Renaud/Reinald I "One-Eyed/Le Borgne" (?) comte de Bar, Mousson1,2,3,4

M, #5281, b. circa 1090, d. 10 March 1148/49
FatherDietrich/Thierry II (?) Comte de Ba-le-Duc, Count in Altkirch und Pfirt, Comte de Montbeliard & Bar-le-Duc3,5,4 b. c 1045, d. 2 Jan 1105
MotherErmentrude (?) de Bourgogne, heiress of Mömpelgard6,3,4 b. bt 1050 - 1055, d. a 8 Mar 1105
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Renaud/Reinald I "One-Eyed/Le Borgne" (?) comte de Bar, Mousson was born circa 1090.2,3 He married Gisele de Vaudémont, daughter of Gerhard I (?) Comte de Vaudémont and Helvide/Edith von Dagsburg Heiress of Egisheim, circa 1120; his 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.2,7,8,3,4
Renaud/Reinald I "One-Eyed/Le Borgne" (?) comte de Bar, Mousson died on 10 March 1148/49; crossing eh Mediterranean.2,7,3
     ; Ct Reinald I "One-Eyed" of Bar and Mousson, *ca 1090, +10.3.1149/24.6.1150; 1m: ca 1110 NN; 2m: ca 1120 Gisela de Vaudémont (*1090 +after 1141.)2 GAV-24 EDV-24.

; "He was an opponent of Emperor Heinrich V and, as a crusader, went with King Louis VII of France on the second crusade."3

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 146, 147
2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen 1995, Neustadt an der Aisch , Erich Brandenburg, Reference: 100.3

; Weis [AR7] line 144-24.9

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Gisele de Vaudémont b. 1090, d. a 1141
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 272. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reinald I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026515&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thierry I (Dietrich): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026664&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrude de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026534&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisèle de Vaudemont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026516&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 144-24, p. 127. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 4.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148885&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reinald I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026515&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164669&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#ClemenceM1RenaudClermontM2ThibautCrepy. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephanie de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030542&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#StephanieMHuguesBroyes
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030536&tree=LEO

Gisele de Vaudémont1,2,3,4

F, #5282, b. 1090, d. after 1141
FatherGerhard I (?) Comte de Vaudémont1,2,3,5,6 b. c 1057, d. c 1108
MotherHelvide/Edith von Dagsburg Heiress of Egisheim1,2,7,8 d. b 29 Jan 1126
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Gisele de Vaudémont was born in 1090 at Vaudemont, Meurthe-Et-Moselle, France.9,10 She married Renard III (?) Count de Toul, son of Frederic I (?) Count de Toul and Gertrude de Toul, circa 1120; her 1st husband.2,1,3 Gisele de Vaudémont married Renaud/Reinald I "One-Eyed/Le Borgne" (?) comte de Bar, Mousson, son of Dietrich/Thierry II (?) Comte de Ba-le-Duc, Count in Altkirch und Pfirt, Comte de Montbeliard & Bar-le-Duc and Ermentrude (?) de Bourgogne, heiress of Mömpelgard, circa 1120; his 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.10,1,2,11,3
Gisele de Vaudémont died after 1141.1,10
     GAV-24 EDV-24.

; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 146.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisèle de Vaudemont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026516&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerhard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028162&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#GerardVaudemontdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helwide von Dagsburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028163&tree=LEO
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reinald I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026515&tree=LEO
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32462
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 4.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148885&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Bar, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164669&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#ClemenceM1RenaudClermontM2ThibautCrepy
  18. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 272. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephanie de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030542&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#StephanieMHuguesBroyes
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030536&tree=LEO

William (?) of England1

M, #5283, b. 17 August 1153, d. April 1156
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England2,1,3 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou2,1 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Last Edited8 Dec 2019
     William (?) of England was born on 17 August 1153 at Le Mans, Sarthe, Anjou, France.4,5,1
William (?) of England died in April 1156 at Wallingford Castle, Wallingford, Berkshire, England, at age 2.6,5,1
      William (?) of England was also known as William (?) Count of Poitiers.7,2,1

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.4. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 278. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 521 (Chart 38). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Henry "The Young King" (?) Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine1,2,3

M, #5284, b. 28 February 1155, d. 11 June 1183
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England4,2,3,5 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou4,2,3 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Last Edited16 Jun 2020
     Henry "The Young King" (?) Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine was born on 28 February 1155 at Bermondsey Palace, co. Surrey, England.6,1,7,2,3,8 He married Marguerite (?) de France, Cts de Vexin, daughter of Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France and Doña Constance (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of France, on 2 November 1160 at Neubourg, Normandy, France (now);
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says "contract Neubourg, Eure 1160, 21 Aug or 2 Nov 1172."9,10,3,11,8,12
Henry "The Young King" (?) Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine died on 11 June 1183 at Chateau Martel, Touraine, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France (now), at age 28.3,13,1,2,8
Henry "The Young King" (?) Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine was buried after 11 June 1183 at Rouen Cathedral, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France (now).3


     He was Comte d'Anjou et du Maine.13,2 He was Duc de Normandie.13,2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. page 195.8

; Per Genealogics: "Henry 'the Young King' was born on 28 February 1155 at Bermondsey, son of Henry II, king of England, and Eleanor de Poitou, duchess of Aguitaine. At a meeting near Gisors on 31 August 1158, we know this from the Le Bec continuation of Robert de Torigny's chronicle, the betrothal of Henry 'the Young King' with Marguerite de France, was agreed to by their fathers Henry II of England and Louis VII of France. The wedding was celebrated prematurely at Le Neubourg on 2 November 1160. Marguerite was then a two-year-old and the younger Henry was five. Henry II had obtained a dispensation from two cardinals as a condition of his acknowledging Pope Alexander III's contested election, this information and the date was given by Ralph of Diceto. Henry 'the Young King' died childless on 11 June 1183 at Martel."8

; "The Young King" per Bartlett [2000] p. 5.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de France ([1157]-Acre shortly after 10 Sep 1197). Robert of Torigny records arrangements for the betrothal in 1158 of "filium suum [Henrici regis] Henricum" and "filiam regis Francorum Margaritam"[456]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1158 that “...archdiaconus Cantuarensis...Thomas regis Cancellarius” arranged the betrothal of “Henricus primogenitus regis Anglorum” and “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, in a later passage recording the marriage of “filium regis Anglorum septennum” and “filiam regis Francorum triennem”[457]. Robert of Torigny records the betrothal "apud Novum Burgum" in 1160 of "Henrico filio Henrici regis Anglorum" and "Margarita filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[458]. Ctss de Vexin, with the Château de Gisors, as her dowry. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “Henricus rex Angliæ” arranged the betrothal of “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, who was living in his household, to “Henrico filio suo” with “castellum de Gisors” as dowry, it being agreed that she would be cared for by the Knights Templar until the marriage took place[459]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "reginam Margaretam Anglie et comitissam Aaliz" as childen of King Louis VII & his second wife[460]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1172 that “Rotro Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” consecrated “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum” as “reginam Angliæ”[461]. Matthew Paris records her coronation as queen 27 Aug 1172 at Winchester Abbey[462]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Ingeburgis (matris Waldemari regis) soror, filia Izizlaui regis alia” married “regi Hungarie”, by whom she had “Bela modernum regem Hungarie” who married “sororem regis Francie”[463]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1186 that “Margarita soror regis Francorum” married “Bela regi Hungariæ”[464]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta soror regis Philippi" as widow of "iunior Henricus rex Anglorum" and records her second marriage to "Hungarorum regi Bela"[465]. Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95, reciting the consanguinity between Philippe II King of France and his second wife Ingebjörg of Denmark on which their divorce was based, which records that “Belæ Regis Hungariæ” married “sororem Philippi Regis Francorum”[466]. Her father-in-law arranged her second marriage so he could retain her dowry. She left for Palestine after being widowed for the second time. The Chronicle of Ernoul records the arrival of "une reine en Hongrie…veve sans hoir" at Tyre [in 1197] and her death eight days later, specifying that she was the sister of the mother of Henri Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem and had been "feme…le jouene roi d'Englietere…et suer…le roi Phelippe de France"[467].
     "m firstly (contract Neubourg, Eure 1160, 21 Aug or 2 Nov 1172) HENRY of England, son of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore d’Aquitaine (Bermondsey Palace 28 Feb 1155-Château de Martel, Turenne 11 Jun 1183, bur Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou, later transferred to Rouen Cathedral). He was crowned King of England in his father’s lifetime 14 Jun 1170 at Westminster Abbey, being styled Duke of Normandy, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine. After this he was known as “the Young King”. He was crowned again 27 Aug 1172 at Winchester Cathedral.
     "m secondly ([1185/86]) as his second wife, BÉLA III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehervar, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest)."
Med Lands cites:
[456] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1158, p. 311.
[457] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[458] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329.
[459] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532.
[460] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1164, MGH SS XXIII, p. 848.
[461] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 514.
[462] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1172, p. 286.
[463] Gertz, M. C. (1917-18) Scriptores Minores Historicæ Danicæ medii ævi (Copenhagen), Vol. I, Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[464] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 518.
[465] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858.
[466] Liljegren, J. G. (ed.) (1829) Diplomatarium Suecanum, Svensk Diplomatarium, Tome I 817-1285 (Stockhom) ("Diplomatarium Suecanum") 101, p. 125.
[467] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris) (“Ernoul”) 26, p. 302.12
He was Crowned King of England: [Ashley, p. 524] HENRY, THE YOUNG KING. The son of HENRY II, who was crowned as king of England in June 1170 to designate him as heir to the throne in the style of the French monarchs. Henry had been born on 28 February 1155 at Bermondsey Palace in Surrey, so he was only fifteen at the time of his coronation. He had already been married for nearly ten years to Margaret, the daughter of Louis VII of France. Louis had agreed the terms of the betrothal as far back as 1158 but had not expected such an early marriage. Henry II, however, used his influence with the new pope, Alexander III, to conduct the marriage and this brought with it certain castles in France as part of Margaret's dowry. Louis constantly objected to Henry's schemes and one-upmanship; Louis had no such skills. However he objected to the coronation of 1170 firstly on the grounds that his daughter had not been crowned queen at the same time but also that it was unlawful. The coronation should have been conducted by Thomas Becket, the authorised representative of the pope. Becket was still in exile in France at that time so the archbishop of York conducted the ceremony. Because of these antagonisms, Henry organized a second coronation at Winchester in August 1172 with the new archbishop of Canterbury and at which Margaret was crowned. The "Young King", as he was always known, had long been status conscious. There is the tale that at the banquet the father waited upon his own son, remarking that "No other king in Christendom has such a butler", to which the son retorted, "It is only fitting that the son of a count should wait on the son of a king." The young Henry was an ungrateful child and, encouraged by his mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine, he rose up in revolt against his father when the old king attempted to transfer three of Henry's key castles to John. The "Young King" sought his mother's help with the result that Eleanor was imprisoned. This led to the other sons coming into the fray, and the next decade saw an embittered rivalry between Henry and his sons. The "Young King" did not survive to inherit the throne, as he died of a fever at Martel Castle in Turenne on 11 June 1183, aged twenty-eight. His only child, William, who had been born in 1177, had lived only three days. His widow, Margaret, married Bela III, king of Hungary, in 1185. She died in 1197 at Acre in the Holy Land. The throne passed to RICHARD (I). on 14 June 1170.15,13,7,3

Family

Marguerite (?) de France, Cts de Vexin b. 1158, d. a 10 Sep 1197
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.4. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 277-278. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 524. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry 'the Young King': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014175&tree=LEO
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014172&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Margueritedied1197. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  13. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 278.
  14. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  15. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.

Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #5285, b. June 1156, d. 28 June 1189
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England8,3,5,9,6,7 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou8,3,5,6,7 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony was born in June 1156 at London, City of London, Greater London, England.1,10,3,5,6,7 She and Heinrich XII 'der Löwe' (?) Duke of Bavaria & Saxony were engaged in 1165.11,7 Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony married Heinrich XII 'der Löwe' (?) Duke of Bavaria & Saxony, son of Heinrich X "der Stolze/the Proud" (?) Duke of Bavaria & Saxony and Gertrude von Süpplinburg, on 1 February 1168 at St. Peter, Domkirche, Minden, Germany.3,8,12,13,5,14,11,6,7
Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony died on 28 June 1189 at Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; Welf 2 page sayd s. 6.8.1195.1,10,3,15,5,6,7
Matilda (Maud) (?) of England, Duchess of Saxony was buried after 28 June 1189 at Dom Saint Blasius, Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     6 Jan 1156, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England
     DEATH     28 Jun 1189 (aged 33), Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     Princess of England. She married the 27 years older Henry the Lion, Duke of Brunswick on Feb 1st, 1168. Her marriage founded the long alliance between the Angevin Kings and the Guelphs. In 1182 Henry was exiled by the Emperor and went with his wife to her fathers court. She first stayed in Caen and later in Argentan in the Normandy where she met Bertrand de Born a troubadour who dedicated one of his songs to her. In the spring of 1184 she went with her father to England where Henry II released his wife Eleanor after 11 years imprisonment. Mother and daughter met in Winchester for the first time in 16 years. Shortly thereafter she gave birth to her son Wilhelm. He became the progenitor of all Dukes of Brunswick and therefore of King George I of England. In the following year the couple returned to Germany. Their oldest son Heinrich was the only one of their children that accompanied them. The others stayed in England, among them was Otto, who later became Holy Roman Emperor. Henry the Lion was exiled again in 1189 and returned to England, but Mathilde remained in Brunswick. She died there just 8 days before her fathers death. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry II 1133–1189
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1122–1204
     Spouse
          Henry of Saxony 1129–1195
     Siblings
          Geoffrey FitzRoy Plantagenet 1152–1212
          William De Poitiers 1153–1156
          Henry Plantagenet 1155–1183
          Richard I 1157–1199
          Geoffrey II Plantagenet 1158–1186
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
          Joan Plantagenet 1164–1199
          John I 1166–1216
     Half Siblings
          Marie de Champagne 1145–1198
          Alix Capet 1150 – unknown
          William Longespée 1176–1226
     Children
          Henry V of Brunswick 1173–1227
          Wilhelm von Lüneburg 1184–1213
     BURIAL     Dom Saint Blasius, Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Mar 2004
     Find a Grave Memorial 8497790.10,1,7,16
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . 195.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6
EDV24.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Matilda was born in London in 1156, the eldest daughter of Henry II, king of England, and Eleanor de Poitou, duchesse d'Aquitaine. Matilda seems to have spent much of her early life in the company of her mother.
     “In 1165 Rainald of Dassel, archbishop of Cologne, arrived at the court of Henry II at Rouen to negotiate a German match for Matilda. There was conflict during the negotiations, however, when Robert de Beaumont, 2nd earl of Leicester, refused to greet the archbishop, alleging him to be a schismatic and a supporter of the anti-pope Victor IV. The original plan to match a daughter of Henry II with a son of Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa was abandoned, and instead Matilda left England in September 1167 to marry Heinrich 'the Lion', Herzog von Sachsen und Bayern. On 1 February 1168 at Minden Cathedral, she became the second wife of Heinrich, who was the son of Heinrich 'the Proud', Herzog von Bayern und Sachsen, and Gertrud von Supplinburg, only child of Emperor Lothar von Supplinburg and Richenza von Northeim. Their sons Heinrich and Wilhelm would have progeny.
     “At the time of their marriage, Heinrich 'the Lion' was one of the most powerful allies of Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa. Matilda governed her husband's vast estates during his absence in the Holy Land from 1172 to 1173. In 1174 Heinrich became involved in a conflict with the emperor over his refusal to aid Friedrich in a renewed invasion of Lombardy, and in 1182 Heinrich and Matilda were forced to flee Germany and take refuge in Normandy at her father's court. During this time at the royal court at Argentan, Matilda became acquainted with the troubadour Bertran de Born. Calling her 'Elena' or 'Lana', he made her the object of his desire in two of his poems of courtly love.
     “Matilda, her husband, and their family remained in Normandy under the protection and support of King Henry until 1185, when they were allowed to return to Saxony. Early in 1189 the emperor again ordered Heinrich to go into exile. This time Matilda remained at Brunswick to defend the interests of her husband, but she died three months later, on 28 June 1189.”.6

; This is the same person as ”Matilda of England, Duchess of Saxony” at Wikipedia.17

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “A6. Matilda, *London VI.1156, +28.6.1189; m.Minden 1.2.1168 Duke Heinrich V of Saxony & Bavaria (+6.8.1195)”.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA (Windsor Castle Jun 1156-Brunswick 28 Jun 1189, bur Brunswick Cathedral). Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1156 that “Alienor regina” gave birth to “filiam...Matildem”[425]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the 1165 treaty of alliance between Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany and her father[426]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1167 that “Matildis filia regis” married “Henrico duci Saxonico”[427]. The Chronicle of Gervase records the marriage in 1168 of "Matildis filia regis Anglie" and "dux Saxonum Henrico"[428]. The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis names "Megthildem filiam Henrici regis Anglorum" as second wife of "Heinricus dux"[429]. The Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses record that "ecclesia Sancti Blasii episcopi" was founded in 1173 and in a later passage record the death in 1188 of "domina nostra Mechtildis fundatrix"[430]. The Chronicon Montis Serreni records that "soror Rikardi Regis Anglie" wife of "Heinricus dux de Bruneswich" was buried "in mon. sancti Blasii"[431].
     "m (betrothed 1165, Minden Cathedral 1 Feb 1168) as his second wife, HEINRICH “der Löwe” Duke of Saxony [HEINRICH XII Duke of Bavaria], son of HEINRICH X "der Stolze" Duke of Bavaria and Duke of Saxony & his wife Gertrud von Süpplingenburg ([1128/30]-Braunschweig 6 Aug 1195, bur Braunschweig Cathedral). Heinrich was dispossessed of his German lands in summer 1180. He submitted at the general assembly at Erfurt in Nov 1181, was restored to his allodial lands around Brunswick and Lüneburg, but exiled for three years. He sought refuge with his father-in-law in England, before returning to Germany in 1185[432]. When Emperor Friedrich I was preparing to leave on crusade in late 1189, Heinrich refused to accompany him and chose to go into exile in England once again[433]."
Med Lands cites:
[425] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[426] Fuhrmann trans. Reuter (1995), p. 159. Her betrothal is recorded by Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1165, p. 233.
[427] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 512.
[428] Gervase, p. 205.
[429] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 396.
[430] Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses 1173 and 1188, MGH SS XXIV, p. 824.
[431] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1195, MGH SS XXIII, p. 166.
[432] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 168-9.
[433] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 10.
[434] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1199, p. 432.
[435] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.7

; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 2): “D1. Heinrich "der Löwe" ("the Lion"), Herzog von Sachsen (1142-13.4.1180), Herzog von Bayern (1147-24.6.1180) as Heinrich XII, *1129, +Braunschweig 6.8.1195; about 1180 he fell from power and lost his duchies, but the family kept their new family lands in Braunschweig; 1m: 1147/48 (div 1162) Klementia von Zähringen (+before 1167); 2m: Minden 1.2.1168 Matilda of England (*1156 +Braunschweig 6.8.1195)”.19
; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH ([1129/30]-Braunschweig 6 Aug 1195, bur Braunschweig Cathedral). His date of birth is calculated from his dying in his 66th year, according to the chronicle of the Steterburg foundation near Wolfenbüttel[425], Jordan pointing out that the chronicle's author provost Gerhard was close to Heinrich during the last years of his life. After his father's death the dispute with Konrad III King of Germany over the Welf duchies of Bavaria and Saxony continued. A temporary settlement was achieved in 1142 when Albrecht "der Bär" relinquished Saxony, which was awarded to Heinrich, who was installed as HEINRICH "der Löwe" Duke of Saxony on condition that he formally renounce his claim to the duchy of Bavaria. He renewed his claim to Bavaria after the death of his mother, whose second marriage had been arranged as part of the settlement of the issue in 1142. "Henricus dux Saxonie" confirmed the privileges of Kloster Bursfeld, founded by "comes Henricus filius Ottonis ducis, proavus meus", by charter dated 23 Jul 1144[426]. After a lengthy dispute with Albrecht "der Bär" Markgraf von Brandenburg over the inheritance of the counts of Plötzkau and Hermann von Winzenburg, Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany assigned the Plötzkauer inheritance to Markgraf Albrecht and the Winzenburger inheritance to Duke Heinrich at the diet of Würzburg in Oct 1153[427]. In order to terminate the longstanding dispute between the German kings and the Welf family, Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany deprived Heinrich "Jasomirgott" Markgraf of Austria of the duchy of Bavaria in favour of Duke Heinrich in 1156[428]. The latter was installed as HEINRICH XII Duke of Bavaria, although he spent much less time in Bavaria than in Saxony[429], presumably because of Bavaria's greater internal administrative unity which demanded less oversight than Saxony. In 1158, he exchanged some territories with Emperor Friedrich I, receiving land in the southern Harz for the domains which he had received as dowry on his first marriage[430]. From 1166 to 1170, the rebellion of the league of princes severely disrupted the administration of Saxony. Heinrich Duke of Bavaria and Saxony donated property to the church "sancte Marie…in Ourenkierken", with the consent of "heredis nostri…filie nostre Gerthrudis", by charter dated 3 Aug 1171[431]. Duke Heinrich made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1172 but refused the invitation of Amaury I King of Jerusalem to fight[432]. He lost the duchies of Saxony and Bavaria in 1180, but retained his mother's inheritance of Brunswick where he established his court. He was tried in absentia at Worms in Jan 1179 for having expelled Ulrich Bishop of Halberstadt, and outlawed. Heinrich was dispossessed of his properties in summer 1180. He submitted at the general assembly at Erfurt in Nov 1181, was restored to his allodial lands around Brunswick and Lüneburg, but was exiled for three years. He left with his wife in Jul 1182 and sought refuge with his father-in-law first in Normandy, later in England, before returning to Germany in 1185[433]. "Heinricus dux de Brunswic…" witnessed the charter dated 1186 under which Konrad [I] Archbishop of Mainz confirmed property of Tettenborn church[434]. When Emperor Friedrich I was preparing to leave on crusade in late 1189, Heinrich refused to accompany him and chose exile in England once more[435]. He returned to Germany in Oct 1189 after the death of his wife. He destroyed Bardowick, captured Lübeck and Lauenburg, and attracted Hamburg to his support. Heinrich VI King of Germany appealed for help against Duke Heinrich at a diet at Merseburg in Oct 1189, unsuccessfully besieged Brunswick, but sacked Hannover. King Heinrich made a peace settlement with Duke Heinrich at Fulda in Jul 1190[436]. Heinrich failed to observe the terms of the peace agreement. Although the Saxon princes assembled troops led by Wichmann Archbishop of Magdeburg, a truce was agreed[437]. Duke Heinrich and Emperor Heinrich V were finally reconciled in Mar 1194 at Tilleda on the Kyffhäuser mountain, when the former was reconfirmed in his allodial possessions and agreed to take part in the imperial campaign in Italy later that year[438]. The Chronicon Montis Serreni records the death in 1195 of "Heinricus dux de Bruneswich" and his burial "in mon. sancti Blasii iuxta uxorem"[439]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "6 Aug" of "Heinricus dux"[440].
     "m firstly ([1148/49], divorced Konstanz 23 Nov 1162) as her first husband, KLEMENTIA von Zähringen, daughter of KONRAD Herzog von Zähringen & his wife Clémence de Namur (-[1173/75]). The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis names "filiam ducis Zaringie, Clementiam" as wife of "Heinricus dux"[441]. Heiress of Badenweiler, although her first husband sold these Swabian estates to Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany in 1158, receiving in exchange Herzberg, Scharzfels and Pöhlde south of the Harz[442]. Her first marriage was arranged to confirm her father's alliance with the Welf party in southern Germany[443]. The Annales Palidenses record the repudiation by "Heinricus dux" of his first wife "Bertoldi ducis Zaringe sorore"[444]. Her first husband repudiated Klementia because of the growing difficulties between her brother Duke Berthold IV and Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa", with whom Duke Heinrich was by then in close alliance[445]. She married secondly (1164) as his third wife, Humbert III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie. Her second marriage is confirmed by Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum which record in 1173 the betrothal of “Henricus rex Angliæ, Johanni filio suo cognomento sine terra” and [her daughter] “septenni filiam primogenitam Humberti comitis de Moriana...ex relicta Henrici Saxonis ducis”[446].
     "m secondly (betrothed 1165, Minden Cathedral 1 Feb 1168) MATILDA of England, daughter of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore Dss d’Aquitaine (Windsor Castle Jun 1156-Brunswick 28 Jun 1189, bur Brunswick Cathedral). The Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis names "Megthildem filiam Henrici regis Anglorum" as second wife of "Heinricus dux"[447]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1156 that “Alienor regina” gave birth to “filiam...Matildem”[448]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1167 that “Matildis filia regis” married “Henrico duci Saxonico”[449]. The Chronicle of Gervase records the marriage in 1168 of "Matildis filia regis Anglie" and "dux Saxonum Henrico"[450]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the 1165 treaty of alliance between Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany and her father[451]. The Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses record that "ecclesia Sancti Blasii episcopi" was founded in 1173 and in a later passage record the death in 1188 of "domina nostra Mechtildis fundatrix"[452]. The Chronicon Montis Serreni records that "soror Rikardi Regis Anglie" wife of "Heinricus dux de Bruneswich" was buried "in mon. sancti Blasii"[453].
     "Mistress (1): [--- von Blieskastel, daughter of GOTTFRIED Graf von Blieskastel & his wife ---] ([1130]-[1190]). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mathildem [de Luscelenburch]" as mother of "comitem Folmerum et sorores eius Helvidem, quam habuit comes Gerardus de Reneke dyocesis Herbipolensis et illam qua dux de Bronsviic genuit filiam, que in Sclavia hereditavit"[454], although the Chronicle appears to skip a generation in this account. The likely birth date of this individual suggests it is unlikely that she was the daughter of Graf Gottfried [I], given the other dates attributed to his children. Until corroboration of her parentage is found in other sources, the accuracy of Alberic must be considered doubtful. Jordan clarifies that the name "Ida" attributed to Duke Heinrich's mistress[455] is incorrect, being an error deriving from Origines Guelficæ[456] which, in recopying from the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, miscopied the word "illam" as "Idam"[457]."
Med Lands cites:
[425] Jordan (1986), p. 22.
[426] Stumpf, K. F. (ed.) (1863) Urkunden zur Geschichte des Erzbisthums Mainz im zwölften Jahrhundert (Acta Maguntina Seculi XII) (Innsbruck) (“Mainz Urkunden 12th Century”), 28, p. 31.
[427] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 140, and Jordan (1986), p. 44.
[428] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 140.
[429] Jordan (1986), pp. 131-2.
[430] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 163.
[431] Erhard, H. A. (ed.) (1851) Regesta historiæ Westfaliæ (Münster) ("Westfaliæ Regesta") Band II, CCCXLVIII, p. 111.
[432] Runciman (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 2, p. 393.
[433] Jordan (1986), p. 183, and Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 168-9.
[434] Mainz Urkunden 12th Century, 99, p. 102.
[435] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 10.
[436] Jordan (1986), pp. 189-92, and Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 176 and 180-1.
[437] Jordan (1986), pp. 193-5.
[438] Jordan (1986), p. 197.
[439] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1195, MGH SS XXIII, p. 166.
[440] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg.
[441] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 396.
[442] Jordan (1986), pp. 65 and 95.
[443] Haverkamp (1988), p. 146.
[444] Annales Palidenses 18 1160, MGH SS XVI, p. 94.
[445] Haverkamp (1988), p. 223.
[446] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 561.
[447] Chronicon Sancti Michaelis Luneburgensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 396.
[448] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[449] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 512.
[450] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1879) The Historical Works of Gervase of Canterbury, Vol. I (London) (“Gervase”), p. 205.
[451] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159.
[452] Annales Sancti Blasii Brunsvicenses 1173 and 1188, MGH SS XXIV, p. 824.
[453] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1195, MGH SS XXIII, p. 166.
[454] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851.
[455] For example in Brandenburg, E. (1935) Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, p. 44.
[456] Scheidt, C. L. (1752) Origines Guelficæ (Hannover), Vol. III, pp. 181.
[457] Jordan (1986), p. 256.11

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 521 (Chart 38). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  4. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.5. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005975&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Matildadied1189. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 278. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Heinrichdied1195
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html#HL
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich 'the Lion': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013450&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich 'the Lion': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013450&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 October 2020), memorial page for Mathilda Plantagenet (6 Jan 1156–28 Jun 1189), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8497790, citing Dom Saint Blasius, Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8497790/mathilda-plantagenet. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_England,_Duchess_of_Saxony. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html#MH2
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html#HL
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richenza/Matilde of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00023795&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020506&tree=LEO
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html#H1
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PALATINATE.htm#HeinrichIRheindied1227

Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England1,2

M, #5286, b. 8 September 1157, d. 6 April 1199
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England3,2,4 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou3,2 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Last Edited27 May 2020
     Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England was born on 8 September 1157 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.5,6,2,7,8 He and AlixAliceAlys (?) de France, Countess of Vexin, Comtesse d'Eu, Dame d'Arques were engaged in 1169; Med Lands says: "Betrothed by peace treaty 30 Sep 1174, betrothed 21 Sep 1177."7,9,10 Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England married Berenguela/Berengaria (?) of Navarre, daughter of Sancho VI Garcia "el Sabio" (?) King of Navarre and Doña Sancha (?) Infanta de Castile, Queen consort of Navarre, on 12 May 1191 at Limassol, Cyprus.5,11,3,7,8
Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England died on 6 April 1199 at Château de Chalus, Chalus, Departement de la Haute-Vienne, Limousin, France (now), at age 41; killed by a crossbow bolt fired by Peter Basil, a young knight.5,6,12,8,13
Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England was buried after 6 April 1199 at Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen (his heart), Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     8 Sep 1157, Oxford, City of Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
     DEATH     6 Apr 1199 (aged 41), Chalus, Departement de la Haute-Vienne, Limousin, France
     English Monarch, Duc d'Aquitaine. Born at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, the third son of Henry II 'Curtmantle', King of England and Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine. He spent his youth in France at his mother's court at Poitiers training as a soldier and gained the title of Duc d'Aquitaine in 1172. He fought with his brothers Henry and Geoffrey in their rebellion against their father in 1173; he fought for his father against his brothers when they supported an 1183 revolt in Aquitaine during which Prince Henry died; and he joined Philip II of France against his father in 1188, forced him to acknowledge Richard as his heir, and harried him to his death in 1189. Richard succeeded to the title of King Richard I of England on July 6, 1189 and was crowned in September 1189 at Westminster Abbey, London when he was styled Rex Anglaie, Dux Normanniae et Aquitainaie et Comes Andegavaie. He acted upon a promise to his father and joined the Third Crusade departing for the Holy Land in 1190 leaving his youngest brother, John, in charge of the realm. In 1191, he conquered Cyprus. He held his own against Saladin, nearly taking Jerusalem twice. Although he did not vanquish the Turks, a truce with Saladin granted easier access to the region for Christian pilgrims. He became known as Richard the Lionheart or Coeur de Lion for his prowess on the battlefield. He married Berengaria of Naverre when on a Crusade in 1191 but had no children. On his way home from the Holy Land in March of 1192, Richard was shipwrecked and captured. He was imprisoned by the Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI who demanded a 150,000-mark ransom which was raised through heavy taxing of the people of England. Richard was freed in February of 1194. Upon returning to England he had a second coronation to demonstrate his authority and quashed John's plots before leaving for France and igniting a war with Philip II in order to regain lost territory. Their fight continued sporadically until the French were finally defeated near Gisors in 1198. Richard was mortally wounded in a skirmish at the castle of Chalus in the Limousin in 1199. Upon his death his heart was interred at the cathedral in Rouen while his body was interred at Fontevraud Abbey. This king of England had spent less than seven months of a ten year reign in his kingdom. Bio by: Iola
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 11 Apr 1999
     Find A Grave Memorial 5110.13
Richard I "Coeur de Lion" (?) King of England was buried after 6 April 1199 at Fontevraud Abbey (his body), Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France,

; Upon his death his heart was interred at the cathedral in Rouen while his body was interred at Fontevraud Abbey.14,5,7,15
     He was Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou.7

; Per HBC:
     "England's King Richard I (1157-1199), called the Lionheart for his ferocity and courage, spent all but six months of his 10-year reign fighting outside his beloved homeland. One of history's great warrior kings, he won many victories--some against his own brothers--and led the Third Crusade. However, he met a surprisingly humble end on the battlefield.
     "When a cache of Roman gold was discovered in Aquitaine, the Lord of Châlus, a minor castle, refused to follow feudal law and give the treasure to Richard, his overlord. Richard believed it would take only a day or two to take the castle and brought his armies to lay siege.
     "With uncharacteristic carelessness, Richard rode around the castle walls without full armor, observing ragtag enemy troops along the battlements. One soldier, Bertran de Gourdon, carrying a frying pan for a shield, trained his crossbow on the king. Legend has it that upon seeing the bowman taking aim, Richard actually applauded the man's courage before raising his shield to deflect the bolt. He took the shaft in his shoulder, just below the neck.
     "The king bravely yanked the bolt out, but it broke off to leave a barb in his flesh that, though surgically removed, turned the cut into a mortal wound. While the king lay dying, Châlus Castle was stormed and captured. Its troops were all killed or hanged, except for Gourdon, whom Richard ordered brought before him.
     ""You slew my father and my two brothers," de Gourdon said. "Now devise what torments you may for me" A dying warrior who esteemed bravery above all else, Richard not only pardoned the man but also gave him 100 shillings. A few days later, cradled in his mother's arms, Richard the Lionheart died."16

; See Wikipedia article.17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. page 195.
2. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia, London, 1990 , Hallam, Elizabeth; General Editor. page 169 biography.
3. Kings and Queens of Britain, 1986 , Williamson, David. page 56.8


; Faris (1999) p. 278-279: [quote] RICHARD OF ENGLAND Coeur de Lion, third but eldest surviving son, born 8 Sep. 1157, Duc d'Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou; succeeded father as King of England (and the French lands) and was crowned 3 Sep. 1189; immediately set about organising an army to join the French and Germans on the. Third Crusade, whose aim was to recover Jerusalem, captured from the westerners by the Muslins in 1187, to the shame of western Christendom. Richard left England on 12 Dec. 1189: secured Acre and Jaffa and defeated the Muslims in the battle of Arsuf, but his forces were not sufficiently strong to gain Jerusalem. He had to be content with making a truce with the Islamic leader Saladin, who much admired him. On Richard's journey home he was imprisoned in Germany; he was released in 1194 on payment of a huge ransom; returned to England on 13 Mar. 1194. His brother John had stirred up tensions in England by challenging the rule of his deputy (justiciar) there. His overlord in France, Philippe Augustus, encouraged dissidents there. But after his return Richard turned his formidable military talent to wage war against the French king. In 1199, during a minor siege at Chalus in Aquitaine, Richard was fatally injured by a crossbow bolt; died 6 Apr. 1199 s.p., buried with his parents at Fontévrault Abbey; married at Lemesos, Cyprus, 1 May 1191 BERENGARIA DE NAVARRE, born about 1163, died at Espans Abbey, near Le Mans, about 1230, buried there, daughter of Sancho VI, Roi de Navarre, by Sanchia, daughter of Alfonso VII, Rey de Castilla. Powicke (1961), p. 33. Pager (1977), p. 15. [end quote]18,19,6 He was King of England, [Ashley, pp. 524-525] RICHARD (I) LIONHEART. King of England, 6 July 1189-6 April 1199. Crowned Westminster Abbey, 2 September 1189. Titles: king of England, duke of Normandy and duke of Aquitaine (from 1172). Born: Beaumont Palace, Oxford, 8 September 1157. Died: Chalus, Aquitaine, 6 April 1199, aged 41. Buried: Fontevrault Abbey, Anjou. Married: 12 May 1191, at Limassol, Cyprus, Berengaria (c1163-after 1230), dau. of Sancho VI, king of Navarre: no children. Richard had one, possibly two illegitimate children. Probably no other historical king of England has so much legend attached to him and so much reputation which is ill founded. We know Richard as the Lionhearted, or Coeur-du-Lion, the brave and intrepid champion of Christendom against the infidel, and he is one of our national heroes. And yet the truth is so very different.
Richard had little interest in England and certainly not in the administrative demands of government. In his youth he had not expected to become king, as his elder brother HENRY (THE YOUNG KING) was heir to the throne. In 1172 he was invested with the duchy of Aquitaine, the inheritance of his mother, Eleanor. Like all the sons of HENRY II, Richard seemed a less than grateful child. He was devoted to his mother and, when she was imprisoned, Richard joined in the rebellion of his brothers against their father seeking to gain more authority. Henry was still able to rebuff them at this time, but the relationship between father and sons soured over the years, with Richard's brother JOHN being the favourite. Richard had one passion in life. He loved to fight. The thrill of battle never left him. In his youth he had trained as a knight and was a champion of the tourney. His courage and strength soon became the wonder of Aquitaine where he spent several years in battle against the rebellious barons. His military skill was evident when he took the hitherto impregnable castle of Taillebourg in 1179. Richard was tall, with handsome features and tousled red hair. He seems to have attracted as much attention from men as from women and there is almost certainly some truth in the belief that Richard had homosexual inclinations.
After the death of his elder brother Henry in 1183 Richard became his father's heir. Henry hoped that Richard would pass Aquitaine on to John, but Richard had no such intention. Henry's efforts to gain land back from his sons for John only led to warfare between Richard and his father. In 1189 Richard joined forces with Philippe II of France and beat his father into submission. Henry died a few days later and Richard travelled promptly to England to be crowned, pausing briefly in Normandy to be acknowledged Duke.
Richard's coronation was marred by the persecution of the Jews that broke out in London and later in other cities, especially York. Two years earlier Saladin's forces had captured Jerusalem, and the cry went up across Europe to regain the heart of Christendom from the infidel. Henry II had originally been asked to lead the Crusade, and Richard had been anxious to take part, but with them both fighting each other nothing had happened. With Henry's death, Richard's one ambition now was to lead an army against the Saracens. His stay in Britain was brief, sufficient to raise finances and resources for the Crusade. This included the infamous Quit-claim of Canterbury whereby Richard sold all rights in Scotland back to WILLIAM THE LYON for ten thousand marks. He returned to France in December 1189 and would not set foot in England again for four years, and then only for two months. Although king of England for ten years he spent only six months in his kingdom. He left the administration of England in the hands of William Longchamp, a loyal and capable chancellor whose short temper and arrogance caused considerable friction with other barons and for a period forced him to retreat to Normandy.
Richard combined forces with Philippe II of France and set off for the Holy Land in July 1190. The vast army encountered transportation difficulties when their fleet was delayed and they decided to winter in Sicily. Richard's sister Joanna was the recently widowed queen of Sicily and Richard was less than satisfied with her treatment by the new king Tancred. A skirmish broke out between the crusaders and the inhabitants of Messina which resulted in Richard capturing the town. This enabled him to negotiate favourable terms with Tancred, which not only brought the release of Joanna, but much needed funds for the Crusade. It was not a happy winter in Sicily, however. Richard and Philippe quarreled over Richard's planned marriage with Philippe's sister Alys. They had been betrothed for over twenty years, but during that time Alys had almost certainly become the mistress of Richard's father Henry. She was not exactly a shining example of virtue and Richard, who had little interest in the fair sex, declined to marry her. In the midst of this quarrel, Eleanor of Aquitaine arrived in Sicily with a new bride for her son, Berengaria of Navarre. Incensed, Philippe sailed on ahead to the Holy Land. Richard followed in April 1191, but en route the ship carrying his young bride and his sister was nearly captured by Isaac Comnenus, a Byzantine rebel who had usurped power on Cyprus. In the resultant battle Richard conquered Cyprus, which he subsequently sold to Guy de Lusignan, the exiled king of Jerusalem. While in Cyprus, Richard married Berengaria. There were to be no children of this marriage. Although Richard may have been homosexual (and he certainly had a fascination for Berengaria's brother Sancho) he had at least one illegitimate child, Philip, who became lord of Cognac, probably the offspring of a lady at court in Aquitaine, a child of Richard's youth.
Richard reached the Holy Land in June 1191 and his forces helped conclude the siege of Acre, which had been deadlocked since August 1189, and where the besiegers were themselves besieged by Saladin's army. Richard however fell out with Duke Leopold of Austria, whom he insulted. Both Leopold and King Philippe of France soon returned home. Richard killed the prisoners taken at Acre and marched down the coast to Jaffa, winning a victory at Arsuf en route. However his forces were unable to penetrate inland to Jerusalem and, in September 1192, Richard was forced to conclude a three-year treaty with Saladin. Although Richard's Crusade failed in its prime objective, his exploits were amplified in their telling so that his English and French subjects elevated him to the status of a super-hero. In fact he was an extremely arrogant, petulant king, with a vicious temper and a total lack of moral scruples.
Richard returned to Europe in October 1192 but his ship was wrecked in the Adriatic and he was forced to travel across land. When he entered the territories of his enemy Leopold of Austria he apparently disguised himself as a woodsman, but he betrayed himself because of his fine gloves and was handed over to the Emperor Heinrich VI, who demanded a ransom of 150,000 marks. Richard was held captive for fifteen months while negotiations ensued and the ransom was raised. The negotiations were conducted by Richard's new justiciar, Hubert Walter, who had accompanied him to Palestine and who had arrived safely home. Hubert not only succeeded in raising the ransom but also quashed the attempted revolt by John to gain the throne. John's ineptitude nevertheless lost him lands in northern France. It is to this period that the romantic legend belongs of Richard's minstrel Blondel travelling from one castle to another in Austria and singing Richard's favourite song until he heard Richard sing back in response from the castle of Dürrenstein. Like most legends it probably has a core of truth.
Richard was eventually released and returned to England in March 1194. Despite John's treachery, Richard forgave him, merely admonishing him for acting like a child. He devoted the remaining years of his life to regaining his lost territories in France. He left for France in May 1194 and never returned to England. He seemed little concerned about the problems that his absence had caused elsewhere in Britain, particularly in Wales where warfare had broken out between the various rulers, and also in the Irish Sea where RAGNALD of Man ruled as a pirate. Henry II had held these upstarts in check, but Richard showed no such interest.
Although Richard made peace with Philippe II on more than one occasion, war always broke out again. Nevertheless Richard reconquered all of his former territories and, in building new fortifications, left them stronger than before. He received an arrow wound during a skirmish at the castle of Chalus in the Limousin, and he died from the infection a few days later in April 1199. Richard spent his entire life as a warrior. He was an excellent soldier, fearless, brave and a great tactician, but he was useless at anything else. He left no heir, and had also spent a considerable fortune on his exploits. The English, in their usual way of preferring the legend to the facts, have long cherished the memory of a man who, in fact, had no interest in England other than as a source of revenue, and who was a ruthless fighting machine who made enemies of most of the royalty of Europe.
Berengaria survived Richard by over thirty years. She settled in Le Mans where she helped finance the construction of the Abbey of L'Epau where she was later buried. It is often stated that Berengaria was the only queen of England never to set foot in the country. She never did so during Richard's reign, but she made occasional visits after his death until she settled down as a nun at L'Epau. between 6 July 1189 and 6 April 1199.20,1 He Crowned.6 He was 3rd Crusade between 11 December 1189 and 13 March 1194.7

; Saladin: The Courtly Barbarian - Christian Europe was horrified when, in 1187, Sultan Saladin conquered the city of Jerusalem in an openly avowed holy war against non-believers, and made it a Muslim stronghold off-limits to Christians. Reviled as an infidel and considered a barbarian for beheading European knights, Saladin was in fact a scholar, a patron of the arts, and, above all, a gentleman.

When King Richard the Lionheart led the Third Crusade to liberate Jerusalem, he learned the truth about Saladin firsthand. Richard knew from varied accounts that his archenemy was a brilliant warrior, but he was surprised to see that Saladin was also quite chivalrous.

When King Richard fell ill during the siege of Acre, Saladin sent him fresh fruit and ordered ice brought from nearby mountains to cool his fever. Having finally starved the city of Acre into submission in 1191, Richard and his troops pressed on toward Jaffa where he and Saladin finally met on the battlefield. When Richard's horse was killed beneath him, Saladin quickly dispatched a groom with two fresh mounts for him.

The vigilance of Saladin and his troops rendered Jerusalem impregnable to attack. In 1192, Saladin and Richard, by now mutual admirers despite considerable bloodshed on both sides, signed a three-year truce allowing Muslims to retain control of Jerusalem, but giving Christians permission to visit the city's Holy Sepulcher if they came unarmed. Saladin's gesture of religious tolerance appears even nobler when contrasted with the earlier Christian conquest of Jerusalem, in which Muslims were killed in great numbers. In 1192, Richard's defeated troops were treated with uncommon respect and dignity.

Following the end of his military career, Saladin went on to become a builder of mosques and a celebrated theologian, further defying his one-dimensional image in Europe.21

Family 3

Berenguela/Berengaria (?) of Navarre b. c 1163, d. 23 Dec 1230

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 524-525. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 278. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.5. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005973&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014171&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Alixdiedafter1200MGuillaumeIIIPonthieu. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 56.
  12. [S1423] Jr. James Reston, Warriors of God: Richard the Lionheart and Saladin in the Third Crusade (New York: Anchor Books, Random House, 2001), pp. 381-382. Hereinafter cited as Reston [2001] "Warriors of God."
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 November 2019), memorial page for Richard I (8 Sep 1157–6 Apr 1199), Find A Grave Memorial no. 5110, citing Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave , at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5110/richard_i. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 279.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 December 2019), memorial page for Richard I (8 Sep 1157–6 Apr 1199), Find A Grave Memorial no. 1952, citing Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1952/richard_i
  16. [S1408] History Book Club FYI, "History Book Club FYI Ancient & Medieval History Newsletter: "King Richard I: The Lion's Heart Is Stilled"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to Greg Vaut, 25 Oct 2002. Hereinafter cited as "History Book Club FYI 25 Oct 2002."
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_I_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S585] Unknown author, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #2765 (n.p.: published by: Family Tree Maker, Broderbund Software, Inc., Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  19. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  20. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  21. [S1411] History Book Club FYI, "History Book Club FYI Ancient & Medieval History Newsletter: "Saladin: The Courtly Barbarian"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to Greg Vaut, 15 Nov 2002. Hereinafter cited as "History Book Club FYI 15 Nov 2002."
  22. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  23. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.6.

Geoffrey III (?) Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #5287, b. 23 September 1158, d. 19 August 1186
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England7,3,5,6,8 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou7,3,5,6 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Last Edited8 Dec 2019
     Geoffrey III (?) Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany was born on 23 September 1158 at England.9,3,5,10 He married Constance de Penthievre Duchess of Brittany, daughter of Conan IV "le Petit, le Fort" (?) Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond and Margaret de Huntingdon Duchess of Brittany, in July 1181; her 1st husband.4,7,11,12,5,6
Geoffrey III (?) Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany died on 19 August 1186 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, at age 27.1,13,5,10
Geoffrey III (?) Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany was buried after 19 August 1186 at Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.9,5,1


     He was Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond (jure uxoris.)9

; Per Genealogics:
     "Geoffrey was born on 23 September 1158, the fourth son of Henry II, king of England, and Eleanor de Poitou, duchess of Aquitaine.
     "As parts of his father's plans to secure and extend his family lands in France, as a child he was betrothed (1166/7) to Constance, the heiress of Brittany. At the family settlement at Montmirail in 1169, Geoffrey did homage for Brittany to his eldest brother, the Young Henry, who, in turn, did homage for Brittany to Louis VII of France. With his elder brothers, he allied with the French king against his father in 1173-4. In 1175 he began his rule in Brittany, doing homage for the county to the new French king, Philippe II August, in 1179.
     "In July 1181 Geoffrey finally married Constance, daughter of Conon IV le Petit, duke of Brittany, and Margaret of Scotland. They became the parents of three children, none of which would have progeny.
     "In 1183 Geoffrey goaded the Young Henry into revolt against the Old King and Richard of Poitou, the future Richard I; a year later he allied with his younger brother John against Richard, disappointed perhaps at not being given Anjou on the Young Henry's death in 1183; it had gone to Richard.
     "Geoffrey had developed a passion for tournament and intrigue which finally killed him. It was at a tournament in Paris, whither he had gone to plot with Philippe II August, that he was mortally wounded and died on 19 August 1186. His son Arthur was born posthumously."10

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. page 195..10

; Faris (1999) p. 279: [quote] GEOFFREY OF ENGLAND, fourth son, born 23 Sep. 1158, Duc de Bretagne and Earl of Richmond jure uxoris; killed in a tournament at Paris on 19 Aug. 1186, buried in the quire of Notre Dame Cathedral there; married July 1181 CONSTANCE DE BRETAGNE, daughter and heiress of Conan IV le Petit, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, by Margaret, daughter of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumberland. [end quote]14

Family

Constance de Penthievre Duchess of Brittany b. c 1162, d. 5 Sep 1201
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 521 (Chart 38). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  4. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.6. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 279. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005254&tree=LEO
  11. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  13. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  14. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bretagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005257&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde de Bretagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005255&tree=LEO
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 139-24, p. 122. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005256&tree=LEO

Phillip (?) Prince of England1

M, #5288, b. circa 1160, d. circa 1162
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Phillip (?) Prince of England was born circa 1160 at England.2
Phillip (?) Prince of England died circa 1162.2
     ; According to The Henry Project: " son, died young. Lewis (2002) would place an additional son either here or between Geoffrey and Eleanor, based on a statement of Ralph of Diceto that there were six sons, two of whom died young [R. Dic. ii, 17, 269]. Although Ralph is generally a trustworthy authority, this son is not confirmed by any other source."1

Citations

  1. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Henry II of England: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/henry002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  2. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).

Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Duchess of Narbonne1,2,3

F, #5289, b. October 1165, d. 4 September 1199
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England2,4,3,5 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou2,4,3 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Last Edited8 Dec 2019
     Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Duchess of Narbonne was born in October 1165 at Château d’Angers, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France; Per Med Lands: "JOAN (Château d’Angers, Anjou Oct 1165-Fontevrault Abbey in childbirth 4 Sep 1199, bur Fontevrault Abbey). Robert of Torigny records the birth "1165…mense Octobris" of "filiam [reginæ Alienoræ]…Johanna"[518]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1165 that “Alienor regina” gave birth to “filiam...Johannam”[519]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1177 that “Johanna filia regis Angliæ” married “Willelmo regi Siciliæ”[520]. Matthew Paris records her first marriage in 1176, and refers to her second marriage in a later passage[521]. Her first marriage is also recorded by William of Tyre (Continuator)[522]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage in [1177] of "Johanna filia regis Angliæ" and "Willelmo regi Siciliæ"[523]. The marriage contract between “Willielmus...Rex Siciliæ...” and “Johannam puellam regii...filiam Henrici...Regis Anglorum” is dated Feb 1177[524]. She was crowned Queen of Sicily 13 Feb 1177 at Palermo Cathedral. After the death of her first husband, she was kept in confinement by his successor King Tancred. After her brother Richard I King of England (who was travelling through Italy on his way to join the Third Crusade in Palestine) demanded her release, she was sent to join him at Messina. The English king captured Messina to force Tancred to negotiate terms over the inheritance of King Guillaume[525]. Berenguela of Navarre, future bride of her brother King Richard, stayed with Joanna after landing in Naples in early 1191. They sailed together for Palestine with King Richard's fleet, landing at Limassol, Cyprus in Apr 1191[526]. Bar Hebræus records that the peace negotiations with between the Franks and the Muslims in Palestine in A.H. 587 (Oct 1191) included a proposal for "son frère el-Malec el-Adel" (referring to Salah-ad-Din) to marry "la sœur du roi d'Angleterre" (which must refer to Joanna as the only living sister of King Richard I who was not married at the time), but that the proposal was rejected because the priests imposed the requirement of his conversion to Christianity[527]. Joanna sailed from Acre for France 29 Sep 1191 with her sister-in-law Queen Berengaria[528]. Her second marriage was arranged by her brother Richard I King of England as part of the peace terms negotiated with Raymond VI Comte de Toulouse in 1196[529]. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the betrothal in 1196 of "soror regis Ricardi Johanna quæ et regina exstiterat Siciliæ" and "comiti Sancti Ægidii"[530]. The Annals of Margan record the betrothal “apud Rothomagum” in 1196 of “Johanna relicta Willelmi regis Apulia” and “comiti Sancti Egidii”[531]. The Thalamus de Montpellier records the marriage in 1196 "el mes duchoire" of "R. coms de Tolosa" and "la regina Johanna"[532]. She took the veil on her deathbed. The necrology of the Prieuré de Collinances records the death "4 Sep" of "Johanna regina Sicilie"[533]. The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that Joan died in 1199 after her brother King Richard and was buried "dans l´église de Fontevrault"[534]. Roger of Hoveden records the death "in Normannia apud Rothomagum" in Sep 1199 of "Johanna uxor Raimundi comitis de Sancto Egidio, quondam regina Siciliæ, soror…Johannis regis Angliæ" and her burial "ad abbatiam Frontis Ebraudi"[535]. The Clypeus Nascentis Fontebraldensis Ordinis records that a living child was removed from Joan´s body after she died and lived long enough to be baptised, but died and was buried at the church of Notre-Dame de Rouen[536]. m firstly (Palermo Cathedral 13 Feb 1177) GUILLAUME II King of Sicily, son of GUILLAUME I King of Sicily & his wife Infanta doña Margarita de Navarra (1155-17 Nov 1189). m secondly (Rouen Oct 1196) as his third wife, RAYMOND VI Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND V Comte de Toulouse & his wife Constance de France (27 Oct 1156-Toulouse 2 Aug 1222)."
Med Lands cites:
[518] Robert de Torigny I, 1165, p. 357.
[519] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 512.
[520] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 515.
[521] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1176, p. 298, "Quinto idus novembris apud Sanctum Egidium", and Vol. III, 1236, p. 326.
[522] William of Tyre Continuator XXIV.V, p. 112.
[523] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 154.
[524] Fœdera (1816), Vol. I, Part I, p. 35.
[525] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 38-40.
[526] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 42-4.
[527] Bar Hebræus, RHC Historiens orientaux I, p. 64.
[528] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 74.
[529] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 167.
[530] Radulphi de Coggeshall, p. 70.
[531] Annales de Margan, p. 23.
[532] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at (23 Apr 2008).
[533] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Collinances, p. 201.
[534] Lagarde, C. (trans.) (1864) Chronique de Maître Guillaume de Puylaurens sur la guerre des Albigeois (1202-1272) (Béziers), Chap. V, p. 21.
[535] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. IV, p. 96.
[536] Clypeus Nascentis Fontebraldensis Ordinis, Tome II, p. 160, cited in Devic, Dom C., Dom Vaissete, Dulaurier, E. (1875) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome VI, p. 190.1,6,2,3,7,8
She married Guglielmo/William II "the Good" (?) King of Sicily, Duke of Apulia, Prince of Capua, son of Guillaume I "le Mauvais" de Hauteville King of Sicily and Margarita (?) de Navarre, on 13 February 1177 at Palermo Cathedral, Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy (now);
Her 1st husband.3,6,1,2,9,4,10,7,11 Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Duchess of Narbonne married Raimund VI (?) Duke of Narbonne, Comte de Toulouse, Marquis of Provence, son of Raimund VII (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Margrave of Provence and Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles, in October 1196 at Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France;
His 4th wife; her 2nd husband.12,6,2,4,3,7
Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Duchess of Narbonne died on 4 September 1199 at Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France, at age 33.6,1,2,3,7
Joan (Joanna) (?) Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Duchess of Narbonne was buried after 4 September 1199 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     10 Oct 1164, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     24 Sep 1199 (aged 34), Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Princess of England, Queen of Sicily, Countess of Toulouse, youngest daughter of Henry II. and Eleanor of Aquitaine. She married the 12 years older William II. 'the Good' of Sicily on Feb. 13 1177. William died childless in 1189 and was succeeded by Tancred of Lecce who treated her badly and held her prisoner for a while. Her brother Richard stayed in Sicily for a few months on his way to the holy land during the third crusade. He was later joined by mother who brought his bride Berengaria of Navarra with her. Tancred, who already fought against Heinrich VI. handed her over because he couldn't risk to have another enemy.A few days after her brothers departure from Sicily she went with Berengaria on board a ship that was supposed to bring them to Akko. After a storm they stranded in Cyprus where they where taken prisoners by Byzantine Emperor Isaac II. Angelus. Richard's troops conquered Cyprus after three weeks and they where able to continue their travel. They stayed in Akko during the whole Crusade. During the peace negotiations with Saladin, Richard suggested to marry Joan with Saladins brother Malik al-Adil and give them the Kingdom of Jerusalem to rule. This suggestion was soon dropped again. After the crusade she and Berengaria went to Rome where they stayed until after Richards release from his imprisonment. In Oct. 1196 Joan became the fifth wife of Raymond VI. of Toulouse. She gave birth to one son, Raymond VII., in July 1197. In 1199 she stayed in the Castle of Cassès where rebellious barons besieged her. She was already five months pregnant and escaped from the castle to ask her brother for help. It was too late Richard was already dead. In Nioret she met her mother and went with her to Rouen. She suddenly decided to become a nun in the Abbey of Fontevraud and shocked her environment with this revelation. The arch bishop of Canterbury tried to change her decision without success. She traveled to Fontevraud where she gave birth to a son on September 24, 1199, a few minutes later she died in her mothers arms, just five month after her brother. The child only lived a few days. She was buried in the Abbey but the body was never found. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry Plantagenet 1133–1189
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1123–1204
     Spouse
          William II 1154–1189
     Siblings
          Geoffrey FitzRoy Plantagenet 1152–1212
          William De Poitiers 1153–1156
          Henry Plantagenet 1155–1183
          Mathilda Plantagenet 1156–1189
          Richard I 1157–1199
          Geoffrey II Plantagenet 1158–1186
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
          King John I 1166–1216
          King John I 1166–1216
     Half Siblings
          Marie de Champagne 1145–1198
          Alix Capet 1150 – unknown
          William Longespée 1176–1226
     Children
          Bohemond of Sicily 1180–1181
          Raymond VII of Toulouse 1197–1249
     BURIAL     Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 19 Mar 2004
     Find A Grave Memorial 8534574.13
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Joan of England (October 1165 – 4 September 1199) was a queen consort of Sicily and countess consort of Toulouse. She was the seventh child of Henry II, King of England and Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine. From her birth, she was destined to make a political and royal marriage. She married William II of Sicily and later Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse, two very important and powerful figures in the political landscape of Medieval Europe.
Early life
     "Joan was born in October 1165 at Château d'Angers in Anjou as the seventh child of Henry II, King of England and his queen consort, Eleanor of Aquitaine.[2] She spent her youth at her mother's courts at Winchester and Poitiers. As a young Angevin princess, Joan's early education consisted of subjects to ready her for marriage, and not just any marriage, but a royal one. She likely learned how to sew and weave, sing, play an instrument, and ride a horse – a pastime that she loved.[3]
Queen of Sicily
     "In 1176, William II of Sicily sent ambassadors to the English court to ask for Joan's hand in marriage.[4] The betrothal was confirmed on 20 May, and Joan's father had to raise money to pay for the cost of the journey and the wedding. He did this by imposing a tax on English subjects.[3] On 27 August, Joan set sail for Sicily from Southampton, escorted by John of Oxford, the bishop of Norwich and her uncle, Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. In the Angevin territories of northern France, she was met by her eldest brother Henry the Young King, and he escorted her to Poitou to her brother Richard Lionheart. He took her to Saint Gilles, and her entourage was met by representatives of the Kingdom of Sicily: Alfano, Archbishop of Capua, and Richard Palmer, Bishop of Syracuse.
     "After a hazardous voyage, Joan arrived safely in Palermo, and on 13 February 1177, she married King William and was crowned Queen of Sicily at Palermo Cathedral.[5]
     "Joan produced no surviving heir, although there were rumours that she had given birth to a boy called Bohemond, born in 1181 or '82, but if he existed at all, he died in infancy.[3] Traditionally, a royal husband in such a situation may have annulled the marriage for a chance to marry a woman who would give him a son. King William did not annul the marriage, nor did he express any interest in doing so. Instead, he named his aunt Constance, daughter of Roger II of Sicily as his heir.
     "When William II died in November 1189, Sicily was seized by his bastard cousin Tancred, who took the lands given to Joan by William with the sound strategic reason that Monte Sant'Angelo lay on the route taken by the invading forces of Heinrich VI of Germany.[1]
Third Crusade
     "Finally, her brother King Richard I of England arrived in Italy in 1190, on the way to the Holy Land. He demanded her return, along with every penny of her dowry. When Tancred balked at these demands, Richard seized a monastery and the castle of La Bagnara. He decided to spend the winter in Italy and attacked and subdued the city of Messina, Sicily.[6] Finally, Tancred agreed to the terms and sent Joan's dowry. In March 1191 Eleanor of Aquitaine arrived in Messina with Richard's bride, Berengaria of Navarre.
     "Eleanor returned to England, leaving Berengaria in Joan's care. Richard decided to postpone his wedding, put his sister and bride on a ship, and set sail. Two days later the fleet was hit by a fierce storm, destroying several ships and blowing Joan and Berengaria's ship off course. Richard landed safely in Crete, but they were stranded near Cyprus. The self-appointed despot of Cyprus, Isaac Comnenus was about to capture them when Richard's fleet suddenly appeared. The princesses were saved, but the despot made off with Richard's treasure. Richard pursued and captured Isaac, threw him into a dungeon, married Berengaria on 12 May 1191 at Limasol, Cyprus and then sent Joan and Berengaria on to Acre.
     "Joan was Richard's favourite sister, but he was not above using her as a bargaining chip in his political schemes. He even suggested marrying her to Saladin's brother, Al-Adil, and making them joint rulers of Jerusalem. Although Al-Adil and Saladin both expressed agreement with the arrangement, the plan failed when the high ranking priests opposed the wedding and threatened Richard that he would be excommunicated from the Christian Church. King Philip II of France also expressed some interest in marrying her, but this scheme, too, failed (possibly on grounds of affinity, since Philip's father Louis VII had formerly been married to her mother).
Countess of Toulouse
     "Joan was married in October 1196, at Rouen, as his third wife, to Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse, with Quercy and the Agenais as her dowry. She was the mother of his successor Raymond VII of Toulouse (born July 1197), and a daughter, Joan (born 1198), who married Bernard II de la Tour, Lord of la Tour.
     "Some chroniclers, who disliked Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse (believing he was a heretic), claim that his marriage to Joan quickly became unhappy, and that she had been fleeing to her brother Richard's domains in 1199, when she learned of Richard's death. "The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens", however, says the following of Joan's last few months: "She was an able woman of great spirit, and after she had recovered from childbed, she was determined to counter the injuries being inflicted upon her husband at the hands of numerous magnates and knights. She therefore took arms against the lords of Saint-Felix, and laid siege to a castrum belonging to them known as Les Cassés. Her efforts were of little avail; some of those with her treacherously and secretly provided arms and supplies to the besieged enemy. Greatly aggrieved, she abandoned the siege, and was almost prevented from leaving her camp by a fire started by the traitors. Much affected by this injury, she hastened to see her brother King Richard to tell him about it but found that he had died. She herself died, whilst pregnant, overcome by this double grief."
Death and burial
     "Joan asked to be admitted to Fontevrault Abbey, an unusual request for a married, pregnant woman, but this request was granted. She died in childbirth and was veiled a nun on her deathbed. Her son, born by Caesarean section once Joan had died, lived just long enough to be baptised, receiving the name of Richard. Joan was thirty-three years old.
     "Joan was buried at Fontevrault Abbey. Her effigy was originally shown kneeling at the head of her father's tomb with her hands clasped and head bent in an attitude of devotion which was expressed on her face. Her son Raymond was buried beside her and his effigy knelt facing hers. Both effigies were destroyed during the French Revolution.
Notes
1. Historians are divided in their use of the terms "Plantagenet" and "Angevin" in regards to Henry II and his sons. Some class Henry II to be the first Plantagenet King of England; others refer to Henry, Richard and John as the Angevin dynasty, and consider Henry III to be the first Plantagenet ruler.
Historical sources
-- Robert of Torigni
-- Roger of Hoveden
-- Ralph of Diceto
-- Duvernoy, Jean, editor (1976), Guillaume de Puylaurens, Chronique 1145–1275: Chronica magistri Guillelmi de Podio Laurentii, Paris: CNRS, ISBN 2-910352-06-4
References
1. Abulafia 2004
2. The Later Crusades, 1189–1311, Volume 2, ed. Kenneth M. Setton, Robert Lee Wolff, Harry W. Hazard, (The University of Wisconsin Press, 1969), 841.
3. Huscroft, Richard. The Growth of An Empire, Chapter 6 "The Princess's Tale".
4. W. L. Warren, Henry II, (University of California Press, 1977), 143.
5. Louise J. Wilkinson, Eleanor de Montfort: A Rebel Countess in Medieval England, (Continuum International Publishing Group, 2012), 27.
6. The Norman Kingdom of Sicily and the Crusades, Helene Wieruszowski, The Later Crusades, 1189–1311, Vol. 2, 41.
Bibliography
-- Abulafia, D. S. H (2004). "Joanna , countess of Toulouse (1165–1199)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.) Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14818.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
-- Owen, D.D.R. (1984). Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend. Cooper Square Press. ISBN 0-631-20101-7.
-- Payne, Robert (1996). The Dream and the Tomb: A History of the Crusades. Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 0-8154-1086-7.
-- "Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady" (2008). Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons (eds.) Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 0-230-60236-3.
Further reading
-- Alio, Jacqueline (2018). Queens of Sicily 1061-1266. Trinacria. ISBN 978-1-943-63914-4.
-- Bowie, Colette (2014). The Daughters of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Brepols. ISBN 978-2-503-54971-2.
-- Bowie, Colette (2013). "Shifting Patterns in Angevin Marriage Policies: The Political Motivations for Joanna Plantagenet's Marriages to William II of Sicily and Raymond VI of Toulouse". In Aurell, Martin (ed.) Les stratégies matrimoniales (IXe-XIIIe siècle). Brepols. pp. 155–167. doi:10.1484/M.HIFA-EB.5.101234.
-- Bowie, Colette (2013). "To Have and Have Not: The Dower of Joanna Plantagenet, Queen of Sicily (1177-1189)". In Woodacre, Elena (ed.) Queenship in the Mediterannean: Negotiating the Role of the -- Queen in the Medieval and Early Modern Eras. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 27–50. doi:10.1057/9781137362834_3. ISBN 978-1-349-47278-9.14

