Baldwin (Baudouin) IV "le Lépreux" (?) King of Jerusalem1,2,3,4,5

M, #6301, b. 1161, d. 16 March 1185
FatherAmalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus3,6,7 b. 1136, d. 11 Jul 1174
MotherAgnes de Courtenay Lady of Thoron8,3 b. c 1133, d. bt 1184 - 1185
Last Edited9 Dec 2019
     Baldwin (Baudouin) IV "le Lépreux" (?) King of Jerusalem was born in 1161 at Anjou, France; Anjou 2 page says b. 1161; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1160.2,3,5,4
Baldwin (Baudouin) IV "le Lépreux" (?) King of Jerusalem died on 16 March 1185 at Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel (now).9,2,3,4,5,10
Baldwin (Baudouin) IV "le Lépreux" (?) King of Jerusalem was buried after 16 March 1185 at Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1161, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     DEATH     16 Mar 1185 (aged 23–24), Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     (Baldwin the Leper), c.1161–1185, Latin king of Jerusalem (1174–85), son and successor of Amalric I. Raymond,count of Tripoli, was regent from 1174 to 1176. Baldwin was constantly engaged, except for a truce (1180–82), in defending his kingdom against Saladin. In 1183 his leprosy began to spread very rapidly; he appointed Guy of Lusignan as his regent, but in the same year he withdrew the commission and had his five-year-old nephew crowned king as Baldwin V (d. 1186). Raymond was regent for Baldwin V, who was succeeded as king by Guy of Lusignan.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Amalric I of Anjou 1136–1174
          Agnès de Courtenay de Anjou, of Jerusalem 1134–1184
     Siblings
          Sybilla de Montferrat-de Lusignan 1158–1190
     BURIAL     Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     Created by: HalfBloodPrincess
     Added: 9 May 2005
     Find A Grave Memorial 10933359.10
     Reference: van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: 141.4

; See Wikipedia article.11 He was King of Jerusalem between 1174 and 1185.12,3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 234. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin IV 'the Leper': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020220&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amalric I d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020218&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#AmauryIA. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Courtenay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076116&tree=LEO
  9. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 October 2019), memorial page for Baldwin, IV (1161–16 Mar 1185), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10933359, citing Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel ; Maintained by HalfBloodPrincess (contributor 46529909), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10933359/baldwin. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_IV_of_Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 112.

Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem1,2,3,4

F, #6302, b. between 1150 and 1160, d. 21 October 1190
FatherAmalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus1,2,5,4,3,6 b. 1136, d. 11 Jul 1174
MotherAgnes de Courtenay Lady of Thoron1,7,2,3,4 b. c 1133, d. bt 1184 - 1185
Last Edited8 Oct 2020
     Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem was born between 1150 and 1160.1,8,3 She married Guglielmo VI "Lungaspada" del Monferrato Count of Jaffa and Askalon, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, in October 1176; her 1st husband; van de Pas says m. Nov. 1176.9,1,10,2,4,3,11 Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem and Baudouin I d'Ibelin Lord of Mirabel and Rama were engaged in 1179.12 Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem married Guy de Lusignan King of Jerusalem and Cyprus, Comte de Jaffa et d'Ascalon, son of Hugues VIII "le Vieux" de Lusignan sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche, Seigneur de Bourgogne de Rancon, Seigneur de Fontenay and Bourgogne de Rancon dame de Fontenay, in April 1180; her 2nd husband.9,8,13,2,3,4,14
Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem died on 21 October 1190; van de Pas says d. July 1190.1,8,13,3,4
Sybil (Sibylle) (?) Queen of Jerusalem was buried after 21 October 1190 at Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel.8


     ; van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: 141.15,3
; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN [I] of Ibelin (1135 or before-[Feb 1186/88]). The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "mesire Hue, et mesire Baudoyn, et mesire Belleem" as the three sons of "Belleem a la Barbe" & his wife[820]. “Reinerius de Ramis”, fearing death, donated property to “infirmis Sancti Lazari secus muros Jerusalem”, in the presence of “...me Barisano, Hugone...ac Balduino filiis meis, nepotibus ipsius...atque muliere mea, sorore eius”, confirmed by “Barisanus et Hugo ac Balduinus filii mei”, by charter dated 1148[821]. "Balduinus…in sancta Iherusalem Latinorum rex quartus" confirmed the donation by "Hugo de Hybelino et…fratris sui Balduini et sororis sue Hermengardis domine Tiberiadis et matris sue Helois…" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 14 Jan 1155[822]. "Melisendis…Iherosolimorum regina" confirmed the donation of "Hugonis de Hibeline…et Balduini fratri sui" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1155[823]. "Amalricus…comes Ascalonis" confirmed a donation to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by "Hugonis de Hybelino et fratrum suorum Balduini et Barisani et Hermengardis sororis sue matrisque sue Alois…" by charter dated 1158[824]. "…Hugo de Ybelino et frater eius Balduinus" subscribed the charter dated 26 Jul 1160 under which "Balduinus…in sancta Iherusalem Latinorum rex quartus" granted privileges to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem[825]. Lord of Mirabel. "Balduinus de Mirabella, filius Barisani" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "uxoris R[ichildis] et fratris Barisani", by charter dated 1165[826]. "Balduinus de Ybelin, dominus Mirabelli" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "Hugonis de Ybelin et Baliani fratrum, Richeldis uxoris", by charter dated [29] Apr 1166, subscribed by "Nicholaus de Jbelin, Osmundus frater eius…"[827]. "Balduinus de Mirabell" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "Ugonis de Ibelino, domini sui, et Barisani fratrum necnon Agnetis comitissæ, uxoris Hugonis, Richoldis uxoris suæ, et dominæ Stephaniæ", by charter dated 1167[828]. "Hugo dominus de Hibelini" confirmed that "dominus Rainerius bone memorie avunculus meus" had donated land "in territorio Ramatensi" to St Lazarus of Jerusalem, and now redonated the land as well as land which "quam habuerunt de domina Eva", with the consent of "Agnetis comitisse uxoris mee, et domini Balduini et domini Barisani fratrum meorum", by charter dated 1169[829]. He succeeded his brother as Lord of Rama. He was captured by Saladin near Marj Ayn 20 Jun 1179 but released a few months later on promise of a ransom of 150,000 dinars[830]. A strong opponent of the Lusignan faction in the kingdom of Jerusalem (although his daughter was married to Aimery de Lusignan), he refused to pay homage to Sibylle Queen of Jerusalem and her husband King Guy after their coronation in 1186. He left Rama to his minor son, and went to the court of Bohémond III Prince of Antioch[831].
     "m firstly ([1155], divorced [1174]) RICHILDE of Bethsan, daughter of GREMONT [I] Lord of Bethsan & his wife Marguerite of Beirut. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Richeut…fille de Gremont de Bessan" as wife of "Baudoyn…seignor de Rames", stating that they were divorced[832]. In another passage, the Lignages d'Outremer name "André et Gautier et Amauri et Phelippe et Richeut et Ysabiau et Estefenie" as children of "Gremont le seignor de Bessan" & his wife, specifying that Richilde married "Baudoyn d'Ybelin" and was "mere de la reyne Eschive"[833]. Rüdt-Collenberg suggests that this parentage is chronologically improbable, although his reasoning is unclear[834]. "Balduinus de Mirabella, filius Barisani" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "uxoris R[ichildis]…", by charter dated 1165[835]. "Balduinus de Ybelin, dominus Mirabelli" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "…Richeldis uxoris", by charter dated [29] Apr 1166[836]. "Balduinus de Mirabell" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "…Richoldis uxoris suæ…", by charter dated 1167[837].
     "m secondly (1175) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Gothman, widow of HUGUES Lord of Caesarea, daughter of JEAN de Gothman & his wife Amandala --- (-[1177/80]). The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabiau…fille de sire Johan Gomans…feme de Hue de Cesaire" as second wife of "Baudoyn…seignor de Rames"[838]. "Balduinus, dominus Ramensis" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, with the consent of "uxoris Helisabeth et fratris Barisani", by charter dated 1175, subscribed by "…Aubertus, consanguineus Balduini…"[839].
     "[Betrothed ([1179]) to SIBYLLE of Jerusalem, widow of GUGLIELMO "Lungaspada" di Monferrato, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his first wife Agnès de Courtenay ([1160]-Acre [Sep/21 Oct] 1190). The Chronicle of Ernoul suggests this betrothal, although not explicitly, when it records in the same paragraph that "Bauduins de Rames" and "la contesse Sibille de Jaffes et d'Escalonne li seur le roi" were both widowed from their second and first marriages respectively, apparently confirmed in a later passage which states that Sibylle wished to marry him if he was released from prison[840]. The same source records that Sibylle married her second husband while her betrothed, Baudouin of Ibelin, was in Constantinople requesting Emperor Manuel I to finance the payment of the ransom which had been promised to Saladin as the price for his release from captivity[841].]
     "m thirdly (after Apr 1180) as her first husband, MARIE, daughter of RENIER Constable of Tripoli & his wife [Marie ---] (-after Oct 1228). The Lignages d'Outremer name "Marie" as third wife of "Baudoyn…seignor de Rames", naming her four brothers "Gautier seignor de Baruth, et Gui seignor de Cesaire de par sa feme, et Bernart, et Hue" and her sister "feme de Johan Le Tor, seignor dou Manoet"[842]. This suggests that her father was Guy [II] Lord of Beirut. However, her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated Oct 1228 under which "Maria, Rainerii quondam constabularii Tripolitani filia, uxor G de Haam et mater Thomæ constabularii Tripolitani, necnon Beatrix olim filia Petri de Revandel eiusdem Thomæ uxor" confirmed a sale of property by her son[843]. She married secondly as his second wife, Guillaume of Tiberias, and thirdly Gérard de Ham Constable of Tripoli. The Lignages d'Outremer records the second marriage of Marie to "Guillaume de Thabarie" and her third marriage to "Girart de Han", stating that she was mother of "la dame dou Pui et le conestable de Triple" by her third husband[844]. This is confused by another passage in the Lignages d'Outremer which records that "Echive…dame dou Pui, et ayeulle de cestui conestable de Triple et seignor dou Pui qui ores est" was her daughter by her second husband, while "Thonas…conestable de Triple et Agnes…feme de Hue de Gibellet" were her children by her third husband[845]. Richerio Bishop of Melfi confirmed the property rights of "Mariam viduam Girardi de Hanis, matrem Thomæ comestabuli Tripolitani" by charter dated Mar 1227[846]. "Maria, Rainerii conestabolis Tripolis quondam filia, et uxor G[erardi] de Haam conestabolis Tripolis et mater Thome conestabolis Tripolis, et Beatrix olim filia Petri de Revandel eiusdem Thome uxor" confirmed the sale of property to Blanche Queen of France by charter dated Oct 1228[847]."
Med Lands cites:
[820] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXV, p. 60.
[821] Marsy ‘Fragments d’un cartulaire de Saint Lazare’ (1884), V, p. 125.
[822] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 56, p. 110.
[823] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 50, p. 92.
[824] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 60, p. 120.
[825] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 54, p. 102.
[826] Röhricht (1893), 419, p. 109.
[827] Röhricht (1893), 423, p. 110.
[828] Röhricht (1893), 433, p. 113.
[829] Marsy ‘Fragments d’un cartulaire de Saint Lazare’ (1884), XXV, p. 142.
[830] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 420.
[831] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 449-50.
[832] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, p. 60.
[833] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXVII, p. 77.
[834] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. (1965) 'Les premiers Ibelins', Le Moyen Age LXXI, 4e série, XX (Bruxelles), reprinted in Familles de l'Orient latin XIIe-XIVe siècles (Variorum Reprints, London, 1983), III, p. 464.
[835] Röhricht (1893), 419, p. 109.
[836] Röhricht (1893), 423, p. 110.
[837] Röhricht (1893), 433, p. 113.
[838] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, p. 60.
[839] Röhricht (1893), 533, p. 142.
[840] Ernoul 6 and 7, pp. 48 and 57.
[841] Ernoul 7, p. 59.
[842] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, p. 60.
[843] Röhricht (1893), 993, p. 261.
[844] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, p. 61.
[845] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXVII, p. 75. .
[846] Röhricht (1893), 980, p. 257.
[847] Marsy, A. de ‘Documents concernant les seigneurs de Ham’ Archives de l’Orient Latin, Vol. 2 (Paris, 1884), V, p. 162.12
She was Queen of Jerusalem between 1185 and 1190.2

