Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny1

M, #6361, d. between 21 November 1129 and 26 November 1129
FatherRoger d'Aubigny1,2
MotherAmicie de Mowbray1
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited6 Oct 2020
     Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny married Mathilde/Maud de L'Aigle, daughter of Richer de L'Aigle Seigneur de L'Aigle and Judith Le Goz (?) d'Avranches, in 1107/8.3,2 Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny and Mathilde/Maud de L'Aigle were divorced in 1118.3 Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny married Gundreda de Gournay, daughter of Gerard de Gournay of Caister Norfolk, Seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray and Edith/Aldgyth de Warenne, in June 1118.3,1,2
Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny died between 21 November 1129 and 26 November 1129.2
     ; Nele; closely associated with HENRY I, who made over to him following his victory of Tinchebrai 1106 the possessions in England of Robert de Stuteville, a follower of HENRY's defeated er bro ROBERT, DUKE OF NORMANDY; m 1st after 1107 (but later repudiated) Maud, formerly w of Robert de Mowbray (originally Mon(t)brai, in Normandy), Earl of Northumberland, her marriage to the latter having been previously declared null due to their kinship (Robert, it has been suggested, may have been 1st cousin to Nele through the latter's mother, sis of Roger de Mowbray, f of Robert); m 2nd June 1118 Gundred, dau of Gerard de Gournay by Edith, dau of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (see NORFOLK, D, preliminary remarks), and d 21/26 Nov 1129.2 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Family 2

Gundreda de Gournay b. WFT Est. 1092-1097, d. WFT Est. 1093-1186
Child

Citations

  1. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 158-3, p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 544, Figure 14: The transmission of the surname Mowbray.
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 158-4, p. 188.
  5. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."

Gundreda de Gournay

F, #6362, b. WFT Est. 1092-1097, d. WFT Est. 1093-1186
FatherGerard de Gournay of Caister Norfolk, Seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray1,2 b. 1060, d. c 1104
MotherEdith/Aldgyth de Warenne1,3,4 b. c 1076
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited6 Oct 2020
     Gundreda de Gournay was born WFT Est. 1092-1097 at England.5
Gundreda de Gournay died WFT Est. 1093-1186.5 She married Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny, son of Roger d'Aubigny and Amicie de Mowbray, in June 1118.6,7,1
     EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Gundreda de Gournay was also known as Gundred Gournay.

Family

Nele (Nigel) d'Aubigny d. bt 21 Nov 1129 - 26 Nov 1129
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerard de Gournay, of Caister Norfolk: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00427301&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edith|Gundred de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015441&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#GerardGournaydied1099. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 544, Figure 14: The transmission of the surname Mowbray.
  7. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 158-3, p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  8. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 158-4, p. 188.
  9. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."

Henry le Scrope KB, 7th Baron Srope of Bolton1

M, #6363, b. circa 1480, d. 1533
FatherHenry le Scrope 6th Baron Scrope of Bolton1 b. c 1468, d. 1506
MotherElizabeth de Percy1
Last Edited11 Nov 2002
     Henry le Scrope KB, 7th Baron Srope of Bolton married Mabel/Margaret Dacre, daughter of Sir Thomas Dacre KB, KG, 2nd Lord Dacre of Gilsland and Elizabeth Greystoke Baroness Greystoke.1,2 Henry le Scrope KB, 7th Baron Srope of Bolton was born circa 1480.3 He married Alice le Scrope Baroness Scrope of Masham, daughter of Thomas le Scrope 6th Lord Scrope of Masham and Lady Elizabeth Neville, before 20 April 1494.1
Henry le Scrope KB, 7th Baron Srope of Bolton died in 1533.1
     ; HENRY, 7TH BARON SCROPE OF BOLTON, K.B, "stern and stout on horseback who had not his peer, no Englishman Scots did more doubt," fought at Flodden 1513, when (says the ballad) "with him did wend all Wensleydale from Morton unto Mossdale Moor," and "all Richmondshire the lusty Scroop did lead and guide"; was one of the signatories of the letter praying Pope Clement VII to grant HENRY VIII a divorce from Queen Catherine of Aragon; b. ca. 1480; m 1st, ante 20 April, 1494, Alice, Baroness Scrope of Masham (see above), and had issue. He m 2nd, Mabel, who attended the Queen to the Field of the Cloth of Gold, dau of Thomas, 2nd Baron Dacre of the North, KG, and d 1533, having by her had issue.3 He was 7th Baron Scrope of Bolton.1

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Mabel/Margaret Dacre
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint og 1883 edition), p. 152. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page (see ROKEBY formerly of Arthingworth).
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scarbrough Family Page.

