Stefan (?) von Reidenburg, Burggrave of Regensburg1

M, #57031
Last Edited3 Jul 2003

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Laszlo (?) of Hungary1

M, #57032, b. 1101, d. 1112
FatherKoloman "the Bookish" (Kálmán "Könyves") (?) King of Hungary1,2,3 b. c 1063, d. 3 Feb 1116
MotherFelicia (?) of Sicily1,4 b. 1078, d. c 1102
Last Edited21 Apr 2020
     Laszlo (?) of Hungary was born in 1101.1
Laszlo (?) of Hungary died in 1112.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kálmán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020725&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#KalmanI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Felicia of Sicily: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139746&tree=LEO

(?) (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #57033, b. circa 1102
FatherKoloman "the Bookish" (Kálmán "Könyves") (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1063, d. 3 Feb 1116
MotherFelicia (?) of Sicily1,2,4,7 b. 1078, d. c 1102
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     (?) (?) of Hungary was born circa 1102.2 She married Vladimirko Vladimirovitch (?) 1st Prince of Galitzia/Halicz, son of Volodar Rostislavich (?) Prince of Tmutorokan and Przemysl and Anna(?) (?) von Pommern, circa 1117.1,2,8,3

     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 129.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter. Baumgarten refers to the wife of Prince Vladimirko as the daughter of King Kálmán but only cites one secondary source in support[573].
m ([1117]) VLADIMIRKO Volodarovich, son of VOLODAR Rostislavich Prince of Peremysl & his wife [Anna] von Pommern (-1153). He became the first Prince of Galich in 1144."
Med lands cites: [573] Baumgarten (1927), p. 25, citing Tatyszczew Histoire de Russie, II 119.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "VLADIMIRKO Volodarovich, son of VOLODAR Rostislavich Prince of Peremyshl & his wife [Anna] von Pommern (-1153). He became the first Prince of Galich in 1144. After his objection to Vsevolod Olegovich appointing his son as Prince of Volynia, Prince Vladimirko was defeated by a coalition of reigning princes led by the Grand Prince of Kiev. He was deposed as Prince by the people of Galich in favour of his nephew Ivan Rostislavich Prince of Zvenigorod, but forced his way back into Galich and expelled Prince Ivan. He presided over the expansion of Galich, allying himself with Iurii Prince of Suzdal and Emperor Manuel I, and invaded Kiev in 1149. Galich also became the seat of a bishop[624].
     "m ([1117]) --- of Hungary, daughter of KÁLMÁN "Könyves/the Bookman" King of Hungary & his first wife --- of Sicily. Baumgarten refers to the wife of Prince Vladimirko as the daughter of King Kálmán but only cites one secondary source in support[625]. "
Med lands cites:
[624] Franklin & Shepard (1998), pp. 329-30.
[625] Baumgarten (1927), p. 25, citing Tatyszczew Histoire de Russie, II 119.
[626] Baumgarten (1927), pp. 15-17.10

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139743&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik3.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#DaughterMVladimirkoVolodarovichPeremysl. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kálmán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020725&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#KalmanI
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Felicia de Hauteville: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139746&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimirko Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139742&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139743&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirkoVolodarovichdied1153B.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jaroslav Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139744&tree=LEO

Vladimirko Vladimirovitch (?) 1st Prince of Galitzia/Halicz1,2

M, #57034, b. circa 1095, d. 1153
FatherVolodar Rostislavich (?) Prince of Tmutorokan and Przemysl3,1,2,4 d. 19 Mar 1124
MotherAnna(?) (?) von Pommern5,1,4
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Vladimirko Vladimirovitch (?) 1st Prince of Galitzia/Halicz was born circa 1095; Genealogy.EU says b. 1104; Genealogics says b. c1095.2,6 He married (?) (?) of Hungary, daughter of Koloman "the Bookish" (Kálmán "Könyves") (?) King of Hungary and Felicia (?) of Sicily, circa 1117.7,8,1,2

Vladimirko Vladimirovitch (?) 1st Prince of Galitzia/Halicz died in 1153.7,1,2,6,9
      ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Vladimirko, 1st Pr of Galitzia (1144-53), *1104, +1153."2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Volodymyrko Volodarovych (Volodymyrko Volodarevych, Ukrainian: ??????????? ???????????, Russian: ???????? ??????????? (??????????), Vladimir Volodarevich "Vladimirko") (* 1104 - † 1152) was a Galician prince (from 1141, according to others from 1144), son of Volodar Rostyslavych.
     "In 1124 became Zvenyhorod prince, and in 1129, after the death of his brother Rostyslav, captured Peremyshl.
     "Gradually united Peremyshl, Zvenyhorod, Halych and Terebovlia land at one Principality of Halych. The capital of the principality was moved to Halych in 1141 (according to others in 1144), occupied after the death of his nephew Ivan.
     "Tried to unite under his authority and Volyn principality, but to fight for them with the Kiev Prince Vsevolod II Olgovichs failed. Ally performed by Yuri Dolgorukiy in its struggle against the Kyiv Prince Izyaslav Mstyslavych and helped win Kyiv.
     "In alliance with the Byzantine Emperor Manuel Comnenus he led the long struggle against the Kingdom of Hungary. In 1152 signed a peace treaty with Hungarian king Gejza.
     "He had a son: Yaroslav Osmomysl prince of Halych.
External links
** Volodymyrko Volodarovych in the Internet Encyclopedia of Ukraine, vol. 5 (1993.)10"

; Per Genalogy.EU: "Vladimirko, Pr of Zwenihorod (1124-29), Pr of Przemysl (1129-53), Pr of Terebovlya (1141-53), united all these lands into the Princedom of Halicz (or Galicia) in 1141, *1104, +II.1153; m.ca 1117 N, a dau.of King Koloman of Hungary."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 129.9 Vladimirko Vladimirovitch (?) 1st Prince of Galitzia/Halicz was also known as Wladimir (?) Prince of Halicz.7,1

; Per Genealogics:
     "Vladimirko was the son of Volodar (Vladimir), Prince of Tmutorokan and Przemysl, and a Pomeranian princess. About 1117 he was married to a Hungarian princess, the daughter of Kálmán, king of Hungary, and Felicia de Hauteville. Their son Jaroslav Vladimirkovitch would have progeny. In 1124 Vladimirko became prince of Zvenyhorod, and in 1129, after the death of his brother Rostyslav, he captured Przemysl. He gradually united Przemysl, Zvenyhorod, Halicz and Terebovlia into the principality of Halicz. The capital of the principality was moved to Halicz in 1141. Vladimirko attempted to unite the historic region of Volhynia under his authority as a principality, but his struggle for it with Vsevolod II, grand duke of Kiev, was unsuccessful. He was an ally of Youry Dolgoruki, prince of Rostow and Suzdal, in his struggle against his nephew Isjaslaw II, son of Youry's elder brother Mstislav I, and he helped Youry to regain Kiev. In alliance with Manuel I Komnenos, emperor of Byzantium, Vladimirko led a long struggle against the kingdom of Hungary. However in 1152 he signed a peace treaty with Hungarian king Geisa II. Vladimirko died in 1153."6

; Per Med Lands:
     "VLADIMIRKO Volodarovich, son of VOLODAR Rostislavich Prince of Peremyshl & his wife [Anna] von Pommern (-1153). He became the first Prince of Galich in 1144. After his objection to Vsevolod Olegovich appointing his son as Prince of Volynia, Prince Vladimirko was defeated by a coalition of reigning princes led by the Grand Prince of Kiev. He was deposed as Prince by the people of Galich in favour of his nephew Ivan Rostislavich Prince of Zvenigorod, but forced his way back into Galich and expelled Prince Ivan. He presided over the expansion of Galich, allying himself with Iurii Prince of Suzdal and Emperor Manuel I, and invaded Kiev in 1149. Galich also became the seat of a bishop[624].
     "m ([1117]) --- of Hungary, daughter of KÁLMÁN "Könyves/the Bookman" King of Hungary & his first wife --- of Sicily. Baumgarten refers to the wife of Prince Vladimirko as the daughter of King Kálmán but only cites one secondary source in support[625]. "
Med lands cites:
[624] Franklin & Shepard (1998), pp. 329-30.
[625] Baumgarten (1927), p. 25, citing Tatyszczew Histoire de Russie, II 119.
[626] Baumgarten (1927), pp. 15-17.9
He was Prince of Halics (Halych) between 1141 and 1153.10 He was 1st Prince of Galitzia between 1144 and 1153.2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimirko Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139742&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimir (Volodar): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139740&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VolodarRostislavichdied1124B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Pommern: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139741&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimirko Vladimirovitch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139742&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139743&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirkoVolodarovichdied1153B.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volodymyrko_Volodarovych. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jaroslav Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139744&tree=LEO

Borisz Conrad (?)1

M, #57035, b. circa 1112, d. between 1154 and 1155
FatherKoloman "the Bookish" (Kálmán "Könyves") (?) King of Hungary1,2,3 b. c 1063, d. 3 Feb 1116
MotherEuphemia/Sofia Vladimirovna (?) of Kiev1,4 d. 4 Apr 1139
Last Edited21 Apr 2020
     Borisz Conrad (?) was born circa 1112 at Kyiv (Kiev), Ukraine (now).1
Borisz Conrad (?) died between 1154 and 1155.1
      ; parentage uncertain] Borisz Conrad, *in Kiev ca 1112, +1154/55, a contestant for the throne on his brothers death; m.Anna, dau.of Constantine Dukas. Children:
"     C1. Koloman/Constantinos Calamanos, Regent of Cilicia (1163-75), settled in Kilikia and left descendants there
"     C2. Stephanos, Regent in Cilicia 1164.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kálmán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020725&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#KalmanI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jevfemija Vladimirovna of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330256&tree=LEO

Adelaide (?) of Hungary1

F, #57036, b. between 1105 and 1107, d. 15 September 1140
FatherÁlmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia1,2,3 b. c 1068, d. 1 Sep 1129
MotherPredslava Sviatopolkovna (?) of Kiev1
Last Edited17 Jul 2020
     Adelaide (?) of Hungary was born between 1105 and 1107.1 She married Sobieslav I Udalrich (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke in Znaim and Brünn, son of Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia and Swietoslawa/Swatawa (?) of Poland, in 1123.1,4

Adelaide (?) of Hungary died on 15 September 1140.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almos of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020701&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Almosdied1129. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Elzbietadied1209

Zsofia (?) of Hungary1

F, #57037, b. between 1136 and 1137
FatherBéla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary1,2,3 b. bt 1108 - 1110, d. 13 Feb 1141
MotherJelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary1,4,3 b. a 1109, d. a 1146
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Zsofia (?) of Hungary was born between 1136 and 1137.1
      ; a nun.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO

Erszebet (?) of Hungary1

F, #57038, b. circa 1128, d. circa 1155
FatherBéla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary2,3,1 b. bt 1108 - 1110, d. 13 Feb 1141
MotherJelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary2,4,1 b. a 1109, d. a 1146
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Erszebet (?) of Hungary was born circa 1128.2 She married Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania, son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland and Salome (?) von Berg-Schelklingen, between 1136 and 1140
;
His 1st wife.5,2,6,7
Erszebet (?) of Hungary died circa 1155.5
     Erszebet (?) of Hungary was also known as Elizabeth (?) of Hungary.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "MIESZKO of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1126/27]-13 Mar 1202). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) the five sons of Boles?aw III "Vladislaum, Boleslaum, Mesiconem, Kazimirum, Henricum", specifying that Mieszko succeeded in "Gneznam et Pomeraniam"[269]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Boleslaum quartum, Mesiconem tercium, Henricum primum, et Kazimirum secundum, necnon Judittam" as the children of "Boleslaus" and his second wife "ex Theutunica", adding that their father granted "Gnesnam et Pomeraniam" to Mieszko[270]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Vergescelaus…Mesico et Casemarus" as three brothers "in Polonia"[271]. He succeeded in 1138 as MIESZKO III "Stary/the Old" Prince of Greater Poland. "Miecislaus Senex Dux Poloniæ" donated property to Ladensi monastery by charter dated 1145[272]. The dating clause of a charter dated 1153 names "Bolezlao, Mesikone, Henrico, fratribus germanis in Polonia principantibus"[273]. Prince of Krakow 1173-1177, 1190, and 1198/99-1202. Duke of Pomerania 1138-1202. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Mesko dux frater senior Kazimiri" demanded Krakow from the sons of Kazimierz, specifying that Leszek defeated Mieszko at Moscow, but that Mieszko obtained Krakow[274]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that Mieszko III Prince of Poland invaded Russia in support of "sororis sue primogeniti Romani, patris Danielis" who has been expelled by "fratres de Russia"[275]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1202 of "dux Mesko frater Kazimiri"[276].
     "m firstly ([1136/40]) ERSZÉBET of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia ([1128]-before 1155). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the first wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Ungarorum" but does not name her[277]. She is named “Elisabeth” in Europäische Stammtafeln[278], but the source on which this is based has not been identified.
     "m secondly ([1151/54]) IEVDOKIA Iziaslavna, daughter of IZIASLAV II Mstislavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife --- of Lithuania. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the second wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Russie"[279]. Baumgarten names and records the parentage of the second wife of Mieszko III but cites only one secondary source in support[280].
     "Prince Mieszko & his first wife had five children.
     "Prince Mieszko & his second wife had five children."
Med Lands cites:
[269] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[270] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 92.
[271] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1146, MGH SS XXIII, p. 838.
[272] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, I, p. 1.
[273] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, II, p. 4.
[274] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1195 and 1196, MGH SS XIX, p. 593.
[275] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 101.
[276] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1202, MGH SS XIX, p. 594.
[277] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[278] ES II 154.
[279] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[280] Baumgarten (1927), p. 26, citing Balzer, Genealogia Piastów 165-7.7

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020775&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIIdied1202
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Odon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165071&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludmilla of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026289&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030039&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Judytadiedafter12Dec1201
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079717&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Elzbietadied1209

Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania1,2

M, #57039, b. circa 1126, d. 13 March 1202
FatherBoleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland1,3,4,5,6 b. 20 Aug 1086, d. 28 Oct 1138
MotherSalome (?) von Berg-Schelklingen1,7,8,9,5,6 b. b 1101, d. 27 Jul 1144
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania was born circa 1126.1,5,10 He married Erszebet (?) of Hungary, daughter of Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary and Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary, between 1136 and 1140
;
His 1st wife.1,11,7,10 Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania married Yevdokia/Ewdokija Izyaslavna (?) of Kiev, daughter of Izyaslav II Mstislavitch (?) Grand Duke of Kiev and NN von Hohenstaufen, between 1151 and 1154
;
His 2nd wife.1,7,2,10
Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania died on 13 March 1202 at Kalisz, Poland.1,7,10
Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania was buried after 13 March 1202 at Cathedral of Saint Paul the Apostle, Ostrowo Koscielne, Powiat slupecki, Wielkopolskie, Poland; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1126
     DEATH     13 Mar 1202 (aged 75–76), Ostrowo Ko?cielne, Wielkopolskie, Poland
     He was Duke of Greater Poland from 1138 and High Duke of Poland, with interruptions, from 1173 until his death. He was the fourth and second surviving son of Duke Boles?aw III Wrymouth of Poland, by his second wife Salomea, daughter of the German count Henry of Berg-Schelklingen.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Boleslaw III Wrymouth 1086–1138
     Spouse
          Elizabeth Of Hungary 1128–1154
     Siblings
          Casimir of Masovia unknown–1194
          Vladislas II King Of Poland 1105–1159
          Richeza 1116–1160
     Children
          Odon Pozna?ski 1149–1194
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Saint Paul the Apostle, Ostrowo Ko?cielne, Powiat slupecki, Wielkopolskie, Poland
     Created by: Mademoiselle
     Added: 30 Dec 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 122475165.12
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 120, 121.5 EDV-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Mieszko III 'the Old' of the Piast dynasty was duke of Greater Poland 1138-1202, and high duke of all Poland, with interruptions, from 1173 to 1202. He was born about 1126, the son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty, king of Poland, and Salome von Berg-Schelklingen. Mieszko was Boleslaw's third son, and the couple's second.
     "About 1140 Mieszko married Elisabeth of Hungary, daughter of Béla II 'the Blind', king of Hungary, and Jelena of Serbia. They had two sons, Odon and Stephen, three daughters Elisabeth, Ludmilla and Judith. Odon and their daughters would have progeny.
     "About 1154 Mieszko married Jevdokia of Ruthenia, daughter of a king of Ruthenia (ruler of Kievan Rus'), and his wife who would have been kinswoman of Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa. Her father was probably one of the ruling sons of Mstislav I, themselves allies of Mieszko III - either Isjaslaw Mstislavich of Volynia or Rostislav Mstislavich of Smolensk. Of their three children only Anastasia is recorded with progeny, marrying Bogislaw I, Herzog von Pommern-Stettin.
     "In accordance with the testament of Mieszko's father Boleslaw III Krzywousty, Poland was divided into hereditary provinces distributed among his sons, with the royal province of Krákow being reserved for the eldest son, who was to be the high duke of all Poland.
     "The province of Greater Poland was granted to Mieszko (and was subsequently divided among Mieszko's descendants and successors).
     "In 1173 Mieszko was promoted to the throne of Kraków and became high duke of Poland (in Latin: _dux maximus, dux totius Poloniae_). However he was soon expelled from Kraków by his younger brother Kazimierz II, and from Greater Poland by his son Odon. The main reason of Odon's rebellion was the favouritism showed by Mieszko III to his children from his second marriage, and Mieszko's attempts to force him to become a priest in order to eliminate him from the succession. Mieszko was forced to escape and went to Bohemia (where he unsuccessfully sought the help of his son-in-law Duke Sobeslav II), Germany and Pomerania (where Mieszko obtained the support of his other son-in-law Bogislaw I, Herzog von Pommern-Stettin). Mieszko never abdicated his rights or ambitions, and returned to Kraków four times, recovering his Greater Poland domains in 1182 and the title of High Duke in 1191. He died on 13 March 1202."5

; Per Genalogy.EU: "Mieszko III "Stary" "the Old", Pr of Cracow (1173-77) + (1190) + (1199-1202), Pr of Great Poland (1138-77)+(1194-1202), Duke of Pomerania (1138-1202), *1126/27, +Kalisz 13.3.1202; 1m: 1136/40 Elisabeth of Hungary (*1128 +ca 1155); 2m: 1151/54 Yevdokia, dau.of Gr Pr Isjaslaw II of Kiev; for his issue see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html."1 Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania was also known as Mieszko III (?) Hugh Duke of Poland, Duke of Gniezno, Poznan and Kalisz.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "MIESZKO of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1126/27]-13 Mar 1202). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) the five sons of Boles?aw III "Vladislaum, Boleslaum, Mesiconem, Kazimirum, Henricum", specifying that Mieszko succeeded in "Gneznam et Pomeraniam"[269]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Boleslaum quartum, Mesiconem tercium, Henricum primum, et Kazimirum secundum, necnon Judittam" as the children of "Boleslaus" and his second wife "ex Theutunica", adding that their father granted "Gnesnam et Pomeraniam" to Mieszko[270]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Vergescelaus…Mesico et Casemarus" as three brothers "in Polonia"[271]. He succeeded in 1138 as MIESZKO III "Stary/the Old" Prince of Greater Poland. "Miecislaus Senex Dux Poloniæ" donated property to Ladensi monastery by charter dated 1145[272]. The dating clause of a charter dated 1153 names "Bolezlao, Mesikone, Henrico, fratribus germanis in Polonia principantibus"[273]. Prince of Krakow 1173-1177, 1190, and 1198/99-1202. Duke of Pomerania 1138-1202. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Mesko dux frater senior Kazimiri" demanded Krakow from the sons of Kazimierz, specifying that Leszek defeated Mieszko at Moscow, but that Mieszko obtained Krakow[274]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that Mieszko III Prince of Poland invaded Russia in support of "sororis sue primogeniti Romani, patris Danielis" who has been expelled by "fratres de Russia"[275]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1202 of "dux Mesko frater Kazimiri"[276].
     "m firstly ([1136/40]) ERSZÉBET of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia ([1128]-before 1155). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the first wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Ungarorum" but does not name her[277]. She is named “Elisabeth” in Europäische Stammtafeln[278], but the source on which this is based has not been identified.
     "m secondly ([1151/54]) IEVDOKIA Iziaslavna, daughter of IZIASLAV II Mstislavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife --- of Lithuania. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the second wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Russie"[279]. Baumgarten names and records the parentage of the second wife of Mieszko III but cites only one secondary source in support[280].
     "Prince Mieszko & his first wife had five children.
     "Prince Mieszko & his second wife had five children."
Med Lands cites:
[269] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[270] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 92.
[271] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1146, MGH SS XXIII, p. 838.
[272] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, I, p. 1.
[273] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, II, p. 4.
[274] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1195 and 1196, MGH SS XIX, p. 593.
[275] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 101.
[276] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1202, MGH SS XIX, p. 594.
[277] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[278] ES II 154.
[279] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[280] Baumgarten (1927), p. 26, citing Balzer, Genealogia Piastów 165-7.10
He was Duke of Poland between 1173 and 1202.7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00224026. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020775&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#BoleslawIIIdied1138B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020775&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salome von Berg-Schelklingen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079683&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salomea_of_Berg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIIdied1202
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 November 2019), memorial page for Mieszko III “The Old” Stary (1126–13 Mar 1202), Find A Grave Memorial no. 122475165, citing Cathedral of Saint Paul the Apostle, Ostrowo Ko?cielne, Powiat slupecki, Wielkopolskie, Poland ; Maintained by Mademoiselle (contributor 46591139), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122475165/mieszko_iii-stary. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Odon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165071&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludmilla of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026289&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030039&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Judytadiedafter12Dec1201
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079717&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Elzbietadied1209
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079763&tree=LEO