Family 2

Baudouin I d'Ibelin Lord of Mirabel and Rama b. 1133, d. bt 1186 - 1188

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sybil d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020228&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amalric I d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020218&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#AmauryIA. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Courtenay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076116&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 1 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan1.html
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 234. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Monfer page ("Aleramici (di Montferrato) family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html#G6
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillermo VII de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027231&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM%20NOBILITY.htm#BaudouinIbelinMirabeldied1186
  13. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076125&tree=LEO
  15. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 112.

Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem1,2

F, #6303, b. 1154, d. between 1216 and 1217
FatherIoannes Dukas Comnenus Duke of Cyprus, Protosebastos3,4,5,6,7,8 b. 1128, d. a 17 Sep 1176
MotherMaria Taronitissa Komnenus (?)3,8
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited4 Nov 2020
     Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem was born in 1154.9,3,1,6,2,10 She married Amalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus, son of Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem and Melisende de Réthel Queen of Jerusalem, on 29 August 1167 at Tyre, Palestine (then);
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.9,11,1,12,5,6,7,2,13,14 Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem married Balian II d'Ibelin Lord of Nablus, son of Balian II (?) Sire d'Ibelin, Constable of Jaffa and Helvis(e)/Alvis (?) de Ramla, in 1177;
Her 2nd husband.11,15,6,7,1,10
Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem died between 1216 and 1217; Rudt-Collenberg says d. bef Feb 1217; Genealogics says d. aft 1206 and bef 1217.11,1,5,6,2,10
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "AMAURY of Jerusalem, son of FOULQUES King of Jerusalem Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Mélisende Queen of Jerusalem (1136-Jerusalem 11 Jul 1174). His parentage is specified by William of Tyre, who records him as the younger son aged 7 when his father died[133]. His mother installed him as Count of Jaffa before 1151[134]. His brother installed him as Lord of Ascalon after the city surrendered in Aug 1153[135]. He succeeded his brother in 1162 as AMAURY I King of Jerusalem, his succession being confirmed by election only after the annulment of his marriage[136]. He was crowned 18 Feb 1162 at Jerusalem by Patriarch Amaury[137]. In Sep 1163, King Amaury invaded Egypt on the pretext that the Fatimid Caliphate had failed to pay the annual tribute of 160,000 dinars which had been agreed with his predecessor in 1160. He was forced to withdraw as the Nile was in flood[138]. He returned to campaign in Egypt in 1164, but hastened back when Nur ed-Din attacked Harenc. He obtained the release of Bohémond III Prince of Antioch, who had been captured by Nur ed-Din at Artah, but not that of Raymond III Count of Tripoli[139]. King Amaury's army was routed in Egypt 18 Mar 1167 and returned to Ascalon 10 Aug[140]. After agreeing an alliance with Byzantium, King Amaury launched another expedition to Egypt and with the help of Andronikos Kontostephanos unsuccessfully laid siege to Damietta in late 1169[141]. King Amaury appointed Milon de Plancy as Seneschal of Jerusalem.
     "m firstly ([1158], annulled 1162) as her second husband, AGNES de Courtenay, widow of RENAUD Lord of Marash, daughter of JOSCELIN II de Courtenay Count of Edessa & his wife Béatrice --- (1133-[Sep 1184/1 Feb 1185]). William of Tyre records that "Joscelinus junior, ex sorore Levonis Armeni" and his wife "Wilelmi de Saona viduam…Beatricem" had "filiam" who firstly married "Rainaldi de Mares" and secondly "domini Almarici comitis Joppensis, qui postea fuit Hierosolymatorum rex"[142]. Agnès was unpopular in Jerusalem. The Patriarch of Jerusalem refused to confirm her marriage as the parties were third cousins, so within the prohibited degrees, and insisted on an annulment as a condition of her husband's succession as king in 1162. The king agreed, but insisted that the legitimacy and rights of inheritance of his two children be recognised[143]. William of Tyre (Continuator) states[144] that Agnès married thirdly (after 1162) Hugues Ibelin Lord of Rama, and fourthly (before 1171, repudiated before 1174) as his first wife, Renaud Garnier Lord of Sidon. She returned to the court at Jerusalem when her brother was appointed Seneschal in [1176/77], becoming a domineering influence over her two children[145].
     "m secondly (29 Aug 1167) as her first husband, MARIA Komnene, daughter of IOANNES Komnenos protosébastos & his wife --- Taronitissa (1154-before Oct 1217). She is named with her father by William of Tyre when he records her marriage to King Amaury[146]. Caffaro records that "rex Amarricus" married secondly after separating from his first wife "Maria neptis imperatoris Manuelis, filiam Iohannis protosauasto…nepos imperatoris Manuelis ex fratre suo" and that they had "filiam unam…Ysabella"[147]. King Amaury sent ambassadors to Constantinople in [1164/65] to ask the emperor for the hand of an imperial princess but received no answer until they landed at Tyre with Maria Komnene in Aug 1167[148]. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "una filiarum protosebasti" and the brother of Baudouin III King of Jerusalem[149]. She married secondly (1177) Balian of Ibelin Lord of Nablus. The Lignages d'Outremer name "la reyne Marie…niece de l'empereur Manuel" as wife of "Belleem de Ybelin"[150]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "relictam regis Almarici…que fuit de Grecia" married "Bethuliani de Guibelin"[151]. She was given Nablus as her dower on her second marriage[152]. "Hugo…rex Cipri" confirmed the grant to the church of Nicosia by "Philippus de Ybellino" for the soul of "domine Marie regine, matris sue" by charter dated Oct 1217[153].
Med Lands cites:
[133] WT XV.XXVII, p. 702, and XVI.I, p. 704.
[134] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 334.
[135] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 340.
[136] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 362.
[137] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 362.
[138] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 367.
[139] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 369.
[140] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 373-6.
[141] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 384-8.
[142] WT XIV.III, p. 610.
[143] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 362, and WT XIX.IV, p. 889.
[144] WTC XXIII.III, p. 5.
[145] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 407.
[146] WT XX.I, p. 942.
[147] Belgrano, L. T. (ed.) (1891) Annali Genovesi di Caffaro e de´ suoi continuatori, Vol. 1, Fonti per la Storia d´Italia (Genoa), Regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 132.
[148] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 370 and 377.
[149] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 13, p. 237.
[150] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVII, p. 61.
[151] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933.
[152] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 370 and 377.
[153] Mas de Latrie, M. L. (1855) Histoire de l´Ile de Chypre (Paris), Vol. 3, p. 608.14


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 141.
2. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg, Reference: XI (1) XII.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 177.8 EDV-26.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Maria Komnene or Comnena (Greek: ????? ???????, c. 1154 – 1208/1217) was the second wife of King Amalric I of Jerusalem and mother of Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem.
     "She was the daughter of John Doukas Komnenos, sometime Byzantine dux in Cyprus, and Maria Taronitissa. Her sister Theodora married Prince Bohemund III of Antioch, and her brother Alexios was briefly, in 1185, a pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire.
Life
     "After the annulment of his first marriage to Agnes of Courtenay, Amalric was anxious to forge an alliance with Byzantium and emperor Manuel I Komnenos, so in 1164/65 he sent ambassadors to Constantinople to ask the hand of an imperial princess but received no answer until August 1167, when they landed at Tyre with Maria Komnene, who was the emperor's grandniece and had had bestowed upon her a rich dowry.[1]
     "The marriage of Amalric and Maria was celebrated with much fanfare at Tyre, on 29 August 1167. They had two children:
** A daughter, born in 1171 and died shortly after.[2]
** Isabella I of Jerusalem, born in 1172.

     "On his deathbed, in 1174, Amalric left Nablus to Maria, who became dowager queen upon his death.[1]
     "In 1177, Maria married secondly with Balian of Ibelin, who commanded the defense of Jerusalem against Saladin in 1187. She bore him at least four children:
** Helvis of Ibelin, who married (1) Reginald of Sidon (widower of Agnes of Courtenay), and (2) Guy of Montfort
** John of Ibelin, Lord of Beirut and constable of Jerusalem, who married Helvis of Nephin, then Melisende of Arsur
** Margaret, who married (1) Hugh of Tiberias (stepson of Raymond III of Tripoli), and (2) Walter III of Caesarea
** Philip of Ibelin, bailli (regent) of Cyprus, who married Alice of Montbéliard.

