Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #48871, b. 29 July 1166, d. 10 September 1197
FatherHenri I "le Liberal" de Blois comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie3,4,7,6,8 b. 1126, d. 16 Mar 1180/81
MotherMarie (?) de France, Régente de Champagne3,9,4,10,11,8 b. 1145, d. 11 Mar 1197/98
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem was born on 29 July 1166; Racines et Histoire (Anjou) says b. 22-29 July 1166; Racines et Histoire (Blois-Champagne) says b. 29 July 1166; Genealogics says b. 29 July 1166.3,12,13,5,6 He and Isabelle (?) de Hainaut, Cts d'Artois, Queen of France were engaged between 1171 and 1180; Betrothed until she married Philippe II, King of France.14 Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem and Yolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders were engaged between 1181 and 1187; Per Med Lands "Betrothed (1181, contract broken [1187].)15,16" Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem and Ermensinde (Eremansette) de Namur Comtesse de Luxembourg were engaged in 1187.17,18 Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem married Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Amalric (Amaury) I (?) d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus and Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem, on 5 May 1192 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now),
;
Her 3rd husband.1,2,19,20,4,10,21
Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem died on 10 September 1197 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now), at age 31; murdered.1,3,19,12,13,5,6
Henri II «Le Jeune» (?) comte palatin de Troyes, comte de Champagne et de Brie, King of Jerusalem was buried after 10 September 1197 at Church Of Saint Cross, HaTzafon (Northern District), Israel; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     29 Jul 1166
     DEATH     10 Sep 1197 (aged 31)
     Royalty. Born the oldest son of Henri I de Champagne and his wife Marie de France. He succeeded his father in 1181 and married Queen Isabella of Jerusalem as her third husband in 1195. He died after accidentally falling through a window of his palace.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry I of Champagne 1127–1181
          Marie de Champagne 1145–1198
     Siblings
          Scholastique de Champagne unknown–1219
          Marie de Champagne 1174–1204
          Theobald III Of Champagne 1179–1201
     Children
          Philippine de Champagne 1195–1250
     BURIAL     Church Of Saint Cross, Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Israel
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Mar 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 126440228.12
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABELLE de Hainaut (Valenciennes 23 Apr 1170-Paris 14/15 Mar 1190, bur Notre Dame, Paris). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the birth "mense Aprili 1170" of "filiam Elizabeth" to "Balduinus [et] Margharetam…Mathie comitis Boloniensis sororem"[513]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1191 names "Elizabeth Francie reginam…Hyolenz uxorem Petri Autisiodorensis et Sibiliam domnam Bellioci uxorem Wichardi" as the three daughters of "Balduinus [Haynaco]"[514]. The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1179 of "Elizabeth filia comitis Hanoniensis" and "Henrico filio comitis Trecensis"[515]. The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis name the wife of Philippe II King of France as "Elisabeth regina que fuit soror Balduini comitis Flandrie", when recording the birth of their son Louis in 1187[516]. Her marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Philippe Count of Flanders while he was adviser to Philippe II King of France in 1180 after the latter's accession, with Artois as her dowry[517]. She was crowned queen of France 29 May 1180 at the abbaye de Saint-Denis. King Philippe planned to repudiate her in 1186, for lack of a male heir. The Flandria Generosa records the death in 1189 of "Elisabeth Francorum regina" after giving birth to twins, specifying her burial "in eccleisa beatæ Mariæ Parisius"[518]. The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the death "1189 Id Mar" of "Elysabeth regina uxor Philippi Francorum regis" and her burial "in ecclesiam beatissime virginis Marie Parisius"[519]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Id Mar" of "Isabel regina Francorum"[520].
     "Betrothed (1179) to HENRI de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). He succeeded his father in 1181 as HENRI II Comte de Champagne. The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1179 of "Elizabeth filia comitis Hanoniensis" and "Henrico filio comitis Trecensis"[521]. According to Gade[522], Henri II Comte de Champagne was still betrothed to a daughter of Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut when his betrothal to Ermengarde de Namur was arranged. However, this could not have been Isabelle who was married in 1180. It is possible that the betrothal was to Isabelle's younger sister Yolande.
     "m (Abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité, Bapaume, Pas-de-Calais 28 Apr 1180) as his first wife, PHILIPPE II “Auguste” King of France, son of LOUIS VII King of France & his third wife Alix de Champagne (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). "
Med Lands cites:
[513] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 519.
[514] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1191, MGH SS XXIII, p. 868.
[515] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 528.
[516] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1187, MGH SS V, p. 46.
[517] Count Philippe was never appointed regent of France nor guardian of the young king, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 114, footnote 14.
[518] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 7, MGH SS IX, p. 329.
[519] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1189, MGH SS XXVI, p. 291.
[520] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 312.
[521] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 528.
[522] Gade (1951), p. 66.22

; Per Med Lands:
     "YOLANDE de Flandre ([1175]-Constantinople 24 or 26 Aug 1219). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1191 names "Elizabeth Francie reginam…Hyolenz uxorem Petri Autisiodorensis et Sibiliam domnam Bellioci uxorem Wichardi" as the three daughters of "Balduinus [Haynaco]"[524]. The Chronicon Hanoniense records the marriage in 1181 of "Yolandem Balduini comitis Hanoniensis filiam" and "Henricus primus comitis Campanensis filius"[525], but this was presumably only a betrothal as such a marriage is unrecorded elsewhere. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hyolenz…soror comitis Philippi Namucensis" as wife of "comes Petrus Autisiodorensis", specifying that her husband became Comte de Namur by right of his wife[526]. The Historia Episcoporum Autissiodorensium records that Pierre married "Yolandam sororem Henrici Constantinopolitani Imperatoris" as his second wife after the death of "Agnete uxore sua"[527]. She succeeded as YOLANDE Marquise de Namur in 1213. She was crowned Empress of Constantinople with her husband by the Pope 9 Apr 1217 at Rome[528]. She was appointed regent of the Latin Empire of Constantinople after arriving there safely by sea in 1217, in the absence of her husband whose fate at that time was unknown. She was able to stop the attacks of Theodoros Emperor in Nikaia, and arranged his marriage to her daughter Marie to seal the peace which was agreed[529].
     "Betrothed (1181, contract broken 1187) to HENRI II Comte de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the marriage in 1181 of "Yolandem Balduini comitis Hanoniensis filiam" and "Henricus primus comitis Campanensis filius"[530], but this was presumably only a betrothal as such a marriage is unrecorded elsewhere. According to Gade[531], Henri II Comte de Champagne was still betrothed to a daughter of Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut when his betrothal to Ermengarde de Namur was arranged. Presumably this was Yolande.
     "m (contract 24 Jul 1193, Soissons 1 Jul 1193) as his second wife, PIERRE [II] Seigneur de Courtenay, Comte de Nevers et d'Auxerre, son of PIERRE de France Seigneur de Courtenay & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay (after 1158-Epirus after Jun 1219). He succeeded as Marquis de Namur in 1213, by right of his second wife. He was elected to succeed his brother-in-law Henri de Flandres in 1216 as PIERRE I Emperor of Constantinople."
Med Lands cites:
[524] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1191, MGH SS XXIII, p. 868.
[525] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 530.
[526] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 899.
[527] Ex Historia Episcoporum Autissiodorensium LVIII, RHGF XVIII, p. 728.
[528] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 457.
[529] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (Paris), p. 489.
[530] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 530.
[531] Gade (1951), p. 66.16