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . page 195.6,7

Family 2

Raimund VI (?) Duke of Narbonne, Comte de Toulouse, Marquis of Provence b. 27 Oct 1156, d. 2 Aug 1222
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:vii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.7. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 279. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005974&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guglielmo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013704&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#GuillaumeIIdied1189
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 October 2019), memorial page for Joan Plantagenet (10 Oct 1164–24 Sep 1199), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8534574, citing Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8534574/joan-plantagenet. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_England,_Queen_of_Sicily. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028521&tree=LEO
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  18. [S1981] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 18 Oct 2005: "Re: Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 18 Oct 2005."

Geoffroi VI (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Nantes1,2,3,4

M, #5290, b. circa 1 June 1134, d. 26 July 1158
FatherGeoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie2,3,5,4,6 b. 24 Aug 1113, d. 7 Sep 1151
MotherMatilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain2,3,4 b. 7 Feb 1102, d. 10 Sep 1167
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Geoffroi VI (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Nantes was born circa 1 June 1134 at Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France (now).3,7,4
Geoffroi VI (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Nantes died on 26 July 1158 at Nantes, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France.3,7,4

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff005.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou1,2

M, #5291, b. 21 July 1136, d. 30 January 1164
FatherGeoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie3,1,4,5,6 b. 24 Aug 1113, d. 7 Sep 1151
MotherMatilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain3,1,5 b. 7 Feb 1102, d. 10 Sep 1167
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was born on 21 July 1136 at Argentan, Anjou, France.1,5,2,7,8
Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou died on 30 January 1164 at Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France, at age 27.1,5,2,7,8
Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was buried after 30 January 1164 at Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     21 Jul 1136, France
     DEATH     30 Jan 1164 (aged 27), Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     Youngest of the tree sons of Geoffrey Plantagenet and Empress Matilda
     Family Members
     Parents
          Geoffrey Plantagenet IV 1113–1151
          Matilda of England 1102–1167
     Siblings
          Henry Plantagenet 1133–1189
          Hamelin De Warenne 1135–1202
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Created by: Helen L. Smith Hoke
     Added: 30 Sep 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial 30230152.5,9
     Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was also known as Guillaume d'Anjou.7

; See Wikipedia article.8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 194.
2. Henry Project , Baldwin, Stewart. date of birth.7
Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was also known as William Count of Poitou.3 Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was also known as William Longespee (?)5 Guillaume I "Longue-Epee" (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Poitou was also known as William fitz Empress (?)5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.2. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff005.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020225&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzEmpress. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 November 2019), memorial page for William 'Count of Poitou' Longespee (21 Jul 1136–30 Jan 1164), Find A Grave Memorial no. 30230152, citing Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Helen L. Smith Hoke (contributor 46540075), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30230152/william-_count_of_poitou_-longespee. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Emme d'Anjou (?) Princess of Wales1,2

F, #5292, b. circa 1138, d. circa 1214
MotherUnknown (?)3,4
Last Edited30 Sep 2020
     Emme d'Anjou (?) Princess of Wales was born circa 1138 at Normandy, France.5 She married Dafydd I ab Owain Gwynedd King of North Wales, son of Owain Gwynedd ap Gruffydd King of North Wales and Gwladys ferch Llywarch, in August 1174 at Wales.6,1,2,7
Emme d'Anjou (?) Princess of Wales died circa 1214.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 14:135.8

; [illegitimate] Emma d'Anjou, *after 1128; m.Guy V, sire de Laval /OR m.ca VII.1174 David I, Pr of Gwynedd.9 Emme d'Anjou (?) Princess of Wales was also known as Emma (?) d'Anjou.9,10 She was living in 1180.2 She was living in 1212.1

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.2. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emme d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026211&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015368&tree=LEO
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 331, 357-358. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dafydd I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00395933&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emme d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026211&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wennour of GwyneddI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00395935&tree=LEO

Sir Robert de Lumley Knt.1

M, #5293
FatherSir Robert de Lumley Knt.1 b. c 1272, d. 1308
MotherMary fitz Marmaduke1
Last Edited29 Dec 2002
     Sir Robert de Lumley Knt. married Lucia de Thweng, daughter of Marmaduke de Thweng of Kilton, 1st Lord Thweng and Isabel de Ros; his 1st wife.2,1 Sir Robert de Lumley Knt. married Joan (?); possibly his 2nd wife.1
     ; Sir ROBERT de LUMLEY; ktd by 1316; m 1st(?) Lucy, one of three sisters and coheirs of William, Robert, and Thomas de Thweng, respectively 2nd, 3rd and 4th Lords (Barons) Thweng; m (?)2nd(?) Joan - and d by 20 July 1325, having by his 1st w had, with at least one yr s (William): MARMADUKE de LUMLEY.1

Family 1

Joan (?)

Family 2

Lucia de Thweng b. 1320
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scarbrough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001.

Helie/Elias II (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Maine et du Poitou1,2,3

M, #5294, b. circa 1114, d. 15 January 1150/51
FatherFoulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem1,2,4,5,3,6 b. 1092, d. bt 10 Nov 1143 - 13 Nov 1143
MotherEremburge de Baugency Comtesse Heritiere du Maine et du Mans, dame de La Flèche1,2,7,8,6,9 b. bt 1091 - 1096, d. 14 Jan 1126
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Helie/Elias II (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Maine et du Poitou married Philippa du Perche Countess of Perche, daughter of Routrou I/III du Perche Count du Perche and Maud/Mathiulde/Matilda Fitz Roy.1,2,5,3 Helie/Elias II (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Maine et du Poitou was born circa 1114 at Anjou, France.2
Helie/Elias II (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Maine et du Poitou died on 15 January 1150/51 at St. Serge Abbey, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France.5,1,2,3
     ; Helie/Elias II, Cte de Maine 1129, +15.1.1151; m.Philippa du Perche, dau.of Rotrou II du Perche by Mathilda, illegitimate dau.of King Henry I of England.1

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 140
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 82.2

Family

Philippa du Perche Countess of Perche b. c 1113, d. WFT Est. 1141-1207
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026911&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques V 'the Young': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004069&tree=LEO
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/fulk0005.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesVdied1144B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Foulques (Fulk) V: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/fulk0005.htm
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Éremburge de la Flèche: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eremb000.htm
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Maine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026913&tree=LEO

Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine1,2,3

F, #5295, b. circa 1068, d. 1 June 1146
FatherFoulques IV "le Rechin" de Château-Landon Comte de Tours, d'Anjou et de Gatinais1,2,3,4,5,6 b. 1043, d. 14 Apr 1109
MotherHildegarde de Beaugency1,2,3,7,6,8 b. 1043, d. b 1070
Last Edited27 Oct 2020
     Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine was born circa 1068; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1066.2,9,3,7,10 She married Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou, son of Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne, in 1089;
His 1st wife; her 1st husband.11,2,12,13,3,7,14,10 Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine and Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou were divorced in 1090; Leo van de Pas says annulled 1093; Med Lands says divorced 1090.11,2,12,13,3,7,15,10 Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine married Alain IV "Fergent" (?) Duc de Bretagne; comte de Cornouaille, comte de Rennes et de Nantes, son of Hoël V (?) Cte de Cornuaille, de Nantes et de Leon, Duc de Bretagne (jure uxoris) and Hawise/Havoise de Bretagne Duchesse de Bretagne, in 1093;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1,11,16,2,9,3,7,10,17,18
Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine died on 1 June 1146 at Jerusalem, Israel (now); Leo van de Pas says d. ca 1146; Wikipedia says: "...some historians believe her life ended in Jerusalem at the convent of Saint Anne. But obituary lists at Redon Abbey record a date of death in 1146 in Redon where her second husband, Alan IV was buried. It is believed that she died a nun. The contradictions about her death and the records of her burial maybe indicated that in fact she died in Jerusalem, and that her body was subsequently transferred to Redon."1,19,16,3,7,20,21
Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine was buried after 1 June 1146 at Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1068, France
     DEATH     1 Jun 1146 (aged 77–78), Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     French nobility. She was the only daughter of Fulko IV of Anjou and his first wife Hildegarde de Beaugency. She married Guillaume de Aquitaine in 1089 and persuaded him to grant Robert d'Arbissel land in Northern Poitou to establish a religious community which later became Fontevraud Abbey. The marriage was otherwise very unhappy and was dissolved in 1091. Two years later she married Alain IV de Bretagne whom she bore two sons and a daughter. When her husband joined the First Crusade she reigned the duchy until his return in 1101. The couple separated after Alains forced abdication in 1112. In 1117 she accompanied her son to Palestine and back to France. Ten year later she did again travel to the Holy Land and it is possible that she stayed in Jerusalem until her death.
     Family Members
     Spouses
          Alain IV de Bretagne 1063–1119
          Guillaume IX de Aquitaine 1071–1126
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 19 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 90367660.21
     ; Per Med lands:
     "GUILLAUME d’Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet] (22 Oct 1071-10 Feb 1126). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth "1071 XI Kal Nov" of "Goffredo duci…Guillelmus filius"[558]. "Willelmi filius eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [1073/87][559]. "Goffredus…dux Aquitanorum et Guillelmus filius eius" set entry conditions for monks at Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated 1078 or 1079[560]. He succeeded his father in 1086 as GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople (when "Rodulfus…de Scegonges ortus, cognatus ipsius Willelmi principis" was killed and "Hardewinus…de Sancto Medardo" captured), but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[561]. According to Albert of Aix, after the army was dispersed in Asia Minor by the Turks, Duke Guillaume fled to "Longinath juxta Tursolt civitatem", from where he was rescued and brought to Antioch by Tancred's forces[562]. "Aimericus de Ranconia vocatus filius Aimeri qui fuit male peremptus et filius Burgoniæ" donated "mariscum et verniatam quæ sunt sub molendino de Ternant" to the abbey of Ternant Ste-Marie by charter dated 1105, witnessed by "Willelmi ducis, Aldiardis comitissa"[563]. He was a troubadour and composer of lyric poetry. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death "1126 IV Id Feb" of "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" and his burial "Pictavis civitate apud Novum Monasterium"[564]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "10 Feb" of "Guillermus dux Aquitanorum"[565].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Hildegarde de Baugency ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[566]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[567]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", her divorce and her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[568]. She married secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, Alain IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[569]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[570]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[571]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[572].
     "m secondly (1094, divorced 1115) PHILIPPA [Mathilde] de Toulouse, daughter of GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Mortain (-28 Nov 1117). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guillelmus" and "Philippam…filiam Willelmi comitis Tolosani et neptem Raimundi de Sancto Egidio"[573]. Robert of Torigny refers to, but does not name, "filiam unam" of "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii" & his wife, who married "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum"[574]. "Guillelmus…Aquitainie similiter et Vasconie dux et comes" confirmed donations to Sainte-Croix, Bordeaux by "genitor noster Guillelmus qui et Gaufridus vocatus est" with the consent of "Mathildis uxor…" by charter dated 23 Mar 1096[575]. It is assumed that Mathilde and Philippa refer to the same person. "Willelmus comes et uxor mea Philippia, filia Willelmi comitis Tolosæ" donated property to Toulouse Saint-Sernin by charter dated Jul 1098[576]. She is also named in an undated donation by Bertrand Comte de Toulouse which names her father but not her husband[577]. “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis” by charter dated 1114[578]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[579]. She became a nun. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Nov" of "Philippa monacha, Pictavensis comitissa"[580].
     "Mistress (1): AMAUBERGE [Dangerose], wife of AIMERY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault, daughter of ---. "Aimericus Castri Araudi vicecomes" donated property to Saint-Denis en Vaux on the advice of "matris mee Adenoris et uxoris mee Dangerose fratrumque meorum Bosonis et Petri" by charter dated 1109[581]. Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that she was the daughter of Barthélemy [I] Seigneur de l’Isle-Bouchard[582]. Barthélemy is recorded with a daughter with the unusual name Dangerose (see the document POITOU, section SEIGNEURS de l’ISLE-BOUCHARD) who, from a chronological point of view, appears to have been of the right age to have been the wife of Vicomte Aimery [I]. She left her husband to live with Duke Guillaume, for which he was excommunicated. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus comes Pictaviensium” left “uxori suæ” for “pellicem...Amalbergam”, specifying that the resulting dispute lasted seven years[583]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[584].
Med Lands cites:
[558] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 405.
[559] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 18, p. 22.
[560] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XCI, p. 97.
[561] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[562] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XL, p. 581.
[563] Besly (1647), Preuves, p. 392.
[564] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 427.
[565] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 189.
[566] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[567] Angers 65, p. 127.
[568] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XIV.I, p. 606.
[569] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[570] Angers 93, p. 171.
[571] Urseau, C. (ed.) L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers (Angers).
[572] Aurélien de Courson, M. (ed.) (1863) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Redon en Bretagne (Paris), ("Redon"), Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.
[573] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 411.
[574] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[575] Bordeaux Sainte-Croix 3, p. 4.
[576] Douais, C. (ed.) (1867) Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint-Sernin de Toulouse (844-1200) (Paris, Toulouse) ("Saint-Sernin"), 291, p. 206.
[577] Saint-Sernin, 435, p. 312.
[578] Histoire Générale de Languedoc (2nd Edn.) Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362, and 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 451, col. 845.
[579] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.
[580] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.
[581] Documents concernant le Prieuré de Saint-Denis en Vaux, Archives historiques du Poitou Tome VII (Poitiers, 1878) ("Saint-Denis en Vaux") I, p. 346.
[582] ES XIV 83.
[583] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 567.
[584] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.15


; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “Guillaume VII (IX), Duke of Aquitaine (1086-1126), Ct of Poitou, *1071, +1126/27; 1m: 1089 (div 1090) Ermengarde d'Anjou (+1146); 2m: 1094 (div 1115) Philippa=Matilda of Toulouse (+28.11.1117)”.22

; Per Genealogics:
     "Ermengarde was the daughter of Foulques IV 'Rechin', comte d'Anjou and his first wife Hildegarde de Beaugency. About 1089 Ermengarde's father married her to Guillaume VII-IX, duke of Aquitaine. However in 1093 Guillaume repudiated her and had the marriage annulled so that he could marry someone else. The same year, as a dutiful daughter, she married Alain IV Fergent, duke of Brittany, but tried to leave him to enter the convent of Fontevrault, asking that the marriage be annulled. The bishops refused, sending her back to her husband and exhorting her to be obedient and accept her place as a wife and mother. She must have done so, as she and Alain had three children, of whom Conon would have progeny. When Alain joined the First Crusade she capably ruled the duchy on his behalf.
     "In 1119 Ermengarde was a widow when she appeared before the bishops at the Council of Reims to accuse her first husband of bigamy. This may have somewhat surprised them as in both of her marriages she had shown that she could be difficult, though she had obviously reached an understanding with her second husband. She died about 1146."3



; Per Genealogy.EU: "Ermengarde, *ca 1068, +Jerusalem 1146/14.2.1117 !dwid!; 1m: 1089 (div 1090) Duke Guillaume IX of Aquitaine (+1126/7); 2m: ca 1093 Alain IV Fergent, Duc de Bretagne (+1119.)16"



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ermengarde of Anjou (ca. 1068 – 1 June 1146) was a member of the comital House of Anjou and by her two marriages was successively Duchess of Aquitaine and Brittany. Also, she was a patron of Fontevraud Abbey. Ermengarde was the regent of Brittany during the absence of her spouse from 1096 until 1101.
Life
Early years
     "Born in Angers she was the eldest child of Count Fulk IV of Anjou but the only one born by his first wife, Hildegarde of Beaugency. Having lost her mother in 1070, at only two years of age, she received a good education and grew to be pious and concerned about religious reform, especially the struggle against the secular appropriation of church property. She was also noted for her beauty in her youth.
Duchess of Aquitaine
     "It has long been presumed that, in 1089, her marriage was arranged to the young Duke and poet, William IX of Aquitaine. However, this union proved a dismal failure. Her husband was a voracious philanderer, whose affairs infuriated his wife. She suffered from severe mood swings, vacillating between vivacity and sullenness, and would nag her husband. She also had a habit of retiring in bad temper to a cloister after an argument, cutting off all contact with the outside world, before suddenly making a reappearance in the court as if her absence had never occurred. Such behavior, coupled with her failure to conceive a child, led William to send her back to her father and have the marriage dissolved in 1091.
     "Her behavior during her marriage to the Duke has been described by both Marion Meade and Alison Weir as schizophrenic, with Weir adding a suggestion of manic depression.
     "However, Ruth Harvey's 1993 critical investigation[1] shows the assumption of William's marriage to Ermengarde to be based largely on an error in a nineteenth-century secondary source and it is highly likely that Philippa of Toulouse was William's only wife. Further research [2] has found the claim that William was married to "Hermingerda", daughter of Fulk IV of Anjou is based on the very unreliable chronicle of William of Tyre, written between 1169 and 1187, more than 70 years after the events in question would have taken place. Tyre erroneously identifies Ermengarde's mother as Bertrand of Montfort, the sister of Amalricus de Montfort when her mother was in fact Audearde or Hildegarde of Beaugency. Tyre's chronicle lacks any contemporary corroboration, no primary text ever mentions a marriage between William and Ermengarde. It is therefore not only improbable that William married Ermengarde, it is likely that Ermengarde - at least as a wife of William - never existed.
     "But Stephen Philp, poet and mediaeval historian, has counter-argued that, on the basis of pure logic, even if we accept that Ermengarde never married Duke William IX, this has no bearing on whether she actually existed or not. Ermengarde's existence is indeed supported by the correction of the name of her mother. Moreover, several sources give colourful accounts of the marriage and its aftermath, and her later marriage,[3] so there is no good reason to doubt it.
Duchess and regent of Brittany
     "In 1093, her father married her to Duke Alan IV of Brittany, probably to secure an alliance against Normandy, then controlled by William the Conqueror’s son, Robert Curthose. The union produced three children: the future Duke Conan III, Hawise (wife of Count Baldwin VII of Flanders, who repudiated her in 1110) and Geoffrey (who died young in Jerusalem in 1116).
     "Her husband left for Palestine in 1096 to take part in the First Crusade and she served as Regent of the Duchy from then until 1101. She spent little time in Rennes or the west of Brittany, preferring Nantes and the Saumur region. Influenced by Robert of Arbrissel, she approved the expansion of the abbey at Fontevraud, to which she withdrew on two occasions. An admirer of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (to whose abbey she made donations), she favored the creation of Cistercian abbeys. She was also a benefactor of the monastery of Buzay, near Nantes.
     "Alan IV, an unpopular ruler, was forced to abdicated in favor of his son in 1112, and he and Ermengarde were separated after this.
Later years
     "By 1116 Ermengarde was living in Fontevrault Abbey, where she reputedly became a friend of her first husband's second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.
     "In 1118 after the death of Philippa, Ermengarde decided to avenge her deceased friend. She went south from Fontevrault to the court of her former husband, Duke William of Aquitaine, where she demanded to be recognized as the rightful Duchess. William ignored this remarkable request. Accordingly, in October 1119, she suddenly appeared at the Council of Reims, being held by Pope Calixtus II, demanding that the Pope excommunicate William, oust his mistress from the ducal palace, and restore Ermengarde to her rightful place as the Duchess of Aquitaine. The Pope "declined to accommodate her"; however, Ermengarde continued to trouble William for several years afterwards.
Death
     "Ermengarde at one point went on Crusade to Palestine; she returned ten years later, and some historians believe her life ended in Jerusalem at the convent of Saint Anne. But obituary lists at Redon Abbey record a date of death in 1146 in Redon where her second husband, Alan IV was buried. It is believed that she died a nun. The contradictions about her death and the records of her burial maybe indicated that in fact she died in Jerusalem, and that her body was subsequently transferred to Redon.
References
1. Harvey, Ruth. "The wives of the ‘first troubadour’, Duke William IX of Aquitaine". Journal of Medieval History, Volume 19, Issue 4, 1993,pp. 307-325
2. Wolterbeek, Marc. “Inventing History, Inventing Her Story: The Case of William of Aquitaine’s Marital Affairs.” Medieval Association of the Pacific, University of California, Berkeley, March 1995, and International Medieval Congress, Leeds, England, July 1995
3. J. A. Everard, Brittany and the Angevins: Province and Empire 1158–1203, (Cambridge University Press, 2004), 10.
Further reading
** Cawley, Charles (2017-12-14). "Anjou - Comtes D'Anjou, Ducs D'Anjou". Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 2018-04-23.
** Livingstone, Amy (December 2017). "'You will dwell with barbarous and uneducated men': Countess Ermengarde and Political Culture in Twelfth-Century Brittany". History. 102 (353): 858–873. doi:10.1111/1468-229x.12518. ISSN 0018-2648."20



Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 311.23 Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine was also known as Ermengarde of Anjou.