Yevdokia/Ewdokija Izyaslavna (?) of Kiev1,2,3,4

F, #57040
FatherIzyaslav II Mstislavitch (?) Grand Duke of Kiev1,3,5 b. 1096, d. 13 Nov 1154
MotherNN von Hohenstaufen6,7,3,5 d. 1151
Last Edited15 May 2020
     Yevdokia/Ewdokija Izyaslavna (?) of Kiev married Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania, son of Boleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland and Salome (?) von Berg-Schelklingen, between 1151 and 1154
;
His 2nd wife.1,2,4,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MIESZKO of Poland, son of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1126/27]-13 Mar 1202). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names (in order) the five sons of Boles?aw III "Vladislaum, Boleslaum, Mesiconem, Kazimirum, Henricum", specifying that Mieszko succeeded in "Gneznam et Pomeraniam"[269]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Boleslaum quartum, Mesiconem tercium, Henricum primum, et Kazimirum secundum, necnon Judittam" as the children of "Boleslaus" and his second wife "ex Theutunica", adding that their father granted "Gnesnam et Pomeraniam" to Mieszko[270]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Vergescelaus…Mesico et Casemarus" as three brothers "in Polonia"[271]. He succeeded in 1138 as MIESZKO III "Stary/the Old" Prince of Greater Poland. "Miecislaus Senex Dux Poloniæ" donated property to Ladensi monastery by charter dated 1145[272]. The dating clause of a charter dated 1153 names "Bolezlao, Mesikone, Henrico, fratribus germanis in Polonia principantibus"[273]. Prince of Krakow 1173-1177, 1190, and 1198/99-1202. Duke of Pomerania 1138-1202. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Mesko dux frater senior Kazimiri" demanded Krakow from the sons of Kazimierz, specifying that Leszek defeated Mieszko at Moscow, but that Mieszko obtained Krakow[274]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that Mieszko III Prince of Poland invaded Russia in support of "sororis sue primogeniti Romani, patris Danielis" who has been expelled by "fratres de Russia"[275]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1202 of "dux Mesko frater Kazimiri"[276].
     "m firstly ([1136/40]) ERSZÉBET of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia ([1128]-before 1155). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the first wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Ungarorum" but does not name her[277]. She is named “Elisabeth” in Europäische Stammtafeln[278], but the source on which this is based has not been identified.
     "m secondly ([1151/54]) IEVDOKIA Iziaslavna, daughter of IZIASLAV II Mstislavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife --- of Lithuania. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the second wife of Mieszko III as "filia regis Russie"[279]. Baumgarten names and records the parentage of the second wife of Mieszko III but cites only one secondary source in support[280].
     "Prince Mieszko & his first wife had five children.
     "Prince Mieszko & his second wife had five children."
Med Lands cites:
[269] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[270] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 92.
[271] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1146, MGH SS XXIII, p. 838.
[272] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, I, p. 1.
[273] Codex Diplomaticus Poloniæ Tome I, II, p. 4.
[274] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1195 and 1196, MGH SS XIX, p. 593.
[275] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 101.
[276] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1202, MGH SS XIX, p. 594.
[277] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[278] ES II 154.
[279] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.
[280] Baumgarten (1927), p. 26, citing Balzer, Genealogia Piastów 165-7.8


; Ewdokija, dau.of Gr Pr Isjaslaw II of Kiev.1

Family

Mieszko III "Stary/the Old" (?) Prince of Krakow, Duke of Pomerania b. c 1126, d. 13 Mar 1202
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020775&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jevdokija Isjaslavna of Kiev: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122051&tree=LEO
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast2.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IziaslavIIMstislavichdied1154B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079973&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isjaslav II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079972&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIIdied1202
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079763&tree=LEO

Unknown Iaroslavna (?) of Galicia1,2,3

F, #57041
FatherYaroslav I "Osmomysl" Vladimirkovitch (?) Prince of Galicia2,4,3 b. c 1135, d. 1 Oct 1187
MotherOlga Georgievna (?) of Suzdal2,4,3 d. 14 Jul 1181
Last Edited21 Feb 2020
     Unknown Iaroslavna (?) of Galicia married Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary, son of Géza II (?) King of Hungary and Ievfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary, in 1167
; his 1st wife.1,2,3,5 Unknown Iaroslavna (?) of Galicia and Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary were divorced in 1168.1,2,3,5
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "--- Iaroslavna. Baumgarten mentions the betrothal of King István and the daughter of Prince Iaroslav, citing secondary sources in support, but comments that the marriage was not finalised and that she was sent back from Hungary in 1169[629]. Europäische Stammtafeln refers to this as King István's first marriage, stating that she was repudiated in 1168, but it is not known whether this is based on other sources[630].
     "Betrothed (1167, repudiated 1168) to ISTVÁN III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1147-murdered 4 Mar 1172)."
Med Lands cites: [630] ES II 154.3

; a dau.of Pr Jaroslav of Halicz, whom he repudiated in 1168.1

Family

Istvan/Stephen III (?) King of Hungary b. 1147, d. 4 Mar 1172

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik3.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IaroslavnaM1167IstvanIIIHungary. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IaroslavVladimirkovichdied1187.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIII

Maria Comnena1,2

F, #57042, b. March 1152, d. July 1182
FatherManolis (Manuel) I Comnenus Emperor of Byzantium1,3,2,4,5 b. 1122, d. 24 Sep 1180
MotherBertha/Eirene (?) von Sulzbach1,2,6,4,5 d. bt 1159 - 1160
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Maria Comnena and Béla III (?) King of Hungary were divorced.7 Maria Comnena was born in March 1152; Byzant 1 page says b. 1152; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1149.1,2,4 She and Béla III (?) King of Hungary were engaged between 1163 and 1164; the couple was engaged in 1163/4, Bela moved to Byzantium as heir to Manuel, but after Manuel had a son in 1169 the relationship, presumably never consummated, was dissolved [in 1969].1,8,2,7,9,4,5 Maria Comnena and Guglielmo/William II "the Good" (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Apulia, Prince of Capua were engaged between 1166 and 1167; Genealogics says engaged 11171; Med Lands says 1166/67.10,11,4,5 Maria Comnena married Rainer del Monferrato, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, in February 1180.12,1,2,4,5

Maria Comnena died in July 1182 at age 30; died of poisoning; Byzant 1 page says d. 1182; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1183.1,2,4
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "BÉLA, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[734]. The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[735]. The Chronicon Varadiense names "primus…rex Bela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geysa" as the four sons of "Geysa rex" (omitting reference to the second son)[736]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Belam" as the two sons of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[737]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Ingeburgis (matris Waldemari regis) soror, filia Izizlaui regis alia” married “regi Hungarie”, by whom she had “Bela modernum regem Hungarie” who married “sororem regis Francie”[738]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Bela frater eius" returned from Greece and succeeded King István[739]. Designated Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia by his father in 1162. Under the peace treaty signed in 1164 between his brother István III and Emperor Manuel I, Béla was confirmed as Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia, and sent to Constantinople (where he converted to the Greek Orthodox religion and adopted the name ALEXIOS) as István's acknowledged successor. He was installed as Duke of Szerem by his brother in 1165. The emperor granted him the title despot, betrothed him to his daughter and acknowledged him as his heir in Byzantium. The record of the synod of 1166 records the presence of “imperatore domino Manuele Comneno...despota...genero...eius domino Alexio...regi...”[740]. In 1169, when his own son Alexios Komnenos was born, Béla was demoted from despot to cæsar. The betrothal was terminated, although Béla remained in Constantinople as a member of the imperial family until 1172, when he succeeded his brother as BÉLA III King of Hungary and reconverted to Roman Catholicism. He was crowned 13 Jan 1174. "Bela III secundi Geyzæ regis filius…Ungariæ, Dalmatiæ, Croatiæ, Ramæque rex" confirmed the possessions of the church of Zagreb by charter dated 1175, witnessed by "Farcasio palatino comite, Subano Bano…"[741]. He remained a loyal ally of Byzantium until the death of Emperor Manuel in 1181, even sending troops to help the emperor fight the Seljuks of Konya in Anatolia in 1176[742]. He recovered Dalmatia, part of Croatia and the region of Sirmium in 1181. Following the murder in 1182 of Maria of Antioch, who was Emperor Manuel's widow and the older half-sister of King Béla's first wife, Béla invaded Byzantine territory in 1183, occupying Beograd and Brani?evo/Barancs. He formed an alliance with Stefan Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia, sacked Niš and Sardika [Sofija], and moved into Thrace[743]. His relative status as a monarch is shown by his statement of revenues, sent to France during the negotiations for his third marriage, which showed that they were equal to those of his French and English counterparts and only inferior to those of the two emperors[744]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Bela Græcus" "rid the country of robbers and brigands" and introduced the practice of submitting petitions in written form, as at the Roman Curia[745]. Béla III King of Hungary granted "totam terram pertinentem ad comitatum Modrus" to "comitis Bartholomæi de Veglia" by charter dated 1193, witnessed by "Dominico curiali comite et eodem de Budrugensi, Andres comite de Suprum, Both comite de Bohar, Egidio comite de Sala, Fulcone comite de Vosvar, --- comite Sanegg [Macario comite de Zaunuch]"[746]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1196…in cena Domini" of "rex Hungarie Bela"[747]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "IX Kal May" in 1190 of "rex Bela tertius filius Geysæ" and his burial "Albæ"[748]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "IX Kal May" in 1190 of "Bela" and his burial "in Albensi ecclesia"[749]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "VIII Kal Mai" of "Bel rex Ungarorum"[750]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Bela Græcus" was buried at Székesfehérvár[751].
     "Betrothed (1163, contract broken 1169) MARIA Komnene, daughter of Emperor MANUEL I & his first wife Bertha von Sulzbach (Mar 1152-poisoned Jul 1182). Niketas Choniates records the betrothal of "Iazæ filio Belæ" and "imperator…Mariam filiam"[752]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal between "Belam qui post Stephanum Geizæ filius" and "Mariæ filiæ suæ" (Emperor Manuel I)[753]. She later married Ranieri di Monferrato. William of Tyre names her and gives her parentage, when recording her marriage[754]. Regent of Byzantium, she was put to death with her husband by Emperor Andronikos I.
     "m firstly (1172) AGNES de Châtillon-sur-Loing, daughter of RENAUD de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch (1154-1184, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as second of the three daughters of "Raynaldus de Castellione uxor…relictam principis Raymundi" and her husband "rex Bela de Hungaria"[755]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Marie married "el re d'Ungaria", "Maria" presumably being an error for "Agnes"[756]. She lived at the court of Emperor Manuel I[757]. She adopted the name ANNA in Hungary. The Memoria Vivorum in the necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert names "Bela rex Ungarie et consors eiusdem regina Anna et liberi amborum Heimricus, Andreas, Margareta"[758].
     "Betrothed (after Sep 1185) to THEODORA Komnene, widow of ANDRONIKOS Lapardas sébastos, daughter of --- & his wife [Eirene Komnene Anema]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and betrothal has not yet been identified. Stiernon suggests that Theodora was the granddaughter of Theodora, daughter of Emperor Ioannes II[759], but this seems to be based on no more than guesswork. According to Kerbl, her betrothal to King Béla must have taken place after the murder of Emperor Andronikos I, with whom King Béla III did not enjoy close relations[760]. It was presumably arranged by Andronikos's successor Emperor Isaakios II Angelos. Theodora became a nun in 1186.
     "m secondly ([1185/86]) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de France Ctss de Vexin, widow of HENRY associate-King of England, daughter of LOUIS VII King of France & his second wife Infanta doña Constanza de Castilla y León ([1157]-Acre shortly after 10 Sep 1197). Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1158 that “...archdiaconus Cantuarensis...Thomas regis Cancellarius” arranged the betrothal of “Henricus primogenitus regis Anglorum” and “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, in a later passage recording the marriage of “filium regis Anglorum septennum” and “filiam regis Francorum triennem”[761]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Ingeburgis (matris Waldemari regis) soror, filia Izizlaui regis alia” married “regi Hungarie”, by whom she had “Bela modernum regem Hungarie” who married “sororem regis Francie”[762]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1186 that “Margarita soror regis Francorum” married “Bela regi Hungariæ”[763]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta soror regis Philippi" as widow of "iunior Henricus rex Anglorum" and records her second marriage to "Hungarorum regi Bela"[764]. Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95, reciting the consanguinity between Philippe II King of France and his second wife Ingebjörg of Denmark on which their divorce was based, which records that “Belæ Regis Hungariæ” married “sororem Philippi Regis Francorum”[765]. Her first husband's father arranged her second marriage so he could retain her dowry. She left for Palestine after being widowed for the second time. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the arrival of "une reine en Hongrie…veve sans hoir" at Tyre [in 1197] and her death eight days later, specifying that she was the sister of the mother of Henri Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem and had been "feme…le jouene roi d'Englietere…et suer…le roi Phelippe de France"[766]. "
Med Lands cites:
[734] Chronicon Zagrabiense, 14, p. 256.
[735] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[736] Chronicon Varadiense, 14, p. 256.
[737] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[738] Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[739] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[740] Patrologia Graeca, Vol. 140, Nicetæ Choniatæ Thesaurarii, Lib. XXV, Actio TertiaI, 1, col. 254.
[741] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 188.
[742] Fine (1991), p. 243.
[743] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 6.
[744] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[745] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 69, pp. 143-5.
[746] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 292.
[747] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873.
[748] Chronicon Varadiense, 16, p. 256.
[749] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[750] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
[751] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 69, p. 145.
[752] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 167.
[753] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 5, p. 215.
[754] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XXII.IV, p. 1067.
[755] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[756] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[757] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 365.
[758] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, 'Memoria Vivorum', Salzburg Necrologies, p. 83.
[759] Stiernon, L. 'Notes de titulature et de prosopographie Byzantines, Theodora Comnène et Andronic Lapardas sébastos', REB 24 (1966), pp. 89-106, cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 149.
[760] Kerbl (1979), p. 150.
[761] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[762] Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[763] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 518.
[764] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858.
[765] Diplomatarium Suecanum 101, p. 125.
[766] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris) (“Ernoul”) 26, p. 302.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “King Béla III of Hungary (1172-96) -cr 13.1.1173, King of Dalmatia and Croatia, *ca 1148, +23.4.1196 Székesfehérvár; 1m: (div 1169) Maria of Byzantium (*1152 +1182), dau.of Emperor Manuel I Komnenos of Byzantium actually, the couple was engaged in 1163/4, Bela moved to Byzantium as heir to Manuel, but after Manuel had a son in 1169 the relationship, presumably never consummated, was dissolved; 2m: 1172 Anna (+1184), dau.of Renaud de Chatillon-sur-Loing, Pr of Antioch; 3m: ca 1185 Theodora Komnena; 4m: 1186 Marguerite of France, Cts de Vexin (*1158, +1197), dau.of King Louis VII of France. All Béla's kids were by 2m.”.8