     "Maria and Balian supported Conrad of Montferrat (uncle of the late King Baldwin V) in his struggle for the crown against Guy of Lusignan. They arranged for Maria's daughter by Amalric, Isabella, to have her first marriage annulled so that she could marry Conrad, giving him a stronger claim to the throne. In this, Maria and Balian gained the enmity of Richard I of England and his chroniclers. The anonymous author of the Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi wrote of them: "Steeped in Greek filth from the cradle, she had a husband whose morals matched her own: he was cruel, she was godless; he was fickle, she was pliable; he was faiihless, she was fraudulent."
     "As the grandmother of Alice of Champagne (Isabella's daughter by her third husband, Henry II of Champagne), Maria conducted the marriage negotiations with Cyprus in 1208 – Alice was to marry Hugh I of Cyprus. Blanche of Navarre, Regent and Countess of Champagne, widow of Alice's paternal uncle, provided the dowry for Alice. This is the last time Maria is mentioned, and she was certainly dead by 1217.
Notes
1. Steven Runciman: A History of the Crusades (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 370 and 377.
2. Steven Runciman: A History of the Crusades (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 404 and 443 footnote 2, the latter specifying that this was the elder daughter.
Bibliography
** Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier, edited by M. L. de Mas Latrie. La Société de l'Histoire de France, 1871.
** La Continuation de Guillaume de Tyr (1184-1192), edited by Margaret Ruth Morgan. L'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, 1982.
** Ambroise, The History of the Holy War, translated by Marianne Ailes. Boydell Press, 2003.
** Chronicle of the Third Crusade, a Translation of Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi, translated by Helen J. Nicholson. Ashgate, 1997.
** Peter W. Edbury, The Conquest of Jerusalem and the Third Crusade: Sources in Translation. Ashgate, 1996.
** Edbury, Peter W. John of Ibelin and the Kingdom of Jerusalem, 1997
** Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984
** Steven Runciman, A History of the Crusades, vols. II-III. Cambridge University Press, 1952-55."16 Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem was also known as Maria Komnene of Nauplia.11 Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem was also known as Maria Comnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem.3,1,5,6,7,17,16

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA Komnene (1154-before Oct 1217). She is named with her father by William of Tyre when he records her marriage with King Amaury[308]. Caffaro records that "rex Amarricus" married secondly after separating from his first wife "Maria neptis imperatoris Manuelis, filiam Iohannis protosauasto…nepos imperatoris Manuelis ex fratre suo" and that they had "filiam unam…Ysabella"[309]. Amaury King of Jerusalem sent ambassadors to Constantinople in [1164/65] to ask the emperor for the hand of an imperial princess but received no answer until they landed at Tyre with Maria Komnene in Aug 1167. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "una filiarum protosebasti" and the brother of Baudouin III King of Jerusalem[310]. She was given Nablus as her dower[311]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "la reyne Marie…niece de l'empereur Manuel" as wife of "Belleem de Ybelin"[312]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "relictam regis Almarici…que fuit de Grecia" married "Bethuliani de Guibelin"[313]. "Hugo…rex Cipri" confirmed the grant to the church of Nicosia by "Philippus de Ybellino" for the soul of "domine Marie regine, matris sue" by charter dated Oct 1217[314].
     "m firstly (Tyre 29 Aug 1167) as his second wife, AMAURY I King of Jerusalem, son of FOULQUES King of Jerusalem Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Mélisende Queen of Jerusalem (1136-11 Jul 1174).
     "m secondly ([1177]) BALIAN of Ibelin, son of BALIAN of Ibelin Lord of Rama & his wife Helvis of Rama ([1142/43]-[1193/94]). Lord of Nablus, by right of his wife. Lord of Rama and Mirabel."
Med Lands cites:
[307] Chuat, J. C. (2006) De Chemins en Jalons, Vol. II. Jalons vers l’antiquité (privately published by the author), pp. 21-2.
[308] WT XX.I, p. 942.
[309] Belgrano, L. T. (ed.) (1891) Annali Genovesi di Caffaro e de’ suoi continuatori, Vol. 1, Fonti per la Storia d’Italia (Genoa), Regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 132.
[310] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 13, p. 237.
[311] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 370 and 377.
[312] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVII, p. 61.
[313] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933.
[314] Mas de Latrie, M. L. de (1855) Histoire de l'Ile de Chypre (Paris), Vol. 3, p. 608.10
She was Queen consort of Jerusalem between 1167 and 1174.16

Family 1

Amalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus b. 1136, d. 11 Jul 1174
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026639&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ioannes Dukas Komnenos: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049922&tree=LEO
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart XI (I.): The House of Ibelin.
  7. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026639&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1217. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1 page ("The Komnenos family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html#TKK
  12. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amalric I d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020218&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#AmauryIA
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106161&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Komnene,_Queen_of_Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 9.
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 9.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014217&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helvis Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122080&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049924&tree=LEO
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ibelin page (d'Ibelin Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/ibelin.html
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00197956&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106159&tree=LEO

Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #6304, b. between 1169 and 1172, d. before May 1206
FatherAmalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus3,4,8,6,5,7,9 b. 1136, d. 11 Jul 1174
MotherMaria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem10,3,11,4,5,6,7,12 b. 1154, d. bt 1216 - 1217
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem was born between 1169 and 1172; Genealogy.EU (Lusignan 1 page) says b. 1169/71; Anjou 2 page b. 1171/72; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1170.13,14,3,6,5,15 She married Honfroy IV de Toron (?) Lord of Kerak, Oultrejourdain and Toron, son of Onfroi III (?) Seigneur de Thoron and Etienette (?) de Milly, on 22 November 1183 at Castle of Kerak, Palestine (then);
Her 1st husband.13,4,5,6,16,7,15 Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem and Honfroy IV de Toron (?) Lord of Kerak, Oultrejourdain and Toron were divorced in November 1190.13,4,6,5,16,17,18 Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem married Conrad I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrat, King of Jerusalem, Prince of Tyrus, son of Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Judith (?) von Babenberg, on 24 November 1190 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now);
Her 2nd husband.1,13,19,3,4,5,17,15 Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem married Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem, son of Henri I "le Liberal" de Blois comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie and Marie (?) de France, Régente de Champagne, on 5 May 1192 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now);
Her 3rd husband.1,13,4,5,20,7,15 Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem married Almeric/Amaury II de Lusignan King of Cyprus, King of Jerusalem, son of Hugues VIII "le Vieux" de Lusignan sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche, Seigneur de Bourgogne de Rancon, Seigneur de Fontenay and Bourgogne de Rancon dame de Fontenay, in January 1198 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now);
Her 4th husband; his 2nd wife; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 1197.1,14,21,3,22,23,4,5,15
Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem died before May 1206; Anjou 2 page says d. bef May 1206; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1208.13,3,5,6,15
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Isabella was born in 1172, the daughter of Amalric I d'Anjou, king of Jerusalem and Maria Komnena. In 1183 she was married to Honfroy IV de Toron, but the marriage was annulled against her wishes in 1190. In July of that year she had succeeded to the throne of Jerusalem after the death of her half-sister Sibyl. On 24 November that year she was married to Conrad, marchese de Monferrato, son of Guillermo V 'il Vecchio', marchese de Monferrato and Judith von Österreich. Isabella and Conrad had a daughter Maria who would have progeny. Sybil's husband and consort Guy de Lusignan was deposed as king of Jerusalem in 1192.
     "Conrad was assassinated in April 1192, and on 5 May that year Isabella married Henri II, comte de Champagne, son of Henri I, comte de Champagne and Marie de France, daughter of Louis VII, king of France. Isabella and Henri had three daughters of whom two, Alix and Philippe, would have progeny.
     "Henri, who had become king of Jerusalem by right of his wife, died on 10 September 1197, falling from a window. In January 1198 Isabella married Amaury/Amalrich/Aimery de Lusignan, king of Cyprus, son of Hugues VIII 'le Brun' de Lusignan, sire de Lusignan and Bourgogne de Rancon, and brother of Guy, the widower of Isabella's half-sister Sibyl and deposed former king of Jerusalem. Amaury was also a widower, his first wife Echive Ibelin having died in 1195. Isabella and Amaury had three children, of whom two daughters, Sibylle and Melisande, would have progeny. Amaury also became king of Jerusalem by right of his wife.
     "Isabella died before May 1206, just outliving her husband, who died on 1 April 1205. Her daughter Maria de Monferrato, from her second marriage, succeeded her as queen of Jerusalem. In 1210 she married Jean de Brienne who became titular king of Jerusalem. Maria died in 1212 and Jean was named regent for their infant daughter Yolande de Brienne, who inherited the crown of Jerusalem as Isabella II."6

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. page 141.
     2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:82.6

