Chostconis (?)1

M, #93271
ReferenceGAV33
Last Edited3 Dec 2019
     GAV-33.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Cho?cisko (Polish pronunciation: [x???t?isk?]) is a legendary figure in a Polish prehistory, father of Piast the Wheelwright, the founder of the Piast dynasty. His name occurs in the first Polish chronicle, Cronicae et gesta ducum sive principum Polonorum[1] by Gallus Anonymus, where the author refers three times to Piast as the son of Cho?cisko.
     "Cho?cisko's name is probably derived from a simplified pronunciation of the word Hastingsko derived from the term Hasding (meaning long-haired[2]) which was difficult to pronounce in Old Slavonic. The other analysis suggests that Cho?cisko's name is probably derived from chost or chwost meaning tail in old Slavic.
References
1. [1] Archived 2009-01-25 at the Wayback Machine Excerpts from Gallus Anonymus' chronicle in English
2. Wolfram Herwig, The Roman Empire and its Germanic Peoples, trans.Thomas Dunlap, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London, University of California Press,p.19."2 Chostconis (?) was also known as Choscisko (?)2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#_Toc481253515. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cho%C5%9Bcisko. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Wladivoy (?) of Poland, Duke of Bohemia1,2

M, #93272, b. circa 981, d. between January 1003 and March 1003
FatherMieszko I Dagon (?) King of Poland1 b. 922, d. 25 May 992
MotherDobrava/Dubrawka (?) Princess of Bohemia1 b. bt 940 - 945, d. 977
Last Edited30 Nov 2019
     Wladivoy (?) of Poland, Duke of Bohemia was born circa 981.3
Wladivoy (?) of Poland, Duke of Bohemia died between January 1003 and March 1003.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands: "WLADIWOY of Poland (-[Jan/Mar] 1003). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded in 1002 as VLADIVOY Duke of the Bohemians. Thietmar records that the Bohemians "secretly called Wlodowej from Poland" after Duke Boleslav was deposed and "was unanimously elected in his place because of his consanguinity"[80]. Thietmar records that Duke Wlodowej died and "the brothers who had been expelled along with their mother were recalled by the repentant Bohemians"[81].
Med Lands cites:
[80] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221.
[81] Thietmar 5.28, p. 224.1


; From Doubravka's Wikipedia article: "...a theory has been advanced (apparently recorded by Thietmar and supported by Oswald Balzer in 1895) that Vladivoj (c. 981 – January 1003), who ruled as Duke of Bohemia during 1002–1003, was another son of Doubravka and Mieszko I.[1] Although modern historians have rejected this hypothesis,[citation needed] Czech historiography has supported the notion of mixed Piast-P?emyslid parentage for Vladivoj.[13]"
Wikipedia cites:
[1] Cawley, Charles, BOHEMIA, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
[12] According to one theory, this unnamed daughter of Mieszko I and her Pomeranian husband were the parents of Zemuzil, Duke of Pomerania.
[13] Krzemie?ska, Barbara (1999). B?etislav I.: ?echy a st?ední Evropa v prvé polovin? XI. století [Bretislaus I: Bohemia and Central Europe in 1st Half of the 11th Century] (in Czech) (2nd. ed.) Praha: Garamond. pp. 28–29. ISBN 80-901760-7-0.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Vladivoj (c.?981 – January 1003) was Duke of Bohemia from 1002 until his death.
     "He was probably a member of the Piast dynasty, maybe the second son of Doubravka, daughter of Duke Boleslaus I of Bohemia, and her husband Duke Mieszko I of Poland, or a distant relative.[citation needed] When Duke Boleslaus III was dethroned during a revolt by the Czech Vršovci clan, the Bohemian nobles declared Vladivoj, who had earlier fled to Poland, duke in 1002.[1] The Czech historian Dušan T?eštík writes that Vladivoj assumed the Bohemian throne with the support of the Polish duke Boles?aw I the Brave.[2] In November, he also obtained the support by the German king Henry II who enfeoffed him with the Bohemian duchy.
     "After Vladivoj died in 1003, Boles?aw the Brave invaded Bohemia and restored Boleslaus III who had many Bohemian noblemen murdered.[3][1] It is said that Vladivoj was an alcoholic, and drinking was a possible contributor to his death.[citation needed] A massacre of the Vršovci clan at Vyšehrad ordered by Boleslaus III led to his deposition and the succession of his younger brother Jaromír.
References
1. Manteuffel 1982, p. 65.
2. T?eštík 2011, p. 78.
3. Berend, Urba?czyk & Wiszewski 2013, p. 142."2 Wladivoy (?) of Poland, Duke of Bohemia was also known as Vladivoy (?) of Poland.1 Wladivoy (?) of Poland, Duke of Bohemia was also known as Vladivoj (?) of Poland.4 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1002 and 1003.

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Dobrawadied977. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladivoj,_Duke_of_Bohemia.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladivoj,_Duke_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubravka_of_Bohemia

Beatrix von Schweinfurt1

F, #93273, d. 1104
FatherOtto III (?) Duke of Schwaben, Markgraf von Schweinfurt1,2,3 b. c 1000, d. 28 Sep 1057
MotherIrmingard de Susa1,4,3 b. c 1022, d. 28 Jan 1078
Last Edited13 Nov 2020
     Beatrix von Schweinfurt married Heinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau.5
Beatrix von Schweinfurt died in 1104.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 88; 8:98b.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444565&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080002&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OttoSchweinfurtdied1057. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080003&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444564&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix von Hildrizhausen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444566&tree=LEO

Heinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau1

M, #93274
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Heinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau married Beatrix von Schweinfurt, daughter of Otto III (?) Duke of Schwaben, Markgraf von Schweinfurt and Irmingard de Susa.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 88; 8:98b.1 Heinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau was living in 1054.1

Family

Beatrix von Schweinfurt d. 1104
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444564&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix von Hildrizhausen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444566&tree=LEO

Beatrix von Hildrizhausen1

F, #93275, d. between 1115 and 1122
FatherHeinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau1
MotherBeatrix von Schweinfurt1 d. 1104
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Beatrix von Hildrizhausen married Heinrich I von Werl Graf von Rietberg, Vogt des Stiftes Paderborn, son of Konrad (?) Graf von Werl zu Arnsberg and Mathilde (?) von Northeim;
Her 2nd husband.1,2,3 Beatrix von Hildrizhausen married Gottfried I von Cappenberg Vogt von Werden, son of Hermann von Cappenberg and Gerberga von Huneburg;
Her 1st husband.4,5
Beatrix von Hildrizhausen died between 1115 and 1122.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH von Werl (-[1115/18]). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Graf von Rietberg. Vogt of Paderborn.
     "m (after 1106) as her second husband, BEATRIX von Hildrizhausen, widow of GOTTFRIED [I] Graf von Cappenberg, daughter of HEINRICH Graf von Hildrizhausen & his wife Beatrix von Schweinfurt (-[1115/22]). The Annalista Saxo refers to the unnamed daughter of Beatrix von Schweinfurt and her husband as the wife of "Godefridus de Cappenberch", and mother of "duos filios Gotefridum et Ottonem"[1964]. The Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis names "pater eius Godefridus, mater Beatrix" as parents of Gottfried Graf von Cappenberg[1965]. The Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis names "Heinricum comitem de Ryetbeke" as second husband of Beatrix who married him after the death of "Godefrido"[1966]."
Med Lands cites:
[1964] Annalista Saxo 1036.
[1965] Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis 1, MGH SS XII, p. 515.
[1966] Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis 12, MGH SS XII, p. 530.3


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 8:98b.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix von Hildrizhausen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444566&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164523&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#HeinrichRietbergdied11151118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gottfried I von Cappenberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444567&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#AdelheidArnsbergMAdolfIIBerg
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eilika: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060568&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#EilikaRietbergMEgilmarIILerigauOldenburg

Gottfried I von Cappenberg Vogt von Werden1

M, #93276, d. 1106
FatherHermann von Cappenberg2 d. bt 1082 - 1091
MotherGerberga von Huneburg2
Last Edited15 Mar 2020
     Gottfried I von Cappenberg Vogt von Werden married Beatrix von Hildrizhausen, daughter of Heinrich (?) Graf von Hildrizhausen, Markgraf auf dem Nordgau and Beatrix von Schweinfurt;
Her 1st husband.1,3
Gottfried I von Cappenberg Vogt von Werden died in 1106; died in batle.1,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 8:98b.1

; Per Med LANDS:
     "GOTTFRIED [I] von Cappenberg (-killed in battle 1106). His parentage can be reconstructed from the Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis which specifies that the father of Gottfried [II] Graf von Cappenberg was "Godefridus" and that "avum habuit Hermannum comitem"[2270]. Graf von Cappenberg. Otto Abbot of Werden confirmed that the abbey had acquired “curtim Hintisle contra domnum Liupponem nobilem virum” by charter dated 1092, witnessed by "De nobilibus comes Thiedericus de Cleue, comes Godefridus de Cappenberge et Wigboldus et Bernhardus homines eius..."[2271]. Vogt von Werden.
     "m as her first husband, BEATRIX von Hildrizhausen, daughter of HEINRICH Graf von Hildrizhausen & his wife Beatrix von Schweinfurt (-[1115/22]). The Annalista Saxo refers to the unnamed daughter of Beatrix von Schweinfurt and her husband as the wife of "Godefridus de Cappenberch", and mother of "duos filios Gotefridum et Ottonem"[2272]. The Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis names "pater eius Godefridus, mater Beatrix" as parents of Gottfried Graf von Cappenberg[2273]. The Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis names "Heinricum comitem de Ryetbeke" as second husband of Beatrix after the death of "Godefrido"[2274]. She married secondly Heinrich Graf von Rietberg."
Med Lands cites:
[2270] Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis 1, MGH SS XII, p. 515.
[2271] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band IV, 610, p. 765.
[2272] Annalista Saxo 1036.
[2273] Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis 1, MGH SS XII, p. 515.
[2274] Vita Godefridi comitis Capenbergensis 12, MGH SS XII, p. 530.3

Family

Beatrix von Hildrizhausen d. bt 1115 - 1122
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gottfried I von Cappenberg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444567&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#GottfriedCappenbergVerdun. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#AdelheidArnsbergMAdolfIIBerg

Ekkehard von Meissen Markgraf von Meissen1

M, #93277, d. 954
FatherEkkehard von Meissen Markgraf von Meissen1
ReferenceGAV32
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     Ekkehard von Meissen Markgraf von Meissen died in 954.1
     GAV-32.