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 177.4 Maria Comnena was also known as Maria Komnena.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (): “E1. [1m.] Maria Komnene, *1152, +of poisoning 1182; she had been engaged to King Bela III of Hungary and to King William II of Sicily, but Byzantine politics kept those matches from being consummated; m.1180 Rainer de Montferrat (*1163 +1182)”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA Komnene (Mar 1152-poisoned Jul 1182). Niketas Choniates records the betrothal of "Iazæ filio Belæ" and "imperator…Mariam filiam"[415]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal between "Belam qui post Stephanum Geizæ filius" and "Mariæ filiæ suæ" (Emperor Manuel I)[416]. Niketas Choniates records the proposed betrothal between "Maria filia [Manuelis]" and "Guilielmus Siciliæ rex"[417]. The Annals of Romoald record that Emperor Manuel sent ambassadors to King Guillaume II shortly after his accession proposing this marriage to his only daughter, and in a later passage refer to the betrothal of "filiam suam Zura Mariam" in 1172[418]. This betrothal was proposed by her father in [1166/67] while Maria was still betrothed to Béla of Hungary, to gain support for his plan to be crowned emperor by the Pope. There is some doubt about how far the negotiations proceeded. If the betrothal did take place, it was terminated by Maria's father[419]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage between "Maria filia [Manuelis]" and "filius Montisferrati marchionis, adolescenti"[420]. William of Tyre names Maria and gives her parentage, when recording her marriage[421]. Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1180 of "Manuel imperator Constantinopolitano…filiam suam natam ex priore uxore sua" and "Rainerio filio Willelmi principis Montis Ferrati"[422]. She and her husband became the focus of opposition to the regency of the dowager Empress Maria. She was put to death with her husband by Emperor Andronikos I.
     "Betrothed firstly (1163, contract broken 1169) to BÉLA of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). Under the peace treaty signed 1164 between his brother István III King of Hungary and Emperor Manuel, Béla was confirmed as Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia, and sent to Constantinople (where he adopted the name ALEXIOS) as King István's acknowledged successor[423]. Emperor Manuel granted him the title despot, betrothed him to his daughter Maria and acknowledged him as his heir in Byzantium. The record of the synod of 6 Mar 1166 records the presence of “imperatore domino Manuele Comneno...despota...genero...eius domino Alexio...regi...”[424]. In 1169, when the emperor's own son Alexios was born, Béla was demoted from despot to cæsar[425]. The betrothal was terminated, although Béla remained in Constantinople as a member of the imperial family until 1172, when he succeeded his brother as BÉLA III King of Hungary.
     "Betrothed secondly ([1166/67]) to GUILLAUME II King of Sicily, son of GUILLAUME I "le Mauvais" King of Sicily & his wife Infanta doña Margarita de Navarra (1155-17 Nov 1189).
     "m (Feb 1180) RANIERI di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1163-poisoned [19/31] Aug 1182). William of Tyre names him and his father, when recording his marriage, specifying that he was "adolescens" at the time[426]. The Cronica of Sicardi Bishop of Cremona records the marriage of "Wilielmi marchioni [filium] Rainerium" and "Emanuel imperator Constantinopolitanus…filiam suam"[427]. He adopted the name IOANNES in Byzantium. He was granted the title cæsar by his father-in-law in 1180 along with extensive estates in Thessaloniki[428]. After the death of Emperor Manuel in 1180, Ranieri and his wife became the focus of opposition to the regency of her stepmother, dowager Empress Maria. Andronikos Komnenos ordered their murder after seizing power as co-emperor in May 1182."
Med Lands cites:
[415] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 167.
[416] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 5, p. 215.
[417] Niketas Choniates, Liber V Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 8, p. 221.
[418] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, pp. 436 and 439.
[419] Parker, J. 'The Attempted Byzantine Alliance with the Sicilian Norman Kingdom (1166-7)', Greierson, P. and Perkins, J. W. (eds.) (1956) Studies in Italian Medieval History, presented to Miss E. M. Jamison, Papers of the British School at Rome Volume XXIV (New Series, Volume XI) (British School at Rome, London), pp. 86-93, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 403.
[420] Niketas Choniates, Liber V Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 8, p. 222.
[421] WT XXII.IV, p. 1067.
[422] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen) Vol. II, p. 87.
[423] Fine (1991), pp. 239-40.
[424] Patrologia Graeca, Vol. 140, Nicetæ Choniatæ Thesaurarii, Lib. XXV, Actio TertiaI, 1, col. 254.
[425] Fine (1991), p. 243.
[426] WT XXII.IV, p. 1066.
[427] Sicardi Episcopi Cremonensis Cronica, MGH SS XXXI, p. 173.
[428] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 63.5

Family 1

Béla III (?) King of Hungary b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196

Family 3

Rainer del Monferrato b. 1163, d. 1182

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manuel I Komnenos: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020911&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121201&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1182. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha (Eirene) von Sulzbach: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121199&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014173&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guglielmo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013704&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#GuillaumeIIdied1189
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121201&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html

