his wife Sophie von Rheineck ([1140]-Tyre 1 Aug 1190). He was created Earl of Ross in 1162 by his brother-in-law Malcolm IV King of Scotland but the earldom was withdrawn from him[553]."
Med Lands cites:
[544] Chronicle of Melrose, 1162, p. 12.
[545] Annales Egmundani 1162, MGH SS XVI, p. 462.
[546] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 57a, p. 117, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[547] Van den Bergh, L. P. C. (1866) Oorkondenboek van Holland en Zeeland, Eerste afdeeling, eerste deel (Amsterdam) ("Oorkondenboek Holland (1866)"), 143, p. 91.
[548] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 177, p. 109.
[549] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 202, p. 122.
[550] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 58b, p. 131.
[551] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 109.
[552] Chronicle of Melrose, 1162, p. 12, where she is called "second sister" of King Malcolm.
[553] CP XI 140.13
He was Crusader.3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 14.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; This is the same person as ”Floris III, Count of Holland” at Wikipedia and as ”Floris III van Holland” at Wikipedia (NL).15,16

; Per Genealogics:
     “Floris III was born about 1140, the son of Dirk VI, count of Holland, and Sophia von Rheineck. On 28 September 1162 he married Aleida of Scotland, daughter of Henry, earl of Huntingdon and of Northumberland and Ada de Warenne, and the sister of William I 'the Lion', king of Scots. The county of Holland adopted from him the rampant lion in its coat of arms. Floris and Aleida had eleven children, of whom three are recorded as having progeny Margaretha, Dirk VII and Willem I.
     “In 1161 Floris made peace with the West Friesians. However war broke out between Flanders and Holland when Philip of Alsace, count of Flanders sought control over Zeeland. Floris was captured in Brugge, and remained imprisoned until being ransomed in 1167 in exchange for recognition of Flemish suzerainty over Zeeland. In 1170 a great flood caused immense devastation in the north and helped to form the Zuider Zee.
     “Floris was a loyal vassal to Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa. He accompanied the emperor on two campaigns in Italy, in 1158 and 1176-1178; in 1176 he fought for Friedrich in the Battle of Legnano against the forces of the Lombard League. Although the battle ended in defeat for the imperial forces, Friedrich thanked Floris by making him part of the imperial nobility, and he gave Floris the toll right of Geervliet, the most important toll station in Holland at the time. This was actually the legalisation of an existing situation, because the counts of Holland had charged tolls illegally since the start of the 11th century.
     “Many farmers came to Holland to turn the swamps into agricultural lands. Dykes and dams were built, and the border between Holland and the bishopric of Utrecht had to be determined. A dispute in 1165 between Floris and the bishop of Utrecht about a new dam in the Rhine at Zwammerdam had to be settled by Emperor Friedrich. Baudouin, a brother of Floris, became bishop of Utrecht in 1178.
     “In 1189 Floris accompanied Friedrich Barbarossa on the Third Crusade, of which he was a distinguished leader. He died on 1 August 1190 at Antioch from the plague and was buried there.
     “Floris was succeeded by his son Dirk VII, who ruled until his death in 1203, and he was succeeded by his younger brother Willem I.”.4 EDV-23.

; Per Med Lands:
     "FLORIS of Holland, son of DIRK VI Count of Holland & his wife Sophie von Rheineck ([1140]-Antioch 1 Aug 1190, bur Antioch St Peter). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Florencium succedentem Hollandie principem, Ottonem de Benthem comitem, Balduinem pontificum, Theodricum antistitem, Peregrinum presidem, Sophiam abbatissam, Hadewigim sanctimonialem et Petronellam…domicellam" as the children of Count Dirk VI & his wife[444]. "Thedricus Hollandensium comes…cum conjuge mea Sophia comitissa et filio nostro Florentio" exchanged property with Epternach by charter dated 1156[445]. The Annales Egmundani name "Florentius filius eius [=Theodericus comes filius Florentii crassi comitis]" when recording that he succeeded his father[446]. He succeeded his father in 1157 as FLORIS III Count of Holland. He made peace with the West-Friesians in 1161. "Florentius tertius…comes Hollandie" donated the church of Vlaardingen, held by "patris mei Theoderici", to Egmond abbey by charter dated 28 Aug 1162, the dating clause of which refers to "anno primo…matrimonii nostri quo sororem regis Scotie Ade duxit uxorem"[447]. He was created Earl of Ross in 1162 by his brother-in-law Malcolm IV King of Scotland, but the earldom was withdrawn from him[448]. He was imprisoned in Flanders 1167 during a struggle over Zeeland. In 1176 he supported Emperor Friedrich “Barbarossa” in the battle of Legnano, and was rewarded with the imperial toll-post at Geervliet. He took part in the Third Crusade 1189, on which he died. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1190 Kal Aug…in Antiochia" of Count Floris III and his burial in "basilica sancti Petri"[449]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "1190 Kal Aug" of "Florencius 3 comes Hollandie" at Antioch[450].
     "m (1162, before 28 Aug) ADA of Scotland, daughter of HENRY of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne ([1146/48]-11 Jan after 1205, bur Middleburg Monastery). The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1162 of "Malcolm king of Scotland…his second sister Ada to Florence earl of Hoilande"[451]. Her birth date is estimated assuming that she was her parents´ second daughter, and bearing in mind the estimated birth dates of their other children as shown in the document SCOTLAND. The Annales Egmundani records the marriage in 1162 of "Florentius comes Hollandiæ" and "sororem Regis Scottorum…Ada"[452]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris III and "Adam filiam Henrici prepotentis regis Scottorum"[453]. "Florentius tertius…comes Hollandie" donated the church of Vlaardingen, held by "patris mei Theoderici", to Egmond abbey by charter dated 28 Aug 1162, the dating clause of which refers to "anno primo…matrimonii nostri quo sororem regis Scotie Ade duxit uxorem"[454]. "Theodericus Hollandie comes…comitis Florentii et Ade comitisse filius" donated property at Poeldijk bij Naaldwijk to the church of St Maria, Utrecht by charter dated 1198, in the presence of "Ada mater mea, Willelmus frater meus comes Frisie, Margareta soror mea, Florentius frater meus…"[455]. "Ada…marchionissa de Brandebrug" donated land "on Pole" to Rijnsburg abbey, with the consent of "Wilhelmi comitis et Florentii fratrum meorum et Ade comitisse matris mee et Ade neptis mee", by charter dated 1205[456]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "III Id Ian" of "Ada quidam Hollandie comitissa regie stirpis" and her burial in Middleburg monastery[457]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "Id Jan" of "Ada comitissa filia Heynrici regis Scothorum"[458]."
Med Lands cites:
[444] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 52, p. 101.
[445] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 133, p. 85.
[446] Annales Egmundani 1157, MGH SS XVI, p. 461.
[447] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 143, p. 91.
[448] CP XI 140.
[449] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 58b, p. 131.
[450] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 109.
[451] Stevenson, J. (trans.) (1991) A Medieval Chronicle of Scotland: The Chronicle of Melrose (Llanerch Press reprint), 1162, p. 12.
[452] Annales Egmundani 1162, MGH SS XVI, p. 462.
[453] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 57a, p. 117.
[454] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 143, p. 91.
[455] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 177, p. 109.
[456] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 202, p. 122.
[457] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 58b, p. 131.
[458] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 109.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 1): “G2. Ct Floris III of Holland (1157-90), *The Hague ca 1141, +Tyrus 1.8.1190; m.28.8.1162 Ada of Scotland (+after 11.1.1204)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “E4. Ada, *Huntingdon ca 1140-46, +after 11.1.1204; m.28.8.1162 Count Floris III of Holland (*ca 1140, +1.8.1190)”.17,18

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 115, HUNTINGDON 4:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015379&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015379&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#DirkVIdied1157. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIIIdied1190
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sophia von Rheineck: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018668&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 100-26. p. 96. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida of Scotland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015380&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aleida of Scotland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015380&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Adadiedafter11Jan1205
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 31 July 2020), memorial page for Floris III of Holland (1141–1 Aug 1190), Find a Grave Memorial no. 89799591, citing Church of Saint Peter Cemetery, Antioch, Hatay, Turkey; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89799591. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_III,_Count_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4777] Wikipedia - De vrije encyclopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Floris III van Holland: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_III_van_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NL).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#AHH
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030632&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Adadiedafter1205
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104734&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Margaretadiedafter1203
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boudewijn van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104737&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robrecht van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104738&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104739&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104740&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104741&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes van Holland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104718&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dirk VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104719&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willem I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013570&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#WillemIdied1222B

Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa1,2,3,4,5

M, #10488, b. circa 1058, d. 21 August 1131
FatherHugues I (?) Comte de Rethel2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 b. 1030, d. 28 Dec 1118
MotherMélisende de Montlhéry2,3,5,6,10,11 b. 1045, d. c 1097
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa was born circa 1058.12,2,3,5 He married Morphia (?) de Melitene, daughter of Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene and Unknown (?), in 1101.12,2,3,4,5,6,13
Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa died on 21 August 1131 at Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel (now); Most sources say he d. 21 Aug 1131, though Find A Grave says 21 Sep 1131.12,2,3,5,14,15
Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa was buried after 21 August 1131 at Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1058, France
     DEATH     21 Sep 1131 (aged 72–73), Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     Baldwin of Rethel, Baldwin of Bourcq, Count of Edessa, King of Jerusalem. Baldwin was the son of Hugh, count of Rethel, and his wife Melisende, daughter of Guy I of Montlhery. He was the youngest of three sons, and the third of seven children.
     Baldwin married Morphia of Melitene, the daughter of the Armenian prince Gabriel of Melitene. They would marry in 1100 and have four daughters:
* Melisende, heir and wife of Fulk V of Anjou
* Alice, wife of Bohemund II of Antioch
* Hodierna, wife of Raymond II of Tripoli
* Ioveta, abbess of the convent in Bethany
     Baldwin of Bourcq regarded Eustace III of Boulogne, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Baldwin of Boulogne as cousins, and followed them to Jerusalem on the first crusade. Godfrey of Bouillon became King Baldwin I of Jerusalem while Baldwin of Boulogne became the Count of Edessa, Baldwin of Bourcg was Regent and served Bohemond of Taranto, Prince of Antioch. When Geoffrey died in 1100, Baldwin Boulogne was elected King, and Baldwin of Bourcq was appointed Count of Edessa, Tancred became Regent.
     Baldwin and Tancred fought with King Baldwin I at Ascalon against the Egyptians, and again at the Battle of Harran against the Seljuk Turks where Baldwin was captured. Tancred acted as Count in his stead, but he remained in captivity in Mosul until ransomed for 60,000 dinars by Joscelin of Courtenay in 1108. Tancred refused to step down until Baldwin gathered support from all the tribes including the Kurds, Arabs, Byzantines and Seljuks. After their reconciliation, Baldwin and Tancred joined in the capture of Tripoli in 1109. Meanwhile, Joscelin of Courtenay fell out of favor, left Jerusalem for Galilee where he was proclaimed the Price of Galilee in 1113.
     King Baldwin I died in 1118, and the crown would have deferred to his older Brother, Eustace III had Joscelin not insisted Baldwin should have it, and Baldwin was crowned King Baldwin II of Jerusalem on Easter Sunday, April 14, 1118. Joscelin became Count.
     The remainder of that year was spent dealing with invasions by Muslim Seljuks from Syria and Fatimids from Egypt. When Antioch was invaded by Seljuks, the Prince, Roger of Salerno, did not wait for Baldwin's reinforcements and the ensuing battle was known as the Field of Blood.
     The Knights Hospitaller was founded in 1113, evolved to the Knights Templar in 1118 bu Hughes de Payens, and Baldwin II established the first written laws of Jerusalem at the Council of Nablus in 1120.Baldwin allowed Hughes to set up quarters in the royal palace of Al Aqsa Mosque on the Temple Mount, thusly the name Knights Templar, referring to the building built on an older temple they called Solomon's Temple.
     Joscelin and Baldwin were captured by Belek in 1122 and 1123 respectively, Eustace Greiner became acting regent, defeating an invasion of Egyptians in 1124. Joscelin and Baldwin escaped, Baldwin was captured again, ransomed for Joscelin's son and Baldwin's daughter. In 1125, the crusaders battled and won against the larger Seljuk army of at the Battle of Azaz. Baldwin's attempt to tale Damascus in 1126 failed.
     In 1131 Baldwin became ill and died on the 21st of August, buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem. Melisende, by law the heir to the kingdom, succeeded her father with Fulk as her co-ruler. The new queen and king were crowned on 14 September.
     There are many descriptions of Baldwin, some quite contradictory, including, "a devout and God-fearing man, notable for his loyalty and for his great experience in military matters" and "after him there was none left amongst them possessed of sound judgment and capacity to govern" along with "grasping and penurious" and "had not governed the people of God well."
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Morphia of Melitene 1085–1127
     Children
          Alice Of Antioch
          Melisende of Jerusalem 1105–1161
          Ioveta of Jerusalem, of Bethany 1120–1163
     BURIAL     Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 2 Mar 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 66396443
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.14
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg, Reference: V (J).
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 625.
3. The Templars, London, 1999 , Read, Piers Paul. 128.16
EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Baldwin du Bourcq, Pr of Edessa (1099-1118), King of Jerusalem (1118-31) =Baldwin II; *ca 1058, +Jerusalem 21.8.1131; m.1101 Moraphia, dau.of the Armenian lord Gabriel, Gov of Melitene (*by 1101, +1126/7.)3"