; Per Med Lands: "EKKEHARD, son of [EKKEHARD [Liudolfinger] & his wife ---] (-[30 Aug 954] or 4 Sep 954). The descent of Ekkehard from an older brother of Heinrich I King of Germany is proposed by Hlawitschka[120]. "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[121]. "Otto…rex" granted property "in pago Hassagoi…Mersapurac in comitatu cuiusdam comitis…Teti" to "nostro fideli Hohstein…et uxori eius Chiniodrud" at the request of "Heinrici fratris nostri…Heckihardique comitis" by charter dated 26 Sep 949[122]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "954 II Non Sep" of "Eggihart com"[123]. m ---. The name of Ekkehard's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[120] Hlawitschka, E. (1987) Untersuchungen zu den Thronwechseln der ersten Hälfte des 11. Jahrhunderts und zur Adelsgeschichte Süddeutschlands. Zugleich klärende Forschungen um "Kuno von Öhningen", Vorträge und Forschungen, Sonderband 35 (Sigmaringen) pp. 20-43, cited in Jackman, p. 153.
[121] D O I 85, p. 166.
[122] D O I 114, p. 197.
[123] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Odadied1025. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ekkehard von Meissen Markgraf von Meissen1

M, #93278
ReferenceGAV33
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     GAV-33.

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Odadied1025. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Brun (?)1

M, #93279
FatherGunther (?) Markgraf von Meissen1 d. 15 Jul 982
Last Edited1 Dec 2019
     ; Per Med Lands: "BRUN . Thietmar names "Count Brun brother of Gunzelin", recording that he successfully defended Meissen against a Polish attack, in a passage dated to 1009[157]."
Med Lands cites: [156] Thietmar 6.54, p. 275.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Odadied1025. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Werner von Walbeck Markgraf de Nordmark1

M, #93280, d. 11 November 1014
FatherLothar III von Walbeck Count im Derlingau, Markgraf of Nordmark1,2,3 b. c 940, d. 25 Jan 1003
MotherGodila (?) von Rothenburg1 d. 1015
Last Edited21 Mar 2020
     Werner von Walbeck Markgraf de Nordmark married Liutgard von Meissen, daughter of Ekkehard I (?) Margrave of Meissen and Thuringia and Schwanhild|Suanehild (?) von Saxony, in January 1003.4,1
Werner von Walbeck Markgraf de Nordmark died on 11 November 1014 at Allerstedt; murdered.1
Werner von Walbeck Markgraf de Nordmark was buried after 11 November 1014 at Walbeck Monastery, Oebisfelde-Weferlingen, Börde, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany.1


     ; Per Med Lands: "WERNER von Walbeck (-murdered Allerstedt 11 Nov 1014, bur Walbeck Monastery). Thietmar records the birth of Werner as first son of Lothar and his wife, born when his mother was "in her thirteenth year"[1757]. The Annalista Saxo names "marchio Werinharius" as son of Lothar[1758]. He succeeded in 1003 as WERNER Markgraf der Nordmark, until 1009. After accusations brought against him at Merseburg by Graf Dedo [Wettin], Werner was deprived of his titles[1759]. Thietmar records Werner abduction of Reinhild "mistress of Beichlingen" in Nov 1014, his capture and planned trial, his death "on the feast of St Martin having patiently endured whatever misfortunes had hitherto come his way", and his burial[1760]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "11 Nov" of "Wirinher com"[1761]. m (Jan 1003) LIUTGARD von Meissen, daughter of EKKEHARD I Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Schwanehild [Billung] (-13 Nov [1012], bur Walbeck Monastery). Thietmar names Liutgard as first born child of Ekkehard and his wife Swanhild[1762]. "Liutgardem" is also named in the Annalista Saxo, which records her parentage[1763]. Thietmar describes Liutgard as "on the one side…my niece and on the other my cousin's wife" when recording her death[1764], although she was rather remotely related to Thietmar to be described as his niece. Thietmar records the betrothal of Werner & Liutgard daughter of Ekkehard after Werner abducted her from the fortress of Quedlinburg, and in a later passage their eventual marriage in Jan of the first year of the reign of King Heinrich II (1003)[1765]. Thietmar records her death on 13 Nov, in a passage dated to 1012, and her burial at Walbeck monastery[1766]."
Med Lands cites:
[1757] Thietmar 4.39, p. 179.
[1758] Annalista Saxo 1010.
[1759] Annalista Saxo 1009.
[1760] Thietmar 7.4-7, pp. 310-12.
[1761] Althoff (1983), Lüneburg.
[1762] Thietmar 4.39, p. 179.
[1763] Annalista Saxo 1029.
[1764] Thietmar 1.13, pp. 77-8.
[1765] Thietmar 4.40-4.42, pp. 180-1, and 6.86, p. 294.
[1766] Thietmar 6.84 and 6.85, pp. 293 and 293.1

Family

Liutgard von Meissen d. 13 Nov 1012

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#WenerWalbeckMgfNordmarkdied1014. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00303373&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#LotharIIIWalbeckMgfNordmarkdied1003
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Odadied1025

Liutgard von Meissen1

F, #93281, d. 13 November 1012
FatherEkkehard I (?) Margrave of Meissen and Thuringia1 b. c 956, d. 30 Apr 1002
MotherSchwanhild|Suanehild (?) von Saxony1 b. c 941, d. 24 Nov 1014
Last Edited1 Dec 2019
     Liutgard von Meissen married Werner von Walbeck Markgraf de Nordmark, son of Lothar III von Walbeck Count im Derlingau, Markgraf of Nordmark and Godila (?) von Rothenburg, in January 1003.1,2
Liutgard von Meissen died on 13 November 1012.1
     ; Per Med Lands: "LIUTGARD (-13 Nov [1012], bur Walbeck Monastery). Thietmar names Liutgard as first born child of Ekkehard and his wife Swanhild[140]. "Liutgardem" is also named in the Annalista Saxo, which records her parentage[141]. Thietmar describes Liutgard as "on the one side…my niece and on the other my cousin's wife" when recording her death[142], although she was rather remotely related to Thietmar to be described as his niece. Thietmar records the betrothal of Werner and Liutgard daughter of Ekkehard after Werner abducted her from the fortress of Quedlinburg, and in a later passage their eventual marriage in January of the first year of the reign of King Heinrich II (1003)[143]. Thietmar records her death on 13 Nov, in a passage dated to 1012, and her burial at Walbeck monastery[144]. m (Jan 1003) WERNER Markgraf der Nordmark, son of LOTHAR I Markgraf der Nordmark [Walbeck] & his wife Godila [von Rothenburg] (-murdered Allerstedt 11 Nov 1014, bur Walbeck Monastery)."
Med Lands cites:
[140] Thietmar 4.39, p. 179.
[141] Annalista Saxo 1029.
[142] Thietmar 1.13, pp. 77-8.
[143] Thietmar 4.40-4.42, pp. 180-1, and 6.86, p. 294.
[144] Thietmar 6.84 and 6.85, pp. 293 and 293.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Odadied1025. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#WenerWalbeckMgfNordmarkdied1014

