Elena/Helene di Busca1,2

F, #57061
FatherAnselmo (?) Marques del Bosco3,4
Last Edited9 Nov 2020
     Elena/Helene di Busca married Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, before 1170;
His 1st wife. Genealogy.EU Montfer page says m. bef 1170; Genealogics says m. bef 1179; Med Lands says m. bef 1171.1,5,6,4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BONIFAZIO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[149]. Regent of Monferrato 1191. He succeeded his brother in 1192 as BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato. He assisted Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in his conquest of Sicily in 1194[150]. A charter dated 13 Jun 1199 records an agreement between the communes of Alessandria, Asti and Vercelli and "dominum Bonifacium marchionem Montisferrati et Gulielmum filius eius"[151]. He joined the movement for a Fourth Crusade, and was elected leader on the death of Thibaut III Comte de Champagne[152], a decision which was ratified at Soissons in Aug 1201[153]. "Bonifatius marchio Montisferrati" granted the right to wood in "bosco Lucedii" to the church of Casale by charter dated 21 Jul 1202[154]. Under the terms of the partition of the Byzantine Empire agreed in March 1204 between Venice and the crusading armies, approximately 3/8 of the territory of the former empire was to be distributed between the crusaders. Bonifazio, as leader of the crusade, expected to be installed as emperor of the newly formed Latin Empire of Constantinople. He married the widow of ex-Emperor Isaakios II in order to advance his claims, but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin IX Count of Flanders whom he considered a less powerful candidate[155]. Bonifazio was assigned a large fief in Anatolia, but demanded Thessaloniki which he claimed belonged as of right to his family since Emperor Manuel I had granted his brother Ranieri a large estate there. At a meeting with Venetian representatives at Adrianople 12 Aug 1204, he ceded the island of Crete (which he claimed had been given as a fief to his brother Ranieri by Emperor Manuel I) to Venice and bought Venice's rights to Thessaloniki[156]. Bonifazio captured Demotika and besieged Adrianople to press his claim. Peace was soon mediated, and Emperor Baudouin exchanged Demotika for Thessaloniki, where Bonifazio declared himself King of Thessaloniki. He extended his kingdom northwards to include Macedonia and southwards into Thessaly[157]. His fiefs were Othon de la Roche (for Attika and Boetia, later to form the duchy of Athens), Guillaume de Champlitte and, after his death, Geoffroy de Villehardouin (for the principality of Achaia or Morea in Peloponese). He was faced with continual threats from the north from the Bulgarians and, against this common threat, allied himself with Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople, confirmed by the marriage of his daughter to the emperor[158]. He was killed by a small Bulgarian raiding party, his head being sent as a trophy to Kalojan Tsar of Bulgaria[159]. The Cronica of Sicardi Bishop of Cremona records the death in 1207 of "Bonifacius marchio Montis-ferrati" killed in battle[160].
     "m firstly (before 1171) ELENA di Bosco, daughter of ---. The Chronica Jacobi de Aquis, dated to 1334, names "la figliola del Marchese del Bosco" as the first wife of "Bonifacio"[161]. The primary source which confirms her name and the name of her father has not yet been identified. 1179.
     "m secondly ([late 1186/early 1187]) ---. According to Niketas Choniates, Bonifazio had remarried in late 1186-early 1187[162]. The identity of his second wife is not known. The following source suggests that she was Jeanne de Châtillon, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch. The reasons noted below suggest that this is unlikely to be correct. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e[ Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Jeanne married "el re de Salonichio" and died without heirs[163]. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, "el re de Salonichio" can only refer to Bonifazio di Monferrato. If the date of this marriage is correctly reported by Niketas, Jeanne would have been considerably younger than her sister Agnes. In addition, Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Bonifazio's third wife which suggests problems of affinity and the consequent difficulty of obtaining Papal dispensation for that later marriage.]
     "m thirdly (May 1204) as her second husband, MARGIT of Hungary, widow of Emperor ISAAKIOS II, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[164]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[165]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[166]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[167]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[168]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[169]. Her husband installed her as Regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[170]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the Emperor in 1209[171]. She married thirdly Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes (-[1217/19]). Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[172]. "
Med Lands cites:
[149] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[150] Sturdza (1999), p. 537.
[151] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars I, col. 122.
[152] WTC XXVII.XXIV, p. 246.
[153] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 110-11.
[154] Casale Monferrato, Vol. I, LXIII, p. 95.
[155] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 124-5.
[156] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[157] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[158] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[159] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[160] Sicardi Episcopi Cremonensis Cronica, MGH SS XXXI, p. 179.
[161] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars II, Historiam Aquensem,Monferratensem ac Pedemontanam, col. 176.
[162] Dieten, van (ed.) (1975) Niketas Choniates Historia (Berlin and New York), Vol. 1, p. 382, (English translation: Magoulias, H. (1984) O City of Byzantium (Detroit), p. 210), information provided by Dr Marianne Gilchrist in a private email to the author dated 10 Feb 2007.
[163] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[165] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[166] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[167] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[168] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), 8, p. 15.
[169] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 13, p. 96.
[170] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[171] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[172] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “Bonifacio 1er di Monferrato ° 1150 +X 04/09/1207 (guerre contre les Bulgares) marquis de Montferrat (1192-1207), Roi de Thessalonique (1204-1207)
     ép. 1) ~1170 Hélène di Busca ° ~1150 + ~1200/04
     ép. 2) Sofia (Alice) di Savoia + 1202
     ép. 3) 1205 Marguerite Arpad de Hongrie ° 1175 + ~1240 (fille de Bela III, Roi de Hongrie, et d’Agnès de Châtillon)”.7

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 200.4 Elena/Helene di Busca was also known as Elena di Bosco.6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena di Busca: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027074&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anselmo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174417&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena di Busca: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027074&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boniface I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027073&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice di Montferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330336&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page - Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillermo VIII-VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027077&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225B.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027076&tree=LEO

Eleonora (?) di Savoia1

F, #57062, d. 1204
FatherUmberto III (?) Comte de Savoie, Aosta and Moriana1 b. bt 1 Aug 1136 - 4 Aug 1136, d. 4 Mar 1189
MotherKlementia (?) von Zähringen1 d. bt 1173 - 1175
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Eleonora (?) di Savoia married Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, between 1186 and 1187;
His 2nd wife
NB: There is skepticism about this 2nd marriage:
     Wikipédia (Fr.) describes the skepticism:
     "Selon Nicétas Choniatès, Boniface se marie, fin 1186-début 1187, avec Jeanne de Châtillon, fille de Renaud de Châtillon et sa première épouse la princesse Constance d'Antioche.
     "Certaines sources affirment qu’en 1197, Boniface épouse Éléonore, une des filles de son cousin Humbert III de Savoie. Si tel est le cas, elle est morte en 1202. Usseglio est sceptique quant à ce mariage1. Il est à noter que, dans ses chansons, Vaqueiras, ne fait aucune allusion à cette épouse."

     Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1 and Montferrat) report that Bonifacio m. Eleonora and Racine et Histoire agrees.
     On the otherhand, Genealogics does not report a marriage between Elena di Bosco and Margarite of Hungary.
     Med Lands shos a middle marriage, but reports "The identity of his second wife is not known."
Conclusion: I have included a second marriage for Bonifacio, with Eleonora di Savoia as a placeholder. GA Vaut.1,2,3,4,5,6
Eleonora (?) di Savoia died in 1204.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BONIFAZIO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[149]. Regent of Monferrato 1191. He succeeded his brother in 1192 as BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato. He assisted Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in his conquest of Sicily in 1194[150]. A charter dated 13 Jun 1199 records an agreement between the communes of Alessandria, Asti and Vercelli and "dominum Bonifacium marchionem Montisferrati et Gulielmum filius eius"[151]. He joined the movement for a Fourth Crusade, and was elected leader on the death of Thibaut III Comte de Champagne[152], a decision which was ratified at Soissons in Aug 1201[153]. "Bonifatius marchio Montisferrati" granted the right to wood in "bosco Lucedii" to the church of Casale by charter dated 21 Jul 1202[154]. Under the terms of the partition of the Byzantine Empire agreed in March 1204 between Venice and the crusading armies, approximately 3/8 of the territory of the former empire was to be distributed between the crusaders. Bonifazio, as leader of the crusade, expected to be installed as emperor of the newly formed Latin Empire of Constantinople. He married the widow of ex-Emperor Isaakios II in order to advance his claims, but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin IX Count of Flanders whom he considered a less powerful candidate[155]. Bonifazio was assigned a large fief in Anatolia, but demanded Thessaloniki which he claimed belonged as of right to his family since Emperor Manuel I had granted his brother Ranieri a large estate there. At a meeting with Venetian representatives at Adrianople 12 Aug 1204, he ceded the island of Crete (which he claimed had been given as a fief to his brother Ranieri by Emperor Manuel I) to Venice and bought Venice's rights to Thessaloniki[156]. Bonifazio captured Demotika and besieged Adrianople to press his claim. Peace was soon mediated, and Emperor Baudouin exchanged Demotika for Thessaloniki, where Bonifazio declared himself King of Thessaloniki. He extended his kingdom northwards to include Macedonia and southwards into Thessaly[157]. His fiefs were Othon de la Roche (for Attika and Boetia, later to form the duchy of Athens), Guillaume de Champlitte and, after his death, Geoffroy de Villehardouin (for the principality of Achaia or Morea in Peloponese). He was faced with continual threats from the north from the Bulgarians and, against this common threat, allied himself with Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople, confirmed by the marriage of his daughter to the emperor[158]. He was killed by a small Bulgarian raiding party, his head being sent as a trophy to Kalojan Tsar of Bulgaria[159]. The Cronica of Sicardi Bishop of Cremona records the death in 1207 of "Bonifacius marchio Montis-ferrati" killed in battle[160].
     "m firstly (before 1171) ELENA di Bosco, daughter of ---. The Chronica Jacobi de Aquis, dated to 1334, names "la figliola del Marchese del Bosco" as the first wife of "Bonifacio"[161]. The primary source which confirms her name and the name of her father has not yet been identified. 1179.
     "m secondly ([late 1186/early 1187]) ---. According to Niketas Choniates, Bonifazio had remarried in late 1186-early 1187[162]. The identity of his second wife is not known. The following source suggests that she was Jeanne de Châtillon, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Constance Pss of Antioch. The reasons noted below suggest that this is unlikely to be correct. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria e[ Joanna" as the two daughters of "Rinaldo de Castellion" and his wife "Costanza…la Nova Princessa", stating that Jeanne married "el re de Salonichio" and died without heirs[163]. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, "el re de Salonichio" can only refer to Bonifazio di Monferrato. If the date of this marriage is correctly reported by Niketas, Jeanne would have been considerably younger than her sister Agnes. In addition, Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Bonifazio's third wife which suggests problems of affinity and the consequent difficulty of obtaining Papal dispensation for that later marriage.]
     "m thirdly (May 1204) as her second husband, MARGIT of Hungary, widow of Emperor ISAAKIOS II, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[164]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[165]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[166]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[167]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[168]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[169]. Her husband installed her as Regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[170]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the Emperor in 1209[171]. She married thirdly Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes (-[1217/19]). Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[172]. "
Med Lands cites:
[149] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[150] Sturdza (1999), p. 537.
[151] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars I, col. 122.
[152] WTC XXVII.XXIV, p. 246.
[153] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 110-11.
[154] Casale Monferrato, Vol. I, LXIII, p. 95.
[155] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 124-5.
[156] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[157] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[158] Sturdza (1999), p. 542.
[159] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[160] Sicardi Episcopi Cremonensis Cronica, MGH SS XXXI, p. 179.
[161] Monumenta Aquensia, Pars II, Historiam Aquensem,Monferratensem ac Pedemontanam, col. 176.
[162] Dieten, van (ed.) (1975) Niketas Choniates Historia (Berlin and New York), Vol. 1, p. 382, (English translation: Magoulias, H. (1984) O City of Byzantium (Detroit), p. 210), information provided by Dr Marianne Gilchrist in a private email to the author dated 10 Feb 2007.
[163] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Beimonte principe 9, p. 172.
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[165] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[166] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[167] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[168] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), 8, p. 15.
[169] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 13, p. 96.
[170] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[171] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[172] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.3

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “Bonifacio 1er di Monferrato ° 1150 +X 04/09/1207 (guerre contre les Bulgares) marquis de Montferrat (1192-1207), Roi de Thessalonique (1204-1207)
     ép. 1) ~1170 Hélène di Busca ° ~1150 + ~1200/04
     ép. 2) Sofia (Alice) di Savoia + 1202
     ép. 3) 1205 Marguerite Arpad de Hongrie ° 1175 + ~1240 (fille de Bela III, Roi de Hongrie, et d’Agnès de Châtillon)”.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy I): “F4. [3m.] Eleonora, +1204; m.1197 Marchese Bonifacio I del Montferrato (+4.9.1207)”.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#GugliemoVIdied1225A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boniface I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 24 June 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."

Nicolas I de Saint-Omer Seigneur de Bootien, Lord of Thebes1,2,3

M, #57063, d. after 1212
FatherGuillaume IV de Saint-Omer Chatelain de Saint-Omer, seigneur de Fauquembergues2,4 d. bt 1190 - 1192
MotherIda (?) d'Avesnes2,5
Last Edited20 Sep 2020
     Nicolas I de Saint-Omer Seigneur de Bootien, Lord of Thebes married Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary, daughter of Béla III (?) King of Hungary and Agnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary, after September 1207;
Her 3rd husband.1,3,6,7
Nicolas I de Saint-Omer Seigneur de Bootien, Lord of Thebes died after 1212.1
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “E2. Margit, *1175, +after 1223; 1m: 1185 Emperor Isaac II Angelos of Byzantium (*ca 1155 +12.4.1204); 2m: 1204 Mgve Boniface I of Montferrat, King of Thessalonica (*1150 +4.9.1207); 3m: ca 1210 Nicolas de Saint-Omer (+1217/19)”.1
; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGIT (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[789]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[790]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo/Barancs and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[791]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[792]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[793]. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[794]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[795]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[796]. Her second marriage was arranged by Bonifazio to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[797], but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin Count of Flanders who was considered a less powerful candidate. Her second husband installed her as regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[798]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the emperor in 1209[799]. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[800].
     "m firstly (1185) as his second wife, Emperor ISAAKIOS II, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204).
     "m secondly (1204) as his third wife, BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato King of Thessaloniki, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). King of Thessaloniki 1204.
     "m thirdly (after Sep 1207) NICOLAS de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes, son of GUILLAUME IV Châtelain de Saint-Omer, Seigneur de Fauquembergues & his first wife Ida d'Avesnes (-[1217/19])."
Med Lands cites:
[789] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[790] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[791] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[792] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[793] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[794] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[795] Bekkerus, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[796] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[797] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[798] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[800] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nicolas I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00275712&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00275710&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida d'Avesnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00275711&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020752&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MargitM1IsaakiosIIByzM2BonifMonferrato. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Saloman (?) of Hungary1