Reference: Weis [1992:107] 119-24.1 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; Per Med lands:
     "ERMENGARDE d'Anjou ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146, bur Redon). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[252]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[253]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", records her divorce and names her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[254]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[255]. The Chronicon Briocensi records the marriage of "Alanus filius primogenitus [Hoelli]" and "Ermengardem filiam Comitis Andegavensis"[256]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Fergannus comes" married “filiam comitis Andegavorum” after the death of his first wife[257]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[258]. "Conanus…Britaniaæ dux cum sorore mea Hidevis et matre mea Ermeniart" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1118, which names "pater meus Alanus et avus Hoel et attavus Alanus"[259]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[260]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[261].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Audearde [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne [Capet] ([22 Oct 1071]-10 Feb 1127).
     "m secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, ALAIN IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany, son of HOËL de Cornouaïlle & his wife Havise de Bretagne (-13 Oct 1119)."
Med Lands cites:
[252] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[253] Angers 65, p. 127.
[254] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606.
[255] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[256] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF XII, p. 566.
[257] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291.
[258] Angers 93, p. 171.
[259] Morbihan, 192, p. 155.
[260] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.
[261] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.10

; Per Med lands:
     "ALAIN de Cornouaïlle, son of HOËL Comte de Cornouaïlle & his wife Havise de Bretagne (-13 Oct 1119). The Chronicon Briocensi names "Alanum, Mathiam et Benedictum" as the three children of "Hoellus…ex Hadevisa uxore sua"[185]. The Flandria Generosa names "comes Alanus" son of "Havisis Namnetensis comitissa", when outlining the basis for the consanguinity between his daughter Havise and her husband Baudouin VII Count of Flanders which constituted grounds for the couple's separation[186]. "Constancius" donated property to the abbey of Redon with the consent of "Jedear uxore mea" and affirmed by "Hoel comes et Haduis comitissa, Alanus et Mathias et Eudo filii eorum" by charter dated before 1072[187]. "Berta comitissa Alani Redonensis ducis uxor" donated property to Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé, for the souls of "filie nostre Hadeuis comitisse Hoelis ducis Britannie conjugis et…filiorum suorum, meorum…nepotum Alani et Mathie", by charter dated 1075, signed by "Alanus nothus filius Conani comitis, Vitalis et Gualterius Carnotenses, familiares comitisse Haduis neptis mee…"[188]. He succeeded in 1084 as ALAIN IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany. "Alanus comes filius Hoeli comitis" confirmed the rights of the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1084[189]. "Alano qui et Fergant, Hoeli filio, totius Britannie consule" donated property to the abbey of Redon by charter dated 1092[190]. He accompanied Robert III Duke of Normandy on the First Crusade[191]. Albert of Aix names "…domnus Alens cognomine Fercans, Conans quoque, ambo principes Brittanorum…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[192]. He abdicated in [1114/16] in favour of his son, becoming a monk at the abbey of Redon: the Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Alanus Fergent, ex Britonum duce rotonensis monachus, anno 1119 fato functus" was buried at the abbey of Redon[193]. The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the death in 1119 of "Alanus Fergent pater Conani"[194]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiensis records the death "III Id Oct" in 1119 of "Alanus Fergant junior filius Hoëlis Comitis"[195].
     "m firstly (contract Caen, Bayeux [1086/88]) CONSTANCE of England, daughter of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Normandy [1057/1061]-13 Aug 1090, bur Church of St Melans near Rhedon). Guillaume of Jumièges names Constance as second daughter, naming her husband "Alanno Fergant comiti minoris Britanniæ filio...Hoelli" and specifying that she died childless[196]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William I arranged the marriage of "Constantiam filiam suam" and “Alanno Ferganno” at Caen (presumably indicating the finalisation of the marriage contract) and in a later passage that the couple were married at Bayeux[197]. Three different Breton sources record her marriage in different years. The Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii records the marriage in 1086 of "Alanus" and "Constantiam filiam Regis Anglorum Guillelmi"[198]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiensis records the marriage in 1087 of "Alanus Hoëli Consulis filius" and "Constantiam Guillelmi Regis Anglorum filiam"[199]. The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the marriage in 1088 of "Alanus" and "Constantiam filam Regis Guillelmi Anglorum"[200]. Orderic "Alanus dux Britannorum et Constantia uxor eius" donated property to the priory of Livré by charter dated 31 Jul 1089[201]. According to William of Malmesbury, "she excited the inhabitants [of Brittany] by the severity of her justice to administer a poisonous potion to her"[202]. Orderic Vitalis, on the other hand, says that she "did everything in her power to further the welfare of her subjects" and "was deeply grieved when she died"[203]. The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the death in 1090 of "Constantia Alani coniux…sine liberis"[204]. The Chronicon Universum in the cartulary of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé records the death in 1090 of "Constantia comitissa filia regis Anglorum"[205].
     "m secondly ([1093]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, divorced wife of GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou], daughter of FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Hildegarde de Baugency ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146, bur Redon). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[206]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[207]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", records her divorce and names her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[208]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Fergannus comes" married “filiam comitis Andegavorum” after the death of his first wife[209]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[210]. The Chronicon Briocensi records the marriage of "Alanus filius primogenitus [Hoelli]" and "Ermengardem filiam Comitis Andegavensis"[211]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[212]. "Conanus…Britaniaæ dux cum sorore mea Hidevis et matre mea Ermeniart" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1118, which names "pater meus Alanus et avus Hoel et attavus Alanus"[213]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[214]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[215].
     "Mistresses (1) - (2): ---. The names of Duke Alain's mistresses are not known.
Med Lands cites:
[185] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 566.
[186] Flandria Generosa 25, MGH SS IX, p. 323.
[187] Redon CCCXXXIII, p. 283.
[188] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, LXXV, p. 222.
[189] La Borderie (1888), XIX, p. 44.
[190] Redon CCC, p. 251.
[191] Orderic Vitalis, quoted in Domesday Descendants, p. 224.
[192] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXIII, p. 316.
[193] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.
[194] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 559.
[195] Ex Chronico Kemperlegiensis, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 562.
[196] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXIV, p. 310.
[197] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291, and Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 115.
[198] Ex Chronico Ruyensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 563.
[199] Ex Chronico Kemperlegiensis, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 562.
[200] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 559.
[201] La Borderie (1888), XXIII, p. 56.
[202] William of Malmesbury, 276, p. 255.
[203] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291, translation Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 353.
[204] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 559.
[205] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, Chronicon Universum, p. 105.
[206] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[207] Angers 65, p. 127.
[208] William of Tyre, RHC, Historiens occidentaux (Paris, 1844), I, XIV.I, p. 606.
[209] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291.
[210] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[211] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 566.
[212] Angers 93, p. 171.
[213] Morbihan, 192, p. 155.
[214] Obituaire de la cathédrale d'Angers.
[215] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.18
She was Duchess consort of Aquitaine between 1089 and 1093.20 She was Duchess consort of Brittany between 1093 and 1112.20

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 119-24, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020206&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques IV 'Rechin': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007641&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIVdied1109. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 5.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegarde de Beaugency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020350&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 4 page (Cournouaille (Cornwall) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne4.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ErmengardeM1GuillaumeIXAquiM2AlainIVBret.
  11. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIXdied1127B
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain IV Fergent: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020205&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#AlainIVdied1119B
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 264, de la ZOUCHE 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ermengarde_of_Anjou_(d._1146). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 December 2019), memorial page for Ermengarde de Anjou (1068–1 Jun 1146), Find A Grave Memorial no. 90367660, citing Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/90367660/ermengarde-de_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020206&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Havide de Bretagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020207&tree=LEO
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 7.

Joscelin de Louvain bâtard de Louvain, Lord of Petworth, Sussex1,2,3,4

M, #5296, b. circa 1130, d. 1179/80
FatherGodefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant2,4,5 b. c 1060, d. 25 Jan 1139
MotherClemence/Clementia (?) de Bourgogne, Regent of Flanders b. 1078, d. c 1133; Racines et Histoire says he was a bastard and doesn't name his mother6,2,4
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited8 Oct 2019
     Joscelin de Louvain bâtard de Louvain, Lord of Petworth, Sussex was born circa 1130 at Egmanton, Nottinghamshire, England.7 He married Agnes de Percy, daughter of William de Percy and Adelaide de Clare, after 1154 at England.8,1,6,2,3,4
Joscelin de Louvain bâtard de Louvain, Lord of Petworth, Sussex died in 1179/80 at Egmanton, Nottinghamshire, England.7,9,2,4
     He was Castellan of Arundel.9

; Jocelin/Josceline, of Louvain; m Agnes, 2nd dau but eventual heiress of William de Percy (see NORTHUMBERLAND, D) and had issue, the 1st Duke of Northumberland of the 1766 cr choosing the title 'Lord Lovaine, Baron of Alnwick' when also given a Barony 1784 in commemoration of this ancestral connection.6 GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-23.



; Josceline de Louvain, +1180; he accompanied his sister, Queen Adela, to England, where he m.after 1154 Agnes de Percy, and inherited all the Percy estates.2

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant4.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 161-25, p. 141. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 161-24, p. 141.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 161-24, p. 141: "...natural son of Godfrey I by an unknown mistress."
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:ii.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:iii.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:iv.
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:v.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:vi.
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 194-195, de PERCY 4:vii.

Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine1,2,3,4

F, #5297, b. circa 1088, d. after 1117
FatherOtto II de Chiny Comte de Chiny2,3,4,5 b. c 1065, d. 28 Mar 1125
MotherAdelaide/Alix (?) de Namur2,3,4,6,7 b. c 1068, d. a 30 Sep 1124
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited23 Nov 2020
     Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine was born circa 1088 at Namur, Belgium; Racines et Histoire says b. ca 1078.2,1,3 She married Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant, son of Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain and Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques, circa 1103 at Belgium; his 1st wife; Racines et Histoire says m. "1105 (ou ~1099 ?)2,8,1,3,9,4"
Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine died after 1117.1,2,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1985 56.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.2
GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Med Lands: "IDA (-before 1125). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium which records [her brother] "Adalbero Metensium primicerius, filiorum Lovaniensis domini avunculus"[610]. The estimated date of her marriage indicates that Ida must have been one of her parents’ older children. m ([1105]) as his first wife, GODEFROI Comte de Louvain, son of HENRI II Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [Adelheid] in der Betuwe (-25 Jan 1139, bur Afflighem). Heinrich V King of Germany invested him as GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1106."
Med Lands cites: [610] Rodulfi, Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium XII.14, MGH SS X, p. 311.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Chiny: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026478&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm#IdaChimaydiedbefore1125MGodefroiBrabant. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027132&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid (Alix) de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027133&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm#OttoIIChinydiedafter1131
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#IdaLouvaindiedbefore1162.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godfried II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020127&tree=LEO
  12. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 155-24, p. 149. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.

Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain1,2,3,4,5

M, #5298, b. between 1020 and 1021, d. between 1078 and 1079
FatherLambert II "Baudri" (?) comte de Louvain, graf van Brussel2,6,7,8,9,10 b. 990, d. a 21 Sep 1062
MotherUda/Oda (?) of Lower Lorraine2,8,11,6,7,10 b. c 995, d. bt 1062 - 1063
ReferenceGAV26 EDV25
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain married Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques, daughter of Eberhard (?) Graaf van Betuwe en Teisterband.2,1,12,13,3,6 Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain was born between 1020 and 1021 at Brabant, Belgium (now).2,5,14
Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain died between 1078 and 1079.1,2,3,5,14,6
Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain was buried between 1078 and 1079 at Saint Gertrudes Collegiate Church, Nivelles, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1021, France
     DEATH     1078 (aged 56–57), France
     Henry II was Count of Louvain from 1054 through 1071.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Lambert II Of Louvain unknown–1054
      Oda Van Verdun Of Louvain unknown–1062
     Children
      Godfrey I Duke of Brabant 1060–1139
     BURIAL     Saint Gertrudes Collegiate Church, Nivelles, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium
     Created by: Helen Rineer
     Added: 5 Mar 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 106245202.14
     GAV-26 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Henri II, called 'le Ceinture' (the Belted) like his father, was born about 1020, the son of Lambert II, comte de Louvain, and Oda of Lower-Lorraine. He was count of Louvain and Brussels from 1054 to 1078. With his wife Adela, of unknown origin, he had four children of whom Henri III, Godfried I and Ida would have progeny.
     "He is mentioned in a deed of 1078 for the chapter of Brussels with his brother Regnier. Little is known about his reign, but we know that in 1071 he supported Richilde, heiress of Hainault, countess of Flanders and Hainault, against her late husband Baudouin's brother Robert 'the Friesian'. Moreover, his daughter Ida married Richilde's second son, Baudouin II, Graaf van Henegouwen.
     "Henri died in or after 1078, and was buried at the abbey of Nivelles."5

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI de Louvain (-[1078/79], bur Nivelles). The Annalista Saxo names "Heinricus comes et Reginherus" as brothers of "Adhela…nata de Brabancia ex castello quod dicitur Lovania seu vulgariter Lovene"[61]. The Chronicon Brabanti names "Henricum II Comitem et Marchionum" as son and successor of "Lambertus II qui et Baldricus dictus Cum-Barba" and his wife "Oda filia Gochelonis Ducis Loth"[62]. He succeeded his father as HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain.
     "m ADELHEID, daughter of EBERHARD Graaf van Betuwe en Teisterbant & his wife --- (-after 1086). The Chronicon Affligemense names "Adela comitissa Lovaniensis" as mother of two sons "Heinrico et Godefrido" specifying that she was one of the founders of Afflighem Abbey[63]. "Adelheyt comitissa, comitis Everhardi filia" donated “predium suum Ortinam” [Orten (Bois-le-Duc)] to Utrecht St Marten, for the souls of “sue ac mariti sui Henrici...per manum Hermanni...advocatum”, by charter dated to [1076/99][64]. She founded the abbey of Afflighem in 1086. Pope Eugene III records donations by "Vualterius qui dicebatur magnus…Gerardus filius suus…Alvericus et filius suus Reimerus…Adeloia venerabilis vidua" to Grimbergen abbey by bull dated 1 May 1147 which confirms the abbey’s privileges[65]. The identity of "Adeloia…vidua" is uncertain, but she may have been the widow of Henri [II] Comte de Louvain."
Med Lands cites:
[61] Annalista Saxo 1070.
[62] Ex Chronicis Brab. in Magno Chron. Belg, p. 106, quoted in RHGF XI, p. 423.
[63] Chronicon Affligemense 4, MGH SS IX, p. 408.
[64] Sloet, L. A. J. W. (ed.) (1872) Ooorkondenboek der graafschappens Gelre en Zutfen, Eerste gedeelte (The Hague), 184, p. 182.
[65] Patrologia Latina, Vol. 180, col. 1209B.6


Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Gens Nostra . 1985 56
     2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, 1995, Neustadt an der Aisch , Brandenburg, Erich. 93.5

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Henri II de Louvain + 1078/79 (ou 1086 ?) comte de Louvain
ép. dès 1079 Adelheid (Adela) de Betuwe (alias de Teisterbant) comtesse des Basques ° ~1023 + après 1086 (fille d’Eberhard in der Betuwe und von Teisterbant) (elle est l’une des fondatrices de l’Abbaye d’Afflighem 1086.)15,16"

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II 'le Ceinture': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020125&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIILouvaindied1078. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#LambertIILouvaindiedafterSep1062B.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lambert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020124&tree=LEO
  10. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 154-21, p. 149. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oda of Lower-Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064415&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela van de Betuwe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026482&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Henry De Louvain, II (1021–1078), Find A Grave Memorial no. 106245202, citing Saint Gertrudes Collegiate Church, Nivelles, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium ; Maintained by Helen Rineer (contributor 47062386), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/106245202/henry-de_louvain_ii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant, grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#AdelheidMHenriIILouvaindiedafter1086
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00580815&tree=LEO
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 7.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#H3
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319752&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIIILouvaindied1095.
  22. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 3.
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 5.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050003&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#IdaLouvaindied1139.

Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques1,2,3,4,5

F, #5299, b. circa 1023, d. after 1086
FatherEberhard (?) Graaf van Betuwe en Teisterband2,6,3,5,7,8 b. c 1015
ReferenceGAV26 EDV25
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques married Henri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain, son of Lambert II "Baudri" (?) comte de Louvain, graf van Brussel and Uda/Oda (?) of Lower Lorraine.1,9,2,3,4,10 Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques was born circa 1023 at France.11,1,4
Adelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques died after 1086.11,1,5
     GAV-26 EDV-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1985 56.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 8.
3. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.12


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID (-after 1086). "Adelheyt comitissa, comitis Everhardi filia" donated “predium suum Ortinam” [Orten (Bois-le-Duc)] to Utrecht St Marten, for the souls of “sue ac mariti sui Henrici...per manum Hermanni...advocatum”, by charter dated to [1076/99][825]. The Chronicon Affligemense names "Adela comitissa Lovaniensis" as mother of two sons "Heinrico et Godefrido" specifying that she was one of the founders of Afflighem Abbey[826]. She founded the abbey of Afflighem in 1086.
     "m HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain, son of LAMBERT [II] Comte de Louvain & his wife Uda of Lotharingia (-[1078/79], bur Nivelles)."
Med Lands cites:
[825] Sloet (1872), 184, p. 182.
[826] Chronicon Affligemense 4, MGH SS IX, p. 408.5


; Per Racines et Histoire: "Henri II de Louvain + 1078/79 (ou 1086 ?) comte de Louvain
ép. dès 1079 Adelheid (Adela) de Betuwe (alias de Teisterbant) comtesse des Basques ° ~1023 + après 1086 (fille d’Eberhard in der Betuwe und von Teisterbant) (elle est l’une des fondatrices de l’Abbaye d’Afflighem 1086.)13,5"

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela van de Betuwe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026482&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#AdelheidMHenriIILouvaindiedafter1086. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eberhard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026483&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#AdelheidMHenriIILouvaindiedafter1086
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIILouvaindied1078.
  11. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026482&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant, grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00580815&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s)-Vlaanderen, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#H3
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319752&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIIILouvaindied1095.
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 5.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050003&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#IdaLouvaindied1139.

Albert III (?) Comte de Namur1

M, #5300, b. before 10 August 1035, d. 22 June 1102
FatherAlbert II (?) Comte de Namur, Vogt von Andenne2,1,3,4 b. c 1000, d. bt 1063 - 1064
MotherRegilindis (?) of Lorraine5,1,3,4 b. c 1015, d. 1064
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Albert III (?) Comte de Namur was born before 10 August 1035 at Namur, Belgium (now); Genealogy.EU, Racines et Histoire and Med Lands say b. bef 10 Aug 1035; Genealogics says b. ca 1027.6,3,4,7 He married Ida Billung von Sachsen, heiress of La Roche, daughter of Bernhard II (?) Herzog von Sachsen and Eilika von Schweinfurt, circa 1066;
Her 2nd husband. Genealogics says m. ca 1067; Genealogy.EU says m. 1065/66; Racines et Histoire (Namur) says m. 1066/67.8,9,6,10,11,3,4,7
Albert III (?) Comte de Namur died on 22 June 1102.6,3,4,7
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Albert was born about 1027, the son of Albert II, comte de Namur, and Regelindis de Lorraine. He was count of Namur from his father's death about 1063.
     “About 1067 Albert married Ida von Sachsen, widow of Friedrich, Graf von Luxemburg, duke of Lower-Lorraine, and daughter of Bernhard II, Herzog von Sachsen, and Eilica von Schweinfurt. Of their five children, Godefroid, Henri and Adelheid would have progeny.
     “From 1071 to 1072, Albert aided Richilde, heiress of Hainault, countess of Flanders and Hainault, to fight against her late husband Baudouin's brother Robert 'the Friesian', but Richilde was defeated and had to renounce Flanders in Robert's favour. In 1076, supported by Matilda, marchioness of Tuscany, he claimed the duchy of Bouillon through his mother, and he fought against Godefroy de Bouillon to assert his claims. During a battle near Dalhem on 20 September 1085 he killed the Count Palatine Hermann II of Lorraine, for which he was sent into disgrace by the German emperor. Finally in the Truce of God of 1086, the bishop of Liège managed to make a peace between the belligerents, though this was in Godefroy's favour.
     “In 1099 Bishop Otbert of Liège gave Albert the county of Brunengeruz. He appeared in a document of 1101 with his son Godefroid, but the latter was recorded alone in 1105.
     “Albert died on 22 June 1102.”.12

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 7:68.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 57.
3. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 171.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia. French Version.12
GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25. Albert III (?) Comte de Namur was also known as Adalbert III (?) Count of Namur.

; This is the same person as ”Albert III, Count of Namur” at Wikipedia and as ”Albert III de Namur” at Wikipédia (FR).13,14

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALBERT de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio"[64]. He succeeded his father in [1063/64] as ALBERT III Comte de Namur. He claimed to succeed to the inheritance of his first cousin Godefroi III "Le Bossu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1076, challenging the succession of Godefroi de Bouillon [Boulogne] and at one point unsuccessfully besieging the castle of Bouillon. As guardian of her interests in Lotharingia, Matilda of Tuscany granted Albert the county of Verdun which Theoderic Bishop of Verdun had bestowed on her in 1076, in order to thwart Godefroi de Bouillon´s inheritance[65]. In addition, Emperor Heinrich IV appointed Albert as vice-duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1076 to rule for his infant son Konrad, whom he had installed as Duke of Lower Lotharingia[66]. "Heinricus…tertius Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of St Jakob, Liège by "Albertus comes Nammucensium filiis [suis] Godefrido, Heinrico, Alberto" by charter dated 1 Jun 1101[67]. The Notæ Bronienses record the death in 1102 of "Albertus comes Namucensis"[68]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "X Kal Jul" of "Adalbertus comes Namurcensis"[69].
     "m ([1065/66]) as her second husband IDA of Saxony, widow of FREDERIC II Duke of Lower Lotharingia [Luxembourg], daughter of BERNHARD II Duke in Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given[70]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[71]. On her marriage, she brought her husband extensive lands north-east of the castle of Bouillon which later formed the county of La Roche[72]. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, her husband's claim to Bouillon was through the property brought by his wife[73]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "II Kal Aug" of "Ida comitissa Namurcensis"[74]."
Med Lands cites:
[64] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, pp. 300-1.
[65] Murray, A. V. (2000) The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: a dynastic history 1099-1125 (Prosopographica & Genealogica), p. 17.
[66] Murray (2000), p. 20.
[67] D H IV 470, p. 635, version b, marked "verunechtet" in the collection.
[68] Notæ Bronienses 1102, MGH SS XXIV, p. 27.
[69] Barbier, J. (ed.) ´Obituaire de l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint-Gérard´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVIII (2e série, Tome II) (Louvain, 1882) ("Brogne Necrology"), p. 325.
[70] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 17 (24), MHG SS VIII, p. 577. Although this passage is not dated, the editor has placed "c 1066" in the margin.
[71] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[72] Murray (2000), p. 17.
[73] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1076, MGH SS XXIII, p. 798.
[74] Brogne Necrology, p. 332.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Namur): “Albert III de Namur ° avant 10/08/1035 (~1027, 1030 ?) + 22/06/1102 comte de Namur (1063/64), Prétendant à la Basse-Lorraine (après le décès de son cousin Godefroi III «Le Bossu» + 1076), investi du comté de Verdun par Matilda de Toscane, et fait vice-duc de Basse-Lorraine par l’Empereur Heinrich IV et Régent pour le Prince Konrad (cité confirmation fondation de Saint-Jacques de Liège par l’Empereur 01/06/1101)
     ép. ~1066/67 Ida von Sachsen, héritière de La Roche (ou Laroche, -en-Ardenne, Luxembourg, Be) ° ~1030 + 31/07/1102 (fille de Bernhard II, duc en Saxe (Billung) et d’Eilika von Schweinfurt ; veuve de Frédéric II, duc de Basse-Lorraine-Luxembourg + 1065) (apporte à son mari une extension de terres au nord-est de Bouillon, futur comté de la Roche)”.7

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Cte Albert III de Namur (1037-1102/5), *before 10.8.1035, +22.6.1102; m.1065/66 Ida, heiress of Laroche (*ca 1035 +31.7.1102), dau.of Duke Bernhard II of Saxony"
[See Note Per Med Lands].1
; Per Genealogy.EU (Billung): “B3. Ida, heiress of Laroche, +31.7.1102, bur Namur; 1m: Frederic II of Lower Lorraine (+1065); 2m: Albert III de Namur (*before 10.8.1035 +22.6.1102)”.9
; Per Med Lands:
     "IDA (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[353]. "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given[354]. On her marriage, she brought her husband extensive lands north-east of Bouillon which later formed the county of Laroche[355]. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, her husband's claim to Bouillon was through the property brought by his wife[356]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "II Kal Aug" of "Ida comitissa Namurcensis"[357].
     "m firstly as his second wife, FREDERIC II Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy, son of FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy [Luxembourg] & his wife [-- von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo).
     "m secondly ([1065/66]) ALBERT III Comte de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102)."
Med Lands cites:
[353] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[354] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 17 (24), MHG SS VIII, p. 577. Although this passage is not dated, the editor has placed "c 1066" in the margin.
[355] Murray, A. V. (2000) The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: a dynastic history 1099-1125 (Prosopographica & Genealogica), p. 17.
[356] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1076, MGH SS XXIII, p. 798.
[357] Barbier, J. (ed.) ´Obituaire de l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint-Gérard´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVIII (2e série, Tome II) (Louvain, 1882) ("Brogne Necrology"), p. 332.11
He was Comte de Namur between 1063 and 1102.6,14

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 2 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027130&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027128&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#ALbertIIIdied1102B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Regelindis de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027131&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg2.html
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Namur, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Namur.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 149-22, p. 131. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027129&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Idadied1102
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Ida de Saxe: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_de_Saxe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_III,_Count_of_Namur. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Albert III de Namur: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_III_de_Namur
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid (Alix) de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027133&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#AlixMOttoIIChiny
  17. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 276. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godefroid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027095&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#Godefroidied1139
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027134&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#HenriNamurLarochediedbefore1138B

Ida Billung von Sachsen, heiress of La Roche1,2,3,4

F, #5301, b. circa 1035, d. 31 July 1102
FatherBernhard II (?) Herzog von Sachsen1,2,5,6,3,7 b. c 995, d. 29 Jun 1059
MotherEilika von Schweinfurt1,8,6,3,7 b. bt 1000 - 1005, d. c 1055
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Ida Billung von Sachsen, heiress of La Roche was born circa 1035; Racines et Histoire (Namur) says b. ca 1030.2,4 She married Friedrich II (?) Graf von Luxemburg, Duke of Lower Lorraine, son of Friedrich I (?) Graf im Moselgau, sn of Gleiberg and Irmtrud von Lahngau Gräfin von Gleiberg, in 1055;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.9,1,10,11,12,3,7 Ida Billung von Sachsen, heiress of La Roche married Albert III (?) Comte de Namur, son of Albert II (?) Comte de Namur, Vogt von Andenne and Regilindis (?) of Lorraine, circa 1066;
Her 2nd husband. Genealogics says m. ca 1067; Genealogy.EU says m. 1065/66; Racines et Histoire (Namur) says m. 1066/67.13,1,14,3,7,15,16,4
Ida Billung von Sachsen, heiress of La Roche died on 31 July 1102; Genealogy.EU (Billung, Luxemburg 2 and Luxemburg 3) and Med Lands say d. 31 July 1102; Genealogics says d. aft 1117.1,2,3,7,17,4
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Cte Albert III de Namur (1037-1102/5), *before 10.8.1035, +22.6.1102; m.1065/66 Ida, heiress of Laroche (*ca 1035 +31.7.1102), dau.of Duke Bernhard II of Saxony"
[See Note Per Med Lands].2

; Per Racines et Histoire (Namur): “Albert III de Namur ° avant 10/08/1035 (~1027, 1030 ?) + 22/06/1102 comte de Namur (1063/64), Prétendant à la Basse-Lorraine (après le décès de son cousin Godefroi III «Le Bossu» + 1076), investi du comté de Verdun par Matilda de Toscane, et fait vice-duc de Basse-Lorraine par l’Empereur Heinrich IV et Régent pour le Prince Konrad (cité confirmation fondation de Saint-Jacques de Liège par l’Empereur 01/06/1101)
     ép. ~1066/67 Ida von Sachsen, héritière de La Roche (ou Laroche, -en-Ardenne, Luxembourg, Be) ° ~1030 + 31/07/1102 (fille de Bernhard II, duc en Saxe (Billung) et d’Eilika von Schweinfurt ; veuve de Frédéric II, duc de Basse-Lorraine-Luxembourg + 1065) (apporte à son mari une extension de terres au nord-est de Bouillon, futur comté de la Roche)”.4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 57.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 7:68.3


; This is the same person as ”Ida de Saxe” at Wikipédia (FR).18 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Billung): “B3. Ida, heiress of Laroche, +31.7.1102, bur Namur; 1m: Frederic II of Lower Lorraine (+1065); 2m: Albert III de Namur (*before 10.8.1035 +22.6.1102)”.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "IDA (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[353]. "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given[354]. On her marriage, she brought her husband extensive lands north-east of Bouillon which later formed the county of Laroche[355]. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, her husband's claim to Bouillon was through the property brought by his wife[356]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "II Kal Aug" of "Ida comitissa Namurcensis"[357].
     "m firstly as his second wife, FREDERIC II Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy, son of FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy [Luxembourg] & his wife [-- von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo).
     "m secondly ([1065/66]) ALBERT III Comte de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102)."
Med Lands cites:
[353] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[354] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 17 (24), MHG SS VIII, p. 577. Although this passage is not dated, the editor has placed "c 1066" in the margin.
[355] Murray, A. V. (2000) The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: a dynastic history 1099-1125 (Prosopographica & Genealogica), p. 17.
[356] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1076, MGH SS XXIII, p. 798.
[357] Barbier, J. (ed.) ´Obituaire de l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint-Gérard´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVIII (2e série, Tome II) (Louvain, 1882) ("Brogne Necrology"), p. 332.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo). The Vita Adelheidis names "Heinrici magnifici ducis et Adhelberonis Metensis episcopi, Friderici ducis fratrumque suorum" as grandsons of "Irminthrudis", daughter of Megingoz[115]. One version of the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ names "...Fredericus dux Lotharingie..." as one of the brothers of Ogive when recording her marriage[116]. Avocat of Stavelot: an undated charter, recording the meeting in May 1033 at Deville between Emperor Konrad III and Henri I King of France, records “super bono sancti Remacli [=Stablo]...comite Frederico” [brother of “comite Heinrico”, so identified as Friedrich/Frédéric de Luxembourg][117]. "…Friderico comite eiusque fratribus, Gisilberto et Theoderico…" were among the witnesses of the testament dated 12 Nov 1036 left by "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis, dominus de Ruscheio, de Serico, de Sarburch et de Berincastel", who was their paternal uncle[118]. He was installed by Heinrich III King of Germany as FREDERIC Duke of Lower Lotharingia: the Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon records in 1046 that “Fridericus frater Heinrici ducis Baioariæ” was installed as “dux Lotharingorum” in place of “Gotefridi fratre ignavo Gozzilone”[119]. The Annales Altahenses record in 1046 that the duchy was removed from "Gozziloni" and granted to "Friderico, Baioariæ ducis fratri"[120]. Emperor Heinrich III donated property “in villa Apinis [Epen] in comitatu Friderici ducis in pago Maselant” to Kloster Burtscheid by charter dated 11 Jul 1056[121]. Ekkehard´s Chronicon Wirziburgense records that “Fridericus et fratres eius” attacked “Germaniæ partibus...contra imperium Romanum” but were defeated by “Agnete imperatoris et principibus regni”, dated to 1057[122]. “Fredericus...Lothariencium dux” donated a serf to Saint-Trond by charter dated 1059, witnessed by “Gisleberti de Orcismunt, Ottonis advocati et fratris eius Emmonis comitis de Los, Alberti comitis de Musal”[123]. Bernold´s Chronicon records in 1059 that “Fridericus et fratres eius de Glichberga” rebelled against “Heinrico regi”[124]. Avocat of Saint-Trond: the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records in 1060 that “Theoderico [error for Federico]...dux Lotharie” was made “advocatus huius opidi” in place of "Ottonem comitem Durachii, fratrem Emmonis comitis de Los", while an earlier passage records the presence in the same year of “Theoderico duce Lotharingiæ...advocato...et Ottoni comite Durachii subadvocato” in a charter [the same as the following donation][125]. “Advocati ducis Friderici, subadvocati comitis Ottonis...” witnessed the charter dated 1060 under which Alberon Bishop of Metz confirmed his predecessors donations to Saint-Trond[126]. A charter dated 30 Aug 1067 records that "Dux Fredericus et Stabulensis advocatus" donated “ecclesiam de Sprimont et allodium...Genape” to Stablo abbey, after the death of “Gerberga uxore mea” from whom was derived his rights to the property[127]. The burials of Frédéric and his first wife Gerberge are confirmed by a charter of Stablo dated 30 Aug 1067[128].
     "m firstly GERBERGE de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain ([1015/30]-before 1059, bur Stablo). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Gerbergam, Friderici ducis uxorem" as daughter of "Mathildis filia Gerberge"[129]. Her suggested birth date is estimated very approximately to test the chronology of her descendants. A charter dated 30 Aug 1067 records that "Dux Fredericus et Stabulensis advocatus" donated “ecclesiam de Sprimont et allodium...Genape” to Stablo abbey, after the death of “Gerberga uxore mea” from whom was derived his rights to the property[130]. The burials of Frédéric and his first wife Gerberge are confirmed by a charter of Stablo dated 30 Aug 1067[131].
     "m secondly as her first husband, IDA of Saxony heiress of La Roche in the Ardennes, daughter of BERNHARD II Duke in Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given[132]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[133]. She married secondly ([1065/66]) Albert III Comte de Namur."
Med Lands cites:
[115] Vita Adelheidis abbatissæ Vilicensis 3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 757.
[116] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 318.
[117] MGH Diplomata, DD K III, 189, p. 251.
[118] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch I, 308, p. 360.
[119] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon, 1046, MGH SS V, p. 126.
[120] Annales Altahenses 1046, MGH SS XX, p.802 .
[121] MGH, Diplomata, DD H III, 377, p. 518.
[122] Ekkehardi Chronicon Wirziburgense, 17, MGH SS VI, p. 31.
[123] Piot, C. (1870) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Trond (Brussels) (“Saint-Trond”), Tome I, XIII, p. 18.
[124] Bernoldi Chronicon, 1059, MGH SS V, p. 427.
[125] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1060, MGH SS X, p. 385.
[126] Saint-Trond, Tome I, XV, p. 20.
[127] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XL p. 663.
[128] Kupper, J. L. ‘Les origines du duché de Limbourg-sur-Vesdre’, Revue belge de philologie et d’histoire, Tome 85, fasc. 3-4 (2007), [available at (26 May 2018)], p. 613, footnote 24, citing Halkin, J. & Roland, C. G. (1909) Recueil des chartes de l’abbaye de Stavelot-Malmédy, Tome I (Brussels), 114, p. 236 [not yet consulted].
[129] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 4, MGH SS XXV, p. 383.
[130] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XL p. 663.
[131] Kupper ‘Limbourg-sur-Vesdre’ (2007), p. 613, footnote 24, citing Halkin & Roland (1909) Stavelot-Malmédy, Tome I, 114, p. 236 [not yet consulted].
[132] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 17 (24), MHG SS VIII, p. 577. Although this passage is not dated, the editor has placed "c 1066" in the margin.
[133] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 3): “B2. Duke Frederic II of Lower Lorraine (1046-65), *1003, +18.5.1065; 1m: Gerberga (+by 1049), dau.of Cte Eustache de Boulogne; 2m: Ida of Saxony (+31.7.1102)”.19