Balian II d'Ibelin Lord of Nablus1,2,3,4

M, #6364, b. 1143, d. after February 1193
FatherBalian II (?) Sire d'Ibelin, Constable of Jaffa2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1090, d. bt 1150 - 1152
MotherHelvis(e)/Alvis (?) de Ramla3,4,7,8,6 b. b 1115, d. bt 1160 - 1165
Last Edited12 Jun 2020
     Balian II d'Ibelin Lord of Nablus was born in 1143.9,4 He married Maria Komnena Lady of Nauplia, Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Ioannes Dukas Comnenus Duke of Cyprus, Protosebastos and Maria Taronitissa Komnenus (?), in 1177;
Her 2nd husband.1,9,4,10,11,12
Balian II d'Ibelin Lord of Nablus died after February 1193.1,9,4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA Komnene (1154-before Oct 1217). She is named with her father by William of Tyre when he records her marriage with King Amaury[308]. Caffaro records that "rex Amarricus" married secondly after separating from his first wife "Maria neptis imperatoris Manuelis, filiam Iohannis protosauasto…nepos imperatoris Manuelis ex fratre suo" and that they had "filiam unam…Ysabella"[309]. Amaury King of Jerusalem sent ambassadors to Constantinople in [1164/65] to ask the emperor for the hand of an imperial princess but received no answer until they landed at Tyre with Maria Komnene in Aug 1167. Ioannes Kinnamos records the marriage of "una filiarum protosebasti" and the brother of Baudouin III King of Jerusalem[310]. She was given Nablus as her dower[311]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "la reyne Marie…niece de l'empereur Manuel" as wife of "Belleem de Ybelin"[312]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "relictam regis Almarici…que fuit de Grecia" married "Bethuliani de Guibelin"[313]. "Hugo…rex Cipri" confirmed the grant to the church of Nicosia by "Philippus de Ybellino" for the soul of "domine Marie regine, matris sue" by charter dated Oct 1217[314].
     "m firstly (Tyre 29 Aug 1167) as his second wife, AMAURY I King of Jerusalem, son of FOULQUES King of Jerusalem Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Mélisende Queen of Jerusalem (1136-11 Jul 1174).
     "m secondly ([1177]) BALIAN of Ibelin, son of BALIAN of Ibelin Lord of Rama & his wife Helvis of Rama ([1142/43]-[1193/94]). Lord of Nablus, by right of his wife. Lord of Rama and Mirabel."
Med Lands cites:
[307] Chuat, J. C. (2006) De Chemins en Jalons, Vol. II. Jalons vers l’antiquité (privately published by the author), pp. 21-2.
[308] WT XX.I, p. 942.
[309] Belgrano, L. T. (ed.) (1891) Annali Genovesi di Caffaro e de’ suoi continuatori, Vol. 1, Fonti per la Storia d’Italia (Genoa), Regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 132.
[310] Ioannes Kinnamos Liber V, 13, p. 237.
[311] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 370 and 377.
[312] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVII, p. 61.
[313] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933.
[314] Mas de Latrie, M. L. de (1855) Histoire de l'Ile de Chypre (Paris), Vol. 3, p. 608.12


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 177;III 631.
2. The Rupenides,Hethumides and Lusignans, Structure of the Armeno-Cilician dynast. Paris, 1963., W.H. Rudt-Collenberg, Reference: XI (I).
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.13