M, #57064
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1,2 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
MotherAgnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary1,2 b. c 1154, d. 1184
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Saloman (?) of Hungary died; died young.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Istvan (?)1

M, #57065
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1,2 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
MotherAgnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary1,2 b. c 1154, d. 1184
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Istvan (?) died; died young.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_III_1172-1196,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Adelheid (?) von Meissen1

F, #57066, d. 1 February 1211
FatherOtto II "der Reiche" (?) Markgraf von Meissen2,3 b. 1125, d. 18 Feb 1190
MotherHedwig (?) von Brandenburg2,3 d. 1 Apr 1203
Last Edited21 Dec 2019
     Adelheid (?) von Meissen married Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia, son of Vladislav/Wladislaw II (?) King of Bohemia and Jutta/Judith (?) of Thuringia, in 1187; his 1st wife.1,4 Adelheid (?) von Meissen and Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia were divorced between 1198 and 1199.1,4
Adelheid (?) von Meissen died on 1 February 1211 at Meissen, Germany (now).1

Family

Przemysl I Ottokar (?) King of Bohemia b. c 1155, d. 15 Dec 1230
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wettin 1 page (The House of Wettin): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wettin 1 page - The House of Wettin: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#OttoMeissendied1190. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia2.html
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 16. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

Erzsebet (?) of Hungary1

F, #57067
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Erzsebet (?) of Hungary married Bökény Cseklészi.2,1
     ; illegitimate?1

Family

Bökény Cseklészi

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Stgeorg2 page (Szentgyörgyi és Bazini): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hung/stgeorg2.html

(?) (?) of Hungary1

F, #57069
FatherBéla III (?) King of Hungary1 b. 1148, d. 23 Apr 1196
MotherAgnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary1 b. c 1154, d. 1184
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     ; unknown daughter.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Maria (?) of Hungary, Heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo1,2

F, #57070, b. between 1203 and 1204, d. between 1237 and 1238
FatherAndras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2,3,4,5 b. 1176, d. 26 Oct 1235
MotherGertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran1,2,6,5 b. c 1185, d. 8 Sep 1213
Last Edited29 May 2020
     Maria (?) of Hungary, Heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo was born between 1203 and 1204.1 She married Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians in 1221; his 2nd wife.7,2,3
Maria (?) of Hungary, Heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo died between 1237 and 1238; Arpad 2 page says d. 1237/38; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1237.1,2
     ; Iwan Asen II, Tsar of the Bulgarians (1218-41), *ca 1190, +1241; 1m: Anna N; 2m: 1221 Maria of Hungary, heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo (*ca 1204, +1237); 3m: 1237/38 Irene Angelina, dau.of Emperor Theodoros of Epirus.7

Family

Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians b. c 1190, d. 1241
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart B (R2): Relationship Table XIII - XIV Century.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andras II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004823&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ANDR%C3%81S_II_1205-1235,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page (The House of Aseniden): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html

Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians1

M, #57071, b. circa 1190, d. 1241
Last Edited28 Nov 2008
     Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians was born circa 1190.1 He married Anna (?); his 1st wife.1 Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians married Maria (?) of Hungary, Heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo, daughter of Andras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran, in 1221; his 2nd wife.1,2,3 Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians married Eirene Komnena Angelina Regent of Bulgaria, daughter of Theodoros I Komnenos Dukas Angelos Emperor of Thessalonica and Maria Dukaina Komnene Petraliphaina, between 1237 and 1238; his 3rd wife.4,1,5
Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians died in 1241.1
     ; Iwan Asen II, Tsar of the Bulgarians (1218-41), *ca 1190, +1241; 1m: Anna N; 2m: 1221 Maria of Hungary, heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo (*ca 1204, +1237); 3m: 1237/38 Irene Angelina, dau.of Emperor Theodoros of Epirus.1 He was Tsar of the Bulgarians between 1218 and 1241.1

Family 2

Maria (?) of Hungary, Heiress of Belgrade and Branicevo b. bt 1203 - 1204, d. bt 1237 - 1238
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page (The House of Aseniden): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart B (R2): Relationship Table XIII - XIV Century.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene Komnena Angelina: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027088&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page - The House of Aseniden: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marija of Bulgaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00298919&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mihaly II Asen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00072289&tree=LEO

Anna (?)1

F, #57072
Last Edited27 Aug 2003
     Anna (?) married Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians; his 1st wife.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page (The House of Aseniden): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html

Eirene Komnena Angelina Regent of Bulgaria1,2

F, #57073, d. 1241
FatherTheodoros I Komnenos Dukas Angelos Emperor of Thessalonica3 d. a 1253
MotherMaria Dukaina Komnene Petraliphaina
Last Edited28 Nov 2008
     Eirene Komnena Angelina Regent of Bulgaria married Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians between 1237 and 1238; his 3rd wife.1,4,2
Eirene Komnena Angelina Regent of Bulgaria died in 1241.2
     ; dau.of Emperor Theodoros of Epirus.1

Family

Ivan/Iwan Asen II (?) Tsar of the Bulgarians b. c 1190, d. 1241
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene Komnena Angelina: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027088&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page (The House of Aseniden): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page - The House of Aseniden: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marija of Bulgaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00298919&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mihaly II Asen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00072289&tree=LEO
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart B (R2): Relationship Table XIII - XIV Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.

Anna Komnene Angelina1

F, #57074, b. circa 1156, d. 1212
FatherAlexios III Komnenos Angelos Emperor of Byzantium2,3 b. c 1153, d. a 1211
MotherEuphrosyne Dukaina Kamaterina2 d. 1211
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited3 Nov 2020
     Anna Komnene Angelina was born circa 1156.1 She married Isaakios Komnenos before 1190; her 1st husband.2 Anna Komnene Angelina married Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea, son of Manuel Lascaris and Ioanna Karatzaina, in 1199; her 2nd husband; his 1st wife; Rudt Collenberg says m. 1200.1,4,3
Anna Komnene Angelina died in 1212.1,3
     ; Anna Komnene Angelina, *ca 1156, +1212; 1m: before 1190 Isaakios Komnenos (+after 1196); 2m: 1199 Theodoros I Laskaris, Emperor in Nicaea (+1222.)1 EDV-24.