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Isabella I (1172 – 5 April 1205) was Queen regnant of Jerusalem from 1190 to her death. She was the daughter of Amalric I of Jerusalem and his second wife Maria Comnena. Her half-brother, Baldwin IV of Jerusalem, engaged her to Humphrey IV of Toron. Her mother's second husband, Balian of Ibelin, and his stepfather, Raynald of Châtillon, were influential members of the two baronial parties. The marriage of Isabella and Humphrey was celebrated in Kerak Castle in autumn 1183. Saladin, the Ayyubid sultan of Egypt and Syria, laid siege to the fortress during the wedding, but Baldwin IV forced him to lift the siege.
     "Baldwin IV, who suffered from lepromatous leprosy, had made his nephew (the only son of his sister, Sybilla by her first husband), Baldwin V, his heir and co-ruler, to prevent Sybilla's second husband, Guy of Lusignan, from mounting the throne. The High Court of Jerusalem stipulated that a committee of Western European rulers was entitled to choose between Sybilla and Isabella to succeed Baldwin V if he died before reaching the age of majority, but Sybilla and Guy of Lusignan were crowned soon after Baldwin V died in 1185. Guy's opponents tried to play Isabella and her husband off against him, but Humphrey did homage to the royal couple.
Early life
Childhood
     "Isabella was the daughter of Amalric, King of Jerusalem, by his second wife, Maria Comnena.[1][2] Maria Comnena (who was a grandniece of the Byzantine Emperor, Manuel I Komnenos) married Amalric on 29 August 1171.[2] Isabella was born before September 1172.[3]
     "Amalric died unexpectedly on 11 July 1174.[4] His son by his first marriage, Baldwin IV, was crowned king two weeks later.[5] Before long, it became obvious that Baldwin suffered from lepromatous leprosy.[6] To secure the succession of the ailing king, his sister, Sybilla, was given in marriage to William of Montferrat in November 1176, but he died seven months later.[7][8][9] Baldwin's cousin, Philip I, Count of Flanders, who landed at Acre in August,[10] offered Robert of Bethune for Sybilla's new husband, also proposing that Isabella (who was Baldwin's and Sybilla's half-sister) should marry Robert's younger brother, William of Bethune.[11] The High Court of Jerusalem refused both proposals.[12]
     "Isabella's mother married Balian of Ibelin in autumn 1177.[13] His brother, Baldwin of Ibelin, wanted to marry Sybilla, but the king preferred another candidate, Guy of Lusignan.[14][15] After the marriage of Sybilla and Guy on Easter 1180, a division emerged between Guy of Lusignan's supporters and opponents.[16][17] The first group included the mother of Baldwin IV and Sybilla, Agnes of Courtenay, her brother, Joscelin, and Raynald of Châtillon, Lord of Oultrejordain.[16] Their opponents included Isabella's mother and stepfather, and Raymond III of Tripoli.[16] To secure Guy's position, the king arranged the betrothal of Isabella to Raynald of Châtillon's stepson, Humphrey IV of Toron in October 1180.[18] Isabella was sent to Kerak Castle to be educated by Humphrey's mother, Stephanie of Milly.[18] Stephanie forbade her to pay visits to her mother and stepfather at Nablus.[18]
     "The relationship between Baldwin IV and Guy of Lusignan deteriorated.[19] Baldwin IV removed Guy from the regency and denied his right of succession, making Guy's stepson (Sybilla's son from her first marriage), Baldwin V, his heir and co-ruler on 20 November 1183.[19][20][21] A version of Ernoul's chronicle suggests that the child Baldwin V was made heir, because the ailing Baldwin IV wanted to avoid a debate between his sisters' supporters about his succession.[22] Guy's principal supporters, Joscelin of Courtenay and Raynald of Châtillon, were not present at Baldwin V's coronation, because they attended the wedding of Isabella and Humphrey of Toron.[23]
First marriage
     "The wedding took place in Kerak Castle.[19] Saladin, the Ayyubid sultan of Egypt and Syria laid siege to the fortress.[24] According to Ernoul's chronicle, Stephanie of Milly sent meals to the besiegers from the feast and Saladin forbade his engineers to destroy the tower of the fortress in which Humphrey and Isabella spent the wedding night.[25] Baldwin IV assembled a relief army and departed from Jerusalem to Kerak, although he was unable to ride a horse.[26][27] Saladin lifted the siege and retreated without fight on 3 or 4 December.[28]
     "[Stephanie of Milly] sent to Saladin bread and wine, sheep and cattle in celebration of her son's wedding... . And when Saladin received these gifts he was exceedingly delighted and gave thanks to those who brought them to him, asking where the bride and bridegroom were staying: their tower was pointed out to him. Thereupon Saladin gave out orders throughout his army that no attack should be directed at this tower.
     "The dying Baldwin IV appointed Raymond of Tripoli regent for Baldwin V in April 1185.[29][30] On Raymond's demand, the High Court of Jerusalem ruled that a committee consisting of the pope, the Holy Roman Emperor and the kings of France and England would be entitled to choose between Sybilla and Isabel if Baldwin V died before reaching the age of majority.[31] Baldwin IV died on 16 March 1185.[31] About a year and a half later (before mid-September 1186) the child Baldwin V also died.[32][33]
     "Sybil's uncle Joscelin of Courtenay persuaded Raymond III of Tripoli and his allies to leave Jerusalem, and urged her supporters (including Raynald of Châtillon) to assemble in the town.[33] Ignoring the 1185 ruling of the High Court, the noblemen and prelates who came to Jerusalem concluded that Sybil was the lawful heir to her son.[34] Those who were opposed to Sybilla (including Raymond III of Tripoli and Balian of Ibelin) assembled in Nablus.[35] They argued that Sybilla's legitimacy was dubious, because her parents' marriage had been annulled.[36] They also emphasized that Isabella was born after the coronation of her father.[36] They sent envoys to Jerusalem to protest against Sybil's coronation, but Heraclius, Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, crowned her in mid-September.[35][37] Heraclius also anointed Guy of Lusignan king after she placed a crown on Guy's head.[35]
     "On Raymond of Tripoli's proposal, the noblemen who assembled in Nablus decided that they proclaim Isabella and Humphrey of Toron queen and king.[37] However, Humphrey (whose mother and stepfather were Sybil's supporters) fled from Nablus to Jerusalem and did homage to Sybil and Guy.[37][35] Before long, all barons followed his example and swore fealty to the queen and her husband, with the exception of Raymond of Tripoli who left the kingdom.[38][39]
Saladin imposed a crushing defeat on the united army of the Kingdom of Jerusalem in the Battle of Hattin on 4 July 1187.[40] Isabella's husband was captured on the battlefield.[41] Before long, Saladin's troops seized most towns and fortresses of the Kingdom of Jerusalem: Tiberias fell soon after the battle, Acre on 9 July, Beirut before 6 August, and Jerusalem on 2 October.[42] Tyre was an exception, holding out for months under the command of Conrad of Montferrat who had come to the Holy Land from Italy a few weeks after the battle.[43]
     "Conrad regarded himself the ruler of Tyre, forbidding Guy of Lusignan to enter the town in summer 1189.[44][45] Guy laid siege to Acre, but James of Avesnes, Louis III of Thuringia and other crusader commanders who came to the Holy Land also questioned his claim to leadership.[46] Guy's wife, Sybilla, and their two daughters died in autumn 1190.[47][48] Guy's opponents argued that he had only been king by marriage, and his wife's half-sister, Isabella, inherited the crown.[47] Guy did not want to abandon his claim to the Kingdom of Jerusalem.[49] Taking advantage of the situation, Conrad of Montferrat decided to marry Isabella.[50][51]
     "Isabella's stepfather supported Conrad's plan.[52] Isabella resisted, but her mother put her under pressure.[53] Maria Komnena also swore that Baldwin IV had forced the eight-year-old Isabella to marry Humphrey of Toron, whose effeminacy was well known.[54] Before long, the papal legate, Ubaldo Lanfranchi, Archbishop of Pisa, and Philip of Dreux, Bishop of Beauvais, annulled the marriage of Isabella and Humphrey.[52][54] Baldwin of Forde, Archbishop of Canterbury, forbade her to marry Conrad, stating that both Isabella and Conrad would commit adultery if they married.[52][54] However, Baldwin of Forde died on 19 November 1190.[52][54]
Second marriage
     "Conrad married Isabella on 24 November.[54] Isabella returned Humphrey the Lordship of Toron that Baldwin IV had annexed to the crown in 1180.[55][56] Guy of Lusignan refused to abdicate,[55] but most barons regarded him the lawful monarch.[52] Conrad and Isabella returned to Tyre.[55] After Philip II of France, who landed at Acre on 20 April 1191, acknowledged Conrad's claim to Jerusalem, Guy of Lusignan and Conrad's opponents (including Humphrey of Toron and Bohemond III of Antioch) sought assistance from Richard I, King of England, who decided to support them.[57] Guy adopted the title of "king-elect of Jerusalem" in May.[58]
     "The crusaders captured Acre on 11 July 1191.[59] On 28 July, Richard of England and Philip of France agreed that Guy could retain the title of king till the end of his life, but Conrad would rule Tyre, Beirut and Sidon; after Guy's death, the kingdom would be united under the rule of Conrad and Isabella or their issue.[47][60] Three days later, Philip of France left for France and Richard of England became the sole supreme commander of the crusaders.[61] The native barons remained hostile towards Guy.[62] After Richard decided to return to England in April 1192, the barons urged him to revise the previous decision about the Kingdom of Jerusalem.[63]
Reign
Election
     "Richard of England held an assembly on 16 April 1192.[64] The prelates and the noblemen who attended the meeting unanimously voted for Conrad.[63][64] Richard accepted their decision, granting Cyprus to Guy in compensation for his lost kingdom.[63] Richard dispatched his nephew, Henry II, Count of Champagne, to inform Conrad about the barons' decision.[64][65] Henry arrived at Tyre about four days later.[65] It was agreed that Conrad and Isabelle would be crowned at Acre.[65]
     "Isabella who loved lingering in her bath spent unusually much time there on 28 April.[64] Being hungry, Conrad decided to have a dinner with Philip of Dreux, but by the time he arrived at Philip's house, the bishop had already finished his meal.[64] Conrad wanted to return home, but two men ambushed and stabbed him in a narrow street.[64][65] Most sources agree that they were sent by Rashid ad-Din Sinan, head of the Assassins.[66] While dying, Conrad ordered Isabella not to give Tyre to anyone but Richard of England or to the new king of Jerusalem.[64] When Hugh III, Duke of Burgundy, who was Philip of France's lieutenant in the Holy Land, urged Isabella to deliver Tyre to him, she shut herself up in the fortress and refused to open its gates.[67][68]
Third marriage
     "On learning of Conrad's assassination, Henry of Champagne, who had meanwhile returned to Acre, hurried back to Tyre.[69] Henry, who was the nephew of both Richard of England and Philip of France, was acclaimed king by the barons and the citizens of Tyre.[70][67] According to Ernoul, Henry was hesitant, because Isabella was pregnant, possibly with a son.[71] The barons and the citizens, continued Ernoul, promised him that his children would inherit the Kingdom of Jerusalem to convince him to accept the crown.[71] The betrothal of Henry and Isabella was announced two days after Conrad's death.[70][67] The marriage was celebrated in Acre on 10 May 1192.[70]
     "Imad ad-Din al-Isfahani, who was present for the wedding, wrote:
Henry of Champagne married the Marquis' wife on the same night, maintaining that he had first right to the dead man's wife. She was pregnant, but this did not prevent himself uniting himself with her, something even more disgusting than the coupling of the flesh. I asked one of their courtiers to whom paternity would be awarded and he said: "It will be the Queen's child." You see the licentiousness of these foul Unbelievers!