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Queen ISABELLA of Jerusalem (X.1190-1206) -cr VII.1191, *1171/72, +before V.1206, bur Jerusalem; 1m: XI.1183 (div XI.1190) Onfroi IV Seigneur de Thoron (*ca 1166 +after 1192); 2m: 24.11.1190 Conrad I de Montferrat (*ca 1146 +murdered Tyrus 28.4.1192); 3m: Acre 5.5.1192 Cte Henri II de Champagne (*29.7.1166 +murdered Acre 10.9.1197); 4m: 1198 Amaury II de Lusignan, King of Cyprus and Jerusalem (+1.4.1205.)2"
; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABELLE of Jerusalem, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-before May 1206). She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who records her parentage and, in a later passage, records her mother's statement at the time of the annulment of her first marriage that Isabelle was only eight years old when that marriage took place[206]. Caffaro names "filiam unam…Ysabella" as the child of "rex Amarricus" and his second wife "Maria neptis imperatoris Manuelis, filiam Iohannis protosauasto…nepos imperatoris Manuelis ex fratre suo" and that they had[207]. Her first marriage was arranged in 1180 by her half-brother King Baudouin IV in an attempt to heal the breach between the Ibelin and Courtenay families[208]. The Lignages d'Outremer record that "Hamfrei le tiers" married "la reyne Ysabiau" but that they were separated and that he died without heirs[209]. Raymond Count of Tripoli promoted her candidacy as queen in 1186, when he opposed the succession of her half-sister Queen Sibylle[210]. However, her husband submitted to Queen Sibylle, which put an end to the plan[211]. She became heir to the throne in 1190 after the death of her half-sister Queen Sibylle. Her first marriage was annulled against her wishes and she was married to her second husband on the advice of her mother[212]. She was crowned in [Jan] 1198 at Acre as ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem with her fourth husband. "Aymericus…Jerusalem Latinorum rex nonus et rex Cypri" granted rights to the commune of Marseille, with the consent of "Ysabelis uxoris mee…quamdam regis Amalrici filia", by charter dated Oct 1198[213]. After the death of her fourth husband in Jan 1205, Queen Isabelle assumed personal authority over the government of Jerusalem[214].
     "m firstly (castle of Kerak Nov 1183, annulled 1190) HONFROY [IV] of Toron, son of HONFROY [III] of Toron & his wife Stephaine de Milly heiress of Oultrejourdain (-after 1190). William of Tyre names him and his father when recording his marriage[215]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names his mother when recording the annulment of his marriage[216]. A charter dated 1180 records earlier donations by "Guidonem de Miliaco…dominus Philippus Neapolitanus dominusque Guido Francigena et dominus Henricus Bubalus, predicti Guidonis filii" and the present donation by "Reginaldus quondam princeps Anthiochensis…Montisregalis et Hebron dominus" of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame de Josaphat with the consent of "uxor mea Stephania…et Hanfredi prefate dominie Stephanie filii et uxoris eius Elisabeth filie regis Jerusalem"[217], although this is presumably misdated if the date of Honfroy's marriage is correct. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the marriage of "Hainfrois" and "le serour le roi…Ysabiaus" on the day Saladin started his siege of the castle of Krak[218]. While Raymond Count of Tripoli was promoting Isabelle's candidacy to succeed as queen in 1186, Honfroy submitted to Queen Sibylle and put an end to the plan[219]. He was captured by Saladin when he took Jerusalem 2 Oct 1187, freed by his mother who promised to surrender the castles of Kerak and Montreal but as neither garrisons would obey her order, she returned him to captivity, from which he was released a few months later[220]. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the ecclesiastical annulment of the marriage of Isabelle and Honfroy "que Hainfrois estoit si mauvais qu'il ne poroit le tiere tenir", undated but in passages which deal with events in 1190[221]. After the annulment of his marriage, Isabelle restored to him the fief of Toron[222].
     "m secondly (Acre 24 Nov 1190) as his third wife, CORRADO di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] ([1145/47]-murdered Tyre 28 Apr 1192). The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis names "Gullielmus Spatam-longam, Conradum, Bonifacium, Fredericum et Raynerium" as the five sons of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" & his wife[223]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him son of "le marquis Boniface", but clarifies this error by specifying that his nephew was king of Jerusalem[224]. He arrived in Constantinople in [1186] and was placed in command of the troops which crushed the rebellion of Theodoros Branas by Emperor Isaakios II, whose sister he married[225]. The Chronicle of Ernoul also records that Corrado was involved in suppressing the rebellion of "Livernas"[226]. He was awarded the title caesar in 1187. He landed at Tyre 14 Jul 1187. He took command of the defence of the city against Saladin, who was unable to capture it[227]. He sent Josias Archbishop of Tyre to the Pope in late summer 1187 to inform him of the plight of the kingdom of Jerusalem[228]. He refused to surrender Tyre to Guy de Lusignan King of Jerusalem in 1188 and 1189, but was persuaded by Ludwig III "der Milde" Landgraf von Thüringen to join in King Guy's attack on Acre[229]. During the early part of the siege, he and King Guy settled their differences, Corrado agreeing to recognise Guy as king while Corrado would continue to hold Tyre, Beirut and Sidon[230]. After the death of Queen Sibylle in 1190, Balian of Ibelin and his wife Queen Maria (mother of Isabelle of Jerusalem) considered Corrado a better candidate for the throne of Jerusalem than King Guy. They therefore engineered his marriage to Isabelle, now heir to the throne, despite the fact that his previous two wives may still both have been alive at the time[231]. After his marriage, Corrado returned to Tyre, refusing to assume the throne of Jerusalem unless King Guy abdicated[232]. After the capitulation of Acre 12 Jul 1191, a meeting of European dignitaries decided that Guy de Lusignan should remain as king of Jerusalem until his death, after which the crown would pass to Corrado, his wife Isabelle and their issue. Meanwhile Corrado would be Lord of Tyre, Beirut and Sidon, and he and King Guy would share the royal revenues[233]. He succeeded his father in 1191 as CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato. After further quarrels between the crusader leaders, a council called by Richard I King of England in Apr 1192 decided that Corrado should replace Guy as king of Jerusalem. His coronation was planned at Acre, but a few days later he was murdered at Tyre, apparently by two Assassins hired by Sheikh Sinan in revenge for an act of piracy against one of his merchant ships[234].
     "m thirdly (Acre 5 May 1192) HENRI II Comte de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricus et Theobaldus" as sons of "comes Henricus Trecensis" & his wife[235]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and specifies that he was nephew of Philippe II King of France[236]. He left on the Third Crusade and was in command of the siege operations at Acre in 1190[237]. After the murder of Corrado di Monferrato, Comte Henri hurried to Tyre, was acclaimed as the suitable candidate to marry Corrado's widow, and within two days his betrothal was announced[238]. He succeeded in 1192 as HENRI King of Jerusalem, by right of his wife, but was never crowned king[239]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Isabella" as wife of "comes Campaniensis Henricus…comes et princeps…in Acra"[240]. Together with Richard I King of England, King Henri signed a five year peace treaty with Saladin 2 Sep 1192, under which the coastal towns as far south as Jaffa were given to the Christians who were also given the right to visit the holy places in Jerusalem[241]. He appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable of Jerusalem in 1194, considering that Amaury de Lusignan had forfeited the post after his arrest following his support of the Pisan revolt in Tyre[242]. Following the succession of Amaury de Lusignan as Lord of Cyprus in 1194, the two parties planned an alliance, sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to King Henri's three young daughters[243]. King Henri died after accidentally falling through a window in his palace[244].
     "m fourthly (Acre Jan 1198) as his second wife, AMAURY I King of Cyprus, son of HUGUES [VIII] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Bourgogne de Rancon ([1145]-Acre 1 Apr 1205). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[245]. "…Aimericus de Lisenian…" subscribed a charter dated 13 Dec 1174 under which Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem donated property to the Knights Hospitallers[246], which appears to be the first mention of his name in the Levant. King Baudouin IV appointed him as Constable of Jerusalem in 1181[247]. He supported the rebellion of the Pisans at Tyre in May 1192, was arrested by Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem, but retired to Jaffa on his release. King Henri, considering that Amaury had thereby forfeited his office of Constable, appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable in his place[248]. Amaury's younger brother Guy Lord of Cyprus had bequeathed his authority in Cyprus to their older brother Geoffroy de Lusignan but, as the latter had returned to France in [1192], the Franks in Cyprus summoned Amaury to succeed as Lord of Cyprus in 1194[249]. The rivalry with the kingdom of Jerusalem was suspended when Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem visited Cyprus in 1194, the new alliance being sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Queen Isabelle's three young daughters[250]. According to Edbury, the reconciliation took place in 1197[251]. Amaury did homage to Emperor Heinrich VI, through his ambassador Renier of Jebail, at Gelnhausen in Oct 1195, in return being recognised by the emperor as AMAURY I King of Cyprus. He was crowned in Sep 1197 at Nicosia, where he did homage once more to the emperor's representative Konrad von Querfurt, Bishop of Hildesheim, who was present at the ceremony as Imperial Chancellor[252]. On the death of Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem in Sep 1197, King Amaury was proposed by the German leaders, headed by Konrad von Wittelsbach Archbishop of Mainz, as the best candidate to become Queen Isabelle's fourth husband. King Amaury arrived at Acre in Jan 1198, married Isabelle and was crowned with his wife a few days later as AMAURY II King of Jerusalem. The two kingdoms were linked only by the person of the monarch, as each retained its own administrative identity[253]. After the collapse of the German crusade in early 1198, King Amaury opened negotiations with al-Adil (Saladin's brother) although the six year peace treaty was not signed until Sep 1204, under the terms of which Beirut, Sidon, Jaffa and Ramleh were transferred back to the kingdom of Jerusalem[254]. "Aymericus…Latinorum Jerusalem rex nonus et rex Cipri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Mar 1201 which names "frater meus rex Guido"[255]. The Archbishop of Cæsarea records the death "c purificacionem B. Mariæ" of "regis Amalrici II filium" and the death 1 Apr of the king himself, by charter dated [May] 1205[256]. On the death of King Amaury in 1205, the two kingdoms of Jerusalem and Cyprus were separated once more.
Med Lands cites:
[206] WTC XXIII.III, p. 6, and WTC XXV.XI, p. 152.
[207] Caffaro regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 132.
[208] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424.
[209] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXI, p. 65.
[210] WTC XXIII.XVIII, p. 30.
[211] WTC XXIII.XIX, p. 31, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 448-9.
[212] WTC XXV.XI, pp. 152-3, and XXV.XII, p. 154.
[213] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 24.
[214] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 104.
[215] WT XXII.V, p. 1068.
[216] WTC XXV.XI, p. 152.
[217] Delaborde, H. F. (ed.) (1880) Chartes de Terre Sainte provenant de l'abbaye de Notre-Dame de Josaphat (Paris) ("Josaphat") XLI, p. 88.
[218] Ernoul 9, p. 103.
[219] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 448-9.
[220] Runciman (1978), Vol 2, pp. 462-5.
[221] Ernoul 24, p. 267.
[222] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 32.
[223] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
[224] WTC XXIII.XI, p. 15.
[225] Sturdza (1999), p. 537, Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 444-5, and WTC XXIII.XVI, p. 25.
[226] Ernoul 11, p. 128.
[227] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 471-2.
[228] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 4-5.
[229] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 25.
[230] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 27.
[231] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 31.
[232] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 32.
[233] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 51.
[234] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 64.
[235] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 856.
[236] WTC XXVI.XIV, p. 195.
[237] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 29.
[238] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 65.
[239] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 82.
[240] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[241] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 73.
[242] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[243] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[244] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 93.
[245] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876.
[246] Röhricht (1893), 518, p. 137.
[247] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424.
[248] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[249] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[250] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[251] Edbury (1994), p. 32.
[252] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 85.
[253] Edbury (1994), p. 33.
[254] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 98 and 103.
[255] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 177, p. 316.
[256] Röhricht (1893), 803, p. 215.21

; Per Racines et Histoire (Luxembourg): “2) Ermesende de Namur / Ermesende II de Luxembourg ° 07/1186 + 12/02/1247 comtesse de Luxembourg (1196) fiancée (1187) à Henri II comte de Champagne ° 29/07/1166 + 10/09/1197 (Acre)
     ép. 1) 1197 Thibaut 1er, comte de Bar (-Le-Duc) °~1160 + 12-13/02/1214 (fils de Renaud II et d’Agnès de Blois) (rachète les comtés de Luxembourg, La Roche et Durbuy, avec l’approbation de Philipp, Roi de Germanie, assiège Philippe, marquis de Namur, dans Namur aboutissant au traité de Dinant (26/07/1199) récupérant officiellement ses comtés plus Namur sur la rive droite de la Meuse et abandonnant Namur à Baudouin IX, comte de Flandres et de Hainaut)
     ép. 2) 02-05/1214 Walram (Waleran) III, duc de Limbourg (1221), seigneur de Monschau (Montjoie), marquis d’Arlon puis comte de Luxembourg (du chef de sa femme) + 02/07/1226 (Cremona) (fils de Hendrik III, duc de Limbourg + 1221 et de Sophie von Saarbrücken) ”.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENSENDE de Namur (Jul 1186-12 Feb 1247, bur Clairefontaine, near Arlon[138]). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the birth in Jul 1186 of "Ermensendem" daughter of "comes Namurcensis Henricus" and his wife Agnes[139]. The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1187 of "Ermensendis" and "comiti Campanensi Henrico"[140]. Her first betrothal was arranged by Comte Henri in order to guarantee a suitably strong protector for his daughter in light of his dispute with Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut regarding the eventual succession to his counties but the arrangement was discontinued after the 1190 imperial decision in favour of Comte Baudouin[141]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1193 records the marriage of "Theobaldus comes Barrensis" and "filiam Henrici comitis ceci…Ermensendem"[142]. She succeeded her father in 1196 as ERMENSENDE Ctss de Luxembourg. Her first husband bought the counties of Luxembourg, Durbuy and La Roche, with the approval of Philipp King of Germany, and besieged Philippe Marquis de Namur in his castle at Namur, which forced the negotiation of the 1199 treaty of Dinant[143]. Under the treaty, signed 26 Jul 1199, Baudouin IX Count of Flanders and Hainaut inherited Namur, while Ermesinde retained Luxembourg, Durbuy, La Roche and that part of Namur which lay on the right bank of the river Meuse[144]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "seniori Walerano filio Henrici" as second husband of "Ermensende filia Henrici ceci comitis Namucensis"[145]. She received Arlon as her jointure on her second marriage[146].
     "Betrothed (1187) to HENRI II Comte de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197).
     "m firstly (1197) as his third wife, THIBAUT I Comte de Bar, son of RENAUD II Comte de Bar & his wife Agnes de Blois ([1160]-12/13 Feb 1214, bur Saint-Mihiel).
     "m secondly ([Feb/May] 1214) as his second wife, WALERAN de Limbourg Seigneur de Montjoie, son of HENDRIK III Duke of Limburg & his wife Sophie von Saarbrücken (-Cremona 2 Jul 1226, bur Rode Abbey). He succeeded in 1221 as WALERAN IV Duke of Limburg."
Med Lands cites:
[138] Gade (1951), p. 85.
[139] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 550.
[140] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 552.
[141] Gade (1951), pp. 66 and 68.
[142] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1193, MGH SS XXIII, p. 870.
[143] Gade (1951), p. 74.
[144] Gade (1951), p. 74.
[145] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 899.
[146] Gade (1951), p. 76.17


; This is the same person as ”Henry II, Count of Champagne” at Wikipedia and as ”Henri II de Champagne” at Wikipédia (FR).14,13

; Per Genealogics:
     “Henri was born on 29 July 1166, the elder of two sons of Henri I, comte de Champagne, and Marie de France, a daughter of King Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. His father died in 1181, and his mother ruled as regent until 1187.
     “In 1190 Henri left for the East, after having his barons swear to recognise his younger brother Thibaut as his successor should he fail to return. He joined the Third Crusade, arriving ahead of his uncles, King Philippe II August of France and King Richard I of England. Initially, he was one of the leaders of the French contingent at the siege of Acre before Philippe's arrival. He is said to have been a member of the group involved in the abduction of Isabella d'Anjou, queen of Jerusalem to get her to consent to a divorce from Honfroy IV de Toron so that she could be married to Conrad, Marchese de Monferrato. Henri was related to Conrad through both his maternal grandparents. According to Baha al-Din, he was wounded at Acre on 15 November 1190.
     “Later on in the campaign, Henri shifted his allegiances to Richard. In April 1192 King Richard sent Henri as his representative from Acre to Tyre, to inform Conrad de Monferrato of his election as king of Jerusalem. Henri then returned to Acre. A few days later, Conrad was murdered by two Hashshashin. Henri came back to Tyre two days later, ostensibly to help organise Conrad's coronation, but found that a funeral was being prepared instead. He was immediately betrothed to the newly-widowed - and pregnant - Queen Isabella of Jerusalem. They were married just eight days after Conrad's death.
     “The marriage was regarded as romantic by some of the chroniclers: that Isabella was so taken with Henri's physical attractions (he was 20 years younger than Conrad) that she asked him to marry her. Since she was already known to be pregnant with Conrad's child (Maria de Monferrato), the marriage was considered scandalous by some, but it was politically vital for her to acquire another husband to defend the kingdom. However, some consultation with the Haute Cour might have been expected. The couple went on to have three daughters, Marie who died young, Alix and Philippe.
     “Henri asked for permission from his uncle Richard, who gave it promptly: however, since Richard was suspected of Conrad's murder, this raises further questions about the whole episode. Indeed, Henri, who was known to the Arabs as 'al-kond Herri', later sought an alliance with the Hashshashin, and was invited to visit their fortress stronghold, al-Kahf. To demonstrate his authority, the grand master of the Hashshashin beckoned to two adherents, who immediately flung themselves from the ramparts to their deaths. The Hashshashin then offered to commit a murder for Henri, as an honour to their guest. Henri demurred, concluded the treaty, and departed. One source has suggested Henri himself as a suspect in Conrad's murder, although it would have been a risky undertaking without his uncle's support.
     “Henri died in 1197, falling from a first-floor window at his palace in Acre. There are varying accounts in different manuscripts of the Old French Continuation of William of Tyre, also known as _The Chronicle of Ernoul._ The majority suggests that a window-lattice or balcony gave way as he leaned against it. A servant, possibly a dwarf named Scarlet, also fell, after trying to save him by catching hold of his hanging sleeve, but he weighed too little to pull the king (who was tall and strongly-built) back. Another version suggests that Henri had been watching a parade from his window, when a party of Pisan envoys entered the room. Turning to greet them, he stepped backwards and overbalanced. Whatever the exact circumstances, Henri was killed outright; the servant, who suffered a fractured femur, raised the alarm, but later died of his injury. Some accounts suggest that Henri might have survived if his servant had not landed on top of him.
     “His widow Queen Isabella remarried soon after his death. Her fourth (and last) husband was Amaury/Amalrich/Aimery de Lusignan, king of Cyprus. Henri's heir-general was his eldest daughter Alix who was soon married to her stepbrother Hugues I de Lusignan, king of Cyprus, and whose heirs represent the senior line of counts of Champagne. Henri left several difficulties for Champagne. He had borrowed a great deal of money to finance his expedition to Jerusalem, and for his marriage; and the succession to the county of Champagne would later be contested by his daughters. In 1213, supporters of his nephew Thibaut IV of Champagne alleged to the papal legate that the annulment of Isabella's marriage to Honfroy de Toron (who was still alive during her marriage to Henri) was invalid, and therefore the girls were illegitimate. However, this was questionable: the legitimacy of Isabella's daughter by Conrad, Maria, and the right of her descendants to the throne of Jerusalem was never challenged, and if Maria was legitimate, so too were Isabella's daughters by Henri. Thibaut eventually had to buy off both Alix and Philippe at considerable cost.”.23