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 2 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027129&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Namur, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Namur.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020361&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#BernhardIIdied1059. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Idadied1102
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eilica von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020364&tree=LEO
  9. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 276. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091990&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Fredericdied1065
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 149-22, p. 131. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg2.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027128&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#ALbertIIIdied1102B
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html#F2
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Ida de Saxe: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_de_Saxe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid (Alix) de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027133&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#AlixMOttoIIChiny
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godefroid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027095&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAMUR.htm#Godefroidied1139
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I de Namur: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027134&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#HenriNamurLarochediedbefore1138B

Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #5302, b. 1092, d. between 10 November 1143 and 13 November 1143
FatherFoulques IV "le Rechin" de Château-Landon Comte de Tours, d'Anjou et de Gatinais7,1,8,2,9,10,11,12 b. 1043, d. 14 Apr 1109
MotherBertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs7,1,2,13,4,5,14,12 b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem was born in 1092 at Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now); The Henry Project says b. bet 1089 and 1092 based on "Foulques IV and Bertrada were not married earlier than 1089, and Foulques V was certainly born before Bertrada ran off with Phillipe of France in 1092."15,16,1,17,4,2,6,18,12 He married Eremburge de Baugency Comtesse Heritiere du Maine et du Mans, dame de La Flèche, daughter of Hélie I (Elias) "de la Flèche" de Beaugency seigneur de La Flèche, Comte du Maine and Matilda/Mahaud de Château-du-Loir dame du Mayet, dame de Château-du-Loire, Countess, on 11 July 1110 at France;
His 1st wife.19,1,20,3,12,21,22,23,24,25,26 Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem married Melisende de Réthel Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa and Morphia (?) de Melitene, on 2 June 1129 at France;
His 2nd wife.27,16,1,28,2,3,17,4,5,29,30,31,12
Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem died between 10 November 1143 and 13 November 1143 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now); Genealogy.EU says d. "Acre 10.11.1143/Ptolemais 13.11.1144"; Genealogics says d. Acre 13 Nov 1144; Rudt Collenberg says d. 13.XI.1144; Med Lands says d. 10or 13 Nov 1144
     per The Henry Project: "[Chr. S. Albini Andegav.: 1143; Chr. S. Serg. Andegav.: 1143; Chr. S. Flor. Salm.: 1141 (sic, but in same year as the death of Pope Innocent II); Will. Tyre xv, 27 (vol. 2, p. 135), xvi, 3 (vol. 2, p. 139): 13 Nov. 1142] William of Tyre is often off on his chronology (as in the case of the death dates of Fulk's sons by his second wife, both also off by a year). Some sources [e.g., ES 2: 82] give 1144, but 1143 (in the same year as Pope Innocent II) seems the most likely."2,16,1,17,4,5,6,18,12
Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem was buried after 13 November 1143 at Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1092, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     10 Nov 1143 (aged 50–51), Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Israel
     French Nobility. King of Jerusalem, Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine, also known as Fulk V "The Young". He was the only son of Fulk IV "Le Rechin" of Anjou and his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort, who left her husband to become first mistress and later wife of King Philipp. He succeeded his father in 1109 and continued the war with Maine that his father had started. He invaded it and in 1110 married Eremburge of Maine to strengthen his reign there. From this marriage he was father of Geoffrey, Isabel (wife of William "The Atheling"), Elias II, Count of Maine and Sibylle, (later wife of William Clito of Normandy and Count Thierry of Flanders). He reorganized the administration and signed peace settlements with the counties that surrounded his territory. In 1120 he joined the crusade where he made a name for himself, as being a good warrior. In 1127 he received a message from the king of Jerusalem, Baldwin II, who proposed a marriage between Fulk and Baldwins daughter and heiress, Melisende. He abdicated in Anjou in favor for his son Geoffrey and married Melisende in 1129. Baldwin gave him the cities Acre and Tyre. Melisende gave birth to a son who was named Baldwin and that was supposed to reign with his parents. After the kings death in 1131 they ruled together, but Fulk soon assumed control of the government and excluded her entirely. As he was also regent of Antioch he married the heiress Constance to Raymond of Poitiers, uncle of Eleonore of Aquitaine. The Count of Jaffa, Hugh II, a cousin of Melisende sided with her and rebelled against him. They later signed a peace contract and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for 3 years. In 1135 the queen's party took over the government and Fulk's supporters fled. The couple reconciled later and she gave birth to a second son, Amalric. Fulk was able to strengthen the borders in the north and south and built several castles to secure the kingdom against the Muslims under Zengi and the Egyptians. He died during a hunting accident, when his horse stumbled, fell and landed on top of him. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Fulk of Anjou 1043–1109
          Bertrade de Montfort 1070–1117
     Spouses
          Eremburge De Beaugency 1096–1126 (m. 1110)
          Melisende of Jerusalem 1105–1161
     Children
          Mathilde d'Anjou 1110–1154
          Sibylle d'Anjou 1112–1165
          Geoffrey Plantagenet IV 1113–1151
          Baldwin of Anjou 1130–1163
          Amalric I of Anjou 1136–1174
     BURIAL     Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 20 Sep 2005
     Find A Grave Memorial 11784872.18
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Bellême): “Erembourg du Maine + 15/01/1126
     ép. après 1058 Foulques «Le Jeune», comte d’Anjou”


Per Racines et Histoire (Beaugency): “Eremburge de Beaugency ° 1099 (ou 1091 ?) + 14-15/01/1126 comtesse du Maine et du Mans (1110), dame de La Flèche et de château-du-Loir
     ép. dès 14/04/1109 Foulques V «Le Jeune» d’Anjou ° 1092 (Angers) + 13/11/1144 (Acre, Palestine) 9° comte d’Anjou (14/04/1109-1129), du Maine (1110-1129) et de Tours (1109), Roi de Jérusalem (14/09/1131- 1143) (fils de Foulques IV et de Bertrade de Montfort ; ép. 2) 02/06/1129 Mélisende de Réthel)
     postérité Anjou, Plantagenêts ”.23,24
; Per Med Lands:
     "EREMBURGE du Maine ([1096]-14 Jan 1126). Orderic Vitalis names “Eremburgem” as the daughter of “Helias [de Balgenceio]” and his wife “Gervasii de Castro Ligeri...filiam”, adding that she married “domini sui filio Fulconi Andegavorum comiti”[209]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavensium records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was betrothed to "Helias comes unicam filiam", who later married Geoffroy’s younger half-brother[210]. A charter dated 25 Apr 1120 records that "comes Andergavensis Fulco Fulconis et comitissa uxor eius Aremburgis filia comitis Helie" were present at the consecration of the church of Le Mans[211]. She succeeded her father in 1110 as Ctss du Maine. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Haremburgis Andegavorum nobilis comitissa"[212].
     "Betrothed to GEOFFROY IV Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Ermengarde de Bourbon ([1073]-19 May 1106).
     "m (betrothed before 14 Apr 1109, 11 Jul 1110) as his first wife, FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 13 Nov 1144)."
Med Lands cites:
[209] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332.
[210] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 142.
[211] Château-du-Loir 78, p. 44.
[212] Urseau Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.26
GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: page 141.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 311.
3. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia London, 1990. , Elizabeth Hallam, General Editor, Reference: 81 biography.20


; This is the same person as ”Fulk, King of Jerusalem” at Wikipedia and as ”Foulques V d'Anjou” at Wikipédia (FR).32,33

; This is the same person as ”Foulques (Fulk) V” at The Henry Project.11

; Per Genealogics:
     "Crusader & Knight Templar, Count of Tyre and Ptolemais. Foulques V 'the Young', Comte d'Anjou et Maine, King of Jerusalem, 1092-1144. In 1110, Fulk V married the only daughter of Héli, Count of Maine, thereby ultimately uniting Anjou and Maine. In 1120 he went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. His wife died in 1126 and in 1128 a delegation from Baudouin II, King of Jerusalem, arrived in France, asking Louis VII to choose one of the French nobility to marry his daughter Melisende and become heir to the throne of Jerusalem.
     "Fulk was chosen and married Melisende and in due course succeeded as King of Jerusalem. To defend the holy city from the Muslim champion, Zengi, Fulk allied with the Emir of Damascus and the Emperor of Constantinople during the early 1130s. Turkish raiders took him prisoner in 1137, but then freed him."2 Foulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem was also known as Fulk V "The Young" (?) Cte d'Anjou ed de Maine, King of Jerusalem.15,7,1

; Per Med Lands:
     "FOULQUES d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchiin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 10 or 13 Nov 1144). The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco" was the son of "Fulco Rechin" and "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti", referring to her as his third wife[273]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum iuniorem Martellum et Fulconam" as the two sons of "Fulco"[274]. William of Tyre names him and records his parentage[275]. His parentage is also given by Orderic Vitalis[276]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[277]. William of Tyre records that Foulques was imprisoned by the Comte de Poitou but released after the intervention of his mother, who was by then queen of France[278]. He succeeded his father in 1109 as FOULQUES V "le Jeune" Comte d'Anjou. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][279]. "Fulcho iunior comes Fulchonis comitis filius, frater Martelli Iunioris" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 4 Jan 1113[280]. Orderic Vitalis records that Foulques swore fealty to Henry I King of England, who invested him with the county of Maine, at "Petra Peculata" near Alençon in late Feb 1113, the alliance being confirmed by the betrothal of Henry's son to Foulques's daughter[281]. He later fought with King Henry I over the inheritance of his first wife. William of Malmesbury also records his dispute with King Henry over the latter's retention of the dowry of Foulques’s daughter Alice after her husband died in the Blanche Nef [White Ship][282]. The quarrel finally ended with the marriage of Foulques’s son to the king's daughter in 1128. Orderic Vitalis records that Foulques went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1120 and remained there "for some time attached to the Knights of the Temple"[283]. He left France in early 1129, resigning the county of Anjou to his older son by his first marriage, and landed at Acre in May 1129 before travelling to Jerusalem for his second marriage[284]. He was crowned FOULQUES King of Jerusalem 14 Sep 1131, by right of his second wife. He imposed himself as regent of Antioch after his sister-in-law Alix Ctss of Antioch attempted to reassert her right to the regency after the death of her father. He rescued Pons Count of Tripoli from the castle of Montferrand in 1133, where he had fled after being ambushed by Turkomans in the Nosairi Mountains. He also relieved Antioch which was being threatened by Sawar Governor of Aleppo[285]. Zengi marched on Homs and besieged the castle. King Foulques attempted to relieve the siege, but his army was massacred, and Foulques was obliged to seek refuge in the castle which he was eventually obliged to surrender as the price for his own release[286]. He agreed an alliance with Unur of Damascus in 1139 against Zengi atabeg of Aleppo, who was threatening Damascus, and forced the latter's retreat to Aleppo[287]. King Foulques died after being thrown from his horse during a hunting party[288]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Fulco prius Andegavorum comes postea rex Hierusalem"[289].
     "m firstly (before 14 Apr 1109, 11 Jul 1110) EREMBURGE du Maine, daughter and heiress of HELIE de la Flèche Comte du Maine & his first wife Mathilde de Château-du-Loir ([1096]-14 Jan 1126). Orderic Vitalis names “Eremburgem” as the daughter of “Helias [de Balgenceio]” and his wife “Gervasii de Castro Ligeri...filiam”, adding that she married “domini sui filio Fulconi Andegavorum comiti”[290]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulcone Richin filius eius Fulco" was married to "Helia Cenomannensi comite, unicam filiam suam" who had been betrothed to "Martellus frater suus"[291]. A charter dated 25 Apr 1120 records that "comes Andergavensis Fulco Fulconis et comitissa uxor eius Aremburgis filia comitis Helie" were present at the consecration of the church of Le Mans[292]. She succeeded her father in 1110 as Ctss du Maine. "Arenburgim Andegavensem comitissam…vir meus Fulco Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud by charter dated 18 Aug, dated to [1109/15][293]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Haremburgis Andegavorum nobilis comitissa"[294]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death in 1126 of "Arenburgis comitissa"[295]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "15 Jan" of "Aremburgis comitissa"[296].
     "m secondly (Jerusalem 2 Jun 1129) MELISENDE of Jerusalem, daughter of BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem & his wife Morphia of Melitene (-11 Sep 1161). She is named by William of Tyre who also records her parentage[297]. In 1127, her father sent Guillaume de Bures and Guy Brisebarre to France to offer her hand in marriage to Foulques V Comte d'Anjou as part of his plan for her eventual succession to the throne of Jerusalem[298]. "Milisenda filia regis…" subscribed the charter dated Mar 1128 under which "Balduinus…rex Iherusalem Latinorum secundus" granted privileges to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem[299]. She succeeded her father in 1131 as MELISENDE Queen of Jerusalem, crowned with her husband 14 Sep 1131. She founded the convent of St Lazarus at Bethany in 1143, and installed her sister Yvette as abbess[300]. After her husband's death, she and her son Baudouin were crowned as king and queen together 25 Dec 1144, but Queen Melisende assumed the government of the kingdom herself. She took as her adviser her first cousin Manassès de Hierges, Constable of Jerusalem[301]. She was in open breach with her son, after he was crowned again as an adult 2 Apr 1151 at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, without informing his mother. A council agreed that he would rule in Galilee and the northern part of the kingdom, while Mélisende retained Jerusalem and Nablus. King Baudouin demanded Jerusalem from her but she refused. He captured Constable Manassès at his castle of Mirabel in 1152 and expelled him from Palestine, after which his mother was obliged to yield Jerusalem[302]. Queen Mélisende presided over a council of regency in 1157 while her son was absent from Jerusalem on campaign[303]."
Med Lands cites:
[273] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[274] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[275] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606.
[276] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 187.
[277] Angers 65, p. 127.
[278] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606.
[279] Fontevraud 156, p. 142.
[280] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 84, p. 99.
[281] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 181.
[282] Malmesbury, 419, p. 365.
[283] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 311.
[284] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 178.
[285] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 195.
[286] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 203.
[287] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 227-8.
[288] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.
[289] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.
[290] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332.
[291] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 143.
[292] Château-du-Loir 78, p. 44.
[293] Fontevraud 165, p. 155.
[294] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.
[295] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 33.
[296] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 188.
[297] William of Tyre Continuator XII.IV, p. 517.
[298] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 177.
[299] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 44, p. 81.
[300] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 231-2.
[301] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.
[302] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 334-5.
[303] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 360.12


; Per Racines et Histoire (Gâtinais/Anjou): “5) Foulques V «Le Jeune» d’Anjou ° 1092 + 1011/1143-13/11/1144 (Acre ou Ptolemaïs, Palestine) comte d’Anjou, de Tours (1109-1129), du Maine (1110-1129), croisé (1121, avec Hugues de Payns), Roi de Jérusalem (1131-1143)
     ép. 1) 11/07/1110 Eremburge de Beaugency, comtesse du Maine et du Mans (1110), dame de La Flèche ° 1091/96 + 14/01/1126
     ép. 2) 02-24/06/1129 (Jérusalem) Mélisende de Réthel, Reine de Jérusalem ° ~1101 + 11/09/1161 (fille de Baudouin II, Roi de Jérusalem) ”.25

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 2): “C3. [5m.] Foulques V "le Jeune", Cte d'Anjou (1109-29), Ct of Maine (1110-29), King of Jerusalem (1131-43), *1092, +Acre 10.11.1143/Ptolemais 13.11.1144; 1m: 11.7.1110 Eremburge, Cts de Maine (*ca 1096 +1126); 2m: 2.6.1129 Melisende de Rethel, Queen of Jerusalem (*ca 1101 +11.9.1161.)1"

; Per Med Lands:
     "MELISENDE of Jerusalem, daughter of BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem & his wife Morfia of Melitene (-11 Sep 1161). She is named by William of Tyre who also records her parentage[103]. In 1127, her father sent Guillaume de Bures and Guy Brisebarre to France to offer her hand in marriage to Foulques V Comte d'Anjou as part of his plan for her eventual succession to the throne of Jerusalem[104]. "Milisenda filia regis…" subscribed the charter dated Mar 1128 under which "Balduinus…rex Iherusalem Latinorum secundus" granted privileges to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem[105]. She succeeded her father in 1131 as MELISENDE Queen of Jerusalem, crowned with her husband 14 Sep 1131. She founded the convent of St Lazarus at Bethany in 1143, and installed her sister Yvette as abbess[106]. After her husband's death, she and her son Baudouin were crowned as king and queen together 25 Dec 1144, but Queen Melisende assumed the government of the kingdom herself. She took as her adviser her first cousin Manassès de Hierges, Constable of Jerusalem[107]. She was in open breach with her son after he was crowned again as an adult in 1151, without informing his mother. A council agreed that he would rule in Galilee and the northern part of the kingdom, while Mélisende retained Jerusalem and Nablus. King Baudouin demanded Jerusalem from her but she refused. He captured Constable Manassès at his castle of Mirabel in 1152 and expelled him from Palestine, after which his mother was obliged to yield Jerusalem[108]. Queen Mélisende presided over a council of regency in 1157 while her son was absent from Jerusalem on campaign[109].
     "m (2 Jun 1129[110]) as his second wife, FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 13 Nov 1144). He left France in early 1129, resigning the county of Anjou to his older son by his first marriage, and landed at Acre in May 1129 before travelling to Jerusalem for his second marriage[111]. He was crowned as FOULQUES King of Jerusalem 14 Sep 1131, by right of his wife. He imposed himself as regent of Antioch after his sister-in-law Alix Ctss of Antioch attempted to reassert her right to the regency after the death of her father. He rescued Pons Count of Tripoli from the Castle of Montferrand in 1133, where he had fled after being ambushed by Turks in the Nosairi Mountains. He also relieved Antioch which was being threatened by Sawar Governor of Aleppo[112]. Zengi marched on Homs and besieged the castle of Montferrand. King Foulques went to relieve the siege, but his army was massacred, and he was obliged to seek refuge in the castle which he was eventually obliged to surrender as the price for his own release[113]. He agreed an alliance with Unur of Damascus in 1139 against Zengi atabeg of Aleppo, who was threatening Damascus, and forced the latter's retreat to Aleppo[114]. King Foulques died after being thrown from his horse during a hunting party[115]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Fulco prius Andegavorum comes postea rex Hierusalem"[116]."
Med Lands cites:
[103] WT XII.IV, p. 517.
[104] WT XIII.XXIV, p. 593, and XIV.II, p. 608.
[105] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 44, p. 81.
[106] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 231-2.
[107] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.
[108] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 334-5.
[109] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 360.
[110] WT XIII.XXIV, p. 593.
[111] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 178.
[112] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 195.
[113] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 203.
[114] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 227-8.
[115] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.
[116] Urseau, C. (ed.) Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers (Angers).30


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Queen Melisende of Jerusalem, *ca 1101, +11.9.1161; m.2.6.1129 Cte Foulcques V d'Anjou, King of Jerusalem (*1092 +13.11.1144.)28"

; Per Racines et Histoire (Rethel): “Mélisende de Jérusalem ° ~1101 + 11/09/1161 Reine de Jérusalem (14/09/1131-1143)
     ép. 02/06/1129 comte Foulques V «Le Jeune» d’Anjou, comte de Tours (1109- 1129) et du Maine (1110-1129), Roi de Jérusalem (1131) ° 1092 (Angers) + 10/11/1144 (Acre, chute de cheval)
     postérité dont : Baudouin III, Roi de Jérusalem (25/12/1144) ° ~1131 + 1162 et Amauri 1er ° ~1136 + 1174”.34 He was Count of Anjou and Tours between 1109 and 1129.35,1,5 He was Count of Maine (jure uxoris) between 1110 and 1129.1,4,5 He was King of Jerusalem. (See attached map of Near Eas in 1135.) between 1131 and 1143.36,1,17,5

Family 2

Melisende de Réthel Queen of Jerusalem b. c 1101, d. 11 Sep 1161
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques V 'the Young': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004069&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/fulk0005.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beaugency.pdf, p. 2.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 118-24, p. 106. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques IV 'Rechin': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007641&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIVdied1109. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/fulk0005.htm
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesVdied1144B.
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/bertr000.htm
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 198, PLANTAGENET 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 118-24, p. 126.
  17. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 October 2019), memorial page for Fulk of Anjou, V (1092–10 Nov 1143), Find A Grave Memorial no. 11784872, citing Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Yerushalayim (Jerusalem District), Israel ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/11784872/fulk-of_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 277. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques V 'the Young': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004069&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eremburge: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004070&tree=LEO
  22. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Éremburge de la Flèche: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eremb000.htm
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bellême Seigneurs d’Alençon & Château-Gontier, & Château-Renaud, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Belleme.pdf
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Beaugency ancien Boisgency, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beaugency.pdf
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MAINE.htm#EremburgeMFoulquesVAnjou
  27. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 112, Figure 2.
  28. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html#QM
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Melisende de Réthel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008718&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#MelisendeQueenB
  31. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melisende,_Queen_of_Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  32. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk,_King_of_Jerusalem.
  33. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Foulques V d'Anjou: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foulques_V_d%27Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  34. [S2208] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008: "Re: Daughter of Alphonse Jourdain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Jan 2008, Comtes deRethel, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Rethel.pdf. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008."
  35. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225, p. 112.
  36. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 234. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  37. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015362&tree=LEO
  38. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6.
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO
  40. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  41. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff005.htm
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026911&tree=LEO
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sibylla d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020227&tree=LEO
  44. [S1861] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 20 Jan 2005: "Re: Thierry d'Alsace, Count of Flanders"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 20 Jan 2005."
  45. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 8.
  46. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#SibylleM1GuillaumeIFlanderM2ThierryIFlan.
  47. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amalric I d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020218&tree=LEO

Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant1,2,3

F, #5303, b. circa 1104, d. 23 April 1151
FatherGodefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant4,1,2,3,5 b. c 1060, d. 25 Jan 1139
MotherIda de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine2,6,3 b. c 1088, d. a 1117
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited26 Oct 2020
     Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant was born circa 1104 at Brabant, Belgium (now);
Boyer [2001:7] says b. 1103-6. Genealogics says b. c1104. Find A Grave says b. 1094.7,3,8,9 She married Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England, son of William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy and Mathilde/Matilda/Maud (?) of Flanders, Duchess of Normandy, on 29 January 1121 at Windsor, Berkshire, England.10,11,12,2,3 Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant married William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex, son of William "Pincerna, the Butler" d'Aubigny Lord of Buckenham, co. Norfolk and Matilda/Maud le Bigod, in 1138; HENRY I's widow ADELIZ married in 1138 William d'Aubigny, who the next year, probably as a result, was created Earl of Lincoln. William's father was a Norman immigrant to England in HENRY I's reign. His son, who by this advantageous marriage came into the former Queen's dowry of Arundel Castle, together with its Honour (feudal administrative unit embodying several knight's fees), has been held thereby to have become Earl of Arundel (see also NORFOLK, D). By 1142 he had been deprived of his Earldom of Lincoln and thereafter, indeed even before, was spoken of sometimes as Earl of Arundel and sometimes as Earl of Chichester or Earl of Sussex (see CHICHESTER, E, for elaboration on this point).13,12,14,4,1,2,3
Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant died on 23 April 1151 at Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now).10,2,3,9
Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant was buried after 23 April 1151 at Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1094, Belgium
     DEATH     23 Apr 1151 (aged 56–57), Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium
     English Monarch. The Queen consort of King Henry I, she was the daughter of Godfrey, Duke of Lorraine and Ida (or Clementia) of Namur. Married Henry as his second queen on January 29, 1122, he married her in order to have a male heir; however, they had no children. After the king's death in 1135 she married William d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel in 1138, by whom she had six children. She spent her final years in a convent in Affligem, Flanders where she died at the age of 49. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
      Godfrey I Duke of Brabant 1060–1139
     Spouses
      Henry I of England 1068–1135
      William d'Aubigny 1099–1176
     Siblings
      Ida de Lorraine von Kleve 1107–1162
      Godfrey II de Louvain 1110–1142
      Joscelin de Louvain 1120–1180
     Children
      Olivia d' Aubigny
      Agatha d' Aubigny
      Alice d'Aubigny 1136–1188
      William d'Aubigny 1136–1193
     BURIAL     Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 17 Feb 2004
     Find A Grave Memorial 8397370.9
     GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Family 1

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Chiny: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026478&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adeliza de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007057&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Adeliza Louvain of Brabant (1094–23 Apr 1151), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8397370, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8397370/adeliza_louvain_of_brabant
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-184, NORMANDY 8.
  11. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 508-512. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-23, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lincoln Family Page.
  15. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 3.

Frederic du Donjon

M, #5304, b. circa 1085, d. between 1117 and 1176
FatherEverard de Donjon b. c 1050, d. bt 1088 - 1141
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited14 Feb 2003
     Frederic du Donjon was born circa 1085 at Yerre, France.1
Frederic du Donjon died between 1117 and 1176 at Corbeil, France; WFT Est.1
     GAV-24 EDV-24.