     "Isabella and Conrad's child, Maria of Montferrat, was born in 1192. Henry and Isabella then had three daughters,[72] Marguerite (born 1193/1194), Alice (born 1196) and Philippa (born 1197). Henry died in 1197 when a balcony or window-trellis gave way and he fell out of a window.
Fourth marriage
     "After his death, Isabella married for a fourth time to Aimery of Cyprus, brother of Guy of Lusignan. They were crowned together as King and Queen of Jerusalem in January 1198 in Acre.[73] They had two daughters, Sybilla (born 1198) and Melisende (born 1200), and one son, Amalric (born 1201). King Amalric died in 1205 of food-poisoning caused by white mullet, four days before his wife, and shortly after their son. On her death on 5 April 1205,[citation needed] Isabella was succeeded as queen by her eldest daughter Maria.
     "The legality of Isabella's divorce from Humphrey was challenged in 1213, during the dispute over the succession to Champagne between her daughters Alice and Philippa and Henry's nephew Theobald IV. However, its validity seems to have been upheld: no challenge was made to the legitimacy of Maria and her descendants to succeed to the throne of Jerusalem, and in Champagne, Theobald bought off his cousins Alice and Philippa.
Family
     "Isabella's first marriage to Humphrey IV of Toron was childless.[77]
     "From her second marriage to Conrad of Montferrat she had one daughter:
1. Maria (1192–1212), succeeded Isabella as Queen of Jerusalem.
     "From her third marriage to Henry II, Count of Champagne she had three daughters:
1. Marguerite[78] (1193/1194 – before 1205) betrothed to Guy of Cyprus but they both died as children.
2. Alice (1195/1196–1246), firstly married Hugh I of Cyprus, secondly she married Bohemond V of Antioch and thirdly married Raoul de Soissons. She was a rival claimant of Champagne.
3. Philippa (c. 1197 - 20 December 1250), married Erard de Brienne-Ramerupt and was also a claimant of Champagne.
     "From her fourth and final marriage to Aimery of Cyprus she had the following children:
1. Sybille (October–November 1198 – c. 1230 or 1252), married King Leo I of Armenia[79]
2. Mélisende (c. 1200 – aft. 1249), married January 1, 1218 Bohemund IV of Antioch[80]
3. Amalric (1201 – February 2, 1205, Acre)[81]
In popular culture
     "Isabella has made few fictional appearances, but she is a major character in Graham Shelby's The Knights of Dark Renown (1969) and its sequel The Kings of Vain Intent (1970). Shelby idealises her marriage to Humphrey, depicting them as his young romantic leads. He then goes on to depict her being beaten and raped by Conrad in a sadistically abusive relationship. This sensationalist depiction is not supported by any evidence. Shelby implies that Isabella plotted Conrad's murder in revenge for his abuse, and depicts her as mentally numbed and indifferent to Henry.
     "She is the title character of Alan Gordon's mystery novel, The Widow of Jerusalem (2003), which paints a more sympathetic portrait of her marriage to Conrad. She is introduced as a spoilt, vain young woman, but she matures in the course of the story. Only when it is too late does she realise that her husband loves her. His murder, and the later death of Henry, are investigated by the hero, the fool Theophilos (Feste).
References
1. Hamilton 2000, p. 31.
2. Barber 2012, p. 246.
3. Hamilton 2000, p. 31 (note 47).
4. Hamilton 2000, pp. 31-32.
5. Hamilton 2000, pp. 41-42.
6. Barber 2012, p. 264.
7. Hamilton 2000, pp. 101, 110.
8. Baldwin 1969, p. 593.
9. Barber 2012, p. 267.
10. Barber 2012, p. 268.
11. Hamilton 2000, pp. 119, 126.
12. Hamilton 2000, p. 126.
13. Hamilton 2000, p. 139.
14. Hamilton 2000, pp. 155-157.
15. Barber 2012, p. 274.
16. Hamilton 2000, p. 157.
17. Baldwin 1969, pp. 596, 598.
18. Hamilton 2000, p. 161.
19. Hamilton 2000, p. 192.
20. Baldwin 1969, p. 600.
21. Lambert 1997, p. 160.
22. Lambert 1997, p. 161.
23. Hamilton 2000, p. 194.
24. Hamilton 2000, pp. 182-183, 192.
25. Hamilton 2000, pp. 192-193.
26. Hamilton 2000, p. 196.
27. Barber 2012, pp. 284-285.
28. Barber 2012, p. 285.
29. Barber 2012, p. 289.
30. Hamilton 2000, pp. 205-206.
31. Hamilton 2000, p. 207.
32. Hamilton 2000, p. 216.
33. Baldwin 1969, p. 604.
34. Hamilton 2000, p. 218.
35. Hamilton 2000, p. 220.
36. Lambert 1997, p. 162.
37. Baldwin 1969, p. 605.
38. Hamilton 2000, p. 221.
39. Barber 2012, pp. 295-296.
40. Barber 2012, pp. 303-304, 365.
41. Barber 2012, p. 304.
42. Barber 2012, pp. 307-308, 365.
43. Barber 2012, p. 365.
44. Painter 1969, p. 51.
45. Barber 2012, p. 330.
46. Barber 2012, pp. 330, 337.
47. Williams 1970, p. 384.
48. Painter 1969, p. 65.
49. Painter 1969, pp. 65-66.
50. Barber 2012, p. 338.
51. Runciman 1989b, p. 30.
52. Painter 1969, p. 66.
53. Runciman 1989b, pp. 30-31.
54. Runciman 1989b, p. 31.
55. Runciman 1989b, p. 32.
56. Hamilton 2000, pp. 161-162.
57. Painter 1969, pp. 63, 66-68.
28. Painter 1969, p. 70.
59. Painter 1969, p. 69.
60. Runciman 1989b, p. 51.
61. Barber 2012, p. 346.
62. Barber 2012, pp. 350, 352.
63. Williams 1970, p. 385.
64. Painter 1969, p. 80.
653. Runciman 1989b, p. 64.
66. Williams 1970, p. 382.
67. Painter 1969, p. 81.
68. Runciman 1989b, p. 65.
69. Williams 1970, p. 387.
70. Runciman 1989b, p. 67.
71. Lambert 1997, p. 163.
72. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Jerusalem
73. Cawley
74. Runciman 1989a, pp. 36, Appendix III (Genealogical tree No. 1.)
75. Treadgold 1997, p. 608.
76. Dunbabin 2000, p. 389.
77. Hamilton, Bernard (2016). "Queen Alice of Cyprus". In Boas, Adrian J. (ed.) The Crusader World. The University of Wisconsin Press. p. 225. ISBN 978-0-415-82494-1.
78. Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado del conte de Campagna 7, p. 164.
79. Runciman 1989b, p. 95, Appendix III: Genealogical trees, Number 1. and 4..
80. Runciman 1989b, p. 95, Appendix III: Genealogical trees, Number 1-2..
81. Runciman 1989b, p. 103.
Sources
-- Baldwin, Marsall W. (1969). "The Decline and Fall of Jerusalem, 1174-1189". In Setton, Kenneth M; Baldwin, Marshall W. (eds.) A History of the Crusades, Volume I: The First Hundred Years. The University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 590–621. ISBN 0-299-04844-6.
-- Barber, Malcolm (2012). The Crusader States. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-11312-9.
-- Dunbabin, Jean (2000). France in the Making, 843-1180. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-820846-4.
-- Hamilton, Bernard (2000). The Leper King and His Heirs: Baldwin IV and the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-64187-6.
-- Lambert, Sarah (1997). "Queen or Consort: Rulership and Politics in the Latin East, 1118-1228". In Duggan, Anne J. (ed.) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995. Boydell Press. pp. 153–169. ISBN 0-85115-657-6.
-- Painter, Sidney (1969). "The Third Crusade: Richard the Lionhearted and Philip Augustus". In Setton, Kenneth M; Wolff, Robert Lee; Hazard, Harry (eds.) A History of the Crusades, Volume II: The Later Crusades, 1189–1311. The University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 45–85. ISBN 0-299-04844-6.
-- Runciman, Steven (1989a). A History of the Crusades, Volume II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-06163-6.
-- Runciman, Steven (1989b). A History of the Crusades, Volume III: The Kingdom of Acre and the Later Crusades. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-06163-6.
-- Treadgold, Warren (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society. Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-2630-2.
-- Williams, Patrick A. (1970). "The Assassination of Conrad of Montferrat: Another Suspect?". Traditio. Fordham University. 26: 381–389. ISSN 0362-1529.
-- Edbury, Peter W. (ed.) The Conquest of Jerusalem and the Third Crusade, 1998, ISBN 1-84014-676-1
-- Gilchrist, M. M. "Character-assassination: Conrad de Montferrat in English-language fiction & popular histories", Bollettino del Marchesato. Circolo Culturale I Marchesi del Monferrato, Alessandria, no. 6, Nov. 2005, pp.5–13. (external link)
-- Ilgen, Theodor. Konrad, Markgraf von Montferrat, 1880
-- Nicholson, Helen J. (ed.) The Chronicle of the Third Crusade: The Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi, 1997, ISBN 0-7546-0581-7
-- Usseglio, Leopoldo. I Marchesi di Monferrato in Italia ed in Oriente durante i secoli XII e XIII, 1926."24

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Queen ISABELLA of Jerusalem (X.1190-1206) -cr VII.1191, *1171/72, +before V.1206, bur Jerusalem; 1m: XI.1183 (div XI.1190) Onfroi IV Seigneur de Thoron (*ca 1166 +after 1192); 2m: 24.11.1190 Conrad I de Montferrat (*ca 1146 +murdered Tyrus 28.4.1192); 3m: Acre 5.5.1192 Cte Henri II de Champagne (*29.7.1166 +murdered Acre 10.9.1197); 4m: 1198 Amaury II de Lusignan, King of Cyprus and Jerusalem (+1.4.1205.)13"