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: page 42.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: page 141.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.23


; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): "g1. Cte Henri II de Champagne et de Brie, became (in right of his wife) King of Jerusalem (1194-97), *29.7.1166, +murdered Acre 10.9.1197; m.Acre 5.5.1192 Isabelle d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem (*1171/72, +ca 1206.)3"

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricus et Theobaldus" as sons of "comes Henricus Trecensis" & his wife[16]. William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and specifies that he was nephew of Philippe II King of France[17]. He succeeded his father in 1181 as HENRI II Comte de Champagne et de Brie. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Henricus comes Trecensis" and the succession of "Henricus filius eius natus ex filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[18]. He ruled under the regency of his mother during his minority 1181-1186. He left on the Third Crusade and was in command of the siege operations at Acre in 1190[19]. After the murder of Corrado di Monferrato, Comte Henri hurried to Tyre, where he was acclaimed as the suitable candidate to marry Corrado's widow the heiress of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and within two days his betrothal was announced[20]. He succeeded in 1192 as HENRI King of Jerusalem, by right of his wife, but was never crowned king[21]. Together with Richard I King of England, he signed a five year peace treaty with Saladin 2 Sep 1192, under which the coastal towns as far south as Jaffa were ceded to the Christians who were also given the right to visit the holy places in Jerusalem[22]. He appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable of Jerusalem in 1194, considering that Amaury de Lusignan had forfeited the post after being arrested for supporting the Pisan revolt in Tyre[23]. Following the succession of Amaury de Lusignan as Lord of Cyprus in 1194, the two parties planned an alliance, sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Comte Henri's three young daughters[24]. Comte Henri died after accidentally falling through a window in his palace at Acre[25]. The necrology of Sens cathedral records the death "VIII Id Sep" of "Henricus comes Campanie"[26].
     "Betrothed (1179) to ISABELLE de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut [later BAUDOUIN VIII Count of Flanders] & his wife Marguerite de Flandres [later Marguerite I Ctss of Flanders] (Valenciennes 23 Apr 1170-Paris 15 Mar 1190, bur Notre Dame, Paris). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1179 of "Elizabeth filia comitis Hanoniensis" and "Henrico filio comitis Trecensis"[27].
     "Betrothed (1181, contract broken [1187]) to YOLANDE de Flandre, daughter of BAUDOUIN VIII Count of Flanders [BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut] & his wife Marguerite Ctss of Flanders ([1175]-Constantinople 24 or 26 Aug 1219). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the marriage in 1181 of "Yolandem Balduini comitis Hanoniensis filiam" and "Henricus primus comitis Campanensis filius"[28], but this was presumably only a betrothal as such a marriage is unrecorded elsewhere. According to Gade[29], Henri II Comte de Champagne was still betrothed to a daughter of Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut when his betrothal to Ermesinde de Namur was arranged. Presumably this was Yolande.
     "Betrothed (1187, broken 1190) to ERMENSENDE de Namur, daughter of HENRI "l'Aveugle" Comte de Luxembourg et de Namur & his second wife Agnes van Gelre (Jul 1186-17 Feb 1247). This betrothal was arranged by Henri Comte de Namur et de Luxembourg in order to guarantee a suitably strong protector for his infant daughter in light of his dispute with Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut regarding the eventual succession to his counties, but the arrangement was discontinued after the 1190 imperial decision in favour of Comte Baudouin[30].
     "m (5 May 1192) as her third husband, ISABELLE of Jerusalem, widow firstly of HONFROY [IV] of Toron, and secondly of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-[May 1206]). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Isabella" as wife of "comes Campaniensis Henricus…comes et princeps…in Acra"[31]. She married fourthly (Apr/Oct 1198) Amaury King of Cyprus and Jerusalem, and was crowned [Jan] 1198 at Acre as ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem with her fourth husband."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 856.
[17] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“William of Tyre Continuator”), XXVI.XIV, p. 195.
[18] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 103.
[19] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 29.
[20] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 65.
[21] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 82.
[22] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 73.
[23] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[24] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.
[25] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 3, p. 93.
[26] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens, Obituaire du xiii siècle, p. 2.
[27] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 528.
[28] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 530.
[29] Gade (1951), p. 66.
[30] Gade (1951), pp. 66 and 68.15
He was Comte de Champagne between 1181 and 1197 at Champagne, France.14,13 He was Crusader - 3rd Crusade between 1190 and 1197 at Palestine.14 He was King of Jerusalem between 1192 and 1197 at Jerusalem, Palestine.1,19,10

Family 1

Isabelle (?) de Hainaut, Cts d'Artois, Queen of France b. 5 Apr 1170, d. 15 Mar 1189/90

Family 2

Yolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders b. 1175, d. 26 Aug 1219

Family 3

Ermensinde (Eremansette) de Namur Comtesse de Luxembourg b. Jul 1186, d. 12 Feb 1247

Family 4

Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem b. bt 1169 - 1172, d. b May 1206
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 235. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014197&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014196&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#HenriIChampagnedied1181B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 9.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003841&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 October 2019), memorial page for Henri II de Champagne (29 Jul 1166–10 Sep 1197), Find A Grave Memorial no. 126440228, citing Church Of Saint Cross, Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Israel ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/126440228/henri_ii-de_champagne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Henri II de Champagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_II_de_Champagne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II,_Count_of_Champagne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#HenriIIChampagnedied1107
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Yolandedied1219.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#Ermesindedied1247A
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  19. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 9.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM%20NOBILITY.htm#BalianIbelinNablusdied1193B
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#IsabelleHainautdied1190.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014197&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 7.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de Champagne.

Thibaut (?) de Poitou1,2

M, #48872
FatherGuillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou1,2,3 b. c 969, d. 31 Jan 1030
MotherSancha/Prisca (?) de Gascogne1,4,2,5 d. c 1018
Last Edited22 Mar 2020
     Thibaut (?) de Poitou died; died young.1,2,6
      ; [2m.] Thibaut of Aquitaine, +young.6

; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 76.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196679&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha de Gascogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196677&tree=LEO
  5. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html

Gerard I 'Trencaléon' (?) Comte d'Armagnac1,2

M, #48873, d. before 29 July 1011
FatherBernard 'La Louche' (?) Comte d'Armagnac et d'Aignan2 d. a 1029
MotherEmerina (?)2
Last Edited24 Mar 2020
     Gerard I 'Trencaléon' (?) Comte d'Armagnac married Adalais (?) vicomtesse d'Auvillars et de Brulhois, daughter of Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou and Sancha/Prisca (?) de Gascogne,
;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.1,2
Gerard I 'Trencaléon' (?) Comte d'Armagnac died before 29 July 1011.2
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "GERAUD [I] "Trencaléon" (-before 29 Jul 1011). The Genealogica Comitum Guasconiæ names "Gerardum Trencaleonem" as son of "Bernardum Luscum"[7]. Comte d'Armagnac. The date of his death is set by the Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis which quotes a charter dated 29 Jul 1011 under which "Ugo…Præsul, secundum lineam carnis eidem Duci propinquis et affinis", with the consent of "eodem Duce [provinciam Vasconiam Sanctione…ducatum]…et Arnaldo Vicecomite et cum coniuge sua eorumque filio Arnaldo, eiusque coniuge Adalias…", donated property to the convent of Condom[8]. m firstly ---. The primary source which confirms this first marriage has not been identified.
     "m secondly as her first husband, ADELAIS, daughter of ---. Her first and second marriages are confirmed by the charter of her son (by her second marriage) who declares himself "Oddo de Lomania frater Bernardi comitis Armaniacensis" in his donation of property to the monastery of Saint-Mont dated to [1062][9]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[10], she was Adelais de Poitou, daughter of Guillaume V Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume III Comte de Poitou], but this appears impossible chronologically. Jaurgain states that Adelais must have been the daughter of Duke Guillaume V by his second marriage to Sancha [Brisca] de Gascogne, adding that this is the only way to explain why her son Bernard was accepted as Comte de Gascogne after the death of Eudes Duke of Gascony and Aquitaine who would, if this hypothesis was correct, have been Bernard’s maternal uncle[11]. However, as can be seen in the document AQUITAINE DUKES, the children of this couple must have been born during the period [1011/18], which means that the charter dated 29 Jul 1011 which fixes the timing of the death of Adelais’s first husband and her second marriage must be incorrectly dated by at least twenty if not thirty years. She married secondly (before 29 Jul 1011) Arnaud [II] Vicomte de Lomagne. Her second marriage is confirmed, and its date set, by the Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis which quotes a charter dated 29 Jul 1011 under which "Ugo…Præsul, secundum lineam carnis eidem Duci propinquis et affinis", with the consent of "eodem Duce [provinciam Vasconiam Sanctione…ducatum]…et Arnaldo Vicecomite et cum coniuge sua eorumque filio Arnaldo, eiusque coniuge Adalias…", donated property to the convent of Condom[12]."
Med Lands cites:
[7] Genealogia Comitum Guasconiæ, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 386.
[8] Ex Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis, RHGF, Tome XI, p. 395.
[9] Saint-Mont 5, p. 11.
[10] ES III 569.
[11] Jaurgain (1898), p. 263.
[12] Ex Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis, RHGF, Tome XI, p. 395.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/gasccent.htm#BernardArmagnacdiedafter1029B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Osbern d'Arches1

M, #48874
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited14 Aug 2019
     EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Yarborough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Jean I (?) King of Cyprus and Jerusalem1,2,3,4,5

M, #48875, b. 1259, d. 20 May 1285
FatherHugues III "le Grand" de Lusignan King of Cyprus and Jerusalem1,6,3,4,5 b. b 1240, d. 24 Mar 1284
MotherIsabella d'Ibelin Queen Consort of Cyprus1,7,3,4,5 b. c 1241, d. 2 Jun 1324
Last Edited30 Sep 2004
     Jean I (?) King of Cyprus and Jerusalem was born in 1259; Poitou 2 page says b. ca 1267; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1259.3,5
Jean I (?) King of Cyprus and Jerusalem died on 20 May 1285 at Nicosia, Cyprus.1,2,3
Jean I (?) King of Cyprus and Jerusalem was buried after 20 May 1285 at Santa Sophia, Nicosia, Cyprus.3
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III/3 565.2

; King Jean I of Jerusalem and Cyprus (24.3.1284-1285) -cr Santa Sophia, Nicosia 11.5.1284, *ca 1267, +Nicosia 20.5.1285, bur Santa Sophia, Nicosia.3 He was King of Cyprus between 1284 and 1285.4 He was King of Jerusalem between 1284 and 1285 at Jerusalem, Palestine.1,3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 235. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064476&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou2.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart C (CA): Relationship Table "Cyprus-Armenocilicia". Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues III de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064447&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064448&tree=LEO

Henri II de Lusignan King of Cyprus, King of Jerusalem1,2,3,4

M, #48876, b. 1271, d. 31 August 1324
FatherHugues III "le Grand" de Lusignan King of Cyprus and Jerusalem2,5,6,3,4,7 b. b 1240, d. 24 Mar 1284
MotherIsabella d'Ibelin Queen Consort of Cyprus2,8,6,3,4 b. c 1241, d. 2 Jun 1324
Last Edited13 Oct 2004
     Henri II de Lusignan King of Cyprus, King of Jerusalem was born in 1271.1 He married Constanza (?) of Aragon-Sicily, daughter of Federigo II (?) of Aragon, King of Sicily and Lenore/Eleonore (?) d'Anjou, on 16 October 1317 at Santa Sophia, Nicosia, Cyprus.1,3,4

Henri II de Lusignan King of Cyprus, King of Jerusalem died on 31 August 1324 at Strovolos (nr Nicosia), Cyprus.1,2
      ; King Henri II of Cyprus (20.5.1285-26.4.1306)+(26.8.1310-1324) -cr Santa Sophia, Nicosia 24.6.1285, King of Jerusalem (1285-91) -cr Tyrus 15.8.1286, from 28.5.1291 after the fall of Acre this title became titular, *1271, +Strovolos, nr Nicosia 31.8.1324, bur Franciscan Church, Nicosia; m.Santa Sophia, Nicosia 16.10.1317 Constanza of Sicily (*1303/07 +after 19.6.1344.)1 He was King of Jerusalem between 1285 and 1291 at Jerusalem, Palestine.2,7 He was last King of Jerusalem between 1285 and 1291.1 He was King of Cyprus between 20 May 1285 and 26 April 1306.1 He was King of Cyprus between 26 August 1310 and 31 August 1324.1