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant1,2,3,4,5

M, #5305, b. circa 1060, d. 25 January 1139
FatherHenri II 'le Ceinture' (?) Comte de Louvain6,7,8 b. bt 1020 - 1021, d. bt 1078 - 1079
MotherAdelaide/Adele (?) van Betuwe, comtesse des Basques9,6,8 b. c 1023, d. a 1086
ReferenceGAV25 EDV24
Last Edited23 Nov 2020
     Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant was born circa 1060 at Lorraine Inferie, France.10,6 He married Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine, daughter of Otto II de Chiny Comte de Chiny and Adelaide/Alix (?) de Namur, circa 1103 at Belgium; his 1st wife; Racines et Histoire says m. "1105 (ou ~1099 ?)11,2,10,5,6,12" Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant married Clemence/Clementia (?) de Bourgogne, Regent of Flanders, daughter of Guillaume I "The Great" Testard (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Macon and Etiennette (?), in 1125;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife. Genealogy.EU (Brabant 2 page) says m. ca 1125; so does Racines et Histoire.13,10,14,15,5,16,6,17
Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant died on 25 January 1139 at Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now).10,5,6
Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant was buried after 25 January 1139 at Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1060, Belgium
     DEATH     25 Jan 1139 (aged 78–79), Belgium
     Godfrey I of Brabant "The Bearded" Count of Brabant, Brusels and Louvain, Duke of Lower Lorraine, Margrave of Antwerp, Godefroi de Louvain
     Godfrey was the second son of Henry II of Brabant, Count of Louvan and Adela, the daughter of Count Everard of Orthen. Grandson of Lambert II Count of Louvain and Oda de Verdun. Born about 1060 in Brabant, now Belgium.
     Godfrey had an unknown first wife, and secondly married Ida of Namur, the daughter of Otto II of Namur and Adelaide of Chiny. They had the following children:
* Adeliza of Louvain, wife of Henry I, King of England & William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel
* Godfrey II of Louvain, Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Louvain
* Clarissa d. 1140
* Henry, monk at the abbey of Affligem
* Ida, wife of Arnold II, count of Cleves
* Joscelin of Louvain, married Agnes De Percy
     After Ida died in 1125, Godfrey married Clementia, the daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and widow of Robert II, Count of Flanders. They had no children.
     Godfrey succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. His life and rule was full of struggles over land with many political heads of state and religious powers. Godfrey's peers were the Emperor Henry IV, King Henry of England, Pope Paschal II, Robert II of Flanders, Baldwin of Flanders abd Charles the Good.
     Godfrey retired to the abbey of Affligem, dying of old age on 25 January 1139, buried in the left aisle of the abbey church.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Henry De Louvain, II 1021–1078
     Children
      Adeliza Louvain of Brabant 1094–1151
      Ida de Lorraine von Kleve 1107–1162
      Godfrey II de Louvain 1110–1142
      Joscelin de Louvain 1120–1180
     BURIAL     Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 4 Dec 2010
Find A Grave Memorial 62531138.6
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Gens Nostra. 1985 56
     2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, 1995, Neustadt an der Aisch , Brandenburg, Erich. 93
     3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia .6

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Duke Godfrey I=Godfried V "der Bärtige" of Lower Lorraine (1139-40), *ca 1060, +Jerusalem 25.1.1139/40; 1m: ca 1099 Ida de Chiny (*ca 1078, +ca 1117); 2m: ca 1125 Clementia, dau.of Cte Guillaume de Bourgogne."10
GAV-25 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GODEFROI de Louvain, son of HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [Adelheid] in der Betuwe (-25 Jan 1139, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Chronicon Affligemense names "Heinrico et Godefrido" as the two sons of "Adela comitissa Lovaniensis"[96]. "Henricus…Bracbatensis patriæ comes et advocatus" founded Afflighem abbey by charter dated 1086 which also records the donation of property "juxta in villa…Asca" made by "fraterque meus Godefridus"[97]. He succeeded his brother in 1095 as GODEFROI Comte de Louvain. He was in conflict with Richer Bishop of Liège over the county of Brugeron in 1095/96[98]. Markgraaf van Antwerpen 1105. Heinrich V King of Germany invested him as GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1106. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ, Comes Lovaniensis et Bruxellensis Marchio sacri Regni” founded Afflighem Abbey where he was buried[99]. Vogt of Afflighem 1107. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the abdication in 1128 of "Godefridum Lovaniensem comitem de ducatu Lotharingie" and his substitution by "Waleramnum comitem Lemburgie"[100]. Vogt of Gembloux and Nivelles 1129. "Ducem Godefridum seniorem eiusque filium…Godefridum iuniorem" donated property "in parochia Braniensi…Dudinsart" to Gembloux by charter dated 1131, witnessed by "Godefridus comes Namucensis eiusque filius Henricus, Henricus minor filius ipsius ducis, Wilhelmus advocatus de Namuco eiusque frater Anselmus…"[101]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1139 of "Godefridus maior dux Lotharingiæ"[102]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death of "Godefridus Barbatus Lovaniensis dux Lothariensis" and his burial at Afflighem[103]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Godefridus dux Lovaniensis, frater nostre societatis"[104].
     "m firstly ([1105]) IDA de Chiny, daughter of OTTO [II] Comte de Chiny & his wife Alix de Namur (-1117/25). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium which records [her brother] "Adalbero Metensium primicerius, filiorum Lovaniensis domini avunculus"[105].
     "m secondly ([1125]) as her second husband, CLEMENCE de Bourgogne, widow of ROBERT II Count of Flanders, daughter of GUILLAUME I Comte de Bourgogne & his wife Etiennette --- ([1078]-[1133]). "Clementie Flandrarum comitisse" is named as wife of "Robertus iunior" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[106]. Orderic Vitalis names her as wife of Count Robert but does not give her origin[107]. Her origin is confirmed by the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana which names "Clementiam filiam Willelmi comitis Burgundionum cognomento Testahardith" as wife of "Rodbertus Rodberti filius"[108]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. Clemence could not have been born much later than 1078, given the birth of her first child (by her first husband) in 1093. She was appointed regent in Flanders during the absence of her first husband on crusade[109]. She promoted the monastic movement and introduced Cluniac rule into several abbeys in Flanders[110]. She founded Bourbourg Abbey with her first husband in [1103]. "Balduinus Flandrensium comes et Clementia comitissa" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Bertin to Cluny made by "dominus meus Rotbertus comes", by charter 12 Apr 1112[111]. She opposed the succession in 1119 of Count Charles, supporting the candidature of Guillaume d'Ypres[112]. The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin records the death in [1133] of "Clementia Roberti iunioris vidua" and specifies that "eatenus pene terciam partem Flandrie dotis loco tenuit"[113], although it is curious that this does not refer to her second husband who was still alive when she died.
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Duke Godefroi's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[96] Chronicon Affligemense 4, MGH SS IX, p. 408.
[97] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, LXII, p. 73.
[98] Giles of Orval, Ægidii Aureævallensis Gesta episcoporum Leodiensium, MGH SS XXV, pp. 1-129, cited in Murray (2000), p. 55.
[99] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[100] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1126, MGH SS X, p. 386, which dates the event to the third year of the reign of King Lothar.
[101] Roland, C. G. (ed.) (1921) Recueil des chartes de l´abbaye de Gembloux (Gembloux) ("Gembloux"), 51, p. 58.
[102] Annales Blandinienses 1139, MGH SS V, p. 29.
[103] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1138, MGH SS XXIII, p. 833.
[104] Barbier, J. (ed.) ´Obituaire de l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint-Gérard´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVIII (2e série, Tome II) (Louvain, 1882) ("Brogne Necrology"), p. 297.
[105] Rodulfi, Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium XII.14, MGH SS X, p. 311.
[106] Saint-Bertin II.57, p. 266.
[107] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 163.
[108] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[109] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin), Vol. 1, p. 166.
[110] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 58.
[111] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1878) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris) Tome V, 3899, p. 249.
[112] Nicholas (1992), p. 62.
[113] Saint-Bertin II.11, p. 298.18


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Godfrey I (German: Gottfried, Dutch: Godfried), born c. 1060, died 25 January 1139, called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey VI – n.b. Godfrey of Bouillon, d. 1100, was Godfrey V, but numbering is uncertain) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.
Biography
     "Godfrey was the son of Henry II (c. 1020–1078) and Adela of Orthen (or Betuwe), a daughter of Count Everard of Orthen. He succeeded his brother Henry III who died wounded in a tournament in 1095, and only had young daughters. His widow Gertrude married Theodoric II, Duke of (upper) Lorraine.
     "He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.
     "Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders "the Crusader", who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.
     "In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.
     "By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran of Limburg (c. 1085 – 1139), the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).
     "After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Theodoric of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.
     "Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.
Family and children
     "He married Ida of Chiny (1078–1117), daughter of Otto II, Count of Chiny, (c. 1065 – after 1131) and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:
* Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103 – d. abbey of Affligem, 23 April 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109 – before 1151).
* Godfrey II of Louvain (b. 1107 – d. 13 June 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia (Lower Lorraine), Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Louvain. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach (d.a. 1163), daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.
* Clarissa (d. 1140).
* Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.
* Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold I, Count of Cleves (d. 1147).
* Joscelin of Louvain, married Agnes De Percy and had issue.
     Later, he married Clementia of Burgundy (c. 1078 – c. 1133), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and widow of Robert II, Count of Flanders. They had no children.
Sources
* Collins's Peerage of England, ed. S.E. Brydges IX vols, London 1812.
* Académie royale de Belgique, Biographie Nationale, v. 7, Brussels, 1883.
* Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Godfrey I, Count of Louvain, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.[self-published source][better source needed]"19


; Per Genealogics:
     "Godfried was born about 1060, the son of Henri II, comte de Louvain, and Adela. Called 'the Bearded', 'the Courageous', or 'the Great', he was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Louvain (or Leuven) from 1095 to his death, and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfried V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.
     "Godfried succeeded his brother Henri III in 1095. He came first into conflict with Otbert, bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz they both claimed. In 1099 Emperor Heinrich IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, comte de Namur. Godfried arbitrated a dispute between Heinrich III, Graf von Luxemburg, and Arnold I, Graf von Looz, Burggraf von Mainz, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.
     "Godfried was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102 he stopped Robert II, Graaf van Vlaanderen, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor Heinrich V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Heinrich I, Graf von Limburg, duke of Lower Lorraine, was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfried. After Heinrich escaped from prison he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.
     "About 1103 Godfried married Ida de Chiny, daughter of Otto II, comte de Chiny, and Adelheid (Alix) de Namur. Their son Godfried II and daughters Adeliza and Ida would have progeny. Godfried's wife Ida died about 1117/1121, and after 1121 he married Clementia de Bourgogne, widow of Robert II, Graaf van Vlaanderen, and daughter of Guillaume I, comte de Bourgogne, and his wife Stephanie. This marriage remained childless.
     "In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfried led a revolt in Germany. In 1118 the emperor and Godfried were reconciled. In 1119 Baudouin VII, Graaf van Vlaanderen, died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfried's second wife. Godfried supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles 'the Good'. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfried again sided with the loser.
     "By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I, king of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, Godfried greatly increased his prestige. However, Emperor Heinrich V died in 1125 and Godfried supported Konrad III von Schwaben, Herzog von Franken, against Lothar von Supplinburg. After Lothar was elected, he withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine from Godfried and granted it to Walram III Paganus, the son of Heinrich I whom Emperor Heinrich V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfried maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).
     "After the assassination of Charles 'the Good', Graaf van Vlaanderen, in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito, the son of Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy, prevailed but his reign was soon dogged by revolts. Godfried intervened on behalf of Thierry d'Alsace, who prevailed against Clito and was count of Flanders until his death in 1168. Godfried continued to war against Liège and Namur.
     "Godfried spent his last years in the abbey of Afflighem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church."6


; Per Burke's: "GODFREY I , DUKE OF BRABANT from 1106, also MARQUIS OF ANTWERP and COUNT OF LOUVAIN, called 'The Bearded', deposed from his Duchy 1127 but continued styling himself Duke and was so succeeded by his son; m 1st Ida, dau of Albert III, Marquis of Namur. GODFREY I m 2nd Clemence, widow of Robert II, Count of Flanders, dau of Count William I of Burgundy and sis of POPE CALIXTUS II, and d c 1140."2
He was Duke of Brabant in 1106.2 He was Duke of Lower Lorraine between 1139 and 1140.10

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 274. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godfried I 'with the Beard': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020126&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Godfrey I Duke of Brabant (1060–25 Jan 1139), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62531138, citing Affligem Abbey, Affligem, Arrondissement Halle-Vilvoorde, Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62531138/godfrey_i-duke_of-brabant. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri II 'le Ceinture': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020125&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIILouvaindied1078. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela van de Betuwe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026482&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Chiny: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026478&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm#IdaChimaydiedbefore1125MGodefroiBrabant
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 161-23, p. 141. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clementia de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026395&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 7.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RaimondAmousdied1107
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#GodefroiILouvainVLowLothdied1139B.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_I,_Count_of_Louvain. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#IdaLouvaindiedbefore1162.
  21. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godfried II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020127&tree=LEO
  23. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 155-24, p. 149. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.

Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland1,2

M, #5306, b. circa 1017, d. 28 June 1061
Floris I, Count of Holland
Photograph by Hendrik van Heessel (†1470)
FatherDirk III Hierosolymita (?) Count of Holland3,1,4,5,6 b. c 985, d. 27 May 1039
MotherOthelindis (?) von der Nordmark1,5,7,3,6 b. c 993, d. 9 Mar 1044
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited4 Aug 2020
     Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland was born circa 1017 at Vlaardingen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands; Genealogics says b. ca 1017; Med Lands says b. 1010/21.1,3,6 He married Gertrude (?) von Sachsen, daughter of Bernhard II (?) Herzog von Sachsen and Eilika von Schweinfurt, circa 1050;
Her 1st husband.8,9,1,3,6,10,11,12
Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland died on 28 June 1061 at Nederhermert, Gelderland, Netherlands; murdered.1,3,6
Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland was buried after 28 June 1061 at Egmond Abbey, Egmond aan den Hoef, Bergen Municipality, Noord-Holland, Netherlands,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1020, Noord-Holland, Netherlands
     DEATH     28 Jun 1061 (aged 40–41), Noord-Holland, Netherlands
     Floris I of Holland was Count of Holland (which was called Frisia at that time) from 1049 to 1061. He was a son of Dirk III and Othelindis. He succeeded his brother Dirk IV who was murdered in 1049. He was involved in a war of a few Lotharingian vassals against the imperial authority. On a retreat from Zaltbommel he was ambushed and killed in battle at Nederhemert (called Hamerth at the time), on 28 June 1061. He married ca. 1050 Princess Gertrude of Saxony, daughter of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony and Eilika of Schweinfurt, and had at least three children by her:
1. Dirk V (c. 1052, Vlaardingen–17 June 1091).
2. Bertha (c. 1055–1094, Montreuil-sur-Mer), who married Philip I of France in 1072.
3. Floris (b. c. 1055), a canon at Liége.

     Gertrude married secondly in 1063 Robert the Frisian, Count of Flanders, who also acted as guardian for the children of her previous marriage and as regent for his stepson until 1071.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Dirk III of Holland unknown–1039
          Othelindis of Holland
     Spouse
          Geertruida von Sachsen 1033–1113
     Siblings
          Dirk IV Count of Holland 1030–1049
     Children
          Dirk V Count of Holland 1052–1091
          Bertha of Holland 1055–1093
     BURIAL     Egmond Abbey, Egmond aan den Hoef, Bergen Municipality, Noord-Holland, Netherlands
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 7 May 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 89760908.13
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: 12
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.3
GAV-25 EDV-25.

; This is the same person as ”Floris I, Count of Holland” at Wikipedia, as ”Florent Ier de Frise occidentale” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Floris I (graaf)” at Wikipedia (DE).14,15,16

; Per Genealogics:
     “Floris was born in Vlaardingen, Zuid Holland, about 1017, the second son of Dirk III, count of Holland and Othelhildis. About 1050 he married Gertrud of Saxony, daughter of Bernhard II, duke of Saxony and Eilica von Schweinfurt. They had seven children, of whom two, Dirk and Bertha, would have progeny. Bertha married Philippe I, king of France.
     “Floris succeeded his brother Dirk IV who was murdered in 1049. He was involved in a war by Lotharingian vassals against imperial authority. Floris I was murdered at Nederhemert on 28 June 1061. He was succeeded by his son Dirk V.”.3 Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland was also known as Florent I (?) Count of Holland.

; Per Med Lands:
     "FLORIS ([1010/21]-Hamerth 28 Jun 1061, bur Egmond). The Annales Egmundani names "Florentius I" as brother of "Theodericus IIII comes filius Theoderici et Othelhildis" when recording that he succeeded his brother[324]. No source has been identified which indicates Floris’s birth date. However, recent examination of his skeleton has revealed that he was aged between 40 and 50 years old when he died, which would place his birth in [1010/21][325]. His estimated marriage date suggests his birth in the later part of this estimated birth date range. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names "Theodricum succedentem Hollandia principum et Florencium Orientalis Frisie comitem" as children of Count Dirk III & his wife[326]. "Heinricus…rex" confirmed a treaty between Wilhelm Bishop of Utrecht and Reginbert Abbot of Echternach under which they recognised each other's rights in "Flardinge, Kiericwerve, Velsereburc, Heligelo, Pethem" by charter dated 28 Dec 1063 which names "Theoderico comite ac filio eius Theoderico fratreque eius Florencio"[327]. He succeeded his brother in 1049 as FLORIS I Count of Holland. The Annales Egmundani record that "Florentius comes Hollandensis" was killed in 1061 at "Hamerthe"[328]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1061…in Hamerth…XIV Kal Iun" of Count Floris and his burial at Egmond[329]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records that "Florentius primus Hollandie comes" was killed in battle "1061 IV Kal Iul"[330].
     "m ([1050]) as her first husband, GERTRUD of Saxony, daughter of BERNHARD II Duke of Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris and "Gertrudim filiam Hermanni ducis Saxonum"[331], "Hermanni" being an error for "Bernardi" as the former would be impossible chronologically. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum"[332]. "Theodericus…Holtlandensis comes…Florentii filius" recites the ownership history of properties claimed by the church of Utrecht in Holland, including donations by "Florentius, tercii Theoderici filius, cum bone memorie uxore sua Gerthrude", by spurious charter dated 26 Jul 1083, probably written [1130][333]. She married secondly (1063) Robert de Flandre ([1035]-13 Oct 1093), who was regent of Holland for his stepson until 1071, when he succeeded as Robert I Count of Flanders. The date of her second marriage is based on the Chronologia Johannes de Beke recording that, two years after the death of her first husband, Gertrud married "Roberto iuniori filio Balduini comitis Flandrie", specifying that the latter ruled the county of Holland on behalf of "Theodrici domicelli iunioris adhuc etatis"[334]. "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin[335]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[336]. The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired the "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud[337]. [The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa"[338]. It is uncertain whether this entry relates to the widow of Count Floris and Count Robert.] Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders[339]. [A manuscript catalogue of benefactors to Eversham monastery records the death “1 aprilis” 1113 of “Robertus Hierosolymitanus...Gertrudis mater eius”[340]. The accuracy of this source is unknown. The latest date recorded is 1629, but it is not known whether the document represents a later compilation based on earlier sources.]"
Med Lands cites:
[324] Annales Egmundani 1049, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[325] Cordfunke, E. H. P. (2010) De Abdij van Egmond, p. 96 [communicated by Kees Nieuwenhuijsen in a private email to the author dated 12 May 2016].
[326] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 39a, p. 73.
[327] D H IV 116, p. 152.
[328] Annales Egmundani 1061, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[329] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 46, p. 87.
[330] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[331] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 45, p. 85.
[332] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[333] Oorkondenboek Holland (1970) 88, p. 181, Latin text and English translation available at (31 Aug 2006).
[334] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 46, p. 87.
[335] Saint-Bertin II.92, p. 288.
[336] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[337] Annales Egmundani 1063, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[338] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[339] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[340] Meestere, G. de (1852) Chronicon Monasterii Evershamensis (Bruges), Catalogus benefactorum præcipuorum nostræ ecclesiæ de Eversham, p. 68.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 1): “C2. Ct Floris I of Holland (1049-61), *Vlaardingen ca 1017, +murdered Gelderland 28.6.1061; m.ca 1050 Gertrud of Saxony (*ca 1030, +4.8.1113)”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD of Saxony (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum"[341]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris and "Gertrudim filiam Hermanni ducis Saxonum"[342], "Hermanni" being an error for "Bernardi" as the former would be impossible chronologically. "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin[343]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[344]. The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired the "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud[345]. [The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa"[346]. It is uncertain whether this entry relates to the widow of Count Floris and Count Robert.] Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders[347]. [A manuscript catalogue of benefactors to Eversham monastery records the death “1 aprilis” 1113 of “Robertus Hierosolymitanus...Gertrudis mater eius”[348]. The accuracy of this source is unknown. The latest date recorded is 1629, but it is not known whether the document represents a later compilation based on earlier sources.]
     "m firstly ([1050]) FLORIS I Count of Holland, son of DIRK III Count of Holland & his wife Othelindis [von Haldensleben-Nordmark] ([1010/21]- Hamerth 28 Jun 1061, bur Egmond).
     "m secondly (1063) ROBERT de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). Count of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He succeeded his nephew 1071 as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders."
Med Lands cites:
[341] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[342] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[343] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris), II.92, p. 288.
[344] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[345] Annales Egmundani 1063, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[346] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[347] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[348] Meestere, G. de (1852) Chronicon Monasterii Evershamensis (Bruges), Catalogus benefactorum præcipuorum nostræ ecclesiæ de Eversham, p. 68.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Billung): “D2. Gertrud, *Schweinfurt ca 1028, +Veurne 4.8.1113, bur Veurne; 1m: ca 1050 Floris I of Holland (+28.6.1061); 2m: 1063 Robert I of Flanders (*1031 +13.10.1093)”.18 He was Count of Holland between 1039 and 1049.1

Family

Gertrude (?) von Sachsen b. c 1028, d. 4 Aug 1113
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018662&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018662&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dirk III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091843&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#DirkIIIdied1039B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIdied1061
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Othelhildis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091844&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 164-23, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geertruid of Saxony: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018661&tree=LEO
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Gertruddied1113
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 31 July 2020), memorial page for Floris I of Holland (1020–28 Jun 1061), Find a Grave Memorial no. 89760908, citing Egmond Abbey, Egmond aan den Hoef, Bergen Municipality, Noord-Holland, Netherlands; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89760908. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_I,_Count_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Florent Ier de Frise occidentale: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florent_Ier_de_Frise_occidentale. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S4777] Wikipedia - De vrije encyclopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Floris I (graaf): https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_I_(graaf). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NL).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html#GB2
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adele: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174510&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#AdelaChristinadied1085MBaudouinIGuines
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104702&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104703&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Peter: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104704&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Machteld: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104705&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dirk V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018663&tree=LEO
  26. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Berthadied1093

Gertrude (?) von Sachsen1

F, #5307, b. circa 1028, d. 4 August 1113
FatherBernhard II (?) Herzog von Sachsen2,3,4,5,6 b. c 995, d. 29 Jun 1059
MotherEilika von Schweinfurt2,7,4,5,6 b. bt 1000 - 1005, d. c 1055
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Gertrude (?) von Sachsen was born circa 1028 at Schweinfurt, Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany; Genealogics says b. ca 1030; Med Lands; Racines et Histoire and Genelaogy.EU say b. ca 1028.8,9,6,5 She married Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland, son of Dirk III Hierosolymita (?) Count of Holland and Othelindis (?) von der Nordmark, circa 1050;
Her 1st husband.8,10,11,12,13,14,9,5 Gertrude (?) von Sachsen married Robert I "le Frison" (?) Count of Flanders, Count of Holland, son of Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen and Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance, in 1063;
Her 2nd husband.10,8,9,6,5,15,16
Gertrude (?) von Sachsen died on 4 August 1113 at Veurne.8,9,5,6
Gertrude (?) von Sachsen was buried after 4 August 1113 at Sint-Walburgakerk, Veurne, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1033
     DEATH     3 Aug 1113 (aged 79–80), Veurne, Arrondissement Veurne, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Family Members
     Parents
          Bernard II von Sachsen 995–1059
     Spouse
          Floris I of Holland 1020–1061
     Siblings
          Ordulf of Saxony 1020–1072
     Children
          Dirk V Count of Holland 1052–1091
          Bertha of Holland 1055–1093
     BURIAL     Sint-Walburgakerk, Veurne, Arrondissement Veurne, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 1 Sep 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 116377694.8,17
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "FLORIS ([1010/21]-Hamerth 28 Jun 1061, bur Egmond). The Annales Egmundani names "Florentius I" as brother of "Theodericus IIII comes filius Theoderici et Othelhildis" when recording that he succeeded his brother[324]. No source has been identified which indicates Floris’s birth date. However, recent examination of his skeleton has revealed that he was aged between 40 and 50 years old when he died, which would place his birth in [1010/21][325]. His estimated marriage date suggests his birth in the later part of this estimated birth date range. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names "Theodricum succedentem Hollandia principum et Florencium Orientalis Frisie comitem" as children of Count Dirk III & his wife[326]. "Heinricus…rex" confirmed a treaty between Wilhelm Bishop of Utrecht and Reginbert Abbot of Echternach under which they recognised each other's rights in "Flardinge, Kiericwerve, Velsereburc, Heligelo, Pethem" by charter dated 28 Dec 1063 which names "Theoderico comite ac filio eius Theoderico fratreque eius Florencio"[327]. He succeeded his brother in 1049 as FLORIS I Count of Holland. The Annales Egmundani record that "Florentius comes Hollandensis" was killed in 1061 at "Hamerthe"[328]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1061…in Hamerth…XIV Kal Iun" of Count Floris and his burial at Egmond[329]. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records that "Florentius primus Hollandie comes" was killed in battle "1061 IV Kal Iul"[330].
     "m ([1050]) as her first husband, GERTRUD of Saxony, daughter of BERNHARD II Duke of Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris and "Gertrudim filiam Hermanni ducis Saxonum"[331], "Hermanni" being an error for "Bernardi" as the former would be impossible chronologically. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum"[332]. "Theodericus…Holtlandensis comes…Florentii filius" recites the ownership history of properties claimed by the church of Utrecht in Holland, including donations by "Florentius, tercii Theoderici filius, cum bone memorie uxore sua Gerthrude", by spurious charter dated 26 Jul 1083, probably written [1130][333]. She married secondly (1063) Robert de Flandre ([1035]-13 Oct 1093), who was regent of Holland for his stepson until 1071, when he succeeded as Robert I Count of Flanders. The date of her second marriage is based on the Chronologia Johannes de Beke recording that, two years after the death of her first husband, Gertrud married "Roberto iuniori filio Balduini comitis Flandrie", specifying that the latter ruled the county of Holland on behalf of "Theodrici domicelli iunioris adhuc etatis"[334]. "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin[335]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[336]. The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired the "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud[337]. [The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa"[338]. It is uncertain whether this entry relates to the widow of Count Floris and Count Robert.] Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders[339]. [A manuscript catalogue of benefactors to Eversham monastery records the death “1 aprilis” 1113 of “Robertus Hierosolymitanus...Gertrudis mater eius”[340]. The accuracy of this source is unknown. The latest date recorded is 1629, but it is not known whether the document represents a later compilation based on earlier sources.]"
Med Lands cites:
[324] Annales Egmundani 1049, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[325] Cordfunke, E. H. P. (2010) De Abdij van Egmond, p. 96 [communicated by Kees Nieuwenhuijsen in a private email to the author dated 12 May 2016].
[326] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 39a, p. 73.
[327] D H IV 116, p. 152.
[328] Annales Egmundani 1061, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[329] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 46, p. 87.
[330] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[331] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 45, p. 85.
[332] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[333] Oorkondenboek Holland (1970) 88, p. 181, Latin text and English translation available at (31 Aug 2006).
[334] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 46, p. 87.
[335] Saint-Bertin II.92, p. 288.
[336] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[337] Annales Egmundani 1063, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[338] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[339] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[340] Meestere, G. de (1852) Chronicon Monasterii Evershamensis (Bruges), Catalogus benefactorum præcipuorum nostræ ecclesiæ de Eversham, p. 68.13


; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 1): “C2. Ct Floris I of Holland (1049-61), *Vlaardingen ca 1017, +murdered Gelderland 28.6.1061; m.ca 1050 Gertrud of Saxony (*ca 1030, +4.8.1113)”.18 GAV-25 EDV-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 10.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: 12.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6


; Per Genealogics:
     “Gertrud was born about 1030, the daughter of Bernhard II, Herzog von Sachsen, and Eilica von Schweinfurt. About 1050 she married Floris I, Graaf van Holland, son of Dirk III, Graaf van Holland, and his wife Othelhildis. They had seven children, of whom two, Dirk and Bertha, would have progeny. Bertha married Philippe I, king of France. On the death of Floris in 1061, Dirk became Graaf van Holland. As he was still young she became regent.
     “When Dirk V succeeded his father, Willem I, bishop of Utrecht, took advantage of the situation, occupying territory that he had claimed in Holland. Gertrud and her son withdrew to the islands of Friesia (Zeeland), leaving Willem to occupy the disputed lands.
     “In 1063 Gertrud married Robert I 'the Friesian', Graaf van Vlaanderen, the second son of Baudouin V, Graaf van Vlaanderen, and Adèle de France. She and her husband, who had five children of whom three would have progeny, acted as co-regents for the young count. Gertrud died on 4 August 1113.”.6 Gertrude (?) von Sachsen was also known as Geertruid (?) of Saxony.1

; This is the same person as ”Gertrude of Saxony” at Wikipedia, as ”Gertrude de Saxe (1028-1113)” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Gertrud von Sachsen (1030–1113)” at Wikipedia (DE).19,20,21

; Per Genealogy.EU (Billung): “D2. Gertrud, *Schweinfurt ca 1028, +Veurne 4.8.1113, bur Veurne; 1m: ca 1050 Floris I of Holland (+28.6.1061); 2m: 1063 Robert I of Flanders (*1031 +13.10.1093)”.22

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD of Saxony (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum"[341]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris and "Gertrudim filiam Hermanni ducis Saxonum"[342], "Hermanni" being an error for "Bernardi" as the former would be impossible chronologically. "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin[343]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[344]. The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired the "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud[345]. [The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa"[346]. It is uncertain whether this entry relates to the widow of Count Floris and Count Robert.] Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders[347]. [A manuscript catalogue of benefactors to Eversham monastery records the death “1 aprilis” 1113 of “Robertus Hierosolymitanus...Gertrudis mater eius”[348]. The accuracy of this source is unknown. The latest date recorded is 1629, but it is not known whether the document represents a later compilation based on earlier sources.]
     "m firstly ([1050]) FLORIS I Count of Holland, son of DIRK III Count of Holland & his wife Othelindis [von Haldensleben-Nordmark] ([1010/21]- Hamerth 28 Jun 1061, bur Egmond).
     "m secondly (1063) ROBERT de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). Count of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He succeeded his nephew 1071 as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders."
Med Lands cites:
[341] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[342] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[343] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris), II.92, p. 288.
[344] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[345] Annales Egmundani 1063, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[346] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[347] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[348] Meestere, G. de (1852) Chronicon Monasterii Evershamensis (Bruges), Catalogus benefactorum præcipuorum nostræ ecclesiæ de Eversham, p. 68.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “G2. Ct Robert I "le Frison" of Flanders (1071-93), Ct of Holland (1062-71) [during the minority of his stepson], *1031, +13.10.1093; m.1063 Gertrud of Saxony (*ca 1034 +4.8.1113) dau.of Duke Bernhard II of Saxony, widow of Ct Floris I of Holland”.23