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Baldwin II, also known as Baldwin of Bourcq or Bourg (French: Baudouin; died 21 August 1131), was Count of Edessa from 1100 to 1118, and King of Jerusalem from 1118 until his death. He accompanied his cousins, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Baldwin of Boulogne, to the Holy Land during the First Crusade. He succeeded Baldwin of Boulogne as the second count of Edessa when his cousin left the county for Jerusalem. He was captured at the Battle of Harran in 1104. He was held first by Sökmen of Mardin, then by Jikirmish of Mosul, and finally by Jawali Saqawa. During his captivity, Tancred, the Crusader ruler of the Principality of Antioch, and Tancred's cousin, Richard of Salerno, governed Edessa as Baldwin's regents.
     "Baldwin was ransomed by his cousin, Joscelin of Courtenay, Lord of Turbessel, in the summer of 1108. Tancred attempted to retain Edessa, but Bernard of Valence, the Latin Patriarch of Antioch, persuaded him to restore the county to Baldwin. Baldwin allied with Jawali, but Tancred and his ally, Radwan of Aleppo, defeated them at Turbessel. Baldwin and Tancred were reconciled at an assembly of the crusader leaders near Tripoli in April 1109. Mawdud, the Atabeg of Mosul, and his successor, Aqsunqur al-Bursuqi, launched a series of campaigns against Edessa in the early 1110s, devastating the eastern regions of the country. Baldwin accused Joscelin of treason for seizing the prosperous town of Turbessel from him in 1113 and captured the neighboring Armenian lordships in 1116 and 1117.
     "Baldwin of Boulogne, the first king of Jerusalem, died on 2 April 1118. He bequeathed Jerusalem to his brother, Eustace III of Boulogne, stipulating that the throne was to be offered to Baldwin if Eustace failed to come to the Holy Land. Arnulf of Chocques, the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, and Joscelin of Courtenay, who held the largest fief in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, convinced their peers to elect Baldwin king. Baldwin took possession of most towns in the kingdom and gave Edessa to Joscelin. After the army of the Principality of Antioch was almost annihilated on 28 June 1119, Baldwin was elected regent for the absent Bohemond II of Antioch. The frequent Seljuq invasions of Antioch forced him to spend most of his time in the principality, which caused discontent in Jerusalem. After Nur al-Daulak Balak captured him in April 1123, a group of noblemen offered the throne to Charles I, Count of Flanders, but Charles refused. During his absence, the Jerusalemite troops captured Tyre with the assistance of a Venetian fleet. After he was released in August 1124, he tried to capture Aleppo, but al-Bursuqi forced him to abandon the siege in early 1125.
     "Bohemond II came to Syria in October 1126. Baldwin gave his second daughter, Alice, in marriage to him and also renounced the regency. Baldwin planned to conquer Damascus, but he needed external support to achieve his goal. He married off his eldest daughter, Melisende, to the wealthy Fulk V, Count of Anjou in 1129. The new troops who accompanied Fulk to Jerusalem enabled Baldwin to invade Damascene territory, but he could seize only Banias with the support of the Nizari (or Assassins) in late 1129. After Bohemond II was killed in a battle in early 1130, Baldwin forced Alice to leave Antioch and assumed the regency for her daughter, Constance. He fell seriously ill in Antioch and took monastic vows before he died in the Holy Sepulchre. Baldwin had been respected for his military talent, but he was notorious for his "love for money".
Early life
     "Baldwin was a younger son of Hugh I, Count of Rethel and Melisende of Monthléry.[1] He was closely related to the lords of Courtenay and Le Puiset, and other noble families in the Ile-de-France.[2] He was also a kinsman of the brothers Eustace III of Boulogne, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Baldwin of Boulogne, but their exact relationship is unknown.[1][3] Historian Alan V. Murray says that the primary sources suggest that their connection "was not particularly close", and that Baldwin was most probably related to their mother, Ida of Lorraine.[4] Thomas Asbridge says that Baldwin was the Boulogne brothers' second cousin.[5]
     "He was the lord of Bourcq when he joined the army of Godfrey of Boulogne at the beginning of the First Crusade.[6] The army departed for the Holy Land on 15 August 1096, and reached Constantinople on 23 December.[7] The Byzantine emperor, Alexios I Komnenos, urged the crusader leaders to take an oath of fealty to him.[8] Godfrey of Bouillon appointed Baldwin, Conon of Montaigu and Geoffrey of Esch to represent him at a meeting with Alexios in January 1097.[9] After Godfrey and his principal commanders swore fealty to the Emperor, the crusader army was shipped to Asia Minor in February.[10]
     "Baldwin of Boulogne and the Norman Tancred broke away from the main army to invade Cilicia around 15 September 1097.[11] Baldwin accompanied them in Boulogne's contingent.[12][13] He also participated in Boulogne's military campaigns against the Seljuq rulers of the fortresses on the plains near the River Euphrates.[14] After seizing Ravendel, Turbessel and Edessa, Boulogne established the first crusader state, the County of Edessa, in early 1098.[15][16]
     "Baldwin rejoined the main crusader army, which was marching towards Jerusalem, near Tyre in late May 1099.[17] He and Tancred seized Bethlehem; there was no resistance as the town was inhabited by local Christians.[18] The crusaders laid siege to Jerusalem, and shortly afterwards Baldwin and Tancred captured an elderly Muslim nobleman.[5] After he refused to convert to Christianity, Baldwin's soldiers beheaded him at the Tower of David to frighten the defenders of Jerusalem.[19] Jerusalem fell to the crusaders on 15 July.[20] Baldwin left Jerusalem in the retinue of Robert II, Count of Flanders, in late August.[21] Robert returned to Europe, but Baldwin remained in Syria.[22] Geoffrey of Bouillon died on 18 July 1100.[20] Baldwin of Boulogne decided to return to Jerusalem to take possession of Geoffrey's inheritance.[23]
Count of Edessa
First years
     "Baldwin was staying in Antioch when Baldwin of Boulogne decided to leave Edessa.[24] He was a military commander of the troops of Bohemond I of Antioch who had recently been captured by Danishmend Gazi.[24][25][26] Baldwin of Boulogne summoned Baldwin from Antioch and granted him the County of Edessa.[27][28] Baldwin swore fealty to Baldwin of Boulogne,[29] who left Edessa for Jerusalem on 2 October 1100.[30]
     "Baldwin married Morphia, the daughter of Gabriel, the Armenian lord of Melitene,[31] which enabled him to consolidate his position among his mainly Armenian subjects.[29][32] Sökmen, the Artuqid ruler of Mardin, attacked Saruj in early 1101.[33][34] Baldwin attempted to relieve the town, but Sökmen routed his army, forcing him to return to Edessa.[34][35] When relating these events, the Armenian historian, Matthew of Edessa, described Baldwin as a coward who was "pitiful in body".[33] Sökmen captured the town, but the fortress resisted his siege.[34] Baldwin went to Antioch to raise new troops before returning to Saruj.[33][34] He forced Sökmen to leave the town and executed all the townspeople who had cooperated with the Artuqids.[34]
     "One of his cousins, Joscelin of Courtenay, came to Edessa in 1102.[29] Baldwin granted him lands to the west of the Euphrates.[29][36] When the Egyptians invaded the Kingdom of Jerusalem in May, Baldwin of Boulogne—who had been crowned king of Jerusalem—sent envoys to Tancred (who ruled Antioch) and Baldwin, seeking their assistance.[37] They assembled their troops and marched to Jerusalem together, but by the time they arrived in late September, the Egyptians had returned to their headquarters at Ascalon.[38][39] The three crusader rulers made a raid against Ascalon, but Tancred and Baldwin soon returned to their realms.[40]
     "Tancred's ambitions in northern Syria irritated both Baldwin and Bernard of Valence, the Latin Patriarch of Antioch.[36] They started negotiations with Danishmend Gazi regarding Bohemond's release.[36][41] Kogh Vasil, the Armenian lord of Raban and Kaisun, and Bohemond's Italian kinsmen contributed to his ransom.[36][41] Bohemond was set free in May 1103.[42] Baldwin granted villages to the Armenian prelate, Barsegh Pahlavuni,[43] because he wanted to strengthen his position among his Armenian subjects.[44]
First captivity
     "Baldwin's troops made frequent raids against the fertile plains around Harran.[45][46] Sökmen and Jikirmish, the atabeg of Mosul, made an alliance and invaded Edessa in May 1104.[45] While their troops were assembling at Ras al-Ayn, Baldwin sent envoys to Joscelin and Bohemond and persuaded them to make a joint attack against Harran.[47][48] Baldwin, Bohemond and Joscelin went together to Harran and entered into negotiations with the Seljuq garrison for a peaceful surrender.[49][48] However, both Baldwin and Bohemond wanted to seize the wealthy town and the crusader army started disintegrating because of their conflict.[46]
     "Sökmen and Jikirmish attacked the crusaders' camp at Harran on 7 May.[46][50] Applying the tactic of feigned retreat, they drew the crusaders into an ambush, capturing Baldwin and Joscelin.[48][46] Bohemond and Tancred rode to Edessa to save the town.[51] Benedict, Archbishop of Edessa, who was also captured but quickly released, and the Edessene knights elected Tancred regent for the captive Baldwin.[51][46] Baldwin was first taken to Sökman's tent, but Jikirmish's soldiers broke into it and dragged him away.[52][53] Joscelin remained in the custody of Sökmen, passing to Ilghazi upon the latter's death. The citizens of Turbessel paid a ransom for Joscelin in 1107.
     "Jikirmish laid siege to Edessa, but Tancred routed his troops, forcing him to flee.[54] Jikirmish then took Baldwin to Mosul.[55] Tancred captured a Seljuq princess of Jikirmish's household at Edessa.[54][56] Jikirmish offered to pay 15,000 bezants in ransom, or to release Baldwin in return for her liberty.[54][56] Bohemond and Tancred preferred the money and Baldwin remained imprisoned.[54][57] Before his departure for Europe in the autumn, Bohemond appointed Tancred to rule Antioch and their kinsman, Richard of Salerno, was entrusted with the administration of Edessa.[58][59]
     "A Turkish soldier of fortune, Jawali Saqawa, captured Jikirmish and seized Mosul in 1107.[59][60] Joscelin started negotiations with Jawali over the release of Baldwin.[55] Jawali demanded 60,000 dinars and the release of the Muslim prisoners from Edessa.[55] The Seljuq Sultan, Muhammad I Tapar, made the Mamluk Mawdud atabeg of Mosul.[61] When Mawdud expelled Jawali from Mosul, Jawali fled to the fortress of Qalat Jabar, taking Baldwin with him.[62] Joscelin paid 30,000 dinars to Jawali and offered himself as hostage to guarantee the payment of the balance.[62][63] Jawali, who needed allies against Mawdud, accepted the offer and released Baldwin in the summer of 1108.[62][64][65]
Conflicts
     "Baldwin went to Edessa after his release, but Tancred demanded his oath of fealty in exchange for the town.[65][66] Baldwin refused and went to Turbessel.[50][62] After Tancred carried out a raid against Turbessel, they started peace negotiations, but could not reach a compromise.[62] Baldwin made an alliance with Kogh Vasil against Tancred.[62][59] Oshin of Lampron also sent troops—300 Pecheneg horsemen—to join them.[67] Their raids against the Principality of Antioch persuaded Tancred to accept the arbitration of the Catholic prelates,[50][68][69] who decided in favor of Baldwin; he returned to Edessa on 18 September 1108.[70][69]
     "In accordance with his treaty with Jawali, Baldwin released most of the Muslim prisoners held in Edessa.[66][68] He also allowed the Muslim burghers of Saruj to build a mosque, and executed the unpopular rais (or governor) of the town, who was a convert from Islam.[68][71] Jawali's alliance with Baldwin alarmed Fakhr al-Mulk Radwan, the Seljuq ruler of Aleppo, which brought about a rapprochement between Radwan and Tancred.[68][56] When Jawali launched a military expedition against Aleppo, Baldwin and Joscelin of Courtney joined him, while Tancred came to assist Radwan.[50][68] Radwan and Tancred routed Jawali, Baldwin and Joscelin near Turbessel in late September 1108.[70][72]
     "Baldwin fled the battlefield to a nearby fortress.[70][72] Tancred laid siege to it, but lifted the siege when he learnt of Jawali's approach.[69] Believing that Baldwin had died, the Armenian burghers of Edessa held an assembly to set up a provisional government.[72][56] After his return, Baldwin thought that the Armenians wanted to dethrone him and ordered the blinding of the ringleaders.[72][73] The Armenian bishop of the town was obliged to pay a huge fine.[72] To put an end to the conflicts between the crusader leaders, Baldwin I of Jerusalem summoned them in the name of the "Church of Jerusalem" to Mount Pilgrim near Tripoli in April 1109.[70][74] At the meeting, the king mediated a reconciliation between Baldwin and Tancred, who acknowledged Baldwin's rule in the County of Edessa in exchange for receiving Galilee and other fiefs in the Kingdom of Jerusalem.[75][76] Thereafter Baldwin participated in the siege of Tripoli, which ended with the capture of the town by the crusaders.[70][75]
Mawdud's campaigns
     "The Seljuq sultan instructed Mawdud to unite his troops with the Seljuq ruler of Armenia, Sökmen el-Kutbî, and the Artuqid Ilghazi against the crusaders.[75][77] They laid siege to Edessa in April 1110.[70] Baldwin sent envoys to Baldwin I of Jerusalem, who was besieging Beirut, urging him to come to his rescue, but the king did not abandon the siege until Beirut fell on 13 May.[70][77] Before departing for Edessa, Baldwin I celebrated Pentecost in Jerusalem.[77] The King persuaded Bertrand of Tripoli, Joscelin of Courtenay and other crusader leaders to join his campaign, and the Armenian Kogh Vasil and Abu'l-Garib also sent contingents.[78][79] On their arrival, Mawdud and his allies lifted the siege of Edessa and withdrew towards Harran.[80]
     "Baldwin and Tancred accused each other of having incited the invasion.[81] Tancred also claimed sovereignty over the County of Edessa, saying that its territory had been subject to Antioch under the Byzantine Empire.[81] Baldwin I refuted Tancred's claim, declaring himself the head of the Latin East.[81] After a short campaign against the neighboring Muslim territories, the rulers of the other crusader states decided to leave the county.[82] On the King's advice, Baldwin ordered the transfer of the local Christian (predominantly Armenian) peasants to the lands to the west of the Euphrates.[81][83] Taking advantage of the gathering of the Christian peasants by the river and their mainly Armenian escort, Mawdud attacked and massacred them.[80][84][85] Baldwin, who had already crossed the river along with the other crusader leaders, hastily returned and assaulted Mawdud's troops, although they outnumbered his small retinue.[86] Baldwin and his men were only saved by Baldwin I and Tancred, who had followed on the other bank of the river.[87]
     "In July 1111 Mawdud launched a new invasion against the county and laid siege to Turbessel.[88][89] While Mawdud was besieging Turbessel, Sultan, the Munquidite emir (or ruler) of Shaizar, sent envoys to him, seeking his assistance against Tancred.[90] Mawdud lifted the siege of Turbessel and moved to help Shaizar.[91] Toghtekin, the atabeg of Damascus, joined him and they decided to reconquer Tripoli in September.[91][92] The concentration of Muslim forces alarmed the crusaders and Baldwin I of Jerusalem summoned all crusader rulers to his camp.[91] Baldwin complied, accompanied by his two powerful vassals, Joscelin and Pagan of Sajar.[91][89] The smaller Muslim rulers had meanwhile left Mawdud's camp and returned to Mesopotamia.[89] Mawdud did not risk a pitched battle with the united crusader armies and retired first to Shaizar, and later to Mosul.[93][89] In April 1112, Mawdud returned and besieged Edessa.[92] His agents started secret negotiations with some Armenian soldiers in the town, but Joscelin, who was informed of the plot, warned Baldwin.[89][94] Mawdud could not capture the town and withdrew to Mosul in June.[95] Next year, he was murdered by Assassins at Damascus.[96]
     "Mawdud's invasions devastated the eastern regions of the county, but Joscelin's fief at Turbessel still flourished.[83][94] In 1113 Baldwin persuaded Joscelin to come to Edessa, saying that he was dying and want to make his last will.[94] Stating that Joscelin had not sent enough food to Edessa, Baldwin had him imprisoned and only released him after Joscelin renounced Turbessel.[94][97] Joscelin soon left the county for Jerusalem, where Baldwin I granted Galilee to him.[97] A new reconciliation between the crusader leaders was brought about by marriage alliances: Baldwin's sister, Cecilia, was given in marriage to Roger of Salerno, who had succeeded Tancred in Antioch in late 1112; and Joscelin married Roger's sister, Maria.[98]
Expansion
     "While Baldwin was away from his capital to take possession of Turbessel, the Armenians of Edessa continued to plot against him.[99] He returned to the town and ordered the transportation of the Armenian townspeople to Samosata.[97][99] After the Armenians started to move to Kaisun, Baldwin allowed those who remained in Samosata to return to Edessa in early 1114.[97][99]
     "Mawdud's successor, Aqsunqur al-Bursuqi, invaded the county in May 1114, but Edessa resisted his siege, forcing him to return to Mosul.[96][99] The Sultan made Bursuq ibn Bursuq of Hamadan the supreme commander of the Seljuq armies.[100] Bursuq moved on Edessa in early 1115, but he soon left for Aleppo.[101] Lulu el-Yaya, the atabeg of Aleppo, sought assistance from Ilghazi and Toghtekin, who also persuaded Roger of Salerno to join their coalition against Bursuq.[101][102] At Roger's request, Baldwin I of Jerusalem, Pons of Tripoli and Baldwin also gathered their troops at Apamea in August.[101] Bursuq chose to retreat and the crusader rulers dispersed.[101]
     "Taking advantage of the weakening of the Seljuqs' power after Roger of Salerno's victory at the Battle of Sarmin, Baldwin decided to annex the small Armenian principalities in the valley of the Euphrates.[103] The Armenian Thoros I of Cilicia captured Kogh Vasil's successor, Vasil Dgha, who had made an alliance with Bursuq.[99] Thoros sold Vasil Dgha to Baldwin, who forced his prisoner to renounce Raban and Kaisun in 1116.[103][99] Next, Baldwin laid siege to Abu'l-Garib's fortress of Birejik.[103] The siege lasted for a year and Abu'l-Garib was forced into surrender in 1117.[103][99] Baldwin granted the fortress to his cousin, Waleran of Le Puiset.[99] In the same year, Kogh Vasil's brother, Bagrat, had to abandon Cyrrhus and Baldwin captured Constantine of Gargar.[103][104]
King of Jerusalem
Ascension to the throne
     "The childless Baldwin I of Jerusalem died on 2 April 1118, during a campaign against Egypt.[105][106] According to the contemporaneous Albert of Aachen he had willed the kingdom to his eldest brother, Eustace III of Boulogne, "if by chance he would come", but also stipulated that Baldwin of Bourcq should be elected king, if Eustace were unable to come, "because of his age".[106][107] Baldwin arrived in Jerusalem around the day when the late king's body was carried into the town.[106] Albert of Aachen stated that Baldwin had come to celebrate Easter in Jerusalem, without having any knowledge of the King's death.[106] Decades later, William of Tyre recorded that Baldwin had been informed of his kinsman's death during his journey to Jerusalem.[108]
     "The question of Baldwin I's succession divided the barons and the prelates, according to William of Tyre.[107][109] The highest-ranking prelate, Arnulf of Chocques, the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, and Joscelin of Courtenay, who held the largest fief in the kingdom, argued that Baldwin should be elected without delay to avoid an interregnum.[107][109] Others maintained that the crown should first be offered to Eustace in accordance with Baldwin I's last will.[107][109] Some "great nobles", whom William of Tyre did not name, were appointed to inform Eustace of his brother's death.[109] However, shortly after their departure, on Easter Day (that is on 14 April), Baldwin was anointed.[110] His coronation was delayed for unknown reasons.[111][112] Patriarch Arnulf died two weeks after Baldwin's anointment and his successor, Warmund of Picquigny, was only installed in August or September.[113]
     "Baldwin promised the County of Edessa to Joscelin, but Joscelin remained in the kingdom to secure the defence of Galilee.[114] Baldwin convoked the noblemen to an assembly "on an appointed day" to receive "fealty and an oath of allegiance from them", according to Albert of Aachen.[109] He also secured the direct royal control of eight important towns, including Nablus, Jaffa, Acre, Sidon and Tiberias.[109][115] Modern historian Alan Murray argues that Albert of Aachen's words are evidence that Baldwin "carried out a major distribution of fiefs, granting out some lordships but retaining other towns and territories as domain lands" in 1118.[115] Baldwin also reorganized the royal household, making Hugh Caulis constable, Pagan butler, and John the chamberlain.[115]
     "Eustace accepted the barons' invitation and left Boulogne for Jerusalem.[112] He had travelled as far as Apulia when he was informed of Baldwin's ascension to the throne.[112] The delegates tried to convince him to continue his journey, saying that Baldwin's election was illegal, but Eustace preferred to return home.[112]
Muslim threat
     "His predecessor's last campaign against Egypt brought about a rapprochement between Egypt and Damascus.[114] Baldwin sent envoys to Toghtekin in Damascus to argue against his making an alliance with the Egyptian vizier, Al-Afdal Shahanshah, but Toghtekin demanded Oultrejourdain in return for his neutrality.[114] Toghtekin launched an incursion against Galilee and Al-Afdal gathered his troops near Ascalon in May or June 1118.[114][116] Baldwin hurried to the southern frontier and urged Roger and Pons to send reinforcements from Antioch and Tripoli.[114] Neither the Egyptians nor the crusaders risked a pitched battle and both armies were dissolved three months later.[114] Baldwin and Joscelin made a raid against Damascene territory in the autumn and defeated Toghtekin's son, Taj al-Muluk Buri near Daraa.[114][116]
     "Ilghazi, Toghtekin and the Munquidites of Shaizar made an alliance and their troops started raiding Antioch and Edessa in May 1119.[117][118] Roger sent envoys to Baldwin, urging him to come to the north to fight against the invaders.[117][118] The envoys met with Baldwin in Tiberias, because he had just concluded a short campaign against a Bedouin tribe in Oultrejourdain.[119] He gathered troops and departed for Antioch, taking a portion of the True Cross with him.[117] Roger did not wait until Baldwin's arrival and marched from Antioch. On the plains of Sarmada[120][121] Ilghazi's army encircled the crusaders' camp and on 28 June inflicted a major defeat in the Battle of the "Field of Blood".[116][122] Roger and hundreds of his soldiers died fighting and most who survived the battle were taken prisoner. Antioch was left almost undefended, but Ilghazi did not attack the city.[123]
     "Baldwin and Pons of Tripoli reached Antioch in late July or early August.[124][125] The leaders of the city acknowledged Baldwin as regent for the lawful prince, the ten-year old Bohemond II, who was living in southern Italy.[124][126] Baldwin distributed the estates of the noblemen who had perished in the Field of Blood among his retainers, mainly through giving the widows of the deceased lords to them in marriage.[124][127] Meanwhile, Ilghazi and Toghtekin joined their forces and started to capture the Antiochene fortresses to the east of the Orontes River.[128] Baldwin gathered almost all available crusader troops and marched against the Muslims as far as Tell Danith near Zardana.[128][126] The crusaders and the united armies of Toghtekin and Ilghazi clashed in the Battle of Hab on 14 August.[116] According to Walter the Chancellor, the crusaders routed the Muslims, but Matthew of Edessa stated that "neither side was defeated nor was victorious".[126] Baldwin returned to Antioch two days later, where the townspeople and the patriarch gave him a "victor's welcome".[126] Before leaving Antioch he granted the County of Edessa to Joscelin of Courtenay.[116]
     "Baldwin and his wife were crowned king and queen in Bethlehem on Christmas Day.[129] He and the Patriarch held a general assembly at Nablus on 16 January 1120.[127] The prelates and noblemen who attended the meeting confirmed the clergy's right to collect the tithe and to bear arms "in the cause of defense".[130] The council also ordered the punishment of adulterers, pimps, sodomites and bigamists, and prohibited sexual relations between Christians and Muslims.[130][131] Other decrees established penalties against thieves and those who falsely accused others of crimes.[130][131] The decisions of the council were the first examples of law making in the Kingdom of Jerusalem.[116]
     "A confraternity of knights established by Hugh of Payns and Godfrey de Saint-Omer to protect pilgrims in the Holy Land most probably received official recognition at the council, according to historians Malcolm Barber and Christopher Tyerman.[132][133] Baldwin temporarily lodged the knights in the royal palace on the Temple Mount and they became known as the Knights Templar.[132][133] He offered Nabi Samwil to the Cistercians, but Bernard of Clairvaux ceded the place to the Premonstratensians who built a monastery.[134] Shortly after the council, Baldwin and Patriarch Warmund also sent letters to Pope Calixtus II and the Venetians, urging them to support the defense of the Holy Land.[135] The crusaders especially needed the Venetians' ships against the Egyptians.[135]
     "Ilghazi and his nephew, Belek Ghazi, invaded Edessa and Antioch in May 1120.[136][137] Being responsible for the defence of the northern crusader states, Baldwin decided to again lead his troops to Antioch, but a significant group of the Jerusalemite noblemen and clergy opposed the expedition.[138][139] Patriarch Warmund refused to accompany the royal army and allowed Baldwin to take the True Cross with him only after lengthy negotiations.[138][139] Baldwin and his army reached Antioch in June.[136] Ilghazi agreed to sign a one-year truce, which secured the possession of Kafartab and two other fortresses for the crusaders.[136][140]
     "Baldwin returned to Jerusalem only in early 1121, after Toghtekin made a raid against Galilee.[140] In July, he invaded Damascene territory and destroyed a fortress that Toghtekin had recently erected near Jerash.[140] David IV of Georgia routed the united armies of Ilghazi and the Seljuq prince Toghrul Arslan in August.[140] Taking advantage of Ilghazi's weakness, Baldwin launched a military campaign across the Orontes. In November this forced Ilghazi's son to hand over to the crusaders Zardana, Athareb and other forts that Ilghazi had captured the previous year.[136][140]
     "In early 1122 Pons of Tripoli refused to pledge allegiance to Baldwin for unknown reasons.[136][138] After Baldwin mustered his troops and marched against Tripoli, Pons paid homage to him without resistance.[141] Ilghazi and Belek laid siege to Zardana in June, but Baldwin and Joscelin of Edessa's arrival forced them to lift the siege in July.[136] Belek ambushed and captured Joscelin near Saruj on 13 September.[142] Ilghazi reoccupied Athareb,[143] but he died on 3 November 1122.[142] His lands were divided between his sons and nephews.[143] Baldwin, who was still in Antioch, persuaded Badr ad-Daulah Suleiman, the new ruler of Aleppo, to restore Athareb to the crusaders on 2 April 1123.[143] Baldwin recaptured Birejik and made Geoffrey, Lord of Marash, regent of Edessa.[143]
Second captivity
     "Baldwin made a raid towards Kharput where Belek held Joscelin and other knights captive, but he stopped near Gargar.[144] While Baldwin was preparing to practice falconry on the morning of 18 April 1123, Belek attacked his camp and captured him.[145][146] Baldwin was taken to the fortress of Kharput.[146] While Belek was away in Aleppo in June, Jocelyn's fifty Armenian supporters came to Kharput, disguising themselves as monks, and expelled the Seljuq garrison from the fortress.[147] Joscelin left Kharput to gather troops in Turbessel and Antioch, but Baldwin and the Armenian soldiers remained in the fortress to defend it against Belek.[147] Belek returned to Kharput and forced Baldwin to surrender.[148] Belek ordered the execution of the Armenians and transferred Baldwin to Harran.[148]
     "On learning of Baldwin's captivity, Patriarch Warmund convoked the prelates and barons to an assembly which elected Eustace Grenier bailliff (or regent) of Jerusalem.[144][149] After Grenier died on 15 June, William of Bures succeeded him as regent.[150][151] The baillifs and the patriarch closely cooperated with each other and other high-ranking officials in administering the kingdom during Baldwin's captivity.[144][152] They made an alliance—the so-called Pactum Warmundi—with Domenico Michiel, the Doge of Venice, offering commercial privileges to the Venetians in return for their military assistance against the Egyptian towns on the coast.[153] They captured Tyre on 7 or 8 July 1124.[154][155]
     "The contemporaneous Galbert of Bruges recorded that delegates came to Flanders from Jerusalem during Baldwin's captivity.[156][157] They stated that Baldwin "was grasping and penurious, and had not governed the people of God well".[158][159] They offered the crown to Charles the Good, Count of Flanders.[160] Bruges's report shows that a faction of the Jerusalemite nobility attempted to dethrone the captive Baldwin.[156][157][161] Being the head of the lineage from which the first two rulers of Jerusalem were descended, and also the overlord of their brother, Eustace, Charles the Good was an ideal candidate for the throne. However, he refused the offer.[160] Murray tentatively associates the leader of the discontented noblemen with the Flemish Eustace Grenier.[161]
     "Belek died fighting against one of his rebellious officials on 6 May 1124[162][163] and Baldwin was seized by Ilghazi's son, Timurtash.[164] Timurtash entrusted Sultan, the emir of Shaizar, with commencing negotiations for Baldwin's release with Joscelin and Morphia.[164] According to their agreement, Baldwin was to pay 80,000 dinars and to cede Athareb, Zardana, Azaz and other Antiochene fortresses to Timurtash.[164][165] Baldwin also promised that he would assist Timurtash against the Bedouin warlord, Dubais ibn Sadaqa.[164][165] After a quarter of Baldwin's ransom was paid and a dozen hostages (including Baldwin's youngest daughter Ioveta and Jocelyn's son Joscelin II) were handed over to Timurtash to secure the payment of the balance, Baldwin was released on 29 August 1124.[162][164]
Wars
     "Baldwin went to Antioch where Patriarch Bernard reminded him that he had not been authorized to renounce Antiochene territories and on 6 September 1124 forbade him to cede fortresses to Timurtash.[162][166][167] On 6 October, Baldwin laid siege to Aleppo where the hostages for his ransom were held.[162][167] Dubais ibn Sadaqa, and two Seljuq princes, Sultan-Shah ibn Radwan and Toghrul Arslan, joined him and Timurtash did not support the besieged town.[166] Il-Bursuqi decided to intervene and gathered his troops.[168] On learning of Il-Bursuqi's approach, Dubais ibn Sadaqa withdrew from Aleppo, which forced Baldwin to lift the siege on 25 January 1125.[168][169]
     "After more than two years absence, Baldwin returned to Jerusalem on 3 April.[168][169] He renegotiated the Pactum Warmundi with the Venetians, approving most of its terms in the so-called Pactum Balduini, but also stipulating that the Venetians were to provide military assistance to the kingdom.[170] After Il-Bursuqi, Toghtekin and Khirkan of Homs captured Kafartab and laid siege to Zardana, Baldwin again went north.[168] Few knights accompanied him from the kingdom, which according to Murray and Barber may have been a sign of discontent over his frequent campaigns.[156][171] Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin of Edessa joined him and they defeated the Seljuqs at the Battle of Azaz in late May. The battle has been described by historian Peter Lock as "one of the bloodiest engagements in the history of the crusader states".[169] Spoils seized enabled Baldwin to pay off his ransom before his return to Jerusalem.[172]
     "The career of some influential lords started around the time when Baldwin returned to Jerusalem in 1125.[173] Walter I of Brisebarre witnessed the Pactum Balduini as lord of Beirut on 2 May 1125; Pagan the Butler was first mentioned as lord of Oultrejordain in 1126.[174] According to William of Tyre, Pagan seized Oultrejordain after Roman of Le Puy and his son, Ralph, had been deprived of the territory.[175] Murray argues that Baldwin must have confiscated Oultrejordain from Roman because Roman had been one of his opponents during his captivity.[175] Murray also says that Baldwin allegedly adopted an expansionist policy against Damascus in the late 1120s to assuage the Jerusalemite noblemen's discontent.[176] He made a raid against Damascene territory across the Jordan in early 1126.[169][176] Accompanied by almost the whole army, Baldwin routed Toghtekin on 25 January and returned to the kingdom laden with booty.[169][177] Shortly thereafter he supported Pons of Tripoli in capturing Rafaniyah and in raiding Homs.[177] Al-Bursuqi laid siege to Athareb in July 1126.[169] Baldwin again marched north and Joscelin of Edessa joined him at Artah.[169][178] Both sides wanted to avoid a pitched battle, and Al-Bursuqi retired to Aleppo.[178]
Succession
     "After reaching the age of majority, Bohemond II of Antioch came to Syria to claim his inheritance in October 1126.[179] His arrival put an end to Baldwin's rule in Antioch, but Bohemond married Baldwin's second daughter, Alice.[159] Baldwin, who had no sons, made his eldest daughter, Melisende, his heir in 1126 or 1127.[112]
     "Baldwin had already realized that the crusaders were unable to conquer Damascus without further reinforcements from Europe.[180] After consulting with his nobles, he sent William I of Bures and Guy of Brisebarre to France to offer Melisende's hand to the powerful count of Anjou, Fulk V, in the autumn of 1127.[181] Hugh of Payns and his five fellows accompanied the envoys.[180] The embassy first visited Louis VI of France, who gave consent to the marriage.[182] The negotiations between Fulk and Baldwin's envoys lasted for months.[182] In August or September 1127, Baldwin launched a new military campaign against Damascene territory.[183] Historian Steven Tibble proposes that the royal fortress at Wadi Musa was built shortly after this.[184]
     "Baldwin dispatched William I, Archbishop of Tyre, and Robert, Bishop of Lydda and Ramla, to the Holy See.[185] Pope Honorius II stated that Baldwin was the lawful ruler of Jerusalem in a letter of 29 May 1129.[186] Christopher Tyerman and Hans Eberhard Mayer agree that the pope wrote his letter to remove any doubts about the legitimacy of Baldwin's rule.[157][186] On the other hand, Stephen of La Ferté, who had succeeded Warmund of Picquigny as patriarch in July 1128, turned against Baldwin and demanded Jerusalem for the patriarchate.[187]
     "Fulk of Anjou arrived to the Holy Land in the spring of 1129.[188] He married Melisende and Baldwin granted them the two wealthiest towns of the kingdom, Tyre and Acre.[188] Hugh of Payns, who had achieved the adoption of the statutes of the Knights Templar at the Council of Troyes, returned to the kingdom accompanied by new crusaders.[189][190]
     "Toghtekin's successor, Taj al-Muluk Buri, ordered the massacre of the Nizari in Damascus in September 1129.[191] The Nizari's local leader, Ismail al-Ajami, sent envoys to Baldwin and offered the fortress of Banias to the crusaders in return for receiving asylum in the kingdom.[191] Baldwin accepted the offer and his troops seized Banyas.[190] Taking advantage of the presence of the new crusaders, he also decided to attack Damascus.[192] He gathered all available troops and marched as far as the Wooden Bridge, about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) south-west of the town, in November.[192] After Buri's Turcoman horsemen routed a detachment of the crusader army and a heavy storm turned the plains around Damascus into a large marshland, Baldwin had to return to Jerusalem in early December.[192][193]
     "After the Danishmend Gazi Gümüshtigin ambushed and killed Bohemond II in February 1130, Baldwin travelled to Antioch to make arrangements for the administration of the principality.[194] Alice, however, wanted to establish herself as regent during the minority of her and Bohemond's infant daughter, Constance, and did not allow Baldwin to enter Antioch.[194][195][196] She even sent envoys to Imad ad-Din Zengi, the atabeg of Mosul, to seek his assistance against her father, according to the contemporaneous Ibn al-Qalanisi.[194] The Antiochene noblemen were strongly opposed to her plan and opened two gates of the town, which enabled Baldwin to enter.[196] He forgave his daughter, but forbade her to stay in Antioch during Constance's minority.[196][197] After the Antiochene noblemen swore fealty to him and Constance, Baldwin appointed Joscelin of Edessa to administer the principality.[196]
     "According to William of Tyre, Baldwin fell seriously ill after his return from Antioch.[198] He was already dying when he made arrangements for his succession in August 1131.[199] He was transferred to the patriarch's palace near the Holy Sepulchre where he bequeathed the kingdom to Fulk, Melisende and their infant son, Baldwin.[198] He took monastic vows and entered the collegiate chapter of the Holy Sepulchre, where he died on 21 August.[200] He was buried in the Holy Sepulchre.[198]
Family
     "Most Armenians adhered to the Monophysite Armenian Apostolic Church, but Baldwin's wife, Morphia, was born to an Orthodox noble family.[201][33] Her father, Gabriel, gave her in marriage to Baldwin, because he needed the crusaders' support against his enemies.[202] Morphia gave birth to four daughters.[181] She died on 1 October 1126 or 1127.[112]
     "The eldest daughter of Baldwin and Morphia, Melisende, succeeded Baldwin along with her husband, Fulk.[198] They were crowned in the Holy Sepulchre on 14 September 1131.[198][203] Baldwin's second daughter, Alice, made several attempts to administer Antioch after Baldwin's death.[203] Hodierna was Baldwin and Morphia's third daughter.[181] She was given in marriage to Raymond II, Count of Tripoli before 1138.[181][204] Ioveta was her parents' youngest daughter, and their only child "born into the purple" (that is after her father's coronation).[181] She entered the Convent of Saint Anne in Jerusalem around 1134.[188] About 10 years later, she became the second abbess of the convent that Melisende had established at the Tomb of Lazarus in Bethany.[205]
Legacy
     "Baldwin's contemporaries often criticized him.[206] Matthew of Edessa, who recorded the Armenians' grievances during Baldwin's reign in Edessa, described him as a greedy ruler who had "an intolerable love for money".[206] Stephen of Blois, an ascetic monk who settled in the Amanus Mountains, blamed him for "certain enormities in his way of life".[206] Fulcher of Chartres hinted that Baldwin's captivity was a punishment for sin, because he had never seen other kings who were imprisoned.[206]
     "William of Tyre described Baldwin as "a devout and God-fearing man, notable for his loyalty and for his great experience in military matters," and said that he was nicknamed "the Thorny" (cognominatus est Aculeus).[citation needed] Ibn al-Qalanisi, who calls him "Baldwin the Little" (Baghdawin al-ru'aiuis) to distinguish him from Baldwin I, remarked that "after him there was none left amongst them possessed of sound judgment and capacity to govern".[citation needed]
(See Wikipedia article for footnotes.)
Sources
Primary sources
-- William of Tyre, A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea, trans. E. A. Babcock and A. C. Krey. Columbia University Press, 1943.
-- Galbert of Bruges: The Murder of Charles the Good (Translated by James Bruce Ross) (1959). Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-13671-6
Secondary sources
-- Asbridge, Thomas (2004). The First Crusade: A New History: The Roots of Conflict between Christianity and Islam. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-517823-4.
-- Barber, Malcolm (2012). The Crusader States. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-11312-9.
-- Fink, Harold S. (1969). "The Foundation of the Latin States, 1099–1118". In Setton, Kenneth M; Baldwin, Marshall W. (eds.) A History of the Crusades, Volume One: The First Hundred Years. The University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 368–409. ISBN 978-1-58684-251-2.
-- Köhler, Michael (2013). Alliances and Treaties between Frankish and Muslim Rulers in the Middle East: Cross-Cultural Diplomacy in the Period of the Crusades. BRILL. ISBN 978-90-04-24857-1.
-- Lock, Peter (2006). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. ISBN 9-78-0-415-39312-6.
-- Maalouf, Amin (1984). The Crusades Through Arab Eyes. SAQI. ISBN 978-0-86356-023-1.
-- MacEvitt, Christopher (2010). The Crusades and the Christian World of the East: Rough Tolerance. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 978-0-8122-4050-4.
-- Mayer, Hans Eberhard (1985). "The Succession to Baldwin II of Jerusalem: English Impact on the East". Dumbarton Oaks Papers. 38: 139–147. ISSN 0070-7546.
-- Murray, Alan V. (1992). "Dynastic continuity or dynastic change? Accession of Baldwin II and the nobility of the Kingdom of Jerusalem". Medieval Prosopography. 13: 1–27. ISSN 0198-9405.
-- Murray, Alan V. (1994). "Baldwin II and his Nobles: Baronial Factionalism and Dissent in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, 1118–1134". Nottingham Medieval Studies. 38: 60–85. ISSN 0078-2122.
-- Murray, Alan V. (2000). The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: A Dynastic History, 1099–1125. Prosopographica et Geneologica. ISBN 978-1-9009-3403-9.
-- Runciman, Steven (1989a). A History of the Crusades, Volume I: The First Crusade and the Foundations of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-06161-2.
-- Runciman, Steven (1989b). A History of the Crusades, Volume II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-06162-9.
-- Tibble, Steven (1989). Monarchy and Lordships in the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, 1099-1291. Clarendon Press. ISBN 978-0-19-822731-1.
-- Tyerman, Christopher (2006). God's War: A New History of the Crusades. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-02387-1.
Further reading
-- Ferdinandi, Sergio (2017). La Contea Franca di Edessa. Fondazione e Profilo Storico del Primo Principato Crociato nel Levante (1098-1150) [The Frankish County of Edessa. The Establishment and Historical Profile of the First Crusader State in the Levant (1098-1150)]. Pontificia Università Antonianum - Rome. ISBN 978-88-7257-103-3."15