Family 1

Isaakios Komnenos d. a 1196

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 6 page (The Laskaris Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant6.html

Koloman/Kalman (?) Duke of Croatia, Halicz and Carinthia1

M, #57075, b. 1208, d. 1241
FatherAndras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2,3 b. 1176, d. 26 Oct 1235
MotherGertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran1,4,3 b. c 1185, d. 8 Sep 1213
Last Edited29 May 2020
     Koloman/Kalman (?) Duke of Croatia, Halicz and Carinthia was born in 1208.1 He married Salomea (?) of Krakow, daughter of Leszek V/I "the Wise/Bialy" (?) Duke of Sandomierz and Krakow and Gremislawa Ingvarovna (?), in 1214; Leo van de Pas says m. 1215.5,6,7
Koloman/Kalman (?) Duke of Croatia, Halicz and Carinthia died in 1241; killed in battle.1
     ; [1m.] Koloman (Kálmán), Duke of Croatia (1208-41), Duke of Halicz (1214-19)+(1219-21) and Carinthia, *1208, +k.a.1241; m.1214 Salome of Cracow (*1211 +10.11.1268.)7 He was Duke of Croatia between 1208 and 1241.1 He was Duke of Halicz between 1214 and 1219.1

Family

Salomea (?) of Krakow b. bt 1211 - 1212, d. 10 Nov 1268

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andras II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004823&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ANDR%C3%81S_II_1205-1235,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast3.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salome of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020779&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Saint Hedwig (?) von Andechs, Duchess of Silesia1,2,3,4

F, #57076, b. between 1176 and 1180, d. 13 October 1243
FatherBerthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia1,5,4,6 b. 1153, d. 12 Aug 1204
MotherAgnes (?) von Rochlitz1,7,4 d. 25 Mar 1195
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Saint Hedwig (?) von Andechs, Duchess of Silesia was born between 1176 and 1180.8,9 She married Henryk I "Brodaty" (?) Duke of Lower Silesia, Duke of Krakow and Great Poland, son of Boleslaw I "Wysoki" (?) Duke of Schlesien and Breslau and Christina (?), in 1186; Genealogy.EU (Diessen 2 page) and Med Lands say m. between 1188 and 1192.10,4,8,11,12
Saint Hedwig (?) von Andechs, Duchess of Silesia died on 13 October 1243.4,8
Saint Hedwig (?) von Andechs, Duchess of Silesia was buried after 13 October 1243 at Sanctuary of St. Jadwiga in Trzebnica, Trzebnica, Powiat trzebnicki, Dolnoslaskie, Poland (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1174, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     DEATH     15 Oct 1243 (aged 68–69), Trzebnica, Dolno?l?skie, Poland
     Saint Hedwig of Andechs, also known as Saint Hedwig of Silesia, was Duchess of Silesia from 1201 and of Greater Poland and High Duchess consort of Poland. She was the daughter of Count Berthold IV of Andechs and his second wife Agnes of Wettin, she was born at Andechs Castle in the Duchy of Bavaria. At the age of twelve, Hedwig married Henryk I Brodaty, son and heir of the Piast duke Boleslaw I the Tall of Silesia. Hedwig and Henry had lived very pious lives, and Hedwig had great zeal for religion. She had supported her husband in donating the Augustinian provostry at Nowogród Bobrzan'ski (Naumburg) and the commandery of the Knights Templar at Oles'nica Mala (Klein Oels). Hedwig always helped the poor and donated all her fortune to the Church. According to legend, she went barefoot even in winter, and when she was urged by the Bishop of Wroclaw to wear shoes, she carried them in her hands. On 15 October 1243, Hedwig died and was buried in Trzebnica Abbey with her husband, while relics of her are preserved at Andechs Abbey and St. Hedwig's Cathedral in Berlin.
     Hedwig was canonized in 1267 by Pope Clement IV, a supporter of the Cistercian order, at the suggestion of her grandson Prince-Archbishop Wladyslaw of Salzburg. She is the patron saint of Silesia, of Andechs, and of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wroclaw and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Görlitz. Her feast day is celebrated on the Roman Catholic calendar of saints on 16 October. A 17th-century legend has it that Hedwig, while on a pilgrimage to Rome, stopped at Bad Zell in Austria, where she had healing waters spring up at a source which today still bears her name.
     Hedwig and Henryk I had seven children:
Agnes (ca. 1190 – before 11 May 1214).
Boleslaw (ca. 1191 – 10 September 1206/08).
Henry II the Pious (ca. 1196 – killed in Battle of Legnica, 9 April 1241).
Konrad the Curly (ca. 1198 – Czerwony Kosciol, 4 September 1213).
Sophie (ca. 1200 – before 22/23 March 1214).
Gertrude (ca. 1200 – Trebnitz, 6/30 December 1268), Abbess of Trebnitz.
A son [Wladyslawl] (before 25 December 1208–1214/17).
     Family Members
     Parents
          Berthold IV von Andechs 1153–1204
          Agnes of Rochlitz unknown–1195
     Spouse
          Henryk I Brodaty 1165–1238
     Siblings
          Agnes Marie of Andechs 1175–1201
          Otto I von Andechs 1180–1234
          Gertrude von Andechs-Meran      Children
          Henryk II Pobozny 1196–1241
     BURIAL     Sanctuary of St. Jadwiga in Trzebnica, Trzebnica, Powiat trzebnicki, Dolno?l?skie, Poland
     Maintained by: A.D.L
     Originally Created by: nbo
     Added: 9 Sep 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 96799540.13
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 26a.14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Berthold VI von Andechs, duke of Meran and Dalmatia, and Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz, were the parents of four daughters. Agnès attracted the interest of Philippe II August, king of France. However, because of their bigamous marriage the pope placed an interdict on France. The second daughter Gertrud, the queen of King András II of Hungary and mother of the later St. Elisabeth of Hungary, was murdered. Mechtild, the youngest, became abbess in Kitzingen, while Hedwig, the third daughter, became known as St.Hedwig of Meran.
     "About 1186 Hedwig married Henryk I, 'the Bearded', duke of Silesia, and they had six children of whom only their son Henryk II would have progeny. A religious man, Henryk I supported and encouraged Hedwig's charitable enterprises and together they founded the abbey of Cistercian nuns at Trebnitz. Some of their children caused them distress, but their son Henryk II became known as 'the Pious' and a daughter Gertrude, the only one Hedwig did not outlive, became abbess of Trebnitz.
     "After the death of her husband in 1238, Hedwig lived in the convent without becoming a nun. From then on she devoted herself to the welfare, spiritual and temporal, of the people around her, using her fortune to relieve the poverty and suffering of the Silesian people. By their policies and foundations, Hedwig and Henryk increased the Germanic influence in Silesia. She died on 13 October 1243."8