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABELLE of Jerusalem, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-before May 1206). She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who records her parentage and, in a later passage, records her mother's statement at the time of the annulment of her first marriage that Isabelle was only eight years old when that marriage took place[206]. Caffaro names "filiam unam…Ysabella" as the child of "rex Amarricus" and his second wife "Maria neptis imperatoris Manuelis, filiam Iohannis protosauasto…nepos imperatoris Manuelis ex fratre suo" and that they had[207]. Her first marriage was arranged in 1180 by her half-brother King Baudouin IV in an attempt to heal the breach between the Ibelin and Courtenay families[208]. The Lignages d'Outremer record that "Hamfrei le tiers" married "la reyne Ysabiau" but that they were separated and that he died without heirs[209]. Raymond Count of Tripoli promoted her candidacy as queen in 1186, when he opposed the succession of her half-sister Queen Sibylle[210]. However, her husband submitted to Queen Sibylle, which put an end to the plan[211]. She became heir to the throne in 1190 after the death of her half-sister Queen Sibylle. Her first marriage was annulled against her wishes and she was married to her second husband on the advice of her mother[212]. She was crowned in [Jan] 1198 at Acre as ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem with her fourth husband. "Aymericus…Jerusalem Latinorum rex nonus et rex Cypri" granted rights to the commune of Marseille, with the consent of "Ysabelis uxoris mee…quamdam regis Amalrici filia", by charter dated Oct 1198[213]. After the death of her fourth husband in Jan 1205, Queen Isabelle assumed personal authority over the government of Jerusalem[214].
     "m firstly (castle of Kerak Nov 1183, annulled 1190) HONFROY [IV] of Toron, son of HONFROY [III] of Toron & his wife Stephaine de Milly heiress of Oultrejourdain (-after 1190). William of Tyre names him and his father when recording his marriage[215]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names his mother when recording the annulment of his marriage[216]. A charter dated 1180 records earlier donations by "Guidonem de Miliaco…dominus Philippus Neapolitanus dominusque Guido Francigena et dominus Henricus Bubalus, predicti Guidonis filii" and the present donation by "Reginaldus quondam princeps Anthiochensis…Montisregalis et Hebron dominus" of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame de Josaphat with the consent of "uxor mea Stephania…et Hanfredi prefate dominie Stephanie filii et uxoris eius Elisabeth filie regis Jerusalem"[217], although this is presumably misdated if the date of Honfroy's marriage is correct. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the marriage of "Hainfrois" and "le serour le roi…Ysabiaus" on the day Saladin started his siege of the castle of Krak[218]. While Raymond Count of Tripoli was promoting Isabelle's candidacy to succeed as queen in 1186, Honfroy submitted to Queen Sibylle and put an end to the plan[219]. He was captured by Saladin when he took Jerusalem 2 Oct 1187, freed by his mother who promised to surrender the castles of Kerak and Montreal but as neither garrisons would obey her order, she returned him to captivity, from which he was released a few months later[220]. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the ecclesiastical annulment of the marriage of Isabelle and Honfroy "que Hainfrois estoit si mauvais qu'il ne poroit le tiere tenir", undated but in passages which deal with events in 1190[221]. After the annulment of his marriage, Isabelle restored to him the fief of Toron[222].
     "m secondly (Acre 24 Nov 1190) as his third wife, CORRADO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] ([1145/47]-murdered Tyre 28 Apr 1192). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[223]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him son of "le marquis Boniface", but clarifies this error by specifying that his nephew was king of Jerusalem[224]. He arrived in Constantinople in [1186] and was placed in command of the troops which crushed the rebellion of Theodoros Branas by Emperor Isaakios II, whose sister he married[225]. The Chronicle of Ernoul also records that Corrado was involved in suppressing the rebellion of "Livernas"[226]. He was awarded the title caesar in 1187. He landed at Tyre 14 Jul 1187. He took command of the defence of the city against Saladin, who was unable to capture it[227]. He sent Josias Archbishop of Tyre to the Pope in late summer 1187 to inform him of the plight of the kingdom of Jerusalem[228]. He refused to surrender Tyre to Guy de Lusignan King of Jerusalem in 1188 and 1189, but was persuaded by Ludwig III "der Milde" Landgraf von Thüringen to join in King Guy's attack on Acre[229]. During the early part of the siege, he and King Guy settled their differences, Corrado agreeing to recognise Guy as king while Corrado would continue to hold Tyre, Beirut and Sidon[230]. After the death of Queen Sibylle in 1190, Balian of Ibelin and his wife Queen Maria (mother of Isabelle of Jerusalem) considered Corrado a better candidate for the throne of Jerusalem than King Guy. They therefore engineered his marriage to Isabelle, now heir to the throne, despite the fact that his previous two wives may still both have been alive at the time[231]. After his marriage, Corrado returned to Tyre, refusing to assume the throne of Jerusalem unless King Guy abdicated[232]. After the capitulation of Acre 12 Jul 1191, a meeting of European dignitaries decided that Guy de Lusignan should remain as king of Jerusalem until his death, after which the crown would pass to Corrado, his wife Isabelle and their issue. Meanwhile Corrado would be Lord of Tyre, Beirut and Sidon, and he and King Guy would share the royal revenues[233]. He succeeded his father in 1191 as CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato. After further quarrels between the crusader leaders, a council called by Richard I King of England in Apr 1192 decided that Corrado should replace Guy as king of Jerusalem. His coronation was planned at Acre, but a few days later he was murdered at Tyre, apparently by two Assassins hired by Sheikh Sinan in revenge for an act of piracy against one of his merchant ships[234].
     "m thirdly (Acre 5 May 1192) HENRI II Comte de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricus et Theobaldus" as sons of "comes Henricus Trecensis" & his wife[235]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and specifies that he was nephew of Philippe II King of France[236]. He left on the Third Crusade and was in command of the siege operations at Acre in 1190[237]. After the murder of Corrado di Monferrato, Comte Henri hurried to Tyre, was acclaimed as the suitable candidate to marry Corrado's widow, and within two days his betrothal was announced[238]. He succeeded in 1192 as HENRI King of Jerusalem, by right of his wife, but was never crowned king[239]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Isabella" as wife of "comes Campaniensis Henricus…comes et princeps…in Acra"[240]. Together with Richard I King of England, King Henri signed a five year peace treaty with Saladin 2 Sep 1192, under which the coastal towns as far south as Jaffa were given to the Christians who were also given the right to visit the holy places in Jerusalem[241]. He appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable of Jerusalem in 1194, considering that Amaury de Lusignan had forfeited the post after his arrest following his support of the Pisan revolt in Tyre[242]. Following the succession of Amaury de Lusignan as Lord of Cyprus in 1194, the two parties planned an alliance, sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to King Henri's three young daughters[243]. King Henri died after accidentally falling through a window in his palace[244].
     "m fourthly (Acre Jan 1198) as his second wife, AMAURY I King of Cyprus, son of HUGUES [VIII] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Bourgogne de Rancon ([1145]-Acre 1 Apr 1205). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[245]. "…Aimericus de Lisenian…" subscribed a charter dated 13 Dec 1174 under which Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem donated property to the Knights Hospitallers[246], which appears to be the first mention of his name in the Levant. King Baudouin IV appointed him as Constable of Jerusalem in 1181[247]. He supported the rebellion of the Pisans at Tyre in May 1192, was arrested by Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem, but retired to Jaffa on his release. King Henri, considering that Amaury had thereby forfeited his office of Constable, appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable in his place[248]. Amaury's younger brother Guy Lord of Cyprus had bequeathed his authority in Cyprus to their older brother Geoffroy de Lusignan but, as the latter had returned to France in [1192], the Franks in Cyprus summoned Amaury to succeed as Lord of Cyprus in 1194[249]. The rivalry with the kingdom of Jerusalem was suspended when Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem visited Cyprus in 1194, the new alliance being sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Queen Isabelle's three young daughters[250]. According to Edbury, the reconciliation took place in 1197[251]. Amaury did homage to Emperor Heinrich VI, through his ambassador Renier of Jebail, at Gelnhausen in Oct 1195, in return being recognised by the emperor as AMAURY I King of Cyprus. He was crowned in Sep 1197 at Nicosia, where he did homage once more to the emperor's representative Konrad von Querfurt, Bishop of Hildesheim, who was present at the ceremony as Imperial Chancellor[252]. On the death of Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem in Sep 1197, King Amaury was proposed by the German leaders, headed by Konrad von Wittelsbach Archbishop of Mainz, as the best candidate to become Queen Isabelle's fourth husband. King Amaury arrived at Acre in Jan 1198, married Isabelle and was crowned with his wife a few days later as AMAURY II King of Jerusalem. The two kingdoms were linked only by the person of the monarch, as each retained its own administrative identity[253]. After the collapse of the German crusade in early 1198, King Amaury opened negotiations with al-Adil (Saladin's brother) although the six year peace treaty was not signed until Sep 1204, under the terms of which Beirut, Sidon, Jaffa and Ramleh were transferred back to the kingdom of Jerusalem[254]. "Aymericus…Latinorum Jerusalem rex nonus et rex Cipri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Mar 1201 which names "frater meus rex Guido"[255]. The Archbishop of Cæsarea records the death "c purificacionem B. Mariæ" of "regis Amalrici II filium" and the death 1 Apr of the king himself, by charter dated [May] 1205[256]. On the death of King Amaury in 1205, the two kingdoms of Jerusalem and Cyprus were separated once more.
Med Lands cites:
[206] WTC XXIII.III, p. 6, and WTC XXV.XI, p. 152.
[207] Caffaro regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 132.
[208] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424.
[209] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXI, p. 65.
[210] WTC XXIII.XVIII, p. 30.
[211] WTC XXIII.XIX, p. 31, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 448-9.
[212] WTC XXV.XI, pp. 152-3, and XXV.XII, p. 154.
[213] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 24.
[214] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 104.
[215] WT XXII.V, p. 1068.
[216] WTC XXV.XI, p. 152.
[217] Delaborde, H. F. (ed.) (1880) Chartes de Terre Sainte provenant de l'abbaye de Notre-Dame de Josaphat (Paris) ("Josaphat") XLI, p. 88.
[218] Ernoul 9, p. 103.
[219] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 448-9.
[220] Runciman (1978), Vol 2, pp. 462-5.
[221] Ernoul 24, p. 267.
[222] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 32.
[223] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[224] WTC XXIII.XI, p. 15.
[225] Sturdza (1999), p. 537, Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 444-5, and WTC XXIII.XVI, p. 25.
[226] Ernoul 11, p. 128.
[227] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 471-2.
[228] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 4-5.
[229] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 25.
[230] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 27.
[231] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 31.
[232] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 32.
[233] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 51.
[234] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 64.
[235] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 856.
[236] WTC XXVI.XIV, p. 195.
[237] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 29.
[238] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 65.
[239] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 82.
[240] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[241] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 73.
[242] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[243] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[244] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 93.
[245] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876.
[246] Röhricht (1893), 518, p. 137.
[247] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424.
[248] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[249] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[250] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[251] Edbury (1994), p. 32.
[252] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 85.
[253] Edbury (1994), p. 33.
[254] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 98 and 103.
[255] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 177, p. 316.
[256] Röhricht (1893), 803, p. 215.15


; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricus et Theobaldus" as sons of "comes Henricus Trecensis" & his wife[16]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and specifies that he was nephew of Philippe II King of France[17]. He succeeded his father in 1181 as HENRI II Comte de Champagne et de Brie. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Henricus comes Trecensis" and the succession of "Henricus filius eius natus ex filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[18]. He ruled under the regency of his mother during his minority 1181-1186. He left on the Third Crusade and was in command of the siege operations at Acre in 1190[19]. After the murder of Corrado di Monferrato, Comte Henri hurried to Tyre, where he was acclaimed as the suitable candidate to marry Corrado's widow the heiress of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and within two days his betrothal was announced[20]. He succeeded in 1192 as HENRI King of Jerusalem, by right of his wife, but was never crowned king[21]. Together with Richard I King of England, he signed a five year peace treaty with Saladin 2 Sep 1192, under which the coastal towns as far south as Jaffa were ceded to the Christians who were also given the right to visit the holy places in Jerusalem[22]. He appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable of Jerusalem in 1194, considering that Amaury de Lusignan had forfeited the post after being arrested for supporting the Pisan revolt in Tyre[23]. Following the succession of Amaury de Lusignan as Lord of Cyprus in 1194, the two parties planned an alliance, sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Comte Henri's three young daughters[24]. Comte Henri died after accidentally falling through a window in his palace at Acre[25]. The necrology of Sens cathedral records the death "VIII Id Sep" of "Henricus comes Campanie"[26].
     "Betrothed (1179) to ISABELLE de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut [later BAUDOUIN VIII Count of Flanders] & his wife Marguerite de Flandres [later Marguerite I Ctss of Flanders] (Valenciennes 23 Apr 1170-Paris 15 Mar 1190, bur Notre Dame, Paris). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1179 of "Elizabeth filia comitis Hanoniensis" and "Henrico filio comitis Trecensis"[27].
     "Betrothed (1181, contract broken [1187]) to YOLANDE de Flandre, daughter of BAUDOUIN VIII Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marguerite Ctss of Flanders ([1175]-Constantinople 24 or 26 Aug 1219). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the marriage in 1181 of "Yolandem Balduini comitis Hanoniensis filiam" and "Henricus primus comitis Campanensis filius"[28], but this was presumably only a betrothal as such a marriage is unrecorded elsewhere. According to Gade[29], Henri II Comte de Champagne was still betrothed to a daughter of Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut when his betrothal to Ermesinde de Namur was arranged. Presumably this was Yolande.
     "Betrothed (1187, broken 1190) to ERMENSENDE de Namur, daughter of HENRI "l'Aveugle" Comte de Luxembourg et de Namur & his second wife Agnes van Gelre (Jul 1186-17 Feb 1247). This betrothal was arranged by Henri Comte de Namur et de Luxembourg in order to guarantee a suitably strong protector for his infant daughter in light of his dispute with Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut regarding the eventual succession to his counties, but the arrangement was discontinued after the 1190 imperial decision in favour of Comte Baudouin[30].
     "m (5 May 1192) as her third husband, ISABELLE of Jerusalem, widow firstly of HONFROY [IV] of Toron, and secondly of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-[May 1206]). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Isabella" as wife of "comes Campaniensis Henricus…comes et princeps…in Acra"[31]. She married fourthly (Apr/Oct 1198) Amaury King of Cyprus and Jerusalem, and was crowned [Jan] 1198 at Acre as ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem with her fourth husband."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 856.
[17] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“William of Tyre Continuator”), XXVI.XIV, p. 195.
[18] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 103.
[19] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 29.
[20] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 65.
[21] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 82.
[22] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 73.
[23] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[24] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[25] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 93.
[26] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens, Obituaire du xiii siècle, p. 2.
[27] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 528.
[28] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 530.
[29] Gade (1951), p. 66.
[30] Gade (1951), pp. 66 and 68.25


; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): "g1. Cte Henri II de Champagne et de Brie, became (in right of his wife) King of Jerusalem (1194-97), *29.7.1166, +murdered Acre 10.9.1197; m.Acre 5.5.1192 Isabelle d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem (*1171/72, +ca 1206.)26" She was Queen of Jerusalem and Cyprus between December 1190 and 1206.13,4,6,5

Family 4

Almeric/Amaury II de Lusignan King of Cyprus, King of Jerusalem b. 1145, d. 1 Apr 1205
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 235. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014217&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 9.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amalric I d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020218&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#AmauryIA. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026639&tree=LEO
  11. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart XI (I.): The House of Ibelin.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026639&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 1 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan1.html
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM%20NOBILITY.htm#BalianIbelinNablusdied1193B
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Honfroy IV de Toron: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444882&tree=LEO
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 8.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Honfroy IV de Toron: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444882&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026638&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014197&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amaury|Amalrich|Aimery de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064418&tree=LEO
  22. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart C (CA): Relationship Table "Cyprus-Armenocilicia."
  23. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_I_of_Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#HenriIIChampagnedied1107
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria de Monferrato: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026637&tree=LEO
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#MarieQueen
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 7.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Champagne.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sybille de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064421&tree=LEO
  34. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart I (Rup.).
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Melizende de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064422&tree=LEO
  36. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 6.

Geoffroy IV "Martel II" (?) comte d'Anjou1,2

M, #6306, b. circa 1073, d. 19 May 1106
FatherFoulques IV "le Rechin" de Château-Landon Comte de Tours, d'Anjou et de Gatinais1,3,4,5 b. 1043, d. 14 Apr 1109
MotherErmengarde de Bourbon1,2,5,6 b. 1055, d. b 1087
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Geoffroy IV "Martel II" (?) comte d'Anjou and Eremburge de Baugency Comtesse Heritiere du Maine et du Mans, dame de La Flèche were engaged.7 Geoffroy IV "Martel II" (?) comte d'Anjou was born circa 1073 at Anjou, France.1,2
Geoffroy IV "Martel II" (?) comte d'Anjou died on 19 May 1106; killed in battle.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "EREMBURGE du Maine ([1096]-14 Jan 1126). Orderic Vitalis names “Eremburgem” as the daughter of “Helias [de Balgenceio]” and his wife “Gervasii de Castro Ligeri...filiam”, adding that she married “domini sui filio Fulconi Andegavorum comiti”[209]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavensium records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was betrothed to "Helias comes unicam filiam", who later married Geoffroy’s younger half-brother[210]. A charter dated 25 Apr 1120 records that "comes Andergavensis Fulco Fulconis et comitissa uxor eius Aremburgis filia comitis Helie" were present at the consecration of the church of Le Mans[211]. She succeeded her father in 1110 as Ctss du Maine. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Haremburgis Andegavorum nobilis comitissa"[212].
     "Betrothed to GEOFFROY IV Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Ermengarde de Bourbon ([1073]-19 May 1106).
     "m (betrothed before 14 Apr 1109, 11 Jul 1110) as his first wife, FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 13 Nov 1144)."
Med Lands cites:
[209] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332.
[210] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 142.
[211] Château-du-Loir 78, p. 44.
[212] Urseau Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.7
He was comte d'Anjou in 1103.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques IV 'Rechin': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007641&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIVdied1109. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde de Bourbon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020351&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MAINE.htm#EremburgeMFoulquesVAnjou

Philippe (?) de France, Cte de Mantes1,2

M, #6307, b. 1093, d. after 1123
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France1,2,3,4 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs1,2,5,4,6 b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
Last Edited20 Jun 2020
     Philippe (?) de France, Cte de Mantes was born in 1093 at France.2,7,1 He married Elizabeth de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry, daughter of Milon/Miles I "le Grand" de Montlhéry seigneur de Montlhery et de Chevreuse, Vcte de Troyes and Lithuaise/Louise (?) Vicomtesse de Troyes, in 1104.8,1,2
Philippe (?) de France, Cte de Mantes died after 1123; Genealogy.EU Monthlery page says d. 1108.2,9,1

Family

Elizabeth de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry b. c 1095, d. a 3 Mar 1141

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/bertr000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Mtlery page (Family de Monthlery): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Monthlery page ("Family de Monthléry"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html#M2

Elizabeth de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry1,2

F, #6308, b. circa 1095, d. after 3 March 1141
FatherMilon/Miles I "le Grand" de Montlhéry seigneur de Montlhery et de Chevreuse, Vcte de Troyes2,3 b. 1035, d. a 1102
MotherLithuaise/Louise (?) Vicomtesse de Troyes2 b. c 1060, d. a 1070
Last Edited2 Apr 2020
     Elizabeth de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry was born circa 1095.4,5 She married Philippe (?) de France, Cte de Mantes, son of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs, in 1104.2,1,6
Elizabeth de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry died after 3 March 1141.2
     ; Elizabeth, Dame de Montlhéry, +after 3.3.1141; m.1104 Philippe of France, Cte de Mantes (+1108.)7

Family

Philippe (?) de France, Cte de Mantes b. 1093, d. a 1123

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Mtlery page (Family de Monthlery): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Milon I de Monthléry dit de Bray: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106096&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Monthlery page ("Family de Monthléry"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html#M2

Fleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis1

M, #6309, b. circa 1093, d. after 1118
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France1,2,3 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs1,4,3,5 b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
Last Edited20 Jun 2020
     Fleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis married (?) (?) de Nagis.6,1 Fleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis was born circa 1093 at France.1
Fleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis died after 1118.1,7
     

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/bertr000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  6. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

(?) (?) de Nagis1

F, #6310, b. circa 1097
Last Edited31 Aug 2003
     (?) (?) de Nagis married Fleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis, son of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs.2,1 (?) (?) de Nagis was born circa 1097 at Nagis.2
      She was living in 1100.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Isabelle Elisabeth (?) Dame de Nagis1

F, #6311, b. circa 1118
FatherFleury/Floris (?) de France, sn de Nagis1 b. c 1093, d. a 1118
Mother(?) (?) de Nagis1 b. c 1097
Last Edited31 Aug 2003
     Isabelle Elisabeth (?) Dame de Nagis married Anseau (?) de Venisy.1 Isabelle Elisabeth (?) Dame de Nagis was born circa 1118 at Nagis.2,1
     

Family

Anseau (?) de Venisy

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Tancrede de Montferrato Prince of Antioch, Prince of Galilea1,2