; Per Genealogics:
     "Baudouin du Bourg was a younger son of Hugues I, count of Réthel and Mélisende de Monthléry. He accompanied his cousin Godfrey of Bouillon on the First Crusade and established himself in 1099 as count of Edessa. In 1101 he married Morfia of Melitene, daughter of Gabriel 'the Armenian', lord of Melitene, and they had four daughters of whom three would have progeny.
     "Baudouin took to wearing an Eastern kaftan and dined squatting on a carpet. The Franks employed Syrian doctors, cooks, servants, artisans and labourers. They clothed themselves in eastern garments, included in their diets the fruits and dishes of the country. They had glass in their windows, mosaics on their floors, fountains in the courtyards of their houses, which were planned on the Syrian model. They had dancing girls at their entertainments; professional mourners at their funerals; took baths; used soap; and ate sugar.
     "In 1118 Baudouin succeeded his cousin Baudouin I as king of Jerusalem. However in 1123 he was captured and imprisoned until 1124. In February 1130 Boemund II, prince of Antioch, husband of Baudouin's second daughter Alix de Réthel, was killed in battle. It had been intended that Baudouin act as regent in Antioch for his granddaughter Constance but his daughter Alix, Constance's mother, closed the gates of Antioch against him and tried to obtain the support of Zengi, the Saracen governor of Aleppo. Baudouin intercepted the messenger and had him hanged. The French barons in Antioch opened the gates and Baudouin was able to enter the city. Though he reconciled with his daughter he banished her to Latakia.
     "Baudouin returned to Jerusalem a sick man; he was admitted as a canon of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, and in August 1131 he died wearing the habit of a monk."2

Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa was also known as Baldwin II (?) King of Jerusalem.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN de Rethel, son of HUGUES [I] Comte de Rethel & his wife Mélisende de Montlhéry ([1075/80]-Jerusalem 21 Aug 1131, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre). William of Tyre names "Balduinus cognominatus de Burgo, domini Hugonis comitis de Retest filius" and records him as "consanguineus" of Godefroi Duke of Lower Lotharingia and his brothers Baudouin and Eustache[67]. In a later passage, William of Tyre names his mother and records that he was "primogenitus"[68], although the inheritance by his brothers of the paternal county seems to indicate that this is incorrect, unless he was passed over by family agreement either because of his absence in Palestine or his already superior position as Count of Edessa. His birth date range is estimated assuming that he was an adolescent or young adult when he joined the First Crusade. He was known as "BAUDOUIN du Bourg". Albert of Aix records that "Godefridus dux regni Lotharingiæ…fraterque eius uterinus Baldewinus, Warnerus de Greis cognatus ipsius Ducis, Baldewinus pariter de Burch, Reinhardus comes de Tul, Petrus…frater ipsius, Dodo de Cons, Henricus de Ascha ac frater illius Godefridus" left for Jerusalem in Aug 1096[69]. Albert of Aix records that "Cononem comitem de Monte Acuto, Baldwinum de Burch, Godefridum de Ascha" were sent by Godefroi de Bouillon for the first meeting with the emperor after the arrival of the crusading army in Constantinople, dated to end 1096[70]. He joined the crusading contingent of Godefroi IV Duke of Lower Lotharingia in Cilicia. After completing his pilgrimage, he returned to Edessa to rejoin Baudouin I Count of Edessa [Boulogne]. When the latter succeeded his brother in 1100 as Baudouin I King of Jerusalem, he invested Baudouin du Bourg as BAUDOUIN II Count of Edessa, as vassal of the kingdom of Jerusalem[71]. Albert of Aix records that "Baldewinus dux civitatis Rohas" installed "Baldewino de Burg…sui generis, filio comitis Hugonis de Rortest" at Edessa on succeeding to the kingdom of Jerusalem, dated to 1100 from the context[72]. Count Baudouin married the daughter of Gabriel, Armenian Lord of Melitene, in order to consolidate his position in Edessa. He was captured with Joscelin de Courtenay by Soqman, Ortokid Prince of Mardin, after the battle of Harran in 1104, but was released in 1107 in exchange for Joscelin de Courtenay who had allowed himself to be recaptured to ensure Baudouin's freedom[73]. During his imprisonment Tancred was appointed regent of Edessa, followed by Richard of the Principate [Sicily] after Tancred assumed the role of regent of Antioch[74]. Baudouin had to evict Richard forcibly to regain Edessa in 1108 following his release[75]. He captured more territory in Cilician Armenia by expelling the Armenian lords Vasil Dgha from Rabun and Kaisun in 1116 and Constantine from Gargar in 1117[76]. Albert of Aix records that Baudouin appointed "fratri Eustachio" as his successor on his deathbed if he would come to Jerusalem, or if he failed to come "Baldewinus de Burg"[77]. Despite being the fallback choice of his predecessor, he was unanimously elected by the council to succeed and was crowned 14 Apr 1118[78] as BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem by Arnoul Patriarch of Jerusalem. In Aug 1119, Baudouin marched to relieve Antioch after the defeat of Roger Prince of Antioch by Najm al-Din Ilghazi ibn Artuk, Turkish emir in north Syria, at the "Ager Sanguinis" and was victorious at Zerdana. He assumed the position of regent of Antioch for the rightful prince Bohémond II who was still in Toulouse[79] and who did not arrive in Palestine until 1126. King Baudouin II returned to Jerusalem to be crowned 25 Dec 1119. He was obliged to increase his time spent in the north to defend Antioch which was attacked in 1120 and 1122. This was unpopular in Jerusalem, where unrest increased after Pons Count of Tripoli renounced his allegiance to King Baudouin in 1122. The king was captured 18 Apr 1123 by Artukid forces and imprisoned in the fortress of Khartpert. The Frankish prisoners seized control of the fortress in Aug 1123, but it was recaptured by Balak and King Baudouin was moved to Harran. He was released 29 Aug 1124 on payment of a ransom, but did not return to Jerusalem until Apr 1125[80]. During his absence, Eustache Granarius Lord of Sidon and Caesarea was appointed Constable of the kingdom, and was succeeded in 1123 by Guillaume de Bures[81]. King Baudouin's armies defeated a Fatimid invasion, preventing the recapture of Jaffa in May 1123, and captured Tyre 7 Jul 1124 after a five month siege. While King Baudouin II was held captive, a faction in Jerusalem which was hostile to the king offered the throne of Jerusalem to Charles "the Good" Count of Flanders [Denmark], who refused the offer[82]. King Baudouin's forces made a major push northwards in 1129 to capture more territory, but failed to capture Damascus[83]. When dying, he became a monk and was admitted as a canon of the Holy Sepulchre[84].
     "m (1101) MORFIA of Melitene, daughter of GABRIEL Lord of Melitene & his wife ---. She is named by William of Tyre, who also names her father and specifies his Armenian origin but emphasises his Greek faith, when recording her marriage[85]. This marriage was arranged to consolidate her husband's position as newly installed count of Edessa. She was crowned as queen of Jerusalem at Bethlehem at Christmas 1119[86]."
Med Lands cites:
[67] WT I. XVII, p. 45.
[68] WT XII.I, p. 511.
[69] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. I, p. 299.
[70] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XI, p. 306.
[71] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 36.
[72] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VII, Cap. XXXI, p. 527.
[73] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 43 and 111-12.
[74] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 47.
[75] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 112-14.
[76] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 130.
[77] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XXVIII, p. 707.
[78] Fulcher III.I, p. 441, which specifies that he was crowned on Easter day.
[79] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 152.
[80] Runciman (1978), pp. 162-5 and 171-2.
[81] Runciman (1978), p. 166.
[82] Galbert of Bruges (Galbertus notarius Brugensis), De multro, traditione, et occisione gloriosi Karoli comitis Flandriarum, Rider, J. (ed.), Corpus Christianorum, Continuatio Medievalis 131 (Turnhout, 1994), p. 15, discussed in Murray (2000), pp. 139-45.
[83] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 178-80.
[84] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 185.
[85] WT X.XXIV, p. 437.
[86] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 155.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "MORFIA of Melitene . She is named by William of Tyre, who also names her father and specifies his Armenian origin but emphasises his Greek faith, when recording her marriage[1155]. This marriage was arranged to consolidate her husband's position as newly installed count of Edessa. She was crowned as queen of Jerusalem at Bethlehem at Christmas 1119[1156].
     "m (1101) BAUDOUIN II Count of Edessa, son of HUGUES de Rethel & his wife Mélisende de Montlhéry ([1075/80]-Jerusalem 21 Aug 1131, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre). He succeeded in 1118 as BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem."
Med Lands cites:
[1155] WT X.XXIV, p. 437.
[1156] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 155.17
He was Count of Edessa. See attached map of the Crusader states ca 1135. (From Wiipedia: By MapMaster - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1622291) between 1099 and 1118 at County of Edessa, (Turkey (now).3,5,15 He was King of Jerusalem. See Wikipedia article on the "Kings of Jerusalem". between 1118 and 1131.12,1,4,5,18

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 234. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#BaudouinIIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076235&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#HuguesIRetheldied1118
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hugues Ier de Rethel: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_de_Rethel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mélisende de Monthléry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076236&tree=LEO
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montlhéry, Bray-sur-Seine, La Ferté-Milon, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montlhery.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103A-25, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Morfia de Melitene: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076234&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 19 October 2019), memorial page for Baldwin II King Of Jerusalem (1058–21 Sep 1131), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66396443, citing Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66396443/baldwin_ii-king_of_jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_II_of_Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARMENIA.htm#MorphiaMBaudouinIIJerusalem
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_of_Jerusalem
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html#QM
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 5.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  22. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yvette: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00337621&tree=LEO

Morphia (?) de Melitene1,2,3,4

F, #10489, b. 1085, d. circa 1 October 1126
FatherGabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene2,3,4,5 b. c 1050, d. bt 1102 - 1103
MotherUnknown (?)6
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Morphia (?) de Melitene was born in 1085 at Malatya, Malatya, Turkey (now).7 She married Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa, son of Hugues I (?) Comte de Rethel and Mélisende de Montlhéry, in 1101.8,9,3,10,4,11,12
Morphia (?) de Melitene died circa 1 October 1126; Armenia 1 page says d. 1129.2,3,6
Morphia (?) de Melitene was buried after 1 October 1127 at Church of the Assumption, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1085, Malatya, Malatya, Turkey
     DEATH     1 Oct 1127 (aged 41–42), Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     Morphia of Melitene, was the wife of Baldwin II, king of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. Morphia was the daughter of an Armenian nobleman named Gabriel, he was the ruler of the city of Melitene. Although ethnically Armenian, the family practised the Greek Orthodox faith. The future Baldwin II of Jerusalem was also count of Edessa after 1100, and he consolidated his position in the county by marrying Morphia around 1101. Gabriel, who was very wealthy, gave 50,000 gold bezants as a dowry. Baldwin and Morphia had four daughters: Melisende, Alice, Hodierna, and Ioveta.
     When Baldwin became King of Jerusalem in 1118, Morphia and her children remained in Edessa. After the Muslim victory at the Battle of Ager Sanguinis in 1119, Baldwin returned to the north to respond to the threat. After having secured the crusader territories, he returned home in 1120 with his family, and Morphia was finally crowned as queen. Morphia went back north when Baldwin was taken captive while patrolling the borders of Edessa in 1123, and helped ensure his release by offering their young daughter Ioveta as a hostage.
     According to the Melisende Psalter, Morphia died on October 1, but the year is unknown; it was either 1126 or 1127. With no male heir, Baldwin II designated Melisende, his oldest daughter, as his heir, and married her to Fulk V of Anjou.Two of their other daughters also married influential crusader lords: Alice married Bohemund II of Antioch, and Hodierna married Raymond II of Tripoli. Ioveta became a nun.
Morphia was probably partially responsible for the Greek and Armenian cultural influences that appeared in the Latin kingdom. Art from the kingdom, such as the Melisende Psalter, often shows a mixture of eastern and western styles, just as the western crusaders had begun to accustom themselves to eastern culture. Morphia was buried at the abbey of St. Mary Josaphat, just outside of Jerusalem.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Baldwin II King Of Jerusalem 1058–1131
     Children
          Alice Of Antioch
          Melisende of Jerusalem 1105–1161
          Ioveta of Jerusalem, of Bethany 1120–1163
     BURIAL     Church of the Assumption, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     PLOT     Melisende of Jerusalem Chapel
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 6 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91473756.7
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN de Rethel, son of HUGUES [I] Comte de Rethel & his wife Mélisende de Montlhéry ([1075/80]-Jerusalem 21 Aug 1131, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre). William of Tyre names "Balduinus cognominatus de Burgo, domini Hugonis comitis de Retest filius" and records him as "consanguineus" of Godefroi Duke of Lower Lotharingia and his brothers Baudouin and Eustache[67]. In a later passage, William of Tyre names his mother and records that he was "primogenitus"[68], although the inheritance by his brothers of the paternal county seems to indicate that this is incorrect, unless he was passed over by family agreement either because of his absence in Palestine or his already superior position as Count of Edessa. His birth date range is estimated assuming that he was an adolescent or young adult when he joined the First Crusade. He was known as "BAUDOUIN du Bourg". Albert of Aix records that "Godefridus dux regni Lotharingiæ…fraterque eius uterinus Baldewinus, Warnerus de Greis cognatus ipsius Ducis, Baldewinus pariter de Burch, Reinhardus comes de Tul, Petrus…frater ipsius, Dodo de Cons, Henricus de Ascha ac frater illius Godefridus" left for Jerusalem in Aug 1096[69]. Albert of Aix records that "Cononem comitem de Monte Acuto, Baldwinum de Burch, Godefridum de Ascha" were sent by Godefroi de Bouillon for the first meeting with the emperor after the arrival of the crusading army in Constantinople, dated to end 1096[70]. He joined the crusading contingent of Godefroi IV Duke of Lower Lotharingia in Cilicia. After completing his pilgrimage, he returned to Edessa to rejoin Baudouin I Count of Edessa [Boulogne]. When the latter succeeded his brother in 1100 as Baudouin I King of Jerusalem, he invested Baudouin du Bourg as BAUDOUIN II Count of Edessa, as vassal of the kingdom of Jerusalem[71]. Albert of Aix records that "Baldewinus dux civitatis Rohas" installed "Baldewino de Burg…sui generis, filio comitis Hugonis de Rortest" at Edessa on succeeding to the kingdom of Jerusalem, dated to 1100 from the context[72]. Count Baudouin married the daughter of Gabriel, Armenian Lord of Melitene, in order to consolidate his position in Edessa. He was captured with Joscelin de Courtenay by Soqman, Ortokid Prince of Mardin, after the battle of Harran in 1104, but was released in 1107 in exchange for Joscelin de Courtenay who had allowed himself to be recaptured to ensure Baudouin's freedom[73]. During his imprisonment Tancred was appointed regent of Edessa, followed by Richard of the Principate [Sicily] after Tancred assumed the role of regent of Antioch[74]. Baudouin had to evict Richard forcibly to regain Edessa in 1108 following his release[75]. He captured more territory in Cilician Armenia by expelling the Armenian lords Vasil Dgha from Rabun and Kaisun in 1116 and Constantine from Gargar in 1117[76]. Albert of Aix records that Baudouin appointed "fratri Eustachio" as his successor on his deathbed if he would come to Jerusalem, or if he failed to come "Baldewinus de Burg"[77]. Despite being the fallback choice of his predecessor, he was unanimously elected by the council to succeed and was crowned 14 Apr 1118[78] as BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem by Arnoul Patriarch of Jerusalem. In Aug 1119, Baudouin marched to relieve Antioch after the defeat of Roger Prince of Antioch by Najm al-Din Ilghazi ibn Artuk, Turkish emir in north Syria, at the "Ager Sanguinis" and was victorious at Zerdana. He assumed the position of regent of Antioch for the rightful prince Bohémond II who was still in Toulouse[79] and who did not arrive in Palestine until 1126. King Baudouin II returned to Jerusalem to be crowned 25 Dec 1119. He was obliged to increase his time spent in the north to defend Antioch which was attacked in 1120 and 1122. This was unpopular in Jerusalem, where unrest increased after Pons Count of Tripoli renounced his allegiance to King Baudouin in 1122. The king was captured 18 Apr 1123 by Artukid forces and imprisoned in the fortress of Khartpert. The Frankish prisoners seized control of the fortress in Aug 1123, but it was recaptured by Balak and King Baudouin was moved to Harran. He was released 29 Aug 1124 on payment of a ransom, but did not return to Jerusalem until Apr 1125[80]. During his absence, Eustache Granarius Lord of Sidon and Caesarea was appointed Constable of the kingdom, and was succeeded in 1123 by Guillaume de Bures[81]. King Baudouin's armies defeated a Fatimid invasion, preventing the recapture of Jaffa in May 1123, and captured Tyre 7 Jul 1124 after a five month siege. While King Baudouin II was held captive, a faction in Jerusalem which was hostile to the king offered the throne of Jerusalem to Charles "the Good" Count of Flanders [Denmark], who refused the offer[82]. King Baudouin's forces made a major push northwards in 1129 to capture more territory, but failed to capture Damascus[83]. When dying, he became a monk and was admitted as a canon of the Holy Sepulchre[84].
     "m (1101) MORFIA of Melitene, daughter of GABRIEL Lord of Melitene & his wife ---. She is named by William of Tyre, who also names her father and specifies his Armenian origin but emphasises his Greek faith, when recording her marriage[85]. This marriage was arranged to consolidate her husband's position as newly installed count of Edessa. She was crowned as queen of Jerusalem at Bethlehem at Christmas 1119[86]."
Med Lands cites:
[67] WT I. XVII, p. 45.
[68] WT XII.I, p. 511.
[69] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. I, p. 299.
[70] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XI, p. 306.
[71] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 36.
[72] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VII, Cap. XXXI, p. 527.
[73] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 43 and 111-12.
[74] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 47.
[75] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 112-14.
[76] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 130.
[77] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XXVIII, p. 707.
[78] Fulcher III.I, p. 441, which specifies that he was crowned on Easter day.
[79] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 152.
[80] Runciman (1978), pp. 162-5 and 171-2.
[81] Runciman (1978), p. 166.
[82] Galbert of Bruges (Galbertus notarius Brugensis), De multro, traditione, et occisione gloriosi Karoli comitis Flandriarum, Rider, J. (ed.), Corpus Christianorum, Continuatio Medievalis 131 (Turnhout, 1994), p. 15, discussed in Murray (2000), pp. 139-45.
[83] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 178-80.
[84] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 185.
[85] WT X.XXIV, p. 437.
[86] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 155.11


; per Racines et Histoire: "Morphia de Mélitène, comtesse d’Edesse puis reine de Jérusalem (couronné à Bethléem Noël 1119) (fille de Gabriel, seigneur de Mélitène, de confession grecque orthodoxe.)13"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Moraphia, dau.of the Armenian lord Gabriel, Gov of Melitene (*by 1101, +1126/7.)3"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Morphia of Melitene, or Morfia, or Moraphia (died c. 1126 or 1127) was queen of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem as the wife Baldwin II.[1]
Marriage
     "Morphia was the daughter of an Armenian nobleman named Gabriel (or Khoril, in Armenian), the ruler of the city of Melitene. Although ethnically Armenian, the family practised the Greek Orthodox faith. Melitene was a neighbour of the crusader County of Edessa, and Gabriel soon became a vassal of the county. Baldwin of Rethel became Count of Edessa after 1100, and he consolidated his position in the county by marrying Morphia around 1101. Gabriel, who was very wealthy, gave 50,000 gold bezants as a dowry. The diplomatic marriage fortified alliances in the region.[2][3]
     "Baldwin and Morphia had four daughters: Melisende (who married Fulk V, Count of Anjou[4]), Alice (who married Bohemond II, Prince of Antioch[4]), Hodierna (who married Raymond II, Count of Tripoli[4]) and Ioveta.
Queenship
     "Baldwin was elected King of Jerusalem as successor of Baldwin I in 1118, but Morphia and their daughters remained in Edessa.
     "By the time of his election as king, Baldwin II and Morphia already had three daughters.[2] As the new king, Baldwin II had been encouraged to put away Morphia in favor of a new younger wife with better political connections- one that could yet bear him a male heir. Armenian historian Matthew of Edessa wrote that Baldwin II was thoroughly devoted to his wife,[2] and refused to consider divorcing her.[2] As a mark of his love for his wife, Baldwin II had postponed his coronation until Christmas Day 1119 so that Morphia and his daughters could travel to Jerusalem, and so that Morphia could be crowned alongside him.[2]
     "For her part, Queen Morphia did not interfere in the day to day politics of Jerusalem, but demonstrated her ability to take charge of affairs when events warranted it.[2] When Baldwin was captured during a campaign in 1123, Morphia hired a band of Armenian mercenaries to discover where her husband was being held prisoner.[2] In 1124 Morphia took a leading part in the negotiations with Baldwin's captors to have him released, including traveling to Syria and handing over her youngest daughter Ioveta as hostage and as surety for the payment of the King's ransom.[2]
Death and legacy
     "According to the Melisende Psalter, Queen Morphia died on October 1, but the year is unknown; it was either 1126 or 1127, more likely 1126. With no male heir, Baldwin II designated Melisende, their oldest daughter, as his heir, and married her to Fulk V of Anjou.[5] Two of their other daughters also married influential crusader lords: Alice married Bohemund II of Antioch, and Hodierna married Raymond II of Tripoli. Ioveta became a nun.
     "Queen Morphia was probably partially responsible for the Greek and Armenian cultural influences that appeared in the Latin kingdom. Art from the kingdom, such as the Melisende Psalter, often shows a mixture of eastern and western styles, just as the western crusaders had begun to accustom themselves to eastern culture. Morphia was buried at the Abbey of St. Mary of the Valley of Jehoshaphat, just outside Jerusalem.
     "Her descendant Agnes of Antioch was DNA-tested to belong to mt-haplogroup either H1j8 or H1bz.[6]
Notes
1. Tyerman, Christopher, God's War, (Harvard University Press, 2008), 186.
2. Hamilton, Bernard, Queens of Jerusalem, Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978, Frankish women in the Outremer, pg 143, Melisende's youth pgs 147, 148, Recognized as successor pg 148, 149, Offers patronage and issues diplomas, Marriage with Fulk, Birth of Baldwin III, Second Crowing with father, husband, and son, pg 149,
3. Oldenbourg, Zoe, The Crusades, Pantheon Books, 1966, Baldwin II searches for a husband for Melisende, feudal relatiolnship between France and Jerusalem, Fulk V of Anjou, pg 264,
4. The Lords of Le Puiset on the Crusades, John L. La Monte, Speculum, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Jan., 1942), 100-101.
5 Jackson-Laufer, Guida Myrl, Women Rulers throughout the Ages: An illustrated guide, (ABC-CLIO, 1999), 288.
6.lasz, Judit; Seidenberg, Verena; Hummel, Susanne; Szentirmay, Zoltán; Szabados, György; Melegh, Béla; Kásler, Miklós (2019). "DNA profiling of Hungarian King Béla III and other skeletal remains originating from the Royal Basilica of Székesfehérvár". Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences. 11 (4): 1345–1357. doi:10.1007/s12520-018-0609-7.
References
** Jackson-Laufer, Guida Myrl, Women Rulers throughout the Ages: An illustrated guide, ABC-CLIO, 1999.
** Tyerman, Christopher, God's War, Harvard University Press, 2008."14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Morfia was the daughter of Gabriel 'the Armenian', the ruler of the city of Melitene. Although ethnically Armenian, the family practised the Greek Orthodox faith. Melitene was a neighbour of the crusader county of Edessa, and Gabriel soon became a vassal of the county. Baudouin II du Bourg, the future king of Jerusalem, was also count of Edessa after 1100, and he consolidated his position in the county by marrying Morfia around 1101. Gabriel, who was very wealthy, gave 50,000 gold bezants as a dowry. Morfia and Baudouin had four daughters of whom three would have progeny. The family lived in Edessa until 1118, when her spouse was elected king of Jerusalem as successor of his cousin Baudouin I. When Baudouin became king, Morfia and her children remained in Edessa.
     "By the time of his election as king, Baudouin II and Morfia already had three daughters. As the new king, Baudouin had been encouraged to put away Morfia in favour of a new younger wife with better political connections, and one who could yet bear him a male heir. Armenian historian Matthew of Edessa wrote that Baudouin was thoroughly devoted to his wife, and refused to consider divorcing her. As a mark of his love for his wife, Baudouin had postponed his coronation until Christmas Day 1119 so that Morfia and his daughters could travel to Jerusalem, and so that Morfia could be crowned alongside him as his queen.
     "For her part, Morfia did not interfere in the day to day politics of Jerusalem, but demonstrated her ability to take charge of affairs when events warranted it. When Baudouin was captured during a campaign in 1123, Morfia hired a band of Armenian mercenaries to discover where her husband was being held prisoner, and in 1124 Morfia took a leading part in the negotiations with Baudouin's captors to have him released, including travelling to Syria and handing over her youngest daughter Yvette as hostage and as surety for the payment of the king's ransom.
     "According to the _Melisende Psalter,_ Morfia died on October 1, but the year is unknown; it was either 1126 or 1127, more likely 1126. She was buried at the abbey of St. Mary Josaphat, just outside of Jerusalem. With no male heir, Baudouin designated Melisende, his oldest daughter, as his heir, and married her to Foulques V 'the Young', comte d'Anjou et Maine. Two of their other daughters also married influential crusader lords: Alix married Boemund II, prince of Antioch, and Hodierne married Raymond II, count of Tripolis. Yvette became a nun.
     "Morfia was probably partly responsible for the Greek and Armenian cultural influences that appeared in the Latin kingdom. Art from the kingdom, such as the _Melisende Psalter,_ often shows a mixture of eastern and western styles, just as the western crusaders had begun to accustom themselves to eastern culture."12 EDV-26. Morphia (?) de Melitene was also known as Malfia (?)