; Per Weis: “Robert I, Count of Flanders, b. abt. 1035, d. 3 Oct. 1093; m. 1063, Gertrude of Saxony, d. 4 Aug. 1113, widow of Florent I, Count of Holland, daughter of Bernard II (Billung), Duke of Saxony. (ES 1.2/11).”.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[270]. "Robertus filius Balduini comitis Insulani" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[271]. He is recorded by Orderic Vitalis as uncle of Robert de Normandie[272]. The Annales Blandinienses record that in 1063 "Rodbertus, Baldwini potentissimi iunior filius, Frisiam subintrat"[273]. He was regent of the county of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He rebelled against his nephew Arnoul III Count of Flanders and defeated him at the battle of Cassel 22 Feb 1071, succeeding as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders. He was recognised as count by Philippe I King of France after Robert transferred Corbie to him, the arrangement being confirmed by the king's marriage to Count Robert's stepdaughter Bertha of Holland[274]. Relations with William I King of England were poor, culminating in Count Robert's planned naval attack in 1085, with his son-in-law Knud II King of Denmark, although the enterprise ended when the latter was assassinated[275]. William of Malmesbury records that Robert made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, dated to between 1086 and 1090[276]. On his way back, he entered the service of Emperor Alexios I[277]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death "III Id Oct 1093" of "Rodbertus, primus huius nominis Flandriæ marchysus"[278].
     "m (1063) as her second husband, GERTRUD of Saxony, widow of FLORIS I Count of Holland, daughter of BERNHARD II Duke of Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 18 Jul or 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin[279]. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum"[280]. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[281]. The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud[282]. The date of her second marriage is based on the Chronologia Johannes de Beke recording that, two years after the death of her first husband, Gertrud married "Roberto iuniori filio Balduini comitis Flandrie", specifying that the latter ruled the county of Holland on behalf of "Theodrici domicelli iunioris adhuc etatis"[283]. [The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa"[284]. It is uncertain whether this entry relates to the widow of Count Floris and Count Robert.] Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders[285]. [A manuscript catalogue of benefactors to Eversham monastery records the death “1 aprilis” 1113 of “Robertus Hierosolymitanus...Gertrudis mater eius”[286]. The accuracy of this source is unknown. The latest date recorded is 1629, but it is not known whether the document represents a later compilation based on earlier sources.]"
Med Lands cites:
[270] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[271] Saint-Bertin I.21, p. 197.
[272] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 103.
[273] Annales Blandinienses 1063, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[274] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[275] Nicholas (1992), p. 57.
[276] Malmesbury, 257, pp. 242-3.
[277] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin), Vol. 1, p. 166.
[278] Annales Blandinienses 1093, MGH SS V, p. 27.
[279] Saint-Bertin II.92, p. 288.
[280] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[281] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384.
[282] Annales Egmundani 1063, MGH SS XVI, p. 447.
[283] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 46, p. 87.
[284] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[285] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 107.
[286] Meestere, G. de (1852) Chronicon Monasterii Evershamensis (Bruges), Catalogus benefactorum præcipuorum nostræ ecclesiæ de Eversham, p. 68.16


; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Robert 1er «Le Frison» de Flandres ° 1035 + 12/10/1093 (Winendale ; inh. à Cassel) 10° comte de Flandres (1071/72-1093 : succède à son neveu, reconnu par le Roi Philippe contre la cession de Corbie), comte-régent de Hollande (1062-1071 durant la minorité de son beau-fils, héritier de Hollande), pèlerin à Jérusalem (1086-1090), mercenaire pour Alexis 1er de Byzance au retour (bat Richilde et les troupes françaises à Cassel le 21/02/1071)
     ép.1063 Gertrude de Saxe ° ~1028 (Schweinfurt) + 18/07 ou 04/08/1113 (Veurne) (fille du duc Bernhard II de Saxe et d’Eilika von Schweinfurt ; veuve du comte Floris 1er (Florent) de Hollande + 18/06/1061) ”.9

Family 1

Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland b. c 1017, d. 28 Jun 1061
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geertruid of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018661&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020361&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#BernhardIIdied1059. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Gertruddied1113
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018661&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eilica von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020364&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 164-23, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018662&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIdied1061
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geertruid of Saxony: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018661&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I 'the Friesian': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018660&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#RobertIdied1093B.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 31 July 2020), memorial page for Geertruida von Sachsen (1033–3 Aug 1113), Find a Grave Memorial no. 116377694, citing Sint-Walburgakerk, Veurne, Arrondissement Veurne, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735)m, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116377694. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_of_Saxony. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gertrude de Saxe (1028-1113): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_de_Saxe_(1028-1113). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Gertrud von Sachsen (1030–1113): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrud_von_Sachsen_(1030%E2%80%931113). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html#GB2
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  24. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), p. 157, Line 164-23. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adele: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174510&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#AdelaChristinadied1085MBaudouinIGuines
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104702&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104703&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Peter: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104704&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Machteld: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104705&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dirk V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018663&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Berthadied1093
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105969&tree=LEO
  35. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 7.
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018671&tree=LEO
  37. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#RobertIIdied1111.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018671&tree=LEO
  39. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 16. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  40. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adele of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018669&tree=LEO
  41. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  42. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5.
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026283&tree=LEO
  44. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Gertrudedied11151126A.
  45. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otgiva of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105968&tree=LEO

Everard de Donjon

M, #5308, b. circa 1050, d. between 1088 and 1141
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited18 Aug 2019
     Everard de Donjon was born circa 1050 at France.1 He married an unknown person between 1068 and 1098; WFT Est.1
Everard de Donjon died between 1088 and 1141; WFT Est.1
     GAV-25 EDV-25.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).

Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre1,2

M, #5309, b. circa May 1268, d. 29 November 1314
FatherPhilippe III "Le Hardi" ("The Bold") (?) King of France, King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne at de Brie3,2,4 b. 1 May 1245, d. 5 Oct 1285
MotherIsabella (?) of Aragon, Queen of France3,2,5 b. bt 1247 - 1248, d. 28 Jan 1271
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre was born circa May 1268 at Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France (now).3,6,7,8,9,10 He married Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre, daughter of Enrique (Henri) I "El Gordo" (?) King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne et de Brie and Blanche (?) d'Artois, Queen of Navarre and Champagne, on 16 August 1284 at Notre Dame de Paris, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.6,11,12,3,13,14,7,15,9
Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre died on 29 November 1314 at Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France (now).16,3,6,7,9,8,10
Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre was buried after 29 November 1314 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1268, Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     29 Nov 1314 (aged 45–46), Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     French Monarch. Second of four living children, and second son of Philip III, King of France and Isabella of Aragon. Called Philip the Fair because of his good looks. At the age of two, Philip IV's brother, Louis of France, became the heir apparent to the throne of France when their grandfather, Louis IX, died in 1270. His mother died in 1271, Philip III remarried and had a son, Louis, with his new wife, Mary of Brabant. Louis of France died the same month, poisoned. Although a royal councilor, Pierre de la Broce was hung for the crime, Mary was always a suspect. Philip IV became heir apparent, and Mary's son would be the Count of Evreux. His father arranged his marriage August 16, 1284 to Joan of Navarre; Philip then became Philip I, King of Navarre and Count of Champagne. A year later, Philip III died of dysentery during a battle against Spain, and Philip IV became King of France, crowned January 6, 1286 at Reims. Battles against Edward I, then Duke of Aquitane, in attempts to get … Bio by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philippe III of France 1245–1285
          Isabelle de Aragon 1247–1271
     Spouse
          Jeanne I de Navarre 1273–1305
     Siblings
          Louis de France 1265–1276
          Robert de France 1269–1276
          Charles of Valois 1270–1325 (m. 1290)
     Half Siblings
          Louis d'Evreux 1276–1319
          Marguerite de France 1279–1318
          Blanche de France 1285–1305
     Children
          Louis X of France 1289–1316
          Blanche de France 1290–1294
          Isabella of France 1292–1358
          Philippe V 1293–1322
          Charles IV 1294–1328
          Robert de France 1297–1307
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 10 Dec 1999
     Find A Grave Memorial 7533.10
     ; King PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" of France (6.1.1285-1314) and Navarre (1274-1305) =Felipe I, Cte de Champagne at de Brie, *Fontainebleau 1268, +there 29.11.1314, bur St.Denis 9.12.1314; m.Notre Dame, Paris 16.8.1284 Queen Juana I of Navarre (*14.1.1273 +2.4.1305.)6 EDV-19 GKJ-20.

Reference: Genealogics cits:
1. Gens Nostra. yr 1968.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:12.
3. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. 1.
4. The Child is Father to the Man, Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, Brown, Elizabeth A. R. date of birth.9

; Per Genealogics:
     "Philippe IV 'le Bel', king of France, was born in 1268 during the reign of his grandfather Louis IX. Philippe was not yet three at the death of his mother Isabelle of Aragón. His father had just succeeded to the crown as Philippe III, and Philippe and his three brothers saw very little of him as he threw himself grief stricken into campaigning and administrative affairs. This neglect in Philippe's early years manifested itself in his adult personality.
     "In 1274 his father married Marie of Brabant, a beautiful and cultivated woman. In the same year there also arrived at court the two-year-old Jeanne, queen of Navarre, the only child of Enrique I, king of Navarre, and Blanche d'Artois. Jeanne's father had died earlier that year and she was reared with the royal children. As Philippe's elder brother Louis had died in 1276, rumoured to have been poisoned by their stepmother, Philippe became heir to the throne of France. Philippe made his grandfather Louis IX a model for his own behaviour.
     "On 16 August 1284 Philippe married Jeanne, then aged twelve. In a happy marriage of almost twenty years they had seven children of whom three sons and a daughter would have progeny.
     "In 1285 Philippe accompanied his father to the south, campaigning to install his father's brother Charles, comte de Valois on the throne of Aragón. This enterprise was supported by his stepmother and aimed against the king of Aragón, his late mother's brother. When Philippe III died in October 1285, Philippe IV, as the new king, immediately abandoned the venture.
     "In 1294 war with England began a period of conflict, which strained Philippe IV's resources. The following year saw the birth of the Auld Alliance, a series of treaties, offensive and defensive in nature, between Scotland and France aimed specifically against England. The first such agreement, between Philippe and John Baliol, king of Scots, was signed in Paris on 23 October 1295, and was subsequently ratified at Dunfermline the following February.
     "During this period Philippe came into conflict with Pope Boniface VIII. In 1296 the pope prohibited lay taxation of clergy without papal approval. Both Edward I and Philippe retaliated, forcing Boniface VIII to retreat and accept the legitimacy of clerical taxation without the pope's permission. To mollify Philippe IV, the pope supported him against the Flemish, and in 1297 he canonised Philippe's grandfather Louis IX.
     "In 1301 new disputes developed, and in 1303 Philippe pledged to see Boniface VIII judged for heretical words and criminal and immoral deeds with which the pope had been charged. The pope intended to excommunicate Philippe, but on 7 September 1303 in Anagni he was seized by Guillaume de Nogaret, one of Philippe's ministers. Two days later the townsmen freed the pope, who died a month later. The charges against Boniface VIII helped Philippe in negotiations with the next pope, Benedict XI, and even more with his successor, the Gascon-born Pope Clement V, who transferred the papal curia from Rome to Avignon.
     "In 1303 peace was made with England, and as a result Philippe's daughter Isabelle was engaged to the future Edward II, king of England. However, before the peace treaty was signed, Philippe IV intended to crush the Flemish as their count had allied himself with the English king. In 1302 at Kortrijk, he saw a host of his nobles fall in battle. In 1305 he forced a harsh peace treaty on the Flemish that exacted heavy reparations and humiliating penalties.
     "In April 1304 Philippe's wife Jeanne died, and he considered abdicating and assuming the kingship of the Holy Land as head of a crusading order. However, to vent his grief and prove his dedication to God while advancing the material interests of his kingdom impoverished by long years of warfare, in 1306 he expelled all Jews from France, seizing their property and confiscating the monies owed to them.
     "In the early hours of 13 September 1307, Philippe's officers swooped on the houses of the Knights Templar all over France, carrying off their occupants to the royal dungeons. He justified his actions by proclaiming that they had committed heinous crimes, but he was not believed by the kings of England and Aragón, who did not follow his example. He set about obtaining confessions from the Templars by psychological pressure and horrific torture.
     "In 1312 Pope Clement V dissolved the Templar order and transferred their great estates to the rival crusading order of Knights Hospitaller, who became the legal owners only after paying massive and fictitious Templar 'debts' to Philippe. As he stood at the stake, Templar Grand Master Jacques de Molay summoned king and pope to appear with him before God's tribunal; within a year both were dead, and within a generation Philippe IV's three sons Louis X, Philippe V and Charles IV, 'the cursed kings', were all to die without male heirs, bringing the royal line of Capet to an end."9

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philip IV (April–June 1268 – 29 November 1314), called Philip the Fair (French: Philippe le Bel), was King of France from 1285 to 1314. By virtue of his marriage with Joan I of Navarre, he was also King of Navarre as Philip I from 1284 to 1305, as well as Count of Champagne. Although Philip was known as handsome, hence the epithet le Bel, his rigid and inflexible personality gained him (from friend and foe alike) other nicknames, such as the Iron King (French: le Roi de fer). His fierce opponent Bernard Saisset, bishop of Pamiers, said of him: "he is neither man nor beast. He is a statue."[2] at an unknown age
     "Philip relied on skillful civil servants, such as Guillaume de Nogaret and Enguerrand de Marigny, to govern the kingdom rather than on his nobles. Philip and his advisors were instrumental in the transformation of France from a feudal country to a centralized state.[3] The king, who sought an uncontested monarchy, compelled his vassals by wars and restricted feudal usages.[4] His ambitions made him highly influential in European affairs. His goal was to place his relatives on foreign thrones. Princes from his house ruled in Naples and Hungary. He tried and failed to make another relative the Holy Roman Emperor. He began the long advance of France eastward by taking control of scattered fiefs.[5]
     "The most notable conflicts of Philip's reign include a dispute with the English over King Edward I's fiefs in southwestern France, and a war with the Flemish, who had rebelled against French royal authority and humiliated Philip at the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302 but resulted with Philip's ultimate victory with which he received a significant portion of Flemish cities that were added to the crown lands along with a vast sum of money. In 1306, Philip expelled the Jews from France, and in 1307 he annihilated the order of the Knights Templar. He was in debt to both groups and saw them as a "state within the state". To further strengthen the monarchy, Philip tried to take control of the French clergy, leading to a violent conflict with Pope Boniface VIII. This conflict resulted in the transfer of the papal court to the enclave of Avignon in 1309.
     "His final year saw a scandal amongst the royal family, known as the Tour de Nesle affair, in which Philip's three daughters-in-law were accused of adultery. His three sons were successively kings of France, Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV. Their deaths without surviving sons of their own would compromise the future of the French royal house, which until then seemed secure, precipitating a succession crisis that would eventually lead to the Hundred Years' War (1337–1453).
Youth
     "A member of the House of Capet, Philip was born in the medieval fortress of Fontainebleau (Seine-et-Marne) to the future Philip III, the Bold, and his first wife, Isabella of Aragon.[6] He was the second of four sons born to the couple. His father was the heir apparent of France at that time, being the eldest son of King Louis IX (better known as St. Louis).
     "In August 1270, when Philip was two years old, his grandfather died while on Crusade, his father became king, and his elder brother Louis became heir apparent. Only five months later, in January 1271, Philip's mother died after falling from a horse; she was pregnant with her fifth child at the time and had not yet been crowned queen beside her husband. A few months later, one of Philip's younger brothers, Robert, also died. Philip's father was finally crowned king at Rheims on 15 August 1271. Six days later, he married again; Philip's step-mother was Marie, daughter of the duke of Brabant.
     "In May 1276, Philip's elder brother Louis died, and the eight year old Philip became heir apparent. It was suspected that Louis had been poisoned, and that his stepmother, Marie of Brabant, had instigated the murder. One reason for these rumours was the fact that the queen had given birth to her own first son the month Louis died.[7] However, both Philip and his surviving full brother Charles lived well into adulthood and raised large families of their own.
     "The scholastic part of Philip's education was entrusted to Guillaume d'Ercuis, his father's almoner.[8]
     "After the unsuccessful Aragonese Crusade against Peter III of Aragon, which ended in October 1285, Philip may have negotiated an agreement with Peter for the safe withdrawal of the Crusader army.[9] This pact is attested to by Catalan chroniclers.[9] Joseph Strayer points out that such a deal was probably unnecessary, as Peter had little to gain from provoking a battle with the withdrawing French or angering the young Philip, who had friendly relations with Aragon through his mother.[10]
     "Philip married Queen Joan I of Navarre (1271–1305) on 16 August 1284.[11] The two were affectionate and devoted to each other and Philip refused to remarry after Joan's death in 1305, despite the great political and financial rewards of doing so.[12] The primary administrative benefit of the marriage was Joan's inheritance of Champagne and Brie, which were adjacent to the royal demesne in Ile-de-France, and thus effectively were united to the king's own lands, expanding his realm.[13] The annexation of wealthy Champagne increased the royal revenues considerably, removed the autonomy of a large semi-independent fief and expanded royal territory eastward.[13] Philip also gained Lyon for France in 1312.[14]
     "Navarre remained in personal union with France, beginning in 1284 under Philip and Joan, for 44 years. The Kingdom of Navarre in the Pyrenees was poor but had a degree of strategic importance.[13] When in 1328 the Capetian line went extinct, the new Valois king, Philip VI, attempted to permanently annex the lands to France, compensating the lawful claimant, Joan II of Navarre, senior heir of Philip IV, with lands elsewhere in France. However, pressure from Joan II's family led to Phillip VI surrendering the land to Joan in 1329, and the rulers of Navarre and France were again different individuals.
Reign
     "After marrying Joan I of Navarre, becoming Philip I of Navarre, Philip ascended the French throne at the age of 17. He was crowned on 6 January, in 1286 in Reims. As king, Philip was determined to strengthen the monarchy at any cost. He relied, more than any of his predecessors, on a professional bureaucracy of legalists. To the public he kept aloof, and left specific policies, especially unpopular ones, to his ministers; as such he was called a "useless owl" by his contemporaries, among them Bishop Saisset.[15] His reign marks the transition in France from a charismatic monarchy – which could all but collapse in an incompetent reign – to a more bureaucratic kingdom, a move, under a certain historical reading, towards modernity.
Foreign policy and wars
War against England
     "As the duke of Aquitaine, English King Edward I was a vassal to Philip, and had to pay him homage. Following the Fall of Acre in 1291, however, the former allies started to show dissent.[16]
     "In 1293, following a naval incident between the English and the Normans, Philip summoned Edward to the French court. The English king sought to negotiate the matter via ambassadors sent to Paris, but they were turned away with a blunt refusal. Philip addressed Edward as a duke, a vassal and nothing more, despite the international implications of the relationship between England and France, and not an internal matter involving Philip's French vassals.
     "Edward next attempted to use family connections to achieve what open politics had not. He sent his brother Edmund Crouchback, who was Philip's cousin as well as his step-father-in-law, in attempts to negotiate with the French royal family and avert war. Additionally, Edward had by that time become betrothed by proxy to Philip's sister Margaret, and, in the event of the negotiations being successful, Edmund was to escort Margaret back to England for her wedding to Edward.
     "An agreement was indeed reached; it stated that Edward would voluntarily relinquish his continental lands[which?] to Philip as a sign of submission in his capacity as the duke of Aquitaine. In return, Philip would forgive Edward and restore his land[which?] after a grace period. In the matter of the marriage, Philip drove a hard bargain based partially on the difference in age between Edward and Margaret; it was agreed that the province of Gascony would be retained by Philip in return for agreeing to the marriage. The date of the wedding was also put off until the formality of sequestering and re-granting the French lands back to Edward was completed.
     "But Edward, Edmund and the English had been deceived. The French had no intention of returning the land to the English monarch. Edward kept up his part of the deal and turned over his continental estates to the French. However, Philip used the pretext that the English king had refused his summons in order to strip Edward of all his possessions in France, thereby initiating hostilities with England.[16]
     "The outbreak of hostilities with England in 1294 was the inevitable result of the competitive expansionist monarchies, triggered by a secret Franco-Scottish pact of mutual assistance against Edward I; inconclusive campaigns for the control of Gascony, southwest of France were fought 1294–1298 and 1300–1303. Philip gained Guienne but due to subsequent revolts was later forced to return it to Edward.[17] The search for income to cover military expenditures set its stamp on Philip's reign and his reputation at the time.
     "Pursuant to the terms of the Treaty of Paris in 1303, the marriage of Philip's daughter Isabella to the Prince of Wales, Edward I's heir, was celebrated at Boulogne, 25 January 1308[why?] was meant to seal a peace; instead it would produce an eventual English claimant to the French throne itself, and the Hundred Years' War.[citation needed]
War with Flanders
     "Philip suffered a major embarrassment when an army of 2,500 noble men-at-arms (knights and squires) and 4,000 infantry he sent to suppress an uprising in Flanders was defeated in the Battle of the Golden Spurs near Kortrijk on 11 July 1302. Philip reacted with energy to the humiliation and the Battle of Mons-en-Pévèle followed two years later, which ended in a decisive French victory.[18] Consequently, in 1305, Philip forced the Flemish to accept a harsh peace treaty; the peace exacted heavy reparations and humiliating penalties, and added to the royal territory the rich cloth cities of Lille, Douai, and Bethune, sites of major cloth fairs.[19] Béthune, first of the Flemish cities to yield, was granted to Mahaut, Countess of Artois, whose two daughters, to secure her fidelity, were married to Philip's two sons.
Crusades and diplomacy with Mongols
     "Philip had various contacts with the Mongol power in the Middle East, including reception at the embassy of the Uyghur monk Rabban Bar Sauma, originally from the Yuan dynasty of China.[20] Bar Sauma presented an offer of a Franco-Mongol alliance with Arghun of the Mongol Ilkhanate in Baghdad. Arghun was seeking to join forces between the Mongols and the Europeans, against their common enemy the Muslim Mamluks. In return, Arghun offered to return Jerusalem to the Christians, once it was re-captured from the Muslims. Philip seemingly responded positively to the request of the embassy, by sending one of his noblemen, Gobert de Helleville, to accompany Bar Sauma back to Mongol lands.[21] There was further correspondence between Arghun and Philip in 1288 and 1289,[22] outlining potential military cooperation. However, Philip never actually pursued such military plans.
     "In April 1305, the new Mongol ruler Öljaitü sent letters to Philip,[23] the Pope, and Edward I of England. He again offered a military collaboration between the Christian nations of Europe and the Mongols against the Mamluks. European nations attempted another Crusade but were delayed, and it never took place. On 4 April 1312, another Crusade was promulgated at the Council of Vienne. In 1313, Philip "took the cross", making the vow to go on a Crusade in the Levant, thus responding to Pope Clement V's call. He was, however, warned against leaving by Enguerrand de Marigny[24] and died soon after in a hunting accident.
Finance and religion
Mounting deficits
     "Under Philip IV, the annual ordinary revenues of the French royal government totaled approximately 860,000 livres tournois, equivalent to 46 tonnes of silver.[25] Overall revenues were about twice the ordinary revenues.[26] Some 30% of the revenues were collected from the royal demesne.[25] The royal financial administration employed perhaps 3,000 people, of which about 1,000 were officials in the proper sense.[27] After assuming the throne, Philip inherited a sizable debt from his father's war against Aragon.[28] By November 1286 it reached 8 tonnes of silver to his primary financiers, the Templars, equivalent to 17% of government revenue.[29] This debt was quickly paid off and in 1287 and 1288, Philip's kingdom ran a budget surplus.[29]
     "After 1289, a decline in Saxony's silver production, combined with Philip's wars against Aragon, England and Flanders, drove the French government to fiscal deficits.[29] The war against Aragon, inherited from Philip's father, required the expenditure of 1.5 million LT (livres tournois) and the 1294–99 war against England over Gascony another 1.73 million LT.[29][28] Loans from the Aragonese War were still being paid back in 1306.[28] To cover the deficit, Pope Nicholas IV in 1289 granted Philip permission to collect a tithe of 152,000 LP (livres parisis) from the Church lands in France.[26] With revenues of 1.52 million LP, the church in France had greater fiscal resources than the royal government, whose ordinary revenues in 1289 amounted to 595,318 LP and overall revenues to 1.2 million LP.[26] By November 1290, the deficit stood at 6% of revenues.[26] In 1291 the budget swung back into surplus only to fall into deficit again in 1292.[26]
     "The constant deficits led Philip to order the arrest of the Lombard merchants, who had earlier made him extensive loans on the pledge of repayment from future taxation.[26] The Lombards' assets were seized by government agents and the crown extracted 250,000 LT by forcing the Lombards to purchase French nationality.[26] Despite this draconian measure, the deficits continued to stack up in 1293.[26] By 1295, Philip had replaced the Templars with the Florentine Franzesi bankers as his main source of finance.[30] The Italians could raise huge loans far beyond the capacities of the Templars, and Philip came to rely on them more and more.[30] The royal treasure was transferred from the Paris Temple to the Louvre around this time.[30]
Devaluation
     "In 1294, France went to war against England and in 1297, Flanders declared its independence from France.[31] By 1295, to pay for his constant wars, Philip had no choice but to borrow more and debase the currency by reducing its silver content.[32] This led to the virtual disappearance of silver from France by 1301.[30] Currency depreciation provided the crown with 1.419 million LP from November 1296 to Christmas 1299, more than enough to cover war costs of 1.066 million LP in the same period.[31]
     "The devaluation was socially devastating.[30] It was accompanied by dramatic inflation that damaged the real incomes of the creditors such as the aristocracy and the Church, who received a weaker currency in return for the loans they had issued in a stronger currency.[30] The indebted lower classes did not benefit from the devaluation, as the high inflation ate into the purchasing power of their money.[30] The result was social unrest.[31] By 22 August 1303 this practice led to a two-thirds loss in the value of the livres, sous and deniers in circulation.[33]
     "The defeat at the battle of Golden Spurs in 1302 was a crushing blow to French finance, reducing the value of the French currency by 37% in the 15 months that followed.[33] The royal government had to order officials and subjects to provide all or half, respectively, of their silver vessels for minting into coins.[33] New taxes were levied to pay for the deficit.[33] As people attempted to move their wealth out of the country in non-monetary form, Philip banned merchandise exports without royal approval.[33] The king obtained another crusade tithe from the pope and returned the royal treasure to the Temple to gain the Templars as his creditors again.[33]
Revaluation
     "After bringing the Flemish War to a victorious conclusion in 1305, Philip on 8 June 1306 ordered the silver content of new coinage to be raised back to its 1285 level of 3.96 grams of silver per livre.[34] To harmonize the strength of the old and new currencies, the debased coinage of 1303 was devalued accordingly by two-thirds.[34] The debtors were driven to penury by the need to repay their loans in the new, strong currency.[34] This led to rioting in Paris on 30 December 1306, forcing Philip to briefly seek refuge in the Paris Temple, the headquarters of the Knights Templar.[35]
     "Perhaps seeking to control the silver of the Jewish mints to put the revaluation to effect, Philip ordered the expulsion of the Jews on 22 July 1306 and confiscated their property on 23 August, collecting at least 140,000 LP with this measure.[34] With the Jews gone, Philip appointed royal guardians to collect the loans made by the Jews, and the money was passed to the Crown. The scheme did not work well. The Jews were regarded as comparatively honest, while the king's collectors were universally unpopular. Finally, in 1315, because of the "clamour of the people", the Jews were invited back with an offer of 12 years of guaranteed residence, free from government interference. In 1322, the Jews were expelled again by the King's successor, who did not honour his commitment.[36]
     "When Philip levied taxes on the French clergy of one half their annual income, he caused an uproar within the Catholic Church and the papacy, prompting Pope Boniface VIII to issue the bull Clericis Laicos (1296), forbidding the transference of any church property to the French Crown.[37] Philip retaliated by forbidding the removal of bullion from France.[37] By 1297, Boniface agreed to Philip's taxation of the clergy in emergencies.[37]
     "In 1301, Philip had the bishop of Pamier arrested for treason.[38] Boniface called French bishops to Rome to discuss Philip's actions.[38] In response, Philip convoked an assembly of bishops, nobles and grand bourgeois of Paris in order to condemn the Pope.[38] This precursor to the Estates General appeared for the first time during his reign, a measure of the professionalism and order that his ministers were introducing into government. This assembly, which was composed of clergy, nobles, and burghers, gave support to Philip.[38] Boniface retaliated with the celebrated bull Unam Sanctam (1302), a declaration of papal supremacy.[38] Philip gained a victory, after having sent his agent Guillaume de Nogaret to arrest Boniface at Anagni.[39] The pope escaped but died soon afterward.[39] The French archbishop Bertrand de Goth was elected pope as Clement V and thus began the so-called Babylonian Captivity of the papacy (1309–76), during which the official seat of the papacy moved to Avignon, an enclave surrounded by French territories, and was subjected to French control.
Suppression of the Knights Templar
     "Philip was substantially in debt to the Knights Templar, a monastic military order whose original role as protectors of Christian pilgrims in the Latin East had been largely replaced by banking and other commercial activities by the end of the 13th century.[40] As the popularity of the Crusades had decreased, support for the military orders had waned, and Philip used a disgruntled complaint against the Knights Templar as an excuse to move against the entire organization as it existed in France, in part to free himself from his debts. Other motives appear to have included concern over perceived heresy, assertion of French control over a weakened Papacy, and finally, the substitution of royal officials for officers of the Temple in the financial management of French government.[41] Recent studies emphasize the political and religious motivations of Philip the Fair and his ministers (especially Guillaume de Nogaret). It seems that, with the "discovery" and repression of the "Templars' heresy", the Capetian monarchy claimed for itself the mystic foundations of the papal theocracy. The Temple case was the last step of a process of appropriating these foundations, which had begun with the Franco-papal rift at the time of Boniface VIII. Being the ultimate defender of the Catholic faith, the Capetian king was invested with a Christ-like function that put him above the pope. What was at stake in the Templars' trial, then, was the establishment of a "royal theocracy".[42]
     "At daybreak on Friday, 13 October 1307, hundreds of Templars in France were simultaneously arrested by agents of Philip the Fair, to be later tortured into admitting heresy in the Order.[43] The Templars were supposedly answerable only to the Pope, but Philip used his influence over Clement V, who was largely his pawn, to disband the organization. Pope Clement did attempt to hold proper trials, but Philip used the previously forced confessions to have many Templars burned at the stake before they could mount a proper defense.
n March 1314, Philip had Jacques de Molay, the last Grand Master of the Temple, and Geoffroi de Charney, Preceptor of Normandy, burned at the stake. An account of the event goes as follows:
     "The cardinals dallied with their duty until March 1314, (exact day is disputed by scholars) when, on a scaffold in front of Notre Dame, Jacques de Molay, Templar Grand Master, Geoffroi de Charney, Master of Normandy, Hugues de Peraud, Visitor of France, and Godefroi de Gonneville, Master of Aquitaine, were brought forth from the jail in which for nearly seven years they had lain, to receive the sentence agreed upon by the cardinals, in conjunction with the Archbishop of Sens and some other prelates whom they had called in. Considering the offences, which the culprits had confessed and confirmed, the penance imposed was in accordance with rule — that of perpetual imprisonment. The affair was supposed to be concluded when, to the dismay of the prelates and wonderment of the assembled crowd, de Molay and Geoffroi de Charney arose. They had been guilty, they said, not of the crimes imputed to them, but of basely betraying their Order to save their own lives. It was pure and holy; the charges were fictitious and the confessions false. Hastily the cardinals delivered them to the Prevot of Paris, and retired to deliberate on this unexpected contingency, but they were saved all trouble. When the news was carried to Philippe he was furious. A short consultation with his council only was required. The canons pronounced that a relapsed heretic was to be burned without a hearing; the facts were notorious and no formal judgment by the papal commission need be waited for. That same day, by sunset, a stake was erected on a small island in the Seine, the Ile des Juifs, near the palace garden. There de Molay and de Charney were slowly burned to death, refusing all offers of pardon for retraction, and bearing their torment with a composure which won for them the reputation of martyrs among the people, who reverently collected their ashes as relics.[44][45]
     "The fact that, in little more than a month, Pope Clement V died in torment of a loathsome disease thought to be lupus, and that in eight months Philip IV of France, at the early age of forty-six, perished by an accident while hunting, necessarily gave rise to the legend that de Molay had cited them before the tribunal of God. Such stories were rife among the people, whose sense of justice had been scandalized by the whole affair. Even in distant Germany, Philip's death was spoken of as a retribution for his destruction of the Templars, and Clement was described as shedding tears of remorse on his death-bed for three great crimes: the poisoning of Henry VII, Holy Roman Emperor, and the ruin of the Templars and Beguines.[46] Within 14 years the throne passed rapidly through Philip's sons, who died relatively young, and without producing male heirs. By 1328, his male line was extinguished, and the throne had passed to the line of his brother, the House of Valois.
Tour de Nesle affair
     "In 1314, the daughters-in-law of Philip IV, Margaret of Burgundy (wife of Louis X) and Blanche of Burgundy (wife of Charles IV) were accused of adultery, and their alleged lovers (Phillipe d'Aunay and Gauthier d'Aunay) tortured, flayed and executed in what has come to be known as the Tour de Nesle affair (French: Affaire de la tour de Nesle).[47] A third daughter-in-law, Joan II, Countess of Burgundy (wife of Philip V), was accused of knowledge of the affairs.[47]
Death
     "Philip IV's rule signaled the decline of the papacy's power from its near complete authority. His palace located on the Île de la Cité is represented today by surviving sections of the Conciergerie. He suffered a cerebral stroke during a hunt at Pont-Sainte-Maxence (Forest of Halatte), and died a few weeks later, on 29 November 1314, at Fontainebleau, where he was born. He is buried in the Basilica of St Denis. He was succeeded by his son Louis X.
Issue
     "The children of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre were:
1. Margaret (ca. 1288, Paris – after November 1294, Paris). Died in childhood, but betrothed in November 1294 (aged six) to Infante Ferdinand of Castile, later 2. Ferdinand IV of Castile.
2. Louis X (4 October 1289 – 5 June 1316)[48]
3. Blanche (1290, Paris – after 13 April 1294, Saint Denis). Died in childhood, but betrothed in December 1291 (aged one) to Infante Ferdinand of Castile, later Ferdinand IV of Castile. Blanche was buried in the Basilica of St Denis.
4. Philip V (1292/93 – 3 January 1322)[48]
5. Charles IV (1294 – 1 February 1328)[48]
6. Isabella (c. 1295 – 23 August 1358). Married Edward II of England and was the mother of Edward III of England.[48]
7. Robert (1296, Paris – August 1308, Saint Germain-en-Laye). The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis names "Robertum" as youngest of the four sons of Philip IV of France, adding that he died "in flore adolescentiæ suæ" ("in the flower of youth") and was buried "in monasterio sororum de Pyssiaco" ("in the monastery of the Sisters of Pyssiaco") in August 1308. Betrothed in October 1306 (aged ten) to Constance of Sicily.