; Per Genealogics:
     "Balian was born about 1143, the son of Balian Ibelin, lord of Ibelin, constable of Jaffa, and Helvis of Rama. After the death of his eldest brother Hugues, the castle of Ibelin passed to the next brother Baudouin. He preferred to remain lord of Ramla and gave it to Balian. Balian held Ibelin as a vassal of his brother, and indirectly as a rear-vassal of the king, from whom Baudouin held Ramla.
     "In 1174 Baudouin supported Raymond III, count of Tripoli, over Milon de Plancy, seigneur de Montréal, as regent for Baudouin IV, king of Jerusalem, and in 1177 the brothers were present at the Battle of Montgisard, leading the vanguard victoriously against the strongest point of the Muslim line. That year Balian also married Maria Komnena, daughter of Ioannes Doukas Komnenos, the widow of Amalric I d'Anjou, king of Jerusalem, and so he became stepfather to their daughter Isabella d'Anjou. He received the lordship of Nablus, which had been a dower gift to Maria following her marriage to Amalric. In 1179 Baudouin was captured by Saladin at the Battle of Jacob's Ford, and Balian helped arrange for his ransom and release the next year; the ransom was eventually paid by Byzantine emperor Manuel I Komnenos, Maria's great-uncle.
     "In 1183 Balian and Baudouin supported Raymond III against Guy de Lusignan, husband of Sybil d'Anjou, sister of Baudouin IV and the elder half-sister of Balian's step-daughter Isabella; Guy was by now regent for Baudouin IV, who was dying of leprosy. The king had his 5-year-old nephew Baudouin V de Monferrato, Sybil's son, crowned as co-king in his own lifetime, in an attempt to prevent Guy from succeeding as king. Shortly before his death in spring 1185, Baudouin IV ordered a formal crown-wearing by his nephew at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. It was Balian himself - a notably tall man - who carried the child Baudouin V on his shoulders at the ceremony, signifying the support of Isabella's family for her nephew. Soon after, the eight-year old boy became sole king. When he too died in 1186, Balian and Maria, with Raymond's support, put forward Maria's daughter Isabella d'Anjou, then about 14, as a candidate for the throne. However her husband Honfroy IV de Toron, lord of Kerak, Oultrejourdain and Toron, refused the crown and swore fealty to Guy. Balian reluctantly also paid homage to Guy, while his brother refused to do so and exiled himself to Antioch. Baudouin placed Balian in charge of raising his son Thomas, the future lord of Ramla, who did not go with his father to Antioch. Balian remained in the kingdom as an advisor to Guy. At the end of 1186 Saladin, the sultan of Egypt and Damascus, threatened the borders of the kingdom after Guy's ally Renaud de Châtillon, prince of Antioch, had attacked a Muslim caravan. Saladin was allied with the garrison of Tiberias in the north of the kingdom, a territory held by Raymond III. Guy gathered his army at Nazareth, planning to besiege Tiberias, but Balian disagreed with this, and instead suggested that Guy send an emissary to Raymond in Tripoli, hoping the two could be reconciled before Guy made a foolish attack on Saladin's larger army. The first embassy was a failure and the situation remained unchanged throughout the early months of 1187. After Easter of that year, Balian, Gerard de Ridefort (Grand Master of the Knights Templar), Roger des Moulins (Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller), Renaud Grenier, lord of Sidon, and Joscius, archbishop of Tyre, were sent on a new embassy to Tripoli. During the journey they stopped at Balian's fief of Nablus, and Balian planned to remain behind briefly while the others went ahead. On 1 May the Templars and Hospitallers were defeated by Saladin's son al-Afdal at the Battle of Cresson; Balian was still a day behind, and had also stopped at Sebastea to celebrate a feast day. After reaching the castle of La Fève, where the Templars and Hospitallers had camped, he found that the place was deserted, and soon heard the news of the disastrous battle from the few survivors. Raymond heard about the battle as well and met with the embassy at Tiberias, and agreed to accompany them back to Jerusalem.
     "Since al-Afdal's army had been allowed to enter the kingdom through their alliance with Raymond, the count now regretted his actions and reconciled with Guy. Guy marched north and camped at Sephoria, but insisted on marching the army across a dry and barren plain to relieve Tiberias. The army had no water and was constantly harassed by Saladin's troops, and was finally surrounded at the Horns of Hattin outside Tiberias early in July. In the battle that followed on 4 July, Balian and Joscelin III de Courtenay, count of Edessa, commanded the rearguard, but the Crusader army was completely defeated. The anonymous text _De Expugnatione Terrae Sanctae per Saladinum Libellus_ claims that Balian, Raymond and Renaud Grenier, lord of Sidon, fled the field in the middle of the battle, trampling 'the Christians, the Turks and the Cross' in the process - but this is not corroborated by other accounts, and likely reflects the author's hostility to the Poleins (a European born in the Levant).
     "The defeat was a disaster for the kingdom of Jerusalem: King Guy was taken prisoner, and nearly every town and castle soon fell to Saladin. Balian, Raymond, Renaud Grenier, and Payen of Haifa were among the few leading nobles who managed to escape to Tyre. Raymond and Renaud soon left to attend to the defence of their own territories, and Tyre came under the leadership of Conrad, marchese de Monferrato, Baudouin V's paternal uncle, who had arrived not long after Hattin. Balian was to become one of his closest allies. Leaving Tyre, Balian asked Saladin for permission to return through the lines to Jerusalem to escort his wife and their children to Tripoli. Saladin allowed this, provided that Balian leave the city and take an oath never to raise arms against him.