Urraca Muñoz1

F, #93282, d. before 1130
FatherMunio Gonzalez (?) Conde de Cantabria, Count of the Astúrias1 d. 1097
MotherMaior Rodríguez (?)1
Last Edited4 Dec 2019
     Urraca Muñoz died before 1130.1
     ; Per Med Lands: "URRACA Muñoz (-before 1130). "Comite Gomez Gonzaluez et uxor mea Urraca cometissa" donated the church of San Miguel "in villa…Busto que fuit de fratre meo Fredinando" to "Michaeli Didaz" by charter dated 6 May 1107, witnessed by "senior Lop Sangyez de Ripa[ Ota…Gonzaluo Didaz que tenet Petralata…"[139]. Barton cites a charter dated 17 Jun 1126 in which her son Rodrigo Gómez names his mother Urraca Muñoz[140]. It is not certain that Urraca can be the daughter of Muño González as neither she nor her children are named in the 20 Sep 1120 charter of her supposed sister Jimena Muñoz, which appears to refer to all the donor´s relatives with whom she held an interest in the monastery of Santa Cruz de Castañeda. Torres records her second marriage[141]. m firstly GÓMEZ González, son of conde GONZALO Salvadórez & his wife Sancha Gómez (-killed in battle Candespina 26 Oct 1111, bur San Salvador de Oña). m secondly as his first wife, BELTRÁN de Risnel, son of --- (-1138).]"
Med Lands cites:
[139] Burgos Cathedral, 82, p. 154.
[140] Barton (2002), p. 251, citing Fernández Catón, J. M. (1977) Catálogo del archivo del monasterio de San Pedro de las Dueñas (Léon), no. 12.
[141] Lacarra, J. M. 'Los franceses en la reconquista y repoblación del valle del Ebro en tiempos de Alfonso el Batallador', Cuadernos de Historia 2 (1968), p. 71 footnote 15, cited in Torre (1999), p. 227.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CastilNob.htm#UrracaMunozM1GomezGonzalez. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Alix de Porhoët1

F, #93283, d. 1220
FatherEudo/Eudes/Eudon/Eon II (?) vicomte de Porhoët, Duc de Bretagne1,2 b. c 1110, d. c 1185
MotherBertha de Cornouailles Duchess of Brittany1 b. c 1114, d. 1156
Last Edited17 May 2020
     Alix de Porhoët died in 1220.1
     ; Per Med Lands: "ALIX de Porhoët . Given-Wilson & Curteis state that “Eudo de Porhoët, ex-count of Brittany” claimed in 1168 that the English king, while holding his daughter as a hostage for peace, had made her pregnant ‘treacherously, adulterously and incestuously; for the king and Eudo´s wife were the offspring of two sisters’” (referring to two daughters of King Henry I, one legitimate the other illegitimate, named Matilda)[341]. The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified. Mistress (1168) of: HENRY II King of England, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et du Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault)."
Med Lands cites: [341] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 98.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#AlixPorhoetMistressHenryII. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EudesPorhoetdied1170

Marguerite (?)1

F, #93284, d. after March 1237
FatherBaudouin V/I 'le Courageaux' (?) Comte de Hainaut et Flandres, Mgve of Namur1 b. c 1150, d. c 17 Dec 1195
Last Edited10 Dec 2019
     Marguerite (?) married Simon van Harelbeke.1
Marguerite (?) died after March 1237.1
     ; Per Med Lands: "MARGUERITE (-after Mar 1237). The charter dated Mar 1236 quoted below indicates that Marguerite was the sister of Philippe de Hainaut Comte de Namur (see above). The obscurity of her husband (who is not even described in the sources identified below as a knight) and the high profile marriages of Comte Baudouin VIII’s other known children suggest that Marguerite was illegitimate. The chronology of her life (based, it is true, only on three data points) suggests that she may have been born towards the end of her father’s life. Perhaps she was left, while still a child, in the custody of Philippe Comte de Namur when their father died. A charter of “Simon van Harelbeke” dated 1234 records that he and his wife left on pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in Spain[546]. Maybe Simon died during the journey as the following document describes him as “late”. “Bauduin héritier de l’Empire Romain et Comte de Namur” declared that, “feu Philippe Comte de Namur son oncle seigneur d’Harlebeke” having granted “le Gavene [type of tax] de Harlebeke” to “Marguerite sa sœur et à feu Simon de Harlebeke son mari” and their heirs for ever, “Marie fille desdits Simon et Marguerite” had donated it to Marquette on entering the abbey and that he now confirmed the donation to prevent “Marguerite sa sœur comtesse de Vienne” from disturbing the abbey’s possession, by charter dated Mar 1236 (presumably O.S.)[547]. m (before 15 Oct 1212) SIMON van Harelbeke, son of --- ([1234/Mar 1237])."
Med Lands cites:
[546] Summarised at (16 Feb 2016).
[547] Saint-Genois, J. de (1782) Monumens Anciens (Lille), Tome I, p. 538, citing vidimus dated 3 Aug 1322 of the “doyen et chapitre de Saint Pierre à Lille”. A partial summary (presumably taken from Saint-Genois), which misdates the vidimus, is at Ferrant, J. ‘Esquisse historique sur le culte et les reliques de Saint Bertulphe de Renty en l’église d’Harlebeke’, Annales de la Société d’émulation pour l’étude de l’histoire et des antiquités de la Flandre, Tome 48 (Bruges, 1898), p. 173. I am grateful to Douglas Richardson for drawing my attention to this source. The original document was not found in Hautcœur, E. (1894) Cartulaire de l’église collégiale de Saint-Pierre de Lille (Lille, Paris), Tomes 1 and 2.1

Family

Simon van Harelbeke d. bt 1234 - 1237

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVHainautB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ugo da Parlascio Ebriaco1

M, #93287
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited25 Dec 2019
     GAV-25.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ugo da Parlascio Ebriaco: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00550337&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia1,2

M, #93288, b. circa 1135, d. 1185
FatherComita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea3,2 d. bt 1144 - 1146
MotherElena de Orrù2
ReferenceGAV24
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia married Pellegrina de Lacon;
His 1st wife, later repudiated.1,3,2 Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia was born circa 1135.4 He married Agalburga de Bas-Cevera, daughter of Ponce II de Bas-Cevera Vescomte de Bas and Unknown (?), on 31 October 1157;
His 2nd wife.1,3,2
Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia died in 1185.3
     GAV-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "BARISONE, son of COMITA Judge of Arborea & his wife --- (-1185). Fara names “Helenam Orru” as the wife of “Comita II de Lacon” and mother of “Barisonem filium et filiam Anastasiam”[756]. This information has not been confirmed by primary source evidence. Judge of Arborea. “Judice Barusone de Serra potestate de logu de Arborea” donated property to the church of S. Maria di Bonarcado by undated charter, witnessed by “judice Constantine de Plominos, judice Gunnari de Jugadore, judice Constantine Gallulesa connatu meu”[757]. “Parason...iudex Arboræ filius quondam Comita item iudicis Arboreæ” granted property to “dominæ Agalbursæ...uxori meæ filiæ quondam Pontii de Cervera” on their marriage by charter dated 31 Oct 1157, witnessed by “...Ugonis vicecomitis...”[758]. King of Sardinia. “Baresonus...rex Sardiniæ” made monetary commitments to the commune of Genoa by charter dated 16 Sep 1164, witnessed by “...Constantini de Lacu fratris regii...”[759]. Emperor Friedrich I granted a royal crown to "Barasonem Judicem" in 1165[760]. Zurita records that “la isla de Cerdeña” was governed by “governadores que...tuvieron titulo de juzgados o reynos o señorios...Arborea, Gallura, Caller y el de Turri”, that during the reign of Emperor Friedrich I “Butison [...Barison] Juez y Señor de Arborea” declared himself king and assumed “dominio de toda la isla” with the consent of the emperor, in opposition to “Pisanos que pretendian que la isla era suya y no del Imperio”, but that Barisone was captured by the Genoese who imprisoned him in Genoa and took control “la mitad de la isla en las partidas de Arborea y Caller en oposito de Pisanos a los quales el Emperador Federico dió la investidura de toda la isla”[761]. "Iudice Barusone Darboree" donated property to "Susanna fiia mia", with the consent of "donna Algabursa mugere mia regina de Logu Darboree", by charter dated 1165[762]. “Baruson iudex de Arborea” made peace with “Barusone iudice Turritano”, including arrangements for property held by the latter “tempore Gunnarii quondam iudicis”, by charter dated 1168[763]. “Baruson iudex Arborensis” made peace with “Petro iudice Karalitano”, including arrangements for property held by the latter “tempore Costantini quondam iudicis”, by charter dated Dec 1169[764]. “Iudice Barasune podestando totu Logu d’Arboreæ...cum mugera mia donna Algaburga regina de Logu” confirmed the church of S. Nicola di Gurgo to the Benedictines, as donated by “Iudice Gostantine Au meu et iudice Comida patre meus”, by undated charter, maybe dated to [1182/83][765]. “Rege Barusone d’Arbaree et uxore mia donna Agal Borssa regina de Logu” donated property to S. Maria, Pisa by charter dated Jun 1185 witnessed by “Puneu nebode meu”[766].
     "m firstly (repudiated) PELLEGRINA de Lacon, daughter of --- (-after 27 Apr 1195). Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Apr 1195 under which [her son] “Iudice Petrus Darboree” donated annual income to S. Lorenzo, Genoa, with the consent of “donna mama mia donna Pelegrina de Lacon et de Barusone de Lacon filio meo”[767]. Presumably she was repudiated by her husband as she was still alive at the date of this document.
     "m secondly ([31] Oct 1157) AGALBURGA de Bas-Cevera, daughter of PONCE [II] de Bas-Cevera Vizconde de Bas & his [first wife ---] (-after 8 Oct 1186). “Parason...iudex Arboræ filius quondam Comita item iudicis Arboreæ” granted property to “dominæ Agalbursæ...uxori meæ filiæ quondam Pontii de Cervera” on their marriage by charter dated 31 Oct 1157, witnessed by “...Ugonis vicecomitis...”[768]. If Agalburga was born from her father’s marriage to Almodis, her mother would have been less than ten years old at the time. Although early marriage was common, this does seem exaggerated. It is therefore possible that Agalburga was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her father. Her absence from the charter dated 28 Feb 1164, in which Almodis names her other surviving children, also suggests that Agalburga was not her daughter. "Iudice Barusone Darboree" donated property to "Susanna fiia mia", with the consent of "donna Algabursa mugere mia regina de Logu Darboree", by charter dated 1165[769]. “A...Arboree Regina” granted navigation rights “in toto Arborensi iudicatu” to the commune of Genoa by charter dated 8 Oct 1186, naming “Poncium nepotem meum [...filius quondam Ugonis de Bassis] post quam ad etatem 14 annorum pervenerit”[770].
     "Barisone & his first wife had three children."
Med Lands cites:
[756] Fara, Liber II, p. 237.
[757] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LVII, p. 217.
[758] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LXIV, p. 220.
[759] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LXXVII, p. 231.
[760] Muratori, L. A. (1773) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome I, p. 420.
[761] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. V, LXI, fol. 416 (second page).
[762] Historiæ Patriæ Monumenta, Tome I, DXXXI, col. 842.
[763] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LXXXIII, p. 234.
[764] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, XCIII, p. 239.
[765] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, CXI, p. 253.
[766] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, CXIII, p. 254.
[767] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, CXLIII, p. 278.
[768] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LXIV, p. 220.
[769] Historiæ Patriæ Monumenta, Tome I, DXXXI, col. 842.
[770] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, CXVII, p. 256.3
He was Giudice (ruler/judge) of Arborea.1 Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia was also known as Barisone II de Torres.4