     "All three of Philip's sons who reached adulthood became kings of France, and Isabella, his only surviving daughter, was the queen of England as consort to Edward II of England.
In fiction
     "Dante Alighieri often refers to Philip in La Divina Commedia, never by name but as the "mal di Francia" (plague of France).[49]
     "Philip is the title character in Le Roi de fer (The Iron King), the 1955 first novel in Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings), a series of French historical novels by Maurice Druon. He was portrayed by Georges Marchal in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series, and by Tchéky Karyo in the 2005 adaptation.[50][51]
     "In the 2017 television series Knightfall, Philip is portrayed by Ed Stoppard.
Notes
a. "Ce n'est ni un homme ni une bête. C'est une statue."[2]
References
1. Richardson, Douglas (2011). Kimball G. Everingham (ed.) Plantagenet Ancestry. 2 (2nd ed.) p. 125.
2. Contamine, Kerhervé & Rigaudière 2007, p. 142.
3. Strayer 1980, p. xiii.
4. Brown 1998.
5. Previté-Orton, C. (1951). A history of Europe from 1198 to 1378. p. 259.
6. Woodacre 2013, p. xviii.
7. Brown, E. (1987). "The Prince is Father of the King: The Character and Childhood of Philip the Fair of France". Mediaeval Studies. 49: 282–334. doi:10.1484/J.MS.2.306887. eISSN 2507-0436. ISSN 0076-5872.
8. Guillaume d'Ercuis, Livre de raison, archived from the original on 17 November 2006
9. Strayer 1980, p. 10.
10. Strayer 1980, pp. 10–11.
11. Warner 2016, p. 34.
12. Strayer 1980, pp. 9–10.
13. Strayer 1980, p. 9.
14. Jostkleigrewe 2018, p. 55.
15. Barber 1978, p. 29.
16. Les Rois de France, p. 50
17. Wolfe 2009, p. 51.
18. Curveiller 1989, p. 34.
19. Tucker 2010, p. 295.
20. Rossabi, M. (2014). From Yuan to Modern China and Mongolia: The Writings of Morris Rossabi. The Writings of. 6. Leiden & Boston: Brill. pp. 385–6. ISBN 978-90-04-28126-4.
21. Sir E. A. Wallis Budge, The Monks of Kublal Khan, Emperor of China (1928)
212. Street 1963, p. 265–268.
23. Mostaert & Cleaves, pp. 56–57.
242. Jean Richard, "Histoire des Croisades", p.485
25. Grummitt & Lassalmonie 2015, p. 120.
26. Torre 2010, p. 60.
27. Grummitt & Lassalmonie 2015, pp. 127–128.
28. Strayer 1980, p. 11.
29. Torre 2010, p. 59.
30. Torre 2010, p. 61.
31. Torre 2010, p. 63.
32. Torre 2010, p. 62.
33. Torre 2010, p. 64.
34. Torre 2010, p. 65.
35. Read, P. (2001). The Templars. p. 255. ISBN 978-1-84212-142-9.
36. Adams 1982, p. ?.
37. Ozment 1980, p. 145.
38. Black 1982, p. 48.
39. Lerner 1968, p. 5.
40. Nicholson, Helen (2004). The Knights Templar: a New History. pp. 164, 181. ISBN 978-0-7509-3839-6.
41. Nicholson 2004, p. 226.
42. Théry, Julien (2013). "A Heresy of State: Philip the Fair, the Trial of the "Perfidious Templars," and the Pontificalization of the French Monarchy". Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures. 39 (2): 117–148. JSTOR 10.5325/jmedirelicult.39.2.0117.
43. Barber, M. (1978). The Trial of the Templars. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-45727-9.
44. 141.—Stemler, Contingent zur Geschichte der Templer, pp. 20–1.—Raynouard,pp. 213–4, 233–5.—Wilcke, II. 236, 240.—Anton, Versuch, p. 142
45. "An Historical Sketch of Sacerdotal Celibacy," "Superstition and Force,", "Studies in Church History"; A History of the Inquisition of the Middle Ages, Vol III, by Henry Charles Lea, NY: Hamper & Bros, Franklin Sq. 1888 p.324
46. A History of the Inquisition Vol. 3 by Henry Charles Lea, Chptr. 326, Political Heresy – The State, p. 2. Not in Copyright
47. Bradbury 2007, p. 275.
48. Warner 2016, p. 8.
49. Dante Alighieri (29 July 2003). The Portable Dante. Penguin Publishing Group. p. 233. ISBN 978-1-101-57382-2. Note 109
50. "Official website: Les Rois maudits (2005 miniseries)" (in French). 2005. Archived from the original on 15 August 2009. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
51. "Les Rois maudits: Casting de la saison 1" (in French). AlloCiné. 2005. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
Sources
** Adams, Charles (1982). Fight, Flight, Fraud: The Story of Taxation. Euro-Dutch Publishers. ISBN 978-0-686-39619-2.
** Barber, Malcolm (1978). The Trial of the Templars. Cambridge University Press.
** Black, Antony (1982). Political Thought in Europe, 1250-1450. Cambridge University Press.
** Bradbury, Jim (2007). The Capetians: Kings of France 987–1328. London: Hambledon Continuum. ISBN 978 1 85285 528 4.
** Brown, Elizabeth A.R. (1998). "Philip IV, king of France". Encyclopædia Britannica.
** Contamine, Philippe; Kerhervé, Jean; Rigaudière, Albert (2007). Monnaie, fiscalité et finances au temps de Philippe Le Bel: journée d'études du 14 mai 2004. Comité pour l'histoire économique et financière de la France.
** Curveiller, Stephane (1989). Dunkerque, ville et port de Flandre à la fin du Moyen âge: à travers les comptes de bailliage de 1358 à 1407 (in French). Presses Univ. Septentrion. ISBN 978-2-85939-361-8.
** Grummitt, David & Lassalmonie, Jean-François (2015). "Royal public finance (c.1290–1523)". In Christopher Fletcher; Jean-Philippe Genet & John Watts (eds.) ** Government and Political Life in England and France, c.1300–c.1500. Cambridge University Press. pp. 116–. ISBN 978-1-107-08990-7.
** Lerner, Robert E. (1968). The Age of Adversity: The Fourteenth Century. Cornell University Press.
** Ozment, Steven (1980). The Age of Reform, 1250-1550: An Intellectual and Religious History of Late Medieval and Reformation Europe. Yale University Press.145
** Jostkleigrewe, Georg (2018). Pleszczynski, Andrzej; Sobiesiak, Joanna; Tomaszek, Michal; Tyszka, Przemyslaw (eds.) Imagined Communities: Constructing Collective Identities in Medieval Europe. Vol. 8. Brill.
** Strayer, Joseph (1980). The Reign of Philip the Fair. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-10089-0.
** Torre, Ignacio de la (2010). "The Monetary Fluctuations in Philip IV's Kingdom of France and Their Relevance to the Arrest of the Templars". In Jochen Burgtorf; Paul F. Crawford & Helen Nicholson (eds.) The Debate on the Trial of the Templars (1307–1314). Farnham: Ashgate (published 28 September 2010). pp. 57–68. ISBN 978-0-7546-6570-0.
** Street, John C. (1963). "Les Lettres de 1289 et 1305 des ilkhan Ar?un et Öl?eitü à Philippe le Bel by Antoine Mostaert, Francis Woodman Cleaves". Journal of the American Oriental Society (book review). 83 (2): 265–268. JSTOR 598384.
** Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict. 1. ABC-CLIO.
** Warner, Kathryn (2016). Isabella of France, The Rebel Queen. Amberley.
** Wolfe, Michael (2009). Walled Towns and the Shaping of France: From the Medieval to the Early Modern Era. Palgrave Macmillan.
** Woodacre, Elena (2013). The Queens Regnant of Navarre. Palgrave Macmillan.
Further reading
** Chisholm, H., ed. (1911). "Philip IV (1268–1314)" . Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed. 21. Cambridge University Press. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |encyclopedia= (help)
** Goyau, G. (1911). "Philip IV (the Fair)". In Herbermann, Charles (ed.) Catholic Encyclopedia. 12. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
** Rothbard, M. "The Great Depression of the 14th Century". Archived from the original on 27 November 2009.
** Schein, S. (1 October 1979). "Gesta Dei per Mongolos 1300. The genesis of a non?event". The English Historical Review. 94 (373): 805–819. doi:10.1093/ehr/XCIV.CCCLXXIII.805. JSTOR 565554.
** Théry, Julien (2004), "Philippe le Bel, pape en son royaume", L'Histoire (in French), vol. 289, pp. 14–17."8

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "Philip the Fair, so called because of his good looks; reserved, sarcastic, cautious, pious in a formal and ritualistic sense, very conscious of his royal dignity; a “constitutional king” in that he believed himself bound by the law and precedent. He personally “controlled and directed the ordinary operations of government,” with the goal of building a sovereign state in which no territory or authority was exempt from the king's jurisdiction. Non-noble laymen lawyers, trained at Bologna and Montpellier, predominated in the expanding state bureaucracy, but nobles, most of them clergy, held the highest offices. Enquêteurs, working in pairs and with almost viceregal powers, investigated the conduct of local officials, such as the baillis and seneschals (sénéchaux); royal finances, organized in the Chambre de Comptes, superseded the feudal; appeals to the Parlement, the highest court that enforced and interpreted the law, were encouraged.
     "1288-1290: In conflicts with the cathedral chapter of Chartres and with the bishop of Poitiers, Philip pressed for and won from the Church the principle that no territory in the realm is exempt from royal jurisdiction, that all who hold judicial rights over temporal matters hold them from the king; clerical privileges were guaranteed by the king, not by the pope. The principle embodied in this victory, that the king of France was final and supreme judge in all temporal affairs in the realm, provided the royal justification for the later, more serious conflict with Pope Boniface VIII.
     "1293: Philip treacherously confiscated Gascony, which had been temporarily surrendered by Edward as a pledge, after a Gascon-Norman sea fight.
     "1294-1298: War with Edward I over Guienne. Philip announced a war levy on the clergy and followed a protest with a violent anti-papal pamphlet campaign. To finance the war, Philip debased the coinage. He first made an alliance with the Scots (1295) and excluded English ships from all ports. In 1297 Edward invaded northern France, in alliance with the count of Flanders, but the war was brought to a close by a truce negotiated by Pope Boniface VIII.
     "1296-1303: Philip's conflict with Pope Boniface VIII. The bull Clericis laicos (1296) forbade secular rulers to levy taxes on the clergy without papal consent [>]. Philip retorted by forbidding the export of precious metals (a serious threat to the papal finances) and by waging a vigorous propaganda campaign. Boniface, engaged in a feud with the Colonna in Rome and absorbed in Sicilian affairs, gave way and practically annulled the bull (1297). Boniface attempted to seal the peace by his canonization of Philip's grandfather Louis IX. Boniface hoped this act would inaugurate a new period of French-papal cooperation, but the quarrel resumed after the papal jubilee of 1300. Boniface published the bull Ausculta fili (Listen, my son), condemning Philip's administration of his kingdom, rescinding the agreement giving Philip the right to tax the clergy, implying papal sovereignty over France, and summoning all French bishops to a council in Rome. The bull implicitly denied a principle that Philip had long stressed: that all persons, including clergy, are subject to his jurisdiction. Philip responded by summoning the first well-authenticated (April 10, 1302) Estates General of the clergy, nobility, and representatives of the towns, to win national support for his struggle with the pope. The barons and representatives of the towns wholeheartedly supported the king; the clergy, caught between two masters, asked the pope to revoke the summons to a council. Boniface retaliated with the bull (Nov. 18, 1302) Unam sanctam (one holy catholic and apostolic church) that bases papal jurisdiction over laymen on the pope's right to correct sin; the letter could also be interpreted to mean that the Roman curia had final jurisdiction over the temporal affairs of kings [>]. Boniface multiplied threats in trying to get Philip to yield. A French council, using trumped-up charges, accused Boniface of illegally gaining the papacy, of simony, heresy, and sexual perversion, and called for a general church council to depose him. Boniface prepared another bull (to be published Sept. 8, 1303), declaring Philip automatically excommunicated for preventing the French bishops from going to Rome, and stated that Philip had lost all authority and claim to his subjects' fidelity. To prevent publication of the papal letter, Guillaume de Nogaret, Philip's influential councillor, and Sciarra Colonna, one of Boniface's bitterest enemies, forced their way into the Gaetani palace (Sept. 7, 1303) at Anagni (central Italy) and arrested Boniface. This event marks the culmination of Philip's struggle with the pope. Local townspeople released the pope after three days. He was taken back to Rome but died a broken man about a month after this humiliation. Boniface's successor, Benedict XI (1303-4), desperate to gain French friendship, dismissed all blame for the attack at Anagni, restored privileges revoked by Boniface VIII, and renewed the royal right to tax the clergy.
     "1302: Angered by heavy taxes imposed by French army of occupation, Flemish workers at Bruges rebelled and drove out the French garrison. Although not a great victory, this Matin of Bruges reflected Flemish artisan class's deep resentment at French domination. July 11. Flemish infantry crushed aristocratic French cavalry at Courtrai (Battle of the Spurs), killing all leaders of the French army and some of Philip's councillors.
     "1306: Convinced that he had a special duty to achieve unity and purity of faith in France, in response to anti-Semitic popular opinion, and anxious to pay off the debts of the war with England, Philip ordered the arrest of the Jews of France (about 10,000), seized their property, and gave them the choice of conversion or exile. Most chose exile in Flanders, in the Rhenish towns, across the Rhône, or in Spain.
     "1307: The new efficiency of the French government was demonstrated by the suppression of the Order of the Knights Templar, a large, wealthy, and influential religious order that served as Philip's bankers. On Oct. 13, 1307, almost every Templar in France was simultaneously arrested and the order's property seized, in a police action a modern dictatorship might envy. Using false charges (heresy and homosexuality), Philip waged a propaganda campaign, applied horrible tortures, and pressured Pope Clement V to suppress the order.
     "1312: The Order of the Templars was formally abolished by the Synod of Vienne. Its property was transferred to the Hospitalers (except in Spain and in France, where it passed to the crown). Philip made the Temple treasury a section of the royal finance administration."17 Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre was also known as Philip IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre. He was King of Navarre between 1284 and 1305.8 He was Count of Champagne between 1284 and 1305.8 He was King of France between 1285 and 1314.11,3,8

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 64. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe III 'le Hardi': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000228&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle of Aragón: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004022&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#P4
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_IV_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe IV 'le Bel': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001690&tree=LEO
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 November 2019), memorial page for Philippe IV of France (1268–29 Nov 1314), Find A Grave Memorial no. 7533, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7533/philippe_iv-of_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-30, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 44: Navarre: General Survey.
  13. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 6: Kings of Navarre, 1194-1512. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Navarre 6i: p. 536. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  16. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201, 204. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  18. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Margueritedied1294. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis X 'le Hutin': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003844&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Blanchedied1294
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001692&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Isabelledied1358

Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre1,2,3,4

F, #5310, b. 14 January 1273, d. 2 April 1304
FatherEnrique (Henri) I "El Gordo" (?) King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne et de Brie1,5,6,2,3,4,7,8 b. c 1244, d. 22 Jul 1274
MotherBlanche (?) d'Artois, Queen of Navarre and Champagne1,2,3,4,9 b. c 1248, d. 2 May 1302
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre was born on 14 January 1273 at Bar-Sur-Seine, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).2,3,10,11 She married Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre, son of Philippe III "Le Hardi" ("The Bold") (?) King of France, King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne at de Brie and Isabella (?) of Aragon, Queen of France, on 16 August 1284 at Notre Dame de Paris, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.12,13,5,14,6,2,3,15,16
Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre died on 2 April 1304 at Chateau de Vincennes, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France, at age 31.5,2,3,10,11
Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre was buried after 2 April 1305 at Couvent des Cordelières, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     14 Jan 1273, Bar-sur-Seine, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     DEATH     2 Apr 1305 (aged 32), Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     Royalty, Queen of Navarra, Countess of Champagne and of Brie, by marriage to Philipp IV also Queen of France. Born in Bar-sur-Seine as the only daughter of Henri I and Blanche de Artois. When her father died in 1274 several cities rebelled and Castile and Aragon were ready to invade Navarra. Blanche asked Philipp III for help who returned the peace in Navarra. In exchange Jeanne was engaged to the kings second son, Philippe. When the kings eldest son died in 1276, Jeanne was sent to Paris to be raised with her future husband. They were married in 1284 at Notre-Dame de Paris and Philippe succeeded his father a year later. She will bear six children in this marriage of which two will die young, three will be French kings and one English queen. She never involved herself in Philipps politics, but governed the Champagne and Navarra personally. When the Count of Bar invaded the Champagne she raised an army and defeated him in the Battle of Commines. She also reconquered Navarra from her Spanish neighbors and guaranteed a lasting peace there. Philipp is the first King of France and Navarra but never visited his southern kingdom. In 1304 she founded the College de Navarre in Paris for students mostly from Champagne and Navarra. She died aged 32 years at Vincennes and is buried at the Franciscan monastery. Her grave was destroyed by a fire in 1580. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
      Henri of Navarra 1244–1274
      Blanche d'Artois 1248–1302
     Spouse
      Philippe IV of France 1268–1314
     Half Siblings
      Henry of Lancaster 1281–1345
     Children
      Louis X of France 1289–1316
      Blanche de France 1290–1294
      Isabella of France 1292–1358
      Philippe V 1293–1322
      Charles IV 1294–1328
      Robert de France 1297–1307
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 31 Jan 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 64956255.11
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Joan I of Navarre - Joan I (14 January 1273 – 31 March/2 April 1305)[1] (Basque: Joana) was queen regnant of Navarre and countess of Champagne from 1274 until 1305; she was also queen consort of France by marriage to Philip IV of France. She was the daughter of king Henry I of Navarre and Blanche of Artois.
Life
     "Joan was born in Bar-sur-Seine, Champagne on 14 January 1273 as a princess of the House of Blois.[2] The following year, upon the death of her father, she became Countess of Champagne and Queen of Navarre.[3] Her mother, Blanche, was her guardian and regent in Navarre. Various powers, both foreign and Navarrese, sought to take advantage of the minority of the heiress and the "weakness" of the female regent, which caused Joan and her mother to seek protection at the court of Philip III of France. Her mother arrived in France in 1274, and by the Treaty of Orléans in 1275, Joan was betrothed to one of Philip's sons (Louis or Philip).[4] Blanche therefore placed her daughter and the government of Navarre under the protection of the King of France. After this, Joan was brought up with Philip. It is, in fact, uncertain whether she ever resided in Navarre during her childhood.[2]
Queen of France
     "At the age of 11, Joan married the future Philip IV of France on 16 August 1284, becoming queen consort of France in 1285 a year later. Their three surviving sons would all rule as kings of France, in turn, and their only surviving daughter, Isabella, became queen consort of England.
     "Joan was described as having been plump and plain, whereas her beautiful daughter Isabella resembled her father more in physical appearance. As regards her character, Joan was bold, courageous, and enterprising.
     "Joan was described as a success in her role of Queen of France: she secured the succession, she was an efficient mistress of the royal court, a dignified first lady and had a very good relationship with the King. Having grown up together, the couple was evidently close to each other and Philip is reported to have loved and respected her deeply.[5] His emotional dependence on her is suggested as a reason to why she never visited Navarre. In 1294, Philip appointed her regent of France should his son succeed him being still a minor.[6] However, he is not believed to have entrusted her with influence over the affairs of France, unless they concerned her own domains Navarre and Champagne.[6]
     "Queen Joan founded the famous College of Navarre in Paris in 1305.[citation needed]
Queen of Navarre and Countess of Champagne
     "Queen Joan I of Navarre and countess of Champagne and Brie was declared to be of legal majority upon her marriage in 1284, and did homage for Champagne and Brie to her father-in-law in Paris.[7]
     "Joan never visited the Kingdom of Navarre, which was ruled in her name by French governors appointed first by her father-in-law and then by her spouse in her name.[2] The French governors were extremely unpopular in Navarre and her absence from the country was resented:[8] however, it was the French who were blamed for her absence rather than her, and the loyalty to her right to rule was not questioned; rather, it was emphasized in Navarre that it was in fact she rather than the French who was their sovereign. From afar, edicts were issued in her name, coins struck in her image,[8] and she gave her protection to chapels and convents. She never came closer to Navarre than to Carcassonne in 1300, and her spouse was somewhat blamed for this.[5]
     "Joan was much more directly active as countess of Champagne. While being a county rather than a kingdom, Champagne was much richer and more strategically important. Philip IV appointed her administrators, however, Joan visited Champagne regularly and is recorded to have participated in all duties of a ruling vassal and is not regarded to have been passive but an active independent ruler in this domain. In 1297, she raised and led an army against the Count of Bar when he rebelled against her by invading Champagne.[9] This was explicitly in the absence of her spouse, and she personally brought the count to prison before she joined her spouse.[9] She also personally acted in her process against Bishop Guichard of Troyes, whom she accused of having stolen funds from Champagne and her mother by fraud.[9]
     "Joan died in 1305, allegedly in childbirth but the Bishop of Troyes, Guichard, was arrested in 1308 and accused of killing her with witchcraft by sticking an image of her with a pin. He was released in 1313.[10] Her personal physician was the inventor Guido da Vigevano.
Children
     "With Philip IV of France:
-- Margaret (1288 – c. 1294)
-- Louis X of France, King Louis I of Navarre from 1305, France from 1314 (October 1289 – 5 June 1316)
-- Blanche (1290 – c. 1294)
-- Philip V of France and Navarre (as Philip II) (1292/93 – 3 January 1322)
-- Charles IV of France and Navarre (as Charles I) (c. 1294 – 1 February 1328)
-- Isabella (c. 1295 – 23 August 1358), married Edward II of England
-- Robert (1297 – July 1308)
Notes
1. An annotated index of medieval women. Markus Wiener Publishers. 1992. ISBN 9780910129275. Retrieved 2010-03-25.
2. Woodacre 2013, p. 39.
3. Woodacre 2013, p. 25.
4. Woodacre 2013, p. 29.
5. Woodacre 2013, p. 42.
6. Woodacre 2013, p. 43.
7. Woodacre 2013, p. 35-36.
8. Woodacre 2013, p. 40.
9. Woodacre 2013, p. 37.
10. Menache, Sophia (1998). Clement V. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 85. ISBN 0521592194.
References
-- Woodacre, Elena (2013). The Queens Regnant of Navarre: Succession, Politics, and Partnership, 1274-1512. Palgrave Macmillan.17

; Per Genealogy.EU:
"Queen JUANA I of Navarre (1274-1305), Cts de Champagne, de Brie et de Bigorre, *14.1.1273, +Château de Vincennes 2.4.1305, bur Paris; m.16.8.1284 King Philippe IV of France (*1268 +29.11.1314)"

Per Genealogics:
     "she became countess of Champagne and queen regnant of Navarre aged just three. Various powers, both foreign and Navarrese, sought to take advantage of the minority of the heiress and the 'weakness' of the female regent, which caused Jeanne and her mother to seek protection at the court of Philippe III 'le Hardi', king of France.
     "On 16 August 1284 in the Notre Dame in Paris Jeanne married the future Philippe IV, king of France, son of Philippe III 'le Hardi', and Isabella of Aragón. In 1285 she became queen consort of France. Jeanne brought to the French crown her rights to Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie. She and Philippe had seven children of whom three sons and a daughter Isabelle would have progeny. Their three sons would all rule as kings of France in turn, and Isabelle became queen consort of England.
     "Jeanne was described as having been a plump, plain woman, whereas her beautiful daughter Isabelle resembled her father more in physical appearance. She was said to have been bold, courageous and enterprising. She even led an army against the count of Bar when he rebelled against her. She was a woman of great intelligence and vivacity, a lover of the arts and letters, who founded the famous College of Navarre.
     "Jeanne died in 1305 allegedly in childbirth, although one chronicler accused her husband of having killed her. Her personal physician was the inventor Guido da Vigevano. On her death her rights to Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie were transmitted to her eldest son, the future Louis X."2,10 EDV-19 GKJ-20. She was Queen of Navarre between 1274 and 1305.18,6

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-31, p. 47. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Navarre 6: pp. 535-6. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 6: Kings of Navarre, 1194-1512. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008729&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAVARRE.htm#EnriqueIdied1274. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005198&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001691&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 October 2019), memorial page for Jeanne I de Navarre (14 Jan 1273–2 Apr 1305), Find A Grave Memorial no. 64956255, citing Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/64956255/jeanne_i-de_navarre. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#P4
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-30, p. 98.
  14. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Navarre 6i: p. 536.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe IV 'le Bel': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001690&tree=LEO
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_I_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Margueritedied1294
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis X 'le Hutin': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003844&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Blanchedied1294
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001692&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Isabelledied1358