Family

Constanza (?) of Aragon-Sicily b. bt 1303 - 1307, d. 19 Jun 1344

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou2.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 235. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart C (CA): Relationship Table "Cyprus-Armenocilicia". Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues III de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064447&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou2.html
  7. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064448&tree=LEO

Amaury II de Lusignan Constable of Jerusalem, Seigneur de Tyre, Regent of Cyprus1,2,3,4,5

M, #48877, b. 1272, d. 5 June 1310
FatherHugues III "le Grand" de Lusignan King of Cyprus and Jerusalem6,1,2,7,3,4,5 b. b 1240, d. 24 Mar 1284
MotherIsabella d'Ibelin Queen Consort of Cyprus6,1,8,2,4 b. c 1241, d. 2 Jun 1324
Last Edited30 Sep 2004
     Amaury II de Lusignan Constable of Jerusalem, Seigneur de Tyre, Regent of Cyprus was born in 1272.1 He married Isabella/Zabel (?) Princess of Armenia, daughter of Leo II (?) King of Armenia and Kyr Anna de Lampron, between 1292 and 1293 at Nicosia, Cyprus.1,2,9,10,3,4,5

Amaury II de Lusignan Constable of Jerusalem, Seigneur de Tyre, Regent of Cyprus died on 5 June 1310 at Nicosia, Cyprus; murdered; Poitou 2 page says d. 5 Jun 1310; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 5.I.1310.1,3,5
      ; Amaury II, Constable of Jerusalem IV.1289, Seigneur de Tyrus 1290, Regent of Cyprus ("Governor and Rector" of Cyprus) (26.4.1306-1310), *ca 1272, +murdered at Nicosia 5.6.1310, bur Santa Sophia, Nicosia; m.Nicosia 1292/93 [63491] Pss Zabel of Armenia (*1275-80 +murdered in Armenia before 9.4.1323.)1 Amaury II de Lusignan Constable of Jerusalem, Seigneur de Tyre, Regent of Cyprus was also known as Almaric of Tyre.6 He was Regent of Cyprus between 1306 and 1310.5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amaury de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064479&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart III (H2): The Hethumides (Royal Branch) and the Lusignans-Armenia. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart C (CA): Relationship Table "Cyprus-Armenocilicia."
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 235. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues III de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064447&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064448&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zabel of Armenia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293052&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 2 page - The Hethumids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie (Agnes) de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293047&tree=LEO

Leo/Leon IV (?) King of Armenia1,2,3

M, #48878, b. between 1308 and 1309, d. 28 August 1341
FatherOshin I (?) King of Armenia2,3,4 b. 1282, d. 20 Jul 1320
MotherZabel/Isabelle (?) of Korikos2 d. 3 Apr 1310
Last Edited30 Nov 2004
     Leo/Leon IV (?) King of Armenia was born between 1308 and 1309; Armenia 2 page says b. 1310; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1308/9.1,2 He married Alide/Alice (?) of Korikos, daughter of Oshin (?) Lord of Korikos, Regent and Marguerite d'Ibelin, on 10 August 1321
; his 1st wife.2,3,4 Leo/Leon IV (?) King of Armenia married Constanza (?) of Aragon-Sicily, daughter of Federigo II (?) of Aragon, King of Sicily and Lenore/Eleonore (?) d'Anjou, on 29 December 1331
; his 2nd wife, her 2nd husband; Armenia 2 says m. aft 1329; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 29.XII.1331.1,2,3,5
Leo/Leon IV (?) King of Armenia died on 28 August 1341; murdered; Armenia 2 page says d. 1341/1377; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 28.VIII.1341.1,2
      ; King of Armenia.1,2

Family 1

Alide/Alice (?) of Korikos d. 1329

Family 2

Constanza (?) of Aragon-Sicily b. bt 1303 - 1307, d. 19 Jun 1344

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 2 page (The Hethumids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia2.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart III (H2): The Hethumides (Royal Branch) and the Lusignans-Armenia. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart C (CA): Relationship Table "Cyprus-Armenocilicia."
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 2 page - The Hethumids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia2.html
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.

Henri I (?) of Flanders, Emperor of Constantinople1,2,3,4,5

M, #48879, b. circa 1176, d. 11 July 1216
FatherBaudouin V/I 'le Courageaux' (?) Comte de Hainaut et Flandres, Mgve of Namur1,3,6,4,5,7,8 b. c 1150, d. c 17 Dec 1195
MotherMarguerite I (?) comtesse de Flandres1,3,4,5,7,9 b. c 1145, d. 15 Nov 1194
Last Edited10 Dec 2019
     Henri I (?) of Flanders, Emperor of Constantinople was born circa 1176.3,7 He married Agnès del Monferrato, daughter of Bonifacio I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato, King of Thessalonica and Elena/Helene di Busca, on 4 February 1207
; his 1st wife.10,3,11,4,7 Henri I (?) of Flanders, Emperor of Constantinople married Marija (?) of Bulgaria, daughter of Kaloyan (?) Tsar of Bulgaria, in 1209
; his 2nd wife.2,3,7
Henri I (?) of Flanders, Emperor of Constantinople died on 11 July 1216 at Thessaloniki, Greece (now); murdered.1,2,3,4,5,7
      ; Henri, Emperor of Constantinople (1206-16), *ca 1176, +murdered 11.7.1216; 1m: 4.2.1207 Agnes of Montferrat (*ca 1180 +1208); 2m: 1209 Maria of Bulgaria (+after 1216.)3

; per Encyclopedia Britannica: [quote]Henry of Hainault, byname Henry of Hainaut or Henry of Flanders, French Henri de Hainaut or Henri de Flandre (born c. 1174, Valenciennes, Hainaut [modern Valenciennes, France]—died June 11, 1216, Thessalonica, Macedonia [modern Thessaloníki, Greece]), second and most able of the Latin emperors of Constantinople, who reigned from 1206 to 1216 and consolidated the power of the new empire.

Son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and younger brother of Baldwin I, the first Latin emperor, Henry began the conquest of Asia Minor in 1204 and was on the point of crushing the Byzantine loyalist leader Theodore I Lascaris when a Bulgarian invasion of Thrace necessitated his return to Europe. After the death of Baldwin at the hands of Kalojan, the Bulgarian tsar, in 1205, he served as regent and was made emperor of the Latin empire in August 1206. Henry defeated the Bulgars in Europe and between 1209 and 1211 held the forces of Theodore Lascaris at bay. In 1214 he forced Theodore, who had made himself emperor at Nicaea (now ?znik, Turkey) to sign a treaty at Nymphaeum defining the borders of their two realms and ceding the northwestern portions of Asia Minor to Henry. He also made an alliance through marriage with the Bulgarian tsar Boril. Thus, through diplomacy he was able to ensure the security of the Latin empire. An enlightened ruler, he strove to reconcile his Greek subjects to what they regarded as the disgrace of Latin rule. His refusal to cede Greek church lands to the papacy caused a dispute with Pope Innocent III.

Henry died, possibly poisoned, in the 10th year of his reign and was succeeded by Peter of Courtenay. No capable rulers followed Henry, and the Latin empire declined.[end quote]12 Henri I (?) of Flanders, Emperor of Constantinople was also known as Henri de Hainaut.7 He was Emperor of Constantinople, HENRY I, Latin emperor, the brother of Baldwin, and the ablest of the Latin emperors.

1207: Kaloyan and the Bulgarians besieged Thessalonica, but in vain. Kaloyan died suddenly, probably murdered. Theodore Lascaris, allied with the Seljuks of Rum, defeated David Comnenus and drove him back to Sinope. Theodore then concluded a truce with Emperor Henry, in order to oppose the advance of Alexius of Trebizond, who was now allied with the Seljuks.

1209: Theodore repulsed a second attempt by Peter of Bracheuil and the Crusaders to conquer Bithynia.

1211: Theodore Lascaris defeated Alexius of Trebizond and the sultan of Rum, both of whom were captured. As a result, a large part of the Anatolian coast was added to the Empire of Nicaea.

1212: Henry I defeated Theodore at Luparcos and began the invasion of Anatolia. Theodore made peace, abandoning to the Latin Empire part of Mysia and Bithynia. between 1205 and 1216.1

Family 2

Agnès del Monferrato b. c 1180, d. 1208

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Balkan 9 page (The house of Aseniden): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan9.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026298&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin V-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026297&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVHainautB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026296&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Monferrato: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027076&tree=LEO
  12. [S2390] Encyclopedia Britannica Online, online http://www.britannica.com/, Henry of Hainault; http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/261357/Henry-of-Hainault. Hereinafter cited as Encyclopedia Britannica Online.

Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #48880, b. 21 March 1226/27, d. 7 January 1284/85
FatherLouis VIII "Le Lion" (?) King of France2,4,5,7,6,8,9,10 b. 5 Sep 1187, d. 8 Nov 1226
MotherDoña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France2,4,5,7,6,9,10,11 b. 4 Mar 1187/88, d. 27 Nov 1252
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily was born on 21 March 1226/27 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France; Genealogics says b. Mar 1226.3,4,6,12,9 He married Béatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence, daughter of Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier and Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy, on 31 January 1245/46 at Aix-en-Provence, France,
;
His 1st wife.13,14,2,15,16,6,17,18,10,9 Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily married Marguerite (?) de Bourgogne, Cts de Tonnerre, daughter of Eudes de Bourgogne Cte de Nevers et d'Auxerre, Cte de Tonnerre and Maud/Mahaut II de Dampierre Dame de Bourbon, comtesse de Nevers, Auxerre et Tonnerre, dame du Perche-Goët, Montjoy, Thorigny, Broigny, Donzy et Saint-Aignan, on 18 January 1268 at Trani
;
His 2nd wife; Med Lands says "by proxy Trani 18 Jan 1268, in person [12 Oct/18 Nov] 1268."2,4,19,20,6,9,21,22
Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily was buried after 7 January 1285 at Duomo San Gennaro, Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy; From Find A Grave (Heart):
     BIRTH     Mar 1226
     DEATH     7 Jan 1285 (aged 58), Foggia, Provincia di Foggia, Puglia, Italy
     French and Italian Monarch. He was the Count of Anjou and Maine, and reigned as King of Naples and Sicily, King of Jerusalem and Albania. Born the youngest son of King Louis VIII and Blanche de Castile, in 1246 he married the twelve years old Beatrice, heiress of Provence and became Count of Provence. After negotiations with two popes that altogether lasted more than ten years, he was crowned King of Naples and Sicily in January 1266. On February 26, 1266 he defeated King Manfred of Sicily, a son of Emperor Friedrich II, at the Battle of Benevento. In August 1268 he defeated Conradin of Swabia at Tagliacozzo and had him executed a month later. He persuaded his brother to a new crusade against Tunis in 1270. Arriving in Tunis a few hours after Louis' death, he took command of the forces there, stayed there while the crown prince returned to Europe, and negotiated a peace treaty with the Caliph of Tunis. With the support of the pope he was able to buy the claims of Maria of Antioch-Lusignan on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and was crowned King in 1277 but never really reigned the kingdom. In 1282 he lost Sicily to Peter III of Aragon, who had invaded Sicily after a revolt of the Sicilians and a massacre on the French there, that became known as the "Sicilian Vespers". He tried several times to recapture Sicily but was not successful. Following traditions his body was divided after his death. His heart was brought to France and his intestines to Foggia where they were buried. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis VIII Capet, King of France 1187–1226
          Blanche de Castile 1188–1252
     Spouses
          Beatrice de Provence 1234–1267
          Marguerite de Bourgogne 1250–1308
     Siblings
          Philippe de France 1209–1218
          Louis IX of France 1214–1270
          Robert I d'Artois 1216–1250
          Alphonse III de Poitiers 1220–1271
          Philippe Dagobert de France 1222–1232
          Isabelle of France 1225–1270
          Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
     Children
          Blanche d'Anjou 1250–1270
          Charles II de Anjou 1254–1309
          Philippe d'Anjou 1255–1277
          Isabelle d'Anjou 1261–1304
     BURIAL     Duomo San Gennaro
Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 Apr 2006
     Find a Grave Memorial 14087288.23
Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily died on 7 January 1284/85 at Foggia Castle, Capitanata, Provincia di Foggia, Puglia, Italy, at age 57.3,2,4,6,12,9
Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily was buried after 7 January 1285 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave (Intestines):
     BIRTH     21 Mar 1226, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     7 Jan 1285 (aged 58), Foggia, Provincia di Foggia, Puglia, Italy
     French and Italian Monarch. He was the Count of Anjou and Maine, and reigned as King of Naples and Sicily, King of Jerusalem and Albania. Born the youngest son of King Louis VIII and Blanche de Castile, in 1246 he married the twelve years old Beatrice, heiress of Provence and became Count of Provence. After negotiations with two popes that altogether lasted more than ten years, he was crowned King of Naples and Sicily in January 1266. On February 26, 1266 he defeated King Manfred of Sicily, a son of Emperor Friedrich II, at the Battle of Benevento. In August 1268 he defeated Conradin of Swabia at Tagliacozzo and had him executed a month later. He persuaded his brother to a new crusade against Tunis in 1270. Arriving in Tunis a few hours after Louis' death, he took command of the forces there, stayed there while the crown prince returned to Europe, and negotiated a peace treaty with the Caliph of Tunis. With the support of the pope he was able to buy the claims of Maria of Antioch-Lusignan on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and was crowned King in 1277 but never really reigned the kingdom. In 1282 he lost Sicily to Peter III of Aragon, who had invaded Sicily after a revolt of the Sicilians and a massacre on the French there, that became known as the "Sicilian Vespers". He tried several times to recapture Sicily but was not successful. Following traditions his body was divided after his death. His heart was brought to France and his intestines to Foggia where they were buried. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
      Louis VIII Capet, King of France 1187–1226
      Blanche de Castile 1188–1252
     Spouses
      Beatrice de Provence 1234–1267
      Marguerite de Bourgogne 1250–1308
     Siblings
      Philippe de France 1209–1218
      Louis IX of France 1214–1270
      Robert I d'Artois 1216–1250
      Alphonse III de Poitiers 1220–1271
      Philippe Dagobert de France 1222–1232
      Isabelle of France 1225–1270
      Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21056.4,6,12
      ; Per Genealogy.EU (Barcelona 2): “D5. Cts Beatrice of Provence (1245-67), *1234, +Nocera 23.9.1267, bur Roque-Pymont; m.Aix-en-Provence 31.1.1246 Cte Charles d'Anjou, King of Sicily (*21.3.1226 +7.1.1285)”.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "BEATRICE de Provence ([1232/34]-Naples 23 Sep 1267, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro, transferred 1277 to Aix-en-Provence, Church of St Jean de Jerusalem). The testament of “R. Berengarius…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Forcalquerii”, dated 20 Jun 1238, names “Margaritam filiam nostrum…reginam Francie…Elionors filiam nostrum…reginam Anglie…Sanciam filiam nostram” and appoints “Beatricem filiam nostrum heredem generalem”[460]. Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that she was 12/14 years old at the time of her marriage in 1246. She succeeded in 1245 as BEATRICE Ctss de Provence, in accordance with the testament of her father. The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the marriage "1246 mense Ian pridie Kal Feb" of "Karolus comes, frater Lodovici Francorum regis" and "Beatrice filia comitis Provincie Raimundi Berengarii bone memorie"[461]. A second testament of "Beatrix relicta…Dom. Reymundi Berengarii comitis provinciæ", dated 22 Feb 1264, adds bequests to "…Beatrice Andegavie comitisse"[462]. The testament of "Beatrix…Regina Sicilie, Ducatus Apuliæ et Principatus Capuæ, Andegavensis, Provinciæ et Forcalquerii Comitissa" is dated "die Mercurii in crastino Beatorum Peteri et Pauli Apostolorum" in 1266, with bequests to "filium nostrum Philippum…Domini Caroli…Regis Siciliæ…mariti nostri…filiam nostram Blancham maritatam Roberto Flandrensi…Carolus filius noster primogenitus…Beatricem filiam nostram…Isabellim filiam nostram…" and naming "bonæ memoriæ Domini Raimundi Berengarii quondam patris nostri"[463]. The Istoria of Saba Malaspina records the death of "regina" in Naples, dated to 1267 from the context[464]. An inscription in Naples Cathedral records “domina regina Beatrix uxor domini Caroli de Francia rigis Siciliæ” 1267[465].
     "m (Aix-en-Provence 31 Jan 1246) as his first wife, CHARLES de France Comte d'Anjou et de Maine, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla (posthumously [21] Mar 1226/7-Foggia 7 Jan 1285, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro). Marquis de Provence and Comte de Forcalquier 1246, by right of his wife. Created Comte d'Anjou et du Maine Aug 1246 by his brother King Louis IX. He was invested as CHARLES I King of Sicily at Rome 28 Jun 1265, confirmed by Pope Clement IV 4 Nov, crowned at St Peter’s Rome 6 Jan 1266."
Med Lands cites:
[460] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2719, p. 378.
[461] Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses 1246, MGH SS XXIII, p. 5.
[462] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 639, p. 320.
[463] Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 660.
[464] Istoria di Saba Malaspina, IV, XX, p. 291.
[465] Minieri Riccio (1857), p. 89, footnote 131.18
He was titular King of Jerusalem.4 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

; This is the same person as:
”Charles I of Anjou” at Wikipedia and as
”Charles Ier d'Anjou” at Wikipédia (Fr.)25,26

; Per Genealogics:
     “Charles I Etienne was born in March 1226, the son of Louis VIII, king of France, and Blanche of Castile. Charles was the youngest brother of St. Louis IX, king of France. On 31 January 1246 he married Beatrice de Provence, daughter of Raimund Berengar V, comte de Provence, and Béatrice de Savoie. Charles and Beatrice had seven children, of whom only two, Beatrice and Charles II, would have progeny.
     “In the early 1250s Charles was first approached by envoys from Pope Innocent IV, who was then seeking to detach the kingdom of Sicily from the Holy Roman Empire (in the person of emperor-elect Konrad IV von Hohenstaufen), and offered it to Charles, after his brother-in-law Richard, earl of Cornwall, had declined it. Charles' brother Alphonse, however, was unenthusiastic about the idea; and their brother Louis IX forbade it outright.
     “Balked, Charles took up the cause of Margarethe, Gravin van Vlaanderen en Henegouwen, against her son Jan I d'Avesnes, Graaf van Henegouwen, in the War of the Succession to Flanders and Hainault. She granted Charles the county of Hainault for his service. Louis IX again disapproved, and on his return from Outremer in 1254 he returned Hainault to Jan. The disappointed Charles returned to Provence, where he spent the next few years quietly increasing his power over various lordships on its borders and suppressing a series of rebellions. The Provençals proved staunch supporters of Charles, providing money and troops for his further conquests. Many of them were rewarded with high posts in his new dominions.
     “With the usurpation of the Sicilian throne from Konrad IV's son Konradin (Corradino) by Konrad's half-brother Manfredo of Sicily in 1258, the relationship between the papacy and the Hohenstaufen had changed again. Instead of the boy Konradin, safely sequestered across the Alps, the papacy now faced an able military leader in Italy. Accordingly, when negotiations broke down with Manfredo in 1262, Pope Urban IV again took up the scheme of removing the Hohenstaufen from the kingdom, and offered the crown to Charles again. Manfredo's usurpation from Konradin overcame King Louis' scruples; this time, he was persuaded to admit the offer, and Charles ratified a treaty with the pope in July 1263. The terms were heavily in favour of the pope: the kingdom must never be reunited with the empire, and the king was never to hold imperial or papal office, or interfere with ecclesiastical matters in the kingdom. Nevertheless, Charles accepted eagerly. For money, he called for help from the then-omnipotent Sienese banker Orlando Bonsignori.
     “Having endorsed the treaty, Charles could now play for time. With Manfredo's troops advancing on the Papal States, Charles obtained an extensive renegotiation of the treaty on more favourable lines. As instruction went out to the clergy to submit contributions for the war, Urban IV died in October 1264 at Perugia, fleeing from Manfredo. This raised the possibility of a reversal of papal policy. Fortunately for Charles, the new pope Clement IV was the former adviser of Charles' brother Alphonse and strongly supported the accession of Charles. Charles entered Rome on 23 May 1265 and was proclaimed king of Sicily.
     “Charles was popular in Rome, where he was elected senator, and his diplomacy had already undermined Manfredo's support in northern Italy. While Charles' campaigns were delayed for lack of money, Manfredo idled away his time hunting in Apulia, while his support in the north of Italy dwindled. Charles was able to bring his main army through the Alps, and he and Beatrice were crowned on 6 January 1266. As Charles' army began an energetic campaign, Manfredo suddenly shed his lethargy and moved to meet him. Worried that further delays might endanger the loyalty of his supporters, he attacked Charles' army, then in disarray from the crossing of the hills into Benevento, on 26 February 1266. In the Battle of Benevento that followed, Manfredo's army was crushed and he was killed. Upon his death, resistance throughout the kingdom collapsed, and Charles was master of Sicily.
     “Charles arrived victorious in Naples in 1266 to begin the two centuries of Angevin rule of southern Italy, which established Naples as a European capital and continued the tradition of the southern monarchy while the rest of Italy was fragmenting into city communes and states.
     “Charles quickly began to secure his position by imprisoning all supporters of the imperial designs of the Teutons. There remained, though, one obstacle to his safe establishment on the throne of Naples and Sicily: Konradin von Hohenstaufen, son of Konrad IV, and grandson and legal heir to Emperor Friedrich II lived out of harm's way in Germany. However within a year Konradin, still only fourteen years old, was marching through Italy to claim his birthright. Their armies met in decisive battle at Tagliacozzo, on the border between Abruzzo and Lazio, and the defeated Konradin, attempting to flee Italy, was taken prisoner in Terracina and brought to Naples.
     “Charles needed to establish his kingship and knew that while the young pretender lived, he would be a rallying point for the pro-imperial Ghibelline party. The young Konradin was, therefore, unceremoniously beheaded in the Piazza del Mercato in Naples on 29 October 1268. It was an act that shook the medieval world but it was politically decisive and undertaken in the knowledge that no opposition would be forthcoming from the Church, which had, after all, invited Charles into Italy precisely to remove the Hohenstaufen presence.
     “Now able to concentrate on his kingdom, Charles transferred the capital from Palermo to Naples. This allowed him to be closer to the centre of his interests, which included being a Roman senator, lands in Provence and a desire to expand to the east. The decision conferred great prestige on Naples and placed it an on equal footing with the other major European capitals in terms of trade and as a diplomatic centre. This prestige would be matched by the monuments which the Angevin kings and queens bestowed upon the city. On the negative side, the Neapolitans discovered that it was expensive to maintain a king and his court, especially as large sections of the population - principally the Church and the wealthy - were exempt from taxation. The brunt of the cost had to be borne by the less-wealthy sections. Added to this was the predilection, shared by the first three kings in the line, to amass wealth and debts.
     “Charles I's expansionist plans were rudely upset when, in 1282, the revolt known as the Sicilian Vespers took place. Much of Charles' attention was taken up in trying to reconquer Sicily, which had elected Pedro III, king of Aragón as its king. Not only did the Angevins long fail to retake Sicily but at times risked finding themselves on the receiving end. The skilful admiral of the Sicilian fleet, Ruggiero de Lauria, even managed to take Ischia and Capri and, despite the intervention of the pope and Philippe III of France on the side of the Angevins, managed to draw Charles II (heir to Charles I) into a naval battle just outside the Bay of Naples. Charles had disobeyed his father's orders to stay within the port and protect the city from attack. He had ample time to dwell upon the sense of obeying one's father for the Neapolitan fleet was utterly destroyed and Charles II taken prisoner.
     “Coming to the end of his life, Charles I found that, other than having to negotiate for the release of his son, many of his southern territories were rallying around the Aragónese banner. Tired and disenchanted, he died on 7 January 1285, having declared his grandson Charles Martel the heir in the absence of Charles II. Pedro III of Aragón died in November of that year.
     “Charles II was finally released in 1289, but another six years were to pass before he was able to obtain a truce with the Aragónese. As a result of this truce the Aragónese became recognisably allied to the Angevins and there followed a period of pacts, negotiations and inter-family marriages, all aimed at resolving the problem of Sicily. In 1304 Robert, eventual heir and fourth born son of Charles II (Charles Martel had died as king of Hungary in 1295, Louis took the cloth to become bishop of Toulouse and was eventually canonised, and Philippe had become prince of Tarente) and his sister Marie were married to Sancha and Sancho, children of Sancho of Aragón, king of Mallorca. With the two royal houses now linked by marriage, Charles II was able to consider that a long and complicated period of struggle had ended and felt free to pay a long-postponed visit to his territories in Provence. On his return to Naples in 1308, he died on 6 May 1309 and was succeeded by Robert.”.9

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
118.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.9
Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily was also known as Carlo (Charles) I (?) Count of Anjou, King of Sicily, King of Jerusalem.27