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Hedwig of Silesia (Polish: ?wi?ta Jadwiga ?l?ska), also Hedwig of Andechs (German: Heilige Hedwig von Andechs, Latin: Hedvigis; 1174 – 15 October 1243), a member of the Bavarian comital House of Andechs, was Duchess of Silesia from 1201 and of Greater Poland from 1231 as well as High Duchess consort of Poland from 1232 until 1238. She was reported in the two-volume historical atlas of Herman Kinder and another author to have been great in war and defended from the Teutonic Knights. She was canonized by the Catholic Church in 1267 by Pope Clement IV.
Life
     "The daughter of Count Berthold IV of Andechs and his second wife Agnes of Wettin,[3] she was born at Andechs Castle in the Duchy of Bavaria. Her elder sister, Agnes married King Philip II of France (annulled in 1200) and her sister, Gertrude (killed in 1213) King Andrew II of Hungary, while the youngest Matilda, (Mechtild) became abbess at the Benedictine Abbey of Kitzingen in Franconia, where Hedwig also received her education. Hedwig's brother was Bishop Ekbert of Bamberg [de], Count of Andechs-Meranien. Another brother was Berthold, Archbishop of Kalocsa und Patriarch of Aquileia. Through her sister Gertrude, she was the aunt of Elizabeth of Hungary.
Duchess consort
     "At the age of twelve, Hedwig married Henry I the Bearded, son and heir of the Piast duke Boleslaus the Tall of Silesia. As soon as Henry succeeded his father in 1201, he had to struggle with his Piast relatives, at first with his uncle Duke Mieszko IV Tanglefoot who immediately seized the Upper Silesian Duchy of Opole. In 1206 Henry and his cousin Duke W?adys?aw III Spindleshanks of Greater Poland agreed to swap the Silesian Lubusz Land against the Kalisz region, which met with fierce protest by W?adys?aw's III nephew W?adys?aw Odonic. When Henry went to G?sawa in 1227 to meet his Piast cousins, he narrowly saved his life, while High Duke Leszek I the White was killed by the men of the Pomerelian Duke Swietopelk II, instigated by W?adys?aw Odonic.
The next year Henry's ally W?adys?aw III Spindleshanks succeeded Leszek I as High Duke; however as he was still contested by his nephew in Greater Poland, he made Henry his governor at Kraków, whereby the Silesian duke once again became entangled in the dispute over the Seniorate Province. In 1229 he was captured and arrested at P?ock Castle by rivaling Duke Konrad I of Masovia. Hedwig proceeded to P?ock pleading for Henry and was able to have him released.
     "Her actions promoted the reign of her husband: Upon the death of the Polish High Duke W?adys?aw III Spindleshanks in 1231, Henry also became Duke of Greater Poland and the next year prevailed as High Duke at Kraków. He thereby was the first of the Silesian Piast descendants of W?adys?aw II the Exile to gain the rule over Silesia and the Seniorate Province in accord with the 1138 Testament of Boles?aw III Krzywousty.
Widow
     "In 1238, upon his death, Henry was buried at a Cistercian monastery of nuns, Trzebnica Abbey (Kloster Trebnitz), which he had established in 1202 at Hedwig's request. Hedwig accepted the death of her beloved husband with faith. She said:[4] "Would you oppose the will of God? Our lives are His."
     "The widow moved into the monastery, which was led by her daughter Gertrude, assuming the religious habit of a lay sister, but she did not take vows. She invited numerous German religious people from the Holy Roman Empire into the Silesian lands, as well as German settlers who founded numerous cities, towns and villages in the course of the Ostsiedlung, while cultivating barren parts of Silesia for agriculture.
     "Hedwig and Henry had several daughters, though only one surviving son, Henry II the Pious, who succeeded his father as Duke of Silesia and Polish High Duke. The widow however had to witness the killing of her son, vainly awaiting the support of Emperor Frederick II, during the Mongol invasion of Poland at the Battle of Legnica (Wahlstatt) in 1241. The hopes for a re-united Poland were lost and even Silesia fragmented into numerous Piast duchies under Henry II's sons. Hedwig and her daughter-in-law, Henry II's widow Anna of Bohemia, established a Benedictine abbey at the site of the battle in Legnickie Pole, settled with monks coming from Opatovice in Bohemia.
     "Hedwig and Henry had lived very pious lives, and Hedwig had great zeal for her faith. She had supported her husband in donating the Augustinian provostry at Nowogród Bobrza?ski (Naumburg) and the commandery of the Knights Templar at Ole?nica Ma?a (Klein Oels). Hedwig always helped the poor, the widows and the orphans, founded several hospitals for the sick and the lepers, and donated all her fortune to the Church. She allowed no one to leave her uncomforted, and one time she spent ten weeks teaching the Our Father to a poor woman. According to legend, she went barefoot even in winter, and when she was urged by the Bishop of Wroc?aw to wear shoes, she carried them in her hands.[4]On 15 October 1243, Hedwig died and was buried in Trzebnica Abbey with her husband, while relics of her are preserved at Andechs Abbey and St. Hedwig's Cathedral in Berlin.
Veneration
     "Hedwig was canonized in 1267 by Pope Clement IV, a supporter of the Cistercian order, at the suggestion of her grandson Prince-Archbishop W?adys?aw of Salzburg. She is the patron saint of Silesia, of Andechs, and of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wroc?aw and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Görlitz. Her feast day is celebrated on the General Roman Calendar on 16 October. A 17th-century legend has it that Hedwig, while on a pilgrimage to Rome, stopped at Bad Zell in Austria, where she had healing waters spring up at a source which today still bears her name.
     "In 1773 the Prussian king Frederick the Great, having conquered and annexed the bulk of Silesia in the First Silesian War, had St. Hedwig's Cathedral in Berlin built for the Catholic Upper Silesian immigrants, now the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Berlin.
     "Hedwig glasses are named after Hedwig of Andechs.
Children
     "Hedwig and Henry I had seven children:
1. Agnes (ca. 1190 – before 11 May 1214).
2. Boles?aw (ca. 1191 – 10 September 1206/08).
3. Henry II the Pious (ca. 1196 – killed in Battle of Legnica, 9 April 1241).
4. Konrad the Curly (ca. 1198 – Czerwony Kosciol, 4 September 1213).
5. Sophie (ca. 1200 – before 22/23 March 1214).
6. Gertrude (ca. 1200 – Trebnitz, 6/30 December 1268), Abbess of Trebnitz.
7. A son [W?adys?aw?] (before 25 December 1208–1214/17).
References
1. "Saint Hedwig of Silesia with Duke Ludwig I of Liegnitz and Brieg and Duchess Agnes", The J. Paul Getty Museum
2. Knoblich, Augustin. Lebensgeschichte der heiligen Hedwig, Herzogin und Landespatronin von Schlesien. 1174-1243. Schletter, Breslau 1860 (Digitalisat)
3. Kirsch, Johann Peter (1910). "St. Hedwig". The Catholic Encyclopedia. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 18 February 2007.
4. Fr. Paolo O. Pirlo, SHMI (1997). "St. Hedwig". My First Book of Saints. Sons of Holy Mary Immaculate - Quality Catholic Publications. pp. 243–244. ISBN 971-91595-4-5."15

EDV-23.