; Per Shamà: “I1. Barisone I († fine 1184/inizi 1185), Giudice d’Arborea, incoronato “Rex Sardiniae” dall’Imperatore Federico I il 10.VIII.1164.
     "a) = Pellegrina de Lacon († post 1195), divorzia;
     "b) = ante 31.X.1156 o 1157 Agalbursa de Cervera (o de Bas), figlia di Poncio I, Visconte di Bas, e di Almodis dei Conti di Barcellona († post 30.XI.1186) (v. la nota in del Balzo)”.2

Family 1

Pellegrina de Lacon d. a 27 Apr 1195
Child

Family 2

Agalburga de Bas-Cevera d. a 8 Oct 1186

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#SinispellaArboreaM1UcPonceBas. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, Dinastie Giudicali Di Arborea: http://www.sardimpex.com/A/Arborea.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#BarisoneArboreadied1185
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Barisone II de Torres: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314652&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Agalburga de Bas-Cevera1

F, #93289, d. after 8 October 1186
FatherPonce II de Bas-Cevera Vescomte de Bas2
MotherUnknown (?)2
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Agalburga de Bas-Cevera married Barisone I di Arborea Judge of Arborea, King of Sardinia, son of Comita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea and Elena de Orrù, on 31 October 1157;
His 2nd wife.3,4,5
Agalburga de Bas-Cevera died after 8 October 1186.3
     ; Per Shamà: “I1. Barisone I († fine 1184/inizi 1185), Giudice d’Arborea, incoronato “Rex Sardiniae” dall’Imperatore Federico I il 10.VIII.1164.
     "a) = Pellegrina de Lacon († post 1195), divorzia;
     "b) = ante 31.X.1156 o 1157 Agalbursa de Cervera (o de Bas), figlia di Poncio I, Visconte di Bas, e di Almodis dei Conti di Barcellona († post 30.XI.1186) (v. la nota in del Balzo)”.5 Agalburga de Bas-Cevera was also known as Agalburga de Bas-Cevera.3

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CATALAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgalburgaMBarisoneArborea. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CATALAN%20NOBILITY.htm#PonceCerveraBasdied1155
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#SinispellaArboreaM1UcPonceBas
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#BarisoneArboreadied1185
  5. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, Dinastie Giudicali Di Arborea: http://www.sardimpex.com/A/Arborea.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.

Comita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea1,2

M, #93290, d. between 1144 and 1146
FatherConstantino de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Arborea1,2
MotherAnna di Zori2
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Comita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea married Elena de Orrù.2
Comita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea died between 1144 and 1146; Med Lands says d. aft 1144; Shamà says d. ca 1146.1,2
     He was Giudice (ruler/judge) of Arborea.1 GAV-25.

; Per Med Lands: "COMITA (-after 1144). His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter, maybe dated to [1182/83], under which [his son] “Iudice Barasune podestando totu Logu d´Arboreæ...cum mugera mia donna Algaburga regina de Logu” confirmed the church of S. Nicola di Gurgo to the Benedictines, as donated by “Iudice Gostantine Au meu et iudice Comida patre meus”[488]. Judge of Arborea. “Comita judex Arvorensis” donated property to S. Lorenzo, Genoa by charter dated Dec 1131[489]. m ---. The name of Comita´s wife is not known. Fara names “Helenam Orru” as the wife of “Comita II de Lacon” and mother of “Barisonem filium et filiam Anastasiam”[490]. This information has not been confirmed by primary source evidence."
Med Lands cites:
[488] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, CXI, p. 253.
[489] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, XLI, p. 207.
[490] Fara, Liber II, p. 237.1
Comita III di Arborea Giudice di Arborea was also known as Comita di Arborea.1

; Per Shamà: “H1. Comita III († ca. 1146 ?), Giudice d’Arborea. = Elena de Orrù”.2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#BarisoneArboreadied1185. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, Dinastie Giudicali Di Arborea: http://www.sardimpex.com/A/Arborea.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.

Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres1,2,3

M, #93291, b. circa 1110, d. after 1153
FatherConstantino de Lacon-Zori Giudice di Torres4,2,5 b. c 1064, d. bt 1127 - 1128
MotherMarcusa di Gunale4,2
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres married Elena Orvu.1 Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres was born circa 1110; Shamà says d. ca 1110; Genealogics says d. 1113-1114.2,6 He married Maria Ebriaco, daughter of Ugo da Parlascio Ebriaco, before 1127.7,8,6,2
Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres was buried after 1153 at Abbaye de Clairvaux, Clairvaux, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     19 Jul ---, Clairvaux, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Family Members
     Parents
          Constantine di Torres unknown–1128
     Children
          Barisone di Torres unknown–1191
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Clairvaux, Clairvaux, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 17 Sep 2015
     Find a Grave Memorial 152445948.3
Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres died after 1153 at Abbaye de Clairvaux, Clairvaux, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France; Med Lands says d. aft 24 Jun 1147; Shamà says d. aft 1153; Genealogics says d. 1180-1190.1,2,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GONNARIO, son of COSTANTINO & his wife Marchusa --- (-after 24 Jun 1147). "Gonnarius…Turritanorum Rex et Dominus" confirmed rights of Cassino monastery, in memory of "atavus meus Baraso Rex et Marianus avus noster, Constantinus…genitor noster, et Marchusa Regina uxor eius…et Comita cum uxore sua Muscundola, et Marinus cum uxore sua Justa, Pera filii Gonnarii, Constantinus de Carvia cum uxore sua Jorgia, Foratus de Gentil cum uxore sua Susanna ", by charter dated 24 Jun 1147[484].
     "m ELENA Orvu, daughter of ---. Fara names “Helenam Orru” as the wife of “Genuarius alias Gonarius de Lacon...iudex Arboreæ”, and mother of “tres...filias...Helenam, Georgiam et Pretiosam, totidemque filios...Constantinum, Comitam et Orrocum seu Orrocorum”[485]. This information has not been confirmed by primary source evidence."
Med Lands cites:
[484] Muratori, L. A. (1773) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome I, p. 417.
[485] Fara, Liber II, p. 237.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "GONARIO [II], son of CONSTANTINO Judge of Torres & his wife Marcusa [Maria] di Arrubu (-after 1153). Judge of Torres. “Judice Gonnari de...Turri filius quondam Constantini item judicis” donated property to S. Maria, Pisa by charter dated 6 Mar 1131[679]. “Gonnarius...Turritanorum rex et dominus” donated property to Monte Cassino before leaving for Jerusalem, in memory of “atavus meus Baraso rex, Marianus avus noster, Constantinus...genitor noster et Marchusa regina uxor eius, et consanguinei nostri cum filiis et filiabus, et Comita cum uxore sua Muscundola et Marianus cum uxore sua Iusta, Pera filia Gonnarii, Constantinus de Carvia cum uxore sua Iorgia, Foratus de Gentile cum uxore sua Susanna”, by charter dated 24 Jun 1147[680]. “Judice Barusone de Serra potestate de logu de Arborea” donated property to the church of S. Maria di Bonarcado by undated charter, witnessed by “judice Constantine de Plominos, judice Gunnari de Jugadore, judice Constantine Gallulesa connatu meu”[681]. “Judike Gunnari de Laccon” donated property to Monte Cassino, with the consent of “fiju meu Barasone rege et de sa mujere Pretiosa de Orrubu regina”, by charter dated 1153[682].
     "m ---. The name of Gonario´s wife is not known. Fara records “Mariam Elicandi, nobilis Pisani filiam” as the wife of “Genuarius II”[683]. This information has not been confirmed by primary source evidence.
Med Lands cites:
[679] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, XL, p. 206.
[680] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LVI, p. 216.
[681] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LVII, p. 217.
[682] Codex Diplomaticus Sardiniæ, Tome I, LIX, p. 218.
[683] Fara, Liber II, p. 226.9
GAV-27.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Gonario II (also spelled Gonnario or Gunnari; died between 1180 and 1190) was the giudice of Logudoro[1] (a kingdom in Sardinia) from the death of his father to his own abdication in 1154. He was a son of Constantine I and Marcusa de Gunale. He was born between 1113 and 1114 according to later sources and the Camaldolese church of S. Trinità di Saccargia was founded in his name by his parents on 16 December 1112, though it wasn't consecrated until 5 October 1116.
     "Constantine died between 1127 and 1128, leaving his son under the regency of Ittocorre Gambella. When the Athen family tried to harm the young ruler, Ittocorre whisked him away to Porto Torres and the protection of the Pisans, who took him to Pisa and the house of Ugo da Parlascio Ebriaco. When he turned seventeen, he married Ebriaco's daughter[2] and returned to Sardinia, with Pisan permission and four armed galleys. His father-in-law was part of this expedition to repossess his giudicato (1130). Together they landed at Torres and marched on Ardara, the location of the judicial palace, and took it. Controlling the giudicato again, they began construction of a castle at Goceano to guard the frontier. At this time, Comita II of Arborea allied with the Republic of Genoa to defend himself from filopisano[3] Logudoro, thus dividing the island's allegiance.
     "Gonario was among the first to do homage to the Pisan archdiocese for his giudicato. On 6 March 1131, Gonario did homage to Roger, Archbishop of Pisa, who was then acting papal legate on the island. In the previous year, Constantine I of Arborea, Comita's father, had done likewise. In the following year, 1132, on 26 June, Comita I of Gallura did homage to Roger at Ardara, thus preliminarily establishing the legatine status of Gonario's principality. In 1135, Roger's successor, Uberto, declared Logudoro the base of the Sardinian legateship.
     "In 1144, Gonario got involved in a war with Arborea and, on 10 November, Baldwin, Archbishop of Pisa, moved to give him aid from the Republic. In 1145, Baldwin excommunicated Comita of Arborea. The Pisan prelate, travelling the island as a papal legate, had excommunicated the judge for oppressing the people and warring against Pisa, his righfult sovereign. Bernard of Clairvaux even weighed into island politics and sent a letter to Pope Eugene III to justify Baldwin's actions and commend Gonario as quia bonus princeps dicitur.[4] Nominally Arborea was transferred to Logudoro, but Comita died soon after and his son Barison II succeeded him. In 1146, this Barison hosted the consecration ceremony of Santa Maria di Bonarcado with most of the Arborean clergy and Villano, Archbishop of Pisa. Gonario and Constantine II of Cagliari also attended this ceremony, the only instance of three out of the four giudici appearing in the same place.
     "On 24 June 1147, Gonario was in his twentieth year of rule as Gonnarius . . . Turritanorum Rex et Dominus.[5] This statement indicates that Gonario's rule was considered to begin with his father's death and was uninterrupted by exile and regency. In that year, Gonario left on the Second Crusade as a pilgrim to Jerusalem. He left his four sons, Barison, Peter, Ittocorre, and Comita as regents during his absence. He met Saint Bernard, who had only heard a good reputation earlier, on his return journey (1149). The two founded the Cistercian abbey of Cabuabbas di Sindia. Gonario probably extended this journey, making a pilgrimage to Saint Martin of Tours as well.[6] Not long after this, Gonario, perhaps moved by his meeting with Bernard, entered the monastery of Clairvaux.
Notes
1. From locum de Torres, so called from its principal city Porto Torres.
2. Her name, Maria, is only known from a charter confirming the donation of the church of S. Michele in Therricellu to Montecassino on 20 May 1136. His predecessor, Barison I, had established the close relationship between the church of Logudoro and the monastery of Montecassino.
3. Meaning "Pisan-allied".
4. Translation from Latin: "who is called a good prince".
5. "Gonario, of Torres King and Lord." Moore, 82 n7.
6. This second pilgrimage is known, but it only fits the other knowns if it is posited as an extension of his return from Jerusalem.
Sources
** Moore, John C. "Pope Innocent III, Sardinia, and the Papal State." Speculum, Vol. 62, No. 1. (Jan., 1987), pp 81–101.
** Caravale, Mario (ed). Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani: LVII Giulini – Gonzaga. Rome, 2001.
** Scano, D. "Serie cronol. dei giudici sardi." Arch. stor. sardo. 1939.
** Besta, E. and Somi, A. I condaghi di San Nicolas di Trullas e di Santa Maria di Bonarcado. Milan, 1937.
** Libellus iudicum Turritanorum.
** Onnis, Omar; Mureddu, Manuelle (2019). Illustres. Vita, morte e miracoli di quaranta personalità sarde (in Italian). Sestu: Domus de Janas. ISBN 978-88-97084-90-7. OCLC 1124656644. Retrieved 2019-12-06."10


; Per Genealogics:
     "Gonario II was the son of Constantine I, giudice of Logudoro, and his first wife Marcusa de Gunale. He was the _giudice_ (ruler/judge) of Logudoro (a kingdom in Sardinia) from the death of his father to his own abdication in 1154. He was born in 1113 or 1114 according to later sources, though the Camaldolese church of S. Trinità di Saccargia was founded in his name by his parents on 16 December 1112; it was not consecrated until 5 October 1116.
     "Constantine died in 1127 or 1128, leaving his son under the regency of Ittocorre Gambella. When the Athen family tried to harm the young ruler, Ittocorre whisked him away to Porto Torres and the protection of the Pisans, who took him to Pisa and the house of Ugo da Parlascio Ebriaco.
     "When he turned seventeen, he married Ebriaco's daughter Maria and returned to Sardinia, with Pisan permission and four armed galleys. His father-in-law was part of this expedition to repossess his _giudicato_ (rule) in 1130. Together they landed at Torres and marched on Ardara, the location of the judicial palace, and took it. Controlling the _giudicato_ again, they began construction of a castle at Goceano to guard the frontier. At this time, Comita II of Arborea allied with the republic of Genoa to defend himself from Pisan-allied Logudoro, thus dividing the island's allegiance.
     "Gonario was among the first to do homage to the Pisan archdiocese for his giudicato, On 6 March 1131 Gonario did homage to Roger, archbishop of Pisa, who was then acting papal legate on the island. In the previous year Constantine I of Arborea, Comita's father, had done likewise. On 26 June 1132 Comita I of Gallura did homage to Roger at Ardara, thereby establishing a preliminary legatine status for Gonario's principality. In 1135 Roger's successor Uberto declared Logudoro the base of Sardinian legateship.
     "In 1144 Gonario became involved in a war with Arborea, and on 10 November Baldwin, archbishop of Pisa, moved to give him aid from the republic. In 1145 Baldwin travelling the island as papal legate, excommunicated Comita for oppressing the people and warring against Pisa, his rightful sovereign. Bernard of Clairvaux even weighed into island politics and sent a letter to Pope Eugene III to justify Baldwin's actions and commend Gonario as _quia bonus princeps dicitur._ Nominally Arborea was transferred to Logudoro, but Comita died soon after and his son Barisone II succeeded him. In 1146 this Barisone hosted the consecration ceremony of Santa Maria di Bonarcado with most of the Arborean clergy and Villano, archbishop of Pisa. Gonario and Constantine II of Cagliari also attended this ceremony, the only instance of three out of the four _giudici_ appearing in the same place.
     "On 24 June 1147 Gonario was in his twentieth year of rule as _Gonnarius.....Turritanorum Rex et Dominus._ This statement indicates that Gonario's rule was considered to begin with his father's death and was uninterrupted by exile and regency. In that year, Gonario left on the Second Crusade as a pilgrim to Jerusalem. He left four sons, Barisone, Piero, Ittocorre, and Comita as regents during his absence. He met Bernard of Clairvaux, who had only heard of his good reputation earlier, on his return journey in 1149. The two founded the Cistercian Abbey of Cabuabbas di Sindia. Gonario probably extended this journey, making a pilgrimage to Saint Martin of Tours as well. Not long after this, Gonario, perhaps moved by his meeting with Bernard, entered the monastery of Clairvaux. He died between 1180 and 1190."6
Gonnario II de Lacon-Serra Giudice di Torres was also known as Gonario II (?) de Torres.6

; Per Shamà: “F1. Gonnario I (* 1110 ca., † monastero di Clairvaux post 1153), Giudice di Torres dal 1127 al 1153, abdica e diviene monaco.
     "= ante 1127 Maria Ebriaci, figlia di Ugone Ebriaci, di Genova († post 20.V.1136).”.2 He was Giudice (ruler/judge) of Logudoro between 1124 and 1154.10