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES de France, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla y León (posthumously [21] Mar 1227-Foggia 7 Jan 1285, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro). He is recorded as brother of Louis IX King of France by Matthew Paris, who states that the king sent him home with his brother Alphonse after the battle of Mansurah in 1250[777]. He became Marquis de Provence and Comte de Forcalquier in 1246, by right of his first wife. His brother Louis IX King of France installed him as Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, at Melun in Aug 1246. He accompanied King Louis IX on crusade to Egypt in 1248, but was imprisoned during the retreat from Damietta 5 Apr 1250. He returned to Provence in Oct 1250[778]. Following the death of his mother in 1252, he took an active part in governing France (with his brother Alphonse Comte de Poitiers), taking charge in particular of foreign affairs and military operations[779]. Pope Innocent IV, as part of his anti-Hohenstaufen strategy, proposed Charles as king of Sicily in 1253, but he refused. Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders offered him the county of Hainaut as part of her strategy of disinheriting her children by her first marriage. He besieged Valenciennes, but King Louis required him to renounce any claim to Hainaut in 1256[780]. Raymond des Baux Prince d'Orange ceded him all his claims to the kingdoms of Arles and Vienne 23 Aug 1257. Guglielmo II Conte di Ventimiglia accepted his suzerainty 19 Jan 1258[781]. Pope Urban IV repeated the papal offer of the kingdom of Sicily in Jun 1263[782]. He was elected Senator of Rome in Aug 1263, invested as such in Rome 21 Jun 1265[783]. He was invested as CHARLES I King of Sicily at Rome 28 Jun 1265, confirmed by Pope Clement IV 4 Nov and crowned at St Peter’s Rome 6 Jan 1266. He defeated and killed Manfredo King of Sicily near Benevento 26 Feb 1266, and entered Naples 7 Mar 1266. Under the first Treaty of Viterbo 24 May 1267, Guillaume II de Villehardouin Prince of Achaia accepted Angevin suzerainty[784]. Under the second Treaty of Viterbo 27 May 1267, King Charles acquired all rights over Greece (except the city of Constantinople) from Baudouin II ex-Emperor of Constantinople, confirmed by the betrothal of his daughter to Baudouin's son, and agreed that the military campaign to recapture Constantinople would begin in 1274[785]. Challenged by Konradin von Hohenstaufen, he defeated and captured the latter 23 Aug 1268 at Tagliacozzo, Abruzzo. Imperial Vicar-General in Italy 1268. Charles's attention was diverted from Byzantium by joining his brother's crusade against Tunis in 1270. He captured Durazzo in 1272, declaring himself King of Albania 21 Feb 1272. Comte de Tonnerre in 1273, by right of his second wife. On the death of Guillaume de Villehardouin in 1278, the principality of Achaia passed under Charles's direct authority, as a result of the marriage contract of his deceased son Philippe. Pope Gregory X arranged for Marie of Antioch to sell her rights to the kingdom of Jerusalem to King Charles in Mar 1277 for 1000 gold pounds and an annuity of 4000 pounds tournois. He immediately assumed the title King of Jerusalem and sent Roger di San Severino as his bailli to Acre where the latter succeeded in taking control of the administration and proclaimed Charles as king[786]. Nikephoros Dukas Komnenos Angelos Lord of Epirus accepted his suzerainty in 1278[787]. Encouraged by the new Pope Martin IV, he signed the Treaty of Orvieto 3 Jul 1281 with Venice and Philippe de Courtenay, titular Latin Emperor of Constantinople, with a view to restoring the Latin Empire. The massacre of the French in Palermo 30 Mar 1282 led to general rebellion in Sicily against French rule in favour of Pedro III King of Aragon. He retired to Bordeaux 12 Jan 1283, leaving his son Charles Principe di Salerno as governor of the Kingdom. The Aragonese fleet defeated the Angevin forces in the bay of Naples 5 Jun 1284, during which Charles's heir was captured. He returned to Naples 8 Jun 1284[788]. The Chronicle of Toulouse Saint-Saturnin records the death "in festo Epiphaniæ" in 1284 (presumably O.S.) of "Carolus rex Siciliæ"[789]. The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death 7 Jan 1285 (N.S.) of "Karolus rex Siciliæ"[790].
     "m firstly (Aix-en-Provence 31 Jan 1246) BEATRICE Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier, daughter & heiress of RAYMOND BERENGER IV Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier & his wife Béatrice de Savoie ([1232/34]-Naples 23 Sep 1267, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro, transferred 1277 to Aix-en-Provence, église de Saint Jean de Jérusalem). The testament of “R. Berengarius…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Forcalquerii”, dated 20 Jun 1238, names “Margaritam filiam nostrum…reginam Francie…Elionors filiam nostrum…reginam Anglie…Sanciam filiam nostram” and appoints “Beatricem filiam nostrum heredem generalem”[791]. Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that she was 12/14 years old at the time of her marriage in 1246. The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the marriage "1246 mense Ian pridie Kal Feb" of "Karolus comes, frater Lodovici Francorum regis" and "Beatrice filia comitis Provincie Raimundi Berengarii bone memorie"[792]. A second testament of "Beatrix relicta…Dom. Reymundi Berengarii comitis provinciæ", dated 22 Feb 1264, adds bequests to "…Beatrice Andegavie comitisse"[793]. The testament of "Beatrix…Regina Sicilie, Ducatus Apuliæ et Principatus Capuæ, Andegavensis, Provinciæ et Forcalquerii Comitissa" is dated "die Mercurii in crastino Beatorum Peteri et Pauli Apostolorum" in 1266, with bequests to "filium nostrum Philippum…Domini Caroli…Regis Siciliæ…mariti nostri…filiam nostram Blancham maritatam Roberto Flandrensi…Carolus filius noster primogenitus…Beatricem filiam nostram…Isabellim filiam nostram…ventrem nostrum, si contigat Nos masculum parere...si autem filiam..." and naming "bonæ memoriæ Domini Raimundi Berengarii quondam patris nostri"[794]. The Istoria of Saba Malaspina records the death of "regina" in Naples, dated to 1267 from the context[795]. An inscription in Naples Cathedral records “domina regina Beatrix uxor domini Caroli de Francia rigis Siciliæ” 1267[796].
     "m secondly (by proxy Trani 18 Jan 1268, in person [12 Oct/18 Nov] 1268) MARGUERITE de Bourgogne, daughter of EUDES de Bourgogne [Capet] Comte de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon [Dampierre] Dame de Bourbon Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre ([1249/50]-château de Tonnerre 5 Sep 1308, bur Tonnerre, église de l'Hôpital). William of Tyre (Continuator) records the marriage of King Charles and "la fille du conte de Nevers, niece le duc de Borgoigne" in 1268, around the time of the execution of Konradin[797]. The Istoria of Saba Malaspina records that Charles I King of Sicily married "filia ducis [Burgundiæ]"[798]. Ctss de Tonnerre, Dame de Montmirail et du Perche. An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[799]. After the death of her husband, she returned to France and retired to Tonnerre where she founded a hospital 9 Apr 1293. The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1308 of "Margareta Siciliæ regina relicta primi Karoli regis Siciliæ fratrisque sancti Ludovici"[800].
     "Mistress (1): LAUDUNA, widow of --- Alba di Tarascono, daughter of --- (-after 1273). King Charles I authorised payments to “Laudune relicte quodam domini Albe de Tarascono matri quondam Caroli filioli nostri” for her maintenance in 1273[801].
     "Mistress (2): GIACOMA, wife of RUGGIERO di Pietrafissa, daughter of --- di Pietracastalda e di Sasso & his wife ---. An undated charter records the grant to “domine Iacobe uxori domini Rogerii de Petrafixa sorori quondam Amfesini et Thomasini” of “tertia pars Titi nec non Petracastalda cum Saxo“ which had been granted by Manfredo King of Sicily and confiscated from them because of “proditionem factam in Capuacio” and confirmed its possession by “dominus Ioannes de Ancis gallicus vir domine Sobucie filie dicte domine Iacobe et domini Regis” in the name of his wife[802]. "
Med Lands cites:
[777] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1250, p. 175.
[778] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[779] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[780] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[781] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 246.
[782] Sturdza (1999), p. 495.
[783] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 247.
[784] Sturdza (1999), p. 497.
[785] Fine (1994), p. 170, and Sturdza (1999), p. 497.
[786] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 328-9 and 345.
[787] Fine (1994), p. 185.
[788] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 249.
[789] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, Chronicon Sancti Saturnini Tolosæ, col. 53.
[790] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 570.
[791] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2719, p. 378.
[792] Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses 1246, MGH SS XXIII, p. 5.
[793] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 639, p. 320.
[794] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 660.
[795] Istoria di Saba Malaspina, IV, XX, p. 291.
[796] Minieri Riccio, C. (1857) Genealogia di Carlo I. di Angiò, prima generazione (Naples), p. 89, footnote 131.
[797] WTC XXXIV.VII, p. 453.
[798] Istoria di Saba Malaspina, IV, XX, p. 291.
[799] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), Preuves, p. 88.
[800] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597.
[801] Minieri Riccio (1857), pp. 40-1, 121 footnote 305, quoting ‘folio 100 at. del registro angioino 1274. B...MSS Notamenta ex registris Caroli Primi Regis ex Regia Sicla P. 2, p. 24’.
[802] Minieri Riccio (1857), pp. 41, 121 footnote 307, quoting ‘MSS Notamenta ex Fasciculis Regiæ Siclæ parte 2, p. 620, citing fol. 83 del Fascicolo 76 dell’ archivio angioino’, and LIII, p. 210.10


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 19): “Charles of France, Cte d'Anjou et de Maine (1246-85), became by marriage Cte de Provence et de Forcalquier (1246-85), King of Sicily (1265-85) [the title in this family was sometimes Naples, sometimes Sicily, sometimes both; for convenience I will henceforth call it Naples only], King of Naples (1282-85) and titularly, King of Jerusalem, etc, *21.3.1226, +Foggia 7.1.1285, bur Naples; 1m: Aix-en-Provence 31.1.1246 Beatrice de Provence (*1234 +23.9.1267); 2m: 18.11.1268 Marguerite de Bourgogne, Cts de Tonnerre (*1250 +4.9.1308.)20"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 6): “B.6 Charles, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine (1246-85), King of Sicily (1265-85), King of Naples (1282-85) and titularly, King of Jerusalem, etc; *III.1226, +Foggie 7.1.1285, bur Naples; 1m: 1246 Beatrice de Provence (*1234 +1267); 2m: 1268 Cts Marguerite de Tonnerre (*1250 +1308) dau.of Eudes de Bourgogne, Cte de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre."15

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 10): “B2. Cts Marguerite de Tonnerre, *1250, +Tonnerre 4.9.1308, bur there; m.18.10.1268 King Charles I of Naples (*21.3.1226 +7.1.1285)”.28 He was Cte de Provence et de Forcalquier (by marriage) between 1246 and 1285.20,25 He was Cte d'Anjou et du Maine between 1246 and 1285.4,20,25 He was King of Siciliy between 1265 and 1282.29,4,25

; Per Enc. of World History: "Charles of Anjou became king of Sicily. He made an alliance with Baldwin II, the last Latin emperor, and, through the marriage of his son with the heiress of the Villehardouins, extended his authority over Achaea. He soon became the most formidable opponent of the Greeks, for by the Treaty of Viterbo (1267), he took over the claims of Baldwin II."30 He was King of Naples: CHARLES I (Angevin) king of Naples and of Sicily (1268-82). His grandiose scheme for the creation of a Mediterranean empire in succession to the Byzantine (a revival of the Latin Empire under French auspices), financed by new and heavy taxation, provoked the bloody Sicilian Vespers (1282), a revolt against the rule of Charles that began at the hour of Vespers on Easter Monday, near a church outside Palermo; perhaps 2,000 French men, women, and children were killed. The Sicilians expelled the French, offered the crown to Peter III of Aragon, and hostilities between the Angevins in Naples and Aragonese on the island of Sicily continued for almost a century, to the destruction of good order and the Sicilian economy, and the impoverishment of the Sicilian people.