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg, Reference: V (J).
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 625.12


; Per Med Lands:
     "MORFIA of Melitene . She is named by William of Tyre, who also names her father and specifies his Armenian origin but emphasises his Greek faith, when recording her marriage[1155]. This marriage was arranged to consolidate her husband's position as newly installed count of Edessa. She was crowned as queen of Jerusalem at Bethlehem at Christmas 1119[1156].
     "m (1101) BAUDOUIN II Count of Edessa, son of HUGUES de Rethel & his wife Mélisende de Montlhéry ([1075/80]-Jerusalem 21 Aug 1131, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre). He succeeded in 1118 as BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem."
Med Lands cites:
[1155] WT X.XXIV, p. 437.
[1156] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 155.5
She was Queen consort of Jerusalem between 1118 and 1126.14

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 234. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Morfia de Melitene: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076234&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARMENIA.htm#MorphiaMBaudouinIIJerusalem. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 1 page - The Rupenids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia1.html
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 December 2019), memorial page for Morphia of Melitene (1085–1 Oct 1127), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91473756, citing Church of the Assumption, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91473756/morphia-of_melitene. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103A-25, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#BaudouinIIB
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Morfia de Melitene: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076234&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Edesse.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morphia_of_Melitene. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html#QM
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yvette: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00337621&tree=LEO

Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene1

M, #10490, b. circa 1050, d. between 1102 and 1103
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene married Unknown (?), daughter of Constantine/Kostandin I (?) Lord of Vaghka & Partzerpert.2 Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene was born circa 1050.1
Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene died between 1102 and 1103; Weis (AR7, line 103A-25) and Med Lands say d. 1103; Genealogics says d. 1102.3,1,4
     ; Per Genealogics: "He was Prince and Governor of Melitene on the Upper Euphrates, first for the Eastern Emperor, then for the Sultan. In 1102, the Danishmend army attacked Melitene. Gabriel must have appealed to his son-in-law, Baudouin, King of Jerusalem and Count of Edessa, for help; but Baudouin did nothing, probably because he was unwilling at this juncture to effend the emir. Gabriel's subjects disliked him for his Orthodox faith. The Syrians, in particular, had never forgiven him for having once put one of their bishops to death for treason. He and his capital were captured; but one of his castles held out. Gabriel was told by his captors to order it to capitulate. When the garrison disobeyed him, he was executed before its walls. After Steven Runciman 'A History of the Crusades'."1



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 625.
2. A History of the Crusades, three volumes, Cambridge University Press, 1951, 1952 and 1954, Runciman, Steven. Biographical details.1
He was per Racines et Histoire: "Morphia de Mélitène, comtesse d’Edesse puis reine de Jérusalem (couronné à Bethléem Noël 1119) (fille de Gabriel, seigneur de Mélitène, de confession grecque orthodoxe.)5"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Gabriel of Melitene (died 1102/3[1]) was the ruler of Melitene (modern Malatya). Along with Thoros of Edessa, Gabriel was a former officer of Philaretos Brachamios. Philaretos had installed Gabriel as the ruler of Melitene. Following the death of Philaretos in 1086 Melitene became completely independent of Byzantine control with the aid of the Danishmends. Eventually the Danishmends began harassing Melitene. Gabriel appealed to Bohemund I of Antioch for assistance.
     "In 1100 Bohemund came to Gabriel's aid along with his cousin Richard of Salerno and the Armenian Bishops of Marash and Antioch, but they were both captured and the Bishops slain by Malik Ghazi Gumushtekin, the Danishmend Emir of Sebastea, in the Battle of Melitene. Malik was now constantly raiding Gabriel's territories. Fearing an imminent attack on the city itself, Gabriel asked for help from Baldwin of Boulogne who had recently become King of Jerusalem, despite concerns that Baldwin might take over Melitene, as he did Edessa. Baldwin relieved the siege of Melitene and rescued Bohemund after which Gabriel recognized him as overlord of the city.
     "Some sources state that Gabriel's wife was a daughter of Constantine I, Prince of Armenia; however, the dates simply do not allow for it. The confusion appears to stem from identifying Thoros I, son of Constantine with Thoros of Edessa, the latter of whom Gabriel is attested as being the father-in-law.[citation needed] Gabriel must have had some connection to the Greek culture, either via his mother or wife and, if that connection was to the family of Constantine I, it was most likely further back. His wife may have been a daughter of Constantine's father Roupen, for example; or she may have been a daughter of Philaretos, the general under whom Gabriel served, but this is only speculation. In any case, he was presumably known by his contemporaries and subjects to be descended from a prominent family that was acceptable to both the Greeks and to the Armenians, which could suggest a mixed heritage. Gabriel was disliked by a number of his subjects for his Eastern Orthodox faith.
     "In 1101 Baldwin of Bourcq married Gabriel's daughter Morphia of Melitene, who later became Queen of Jerusalem. Gabriel, who was reputedly very wealthy, gave 50,000 gold bezants as a dowry. William of Tyre described Gabriel as Greek by religion, Armenian by race, language and custom. Byzantine seals bearing his name testify him as Gabriel, protonobelissimos and doux of Melitene.
     "Beginning in 1103, the Danishmends again attacked Melitene. Gabriel asked the Crusaders for support, but they did not send help because they were negotiating with the Danishmends Emir at this time about the release of Bohemond. Melitene was conquered and Gabriel was captured. One of Gabriel's castles resisted the Turks. Gabriel was forced to give the crew of the castle the order to surrender. However, the garrison disobeyed his orders, and he was executed by soldiers of the sultan under the walls of the castle.
Footnotes
1. Hebraeus, Bar (2003). The Chronography of Gregory Abû'l Faraj, the Son of Aaron, the Hebrew Physician, Commonly Known as Bar Hebraeus: Being the First Part of His Political History of the World. ISBN 9781593330552.
References
** The Rupenides, Hethumides, and Lusignans, W. H. Ruedt-Collenberg (Paris: Klincksieck, 1963), p. 78
** A history of the Crusades, Steven Runciman, Cambridge University Press, 1951, p. 320
** Syrian Christians Under Islam: The 1st 1000 Years, David Thomas, Brill Academic Publishers, 2001, p. 169."6



; Per Med Lands: "(-1103). An Orthodox Christian. Lord of Melitene, he is named by William of Tyre[1148]. Vardan's History records that "Ghilich Arslan sultan of the West, grandson of Ddlmush, came into Melitene" in 1098 but "the prince of the city Ghavril, father-in-law of the curopalate of Edessa turned them back in disgrace"[1149]. Albert of Aix records that "Gaveras Armenici ducis principis et domini…Malatinam" requested Bohémond Prince of Antioch to help against "Donimannus quidam princeps Turcorum", dated to 1100 from the context[1150]. He was executed by the Syrians after they captured Melitene[1151]. m ---. The name of Gabriel's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[1148] WT IX.XXI, p. 396.
[1149] Vardan 63.
[1150] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VII, Cap. XXVII, p. 524.
[1151] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 39.4
He was Armenian governor of Melitene on the upper Euphrates.3

Reference: Weis [1992:99], Line 103A-25.7 Gabriel "the Armenian" (?) Lord of Melitene was also known as Ghavril/Gabriel (?) Lord of Melitene.4 EDV-27.

Family

Unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gabriel 'the Armenian': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122048&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 1 page - The Rupenids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103A-25, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARMENIA.htm#MorphiaMBaudouinIIJerusalem. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Edesse.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriel_of_Melitene. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 103A-25, p. 99: "...Armenian gov. of Melitene on the upper Euphrates."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Morfia de Melitene: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076234&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.

Hugues I (?) Comte de Rethel1,2,3

M, #10491, b. 1030, d. 28 December 1118
FatherManasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel2,4,5,6 b. 990, d. 1056
MotherJudith (?)7 b. c 1020
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Hugues I (?) Comte de Rethel was born in 1030.2,8 He married Mélisende de Montlhéry, daughter of Guy I 'Troussel' de Montlhéry Seigneur de Monthléry et Chevreuse, Chatelain de Rochefort-en-Yvelines and Hodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté Dame de Bures et de La Ferté-Alais, after 1058.9,10,2,3,11,12,4,5,13
Hugues I (?) Comte de Rethel died on 28 December 1118.9,10,2,4,13,8
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg, Reference: V (J).
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 625.4


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Hugues I, Cte de Rethel, *1030, +ca 1118; m.1058 Mélisende de Montlhéry (*1045.)2"

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES de Rethel, son of MANASSES [III] Comte de Rethel & his wife Judith --- ([1045/55]-28 Dec [1118]). A charter dated 26 Sep 1081 records the restoration of privileges granted by “Manasses Regitestensis comes”, with the consent of “uxore Judiz et venerabili Hugone filio”, to the chapter of Braux[313]. His birth date range is estimated from the probable birth date range of his son Baudouin. He succeeded his father in [1081] as Comte de Rethel. A charter dated 1094 records absolution granted to "comitem Hugonem", with the consent of "filius eius comitis Manasses"[314]. “Hugo comes et Milesindis collateralis” donated mills “super Axonam fluvium ante Rettestum” to Laon Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “filio nostro Manasse”, by charter dated 1097[315]. "Registensium comes Hugo" donated property to "ecclesie…Marie de Noveyo" by charter dated 1117[316]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "V Kal Jan" of "Hugo comes Regiteste"[317].
     "m (before 1075[318]) MELISENDE de Montlhéry, daughter of GUY "le Grand" Seigneur de Montlhéry & his wife Hodierne de Gometz-La Ferté. The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Brayo et Guidonem Rubeum, Comitissam quoque Reiteste, et Bonam-vecinam de Pontibus, Elizabeth etiam uxorem Joscelini de Corteciniaco, insuper dominam de Puisat, et dominam de S. Galerico" as the children of "Guidonem" and his wife[319]. She is named as wife of Hugues Comte de Rethel by William of Tyre, although he does not specify her origin[320]. In a later passage he records that the mother of Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa was the sister of the mother of Baudouin de Bourg, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity between Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162[321]. “Hugo comes et Milesindis collateralis” donated mills “super Axonam fluvium ante Rettestum” to Laon Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “filio nostro Manasse”, by charter dated 1097[322].
     "Comte Hugues & his wife had [seven] children."
Med Lands cites:
[313] Chartes Rethel (1902), Tome I, I, p. 1.
[314] Jolibois (1847), Notes et documents, IV, p. 195.
[315] Saint-Vincent de Laon, X, p. 194.
[316] Delisle (1867), 1, p. 11.
[317] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 274.
[318] Marriage date estimated from the probable birth date range of the couple's son Baudouin.
[319] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF, Tome XI, p. 275.
[320] William of Tyre, XII.I, p. 511.
[321] William of Tyre, XIX.IV, p. 889.
[322] Saint-Vincent de Laon, X, p. 194.5


; Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Hugues Ier, mort le 28 décembre 11181, fut comte de Rethel de 1081 à 1118. Il était fils de Manassès III, comte de Rethel, et de Judith (probablement de Lotharingie).
Biographie
     "À la suite d'un conflit avec les moines, Hugues imposant des corvées aux vassaux des moines, il fut excommunié par Renauld Ier du Bellay, 46e archevêque de Reims en 1092 . Il fit acte de soumission en 1094 et fit à Novy, don d'un alleu aux moines de Sauve-la-Majeure qui firent en ce lieu une abbaye.
Mariage et enfants
     "Il épousa Mélisende de Montlhéry, fille de Gui Ier, seigneur de Montlhéry, et d'Hodierne de Gometz, et eut :
** Manassès, cité en 1115, mais mort peu après.
** Baudouin († 1131), seigneur du Bourg, puis comte d'Edesse (1100-1118) et roi de Jérusalem (1118-1131 sous le nom de Baudouin II).
** Gervais († 1124), élu archevêque de Reims mais non sacré, puis comte de Rethel.
** Mathilde († 1152), comtesse de Rethel, mariée à Eudes († 1158), seigneur de Vitry.
** Hodierne, mariée à Héribrand II, seigneur de Hierges, puis à Roger de Salerne, prince régent d'Antioche
** peut-être une fille mariée vers 1102 à Léon Ier prince d'Arménie2.
Notes
1. Nécrologie de Saint-Rémi de Reims.
2. peut-être nommée Béatrice. Voir l'article sur Léon Ier à propos de l'identité de son épouse.
Sources
** Foundation for Medieval Genealogy [archive]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#ManassesIIRetheldied1081B."13

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Hugh I, Count of Rethel (1040 in Bourg – 1118 in Rethel) was a son of Count Manasses III of Rethel and his wife Judith of Roucy.[1] He succeeded his father in 1065 as Count of Rethel.
     "Hugh married Melisende of Crécy, the daughter of Lord Guy I of Montlhéry.[2] They had the following children:
** Manasses (1054-1115)[1]
** Gervais (1056-1124), count of Rethel[1]
** Baldwin II (1058-1131), king of Jerusalem (1118-1131), married Morphia of Melitene[2]
** Matilda (b. 1060), married to Odo of Vitry, Count of Rethel[1]
** Hodierna, married Heribrand III of Hierges[3]
** Cecilia of Le Bourcq, married Roger of Salerno, prince-regent of Antioch[1]
** Beatrix (Béatrice) married Leo I, Prince of Armenia

See also
** The Houses of Montlhéry and Le Puiset: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houses_of_Montlh%C3%A9ry_and_Le_Puiset
Notes
1. Housley 2007, p. 33.
2. La Monte 1942, p. 100-101.
3. Runciman 1999, p. 233.
Sources
** Housley, Norman, ed. (2007). Knighthoods of Christ: Essays on the History of the Crusades and the Knights. Ashgate Publishing Limited.
** La Monte, John L. (1942). "The Lords of Le Puiset on the Crusades". Speculum. Vol. 17, No. 1 Jan.
** Runciman, Steven (1999). A History of the Crusades. Vol. II. Cambridge University Press."14 GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montlhéry, p. 3): "Mélissende de Montlhéry ° 1045 + 1097 ou peu après
     ép. avant 1075 (1058 ?) Hugues 1er de Rethel (ou de Bourcq) + 1118 croisé (1101) (fils de Manassès II, comte de Rethel, et de Judith)"
Per Racines et Histoire (Rethel, p. 3): "Hugues 1er (Hugo) ° ~1030 ou 1045/55 + 28/12/1118 comte de Rethel (1081) (cité acte 1081 en faveur de l’église de Breaux ; donation par charte à l’église de Novey ? 1117)
     ép. après 1058 & avant 1075 ou dès 1055 ? Mélisende de Montlhéry ° 1045 (fille de Gui 1er «Le Grand», seigneur de Rochefort, Chevreuse, Châteaufort et La FertéAlais + 1095, et d’Hodierne de Gometz-La Ferté, dame de Bures et de La Ferté-Alais.)15,8 "
; NB: There is confusion about the line of the various men named Manasses who were comtes de Rethel and their wives (Judity de Roucy, Judith, Yvetter de Roucy, etc.)
I. Weis states unequivocally Manasses III m. "Yvette de Roucy, dau. of Giselbert (151-20), Count of Roucy". In addition to this Yvette, Weis also assigns Ebles I as a child of this Giselbert. Weis does not show any ancestry for Manasses III.
II. Genealogics offers the following (showing no parents for Manasses I):
II.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
II.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith b. Est 1020
II.3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

III. Med Lands offers a different descent:
III.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
III.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada
(unclear relation to Manasses III, possibly grandson)
III.3 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m. Judith, one of three possible women:
(1) JUDITH [de Roucy, daughter of --- & his wife ---]. Given the estimated birth date of Judith, wife of Comte Manassès, as shown above, it is chronologically impossible for her to have been the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Roucy, who died in the last years of the 10th century. However, it is not impossible that she was the uterine half-sister of Ebles Comte de Roucy, assuming that their mother remarried after the death of her husband Giselbert.
(2) [IDA] [de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE I Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain.]
(3) [JUDITH] of Lotharingia, daughter of GODEFROI "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his first wife Doda ---
III.4 Hugues, Comte de Réthel

IV. Genealogy.EU (Rethel Family) offers the following:
IV.1 Menasses I, Ct de Rethel, *935, +after 974; m.Odélie (*940)
IV.2 Menasses II, Ct de Rethel, *965, +990; 1m: Yvette de Roucy (*976/985); 2m: 1026 Dada N
IV.3 Menasses III, Ct de Rethel, *990, +1056, fl 1081; m.Judith de Roucy (his mother younger sister) (*990 +? 1081
IV.4 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel, *1030