Family 1

Elena Orvu

Family 2

Maria Ebriaco
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://www.politico.com/news/2019/12/12/liberal-groups-to-spend-7-million-to-flip-state-houses-083535. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, Dinastie Giudicali Di Arborea: http://www.sardimpex.com/A/Arborea.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 30 June 2020), memorial page for Gonario di Torres, II (unknown–19 Jul), Find a Grave Memorial no. 152445948, citing Abbaye de Clairvaux, Clairvaux, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/152445948. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#GonnarioSCostantinoA
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constantine I de Torres: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00550338&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gonario II de Torres: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00550335&tree=LEO
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I31001
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00550335&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#GonarioIITorresdiedafter1153B
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gonario_II_of_Torres. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Elena Orvu1

F, #93292
Last Edited30 Jun 2020

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://www.politico.com/news/2019/12/12/liberal-groups-to-spend-7-million-to-flip-state-houses-083535. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

NN Phokas1

F, #93293
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     NN Phokas married Constantine/Kostandin I (?) Lord of Vaghka & Partzerpert, son of Rupen I (?) Lord of Gobidar & Goromosol, Lord of the Mountains.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "KOSTANDIN ([1050/55][361]-[24 Feb 1102/23 Feb 1103], bur Castalon). Matthew of Edessa names "le grand chef arménien Constantin, fils de Roupen" who occupied "le mont Taurus dans la contrée de Gobidar, qui dépend du district de Maraba", commenting that Constantin "était sorti des rangs de l'armée de Kakig"[362]. The same source confirms that he served in the army of Prince Gaghik, son of Ashot[363], although this may have been to emphasise the regime's continuity with the old Armenian dynasty rather than on the basis of historical fact. The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II records that, after the death of Rupen, "his son Kostandin took Vahka" in the year [Feb 1090/Feb 1091] and "was the first to rule over the Armenian people in Cilicia"[364]. The Lignages d'Outremer record that Kostandin son of "Rupin le Grand" captured "Vahka" and the surrounding mountainous area[365]. Lord of Vaghka and Partzerpert[366]. The fortress of Vaghka is located on the Göksü River[367]. Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle records that "Kostadin, Ruben's son, and the prince of Edessa Toros" invited the crusading army to expel the invaders from Cilicia in [1097][368]. Matthew of Edessa records that Kostandin and his fellow Armenian princes, Pazuni and Oshin, sent provisions to the Frankish crusading armies in 1097/98[369]. The Armenians took advantage of the collapse of Turkish power in Cilicia to expand their sphere of influence, after the capture of Tarsus, Adana, and Mamistra in Sep 1097 by Tancred (nephew of Bohémond Duke of Apulia)[370]. Kostandin established his capital at Sis. Matthew of Edessa records the death of "le grand prince arménien Constantin, fils de Roupen" in the year [25 Feb 1099/24 Feb 1100], stating that he had been one of the army chiefs of "Kakig, le Bagratide, fils d'Aschod" and was buried "dans le couvent de Gasdaghon"[371]. The Chronographie of Samuel d'Ani records that "Constantin fils de Roupen" died soon after a lightning bolt struck his table in the fortress of Vaghka, dated from the context to [1100/1104][372]. The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II records that "Kostandin paron of the Armenians" died in [24 Feb 1102/23 Feb 1103] and was succeeded by "his senior son Toros"[373]. The Lignages d'Outremer record that Kostandin was buried at "Kastaravn"[374].
     "m --- [Phokas], daughter of ---. The wife of Kostandin was "descended from Bardas Phokas", according to the Chronicle of Aleppo[375], although the precise relationship is unknown. From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that she was the great-granddaughter of Bardas Phokas, assuming that the relationship with him is factually correct."
Med Lands cites:
[361] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), Table I, estimates Kostand's birth date range as [1040/45]. This appears early considering the reports of the age of his father Rupen when he died, see above.
[362] Matthew of Edessa (RHC) II.II, p. 30.
[363] Matthew of Edessa (RHC) II.XII, p. 47.
[364] Hethum II's Chronicle 540 A.E. [Feb 1090/Feb 1091].
[365] Lignages d'Outremer, Matenadaran Machtots, MS 1898, p. 131.
[366] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), Table I.
[367] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 197.
[368] Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle 48, 546 A.E.
[369] Matthew of Edessa (RHC) II.II, p. 33.
[370] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, pp. 197-
[371] Matthew of Edessa (RHC) II.XII, pp. 47 and 48.
[372] RHC, Documents arméniens, Tome I, Extrait de la Chronographie de Samuel Ani ("Samuel d'Ani"), p. 448.
[373] Hethum II's Chronicle 551 A.E. [24 Feb 1102/23 Feb 1103].
[374] Lignages d'Outremer, Matenadaran Machtots, MS 1898, p. 131.
[375] Kemal ed Din, Chronicle of Aleppo, RHC, Documents Orientaux III, 1205, cited in Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 49.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter. The wife of Constantine was "descended from Bardas Phokas", according to the Chronicle of Aleppo[1394], although the precise relationship is unknown. From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that she was the great-granddaughter of Bardas Fokas, assuming that she was related to him at all. She is not referred to in Greek sources[1395].
     "m CONSTANTINE Lord of Vaghka and Partzerpert, son of RUPEN Lord of Gobidar and Goromosl [Armenia-Rupen] & his wife --- ([1040/45]-24 Jan 1102, bur Castalon)."
Med Lands cites:
[1394] Kemal ed Din, Chronicle of Aleppo, RHC, Or III, 1205, cited in Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 49.
[1395] Morris Bierbrier, in a private e-mail to the author dated 27 Aug 2006.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#dauMConstantineVaghkaPartzerpert. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARMENIA.htm#_Toc359675596

Unknown (?)1

F, #93294
MotherPulkheria Argyra2
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     Unknown (?) married Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium, son of Theodosios Monomachos and NN Tornikaina;
His 1st wife.1,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "KONSTANTINOS Monomachos ([1005/1010]-11 Jan 1055, bur Monastery of Mangana). Psellos names "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" when recording that Empress Zoe chose to marry him[1655]. His birth date is estimated from Psellos describing him as a "young man" at the time of the accession of Emperor Romanos III[1656]. Although well-born and held in respect, neither Emperor Basileios II nor Emperor Konstantinos VIII promoted him to office, for they were suspicious about his relations with the Skleros family after his second marriage[1657]. Nevertheless, Konstantinos appears to have enjoyed a close relationship with Empress Zoe, especially during the reign of Emperor Mikhael IV, although the latter fabricated charges against him and exiled him to the island of Lesbos. After her joint accession with her sister, Empress Zoe recalled Konstantinos from exile and married him, despite the Byzantine church's prohibition of third marriages[1658]. He was crowned 12 Jun 1042 as Emperor KONSTANTINOS IX. He started his reign with another flush of largesse, which exhausted his treasury[1659]. His general Giorgios Maniakis recaptured the eastern part of Sicily from the Arabs, but was ordered to withdraw by the emperor before he could push his advantage further. Resentful of this treatment, Maniakis rebelled and was acclaimed emperor by his troops, but was killed in battle in 1043 en route to Constantinople. Leon Tornikios (who had courted Emperor Konstantinos's sister Euprepia) rebelled, was proclaimed emperor Sep 1047, and besieged Constantinople but he was captured and blinded[1660]. After several years of lengthy dispute over the standardisation of the liturgy, the Patriarch Mikhael Cerularios in 1055 excommunicated the papal legates in Constantinople (who had just pronounced his own excommunication) and triggered the final separation of the Orthodox church from the Roman Catholic. Emperor Konstantinos suffered from a debilitating illness which attacked his joints and produced partial paralysis[1661]. Cedrenus records the burial of Emperor Konstantinos the day he died "in Manganis"[1662].
     "m firstly ---. Psellos records that "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" had "in the first place [become] the son-in-law to the outstanding member of court society but his wife fell ill and died"[1663]. There is no indication in the text who this might indicate.
     "m secondly (before 1025) --- Skleraina, daughter of BASILEIOS Skleros & his wife Pulcheria Argyre (-before 1034). Psellos records the second marriage of Konstantinos, arranged by Romanos Argyros before he became emperor, to "the daughter of his sister Pulcheria, who in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus", stating that she was her parents' only child[1664]. Zonaras records that, after the death of his first wife, Konstantinos married "imperatoris Romani nepte ex fratre"[1665]. According to Psellos, she died before her husband's exile to Lesbos[1666].
     "m thirdly (11 Jun 1042) as her third husband, Empress ZOE, widow firstly of Emperor ROMANOS III and secondly of Emperor MIKHAEL IV, daughter of Emperor KONSTANTINOS VIII & his wife Helena --- (980-1050).
     "Mistress (1): MARIA [Skleraina], daughter of --- (-[1044], bur Monastery of Mangana[1667]). Zonaras records that, after the death of his second wife, Konstantinos was unable to marry a third time but took as his mistress "consobrina uxoris suæ…adulescentula…et nobili Sclerorum familia orta"[1668]. Psellos records that "the niece of his late wife" became mistress of Konstantinos Monomakhos, the future Emperor Konstantinos IX, after the death of his second wife, being unable to marry her because of the Orthodox church's prohibition of third marriages[1669]. As Psellos, in an earlier passage, records that the second wife of Konstantinos was her parents' only child[1670], the word "niece" cannot be interpreted in its strict sense in this text. The editor of the edition of Psellos which has been consulted states that she was the sister of Romanos Skleros and granddaughter of Bardas (children of an otherwise unrecorded brother of Basileios Skleros), but the primary source on which this is based has not so far been identified[1671]. If this is correct, she and her brother must have been born from an otherwise second marriage of Basileios Skleros. Psellos hints that this might be correct when he refers to her in later passages as "Sclerena"[1672]. Another possibility is that one of Maria's parents was the daughter or son of either Pulcheria Argyre or Basileios Skleros (the parents of Konstantinos's first wife) by a second marriage: Psellos does suggest that Pulcheria and Basileios's marriage terminated early when he states that "…Pulcheria…in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus"[1673]. The primary source which confirms her name has not so far been identified. She followed him into exile on Lesbos in 1034. She was recalled to Constantinople after her husband's accession but was unpopular, her presence causing a riot 9 Mar 1044. Eventually, she was introduced openly to the Palace as her husband's mistress, acting as a junior consort, and was granted the title Augusta[1674]. Psellos records the death of "Sclerena" and the emperor's grief[1675].
     "Mistress (2): (after 1044) GORANDUXT of Georgia, daughter of GIORGI I King of Georgia & [his wife Mariam of Vaspurakan]. Psellos records that the emperor "fell in love with…one of our hostages from Alania…the daughter of the king there"[1676]. She became the emperor's mistress and was granted the title Augusta[1677]. Zonaras records that, after the death of Empress Zoe, Emperor Konstantinos fell in love with "adulescentulam quondam Alani principis filiam, obsidem Romanis datam" and installed her as "Augustam"[1678]. The Georgian Chronicle records that Emperor Konstantinos IX requested "of Bagrat his sister Goranduxt"[1679]. The Georgian Chronicle records that "Georgi" died leaving "two sons Bagrat and Demetre and two daughters"[1680]. The source contains no indication of the name of the mother of the two daughters."
Med Lands cites:
[1655] Psellos, pp. 161-2.
[1656] Psellos, p. 163.
[1657] Psellos, pp. 162-3.
[1658] Psellos, pp. 163-5.
[1659] Psellos, p. 170.
[1660] Psellos, pp. 205-219.
[1661] Psellos, pp. 221-4.
[1662] Cedrenus II, col. 342.
[1663] Psellos, p. 162.
[1664] Psellos, p. 163.
[1665] Zonaras XVII, 20, p. 615.
[1666] Psellos, p. 180.
[1667] Where her lover was buried beside her after his own death, see Psellos, p. 189, footnote 1.
[1668] Zonaras XVII, 21, p. 618.
[1669] Psellos, pp. 180-1.
[1670] Psellos, p. 163.
[1671] Psellos, p. 180 footnote 1.
[1672] Psellos, p. 184.
[1673] Psellos, p. 163.
[1674] Psellos, pp. 183-4.
[1675] Psellos, p. 189.
[1676] Psellos, p. 235.
[1677] Psellos, pp. 235-7.
[1678] Zonaras XVII, 28, p. 648.
[1679] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 103.
[1680] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 101.1