Sicily under Aragonese rule: Peter (1282-85); James (1285-95). James exchanged the investiture of Sardinia and Corsica for that of Sicily, and Sicily passed to his brother, Frederick (1295-1337). Frederick brought to a close the war with Naples (Peace of Caltabeleotta, 1302), marrying the daughter of Charles I and accepting the stipulation that the Sicilian crown should pass to the Angevins on his death. This agreement was not fulfilled, with the result that the struggle continued until, in 1373, Joanna of Naples abandoned Sicily to the Aragonese in return for tribute. Sicily was ruled as a viceroyalty until the reunion with Aragon in 1409. between 1282 and 1285.31,29,4

Family 1

Béatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence b. 1234, d. 23 Sep 1267
Children

Family 2

Marguerite (?) de Bourgogne, Cts de Tonnerre b. 1250, d. 4 Sep 1308

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 5: pp. 653-4. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, France 4: p. 339.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis XIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000162&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIdied1285. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 October 2019), memorial page for Charles of Anjou (21 Mar 1226–7 Jan 1285), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21056, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21056/charles_of_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  14. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004074&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#BeatriceCtssMCharlesISicilydied1285
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008717&tree=LEO
  22. [S3] Unknown subject, (no date), PA State Library, Vertical Family Files, Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania, USA, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#MargueriteBourgognedied1308
  23. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 13 June 2020), memorial page for Charles of Anjou (Mar 1226–7 Jan 1285), Find a Grave Memorial no. 14087288, citing Duomo San Gennaro, Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14087288
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html#BRB5
  25. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  26. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Charles Ier d'Anjou: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Ier_d%27Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  27. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  28. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html#ME
  29. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 253.
  30. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 273.
  31. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 104-28, p. 99. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013789&tree=LEO
  33. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 6: p. 654.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004075&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIIdied1309B
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028507&tree=LEO

Robert II (?) Prince of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople1,2

M, #48881, b. 1299, d. circa 1364
FatherPhilippe I (?) d'Anjou, Prince of Tarento, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, Pr of Achaia, titular Emperor of Constantinople1,2 b. 10 Nov 1278, d. 26 Dec 1332
MotherCatherine II (?) de Valois, titular Empress of Constantinople, Pss of Achaia1,2 b. 18 Nov 1301, d. Oct 1346
Last Edited6 Oct 2003
     Robert II (?) Prince of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople was born in 1299.2 He married Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia, daughter of Louis I "le Boiteux" (?) Duc de Bourbon, Cte de Clermont, de la March et de Castres and Marie (?) of Holland and Hainault, on 9 September 1347 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now),
; her 2nd husband.1,2,3
Robert II (?) Prince of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople died circa 1364.1
Robert II (?) Prince of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople died on 10 September 1364 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now).2
      ; Pr Robert of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople 1343, etc, *1299, +Naples 10.9.1364, bur there; m.Naples 9.9.1347 Pss Maria de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia (*1315 +1387.)2 He was Emperor of Constantinople between 1346 and 1364.1

Family

Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia b. 1315, d. 1387

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html

Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia1,2,3

F, #48882, b. 1315, d. 1387
FatherLouis I "le Boiteux" (?) Duc de Bourbon, Cte de Clermont, de la March et de Castres3,4,5 b. 1279, d. 29 Jan 1342
MotherMarie (?) of Holland and Hainault3,6 b. c 1280, d. Sep 1354
Last Edited17 Feb 2020
     Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia was born in 1315.2,3 She married Guy de Lusignan Constable of Cyprus, titular Prince of Galilee, son of Hugues IV de Lusignan King of Cyprus and Marie d'Ibelin, on 15 January 1330 at Santa Sophia, Nicosia, Cyprus,
; m. Chateau de Bourbon 29.11.1328 (by proxy) Santa Sophia, Nicosia 15-30.1.1330 (in person); her 1st husband; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 20.XII.1328.7,3,8 Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia married Robert II (?) Prince of Tarento, titular Emperor of Constantinople, son of Philippe I (?) d'Anjou, Prince of Tarento, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, Pr of Achaia, titular Emperor of Constantinople and Catherine II (?) de Valois, titular Empress of Constantinople, Pss of Achaia, on 9 September 1347 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now),
; her 2nd husband.1,2,3
Marie (?) de Bourbon, Pss of Achaia died in 1387 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now).2,3
      ; Marie, Pss of Achaia, *1315, +Naples 1387, bur there; 1m: Chateau de Bourbon 29.11.1328 (by proxy) Santa Sophia, Nicosia 15-30.1.1330 (in person) Guy de Lusignan (*1315/16 +1343); 2m: 9.9.1347 Pr Robert II of Tarento (*1299/1319 +Naples 10.9.1364.)3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#LouisIDucdied1342B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002074&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou3.html
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.

John Stewart 2nd Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland1,2,3

M, #48883, b. circa 1484, d. 2 July 1536
FatherAlexander Stewart Duke of Albany, Earl of March1,3,4 b. b 8 Jul 1455, d. 1485
MotherAnne de La Tour d'Auvergne5,3,6 d. 13 Oct 1512
Last Edited28 Oct 2019
     John Stewart 2nd Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland was born circa 1484.7,3 He married Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne Countess of Bologne and Auvergne, daughter of Jean I de La Tour Comte d'Auvergne et de Lauraguais and Jeanne de Bourbon-Vendôme, on 8 July 1505
;
contract 13 July 1505, his cousin.2,7,3,8
John Stewart 2nd Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland died on 2 July 1536 at Château de Mirefleur, Mirefleur, Auvergne, France.5,2,7,3
John Stewart 2nd Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland was buried after 2 July 1536 at Chapelle du Palais de Vic-le-Comte, Vic-le-Comte, Departement du Puy-de-Dôme, Auvergne, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1481
     DEATH     2 Jun 1536 (aged 54–55)
     Duc d'Albanie, comte de La Marche
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alexander Stuart unknown–1485
          Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne unknown–1512
     Spouse
          Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne 1496–1524 (m. 1505)
     BURIAL     Chapelle du Palais de Vic-le-Comte, Vic-le-Comte, Departement du Puy-de-Dôme, Auvergne, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 28 Mar 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 144292732.9
     He was 2nd Duke of Albany.7,3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 69.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 161.
3. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. 91,853.
4. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 319.3


; Per Burke's: John, Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland 1515-23, Governor of the Bourbonnais, Auvergne, Forez and Beaujolais; d at his chateau of Mirefleur in Auvergne, 2 July 1536. He m (contract 13 July 1505) his cousin, Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne, Countess of Boulogne and Auvergne in her own right (dsp June 1524), est dau and co-heiress of Jean, Count of Boulogne and Auvergne. By his mistress, Jean Abernethy, he left a natural dau."2 He was Regent of Scotland between 1515 and 1523.2 He was Regent of Scotland between 1515 and 1524 at Scotland.3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 243. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Stewart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00042031&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alexander Stewart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006043&tree=LEO
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 557 (Chart 42). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080048&tree=LEO
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 14: Scotland: Stuart Kings until the accession to the English throne. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00042032&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 October 2019), memorial page for John Stuart (1481–2 Jun 1536), Find A Grave Memorial no. 144292732, citing Chapelle du Palais de Vic-le-Comte, Vic-le-Comte, Departement du Puy-de-Dôme, Auvergne, France ; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/144292732/john-stuart. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Thomas Stewart Earl of Arran1

M, #48884
FatherJames II Stewart King of Scotland1 b. 16 Oct 1430, d. 3 Aug 1460
MotherMarie van Gelre1 b. 17 Jan 1433, d. 1 Dec 1463
Last Edited27 Nov 2002

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 243. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Charles VIII 'l'Affable" (?) King of France1,2,3

M, #48885, b. 30 June 1470, d. 7 April 1498
FatherLouis XI "le Prudent" (?) King of France2,3 b. 3 Jul 1423, d. 30 Aug 1483
MotherCharlotte (?) of Savoy2,3 b. 11 Nov 1441, d. 1 Dec 1483
Last Edited13 Oct 2003
     Charles VIII 'l'Affable" (?) King of France was born on 30 June 1470 at Amboise, France.2,4,3 He married Anne (?) Duchesse de Bretagne, daughter of Francois II (?) Duc de Bretagne and Marguerite de Foix, in 1491 at Langeais.1,2,4,3

Charles VIII 'l'Affable" (?) King of France died on 7 April 1498 at Amboise, France, at age 27.2,4,3
      ; King CHARLES VIII "l'Affable" of France (1483-98), *Amboise 30.6.1470, +there 7.4.1498, bur St.Denis; m.Langeais 1491 Dss Anne de Bretagne (*1477 +1514.)3 He was King of France: CHARLES VIII. Death of the duke of Brittany (1488) called forth a coalition of the empire, Spain and England to preserve the independence of the duchy, but this proved futile. Charles married Anne, the heiress, in 1491 and concluded the Treaties of Senlis (with the emperor) and Étaples (with England). Spain was bought off by the cession of Roussillon and Cerdagne.

1495-1496: Charles's expedition to Italy to claim the inheritance of Naples (through his father from Charles, duke of Maine and Provence; see genealogical table). Charles marched victoriously through Italy and conquered Naples (bringing the venereal disease syphilis, which rapidly spread across Europe), but he was soon obliged to withdraw in the face of the Holy League (Emperor Maximilian, Pope Alexander VI, Spain, Venice, Milan, and England), formed to protect Italy from foreign domination. Expedition led to the introduction of Renaissance culture into France and marked beginning of Habsburg (Spanish)-Valois (French) conflict (1494-1559) over Italy. between 1483 and 1498.1,2,3

Family

Anne (?) Duchesse de Bretagne b. 25 Jan 1477, d. 9 Jan 1514

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 291. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 17 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet17.html

Eudes IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne1,2

M, #48886, b. 1295, d. 1349
FatherRobert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne2 b. 1248, d. 1305
MotherAgnes (?) of France2 b. 1260, d. 1327
Last Edited28 Sep 2003
     Eudes IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne was born in 1295.3,2 He married Jeanne/Joan II (?) Cts d'Artois, Cts Palatine de Bourgogne, daughter of Philippe V "the Tall" (?) King of France and Jeanne/Joan I (?) Css Palatine de Bourgogne, d'Artois, Queen consort of France and Navarre, on 18 June 1318 at Nogent-sur-Seine, France (now).1,4,3,2

Eudes IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne died in 1349 at Sens, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Capet 5/10 page) say d. 3 April 1350.4,3,2
Eudes IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne was buried at Citeaux, France (now).2
     He was Duc de Bourgogne between 1315 and 1349.2

Family

Jeanne/Joan II (?) Cts d'Artois, Cts Palatine de Bourgogne b. 1 May 1308, d. 13 Aug 1347
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 245. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

Philip (?) Duc d'Orleans et de Touraine, Cte de Valois1,2,3

M, #48887, b. 1 July 1336, d. 1 September 1375
FatherPhilippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France2,3,4 b. 17 Nov 1293, d. 22 Aug 1350
MotherJeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France2,3,5 b. 24 Jun 1293, d. 12 Sep 1348
Last Edited23 Oct 2019
     Philip (?) Duc d'Orleans et de Touraine, Cte de Valois was born on 1 July 1336 at Chateau de Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France (now).2,6,3 He married Blanche (?) de France, Cts de Beaumont, daughter of Charles IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre and Joan/Jeanne (?) d'Evreux, on 18 January 1344
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 20 page) says m. 18 Jan. 1345.1,2,6,3
Philip (?) Duc d'Orleans et de Touraine, Cte de Valois died on 1 September 1375 at Orleans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France, at age 39.2,6,3
Philip (?) Duc d'Orleans et de Touraine, Cte de Valois was buried after 1 September 1375 at Orleans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France.3
     He was Duc d'Orléans.2,6

Family 2

Blanche (?) de France, Cts de Beaumont b. 1 Apr 1327, d. 8 Feb 1392

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 245. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000226&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html

Leonor de Meneses1,2

F, #48888, d. 1452
FatherPeter de Meneses Cde de Villa Real e Viana1,2
Last Edited12 Dec 2003
     Leonor de Meneses married Fernando II "the African" (?) Duque de Braganca, Marquis de Villaviciosa, son of Fernando I (?) Duque de Braganca and Joanna de Castro sna de Cadaval, in 1447
; his 1st wife.1,2
Leonor de Meneses died in 1452 at Portugal; buried Santarem.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 54 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet54.html

Maria (?) of Navarre1,2

F, #48889, b. between 1329 and 1330, d. 29 April 1347
FatherPhilippe III "le Bon" or "le Sage" (?) King of Navarre, Cte d'Evreux, Angouleme et de Longueville, Cte de Mortain3,4,2,5 b. 27 Mar 1306, d. 16 Sep 1343
MotherJeanne II (Joan) (?) de France, Queen of Navarre2 b. 28 Jan 1311, d. 6 Oct 1349
Last Edited18 Oct 2019
     Maria (?) of Navarre was born between 1329 and 1330.6,2 She married Pedro IV "el Ceremonioso" (?) King of Aragon, son of Alfonso IV "el Benigne" (?) King of Aragon and Teresa d'Entenza Countess of Urgel, on 25 July 1338 at Alagon, Spain (now),
; his 1st wife; Louda & Maclagan (Table 46) says m. 1342.1,4,6,2
Maria (?) of Navarre died on 29 April 1347 at Valencia, Aragon, Spain (now).4,6,2
Maria (?) of Navarre was buried after 29 April 1347 at Santa Maria de Poblet, Tarragona, Spain (now).6

Family

Pedro IV "el Ceremonioso" (?) King of Aragon b. 5 Sep 1319, d. 1387
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 250. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html

Eleanor (?) of Portugal1,2,3

F, #48890, b. 1328, d. 30 October 1348
FatherAfonso IV "o Bravo" (?) King of Portugal1,2,3,4 b. 8 Feb 1291, d. 28 May 1357
MotherDoña Beatriz Sancha (?) Infanta of Castile-León, Queen Consort of Portugal1,2,3,5 b. 1293, d. 25 Oct 1359
Last Edited12 May 2020
     Eleanor (?) of Portugal was born in 1328.1,2,6,3 She married Pedro IV "el Ceremonioso" (?) King of Aragon, son of Alfonso IV "el Benigne" (?) King of Aragon and Teresa d'Entenza Countess of Urgel, on 19 November 1347 at Barcelona, Provinicia de Barcelona, Cateluna, Spain (now),
; his 2nd wife.7,1,2,6,3
Eleanor (?) of Portugal died on 30 October 1348 at Exerica, Aragon, Spain (now).1,2,6,3
Eleanor (?) of Portugal was buried after 30 October 1348 at Santa Maria de Poblet, Tarragona, Aragon, Spain (now).6,3
     Eleanor (?) of Portugal was also known as Leonor (?) of Portugal.7