; Per Catholic encyclopedia:
     "St. Hedwig - Duchess of Silesia, b. about 1174, at the castle of Andechs; d. at Trebnitz, 12 or 15 October, 1243. She was one of eight children born to Berthold IV, Count of Andechs and Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia. Of her four brothers, two became bishops, Ekbert of Bamberg, and Berthold of Aquileia; Otto succeeded his father as Duke of Dalmatia, and Heinrich became Margrave of Istria. Of her three sisters, Gertrude married Andrew II, King of Hungary, from which union sprang St. Elizabeth, Landgravine of Thuringia; Mechtilde became Abbess of Kitzingen; while Agnes was made the unlawful wife of Philip II of France in 1196, on the repudiation of his lawful wife, Ingeborg, but was dismissed in 1200, Innocent III having laid France under an interdict. Hedwig was educated at the monastery of Kitzingen, and, according to an old biography, at the age of twelve (1186), was married to Henry I of Silesia (b. 1168), who in 1202 succeeded his father Boleslaw as Duke of Silesia. Henry's mother was a German; he himself had been educated in Germany; and now through his wife he was brought into still closer relations with Germany. Henry I was an energetic prince, who greatly extended the boundaries of his duchy, established his authority on a firm basis, and rendered important services to civilization in the realm. For this purpose he encouraged to the utmost the spread of the more highly developed civilization existing in the German territories adjoining his to the west, so that Silesia became German in language and customs.
     "Hedwig now took a prominent part in the beneficent administration of her husband. Her prudence, fortitude, and piety won for her great influence in the government of the land. In particular she gave her support to new monastic foundations and assisted those already in existence. It was chiefly through the monasteries that German civilization was spread in Silesia. Henry and Hedwig endowed munificently the Cistercian monastery of Leubus, the Premonstratensian monastery of St. Vincent, and the foundation of the Canons of St. Augustine at Breslau. The following monasteries were established: the Augustinian priory of Naumburg on the Bober (1217), later transferred to Sagan, the Cistercian monastery of Heinrichau (1227), and the priory of the Augustinian Canons at Kamenz (1210). St. Hedwig brought the Dominicans to Bunzlau and Breslau, the Franciscans to Goldberg (1212) and later to Krossen. The Templars established a house at Klein-Oels. Henry was also the founder of the Hospital of the Holy Ghost at Breslau (1214), and Hedwig tended with disinterested charity the leper women in the hospital at Neumarkt. At the instance of his saintly wife, the duke then founded at his own expense, and on ground donated by himself the convent of the Cistercian nuns at Trebnitz (1202), and generously endowed it. This was the first house of religious women in Silesia. The first nuns came from Bamberg and took possession of their new monastery early in 1203. The first abbess is said to have been Petrussa, succeeded by Bl. Gertrude, a daughter of Henry and Hedwig, who at an early age had been betrothed to Otto von Wittelsbach. After he murdered the German King Philip of Swabia (1208), the betrothal was annulled and Gertrude entered the Abbey of Trebnitz (before 1212), where she later became abbess.
     "For some years after her marriage, Hedwig resided chiefly at Breslau. She had seven children. A son, Boleslaw, and two daughters, Sophia and Agnes, died at an early age; Henry succeeded to his father's title; Conrad died while still a young man, in consequence of a fall from his horse (c. 1214); and Gertrude embraced the religious life. On Christmas Day, 1208, another son of Hedwig's was baptized, probably not identical with the above-mentioned Boleslaw, who had died before this time. On the suggestion of Hedwig, after the birth of this last child, she and her husband led a virgin life (1209), and pronounced a vow of chastity before the Bishop of Breslau. Duke Henry took the tonsure and allowed his beard to grow, like the Cistercian lay brothers (whence his sobriquet of "the Bearded"). From this time forward Hedwig spent much of her time at the Abbey of Trebnitz, where, on the death of her husband (1238), she took up her permanent abode, that she might devote herself unreservedly to exercises of mortification and piety as well as to works of charity. She transferred to the abbey her inheritance of Schawoine. Hedwig had had many trials and tribulations. In the year 1227 her husband, with Duke Lesko of Sandomir, was treacherously set upon by Swantopolk, Duke of Pomerania, and severely wounded. Hedwig immediately hastened to Gonsawa, where the bloody deed had taken place, to care for her husband. Lesko had been killed, and war now broke out between Henry of Silesia and Conrad of Masovia over the possession of Cracow. Conrad was defeated, but succeeded in surprising Henry in a church attending Divine service and led him captive to Plock (1229). Hedwig forthwith went to her husband's assistance, and her very appearance made such an impression on Conrad of Masovia that he released the duke.
     "Of Hedwig's children, only Gertrude survived her; Duke Henry II fell at Wahlstatt (1241) in a battle against the Tatars. After her husband's death, Hedwig took the grey habit of the Cistercians, but was not received into the order as a religious, that she might retain the right to spend her revenues in charities. The duchess practised severe mortification, endured all trials with the greatest resignation, with self-denying charity cared for the sick and supported the poor; in her interior life of prayer, she gave herself up to meditation on supernatural things. Her piety and gentleness won for her even during life the reputation of a saint. She was interred in the church attached to the monastery, and was canonized by Clement IV, 26 March, 1267, and on 25 August of the same year her remains were raised to the honours of the altar. Her feast is celebrated 17 October; she in honoured as the patroness of Silesia.
     "With St. Hedwig as patroness, R. Spiske, later canon at Breslau, founded, in 1848, a pious association of women and young girls, from which developed the congregation of the Sisters of St. Hedwig, established in 1859, at Breslau, under the Rule of St. Augustine, and constitutions approved by the bishop. Their chief aim is the education of orphaned and abandoned children; they also conduct schools for little girls and trade schools. Their activity extends chiefly over Germany and Austria, but they also have a house in Denmark. The sisters number about three hundred, with mother-house at Breslau."2


; Per Catholic Enc.: "wife of Duke Heinrich I, the Bearded, of Silesia.1 "