Theodora Comnena1

F, #57043
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Theodora Comnena and Béla III (?) King of Hungary were engaged between 1185 and 1186.1,2,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BÉLA, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). The Chronicon Zagrabiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…rex Wela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geyza" as the four sons of "Gexcha rex"[734]. The Chronicon Dubnicense names "Stephanum et Belam, Arpad et Geysam" as the four sons of "Geysa"[735]. The Chronicon Varadiense names "primus…rex Bela, tertius…dux Arpad, quartus…dux Geysa" as the four sons of "Geysa rex" (omitting reference to the second son)[736]. Niketas Choniates names "Stephanum et Belam" as the two sons of "Hunnorum princeps Iazas"[737]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Ingeburgis (matris Waldemari regis) soror, filia Izizlaui regis alia” married “regi Hungarie”, by whom she had “Bela modernum regem Hungarie” who married “sororem regis Francie”[738]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Bela frater eius" returned from Greece and succeeded King István[739]. Designated Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia by his father in 1162. Under the peace treaty signed in 1164 between his brother István III and Emperor Manuel I, Béla was confirmed as Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia, and sent to Constantinople (where he converted to the Greek Orthodox religion and adopted the name ALEXIOS) as István's acknowledged successor. He was installed as Duke of Szerem by his brother in 1165. The emperor granted him the title despot, betrothed him to his daughter and acknowledged him as his heir in Byzantium. The record of the synod of 1166 records the presence of “imperatore domino Manuele Comneno...despota...genero...eius domino Alexio...regi...”[740]. In 1169, when his own son Alexios Komnenos was born, Béla was demoted from despot to cæsar. The betrothal was terminated, although Béla remained in Constantinople as a member of the imperial family until 1172, when he succeeded his brother as BÉLA III King of Hungary and reconverted to Roman Catholicism. He was crowned 13 Jan 1174. "Bela III secundi Geyzæ regis filius…Ungariæ, Dalmatiæ, Croatiæ, Ramæque rex" confirmed the possessions of the church of Zagreb by charter dated 1175, witnessed by "Farcasio palatino comite, Subano Bano…"[741]. He remained a loyal ally of Byzantium until the death of Emperor Manuel in 1181, even sending troops to help the emperor fight the Seljuks of Konya in Anatolia in 1176[742]. He recovered Dalmatia, part of Croatia and the region of Sirmium in 1181. Following the murder in 1182 of Maria of Antioch, who was Emperor Manuel's widow and the older half-sister of King Béla's first wife, Béla invaded Byzantine territory in 1183, occupying Beograd and Brani?evo/Barancs. He formed an alliance with Stefan Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia, sacked Niš and Sardika [Sofija], and moved into Thrace[743]. His relative status as a monarch is shown by his statement of revenues, sent to France during the negotiations for his third marriage, which showed that they were equal to those of his French and English counterparts and only inferior to those of the two emperors[744]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Bela Græcus" "rid the country of robbers and brigands" and introduced the practice of submitting petitions in written form, as at the Roman Curia[745]. Béla III King of Hungary granted "totam terram pertinentem ad comitatum Modrus" to "comitis Bartholomæi de Veglia" by charter dated 1193, witnessed by "Dominico curiali comite et eodem de Budrugensi, Andres comite de Suprum, Both comite de Bohar, Egidio comite de Sala, Fulcone comite de Vosvar, --- comite Sanegg [Macario comite de Zaunuch]"[746]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1196…in cena Domini" of "rex Hungarie Bela"[747]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "IX Kal May" in 1190 of "rex Bela tertius filius Geysæ" and his burial "Albæ"[748]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "IX Kal May" in 1190 of "Bela" and his burial "in Albensi ecclesia"[749]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "VIII Kal Mai" of "Bel rex Ungarorum"[750]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that "Bela Græcus" was buried at Székesfehérvár[751].
     "Betrothed (1163, contract broken 1169) MARIA Komnene, daughter of Emperor MANUEL I & his first wife Bertha von Sulzbach (Mar 1152-poisoned Jul 1182). Niketas Choniates records the betrothal of "Iazæ filio Belæ" and "imperator…Mariam filiam"[752]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the betrothal between "Belam qui post Stephanum Geizæ filius" and "Mariæ filiæ suæ" (Emperor Manuel I)[753]. She later married Ranieri di Monferrato. William of Tyre names her and gives her parentage, when recording her marriage[754]. Regent of Byzantium, she was put to death with her husband by Emperor Andronikos I.
     "m firstly (1172) AGNES de Châtillon-sur-Loing, daughter of RENAUD de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch (1154-1184, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as second of the three daughters of "Raynaldus de Castellione uxor…relictam principis Raymundi" and her husband "rex Bela de Hungaria"[755]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Marie married "el re d'Ungaria", "Maria" presumably being an error for "Agnes"[756]. She lived at the court of Emperor Manuel I[757]. She adopted the name ANNA in Hungary. The Memoria Vivorum in the necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert names "Bela rex Ungarie et consors eiusdem regina Anna et liberi amborum Heimricus, Andreas, Margareta"[758].
     "Betrothed (after Sep 1185) to THEODORA Komnene, widow of ANDRONIKOS Lapardas sébastos, daughter of --- & his wife [Eirene Komnene Anema]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and betrothal has not yet been identified. Stiernon suggests that Theodora was the granddaughter of Theodora, daughter of Emperor Ioannes II[759], but this seems to be based on no more than guesswork. According to Kerbl, her betrothal to King Béla must have taken place after the murder of Emperor Andronikos I, with whom King Béla III did not enjoy close relations[760]. It was presumably arranged by Andronikos's successor Emperor Isaakios II Angelos. Theodora became a nun in 1186.
     "m secondly ([1185/86]) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de France Ctss de Vexin, widow of HENRY associate-King of England, daughter of LOUIS VII King of France & his second wife Infanta doña Constanza de Castilla y León ([1157]-Acre shortly after 10 Sep 1197). Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1158 that “...archdiaconus Cantuarensis...Thomas regis Cancellarius” arranged the betrothal of “Henricus primogenitus regis Anglorum” and “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, in a later passage recording the marriage of “filium regis Anglorum septennum” and “filiam regis Francorum triennem”[761]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Ingeburgis (matris Waldemari regis) soror, filia Izizlaui regis alia” married “regi Hungarie”, by whom she had “Bela modernum regem Hungarie” who married “sororem regis Francie”[762]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1186 that “Margarita soror regis Francorum” married “Bela regi Hungariæ”[763]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta soror regis Philippi" as widow of "iunior Henricus rex Anglorum" and records her second marriage to "Hungarorum regi Bela"[764]. Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95, reciting the consanguinity between Philippe II King of France and his second wife Ingebjörg of Denmark on which their divorce was based, which records that “Belæ Regis Hungariæ” married “sororem Philippi Regis Francorum”[765]. Her first husband's father arranged her second marriage so he could retain her dowry. She left for Palestine after being widowed for the second time. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the arrival of "une reine en Hongrie…veve sans hoir" at Tyre [in 1197] and her death eight days later, specifying that she was the sister of the mother of Henri Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem and had been "feme…le jouene roi d'Englietere…et suer…le roi Phelippe de France"[766]. "
Med Lands cites:
[734] Chronicon Zagrabiense, 14, p. 256.
[735] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[736] Chronicon Varadiense, 14, p. 256.
[737] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 165.
[738] Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[739] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 57.
[740] Patrologia Graeca, Vol. 140, Nicetæ Choniatæ Thesaurarii, Lib. XXV, Actio TertiaI, 1, col. 254.
[741] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 188.
[742] Fine (1991), p. 243.
[743] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 6.
[744] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[745] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 69, pp. 143-5.
[746] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 292.
[747] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873.
[748] Chronicon Varadiense, 16, p. 256.
[749] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 100.
[750] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
[751] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 69, p. 145.
[752] Niketas Choniates, Liber IV Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 1, p. 167.
[753] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 5, p. 215.
[754] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XXII.IV, p. 1067.
[755] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[756] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[757] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 365.
[758] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, 'Memoria Vivorum', Salzburg Necrologies, p. 83.
[759] Stiernon, L. 'Notes de titulature et de prosopographie Byzantines, Theodora Comnène et Andronic Lapardas sébastos', REB 24 (1966), pp. 89-106, cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 149.
[760] Kerbl (1979), p. 150.
[761] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[762] Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[763] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 518.
[764] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858.
[765] Diplomatarium Suecanum 101, p. 125.
[766] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris) (“Ernoul”) 26, p. 302.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “King Béla III of Hungary (1172-96) -cr 13.1.1173, King of Dalmatia and Croatia, *ca 1148, +23.4.1196 Székesfehérvár; 1m: (div 1169) Maria of Byzantium (*1152 +1182), dau.of Emperor Manuel I Komnenos of Byzantium actually, the couple was engaged in 1163/4, Bela moved to Byzantium as heir to Manuel, but after Manuel had a son in 1169 the relationship, presumably never consummated, was dissolved; 2m: 1172 Anna (+1184), dau.of Renaud de Chatillon-sur-Loing, Pr of Antioch; 3m: ca 1185 Theodora Komnena; 4m: 1186 Marguerite of France, Cts de Vexin (*1158, +1197), dau.of King Louis VII of France. All Béla's kids were by 2m.”.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "[THEODORA Komnene (-after 1186). Theodoros Balsamon records that “Comnenam dominam Theodoram...Lapardæ...domini Andronici conjux” was tonsured by Emperor Andronikos I[62]. A poem by Lampros records the donation made by “Theodoras...Komnenes...profyrothalous engonys Theodoras, es pappos Alexios ausonokrator, pater de blastos porfyras Ioannes, autokrator tropaia myria drasas, synaimos anax Manouel Romes Neas...e tov Lapardan ex eponymou genous sebastov Andronikov...”[63]. Stiernon argues that the most logical conclusion from this passage is that the wife of Andronikos Lapardas was the great-niece of Emperor Manuel I, granddaughter of Theodora Komnene[64]. According to Kerbl, her betrothal to King Béla must have taken place after the murder of Emperor Andronikos I, with whom King Béla III did not enjoy close relations[65]. It was presumably arranged by Andronikos's successor Emperor Isaakios II Angelos. Theodora became a nun in 1186. m ANDRONIKOS Lapardas, son of --- (-[1183/85]). Sébastos. The record of the synod of 2 Mar 1166 records the presence of “...sebasto et domestico vestiario...regis et chartulario domino Andronico Lombardo...”[66]. Ioannes Kinnamos names "Andronicus Lampardas et Nicephorus Petralipha" in a campaign in Hungary[67]. Ioannes Kinnamos records that "Andronicus principis chartularius, cognomento Lampardas" took part in the campaign against the Hungarians led by Ioannes Doukas, dated to Jul 1167[68]. Niketas Choniates names "Angeli Constantini duo filii Iohannes et Andronicus...Macroducas Constantinus et Lapartas Andronicus" among those who witnessed the defeat at Myriokephalon, dated to 17 Sep 1176[69]. He was blinded by Emperor Andronikos I, and entered the monastery of Pantepopte. Niketas Choniates records that "Andronico Lapardæ" was arrested and blinded[70].
     "Betrothed (after Sep 1185) to BÉLA III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehérvár, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest)."
Med Lands cites:
[62] Patrologia Græca, Vol. 137, col. 1131.
[63] Stiernon Theodora Comnène et Andronic Lapardas sébastos' (1966), p. 92, quoting Neos Hellenomnemon, Tome VIII (1911), p. 177.
[64] Stiernon 'Theodora Comnène et Andronic Lapardas sébastos' (1966), p. 94.
[65] Kerbl (1979), p. 150.
[66] Patrologia Graeca, Vol. 140, Nicetæ Choniatæ Thesaurarii, Lib. XXV, Actio II, 1, col. 236.
[67] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber VI, 3, p. 260.
[68] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber VI, 7, p. 271.
[69] Niketas Choniates, De Manuele Comneno, Liber VI, 9, p. 233.
[70] Niketas Choniates, De Andronico Comneno, Liber I, 1, p. 359.3

Family

Béla III (?) King of Hungary b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#TheodoraKMAndronikosLapardasBetBelaIII

Géza (?) of Hungary1,2

M, #57044, b. circa 1150, d. before 1210
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary1,3,2 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary1,4,2 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Géza (?) of Hungary was born circa 1150.1 He married (?) (?) Princess of Byzantium after 1190.1

Géza (?) of Hungary died before 1210.1
      ; Géza, *ca 1150, +before 1210; m.after 1190 N, Pss of Byzantium; he settled in Byzantium and had descendants.1

Family

(?) (?) Princess of Byzantium
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO

(?) (?) Princess of Byzantium1

F, #57045
Last Edited4 Jul 2003

Family

Géza (?) of Hungary b. c 1150, d. b 1210
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Alexios (?)1

M, #57046, b. after 1190, d. after 1210
FatherGéza (?) of Hungary1,2 b. c 1150, d. b 1210
Mother(?) (?) Princess of Byzantium1
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Alexios (?) was born after 1190.1
Alexios (?) died after 1210.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Stephanos(?) (?)1

M, #57047, b. after 1190, d. after 1190
FatherGéza (?) of Hungary1 b. c 1150, d. b 1210
Mother(?) (?) Princess of Byzantium1
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Stephanos(?) (?) died after 1190.1 He was born after 1190.1
      ; some sources said, he was ancestor of Croy family.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Arpad (?) of Hungary1,2

M, #57048
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary1,2 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary1,2 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Arpad (?) of Hungary died; died young.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia1

M, #57049, b. between 1141 and 1142, d. 25 March 1189
FatherVladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia1 b. c 1110, d. 18 Jan 1174
MotherGertrud (?) of Austria1 b. 1120, d. 1151
Last Edited20 Oct 2020
     Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia was born between 1141 and 1142.1 He married Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary, daughter of Géza II (?) King of Hungary and Ievfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary, after 1157.1,2

Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia died on 25 March 1189.1
Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia was buried after 25 March 1189 at Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).1
     He was Duke in Olmütz between 1164 and 1173.1 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1172 and 1173.1 He was Duke of Bohemia in 1178.1 He was Duke of Moravia between 1180 and 1189.1