Family

Pedro IV "el Ceremonioso" (?) King of Aragon b. 5 Sep 1319, d. 1387
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 92: Portugal - Early Kings (House of Burgundy).
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Afonso IV 'o Bravo': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020566&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatriz of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020567&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 250. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Leonora Telles de Meneses1,2

F, #48891, d. 1386
FatherMartim Affonso Telles de Meneses3,2
Last Edited30 May 2020
     Leonora Telles de Meneses married Fernão I "the Gentle" (?) King of Portugal, son of Pedro I 'o Justiceiro' (?) King of Portugal and Constanza Manuel (?) de Castile, in 1371
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 48 page) says m. 1372.1,3,2
Leonora Telles de Meneses died in 1386 at Tordesillas, Spain (now).3,2
Leonora Telles de Meneses was buried in 1386 at Cloister Mercedes, near Valladolid, Spain.2
     Leonora Telles de Meneses was also known as Eleanor Telles de Meneses.3

; Per Genealogy.EU: "I1. Mgve Hermann of Brandenburg (after 1295-1308), +Eldenburg 1.2.1308; m.Graz X.1295 Anna von Habsburg (+19.3.1327.)4" She was Regent of Portugal - Regency of Queen Leonora on behalf of Ferdinand's daughter, Beatrice, who was married to John I of Castile. This arrangement led to strong opposition among the Portuguese, who detested both the regent and her lover, and resented all control from outside. in 1383.1

Family

Fernão I "the Gentle" (?) King of Portugal b. 31 Oct 1345, d. 22 Oct 1383
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 250-251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 92: Portugal - Early Kings (House of Burgundy). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ascan 1 page (House of Ascania): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ascania/ascan1.html

Affonso V (?) King of Portugal1,2,3

M, #48892, b. 15 January 1432, d. 28 August 1481
FatherDuarte I (?) King of Portugal1,2,4,3 b. 31 Oct 1391, d. 13 Sep 1438
MotherLeonora/Eleanor (?) Infta of Aragon1,2,3,5 b. bt 1400 - 1402
Last Edited6 May 2004
     Affonso V (?) King of Portugal was born on 15 January 1432 at Sintra, Portugal.2,3 He married Isabella (?) la Paloma, daughter of Infante dom Pedro (?) Infant Pedro of Portugal, Duque de Coimbra and Isabella (?) of Urgel, in 1448
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 48 page) says m. 1445; his 1st wife.6,2,7,3 Affonso V (?) King of Portugal married Juana "la Beltranaja" (?) Infta of Castile, Princess of the Asturias, daughter of Enrique IV "el Impotente" (?) King of Castile and Leon and Juana/Joanna (?) Infanta of Portugal, on 30 May 1475 at Placentia
; Leo van de Pas says they were engaged, but the marriage never took place.3,8 Affonso V (?) King of Portugal and an unknown person were divorced in 1479.3
Affonso V (?) King of Portugal died on 28 August 1481 at Sintra, Portugal, at age 49; died of the plague.1,2,3
      ; King AFFONSO V of Portugal (1438-81), *Sintra 15.1.1432, +of the plague Sintra 28.8.1481; 1m: 1448 *[48893] Isabella of Portugal (*1432 +Evora 2.12.1455); 2m: Placentia 30.5.1475 (div 1479) Juana Bertrandilla (*28.8.1459 +Coimbra 1530, bur there), dau.of King Enrique IV of Castile.3 He was King of Portugal: AFONSO V (the African), an attractive and chivalrous ruler, but lacking the hard-headed realism of his predecessors. The reign began with the regency of the king's mother, Eleonora, a Spanish princess, who again was confronted with Portuguese opposition to a Spanish connection. The nobility revolted, the regent fled, and the king's uncle, Peter, was made regent. His able and enlightened rule came to an end when the king, having reached his majority, allowed himself to be persuaded by favorites to make war on Peter. The latter and his son were defeated and killed in the Battle of Alfarrobeira (1449).

1446: The Ordenaçoes Affonsinas, the first great law code of the Portuguese, representing an amalgam of Roman, Visigothic, and customary law.

1463: Campaigns against the kingdom of Fez. The Portuguese captured Casablanca.

1471: The Portugyese captured Tangiers.

1476: Battle of Toro. Defeat of the Portuguese by the Castilians, after Afonso, who had married a sister of Isabella, attempted to dispute the latter's succession to the throne. between 1438 and 1481.1,2

Family 1

Isabella (?) la Paloma b. 1432, d. 2 Dec 1455
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 250-251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 53 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet53.html
  4. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 8: Kings of Portugal, 1211-1521. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Aragón: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004881&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 251.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Infanta Juana 'la Beltraneja' of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00275001&tree=LEO

Isabella (?) la Paloma1,2,3

F, #48893, b. 1432, d. 2 December 1455
FatherInfante dom Pedro (?) Infant Pedro of Portugal, Duque de Coimbra2,3 b. 9 Dec 1392, d. 20 May 1449
MotherIsabella (?) of Urgel2,3 b. 1409, d. 1443
Last Edited9 Nov 2003
     Isabella (?) la Paloma was born in 1432.2,3 She married Affonso V (?) King of Portugal, son of Duarte I (?) King of Portugal and Leonora/Eleanor (?) Infta of Aragon, in 1448
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 48 page) says m. 1445; his 1st wife.1,2,3,4
Isabella (?) la Paloma was buried on 2 December 1455 at Batalha, Portugal.3
Isabella (?) la Paloma died on 2 December 1455 at Évora, Évora Municipality, Évora, Portugal.2,3

Family

Affonso V (?) King of Portugal b. 15 Jan 1432, d. 28 Aug 1481
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 53 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet53.html

Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal1,2

M, #48894, b. 5 May 1455, d. 25 October 1495
FatherAffonso V (?) King of Portugal1,3,2 b. 15 Jan 1432, d. 28 Aug 1481
MotherIsabella (?) la Paloma1,2 b. 1432, d. 2 Dec 1455
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal was born on 5 May 1455 at Lisbon, Portugal.2 He married Eleanor (?) of Portugal, daughter of Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu and Brites/Beatrice (?) of Portugal, in January 1471 at Setubal, Portugal.1,2

Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal died on 25 October 1495 at Alvora, Portugal, at age 40.1,2
Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal was buried after 25 October 1495 at Batalha, Portugal.2
     Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal was also known as John II (?) King of Portugal.1 He was King of Portugal; "JOHN (JOÃO) II, an energetic prince who at once undertook to restrict the property and power of the nobility, which had become very great during the preceding reign. This led to a revolt of the nobles, led by Ferdinand of Braganza and supported by the Catholic kings of Castile and Aragon. The revolt was suppressed in 1483; Braganza and many of his followers were executed. The royal power thenceforth was more firmly established than ever before." between 1481 and 1495.1,3

Family

Eleanor (?) of Portugal b. 2 May 1458, d. 17 Nov 1525
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 53 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet53.html
  3. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 8: Kings of Portugal, 1211-1521. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 49: Spain - House of Hapsburg. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 55 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet55.html

Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu1,2,3,4,5

M, #48895, b. 17 November 1433, d. 18 September 1470
FatherDuarte I (?) King of Portugal1,2,3,4 b. 31 Oct 1391, d. 13 Sep 1438
MotherLeonora/Eleanor (?) Infta of Aragon1,2,4,6 b. bt 1400 - 1402
Last Edited6 May 2004
     Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu was born on 17 November 1433 at Almeirim, Portugal.4 He married Brites/Beatrice (?) of Portugal, daughter of Joao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duke of Beja and Isabella de Braganza, in 1452 at Alcacovas, Portugal.2,5,4

Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu was buried on 18 September 1470 at Beja, Portugal.4
Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu died on 18 September 1470 at Setobal/Catobriga, Portugal, at age 36.2,4
     Fernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu was also known as Ferdinand (?) Duke of Viseu.2

Family

Brites/Beatrice (?) of Portugal b. c 1430, d. 30 Sep 1506
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 8: Kings of Portugal, 1211-1521. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 53 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet53.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Aragón: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004881&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Eleanor (?) of Portugal1,2

F, #48896, b. 2 May 1458, d. 17 November 1525
FatherFernao (?) Inft of Portugal, Duque de Beja, de Salvaterra e de Viseu1,2 b. 17 Nov 1433, d. 18 Sep 1470
MotherBrites/Beatrice (?) of Portugal1,2 b. c 1430, d. 30 Sep 1506
Last Edited10 Nov 2003
     Eleanor (?) of Portugal was born on 2 May 1458 at Beja, Portugal.1,2 She married Joao II "the Severe" (?) King of Portugal, son of Affonso V (?) King of Portugal and Isabella (?) la Paloma, in January 1471 at Setubal, Portugal.1,2

Eleanor (?) of Portugal died on 17 November 1525 at Lisbon, Portugal, at age 67.1,2
Eleanor (?) of Portugal was buried after 17 November 1525 at Mosteiro da Madre de Deus, Xabregas, Portugal.2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 53 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet53.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 55 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet55.html

Contessina de' Bardi1,2

F, #48897, d. 1473
FatherAlessandro de' Bardi Count of Vernio3,2
Last Edited11 Aug 2004
     Contessina de' Bardi married Cosimo "il Vecchio" de Medici, son of Giovanni di Bicci de Medici and Piccarda Bueri, circa 1416.1,3,2

Contessina de' Bardi died in 1473.2

Family

Cosimo "il Vecchio" de Medici b. 27 Sep 1389, d. 1 Aug 1464
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Medici 1 page (Medici family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici2.html
  4. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, De'Medici: http://www.sardimpex.com/medici2.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.

Semiramide Appiani1

F, #48898
Last Edited23 Mar 2002
     Semiramide Appiani married Lorenzo de Medici, son of Piero Francesco de Medici and Laudomia Acciajuoli, circa 1484.1,2

Family

Lorenzo de Medici b. 1463, d. 20 May 1503

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Medici 3 page (Medici family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici3.html

Chrétienne (?) de Lorraine1,2,3

F, #48899, b. 16 August 1565, d. 19 December 1637
FatherCharles III "le Grand" (?) Duke of Lorraine2,3 b. 15 Feb 1543, d. 14 May 1608
MotherClaude/Claudia de Valois Pss of France2,3 b. 12 Nov 1547, d. 21 Feb 1575
Last Edited12 Aug 2004
     Chrétienne (?) de Lorraine was born on 16 August 1565 at Nancy, Lorraine, France.2,3 She married Ferdinando I de Medici Cardinal, Grand Duke of Tuscany, son of Cosimo I de Medici Duke of Florence, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Leonora Alvarez de Toledo, on 3 May 1589 at Florence, Tuscany, Italy (now).1,2,3,4

Chrétienne (?) de Lorraine died on 19 December 1637 at Florence, Tuscany, Italy (now), at age 72.2,3
      ; Leo van de pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 14
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 1222.2

Family

Ferdinando I de Medici Cardinal, Grand Duke of Tuscany b. 30 Jul 1549, d. 17 Feb 1609
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrétienne de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00010948&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine4.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici3.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 3 page (Medici family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici3.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Claudia de' Medici: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001583&tree=LEO

Claudia de Medici1,2,3,4,5

F, #48900, b. 4 June 1604, d. 25 December 1648
FatherFerdinando I de Medici Cardinal, Grand Duke of Tuscany1,2,3,5 b. 30 Jul 1549, d. 17 Feb 1609
MotherChrétienne (?) de Lorraine1,2,6,7 b. 16 Aug 1565, d. 19 Dec 1637
Last Edited7 Dec 2004
     Claudia de Medici was born on 4 June 1604 at Florence, Tuscany, Italy (now).3,5 She married Federico Ubaldo della Rovere Hereditary Duke of Urbino and Gubbio in 1621
; her 1st husband.8,2,5,9 Claudia de Medici married Leopold V (?) Archduke of Austria, Count of Tyrol, son of Karl (?) Duke von Steyer, Archduke of Austria and Maria Anna (?) of Bavaria, on 19 April 1626 at Innsbruck, Austria,
; her 2nd husband.1,2,3,10,4,5
Claudia de Medici died on 25 December 1648 at Vienna, Austria, at age 44.3,5
      ; Claudia, *Florence 4.6.1604, +Innsbruck 25.12.1648; 1m: 1621 Federico Ubaldo della Rovere (*16.5.1605 +28.6.1623); 2m: Innsbruck 19.4.1626 Archduke Leopold V of Austria, Gf von Tirol (*9.10.1586 +13.9.1632.)5

; Leo van de pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol II page 120
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 132
3. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 1222.2

Family 1

Federico Ubaldo della Rovere Hereditary Duke of Urbino and Gubbio b. 16 May 1605, d. 28 Jun 1623
Child

Family 2

Leopold V (?) Archduke of Austria, Count of Tyrol b. 9 Oct 1586, d. 13 Sep 1632
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Claudia de' Medici: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001583&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 75: Austria, Bohemia and Hungary - Hapsburgs in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Habsburg 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/habsburg/habsburg4.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 3 page (Medici family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici3.html
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici3.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrétienne de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00010948&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Federico Ubaldo della Rovere: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00202795&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rovere page (della Rovere family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/rovere.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Archduke Leopold V of Austria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001337&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Archduke Sigismund Franz of Austria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002335&tree=LEO