V. Racines et Histoire (Rethel) shows two variants:
R&H Variant I:
V.I.1 Manasses I de Réthel, Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.I.2 Manasses II de Réthel , Ct de Réthel m: 1026 Dada N
R&H Variant II:
V.II.1 Manasses I d'Omont, (935-aft 989) Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.II.2 Roger
V.II.3 Manasses II, (965-aft 1026) Ct de Rethel, m Dada/Doda/Yvette de Roucy
V.II.4 Manasses III, (990-1056) Ct de Rethel m. Judith/Ida de Boulogne
V.II.5 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel
Conclusion: In trying to construct a reasonable lineage, I have settled, for the moment, on two unconnected lines, mostly for chronological consistency:
1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada

and (with no direct connection):
1 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
2 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m.
Judith b. Est 1020
3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

This is not entirely satisfactory and I continue to research issue. GA Vaut.16,17,18,19,6,20 He was Comte de Rethel between 1081 and 1118.8,13 He was
Crusader
Per Database of Crusaders:
     Hugh unknown of Bourcq
     Country and Region of Origin     France?Champagne-Ardenne (RE) Ardennes (D)
     Role     Lay
     Gender and Marital Statusa     Male
     Crusades
     Expedition     1st Crusade (1096-1099)?
     Contingent Leader     Godfrey of Bouillon?
     Probability of Participation     Certain
     Consequences of Expedition     Settled
     Sources     AA, pp. 642-643. CKJ, p. 210
(See Databse of Crusaders for details of Sources: https://www.dhi.ac.uk/crusaders/person/?id=396) between 1096 and 1099.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076235&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076235&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#HuguesIRetheldied1118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 103A-23, p. 107.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122047&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Rethel, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103A-24, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Monthlery page ("Family de Monthléry"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html#M2
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mélisende de Monthléry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076236&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parcorroc.htm#MelisendeMontlheryMHuguesIRethel
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hugues Ier de Rethel: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_de_Rethel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_I,_Count_of_Rethel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montlhéry, Bray-sur-Seine, La Ferté-Milon, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montlhery.pdf
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#_Toc52775944
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/descendtext.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO&generations=
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Rethel, pp. 2-3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf
  20. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 16 Dec 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hodierne de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198370&tree=LEO
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice/Cecile de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139824&tree=LEO
  24. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart I (Rup.).
  25. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manasses de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027111&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#BaudouinIIB
  29. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I10765
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gervase: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027109&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#GervaisRetheldiedbefore1124
  32. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes deRethel, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076232&tree=LEO
  34. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#MathildeRethelMEudesVitry

Mélisende de Montlhéry1,2,3

F, #10492, b. 1045, d. circa 1097
FatherGuy I 'Troussel' de Montlhéry Seigneur de Monthléry et Chevreuse, Chatelain de Rochefort-en-Yvelines4,2,5,6 b. bt 1009 - 1010, d. 1095
MotherHodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté Dame de Bures et de La Ferté-Alais7,2,5,8,6 b. c 1014, d. 12 Jul 1074
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited27 Jul 2020
     Mélisende de Montlhéry was born in 1045.2,9,10 She married Hugues I (?) Comte de Rethel, son of Manasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel and Judith (?), after 1058.11,2,9,5,6,12,13,14,15
Mélisende de Montlhéry died circa 1097.12,10
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dyn., Paris, 1963, Rudt-Collenberg, W. H. V(J).6

; Per Med Lands:
     "MELISENDE (-1097 or after). The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Brayo et Guidonem Rubeum, Comitissam quoque Reiteste, et Bonam-vecinam de Pontibus, Elizabeth etiam uxorem Joscelini de Corteciniaco, insuper dominam de Puisat, et dominam de S. Galerico" as the children of "Guidonem" and his wife[935]. She is named as wife of Hugues Comte de Rethel by William of Tyre, although he does not specify her origin[936]. In a later passage he records that the mother of Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa was the sister of the mother of Baudouin de Bourg, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity between Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162[937]. “Hugo comes et Milesindis collateralis” donated mills “super Axonam fluvium ante Rettestum” to Laon Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “filio nostro Manasse”, by charter dated 1097[938].
     "m (before 1075[939]) HUGUES [I] de Rethel, son of MANASSES [III] Comte de Rethel & his wife Judith --- (-[1118]). He succeeded his father [1081] as Comte de Rethel."
Med Lands cites:
[935] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF, Tome XI, p. 275.
[936] William of Tyre XII.I, p. 511.
[937] William of Tyre XIX.IV, p. 889.
[938] Saint-Vincent de Laon, X, p. 194.
[939] Marriage date estimated from the probable birth date range of the couple's son Baudouin.12
GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montlhéry, p. 3): "Mélissende de Montlhéry ° 1045 + 1097 ou peu après
     ép. avant 1075 (1058 ?) Hugues 1er de Rethel (ou de Bourcq) + 1118 croisé (1101) (fils de Manassès II, comte de Rethel, et de Judith)"
Per Racines et Histoire (Rethel, p. 3): "Hugues 1er (Hugo) ° ~1030 ou 1045/55 + 28/12/1118 comte de Rethel (1081) (cité acte 1081 en faveur de l’église de Breaux ; donation par charte à l’église de Novey ? 1117)
     ép. après 1058 & avant 1075 ou dès 1055 ? Mélisende de Montlhéry ° 1045 (fille de Gui 1er «Le Grand», seigneur de Rochefort, Chevreuse, Châteaufort et La FertéAlais + 1095, et d’Hodierne de Gometz-La Ferté, dame de Bures et de La Ferté-Alais.)10,16 "

Citations

  1. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I15192
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Monthlery page ("Family de Monthléry"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html#M2
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gui I de Monthléry: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106272&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mélisende de Monthléry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076236&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106273&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montlhéry Bray-sur-Seine, La Ferté-Milon, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montlhery.pdf
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montlhéry, Bray-sur-Seine, La Ferté-Milon, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montlhery.pdf
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103A-24, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parcorroc.htm#MelisendeMontlheryMHuguesIRethel. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076235&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#HuguesIRetheldied1118
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hugues Ier de Rethel: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_de_Rethel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Rethel, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hodierne de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198370&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice/Cecile de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139824&tree=LEO
  19. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart I (Rup.).
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manasses de Rethel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027111&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#BaudouinIIB
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gervase: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027109&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#GervaisRetheldiedbefore1124
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes deRethel, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076232&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#MathildeRethelMEudesVitry

Manasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel1,2,3

M, #10493, b. 990, d. 1056
FatherManasses I/II (?) Count de Rethel2,4
MotherJudith de Roucy2 b. 990, d. 1081
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Manasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel married Judith (?)5 Manasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel was born in 990.2
Manasses II/III de Réthel Comte de Réthel died in 1056.2,1
     ; Menasses III, Ct de Rethel, *990, +1056, fl 1081; m.Judith de Roucy (his mother younger sister) (*990 +? 1081.)2 GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-27.
; NB: There is confusion about the line of the various men named Manasses who were comtes de Rethel and their wives (Judity de Roucy, Judith, Yvetter de Roucy, etc.)
I. Weis states unequivocally Manasses III m. "Yvette de Roucy, dau. of Giselbert (151-20), Count of Roucy". In addition to this Yvette, Weis also assigns Ebles I as a child of this Giselbert. Weis does not show any ancestry for Manasses III.
II. Genealogics offers the following (showing no parents for Manasses I):
II.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
II.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith b. Est 1020
II.3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

III. Med Lands offers a different descent:
III.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
III.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada
(unclear relation to Manasses III, possibly grandson)
III.3 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m. Judith, one of three possible women:
(1) JUDITH [de Roucy, daughter of --- & his wife ---]. Given the estimated birth date of Judith, wife of Comte Manassès, as shown above, it is chronologically impossible for her to have been the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Roucy, who died in the last years of the 10th century. However, it is not impossible that she was the uterine half-sister of Ebles Comte de Roucy, assuming that their mother remarried after the death of her husband Giselbert.
(2) [IDA] [de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE I Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain.]
(3) [JUDITH] of Lotharingia, daughter of GODEFROI "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his first wife Doda ---
III.4 Hugues, Comte de Réthel

IV. Genealogy.EU (Rethel Family) offers the following:
IV.1 Menasses I, Ct de Rethel, *935, +after 974; m.Odélie (*940)
IV.2 Menasses II, Ct de Rethel, *965, +990; 1m: Yvette de Roucy (*976/985); 2m: 1026 Dada N
IV.3 Menasses III, Ct de Rethel, *990, +1056, fl 1081; m.Judith de Roucy (his mother younger sister) (*990 +? 1081
IV.4 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel, *1030

V. Racines et Histoire (Rethel) shows two variants:
R&H Variant I:
V.I.1 Manasses I de Réthel, Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.I.2 Manasses II de Réthel , Ct de Réthel m: 1026 Dada N
R&H Variant II:
V.II.1 Manasses I d'Omont, (935-aft 989) Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.II.2 Roger
V.II.3 Manasses II, (965-aft 1026) Ct de Rethel, m Dada/Doda/Yvette de Roucy
V.II.4 Manasses III, (990-1056) Ct de Rethel m. Judith/Ida de Boulogne
V.II.5 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel
Conclusion: In trying to construct a reasonable lineage, I have settled, for the moment, on two unconnected lines, mostly for chronological consistency:
1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada

and (with no direct connection):
1 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
2 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m.
Judith b. Est 1020
3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

This is not entirely satisfactory and I continue to research issue. GA Vaut.6,7,8,9,1,10

Family

Judith (?) b. c 1020
Child

Citations

  1. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 103A-23, p. 107.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manasses II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122046&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manasses I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122047&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#_Toc52775944. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/descendtext.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO&generations=
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Rethel, pp. 2-3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 16 Dec 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076235&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#HuguesIRetheldied1118

Judith de Roucy1

F, #10494, b. 990, d. 1081
FatherEbalus/Ebles (?) de Poitou d. a 997; See note on Genealogics2,3
ReferenceGAV28 EDV27
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Judith de Roucy married Manasses I/II (?) Count de Rethel; his 1st wife.4,5 Judith de Roucy married Hermann de Grandpré Comte de Grandpré, son of Hildrad (Hezelin, Hescelin) I de Grandpré Comte de Grandpré and Hadvide (?) de Florennes;
Her 2nd husband.6,7,1 Judith de Roucy was born between 976 and 985.4 She was born in 990 at Danizy, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France (now).4,8
Judith de Roucy was buried in 1081 at Saint Remi Badsilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Danizy, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     DEATH     1081, Doissat, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France
     Judith of Roucy was the daughter of Giselbert (Gilbert of Roucy), Count of Roucy . Iveta or Iuette (another name of Judith) married Manassès, count de Rethel and she was the sister of the count Ebles I of Roucy, of Liétaud, count de Marle, and of Eudes, count de Rumigny.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Gilbert de Roucy unknown–1000
     Siblings
      Ebles De Roucy & De Reims unknown–1033
     BURIAL     Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 8 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 86446222.8
Judith de Roucy died in 1081 at Doissat, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France (now).4,8
     GAV-28 EDV-27 GKJ-27.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:625/675a; 7:11.1 Judith de Roucy was also known as Judith de Roucy.4,1 Judith de Roucy was also known as Yvette de Roucy.9
; NB: There are at least two theories concerning the ancestry of Judith and her siblings, Lietaud and Ebles I. These are outlined by Genealogics:
     “This NN person is being shown to separate the children from the traditional view that their father was Giselbert, Comte de Roucy (I00020519). Ebles succeeded Giselbert and is documented to have the siblings shown. Thus, this fatherhood was widely assumed. Giselbert's wife was conjectured to have been a daughter of Guillaume III de Poitiers and Adela de Normandy in order to explain the name Ebles.
     “A more recent conjectures suggest the children are those of Ebles de Poitiers (I00020505), younger son of Guillaume IV de Poitiers and Emma de Blois, a daughter of Aubry II de Macon and Ermentrude de Roucy, Giselbert's sister. That could explain the rare name Liétaud, whose appearance as both the father-in-law of a sister of Gisbelbert de Roucy and a brother of his successor is striking, the name Eudes and the succession to the Blois lands of Rumigny and Coucy. [Reference] _'La Succession au comté de Roucy aux environs se l'an mil', in 'Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval'_, by Jean-Noël Mathieu.”

Conclusion: I have followed Genealogics' "more recent conjectures", assigning Judith and her siblings as children of Ebles de Poitiers. GA Vaut
     There is also confusion about the line of the various men named Manasses who were comtes de Rethel and their wives (Judity de Roucy, Judith, Yvetter de Roucy, etc.)
I. Weis states unequivocally Manasses III m. "Yvette de Roucy, dau. of Giselbert (151-20), Count of Roucy". In addition to this Yvette, Weis also assigns Ebles I as a child of this Giselbert. Weis does not show any ancestry for Manasses III.
II. Genealogics offers the following (showing no parents for Manasses I):
II.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
II.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith b. Est 1020
II.3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

III. Med Lands offers a different descent:
III.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
III.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada
(unclear relation to Manasses III, possibly grandson)
III.3 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m. Judith, one of three possible women:
(1) JUDITH [de Roucy, daughter of --- & his wife ---]. Given the estimated birth date of Judith, wife of Comte Manassès, as shown above, it is chronologically impossible for her to have been the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Roucy, who died in the last years of the 10th century. However, it is not impossible that she was the uterine half-sister of Ebles Comte de Roucy, assuming that their mother remarried after the death of her husband Giselbert.
(2) [IDA] [de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE I Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain.]
(3) [JUDITH] of Lotharingia, daughter of GODEFROI "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his first wife Doda ---
III.4 Hugues, Comte de Réthel

IV. Genealogy.EU (Rethel Family) offers the following:
IV.1 Menasses I, Ct de Rethel, *935, +after 974; m.Odélie (*940)
IV.2 Menasses II, Ct de Rethel, *965, +990; 1m: Yvette de Roucy (*976/985); 2m: 1026 Dada N
IV.3 Menasses III, Ct de Rethel, *990, +1056, fl 1081; m.Judith de Roucy (his mother younger sister) (*990 +? 1081
IV.4 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel, *1030

V. Racines et Histoire (Rethel) shows two variants:
R&H Variant I:
V.I.1 Manasses I de Réthel, Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.I.2 Manasses II de Réthel , Ct de Réthel m: 1026 Dada N
R&H Variant II:
V.II.1 Manasses I d'Omont, (935-aft 989) Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.II.2 Roger
V.II.3 Manasses II, (965-aft 1026) Ct de Rethel, m Dada/Doda/Yvette de Roucy
V.II.4 Manasses III, (990-1056) Ct de Rethel m. Judith/Ida de Boulogne
V.II.5 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel
Conclusion: In trying to construct a reasonable lineage, I have settled, for the moment, on two unconnected lines, mostly for chronological consistency:
1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada

and (with no direct connection):
1 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
2 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m.
Judith b. Est 1020
3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

This is not entirely satisfactory and I continue to research issue. GA Vaut.2,10,11,12,13

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122045&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00476655&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de Roucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122045&tree=LEO
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page - Rethel family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manasses I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Grandpré, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Grandpre.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139802&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Judith de Roucy (unknown–1081), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86446222, citing Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86446222/judith-de_roucy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 103A-23, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/descendtext.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO&generations=
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#_Toc52775944. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  13. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 16 Dec 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nenri-Hecelin II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139803&tree=LEO

Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium1,2,3,4

M, #10495, b. 13 September 1087, d. 8 April 1143
FatherAlexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East1,3,4 b. 1048, d. 15 Aug 1118
MotherEirene Dukaina1,3,4 b. c 1065
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited4 Nov 2020
     Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium was born on 13 September 1087; Genealogy.EU (Byzant 1 page) says b. 1087; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1087.5,1,3,4,6 He married Saint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary, daughter of Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary and Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary, in 1105.5,2,3,4,7
Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium died on 8 April 1143 at Cilicia at age 55.5,2,3,4,6
     EDV26. Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium was also known as Ioannes II Komnenos Dukas Emperor of Byzantium.3 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 1118 and 1143 at Constantinople, Byzantium.1,3

Citations

  1. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 19. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 105A-25, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II_Komnenos. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene (Piroska) of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andronikos Komnenos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049917&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IoannesIIdied1143B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manuel I Komnenos: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020911&tree=LEO

Saint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary1,2,3

F, #10496, b. 1078, d. 13 August 1134
FatherSaint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary b. 27 Jun 1040, d. 27 Jul 1095; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1 page) says she was the dau. of Laszlo/Ladislas, King of Hungary (c1040-1095)2,3,4,5,6
MotherAdelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary3,7,8,5,9 b. c 1065, d. 3 May 1090
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Saint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary was born in 1078; van de Pas says b. ca 1078.10,3 She married Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium, son of Alexios I Comnenus Basileus (Emperor) of the East and Eirene Dukaina, in 1105.10,2,11,12,3
Saint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary died on 13 August 1134 at Bethinia.10,2,3
     ; per van de Pas: "Daughter of King László the Saint and Adela von Rheinfelden, Piroska was born about 1078. After the death of her father, she spent much time at the court of her cousin, King Kálmán. About 1104/1105 she married the Byzantine heir, Johannes Komnenos Dukas, whose Orthodox faith she had to accept. Her new name was Eirene.

She excelled in her role as Empress, and gained much experience in matters of state. She saw her wealth as a means to help improve the empire. With her husband she founded the Pantokrator Monastery in Constantinople. She always took in pilgrims and heard their tales. She did not forget her native land, granting audiences to Hungarian messengers and serving as an intermediary between Hungary and Byzantium. After her death the Orthodox Church canonised her, and her image can still be seen in a mosaic at Hagia Sophia. Hungarians too consider her their saint.

Unfortunately a detailed history of her has not survived, but she may be considered a role model: a woman who, far away from her native land, tried to do her duty, recognising and accepting the role in which she was placed."3

; van de Pas cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 104
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 175.3

Citations

  1. [S1430] Translated from the Greek by E. R. A. Sewter, editor, The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Pengun, 1969), p. 523. Hereinafter cited as The Alexiad of Anna Comnena.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene (Piroska) of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Laszlo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020747&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#LaszloI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 244A-7, p. 221.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 105A-25, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  12. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andronikos Komnenos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049917&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IoannesIIdied1143B
  15. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manuel I Komnenos: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020911&tree=LEO

Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4

M, #10497, b. 27 June 1040, d. 27 July 1095
FatherBela I (?) King of Hungary1,3,4 b. c 1016, d. 11 Sep 1063
MotherRicheza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary1,5,3,4 b. 22 Sep 1013, d. 21 May 1075
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary was born on 27 June 1040 at Poland.1,2,3 He married Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary, daughter of Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect and Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia, between 1077 and 1078; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says m. 1077.6,1,7,8,3,9
Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary died on 27 July 1095 at Nitra, Slovakia (now), at age 55.10,1,3,4
Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary was buried after 29 July 1095 at Varad (now Oradea), Bihor, Romania (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1048
     DEATH     20 Jun 1095 (aged 46–47)
     Royalty, Saint, son of Bela I and brother of Geza I. He was canonized in 1192.
     BURIAL     Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mary, Oradea, Bihor, Romania
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 2 Sep 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 96397026.1,2,11
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 104.
2. The Penguin Dictionary of Saints, London, 1965 , Attwater, Donald, Reference: 214 biography.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 154.3


; Per Catholic Enc.: "St. Ladislaus - King of Hungary, born 1040; died at Neutra, 29 July, 1095; one of Hungary's national Christian heroes. He was the son of Béla I; the nobles, after the death of Geisa I, passed over Solomon, son of Andrew I, and chose Ladislaus to be their king in 1077. It is true that he made peace with Solomon, when the latter gave up all claims to the throne of Hungary; however, later on he rebelled against Ladislaus, who took him prisoner and held in the fortress of Visegrád. On the occasion of the canonization of Stephen I, Ladislaus gave Solomon his freedom, but in 1086 Solomon, with the aid of the heathen Cumans, revolted against Ladislaus a second time; the latter, however, vanquished them, and in 1089 gained another victory over theTurkish Cumans. In 1091 Ladislaus marched into Croatia, at the request of his sister, the widowed Queen Helena, and took possession of the kingdom for the crown of Hungary, where, in 1092, he founded the Bishopric of Agram (Zágráb). In the same year (1092), he also founded the Bishopric of Grosswardein (Nagy-Várad), in Hungary, which, however, some trace back to Stephen I. Ladislaus governed the religious and civil affairs of his assembly of the Imperial States at Szabolcs, that might almost be called a synod. He tried vigorously to suppress the remaining heathen customs. He was buried in the cathedral of Grosswardein. He still lives in the sagas and poems of his people as a chivalrous king. In 1192 he was canonized by Celestine III."2 EDV-26.