     "When Balian arrived in the city, the inhabitants begged him to stay, and he was absolved of his oath to Saladin by Patriarch Eraclius, who argued that the greater need of Christendom was stronger than his oath to a non-Christian. Balian was recruited to lead the defence of the city, but he found that there were under fourteen, possibly as few as two, other knights there, so he created sixty new knights from the inhabitants. Queen Sybil seems to have played little part in the defence, and oaths were taken to Balian as lord. With Eraclius, he prepared for the inevitable siege by storing food and money. Saladin indeed arrived to besiege the city in September, after he had conquered almost all of the rest of the kingdom, including Ibelin, Nablus, Ramla and Ascalon. The sultan felt no ill-will to Balian for breaking his oath, and arranged an escort to accompany Maria and their children to Tripoli. As the highest ranking lord remaining in Jerusalem, Balian, as Ibn al-Athir wrote, was seen by the Muslims as holding a rank 'more or less equal to that of a king.' Saladin was able to knock down portions of the wall, but was unable to gain entrance to the city. Balian then rode out to meet with the sultan, to report to him that the defenders would rather kill each other and destroy the city than see it taken by force. After negotiations, it was decided that the city would be handed over peacefully, and that Saladin would free seven thousand men for 30,000 bezants; two women or ten children would be permitted to take the place of one man for the same price. Balian handed over the keys to the Tower of David (the citadel) on 2 October. There was a 50-day period for the payment of ransoms. Those who could not pay for their freedom were forced into slavery; Saladin freed some of them, however, and allowed for an orderly march away from Jerusalem, preventing the sort of massacre that had occurred when the crusaders captured the city in 1099. Balian and Patriarch Eraclius had offered themselves as hostages for the ransoming of the remaining Frankish citizens, but Saladin had refused. The ransomed inhabitants marched away in three columns. Balian and the Patriarch led the third, which was the last to leave the city, probably around 20 November. Balian joined his wife and children in Tripoli.
     "The fall of Jerusalem, and the death of Sybil at the Siege of Acre in 1190, led to a dispute over the throne of the kingdom. Balian's stepdaughter Isabella was now the rightful queen, but Guy refused to concede his title, and Isabella's husband Humphrey - who had let her cause down in 1186 - remained loyal to him. If Isabella were to succeed, she needed a politically acceptable and militarily competent husband, the obvious candidate being Conrad, marchese de Monferrato, who also had some claim as Baudouin V's paternal uncle. Balian and Maria seized Isabella and talked her into agreeing to a divorce. There were precedents: the annulment of Amalric I's marriage to Agnes de Courtenay, lady of Thoron, and the unsuccessful attempts to force Sybil to divorce Guy.
     "Isabella's marriage to Humphrey was annulled by Ubaldo Lanfranchi, archbishop of Pisa, who was papal legate, and Philippe de Dreux, bishop of Beauvais. The bishop of Beauvais then married her to Conrad (controversially, since his brother had been married to her half-sister and it was uncertain whether he had been divorced by his Byzantine wife). The succession dispute was prolonged by the arrival of Richard I, king of England, and Philippe II August, king of France, on the Third Crusade: Richard supported Guy as a Poitevin vassal, while Philippe supported Conrad, his late father's cousin.
     "Balian and Maria's role in Isabella's divorce and their support for Conrad as king earned them the bitter hatred of Richard and his supporters. Ambroise, who wrote a poetic account of the crusade, called Balian 'more false than a goblin' and said he 'should be hunted with dogs'. The anonymous author of the _Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi_ wrote that Balian was a member of a 'council of consummate iniquity' around Conrad, accusing him of taking Conrad's bribes, and said of Maria and Balian as a couple: 'Steeped in Greek filth from the cradle, she had a husband whose morals matched her own: he was cruel, she was godless; he was fickle, she was pliable; he was faithless, she was fraudulent'.
     "On 28 April 1192, only days after his kingship was confirmed by election, Conrad was assassinated in Tyre. It was said that one of the two Hashshashin responsible had entered Balian's household in Tyre some months previously, pretending to be a servant, in order to stalk his victim; the other may have similarly infiltrated Renaud of Sidon's or Conrad's own household. Richard was widely suspected of involvement in the murder. Isabella, who was expecting her first child (Maria de Monferrato), married Henri II, comte de Champagne, only a week later.
     "Balian became one of Henri's advisors, and later that year (along with William of Tiberias), he commanded the rearguard of King Richard's army at the Battle of Jaffa. Later he helped negotiate the Treaty of Ramla between Richard and Saladin, ending the crusade. Under this treaty, Ibelin remained under Saladin's control, but many sites along the coast which had been reconquered during the crusade were allowed to remain in Christian hands. After Richard departed, Saladin compensated Balian with the castle of Caymont and five other nearby sites, all outside Acre.
     "Balian died in 1193, in his early fifties. With Maria he had five children of whom Helvis, Philippe, Marguerite and Jean I, would have progeny. Balian's squire Ernoul, who was with him on the embassy to Tripoli in 1187, wrote parts of the Old French continuation of the Latin chronicle of William of Tyre (William had died in 1186, before the fall of Jerusalem). Although this family of manuscripts now often bears his name, his account only survives in fragments within it, mainly for the period 1186-1188, with a heavy bias in favour of the Ibelin family.
     "Balian became a common name in the Ibelin family in the 13th century. Balian, lord of Beirut, son of Jean and grandson of this Balian, succeeded his father as lord of Beirut in 1236. Balian of Beirut's brother, also named Jean, had a son named Balian; this Balian was lord of Arsuf and married Plaisance of Antioch. The name also passed into the family of the Greniers of Sidon, since Balian's daughter Helvis and Renaud of Sidon named their son Balian."13