M, #6312, b. between 1070 and 1075, d. 5 December 1112
FatherOdo Guglielmo III (Odon, Eudes) dit «Le Bon Marquis» (?) Marquis de Monferrato, conte di Conversano e Brindisi3,2
MotherEmma de Hauteville4,3,2
Last Edited13 Jul 2009
     Tancrede de Montferrato Prince of Antioch, Prince of Galilea was born between 1070 and 1075 at Tabaric.2 He married Cécile (?) de France, daughter of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs, in 1106; Genealogy.EU (Hautvle page) says m. 1103.5,1,2
Tancrede de Montferrato Prince of Antioch, Prince of Galilea died on 5 December 1112 at Antioch, Antakya, Turkey (now).6,1
     ; per Racines et Histoire: "Tancrède de Montferrato ° 1070/75 + 05/12/1112 (Antioche) croisé (1097) avec Bohémond d’Apulie, chasse les Turcs de Tarsus (09/1097 dont le chasse sans délai Baudouin de Boulogne), Adana et Mamistra, commande le contingent des Normands de Sicile au siège et à la prise de Jérusalem (07/06-15/07/1099), prend Bethléem où il place une bannière sur l’église de la Nativité, prend Tiberiade (1099) puis toute la Galilée ainsi que le port d’Haïfa, se proclame seigneur de Tibériade (1099), fait Prince-Régent d’Antioche (1101-1103 pendant la captivité de Bohémond 1er , 1104 - pendant l’absence de Bohémond en Europe - où il s’intitule «Dux et Princeps Antiochenus» et 1111-1112 pendant la minorité de Bohémond II), reprend Mamistra, Adana et Tarsus (été 1101), capture (à Tarsus) et emprisonne Raymond de Saint-Gilles, comte de Toulouse (début 1102), le libère contre son engagement à lui laisser les mains libres en Syrie, et de retirer sa garnison de Lattakieh ; défait les troupes turques de Ridwan d’Alep (20/04/1105), reprend Mamistra aux Byzantins (1109), se proclame Prince de Galilée sous la suzeraineté de Baudouin 1er, roi de Jérusalem, prend une forteresse kurde (1110) qui deviendra le Krak des Chevaliers, succède à son oncle comme Tancrède, Prince d’Antioche, lègue la principauté à son neveu Roger (s’empare en 1099 du trésor de la mosquée d’Omar à Jérusalem) ép. fin 1106 (mariage arrangé par Bohémond 1er en visite en France 1104) Cécile de France princesse d’Antioche, puis comtesse de tripoli, enfin dame de Tarsus et Mamistra (1126, Cilicie arménienne) ° 1097 + après 1145 (fille de Philippe 1er, roi de France, et de Bertrade de Montfort ; ép. 2) 1112 (Tripoli) Pons, comte de Tripoli.)2"

Family

Cécile (?) de France b. 1097, d. a 1145

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VI (A): The House of the Princes of Antiochia. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38694
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 217. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Cécile (?) de France1,2,3

F, #6313, b. 1097, d. after 1145
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France1,2,4,3 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs1,5,2,3,6 b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
Last Edited20 Jun 2020
     Cécile (?) de France was born in 1097.1,2 She married Tancrede de Montferrato Prince of Antioch, Prince of Galilea, son of Odo Guglielmo III (Odon, Eudes) dit «Le Bon Marquis» (?) Marquis de Monferrato, conte di Conversano e Brindisi and Emma de Hauteville, in 1106; Genealogy.EU (Hautvle page) says m. 1103.1,7,2 Cécile (?) de France married Pons (?) de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli, son of Bertrand II de Saint Gilles (?) Comte de Toulouse, Count of Tripolis and Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne, in December 1112 at Tripoli, Libya (now); Genealogy.EU (Toul 1 page) says m. 1115.8,9,2
Cécile (?) de France died after 1145.1,10,2

Family 1

Tancrede de Montferrato Prince of Antioch, Prince of Galilea b. bt 1070 - 1075, d. 5 Dec 1112

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/bertr000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toul 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ponce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161624&tree=LEO
  10. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416718&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html

Pons (?) de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli1,2

M, #6314, b. 1098, d. 1137
FatherBertrand II de Saint Gilles (?) Comte de Toulouse, Count of Tripolis2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1067, d. Jan 1112
MotherHélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne2,7,8,9,5 b. 1080, d. 28 Feb 1142
Last Edited20 Sep 2020
     Pons (?) de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli was born in 1098.1,2 He married Cécile (?) de France, daughter of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs, in December 1112 at Tripoli, Libya (now); Genealogy.EU (Toul 1 page) says m. 1115.1,2,10
Pons (?) de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli died in 1137 at Palestine; killed in battle.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 14
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III/4 764.2

; Ct Pons of Tripoli, *1098, +k.a.in Palestine 1137; m.1115 Cecile of France (+after 1045.)3

Family

Cécile (?) de France b. 1097, d. a 1145
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toul 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ponce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161624&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand de Saint Gilles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416726&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TRIPOLI.htm#BertrandToulousedied1112. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Bertrand de Toulouse: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40252&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand de Saint Gilles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416726&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140290&tree=LEO
  9. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Helie Borel: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40247&tree=1
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416718&tree=LEO

Eustachie (?) de France1

F, #6315, b. circa 1099
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France1,2,3 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs1,3,4 b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Eustachie (?) de France married Jean (?) Cte d'Etampes.1 Eustachie (?) de France was born circa 1099 at France.5,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Provence (St Maime near Forcalquier Spring 1221-Paris, Abbaye de St Marcel 21 Dec 1295, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Vincentii Bellovacensis Memoriale Omnium Temporum records the marriage in 1233 of King Louis IX and "comitis Provincie filiam…Margaretam"[442]. "R Berengarii…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Folcalquerii" made arrangements for the dowry of "filie nostre Margarite" by charter dated 17 May 1234[443]. She was consecrated Queen 28 May 1234, Cathedral of St Etienne, Sens. The testament of “R. Berengarius…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Forcalquerii”, dated 20 Jun 1238, names “Margaritam filiam nostrum…reginam Francie…Elionors filiam nostrum…reginam Anglie…Sanciam filiam nostram” and appoints “Beatricem filiam nostrum heredem generalem”[444]. After disputing the succession of her youngest sister Béatrice to the county of Provence, she renounced her rights in 1287 and received Beaufort and Baugé. The testament of "Beatricis relictæ Raimundi Berengarii comitis Provinciæ", dated 14 Jan 1264, confirms her previous testaments appointing "Reginarum filiarum suarum Margarethæ Franciæ et Alienoræ Angliæ…" as her heirs[445]. The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Paris in 1295 of "regina Franciæ Margareta" and her burial "in ecclesia sancti Dionysii in Francia juxta regem sanctissimum Ludovicum conjugem suum", adding that she had retired to "Parisius apud sanctum Marcellum cœnobium sororum minorum"[446].
     "m (Cathedral of St Etienne, Sens, Yonne 27 May 1234) LOUIS IX King of France, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla (Château de Poissy, Yvelines 25 Apr 1214-killed in battle Tunis 25 Aug 1270, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). "
Med Lands cites:
[442] Vincentii Bellovacensis Memoriale Omnium Temporum 1233, MGH SS XXIV, p. 161.
[443] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Tome I, Aix, Instrumenta, Col. 27-28, no. XXIII.
[444] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2719, p. 378.
[445] State Archives, volume 104, page 11, fascicules 11.1, 2 and 3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 636, p. 317.
[446] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 577.7


Family

Jean (?) Cte d'Etampes

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#MargueriteMLouisIXFrancedied1270

Alan de Cherleton

M, #6316, b. 1318/19, d. 3 May 1349
FatherSir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire1 b. c 1286, d. 2 Dec 1360
MotherElena/Ellen La Zouche1 b. c 1288, d. a Oct 1334
ReferenceEDV22 GKJ19
Last Edited30 Jan 2003
     Alan de Cherleton was born in 1318/19.2 He married Margery Fitz Aer between 1332 and 1347; WFT Est.3
Alan de Cherleton died on 3 May 1349.2
     EDV-22 GKJ-19.

Family

Margery Fitz Aer b. 4 Apr 1314, d. 1349
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 31-31, p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Margery Fitz Aer

F, #6317, b. 4 April 1314, d. 1349
ReferenceEDV22 GKJ19
Last Edited30 Jan 2003
     Margery Fitz Aer was born on 4 April 1314.1 She married Alan de Cherleton, son of Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire and Elena/Ellen La Zouche, between 1332 and 1347; WFT Est.2
Margery Fitz Aer died in 1349.1
     EDV-22 GKJ-19.

Family

Alan de Cherleton b. 1318/19, d. 3 May 1349
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 31-31, p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Elena/Ellen La Zouche1

F, #6318, b. circa 1288, d. after October 1334
FatherAlan III La Zouche 1st Baron Zouche of Ashby1 b. 9 Oct 1267, d. b 25 Mar 1314
MotherEleanor de Segrave1 b. c 1267
ReferenceEDV23 GKJ20
Last Edited13 Jan 2007
     Elena/Ellen La Zouche was born circa 1288.2,3 She married Nicholas de Saint Maur (Seymour) Lord St. Maur in April 1314; his 2nd wife.4,3,1,5 Elena/Ellen La Zouche married Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire circa 1317.4,3
Elena/Ellen La Zouche died after October 1334.4,3
     EDV-23 GKJ-20.

Family 2

Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire b. c 1286, d. 2 Dec 1360
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rohan 1 page - Family de Rohan: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/rohan/rohan1.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 31-30, p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 98-6, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  5. [S2008] MJ Carr, "Carr email 18 Dec 2005: "Re: The early Wroths of Enfield, Middlesex "," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Dec 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Carr email 18 Dec 2005."

Thomas de Charlton of Appleby, co. Salop1

M, #6319, b. 1345, d. 6 October 1387
FatherAlan de Cherleton b. 1318/19, d. 3 May 1349
MotherMargery Fitz Aer b. 4 Apr 1314, d. 1349
ReferenceEDV21 GKJ18
Last Edited2 Aug 2008
     Thomas de Charlton of Appleby, co. Salop was born in 1345 at Appleby, Shropshire, England.2,1
Thomas de Charlton of Appleby, co. Salop died on 6 October 1387 at Apley Castle, Shropshire, England.2,1
     EDV-21 GKJ-18.

; van de Pas cites: Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 123.1

Thomas de Charlton of Appleby, co. Salop lived at Appleby, Shropshire, England.3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas de Charlton, of Appleby: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00114019&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 31-32, p. 34. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 98-8, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  4. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 134. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna de Charlton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385323&tree=LEO

Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire1,2

M, #6320, b. circa 1286, d. 2 December 1360
ReferenceEDV23 GKJ20
Last Edited31 Jan 2003
     Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire was born circa 1286.3 He married Elena/Ellen La Zouche, daughter of Alan III La Zouche 1st Baron Zouche of Ashby and Eleanor de Segrave, circa 1317.4,2
Sir Alan de Cherleton Knt., of Apley (Appley) Shropshire died on 2 December 1360 at Apley Castle, Shropshire, England.4,2
     EDV-23 GKJ-20.

Family

Elena/Ellen La Zouche b. c 1288, d. a Oct 1334
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 134. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 98-6, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.

Susanna Corker

F, #6321
FatherCapt. William Corker b. c 1570, d. c 1677
MotherLucy White b. 1575
Last Edited29 May 2001
     ; dau of William CORKER and Lucy WHITE per WFT E1-0391.

Judith Corker

F, #6322
FatherCapt. William Corker b. c 1570, d. c 1677
MotherLucy White b. 1575
Last Edited29 May 2001
     ; dau of William CORKER and Lucy WHITE per WFT E1-0391.