; Per Med Lands: "HEDWIG ([1176/80]-14 May 1243, bur Trebnitz). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names "Hedwigem…filiam ducis Meranie Bertoldi, sororem domine Gerdrudis regine Ungarie et domine Engeldrudis regine Francie" as wife of "Henricus dictus cum barba"[381]. The Annales Wratislavienses name "sancte Hedwigis" as wife of "dux…Heinricus dictus cum barba"[382]. She founded an abbey of Cistercian nuns at Trzebnica [Trebnitz] near Wroc?aw [Breslau], where she cultivated the cult of her niece of St Elisabeth of Hungary. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "1243 VII Id Oct" of "mater iam dicti Henrici beata Hedwigis" and her canonisation "1266 VIII Kal Dec"[383]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1241 II Id Oct" of "Hædewigis ducisse Zlesie, filia Berhtildi ducis Meranie"[384]. She was canonised in 1267[385]. m ([1188/92]) HEINRICH of Silesia, son of BOLESLAW Duke of Breslau [Piast] & his second wife Christina --- ([1165/70]-Krosno 19 Mar 1238). He succeeded in 1231 as HEINRICH I Duke of Lower Silesia, Krakow and Greater Poland."
Med Lands cites:
[381] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 566.
[382] Annales Wratislavienses 1238, MGH SS XIX, p. 527.
[383] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 551.
[384] Notæ Diessenses 1241, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[385] Crossley, Paul 'The Architecture of Queenship: Royal Saints, Female Dynasties and the Spread of Gothic Architecture in Central Europe', Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 277.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH of Silesia, son of BOLESLAW Duke of Breslau [Piast] & his second wife Christina --- ([1165/70]-Krosno 19 Mar 1238). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names "Boleslaum et Henricum dictum cum barba" as the sons of "Boleslaus Altus, primogenitus Vlodislai monarchi" & his second wife "Adilheidem, sororem imperatricis coniugis Conradi secundi imperatoris"[115]. The Chronica principum Polonie names "Henricum dictum cum barba et Conradum et filiam Adilheudim" as the children of Boleslaw and his second wife, adding that Adelheid married "marchio Moravie Dypoldus"[116]. He succeeded his father in 1201 as HEINRICH I “der Bärtige/Brodaly” Duke of Lower Silesia in Breslau. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Bolislaum patrem ducis Vrescelavie Henrici"[117]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record that in 1225 "Henricus dux Zlesie stetit in Cracovia octo diebus cum suo exercitu et recessit"[118]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record that in 1229 "Henricus dux Zlesie captus est a duce Cunrado"[119]. After the death in 1231 of his cousin W?adys?aw III "Laskonogi/Thinboned", Heinrich attempted to establish control over Greater Poland and Krakow, challenged by the other Polish princes among whom the deceased’s nephew W?adys?aw[120]. The Annales Wratislavienses record the death "1238 XIV Kal Apr" of "dux…Heinricus dictus cum barba", and his burial "in monasterio Trebnicensi"[121]. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie adds that he was fifth son of "Bolezlei Alti fundatoris Lubensis" when recording his death[122].
     "m (1188/92]) HEDWIG von Andechs-Merano, daughter of BERTHOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese of Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin ([1176/80]-9 Oct 1243, bur Trebnitz). The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum names "Hedwigem…filiam ducis Meranie Bertoldi, sororem domine Gerdrudis regine Ungarie et domine Engeldrudis regine Francie" as wife of "Henricus dictus cum barba"[123]. The Annales Wratislavienses name "sancte Hedwigis" as wife of "dux…Heinricus dictus cum barba"[124]. She founded an abbey of Cistercian nuns at Trzebnica [Trebnitz] near Wroc?aw [Breslau], where she cultivated the cult of her niece St Elisabeth of Hungary. The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "1243 VII Id Oct" of "mater iam dicti Henrici beata Hedwigis" and her canonisation "1266 VIII Kal Dec"[125]. The Chronica principum Polonie adds that "beatissima Hedwigis" was buried "in monasterio Trebenicensi"[126]."
Med Lands cites:
[115] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 565.
[116] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 98.
[117] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[118] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1225, MGH SS XIX, p. 596.
[119] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1229, MGH SS XIX, p. 596.
[120] Petry, Menzel & Irgang (2000), Band I, pp. 96-8.
[121] Annales Wratislavienses 1238, MGH SS XIX, p. 527.
[122] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 551.
[123] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 566.
[124] Annales Wratislavienses 1238, MGH SS XIX, p. 527.
[125] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 551.
[126] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 108.12

Family

Henryk I "Brodaty" (?) Duke of Lower Silesia, Duke of Krakow and Great Poland b. bt 1165 - 1170, d. 19 Mar 1238
Children

Citations

  1. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Elizabeth of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05389a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  2. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Hedwig at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07189a.htm
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold VI von Andechs: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033350&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#BertoldIIIAndechsMeranodied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033351&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Hedwig von Meran: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030719&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#HedwigMeranodied1243
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henryk I 'the Bearded': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030718&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#HeinrichIdied1238
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 January 2020), memorial page for Hedwig of Andechs (1174–15 Oct 1243), Find A Grave Memorial no. 96799540, citing Sanctuary of St. Jadwiga in Trzebnica, Trzebnica, Powiat trzebnicki, Dolno?l?skie, Poland ; Maintained by A.D.L (contributor 47895058), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/96799540/hedwig-of_andechs. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Hedwig von Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030719&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwig_of_Silesia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henryk II 'the Pious': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030716&tree=LEO

Hugues (?) Archbishop of Besançon1,2

M, #57077, d. 13 September 1101
FatherGuillaume I "The Great" Testard (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Macon1,2,3,4 b. c 1024, d. 12 Nov 1087
MotherEtiennette (?)2,4,3 b. c 1035, d. a 1092
Last Edited6 Dec 2019
     Hugues (?) Archbishop of Besançon died on 13 September 1101.2,4
     ; Per Med Lands: "HUGUES de Bourgogne (-13 Sep 1103). He and his brothers Etienne and Raimond called themselves sons of the "most noble count William" in a late-11th century document[110]. Archbishop of Besançon 1086."
Med Lands cites: [110] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 365, p. 143.3 Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:59.4

Citations

  1. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: Pope Callistus II http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03185a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RaimondAmousdied1107. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00535779&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Drahomira ze Stodor (?)1,2,3

F, #57078, b. circa 890, d. after 935
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited8 Jul 2020
     Drahomira ze Stodor (?) was born circa 890; Leo van de Pas estimate.3 She married Vratislav I (?) Duke of Bohemia, son of Borzivoy I (?) Duke of Bohemia and Saint Ludmila (?) Heiress of Psov, in 906.1,2,3,4,5
Drahomira ze Stodor (?) died after 935; died in exile.2,3,5
     ; Per Med Lands: "VRATISLAV (888-killed in battle 13 Feb 921). The Chronica Boemorum names "Spitigneum et Wratizlaum" as sons of "Borivoy", specifying that the latter succeeded on the death of his older brother[16]. "Wratizlav" is named as younger brother of "Zpuytignev" in the Vita Vencezslavi[17]. He succeeded his brother in 915 as VRATISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians. The Gesta Hungarorum records that, after settling in Pannonia, the Magyars (although the text does not give them this name) raided Moravia and Bohemia and killed "Waratizlao" in battle[18]. m ([906]) DRAHOMIRA, daughter of --- from Stodor (-after 935). The Chronica Boemorum names "Dragomir de durissima gente Luticensi…ex provincial nomine Stodor" as wife of "Wratizlav"[19]. Regent for her son. She was sent into exile[20]."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, pp. 44-5.
[17] Gumpoldi Vita Vencezlavi ducis Bohemiæ 2 and 3, MGH SS IV, p. 214.
[18] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 34, p. 87.
[19] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45.
[20] ES I.2 176.5


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 23.6

; Per Genealogics:
     "Drahomira was a princess of the Hevelli or Hevellians, a Slavic tribe living around the river Havel in the Havelland area of Brandenburg in Eastern Germany from the 8th century onwards. In 906 she married Wratislaw I, duke of Bohemia. They had six children, including Wenceslas, Boleslaw and Strezislava, of whom Boleslaw would have progeny.
     "She led her husband to cooperation with her own people warring against Saxony. After her husband's untimely death in 921 she and her mother-in-law Ludmilla, widow of Wratislaw's father Borziwoy I, divided the government of Bohemia.
     "Popular history depicts Ludmilla as a restrained and pious grandmother, but it is likely that the political demands of government called for more energy and worldliness than history records. The issue of influence over Drahomira's eldest son Wenceslas, only thirteen when his father died, was one of the main reasons for the eventually fatal discord between Drahomira and Ludmilla. Ludmilla exerted great influence over Wenceslas, leaving Drahomira to concentrate her efforts on her younger son Boleslaw.
     "Despite or perhaps as a result of her political and personal efforts, Ludmilla attracted Drahomira's bitter enmity. Ludmilla fled to Tetin castle, where he daughter-in-law's hired assassins, Tunna and Gommon, murdered her in 927.
     "When Wenceslas came to power he sent his mother into exile, though he later recalled her. She was said to have persuaded her younger son Boleslaw to murder his elder brother, and Wenceslas was killed in September 935 by a group of nobles allied to Boleslaw, who took over the rule of Bohemia. Drahomira died after 935. According to a chronicle she was killed in an earthquake."6 GAV-31. Drahomira ze Stodor (?) was also known as Drahomia von Stodar.6