; This is the same person as ”Ladislaus I of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as ”Ladislas Ier de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”I. László magyar király” at Wikipédia (HU).12,13,14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Lászlo was born on 27 June 1040, the son of Béla I, king of Hungary, and Richeza/Ryksa of Poland, daughter of Mieszko II Lambert, king of Poland, and Richeza de Lorraine. He was born in Poland, where his father had sought refuge, and named according to the Slavic traditions of his mother's kin (thereby bringing the name Lászlo to further increasing Hungarian use). However he was recalled to Hungary by his father's eldest brother András I, king of Hungary, and was brought up there.
     "He succeeded to the throne on the death of his brother Geisa in 1077, as the eldest member of the royal family, and speedily won for himself a reputation scarcely inferior to that of Stephan I, by nationalising Christianity and laying the foundations of Hungary's political greatness. Recognising that the Holy Roman Empire was a natural enemy of the kingdom of Hungary, Lászlo formed a close alliance with the pope and other enemies of Heinrich IV, Holy Roman Emperor, including the anti-emperor Rudolf of Swabia and his chief supporter Welf, duke of Bavaria. He married Rudolf's daughter Adela, and she bore him one son and three daughters. Their daughter Piroska of Hungary married Johannes II Komnenos Doukas, emperor of Byzantium.
     "The collapse of the German emperor in his struggle with the pope left Lászlo free to extend his dominions toward the south, and colonise and Christianise the wildernesses of Transylvania and the lower Danube. Hungary was still semi-savage, and its native barbarians were being perpetually recruited from the hordes of Pechenegs, Cumans and other races which swept over it during the 10th century. Lászlo himself had fought valiantly in his youth against the Pechenegs, and to defend the land against the Cumans, who now occupied Moldavia and Wallachia as far as the Olt, he built the fortresses of Turnu-Severin (Szörenyvár) and Alba Iulia (Gyulafehérvár, Weissenburg).
     "He also planted in Transylvania the Szeklers, the supposed remnant of the ancient Magyars from the Dnieper, and in 1094 he founded the bishoprics of Oradea (Nagyvárad, Grosswardein) and of Zagreb (Zágráb, Agram) to provide a fresh focus for Catholicism to the south of Hungary and the districts between the Drave and the Sava (Slavonia). He subsequently tried to conquer other parts of Croatia after the death in 1087 of his sister Helene's husband, Croatian king Dmitar Zwonimir, though his authority was questioned by the Croatian nobility, the pope, the republic of Venice and the Byzantine emperor. Lászlo made a notable incursion into the Croatian lands in 1091 and named his nephew Almos as the viceroy.
     "Lászlo died suddenly on 29 July 1095 when about to take part in the First Crusade. No other Hungarian king was so generally beloved. The whole nation mourned for him for three years, and regarded him as a saint long before his canonisation. A whole cycle of legends is associated with his name. He was canonised on 27 June 1192.
     "C. A. Macartney, in his _Hungary: A Short History,_ eulogised Lászlo: 'Ladislas I, who, like Stephen and his son, Imre, was canonised after his death, was the outstanding personality among them: a true paladin and gentle knight, a protector of his faith and his people, and of the poor and defenceless.15'"

; Per Weis: “St. Ladislas, King of Hungay 1077, d. 27 July 1095; m. abt. 1077/79 Adelaide, d. 1090, parentage uncertain.”.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "LÁSZLÓ (in Poland [1046/50][471]-Nitra 20 Jun 1095, bur Somogyvár, transferred 1192 to Nagyvárad Cathedral[472]). The Gesta Hungarorum names "Geichæ et Ladislai" as sons of "fratris sui Belæ" when recording that King András obtained their agreement to the future succession of his son Salomon[473]. The Kronika W?giersko-Polska names "Geyzam et Ladislaum" as the two older sons of "Bela" and his wife "rex Polonie filiam", adding that they were both born in Poland[474]. "Magnus qui et Geysa supremus Hungarorium Dux postea…rex consecratus, Belæ regis filius" founded the monastery of St Benedict, Gron, in the presence of "Ladislao Duce germano meo…Iula Comite Palatino", by charter dated 1075[475]. He succeeded his brother in 1077 as LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary. He extended the borders of Transylvania eastwards and settled a privileged class of border guards there as protection against incursions by the Kumans[476]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King László inflicted a crushing defeat on the Kumans at "Kyrioleis [Chirasle?]" mountain in Transylvania[477]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus rex et Salomon frater eius" made peace in 1081 and that "crux domini" was struck by lightning in the same year[478]. "Ladislaus…Hungarorum Rex Belæ regis filius" confirmed the foundation of the church of Besprem, "cum Sug comite de Bukon (huius filius fuerit Bodus Salamonis in carcere socius)", by charter dated 1082[479]. After the succession of his sister Ilona as Queen of Croatia, he intervened to protect her interests against the considerable opposition she faced from the Croatian nobility, and occupied much of Croatia including part of Dalmatia. He was obliged to withdraw from Dalmatia to defend Hungary against an attack by Kumans, but retained Pannonian Croatia. "Ladislaus…Hungarorum Rex" confirmed the privileges of the church of St Adrian "in insula Szalad" by charter dated 20 Dec 1091[480]. "Ladislauo…Rex" founded the church of St Egidius, Sumich by charter dated 1091 witnessed by "Dux Lambertus frater eius, Dux David consobrinus, Gerazclauus filius regis Rutenorum gener ipsius…Comes Palatinus Petrus et comes Acha…"[481]. In 1091, he created a special Croatian banovina between the Drava River and Gvozd Mountains, ruled by his nephew Álmos, but this was recaptured by Peter King of Croatia in 1095[482]. A charter dated 17 Apr 1093 records that "regem Ladislaum" reformed five churches, witnessed by "…comitibus Spiguen Grab, Gwth…"[483]. The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "rex Suinimirus" died without leaving an heir from his posterity, and that "quidam ex magnatibus Sclavonie" went "in Hungariam…ad regem Vladisclavum" requesting him to intervene in Croatia to put an end to the chaos which followed the king's death[484]. He was killed during a raid by the Kumans[485]. King László had designated his nephew Álmos as his successor, but Álmos's older brother Kálmán seized the throne in 1095 when King László died[486]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Ladizlaus rex Pannoniæ"[487]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1095 of "Wladizlaus rex Ungarorum"[488]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1097 of "Ladislaus rex"[489]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "IV Kal Aug" in 1095 of "rex Ladislaus filius secundogenitus regis Belæ dicti Belyn" and his burial "in suo monasterio Varadini"[490]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King László was buried at "Warod [Oradea]"[491]. László was later canonised by the Catholic church (“Szent László”), his feast-day is 27 Jun[492].
     "m ([1077 or after]) ADELHEID von Rheinfelden, daughter of RUDOLF Graf von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia [anti-King of Germany] & his second wife Adelaide de Savoie ([1063/65]-3 May 1090, bur St Blasius). "Filia eorum Adilheida regina que nupsit regi Ungariorum" and "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" are named in a donation to Sankt-Blasien by charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086] which also names "cuius filius [Rodolfo et Adelheida] Bertholfus…dux frater regine nostre…cum fratre suo Ottone"[493]. Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date range of her supposed daughter Piroska (although, as noted below, there is doubt concerning Piroska's parentage). The Chronicon of Bernold records that "soror quoque præfati ducis [Berthaldus dux Alemanniæ, filius Roudolfi regis] regina Ungarorum" died in the same month and year as her brother[494]. The name of her husband is not stated in any of the contemporary sources so far identified. However, King László appears to be the most likely possibility: considering Adelheid's estimated birth date, her husband is unlikely to have been King Géza, whose death is recorded in 1077, and King Géza's son Kálmán did not succeeded until 1095, after the recorded date of Adelheid's death as "regina Ungarorum". This supposition is confirmed by the charter dated 1201 under which Imre King of Hungary restored "prædio…Merena", donated by "regina Adulheyth, uxor…bonæ memoriæ regis Ladislai", to "ecclesiæ beati Michaëlis de Vesprimio"[495]. Kerbl suggests that the marriage was arranged by King László as part of his policy of seeking Papal support, his future father-in-law being the candidate for the German throne supported by the Pope[496]. The necrology of Seeon records the death "V Non May" of "Adelheit regina Ungariorum"[497]."
Med Lands cites:
[471] Homan, Geschichte, p. 249, cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 11.
[472] Attwater, D. (1970) The Penguin Dictionary of Saints (Penguin Books), p. 214.
[473] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131.
[474] Kronika W?giersko-Polska, De sancto rege Ladislao, p. 489.
[475] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 428.
[476] Lázár (1996), p. 37.
[477] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 62, p. 139.
[478] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[479] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 448.
[480] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 466.
[481] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 468.
[482] Fine (1991), p. 284.
[483] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 480.
[484] Karbi?, D., Matijevi? Sokol, M. and Sweeney, J. R. (eds. trans.) (2006) Thomæ archidiaconi Spalatensis, Historia Salonitanorum atque Spalatinorum pontificum (CEP) ("Thomas Archdeacon of Split") 17, p. 93.
[485] Lázár (1993), Chapter 5.
[486] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[487] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562.
[488] Annales Gradicenses 1095, MGH SS XVII, p. 648.
[489] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[490] Chronicon Varadiense, 10, p. 254.
[491] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 62, p. 139.
[492] Attwater (1970), p. 214.
[493] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[494] Bernoldi Chronicon 1084, MGH SS V, p. 441.
[495] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome II, p. 385.
[496] Kerbl (1979), p. 7.
[497] Necrologium Seonense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 217.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): "F2. Saint László (Ladislas), King of Hungary (1077-95) -cr 1077 and 1081 (with Holy Crown), canonised 1192, *in Poland ca 1040, +29.7.1095, bur Várad (noe Oradea, Romania); 1m: NN; 2m: 1077 Adelaide (+1079/90), dau.of Duke Rudolf of Swabia.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID von Rheinfelden ([1063/65]-3 May 1090, bur St Blasius). "Filia eorum Adilheida regina que nupsit regi Ungariorum" and "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" are named in a donation to Sankt-Blasien by charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086] which also names "cuius filius [Rodolfo et Adelheida] Bertholfus…dux frater regine nostre…cum fratre suo Ottone"[489]. Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date range of her supposed daughter Piroska (although, as noted below, there is doubt concerning Piroska's parentage). Given her likely birth date, Adelheid must have been her parents' oldest child. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "soror quoque præfati ducis [Berthaldus dux Alemanniæ, filius Roudolfi regis] regina Ungarorum" died in the same month and year as her brother[490]. The name of her husband is not stated in any of the contemporary sources so far identified. However, King László appears to be the most likely possibility: considering Adelheid's estimated birth date, her husband is unlikely to have been King Géza, whose death is recorded in 1077, and King Géza's son Kálmán did not succeeded until 1095, after the recorded date of Adelheid's death as "regina Ungarorum". This supposition is confirmed by the charter dated 1201 under which Imre King of Hungary restored "prædio…Merena", donated by "regina Adulheyth, uxor…bonæ memoriæ regis Ladislai", to "ecclesiæ beati Michaëlis de Vesprimio"[491]. Her father was the candidate for the German throne supported by the Pope, this marriage being arranged by King László as part of his policy of seeking Papal support[492]. The necrology of Seeon records the death "V Non May" of "Adelheit regina Ungariorum"[493].
     "m (1077) LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland (in Poland [1046/50]-Nitra 20 Jun 1095, bur Somogyvár, transferred 1192 to Nagyvárad Cathedral)."
Med Lands cites:
[489] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[490] Bernoldi Chronicon 1084, MGH SS V, p. 441.
[491] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome II, p. 385.
[492] Kerbl, R. (1979) Byzantinische Prinzessinnen in Ungarn zwischen 1050-1200 und ihr Einfluß auf das Arpadenkönigreich (VWGÖ, Vienna), p. 7.
[493] Necrologium Seonense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 217.17
He was King of Hungary, ST. LADISLAS (László) I (canonized 1192), the first great king after St. Stephen. He supported the pope in his conflicts with the emperor, and at home restored order and prosperity. between 1077 and 1095 at Hungary.18,1 He was King of Croatia between 1091 and 1095.12

Family

Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary b. c 1065, d. 3 May 1090
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Ladislaus at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08737a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Laszlo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020747&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#LaszloI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza|Ryksa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020697&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244A-7, pp. 207-208. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  10. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 244A-7, p. 221.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 13 December 2020), memorial page for Ladislaus I (1048–20 Jun 1095), Find a Grave Memorial no. 96397026, citing Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mary, Oradea, Bihor, Romania; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/96397026. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladislaus_I_of_Hungary
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Ladislas Ier de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladislas_Ier_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, I. László magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/I._L%C3%A1szl%C3%B3_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Laszlo I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020747&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied1079
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 226-7. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene (Piroska) of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020759&tree=LEO

Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary1,2,3,4

F, #10498, b. circa 1065, d. 3 May 1090
FatherRudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect5,6,3,7,1,4 b. bt 1020 - 1025, d. 15 Oct 1080
MotherAdelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia5,8,3,7,1,4 b. a 1052, d. 1079
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary was born circa 1065.3,4 She married Saint László/Ladislas I (?) King of Hungary, son of Bela I (?) King of Hungary and Richeza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary, between 1077 and 1078; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says m. 1077.9,10,11,3,12,1
Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary was buried in 1079 at St. Blasien, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).11


Adelaide/Adela von Rheinfelden Queen Consort of Hungary died on 3 May 1090; Genealogics says d. 1079; Med Lands says d. 3 May 1090.9,1,4
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): "F2. Saint László (Ladislas), King of Hungary (1077-95) -cr 1077 and 1081 (with Holy Crown), canonised 1192, *in Poland ca 1040, +29.7.1095, bur Várad (noe Oradea, Romania); 1m: NN; 2m: 1077 Adelaide (+1079/90), dau.of Duke Rudolf of Swabia.13

; Per Weis: “St. Ladislas, King of Hungay 1077, d. 27 July 1095; m. abt. 1077/79 Adelaide, d. 1090, parentage uncertain.”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "LÁSZLÓ (in Poland [1046/50][471]-Nitra 20 Jun 1095, bur Somogyvár, transferred 1192 to Nagyvárad Cathedral[472]). The Gesta Hungarorum names "Geichæ et Ladislai" as sons of "fratris sui Belæ" when recording that King András obtained their agreement to the future succession of his son Salomon[473]. The Kronika W?giersko-Polska names "Geyzam et Ladislaum" as the two older sons of "Bela" and his wife "rex Polonie filiam", adding that they were both born in Poland[474]. "Magnus qui et Geysa supremus Hungarorium Dux postea…rex consecratus, Belæ regis filius" founded the monastery of St Benedict, Gron, in the presence of "Ladislao Duce germano meo…Iula Comite Palatino", by charter dated 1075[475]. He succeeded his brother in 1077 as LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary. He extended the borders of Transylvania eastwards and settled a privileged class of border guards there as protection against incursions by the Kumans[476]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King László inflicted a crushing defeat on the Kumans at "Kyrioleis [Chirasle?]" mountain in Transylvania[477]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Ladizlaus rex et Salomon frater eius" made peace in 1081 and that "crux domini" was struck by lightning in the same year[478]. "Ladislaus…Hungarorum Rex Belæ regis filius" confirmed the foundation of the church of Besprem, "cum Sug comite de Bukon (huius filius fuerit Bodus Salamonis in carcere socius)", by charter dated 1082[479]. After the succession of his sister Ilona as Queen of Croatia, he intervened to protect her interests against the considerable opposition she faced from the Croatian nobility, and occupied much of Croatia including part of Dalmatia. He was obliged to withdraw from Dalmatia to defend Hungary against an attack by Kumans, but retained Pannonian Croatia. "Ladislaus…Hungarorum Rex" confirmed the privileges of the church of St Adrian "in insula Szalad" by charter dated 20 Dec 1091[480]. "Ladislauo…Rex" founded the church of St Egidius, Sumich by charter dated 1091 witnessed by "Dux Lambertus frater eius, Dux David consobrinus, Gerazclauus filius regis Rutenorum gener ipsius…Comes Palatinus Petrus et comes Acha…"[481]. In 1091, he created a special Croatian banovina between the Drava River and Gvozd Mountains, ruled by his nephew Álmos, but this was recaptured by Peter King of Croatia in 1095[482]. A charter dated 17 Apr 1093 records that "regem Ladislaum" reformed five churches, witnessed by "…comitibus Spiguen Grab, Gwth…"[483]. The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "rex Suinimirus" died without leaving an heir from his posterity, and that "quidam ex magnatibus Sclavonie" went "in Hungariam…ad regem Vladisclavum" requesting him to intervene in Croatia to put an end to the chaos which followed the king's death[484]. He was killed during a raid by the Kumans[485]. King László had designated his nephew Álmos as his successor, but Álmos's older brother Kálmán seized the throne in 1095 when King László died[486]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Ladizlaus rex Pannoniæ"[487]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1095 of "Wladizlaus rex Ungarorum"[488]. The Chronicon Posoniense records the death in 1097 of "Ladislaus rex"[489]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "IV Kal Aug" in 1095 of "rex Ladislaus filius secundogenitus regis Belæ dicti Belyn" and his burial "in suo monasterio Varadini"[490]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King László was buried at "Warod [Oradea]"[491]. László was later canonised by the Catholic church (“Szent László”), his feast-day is 27 Jun[492].
     "m ([1077 or after]) ADELHEID von Rheinfelden, daughter of RUDOLF Graf von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia [anti-King of Germany] & his second wife Adelaide de Savoie ([1063/65]-3 May 1090, bur St Blasius). "Filia eorum Adilheida regina que nupsit regi Ungariorum" and "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" are named in a donation to Sankt-Blasien by charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086] which also names "cuius filius [Rodolfo et Adelheida] Bertholfus…dux frater regine nostre…cum fratre suo Ottone"[493]. Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date range of her supposed daughter Piroska (although, as noted below, there is doubt concerning Piroska's parentage). The Chronicon of Bernold records that "soror quoque præfati ducis [Berthaldus dux Alemanniæ, filius Roudolfi regis] regina Ungarorum" died in the same month and year as her brother[494]. The name of her husband is not stated in any of the contemporary sources so far identified. However, King László appears to be the most likely possibility: considering Adelheid's estimated birth date, her husband is unlikely to have been King Géza, whose death is recorded in 1077, and King Géza's son Kálmán did not succeeded until 1095, after the recorded date of Adelheid's death as "regina Ungarorum". This supposition is confirmed by the charter dated 1201 under which Imre King of Hungary restored "prædio…Merena", donated by "regina Adulheyth, uxor…bonæ memoriæ regis Ladislai", to "ecclesiæ beati Michaëlis de Vesprimio"[495]. Kerbl suggests that the marriage was arranged by King László as part of his policy of seeking Papal support, his future father-in-law being the candidate for the German throne supported by the Pope[496]. The necrology of Seeon records the death "V Non May" of "Adelheit regina Ungariorum"[497]."
Med Lands cites:
[471] Homan, Geschichte, p. 249, cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 11.
[472] Attwater, D. (1970) The Penguin Dictionary of Saints (Penguin Books), p. 214.
[473] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131.
[474] Kronika W?giersko-Polska, De sancto rege Ladislao, p. 489.
[475] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 428.
[476] Lázár (1996), p. 37.
[477] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 62, p. 139.
[478] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[479] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 448.
[480] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 466.
[481] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 468.
[482] Fine (1991), p. 284.
[483] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 480.
[484] Karbi?, D., Matijevi? Sokol, M. and Sweeney, J. R. (eds. trans.) (2006) Thomæ archidiaconi Spalatensis, Historia Salonitanorum atque Spalatinorum pontificum (CEP) ("Thomas Archdeacon of Split") 17, p. 93.
[485] Lázár (1993), Chapter 5.
[486] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[487] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562.
[488] Annales Gradicenses 1095, MGH SS XVII, p. 648.
[489] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[490] Chronicon Varadiense, 10, p. 254.
[491] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 62, p. 139.
[492] Attwater (1970), p. 214.
[493] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[494] Bernoldi Chronicon 1084, MGH SS V, p. 441.
[495] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome II, p. 385.
[496] Kerbl (1979), p. 7.
[497] Necrologium Seonense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 217.15