Family

Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary b. bt 1144 - 1145, d. a 12 Jan 1190
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html

Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary1

F, #57050, b. between 1144 and 1145, d. after 12 January 1190
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary1,2,3 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary1,4,3 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited28 Oct 2020
     Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary was born between 1144 and 1145.1 She married Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia, son of Vladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia and Gertrud (?) of Austria, after 1157.5,1

Elizabeth/Erzsebet (?) of Hungary died after 12 January 1190.1

Family

Bedrich/Friedrich (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia and Moravia b. bt 1141 - 1142, d. 25 Mar 1189
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html

Adela/Odola (?) of Hungary1

F, #57051
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary1,2 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary1,2 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Adela/Odola (?) of Hungary married Svatopluk (?), son of Vladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia and Gertrud (?) of Austria, circa 1164.3,1

Family

Svatopluk (?) d. a 15 Oct 1169

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html

Svatopluk (?)1

M, #57052, d. after 15 October 1169
FatherVladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia1 b. c 1110, d. 18 Jan 1174
MotherGertrud (?) of Austria1 b. 1120, d. 1151
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Svatopluk (?) married Adela/Odola (?) of Hungary, daughter of Géza II (?) King of Hungary and Ievfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary, circa 1164.1,2

Svatopluk (?) died after 15 October 1169.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Margaret/Margit (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #57053, b. 1162
FatherGéza II (?) King of Hungary1,3,2 b. 1130, d. 31 May 1162
MotherIevfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary1,4,2 b. 1130, d. bt 1186 - 1193
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Margaret/Margit (?) of Hungary married Andras (?) Obergespan of Somogy
;
Her 2nd husband.1,2 Margaret/Margit (?) of Hungary was born in 1162; Borm posthumously.1,2 She married Isaac "Macrodukas" Dukas, son of Konstantinos "Makrodoukas" Dukas and Anna Comnena, circa 1177
;
Her 1st husband.1,2

Family 1

Andras (?) Obergespan of Somogy

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO

Isaac "Macrodukas" Dukas1,2

M, #57054
FatherKonstantinos "Makrodoukas" Dukas3 d. 30 May 1185
MotherAnna Comnena3
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Isaac "Macrodukas" Dukas married Margaret/Margit (?) of Hungary, daughter of Géza II (?) King of Hungary and Ievfrosiniya/Euphrosine Mstislavna (?) Princess of Kiev, Queen Consort of Hungary, circa 1177
;
Her 1st husband.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IsaakiosMakrodukasdied1185

Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland1,2,3

F, #57056, b. circa 1132, d. between 8 August 1172 and 1174
FatherBoleslaw III Krzywousty (?) King of Poland1,4,5,6,7,8 b. 20 Aug 1086, d. 28 Oct 1138
MotherSalome (?) von Berg-Schelklingen9,10,6,7,8 b. b 1101, d. 27 Jul 1144
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland was born circa 1132; Genealogy.EU (Piast 1 page) says b. after 1130; Genealogics says b. ca 1132.1,2 She married László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary, son of Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary and Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary, in 1136
;
Her 1st husband.11,7,8 Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland and László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary were divorced before 1148.7,8 Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland married Otto I von Brandenburg Markgraf von Brandenburg, son of Albrecht "der Bär" von Ballenstedt Duke of Saxony, Markgraf von der Nordmark , Markgraf von Brandenburg and Sofie von Winzenburg Margravine of Brandenburg, on 6 January 1148
;
His 1st wife; Genealogy.EU (Ascan 1 and Piast 1 pages) say m. 6 Jan 1148; Leo van de Pas says m. 6 Jan 1148.12,1,13,14,7,8
Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland died between 8 August 1172 and 1174.1,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 59.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 82.7


; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDYTA ([1133]-8 Jul [1171/75], bur Brandenburg Cathedral). The Annales Polanorum name "[filiam] Iuditham" in addition to naming the six sons of Prince Boles?aw[257]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Boleslaum quartum, Mesiconem tercium, Henricum primum, et Kazimirum secundum, necnon Judittam" as the children of "Boleslaus" and his second wife "ex Theutunica", adding that Judyta married "regi Ungarie"[258]. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Boleslaus dat filiam suam regi Ungarie" in 1136, but does not name her[259]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[260]. The Regesta Historia Brandenburgensis records the death "VIII Id Jul" of "Juditha marchionissa gemma Polonorum"[261]. An undated charter, dated to [1190], refers to rights previously granted by "marchio Otto Brand." for the soul of "uxoris sue Juditte marchionisse"[262].
     "m firstly (1136, divorced before 1148) LÁSZLÓ of Hungary, son of BÉLA II "the Blind" King of Hungary & his wife Jelena of Serbia ([1132]-14 Nov 1163). He succeeded in 1162 as LÁSZLÓ II King of Hungary.
     "m secondly (6 Jan 1148) as his first wife, OTTO von Brandenburg, son of ALBRECHT "der Bär" Markgraf von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] & his wife Sophie von Winzenburg ([1126/28]-7 Mar 1184, bur Kloster Lehnin). He succeeded his father in 1170 as OTTO I Markgraf von Brandenburg."
Med Lands cites:
[257] Annales Polanorum II 1128, MGH SS XIX, p. 624.
[258] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 92.
[259] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1136, MGH SS XIX, p. 589.
[260] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 8, XXI, p. 108.
[261] Raumer, G. W. von (1836) Regesta Historiæ Brandenburgensis Tome I (Berlin) (“Regesta Historiæ Brandenburgensis”), p. 236.
[262] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 24, Mittelmärkische Urkunden, IV, p. 325.8


; This person is also Judith of Poland at Wikipedia.3 Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland was also known as Judith of Poland.11

; dau.of Pr Boleslav III of Poland.11

; Per Genealogy.EU: "G13. [2m.] Judith, *after 1130, +8.8. 1170-76; m.1148 Mgve Otto I of Brandenburg (+1184.)15"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Margrave Otto I of Brandenburg (1170-84), *1126/28, +7.3.1184; 1m: 6.1.1148 Judith of Poland (+1171/75); 2m: 1176 Adelaide of Holland (+after 1205.)12"

; Per Med Lands:
     "OTTO von Brandenburg, son of ALBRECHT "der Bär" Markgraf von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] & his wife Sophie von Winzenburg ([1126/28]-7 Mar 1184, bur Kloster Lehnin). The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Ottonem, Bernardum ducem Saxonie, Sifridum episcopum Brandenburgensem, postea archiepiscopum Bremensem et Hadewigem [uxor] Otto marchio Misenensis" as children of "Albertus Ursus"[122]. He was co-ruler with his father in 1144. Rudolf Bishop of Halberstadt confirmed an exchange between Hillersleben and Walbeck by charter dated 11 Apr 1145, which names "Adelbertus marchio et Otto filius eius" among the representatives of Hillersleben[123]. "Adelbertus…marchio Brandenburgensis" donated property to the convent at Magdeburg, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Heinrici canonici sancti Mauritii in Magdaburg, Ottonis marchionis, Hermanni, Adelberti, Theoderici et Bernhardi comitum", by charter dated [end May/early Jun] 1151[124]. "Adelbertus, Brandenburgensis Marchio, et Otto Marchio, filius meus" donated property to Kloster Leitzlau, for the repose of "mee coniugis Sophie", by charter dated 1162[125]. "Alberto Brandenburgensi marchione, Ottone filio eius…Hermanno comite de Horlemunde filio eius, Theoderico comite de Werben filio eius, Alberto comite de Balstede filio eius, Bernardo comite de Anehalt filio eius…" witnessed the charter dated 1170 under which "Cazimerus…Pomeranorum princeps" donated property to the church of Havelberg, with the consent of "fratre nostro Boguzlao"[126]. He succeeded his father in 1170 as OTTO I Markgraf von Brandenburg. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" donated property to the bishopric of Havelberg, for the souls of "…Judithe…nostre conjugis", by charter dated 1170[127]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[128]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[129]. The Cronica Principum Saxonie records that "Otto primus [filius Alberti Ursi]" founded "cenobium Leninense ordinis Cisterciensis", where he was buried, in 1180, and in 1184 "Arnesse claustrum dominarum ordinis Benedicti"[130]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[131]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church, confirmed by "Ottonis, Heynrici et Adelberti filiorum suorum"[132]. Pulchawa´s Böhmischer Chronik records that "Otto filius Alberti" died in 1184 and was buried "in Leninensi monasterio"[133].
     "m firstly (6 Jan 1148) as her second husband, JUDYTA of Poland, divorced wife of LÁSZLÓ of Hungary [later LÁSZLÓ II King of Hungary], daughter of BOLES?AW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1133]-8 Jul [1171/75], bur Brandenburg Cathedral). The Annales Polanorum name "[filiam] Iuditham" in addition to naming the six sons of Prince Boles?aw[134]. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Boleslaus dat filiam suam regi Ungarie" in 1136, but does not name her[135]. She is shown as King László's possible wife in Europäische Stammtafeln which also names her Judyta[136], but the source on which this is based has not been identified. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[137]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[138]. The Regesta Historia Brandenburgensis records the death "VIII Id Jul" of "Juditha marchionissa gemma Polonorum"[139]. An undated charter, dated to [1190], refers to rights previously granted by "marchio Otto Brand." for the soul of "uxoris sue Juditte marchionisse"[140].
     "m secondly ([1171/75]) ADELHEID, daughter of ---. A charter of Markgraf Otto I dated 1 Jan 1177 names "Adelheida conjugis mea et…heredibus meis Ottone et Heinrico et Adelberto"[141]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[142]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church[143]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[144], she was Ada of Holland, daughter of Floris III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland. Ada´s marriage into the Brandenburg family is confirmed by the charter dated 1205 under which "Ada…marchionissa de Brandebrug" donated land "in Pole" to Rijnsburg abbey, with the consent of "Wilhelmi comitis et Florentii fratrum meorum et Ade comitisse matris mee et Ade neptis mee"[145]. The similarity between "Ada" and "Adelheid" appears at first sight to establish the connection. However, the chronology is not ideal. It is most likely that "Adelheid" was the mother of Markgraf Otto I´s youngest son Markgraf Albrecht II, as discussed more fully below. Albrecht II was named in the charter dated 1 Jan 1177 quoted above, so was born in the mid-1170s. Albrecht is named in an 1197 document in his own capacity, indicating that he had already reached the age of majority. If Ada of Holland was his mother, she would have been 12 years old at the most when he was born, assuming that she was her parents´ oldest child (which appears unlikely). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum succedentem comitem Hollandie, Wilhelmum comitem Orientalis Frisie, Florencium prepositum Traiecetensis ecclesie, Robertum presidium Kenemarie, Beatricem, Elizabeth, Adelheydim et Margaretam comitissam Clivie" as the children of Count Floris III and his wife[146]. This suggests that "Adelheydim" was the third daughter. While it is acknowledged that the order of births as recorded in such sources is not consistently reliable, the order in which Count Floris´s sons are named in the Chronologia does appear to correspond to the order of their births. If Ada was her parents´ third daughter, it is unlikely that she was born before [1166/68], also bearing in mind that the birth of the couple´s oldest son Dirk should probably be placed in the 1160s in view of his marriage which is recorded in 1186. This date [1166/68] makes it impossible that Ada was the mother of Markgraf Albrecht II. A second possibility for Ada´s Brandenburg husband is Otto II Markgraf von Brandenburg (see below), stated to be the case by Alfred Riedel who compiled the Codex Diplomaticus Brandenburgensis series in the mid-19th century: in his index volume, he lists "Ada Margräfin v. Brandenburg, Gemahlin Otto´s II, Schwester des Grafen Wilhelm von Holland", although he cites no primary source which confirms that this statement is correct[147]. All problems of chronology would be resolved if Otto II was Ada of Holland´s husband, and "Adelheid", second wife of Markgraf Otto I, was a different person. In addition, the timing of Ada´s 1205 donation to Rijnsberg abbey would have followed her husband´s death. It would also be easier to explain Ada´s return to Holland (why would she have gone back if Markgraf Albrecht II had been her son?) and also the absence of any reference to Brandenburg relatives in the 1205 charter."
Med Lands cites:
[122] Cronica Principum Saxonie, MGH SS XXV, p. 477.
[123] Codex Brandenburgensis, Dritter Haupttheil - Die Altmark, Band 22, XXV Kloster Hillersleben, V, p. 414.
[124] Codex Diplomaticus Anhaltinus, Teil I, 362, p. 272.
[125] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 24, Mittelmärkische Urkunden, II, p. 323.
[126] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 3, VII, p. 84.
[127] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 2, VI, p. 441.
[128] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 9, I, p. 2.
[129] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 8, XXI, p. 108.
[130] Cronica Principum Saxonie, MGH SS XXV, p. 477.
[131] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 17, I, p. 1.
[132] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 22, XXIV Kloster Arendsee, I, p. 1.
[133] Codex Brandenburgensis, Vierter Haupttheil - Band 1, Pulcawa´s Böhmischer Chronik, p. 6.
[134] Annales Polanorum II 1128, MGH SS XIX, p. 624.
[135] Annales Cracovienses Compilati 1136, MGH SS XIX, p. 589.
[136] ES II 154, although ES II 120 only shows her marriage to Otto Markgraf von Brandenburg.
[137] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 9, I, p. 2.
[138] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 8, XXI, p. 108.
[139] Regesta Historia Brandenburgensis, Tome I, p. 236.
[140] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 24, Mittelmärkische Urkunden, IV, p. 325.
[141] Krabbo, H. (1910) Regesten der Markgrafen von Brandenburg aus askanischem Hause, Lieferung 1, no. 421 [not yet consulted, information provided by Bert M. Kamp in a private email to the author dated 23 Jun 2011].
[142] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 17, I, p. 1.
[143] Codex Brandenburgensis, Erster Haupttheil - Band 22, XXIV Kloster Arendsee, I, p. 1.
[144] ES I.2 183.
[145] Oorkondenboek Holland (1866), 202, p. 122.
[146] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 57a, p. 117.
[147] Riedel, A. F. (1867) Novus Codex Diplomaticus Brandenburgensis, Nameverzeichniß zu sämmtlichen Bänden (Berlin), Band I, p. 2.14