; See Wikipedia article and entry on Med Lands for more information.14,15

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Balian d'Ibelin, Lord of Nablus, +1193; m.1177 Maria Komnenos, widow of King Amalric I of Jerusalem."16

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1 page ("The Komnenos family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html#TKK
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ibelin page ("d'Ibelin family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/ibelin.html#BN
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049924&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XI (I.): The House of Ibelin. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106161&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM%20NOBILITY.htm#BalianIbelinRamadied1150. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille d’ Ibelin, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ibelin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helvis of Rama: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106162&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106161&tree=LEO
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026639&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1217
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Balian Ibelin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049924&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balian_of_Ibelin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM%20NOBILITY.htm#BalianIbelinNablusdied1193B
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ibelin page (d'Ibelin family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/ibelin.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helvis Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122080&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00197956&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I Ibelin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106159&tree=LEO

Henry le Scrope 8th Baron Srope of Masham1

M, #6365, d. circa 1512
FatherThomas le Scrope 5th Lord Scrope of Masham1,2,3 b. c 1430, d. 1475
MotherElizabeth Greystoke1,4,3 d. a 20 Dec 1483
Last Edited3 Sep 2008
     Henry le Scrope 8th Baron Srope of Masham died circa 1512; dsp.1

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Le Scrope: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00308271&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Danby 12: p. 255. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Greystoke: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104859&tree=LEO

Philippe (?) de France1,2

M, #6366, b. 29 August 1116, d. 13 October 1131
FatherLouis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France1,2,4 b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137
MotherAdelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France1,2,3 b. c 1092, d. 18 Aug 1154
Last Edited1 Nov 2019
     Philippe (?) de France was born on 29 August 1116.1,2
Philippe (?) de France died on 13 October 1131 at age 15; died from a fall from a horse in Paris.1,2
     ; Philippe, *29.8.1116, +from a fall from a horse in Paris 13.10.1131, cr King of France 1129.2