; This is the same person as ”Adelaide of Rheinfelden” at Wikipedia, as ”Adelheid von Schwaben” at Wikipddia (DE), and as ”Adelhaid magyar királyné” at Wikipédia (HU).3,16,17 EDV-27.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 104.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 154; XII 95A.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID von Rheinfelden ([1063/65]-3 May 1090, bur St Blasius). "Filia eorum Adilheida regina que nupsit regi Ungariorum" and "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" are named in a donation to Sankt-Blasien by charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086] which also names "cuius filius [Rodolfo et Adelheida] Bertholfus…dux frater regine nostre…cum fratre suo Ottone"[489]. Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date range of her supposed daughter Piroska (although, as noted below, there is doubt concerning Piroska's parentage). Given her likely birth date, Adelheid must have been her parents' oldest child. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "soror quoque præfati ducis [Berthaldus dux Alemanniæ, filius Roudolfi regis] regina Ungarorum" died in the same month and year as her brother[490]. The name of her husband is not stated in any of the contemporary sources so far identified. However, King László appears to be the most likely possibility: considering Adelheid's estimated birth date, her husband is unlikely to have been King Géza, whose death is recorded in 1077, and King Géza's son Kálmán did not succeeded until 1095, after the recorded date of Adelheid's death as "regina Ungarorum". This supposition is confirmed by the charter dated 1201 under which Imre King of Hungary restored "prædio…Merena", donated by "regina Adulheyth, uxor…bonæ memoriæ regis Ladislai", to "ecclesiæ beati Michaëlis de Vesprimio"[491]. Her father was the candidate for the German throne supported by the Pope, this marriage being arranged by King László as part of his policy of seeking Papal support[492]. The necrology of Seeon records the death "V Non May" of "Adelheit regina Ungariorum"[493].
     "m (1077) LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland (in Poland [1046/50]-Nitra 20 Jun 1095, bur Somogyvár, transferred 1192 to Nagyvárad Cathedral)."
Med Lands cites:
[489] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[490] Bernoldi Chronicon 1084, MGH SS V, p. 441.
[491] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ (Buda), Tome II, p. 385.
[492] Kerbl, R. (1979) Byzantinische Prinzessinnen in Ungarn zwischen 1050-1200 und ihr Einfluß auf das Arpadenkönigreich (VWGÖ, Vienna), p. 7.
[493] Necrologium Seonense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 217.4

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied1079. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027261&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RudolfRheinfeldendied1080
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00496755&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244A-7, pp. 207-208. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Laszlo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020747&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 244A-7, p. 221.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#LaszloI
  16. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Adelheid von Schwaben: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelheid_von_Schwaben. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  17. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, Adelhaid magyar királyné: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelhaid_magyar_kir%C3%A1lyn%C3%A9. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene (Piroska) of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020759&tree=LEO

Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona1,2,3

M, #10499, b. 1005, d. between 5 November 1078 and 6 November 1078
FatherBezzelin/Bertilo von Villingen Graf in der Ortenau4,2,5,3,6 b. c 970, d. 15 Jul 1024
MotherLuitgard von Nellenburg4,2,7,3,6 b. c 975
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona married Béatrix de Bar, daughter of Louis II (?) de Mousson.8 Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona was born in 1005.9,3 He married Richwara (?) von Schwaben circa 1032;
His 1st wife.1,3,6,10,11 Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona married Beatrice (?) de Montbeliard, daughter of Ludwig/Louis II (?) Graf von Mousson, Gf von Mömpelgard, im Altkirch und Pfirt and Sofie (?) of Haute Lorraine, Css of Mousson, in 1056;
His 2nd wife.1,12,2,3,13,6
Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona died between 5 November 1078 and 6 November 1078 at Veste Limburg.1,4,6
Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona was buried between 5 November 1078 and 6 November 1078 at Kloster Hirsau, Calw, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1000
     DEATH     6 Nov 1078 (aged 77–78), Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Berthold I was an ancestor of the House of Baden, in addition to being Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Verona. On his mother's side of the family, Berthold probably descended from the Staufen, who were counts of Ortenau, Thurgau, Breisgau, and Baar. Henry III promised his party-follower Berthold the Duchy of Swabia. However, Henry's widow Agnes of Poitou gave the Duchy in fief to Rudolf of Rheinfelden in 1057. Berthold received, as compensation for the abandonment of his claim to the Duchy, the titles to Carinthia and Verona, whereby the Zähringen ascended to the status of a mediatized house. In Carinthia and Verona, though, Berthold was never really accepted as ruler. Through his enmity with Henry IV, and his favor with Friedrich I, Duke of Swabia, Berthold's claims were in danger. In the end, the Zähringen were able to maintain their position.
     Berthold's sons were:
** Hermann I, founder of the Margraviate of Baden
Berchtold, Duke of Zähringen
Gebhard III, Bishop of Constance
Berthold was succeeded by Hermann I in 1073.
     Family Members
     Children
          Berthold II. von Zähringen 1055–1111
     BURIAL     Kloster Hirsau, Calw, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 9 Apr 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 127693467.6,14
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.2 265.15

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Berchtold I "the Bearded", +5.11.1078, who, having been promised the Duchy of Swabia by the Emperor received instead the Duchy of Carinthia and Margravate of Verona, though he never effected possession; 1m: Richwara von Swabia; 2m: Beatrix von Mömpelgard (+1092.)1"

; Per Genealogics: "Bertold IV-I 'the Bearded' was the son of Berthold von Villingen, count in Breisgau, Thurgau and Ortenau and (Luitgard) von Nellenburg. About 1032 he married Richwara von Schwaben, daughter of Hermann IV, Herzog von Schwaben, and Adelaide of Susa, Markgräfin von Susa, Herrin von Torino. Their sons Berchtold II and Hermann I would have progeny. He later married Beatrix von Mömpelgard, daughter of Graf Ludwig von Mousson, Castellanus in Mömpelgard, Altkirch und Pfirt. and Sofie of Lorraine. This marriage did not result in progeny. In 1061 Berthold was granted the duchy of Carinthia and the margravate of Verona as fiefs to himself and his son Hermann, but he was deprived of those fiefs by Emperor Heinrich IV in 1077 because he supported his brother-in-law, the emperor-elect Rudolf von Rheinfelden, Herzog von Schwaben, Heinrich's rival during the Investiture Dispute. Berthold died about 5 November 1078 in Veste (Castle) Limburg near Weilheim an der Teck."3

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Berthold II, Duke of Carinthia (c. 1000 – 6 November 1078), also known as Berthold I of Zähringen, was a progenitor of the Swabian House of Zähringen. From 1061 until 1077, he was the Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Verona.[1]
Life
     "He was possibly a descendant of one Berthold (or Bezelin) von Villingen (d. 1024), a Swabian count in the Breisgau region and relative of the Ahalolfing dynasty. The early Zähringer were close allies of the Imperial Ottonian dynasty; Berthold von Villingen's son Count Birchtilo was among the nobles capturing and mutilating Antipope John XVI in 998, at the behest of Emperor Otto III. On his mother's side of the family, Berthold probably descended from the Hohenstaufen family, who then ruled as Swabian counts in Ortenau, Thurgau, Breisgau, and Baar.
     "Berthold quickly rose to be one of the most powerful counts in Swabia, and the Salian emperor Henry III even promised his party-follower the title of Duke of Swabia, then held by Otto of Schweinfurt. However, upon Otto's death in 1057, Henry's widow Agnes of Poitou gave the Duchy of Swabia in fief to Count Rudolf of Rheinfelden. Berthold received, as compensation for the abandonment of his claim, the Duchy of Carinthia and the March of Verona, after the death of the Ezzonid duke Conrad III in 1061. As a result, the Zähringer finally ascended to the status of a princely house.
     "Berthold remained the only Carinthian duke from the Zähringen dynasty. Both in Carinthia and Verona, like his Ezzonid predecessor, he was considered a foreign ruler and was never really accepted by the local nobles. According to the contemporary chronicler Lambert of Hersfeld, he was even temporarily declared deposed in 1072/73. Moreover, Berthold fell out with King Henry IV during the fierce Investiture Controversy when, together with Duke Welf I of Bavaria, he supported the election of his former rival Rudolf of Rheinfelden as antiking, after King Henry's Walk to Canossa in 1077. In turn, the king convened the Imperial Diet at Ulm, where he seized the duchy and gave Carinthia to Liutold of Eppenstein, whose grandfather Adalbero had held it until 1035.
     "Berthold then retired to his Swabian home territory, where he had to ward off constant attacks by King Henry's forces. He died the next year at Limburg Castle and was buried in Hirsau Abbey, where he had backed the construction of the monastery church under Abbot William.
Marriage and children
     "Berthold married one Richwara,[2] possibly a descendant of Duke Conrad II of Carinthia. The couple had at least three sons:
** Herman I (c.?1040 – 1074), used the Veronese margravial title and became progenitor of the Margraves of Baden
** Berthold II (c.?1050 – 1111), Duke of Swabia[3] in opposition to Frederick of Hohenstaufen from 1092 to 1098, then Duke of Zähringen
** Gebhard (c.?1050 – 1110), Bishop of Constance from 1084[3]

     "Richwara also gave birth to two daughters:
** Liutgard (d. about 1119), married the Nordgau margrave Diepold of Vohburg; mother of Margrave Diepold III and grandmother of Adelaide of Vohburg, the first wife of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa
** Richinza, married Count Rudolf of Frickingen, secondly married to Louis of Sigmaringen, progenitor of the House of Helfenstein

     "In his second marriage, Berthold was married to Beatrice, sister of Count Theodoric I of Montbéliard.
     "In the end, the Zähringer were able to maintain their position, when around 1098 Berthold II reached an agreement with the Hohenstaufen duke Frederick I of Swabia, retaining the title of "Duke of Zähringen". From 1112, Herman II, son of Herman I, ruled as Margrave of Baden.
Notes
1. Robinson 1999, p. 35.
2. Robinson 1999, p. 36.
3. Barraclough 1961, p. 181.
References
** Barraclough, Geoffrey, ed. (1961). Medieval Germany, 911-1250. Vol. II:Essays. Basil Blackwell.
** Robinson, I.S. (1999). Henry IV of Germany 1056-1106. Cambridge University Press."16

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHOLD (-Limburg 5/6 Nov 1078, bur Hirsau). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "Bertolfum cum Barba" as son of "Bezelinum de Vilingen"[24]. The Genealogia Zaringorum names "Berchtoldus Cum-barba" as son of "Bezelinus comes", specifying that he was buried at Hirsau[25]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed property "…in pago Brysihcgowe in villis Mulinheim et Ougheim in comitatu Bertholdi comitis…in pago Brisihcgowe in villa Piccensole in comitatu supra dicti Bertholdi comitis…" to the cathedral of Basel by charter dated 1 Jun 1048[26]. "Eberhardus comes Turegie provincie" exchanged property with "Bertholdo Carinthiorum duce" by charter dated early Mar 1050, witnessed by "…Burchardus et Eberhardus et Adelbertus, filii Eberhardi comitis…"[27]. This charter is presumably misdated as Berthold did not become Duke of Carinthia until 1061, and his son Marchese in 1072. He was promised the duchy of Swabia by the emperor. He was installed in 1061 as BERTHOLD I "the Bearded" Duke of Carinthia. The Annals of Berthold record that "Berhtoldus comes Suevigena" was appointed Duke of Carinthia in 1061 after the death of "Chounradus…Carantanis ducis"[28]. He never obtained actual possession of the duchy[29], and was deposed in 1077. Marchese di Verona 1066. Graf im Breisgau until 1077. Heinrich IV King of Germany confirmed the privileges of Basel church in property "in comitatu Berchtoldi in pago Brisichgowi" by charter dated 20 May 1073[30]. He founded Kloster Weilheim unter Teck before 1073. He was one of the principal adversaries of Emperor Heinrich IV in the investiture dispute, demonstrated by King Heinrich redistributing Berthold's properties by charter dated 1 Jul 1077 under which "Heinricus…rex" granted property "in pago Brisgowe Bertholfi iam non duci iusto iudicio sublatum" to the church of Strasbourg[31].
     "m firstly RICHWARA, daughter of --- (-before [1056]). . The wife of "Berchtoldus dux de Zaringen" is named "Richwara" in a list of founders of the monastery of St Peter in Schwarzwald[32]. According to Wegener, she was Richwara of Swabia, daughter of Hermann IV Duke of Swabia [Babenberg] & his wife Adelaida di Susa. However, this seems unlikely from a chronological point of view. Richwara gave birth to five children, presumably between [1045/55], so is unlikely to have been born later than 1030, when her supposed father was only 15 years old and her supposed mother about 10.
     "m secondly ([1056]) BEATRIX de Mousson, daughter of LOUIS Comte de Mousson & his wife Sophie of Upper Lotharingia (-26 Oct 1092, bur Toul Cathedral). The Chronicon of Bernold records the death "1092 VII Kal Nov…in civitate Leucorum" of "Beatrix soror Friderici marchionis et uxor quondam Berthaldi ducis" and her burial by the bishop of the same place[33].
     "Duke Berthold & his first wife had five children."
Med Lands cites:
[24] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[25] Genealogica Zaringorum 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 735.
[26] D H III 219, p. 291.
[27] Schaffhausen, Rheinau und Muri: Schaffausen Allerheiligen, 3, p. 6.
[28] Bertholdi Annales 1061, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[29] Mayer, Barraclough (1967), Vol. II, p. 181.
[30] D H IV 258, p. 328.
[31] D H IV 298, p. 391.
[32] Nomina Fundatorum huius loci Monasterii Sancti Petri in Nigri Silva, which follows Genealogia Zaringorum, MHG SS XIII, p. 736.
[33] Bernoldi Chronicon 1092, MGH SS V, p. 455.6
GAV-26. Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona was also known as Bertold IV-I 'der Bärtige' Duke of Kärnten, Graf in der Ortenau.4 Berchtold IV-I "the Bearded" von Zähringen Herzog von Zähringen, graf im Breisgau, Herzog von Kärnten, marchese di Verona was also known as Berthold Count in the Ortengau.9

Family 2

Beatrice (?) de Montbeliard b. c 1040, d. 26 Oct 1092
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Baden 1 page (The House of Zahringen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/baden/baden1.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertold IV-I 'the Bearded': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112683&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertold IV-I 'der Bärtige': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112683&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BADEN.htm#Landoltdiedafter992. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BADEN.htm#Berchtolddied1078
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN (Luitgard) von Nellenburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112681&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 2http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30483
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richwara von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112684&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#RichwaraMBerchtoldIZahringendied1078
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix von Mömpelgard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164899&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 March 2020), memorial page for Berthold I. von Zähringen (1000–6 Nov 1078), Find A Grave Memorial no. 127693467, citing Kloster Hirsau, Calw, Landkreis Calw, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/127693467/berthold_i_-von_z_hringen. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertold IV-I 'der Bärtige': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112683&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berthold_II,_Duke_of_Carinthia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgard von Zähringen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313121&tree=LEO
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Baden 1 page (The House of Zähringen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/baden/baden1.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berchtold II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164900&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BADEN.htm#BertholdIIHgZahringendied1111B
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Sponheim 1 page (The House of Sponheim): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/sponheim/sponh1.html

Louis (?) Seigneur de Faucigny1,2

M, #10500, b. before 1030, d. 1060
FatherErmenrad (?)3,2
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Louis (?) Seigneur de Faucigny married (?) de Glane;      His 2nd wife.4,1 Louis (?) Seigneur de Faucigny was born before 1030.5,6 He married Thietburga (?) of Savoy, daughter of Amadeus I 'Cauda' (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana and Adelaide (?) d'Albon, circa 1053;      His 1st wife.7,6,8,9,10,2
Louis (?) Seigneur de Faucigny died in 1060.5,9
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS . His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 4 Sep 1119 by which his son "Wido…Gebennensis episcopus" donated "ecclesiam de Condominio" for the souls of "patris mei Ludovici et avi mei Ermenradi…" to Cluny[299]. Seigneur de Faucigny. [1030]/[1060].
     "m as her first husband, TETBERGA, daughter of ---. Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 4 Sep 1119 by which "Wido…Gebennensis episcopus" donated "ecclesiam de Condominio" for the souls of "…matrie mee Teberge" to Cluny[300]. She married secondly [as his second wife,] Géraud Comte de Genève. Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Aymo comes Gebennensis et filius meus Giroldus" founded the priory of Chamonix, signed by "uterini fratres comitis, Willelmus Fulciniacus et Amedeus…"[301]."
Med Lands cites:
[299] Cluny, Tome V, 3940, p. 293.
[300] Cluny, Tome V, 3940, p. 293.
[301] Besson (1759), Preuves, 8, p. 346.2
GAV-26.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 70; XI 158.6

Reference: Weis [1992:118].11 Louis (?) Seigneur de Faucigny was also known as Louis I (?) Seigneur de Faucigny.5,6

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027363&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#LouisFaucignyMTetberga. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermenrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141244&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Glane: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00593159&tree=LEO
  5. [S1525] Richard Borthwick, "Borthwick 23 Jan 1999 email "Re: Agnes of Savoy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to soc.genealogy.medieval, 23 Jan 1999. Hereinafter cited as "Borthwick email 23 Jan 1999."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027363&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 133-22, p. 118. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Tetberga: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027362&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#GeraudGenevadied1061
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 133-23, p. 118.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vullielme I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00141245&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#GuillaumeFaucignydied1124B