Citations

  1. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Wenceslaus at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15587b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Drahomira von Stodar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020253&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020252&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#_Toc484863357. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Drahomira von Stodar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020253&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Wenceslas I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020254&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I 'the Gruesome': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020256&tree=LEO

Maria/Helena (?)1

F, #57079
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Maria/Helena (?) married Andras (?) King of Halicz, son of Andras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran, between 1221 and 1227.1
     ; dau.of Prince Mstislav of Novgorod.1

Family

Andras (?) King of Halicz b. bt 1210 - 1212, d. 1234
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Elizabeth (?)1

F, #57080, d. between 1295 and 1296
FatherAndras (?) King of Halicz1 b. bt 1210 - 1212, d. 1234
MotherMaria/Helena (?)1
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Elizabeth (?) married Moys (?) of Daro, Palatine of Hungary.1
Elizabeth (?) died between 1295 and 1296.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Moys (?) of Daro, Palatine of Hungary1

M, #57081, d. 1280
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Moys (?) of Daro, Palatine of Hungary married Elizabeth (?), daughter of Andras (?) King of Halicz and Maria/Helena (?).1
Moys (?) of Daro, Palatine of Hungary died in 1280.1
     ; a Cuman Prince.1

Family

Elizabeth (?) d. bt 1295 - 1296

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Juan (?) de Vidaure1

M, #57082
Last Edited7 Dec 2020

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html#J1

Elizabeth Traversari1

F, #57083, d. 1264
FatherGuglielmo Traversari Patrician of Ravenna1
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Elizabeth Traversari married Stephen (?) of Hungary, Duke of Slavonia, Patrician of Venice, son of Andras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Beatrice d'Este, in 1263; his 1st wife.1
Elizabeth Traversari died in 1264.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Guglielmo Traversari Patrician of Ravenna1

M, #57084
Last Edited4 Jul 2003

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Micaele Sbarra Morosini Patrician of Venice1

M, #57085
Last Edited4 Jul 2003

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Istvan (?)1

M, #57086, b. 1264
FatherStephen (?) of Hungary, Duke of Slavonia, Patrician of Venice1 b. 1236, d. 1271
MotherElizabeth Traversari1 d. 1264
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Istvan (?) died; died young.1 He was born in 1264.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Fenenna (?) of Kujavia1

F, #57087, b. 1276, d. 1295
FatherZiemomysl (?) Prince of Kujawien1 b. bt 1241 - 1245, d. bt 29 Oct 1287 - 24 Dec 1287
MotherSalome (?) of Pommerellen1 b. b 1257, d. bt 3 Oct 1312 - 1314
Last Edited29 Aug 2004
     Fenenna (?) of Kujavia was born in 1276.1 She married Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary, son of Stephen (?) of Hungary, Duke of Slavonia, Patrician of Venice and Tomasina Morosini, in 1290; his 2st wife.1
Fenenna (?) of Kujavia died in 1295.1

Family

Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary b. c 1265, d. 14 Jan 1301
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast3.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Agnes (?) of Austria1,2

F, #57088, b. 18 May 1281, d. 10 June 1364
FatherAlbrecht I von Habsburg Duke of Austria, Holy Roman Emperor3,1,4,5 b. Jul 1255, d. 1 May 1308
MotherElizabeth von Görz-Tirol3,1,6,5 b. b 1262, d. 28 Oct 1313
Last Edited20 Jan 2020
     Agnes (?) of Austria was born on 18 May 1281.1 She married Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary, son of Stephen (?) of Hungary, Duke of Slavonia, Patrician of Venice and Tomasina Morosini, on 13 February 1296 at Vienna, Austria; his 2nd wife.1,3,2
Agnes (?) of Austria died on 10 June 1364 at Königsfelden, Austria, at age 83.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 6.2

Family

Andrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary b. c 1265, d. 14 Jan 1301

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Austria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020773&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 262. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026220&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#AlbrechtIdied1308B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Tirol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026221&tree=LEO

Erzsebet (?)1

F, #57089, b. 1292, d. 6 May 1338
FatherAndrew III (Andras) (?) King of Hungary1 b. c 1265, d. 14 Jan 1301
MotherFenenna (?) of Kujavia1 b. 1276, d. 1295
Last Edited4 Jul 2003
     Erzsebet (?) was born in 1292.1
Erzsebet (?) died on 6 May 1338.1
     ; a nun.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html

Saint Kunigunda/Kinga (?)1

F, #57090, b. 1224, d. 24 July 1292
FatherBela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1 b. Nov 1206, d. 3 May 1270
MotherMarie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia1 b. c 1206, d. 1270
Last Edited23 May 2004
     Saint Kunigunda/Kinga (?) was born in 1224.1 She married Boleslaw V "Wstydliwy/the Modest" (?) Prince of Krakow and Sandomierz, son of Leszek V/I "the Wise/Bialy" (?) Duke of Sandomierz and Krakow and Gremislawa Ingvarovna (?), in 1239.2,3,4
Saint Kunigunda/Kinga (?) died on 24 July 1292 at Sandeck, Poland.1,4
     ; Saint Kunigunda (Kinga), canonised 16.6.1999, *Buda 1224, +24.7.1292; m.1239 Pr Boleslav V of Cracow and Sandomir (*21.6.1226 +7.12.1279.)1

; Blessed Cunegundes - Poor Clare and patroness of Poland and Lithuania; born in 1224; died 24 July, 1292, at Sandeck, Poland. She was the daughter of King Bela IV and niece of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, and from her infancy it pleased God to give tokens of the eminent sanctity to which she was later to attain. With extreme reluctance she consented to her marriage with Boleslaus II, Duke of Cracow and Sandomir, who afterwards became King of Poland. Not long after their marriage, the pious couple made a vow of perpetual chastity in the presence of the Bishop of Cracow; and Cunegundes, amidst the splendour and pomp of the royal household, gave herself up to the practice of the severest austerities. She often visited the poor and the sick in the hospitals, and cared even for the lepers with a charity scarcely less than heroic. In 1279, King Boleslaus died, and Cunegundes, despite the entreaties of her people that she should take in hand the government of the kingdom, sold all her earthly possessions for the relief of the poor and entered the monastery of the Poor Clares at Sandeck. The remaining thirteen years of her life she spent in prayer and penance, edifying her fellow religious by her numerous virtues, especially by her heroic humility. She never permitted anyone to refer to the fact that she had once been a queen and was foundress of the community at Sandeck.

The cultus of Blessed Cunegundes was approved by Pope Alexander VIII in 1690; in 1695 she was made chief patroness of Poland and Lithuania by a decree of the congregation of Rites, confirmed by Clement XI. Her feast is kept in the Order of Friars Minor on the 27th of July.

STEPHEN M. DONOVAN
Transcribed by Paul T. Crowley
Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume IV
Copyright © 1908 by Robert Appleton Company
Online Edition Copyright © 2003 by K. Knight
Nihil Obstat. Remy Lafort, Censor
Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020780&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Blessed Cunegundes: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04569a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.