Family

Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium b. c 1000, d. 11 Jan 1055

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#KonstantinosIXdied1055. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pulkheria Argyra: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00564479&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00564480&tree=LEO

Henry (?) of Stirling1

M, #93295, d. after 12 February 1236
FatherDavid (?) Earl of Huntingdon1 b. c 1144, d. 17 Jun 1219
Last Edited4 Jul 2020
     Henry (?) of Stirling died after 12 February 1236.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     " HENRY of Stirling (-after 12 Feb 1236). "Walkelino filio Stephani, Willo Wacelin Henr et Henrico fil meis…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Comes David frater regis Scotorum" donated "elemosinam totum Kanum et Kuneueth" to St Andrew’s priory[521]. "…Henrico filio comitis…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey[522]. It is unlikely that Henry was legitimate as, unlike his [half-brother] David, he is not named as a beneficiary of the foundation in the body of the charter. Henry is also named well down the list of subscribers to the document, indicating an inferior position relative to the other subscribers. "…Waltero Olifard, Henrico filio comitis David…" subscribed the undated charter under which "comes David frater regis Scottorum" donated "totam terram de Perthegus…et…terre in Pethannot" to Lindores Abbey[523]. "…duobus Henricis filiis comitis…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Comes David frater regis Scocie" donated "Culsamuel et…Munkegyn" to Lindores Abbey[524]. "Johannes de Scocia comes Huntedun" donated "terram…de Lundors" to Lindores Abbey by undated charter, subscribed by "Henrico de Striuelin fratre meo…"[525]. "Henricus de Brechyn filius comitis Dauid" donated revenue to Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "Juliane sponse mee et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Domino Henrico de Striuelin fratre meo…Willelmo filio meo…"[526]. "…Henrico de Strivelin filio comitis David…" subscribed the charter dated 12 Feb 1236 under which Alexander II King of Scotland confirmed donations to Kinloss[527]."
Med Lands cites:
[520] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[521] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 238.
[522] Lindores, II, p. 2.
[523] Lindores, VIII, p. 12.
[524] Lindores, V, p. 10.
[525] Lindores, XV, p. 18.
[526] Lindores, LX, p. 66.
[527] Stuart, J. (1872) Records of the Monastery of Kinloss (Edinburgh) ("Kinloss"), p. 114.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Daviddied1219. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Oda von Meissen1

F, #93296, d. 1111
FatherOtto I (?) graf von Weimar , markgraf von Meissen, Graf von Orlamünde2,3 b. c 1005, d. 1067
MotherAdela (?) de Louvain2,3 d. 1083
Last Edited4 Jul 2020
     Oda von Meissen married Ekbert II (?) Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf of Meissen, son of Ekbert/Egbert I von Braunschweig Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf von Meissen and Irmingard de Susa, before 1080.4,2,3,5
Oda von Meissen died in 1111.2,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:144; 8:131a.2 Oda von Meissen was also known as Oda von Weimar.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "ODA (-1111). The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Odam, Cunigundam, Adelheidam" as the three daughters of Markgraf Otto & his wife, specifying that Oda married "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit"[1185].
     "m (before 1080) EKBERT [II] Graf von Braunschweig Markgraf von Meissen, son of EKBERT [I] Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Irmgard [Aemilia/Imula] di Susa (-3 Jul 1090)."
Med Lands cites:
[1185] Annalista Saxo 1062.3


; Per Med Lands:
     "EKBERT [II] von Braunschweig (-killed 3 Jul 1090). The Notæ Sancti Blasii name "Ecbertus, Gertrudim" as children of "Ecbertum [filium Ludolfi]"[63]. "Heinricus…rex" granted property "pro remedio animæ marchionis Eggeberti…in pago Milsca in villa Goreliz sub comitatu Eggeberti filii predicti marchionis" to the cathedral of Meissen by charter dated 11 Dec 1071[64]. The Annalista Saxo describes "Ekberto comiti de Bruneswic" as patruelis of Emperor Konrad II, when recording the latter installing him as Markgraf, and names him "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit" in an earlier passage[65]. Graf von Braunschweig. He was installed as EKBERT II Markgraf von Meissen. This was presumably after the death of his father as there is no record of any other appointment as Markgraf at that time, although Ekbert would have been very young then. The Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses record that "Ecbertus marchio" was the founder of "Cyriaci martyris"[66]. He supported anti-king Rudolf von Rheinfelden against Heinrich IV King of Germany during the war of investitures, as shown by the charter dated 25 Mar 1079 under which "Rudolfus…rex" donated property "Rokeborthurf in pago castri Zalin", on the request of "marchionis Ekiberti pro remedio patris eius pie memorie Ekiberti marchionis", to the church of Meissen[67]. This also demonstrates that his rebellion against King Heinrich in early 1086 or before was not a new development. The king deposed Ekbert as Markgraf and redistributed his property, as shown by the charters under which "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property to the church of Utrecht, dated 7 Feb 1086 in "comitatum Fresie nomine Ostrogowe et Westregowe…quam Eggebertus in hoc comitatu habuit"[68], and dated 3 Apr 1086 at "Islegowe…quam Ekbertus exinde habuerat" (which refers to "nos marchionem Ekbertum post priorem rebellionem adoptivus ille noster filius Ekbertus")[69]. The Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii records that "Egbertus marchio" was killed in Jul 1090[70].
     "m (before 1080) ODA von Weimar, daughter of OTTO Graf von Weimar Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Adela de Louvain (-1111). The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Odam, Cunigundam, Adelheidam" as the three daughters of Markgraf Otto by his wife, specifying that Oda married "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit"[71]."
Med Lands cites:
[52] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[53] Annalista Saxo 1057.
[54] MGH Diplomata V, D H III 279, p. 380.
[55] Lamberti Annales, 1057, MGH SS V, p. 158.
[56] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 112, p. 146.
[57] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 157, p. 203.
[58] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 187, p. 243.
[59] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 189, p. 245.
[60] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 205, p. 262.
[61] Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 825.
[62] Annalista Saxo 1036.
[63] Notæ Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 827.
[64] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 246, p. 311.
[65] Annalista Saxo 1062 and 1067.
[66] Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses 1090, MGH SS XXIV, p. 824.
[67] MGH Diplomata VI.2, Urkunde König Rudolf 1, p. 676.
[68] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 386, p. 511.
[69] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 388, p. 513.
[70] Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 825.
[71] Annalista Saxo 1062.5