Family 2

Otto I von Brandenburg Markgraf von Brandenburg b. bt 1126 - 1128, d. 7 Mar 1184
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judyta of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030628&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Poland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO
  5. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00224026. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#BoleslawIIIdied1138B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judyta of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030628&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#Judytadied11701176
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salome von Berg-Schelklingen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079683&tree=LEO
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salomea_of_Berg
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ascan 1 page (House of Ascania): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ascania/ascan1.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030627&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRANDENBURG,%20PRUSSIA.htm#OttoIMgdied1184B.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html#JB2
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030629&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030630&tree=LEO

Maria (?) of Hungary1

F, #57057
FatherLászló/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary1 b. 1131, d. 1162
MotherJudyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland1 b. c 1132, d. bt 8 Aug 1172 - 1174
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Maria (?) of Hungary married Niccolo Michieli (?) Patrician of Venice, son of Vitale Michieli II (?) Doge of Venice, between 1165 and 1167.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Niccolo Michieli (?) Patrician of Venice1

M, #57058
FatherVitale Michieli II (?) Doge of Venice1
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Niccolo Michieli (?) Patrician of Venice married Maria (?) of Hungary, daughter of László/Ladislas II (?) King of Hungary and Judyta Boleslawówna (?) of Poland, between 1165 and 1167.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Vitale Michieli II (?) Doge of Venice1

M, #57059
Last Edited28 Nov 2003

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica1,2,3

M, #57060, b. circa 1150, d. 4 September 1207
FatherGuglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato1,4,5,6 b. c 1110, d. bt 1188 - 1191
MotherJudith (?) von Babenberg1,5,6 b. c 1115, d. bt 1168 - 1178
Last Edited9 Nov 2020
     Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica was born circa 1150.1,5,6 He married Elena/Helene di Busca, daughter of Anselmo (?) Marques del Bosco, before 1170
;
His 1st wife. Genealogy.EU Montfer page says m. bef 1170; Genealogics says m. bef 1179; Med Lands says m. bef 1171.1,5,6,7 Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica married Eleonora (?) di Savoia, daughter of Umberto III (?) Comte de Savoie, Aosta and Moriana and Klementia (?) von Zähringen, between 1186 and 1187
;
His 2nd wife
NB: There is skepticism about this 2nd marriage:
     Wikipédia (Fr.) describes the skepticism:
     "Selon Nicétas Choniatès, Boniface se marie, fin 1186-début 1187, avec Jeanne de Châtillon, fille de Renaud de Châtillon et sa première épouse la princesse Constance d'Antioche.
     "Certaines sources affirment qu’en 1197, Boniface épouse Éléonore, une des filles de son cousin Humbert III de Savoie. Si tel est le cas, elle est morte en 1202. Usseglio est sceptique quant à ce mariage1. Il est à noter que, dans ses chansons, Vaqueiras, ne fait aucune allusion à cette épouse."

     Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1 and Montferrat) report that Bonifacio m. Eleonora and Racine et Histoire agrees.
     On the otherhand, Genealogics does not report a marriage between Elena di Bosco and Margarite of Hungary.
     Med Lands shos a middle marriage, but reports "The identity of his second wife is not known."
Conclusion: I have included a second marriage for Bonifacio, with Eleonora di Savoia as a placeholder. GA Vaut.8,1,6,9,5,10 Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica married Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary, daughter of Béla III (?) King of Hungary and Agnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary, in May 1204 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now),
;
His 3rd wife, her 2nd husband.1,11,3,5,6,12,13,14
Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica died on 4 September 1207; killed in battle with the Bulgars.1,3,5,6
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “E2. Margit, *1175, +after 1223; 1m: 1185 Emperor Isaac II Angelos of Byzantium (*ca 1155 +12.4.1204); 2m: 1204 Mgve Boniface I of Montferrat, King of Thessalonica (*1150 +4.9.1207); 3m: ca 1210 Nicolas de Saint-Omer (+1217/19)”.11
; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGIT (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[789]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[790]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo/Barancs and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[791]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[792]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[793]. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[794]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[795]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[796]. Her second marriage was arranged by Bonifazio to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[797], but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin Count of Flanders who was considered a less powerful candidate. Her second husband installed her as regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[798]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the emperor in 1209[799]. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[800].
     "m firstly (1185) as his second wife, Emperor ISAAKIOS II, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204).
     "m secondly (1204) as his third wife, BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato King of Thessaloniki, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). King of Thessaloniki 1204.
     "m thirdly (after Sep 1207) NICOLAS de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes, son of GUILLAUME IV Châtelain de Saint-Omer, Seigneur de Fauquembergues & his first wife Ida d'Avesnes (-[1217/19])."
Med Lands cites:
[789] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[790] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[791] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[792] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[793] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[794] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[795] Bekkerus, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[796] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[797] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[798] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[800] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.14
He was King of Thessalonica.3

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 200.5

; This is the same person as:
”Boniface I, Marquis of Montferrat” at Wikipedia, as
”Boniface de Montferrat” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Bonifacio I del Monferrato” at Wikipedia (It.)12,15,16

; Per Genealogics:
     “Boniface I, the third son of Guillermo V 'il Vecchio', marchese de Monferrato, and Judith von Österreich, was born about 1150, after his father's return from the Second Crusade. He was a younger brother of Guillaume VII 'Longsword' de Monferrato, count of Jaffa and Ascalon, and of Conrad, marchese de Monferrato.
     “Boniface's youthful exploits in the late 1170s are recalled in the famous Epic letter _Valen marques, senher de Monferrat,_ by his good friend and court troubadour Raimbaut de Vaqueiras. These included the rescue of the heiress Jacopina of Ventimiglia from her uncle Count Otto, who was intending to deprive her of her inheritance and send her to Sardinia. Boniface arranged a marriage for her. When Albert of Malaspina (husband of one of Boniface's sisters) abducted Saldina de Mar, a daughter of a prominent Genoese family, Boniface rescued her and restored her to her lover Ponset d'Aguilar. Like the rest of the family, he also supported his cousin Friedrich I Barbarossa in his wars against the independent city communes of the Lombard League. Boniface's eldest brother Guillermo VII had died in 1177, soon after marrying Sybil d'Anjou, the heiress of the kingdom of Jerusalem. In 1179 Manuel I Komnenos, emperor of Byzantium, offered his daughter Maria Komnena as a bride to one of the sons of Guillermo V. Since Boniface, like his older brother Conrad, was already married, and Federico was a priest, the youngest brother Rainer married her instead, only to be murdered along with her during the usurpation of Andronicus I Komnenos.
     “In 1183 Boniface's nephew Baudouin V was crowned co-king of Jerusalem. Guillermo V went out to the Latin kingdom to support his grandson, leaving Conrad and Boniface in charge of Monferrato. However in 1187 Conrad also left for the East: Isaac II Angelos had offered his sister Theodora to Boniface as a wife, to renew the family's Byzantine alliance, but Boniface had just married for the second time, while Conrad was a recent widower.
     “In 1189 Boniface joined the council of regency for Tommaso I de Savoie, son of his cousin Umberto III, comte de Savoie, until the boy came of age about two years later. In 1191, after the new Emperor Heinrich VI granted him the county of Incisa, a fifteen-year war broke out against the neighbouring communes of Asti and Alessandria. Boniface joined the Cremona League, while the two cities joined the League of Milan. Boniface defeated the cities at Montiglio in June that year, but the war as a whole went badly for the dynasty's interests. At Quarto he and Vaqueiras saved his brother-in-law Alberto Malespina when he was unhorsed. The first phase of the war ended with a truce in April 1193. By now, Boniface was marquis of Monferrato, following the deaths of his father in 1191 and of Conrad, the newly elected king of Jerusalem, in 1192. (No claim to Monferrato ever seems to have been made on behalf of Conrad's posthumous daughter Maria.)
     “In June 1194 Boniface was appointed one of the leaders of Heinrich VI's expedition to Sicily. At Messina, amid the fighting between the Genoese and Pisan fleets, Vaqueiras protected his lord with his own shield - an act which helped the troubadour with a knighthood from Boniface that year after the campaign's successful conclusion with Heinrich's coronation as emperor in Palermo. In October 1197 the truce with Asti ended. Boniface made an alliance with Acqui in June 1198. There were numerous skirmishes and raids, including at Ricaldone and Caranzano, but by 1199 it was clear the war was lost, and Boniface entered into negotiations.
     “Throughout the 1180s and 1190s, despite the wars, Boniface had nevertheless presided over one of the most prestigious courts of chivalric culture and troubadour song. In the 12th century the Piemontèis language (which in the present day reflects more French and Italian influences) was virtually indistinguishable from the Occitan of Southern France and Catalonia. Besides Vaqueiras, visitors included Peire Vidal, Gaucelm Faidit, and Arnaut de Mareuil. Boniface's patronage was celebrated widely. To Gaucelm, he was _Mon Thesaur_ (My Treasure). Curiously, Vaqueiras sometimes addressed him as _N'Engles_ (Lord Englishman), but the in-joke is never explained. His sister Adilasia, wife of Manfredo II del Vasto, marquis de Saluzzo, also shared this interest and was mentioned by Vidal.
     “When the original leader of the Fourth Crusade, Thibaut III, comte de Champagne, died in 1201, Boniface was chosen as its new leader. He was an experienced soldier, and it was an opportunity to reassert his dynasty's reputation after defeat at home. Boniface's family was well-known in the east: his nephew Baudouin V de Monferrato and brother Conrad had been kings of Jerusalem, and his niece Maria de Monferrato, Conrad's daughter, was heiress of the kingdom.
     “Boniface's cousin Philipp von Hohenstaufen, King of The Romans, was married to Irene Angelina, a daughter of the deposed Byzantine emperor Isaac II Angelos and niece of Conrad's second wife Theodora Angelos. In the winter of 1201 Boniface spent Christmas with Philipp in Hagenau, and while there he also met with Alexios IV Angelos, Isaac II's son, who had escaped from the custody of his uncle Alexios III Komnenos Angelos. At this time the three discussed the possibility of using the crusading army to restore Alexios IV's right to the throne. Both Boniface and Alexios travelled separately to Rome to ask Pope Innocent III's blessing for the endeavour; however Boniface was specifically told by Innocent not to attack any Christians, including the Byzantines.
     “The crusader army was in debt to the doge of Venice, who had provided their fleet. He instructed to attack the rebellious cities of Trieste, Moglie and Zara and beat them into submission before sailing for Cairo. The pope was angered by these Christian cities being attacked by a crusader army. The doge, Enrico Dandolo, was now the true war leader of this crusade, with Boniface as only a figurehead. Alexios IV Angelos made many promises to the crusaders and their principal financier, the doge of Venice, for riches and honours if they would help him reclaim his kingdom. Dandolo placated the pope by having Alexios IV Angelos promise to submit the Orthodox Church to Rome when he was restored to his throne in Byzantium. This being done, the fleet set sail for Constantinople in 1203.
     “After the conquest of Constantinople in 1204, Boniface was assumed to be the new emperor, both by the western knights and the conquered Byzantine citizens. However the Venetians vetoed him, believing that he already had too many connections in the empire (and likely felt that they would not have a much influence in the new empire if Boniface was in control). Instead, they chose Baudouin VI-IX, Graaf van Vlaanderen. Boniface founded the kingdom of Thessalonica and also held all the territories east of the Bosporus and territories in Crete, though he later conceded Crete to Baudouin. Late 13th and 14th century sources suggest that Boniface based his claim on Thessalonica on the statement that his young brother Rainer had been granted Thessalonica on his marriage to Maria Komnena in 1180.
     “After 1170 Boniface married Elena di Busca, daughter of Anselmo, marques del Bosco. Of their three children, Guillermo VIII-VI would have progeny.
     “According to the chronicler Nicetas Choniates (1155-1215), Boniface remarried in late 1186- early 1187. This bride was possibly Jeanne de Châtillon-sur-Loing, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon, prince of Antioch, and his first wife Constance, princess of Antioch. _The Lignages d'Outremer_ name 'Maria e Joanna' as the two daughters of 'Rinaldo de Castellion' and his wife 'Costanza...la Nova Princessa', stating that Marie (presumably being an error for Agnes) married 'el re d'Ungaria' and Jeanne married 'el re de Salonichio'. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, 'el re de Salonichio' can only refer to Boniface. Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Boniface's last wife; apparently, the marriage was childless or, if they had children none survived to adulthood.
     “In 1204 in Constantinople Boniface married Margrete of Hungary, widow of Isaac II Angelos, emperor of Byzantium, and daughter of Béla III, king of Hungary. Their son Demetrius, emperor at Thessalonica, did not have progeny.
     “Boniface was killed in an ambush by the Bulgarians on 4 September 1207, and his head was sent to Bulgarian Tsar Kaloyan. The loyal Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, who had followed him to the East, probably died with him; it is significant that he composed no _planh_ (lament) to his memory.”.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Monferrato): “G4. Bonifacio I, Marchese di Montferrato (1192-1207), King of Thessalonica (1204-07), *1150, +k.a.in battle with Bulgars 4.9.1207; 1m: by 1170 Helene di Busca (+by 1204); 2m: Sofia/Alice di Savoia (+1202); 3m: 1204 Margareta of Hungary (*1175 +after 1223)”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "BONIFAZIO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[149]. Regent of Monferrato 1191. He succeeded his brother in 1192 as BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato. He assisted Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in his conquest of Sicily in 1194[150]. A charter dated 13 Jun 1199 records an agreement between the communes of Alessandria, Asti and Vercelli and "dominum Bonifacium marchionem Montisferrati et Gulielmum filius eius"[151]. He joined the movement for a Fourth Crusade, and was elected leader on the death of Thibaut III Comte de Champagne[152], a decision which was ratified at Soissons in Aug 1201[153]. "Bonifatius marchio Montisferrati" granted the right to wood in "bosco Lucedii" to the church of Casale by charter dated 21 Jul 1202[154]. Under the terms of the partition of the Byzantine Empire agreed in March 1204 between Venice and the crusading armies, approximately 3/8 of the territory of the former empire was to be distributed between the crusaders. Bonifazio, as leader of the crusade, expected to be installed as emperor of the newly formed Latin Empire of Constantinople. He married the widow of ex-Emperor Isaakios II in order to advance his claims, but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin IX Count of Flanders whom he considered a less powerful candidate[155]. Bonifazio was assigned a large fief in Anatolia, but demanded Thessaloniki which he claimed belonged as of right to his family since Emperor Manuel I had granted his brother Ranieri a large estate there. At a meeting with Venetian representatives at Adrianople 12 Aug 1204, he ceded the island of Crete (which he claimed had been given as a fief to his brother Ranieri by Emperor Manuel I) to Venice and bought Venice's rights to Thessaloniki[156]. Bonifazio captured Demotika and besieged Adrianople to press his claim. Peace was soon mediated, and Emperor Baudouin exchanged Demotika for Thessaloniki, where Bonifazio declared himself King of Thessaloniki. He extended his kingdom northwards to include Macedonia and southwards into Thessaly[157]. His fiefs were Othon de la Roche (for Attika and Boetia, later to form the duchy of Athens), Guillaume de Champlitte and, after his death, Geoffroy de Villehardouin (for the principality of Achaia or Morea in Peloponese). He was faced with continual threats from the north from the Bulgarians and, against this common threat, allied himself with Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople, confirmed by the marriage of his daughter to the emperor[158]. He was killed by a small Bulgarian raiding party, his head being sent as a trophy to Kalojan Tsar of Bulgaria[159]. The Cronica of Sicardi Bishop of Cremona records the death in 1207 of "Bonifacius marchio Montis-ferrati" killed in battle[160].
     "m firstly (before 1171) ELENA di Bosco, daughter of ---. The Chronica Jacobi de Aquis, dated to 1334, names "la figliola del Marchese del Bosco" as the first wife of "Bonifacio"[161]. The primary source which confirms her name and the name of her father has not yet been identified. 1179.
     "m secondly ([late 1186/early 1187]) ---. According to Niketas Choniates, Bonifazio had remarried in late 1186-early 1187[162]. The identity of his second wife is not known. The following source suggests that she was Jeanne de Châtillon, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch. The reasons noted below suggest that this is unlikely to be correct. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e[ Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Jeanne married "el re de Salonichio" and died without heirs[163]. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, "el re de Salonichio" can only refer to Bonifazio di Monferrato. If the date of this marriage is correctly reported by Niketas, Jeanne would have been considerably younger than her sister Agnes. In addition, Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Bonifazio's third wife which suggests problems of affinity and the consequent difficulty of obtaining Papal dispensation for that later marriage.]
     "m thirdly (May 1204) as her second husband, MARGIT of Hungary, widow of Emperor ISAAKIOS II, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[164]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[165]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[166]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[167]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[168]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[169]. Her husband installed her as Regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[170]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the Emperor in 1209[171]. She married thirdly Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes (-[1217/19]). Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[172]. "
Med Lands cites:
[149] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[150] Sturdza (1999), p. 537.
[151] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars I, col. 122.
[152] WTC XXVII.XXIV, p. 246.
[153] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 110-11.
[154] Casale Monferrato, Vol. I, LXIII, p. 95.
[155] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 124-5.
[156] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[157] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[158] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[159] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[160] Sicardi Episcopi Cremonensis Cronica, MGH SS XXXI, p. 179.
[161] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars II, Historiam Aquensem,Monferratensem ac Pedemontanam, col. 176.
[162] Dieten, van (ed.) (1975) Niketas Choniates Historia (Berlin and New York), Vol. 1, p. 382, (English translation: Magoulias, H. (1984) O City of Byzantium (Detroit), p. 210), information provided by Dr Marianne Gilchrist in a private email to the author dated 10 Feb 2007.
[163] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[165] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[166] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[167] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[168] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), 8, p. 15.
[169] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 13, p. 96.
[170] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[171] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[172] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “Bonifacio 1er di Monferrato ° 1150 +X 04/09/1207 (guerre contre les Bulgares) marquis de Montferrat (1192-1207), Roi de Thessalonique (1204-1207)
     ép. 1) ~1170 Hélène di Busca ° ~1150 + ~1200/04
     ép. 2) Sofia (Alice) di Savoia + 1202
     ép. 3) 1205 Marguerite Arpad de Hongrie ° 1175 + ~1240 (fille de Bela III, Roi de Hongrie, et d’Agnès de Châtillon)”.9

; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy I): “F4. [3m.] Eleonora, +1204; m.1197 Marchese Bonifacio I del Montferrato (+4.9.1207)”.8 He was Marchese di Montferrato between 1192 and 1207.1 He was King of Thessalonica between 1205 and 1207.12

Family 2

Eleonora (?) di Savoia d. 1204

Family 3

Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary b. 1175, d. a 1223
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boniface I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillermo V 'il Vecchio': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027229&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boniface I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027073&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena di Busca: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027074&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 24 June 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boniface_I,_Marquis_of_Montferrat. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020752&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MargitM1IsaakiosIIByzM2BonifMonferrato
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Boniface de Montferrat: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boniface_de_Montferrat. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Bonifacio I del Monferrato: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonifacio_I_del_Monferrato. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice di Montferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330336&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillermo VIII-VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027077&tree=LEO
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page - Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225B.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027076&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Demetrius de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020755&tree=LEO