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080007&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oda von Meissen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080007&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OdaWeimardied1111. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ekbert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080006&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRUNSWICK.htm#EkbertIIdied1090

Ekbert II (?) Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf of Meissen1

M, #93297, d. 3 July 1090
FatherEkbert/Egbert I von Braunschweig Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf von Meissen1,2,3 b. c 1036, d. 11 Jan 1068
MotherIrmingard de Susa1,2,4 b. c 1022, d. 28 Jan 1078
Last Edited13 Jul 2020
     Ekbert II (?) Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf of Meissen married Oda von Meissen, daughter of Otto I (?) graf von Weimar , markgraf von Meissen, Graf von Orlamünde and Adela (?) de Louvain, before 1080.1,5,6,2
Ekbert II (?) Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf of Meissen died on 3 July 1090.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ODA (-1111). The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Odam, Cunigundam, Adelheidam" as the three daughters of Markgraf Otto & his wife, specifying that Oda married "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit"[1185].
     "m (before 1080) EKBERT [II] Graf von Braunschweig Markgraf von Meissen, son of EKBERT [I] Graf von Braunschweig, Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Irmgard [Aemilia/Imula] di Susa (-3 Jul 1090)."
Med Lands cites:
[1185] Annalista Saxo 1062.6


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 8:131a.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "EKBERT [II] von Braunschweig (-killed 3 Jul 1090). The Notæ Sancti Blasii name "Ecbertus, Gertrudim" as children of "Ecbertum [filium Ludolfi]"[63]. "Heinricus…rex" granted property "pro remedio animæ marchionis Eggeberti…in pago Milsca in villa Goreliz sub comitatu Eggeberti filii predicti marchionis" to the cathedral of Meissen by charter dated 11 Dec 1071[64]. The Annalista Saxo describes "Ekberto comiti de Bruneswic" as patruelis of Emperor Konrad II, when recording the latter installing him as Markgraf, and names him "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit" in an earlier passage[65]. Graf von Braunschweig. He was installed as EKBERT II Markgraf von Meissen. This was presumably after the death of his father as there is no record of any other appointment as Markgraf at that time, although Ekbert would have been very young then. The Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses record that "Ecbertus marchio" was the founder of "Cyriaci martyris"[66]. He supported anti-king Rudolf von Rheinfelden against Heinrich IV King of Germany during the war of investitures, as shown by the charter dated 25 Mar 1079 under which "Rudolfus…rex" donated property "Rokeborthurf in pago castri Zalin", on the request of "marchionis Ekiberti pro remedio patris eius pie memorie Ekiberti marchionis", to the church of Meissen[67]. This also demonstrates that his rebellion against King Heinrich in early 1086 or before was not a new development. The king deposed Ekbert as Markgraf and redistributed his property, as shown by the charters under which "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property to the church of Utrecht, dated 7 Feb 1086 in "comitatum Fresie nomine Ostrogowe et Westregowe…quam Eggebertus in hoc comitatu habuit"[68], and dated 3 Apr 1086 at "Islegowe…quam Ekbertus exinde habuerat" (which refers to "nos marchionem Ekbertum post priorem rebellionem adoptivus ille noster filius Ekbertus")[69]. The Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii records that "Egbertus marchio" was killed in Jul 1090[70].
     "m (before 1080) ODA von Weimar, daughter of OTTO Graf von Weimar Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Adela de Louvain (-1111). The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Odam, Cunigundam, Adelheidam" as the three daughters of Markgraf Otto by his wife, specifying that Oda married "Ecbertus marchio iunior de Bruneswic et hec sine liberis obit"[71]."
Med Lands cites:
[52] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[53] Annalista Saxo 1057.
[54] MGH Diplomata V, D H III 279, p. 380.
[55] Lamberti Annales, 1057, MGH SS V, p. 158.
[56] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 112, p. 146.
[57] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 157, p. 203.
[58] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 187, p. 243.
[59] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 189, p. 245.
[60] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 205, p. 262.
[61] Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 825.
[62] Annalista Saxo 1036.
[63] Notæ Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 827.
[64] MGH Diplomata VI.1, D H IV 246, p. 311.
[65] Annalista Saxo 1062 and 1067.
[66] Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses 1090, MGH SS XXIV, p. 824.
[67] MGH Diplomata VI.2, Urkunde König Rudolf 1, p. 676.
[68] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 386, p. 511.
[69] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 388, p. 513.
[70] Libro Memoriarum Sancti Blasii, MGH SS XXIV, p. 825.
[71] Annalista Saxo 1062.2

Family

Oda von Meissen d. 1111

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ekbert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080006&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRUNSWICK.htm#EkbertIIdied1090. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ekbert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060578&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080003&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oda von Meissen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080007&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OdaWeimardied1111

Cearbholl (?)1

M, #93298
FatherOilliol Fionn (?)2
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited6 Jul 2020
     GAV-29.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 86,114,144.3

Family

Child

Adelaide (?)1

F, #93299
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited15 Aug 2020

Family

Amadeo III (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta and Maurienne b. c 1092, d. 30 Aug 1148
Children

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#AmedeeIIIdied1148B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html#EA3
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027376&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde d'Albon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027372&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilde de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020557&tree=LEO

Etienne/Guy de Traves Seigneur de Traves1

M, #93300, b. circa 1040, d. after 1098
FatherHugues de Traves Seigneur de Traves3 b. c 1015, d. a 1073
MotherGwendamode de Bagé2
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited15 Dec 2019
     Etienne/Guy de Traves Seigneur de Traves was born circa 1040.1
Etienne/Guy de Traves Seigneur de Traves died after 1098.1
     GAV-26.

; Per Wikipedia article "Liste des seigneurs de Traves":
     "Étienne/Guy de Traves, (vers 1040 - après 1098), seigneur de Traves. Il est présent en 1098 lorsqu'Amédée Ier de Montfaucon se rend vassal de Hugues III, archevêque de Besançon.
Mariage et succession :
     "Son épouse est inconnue (voir toutefois l'article Gislebert de Faucogney), il a Thibaud qui suit.
Sources (See original Wikipedia article for links to some of these sources)
** Jean Baptiste Guillaume, Histoire généalogique des sires de Salins au comté de Bourgogne, C.F. Mourgeon, 1757 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 92 à 109
** Louis Moreri, Le grand dictionnaire historique ou Le melange curieux de l'Histoire sacrée et profane, libraires associés Le Mercier, Desaint et Saillant, Jean-Thomas Herissant, Boudet, Vincent, Le Prieur, 1759 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 656
** François-Ignace Dunod de Charnage, Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire du comté de Bourgogne, contenant l'idée générale de la noblesse et le nobiliaire du dit comté, J.-B. Charmet, 1740 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 232 à 234
** Léopold Niepce, Histoire de Sennecey, de ses seigneurs, du canton de Sennecey-le-grand et de ses dix-huit communes, Dejussieu, 1866 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 316 à 317
** Médiéval Généalogie : [1] [archive]
Notes et références
1. Cartulaire de l'Abbaye Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon, Charte XXXI, vers 1073-87.
2. Cité par Albert d'Aix au siège de Siège de Nicée : "Robertus filius Gerardi…Milo…cognomine Louez…Walterus de Domedart et eius filius Bernardus…Ruthardus filius Godefridi…Rodulfus ditissimus copiarum…Gisilbertus de Treva (Traves) unus de principibus Burgundiæ…Oliverus de castro Jussi…Achar de Montmerla…Walterus de Verveis, Arnulfus de Tyr, Johannes de Namecca…"
3. Charte du 28 octobre 1157 : "Comes Stephanus...et fratrem meum comitem Gerardum" termine une dispute avec l'abbaye de Cherlieu, avec le consentement de "matris nostræ...comitis Willelmi patris nostri et avi nostri domini Theobaldi de Treva", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive]).
4. Le nécrologe de l'abbaye de la Charité enregistre le décès de "Alaida domina de Treva fundatrix huius domus", Médiéval Généalogie, seigneurs de Traves, Thibaut (lire en ligne [archive])
5. "Renardus de Choiseul domicellus (le seigneur Renard de Choiseul) filius domni Roberti de Choiseul (fils du seigneur Robert de Choiseul) domini de Trove (seigneur de Traves) et Margareta eius uxor domicella (son épouse Marguerite), filia quondam domini Henrici domini Branciduni (fille du seigneur Henri de Brancion)", Médiéval Généalogie, Raynard de Choiseul (lire en ligne [archive])."4

; Per Genealogics: "Etienne/Guy was born about 1040, the son of Hugues de Traves and Gwendamode de Bagé. With an unnamed wife he had a son Thibault who would have progeny. Etienne/Guy was present in 1098 when Amédée I de Montfaucon became a vassal of Hugues III, archbishop of Besançon."1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne|Guy de Traves: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00633266&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gwendamode de Bagé: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00633265&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Traves: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00633264&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_seigneurs_de_Traves. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.