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO

Constance (?) Duchess of Burgundy1,2

F, #6367, b. circa 1046, d. between 2 September 1093 and 25 October 1093
FatherRobert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre2,3,4,5 b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
MotherElla/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais2,3,6,7 b. 1016, d. 22 Apr 1109
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited9 Dec 2020
     Constance (?) Duchess of Burgundy was born circa 1046 at Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France (now).8,2,3,9,10 She married Hugues II (?) Comte de Châlons-sur-Saone, son of Thibault/Thibaud de Semur comte de de Chaon-sur-Saône and Ermentrude (?) d'Autun, in 1065;
her 1st husband.2,3,9,5 Constance (?) Duchess of Burgundy married Alfonso VI "the Brave" (?) King of León & Castile, son of Ferdinand I "The Great" (?) King of Castile and Leon and Sancha (?) Infanta de Leon, before 8 May 1080;
his 2nd wife; her 2nd husband; Fletcher says married in 1079.1,11,8,2,3,9,12
Constance (?) Duchess of Burgundy died between 2 September 1093 and 25 October 1093 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain.8,2,3,9,10
Constance (?) Duchess of Burgundy was buried between 2 September 1093 and 25 October 1093 at Sahagun Monastery, Sahagun, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     8 May 1046, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     DEATH     Jan 1093 (aged 46), Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
     French and Spanish Royalty. Born at Dijon, Cote d'Or, Bourgogne, France, the daughter of Helie Ermengarde de Sémur and Robert I, duc de Bourgogne, a younger son of Robert II, King of France. About 1065, she married Hugh II, count de Chalon-sur-Saone. She was widowed about 1079, when she commissioned the building of a monastery. She married Alfonso VI, King of Castilla and León in 1081. The following year she gave birth to her only surviving child, Urraca, who would become Queen of Castilla. She was instrumental in introducing the Roman liturgical rites to Castilian masses. She died at about age 46, and was interred in the monastery of St. Facundo and Primitivo. In the 19th century, the remains were moved several times, and are currently interred in the monastery of San Benito in Sahagún. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert de Bourgogne 1011–1076
     Spouse
          Alfonso VI King Of Castile And Leon 1039–1109
     Siblings
          Hildegarde de Bourgogne 1050–1120
     Children
          Urraca De Portugal Burgundy 1079–1126
     BURIAL     Sahagun Monastery, Sahagun, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 18 Dec 2003
     Find A Grave Memorial 8192215.10
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Constance of Burgundy (8 May 1046 – 1093) was the daughter of Duke Robert I of Burgundy and Helie de Semur-en-Brionnais.[1] She was Queen consort of Castile and León by her marriage to Alfonso VI of León and Castile. She was the granddaughter of King Robert II of France, the second monarch of the French Capetian dynasty. She was the mother of Urraca of León, who succeeded her father in both Castile and León.
Life
     "In 1065, Constance married her first husband, Hugh II, Count of Chalon.[1] They were married for fourteen years until Hughes' death in 1079, they had no children.[2]
     "In late 1079, Constance remarried to Alfonso VI of León and Castile.[2] The marriage appears to have been orchestrated via the Cluniac connections at Alfonso's court. He had previously been married to Agnes of Aquitaine, whom he had either divorced or had been widowed by. The marriage of Constance and Alfonso initially faced papal opposition, apparently due to a kinship between Constance and Agnes.
     "Constance and Alfonso had several children but only one of these lived to adulthood:
** Urraca (b. April 1079 – March 8, 1126) Queen of Castile and León in her own right. Married firstly to Raymond of Burgundy.[3] Married secondly to Alfonso the Battler, no issue.

     "Constance died in 1093 leaving her fourteen-year-old daughter and her husband a widower. He went on to marry three further wives after her death, but only had a son by his Muslim mistress, Zaida of Seville.
Burial
     "After her death, the corpse of Constance was taken to the town of Sahagún and was buried in the Monastery of St. Facundo and Primitivo, where her husband, King Alfonso VI would be buried along with all his wives.[4]
     "The grave that contained the remains of Alfonso VI was destroyed in 1810 during a fire in the Monastery. The remains of the king and several of his wives, including those of Constance, were collected and kept in the abbot's chamber until 1821. When the religious were expelled from the monastery, they were then deposited by Abbot Ramon Joys in a box that was placed on the south wall of the chapel of the Crucifix, until, in January 1835, the remains were collected and placed in another box, being brought to the archive. The purpose was to place all remaining interests in a new sanctuary that was being built then.[5] However, when the monastery of San Benito was disentailed in 1835, the monks gave the two boxes containing the actual remains to the relative of a priest, who hid them until 1902 were found by the professor Zamora Rodrigo Fernández Núñez.[5]
     "Today, the remains of Alfonso VI are buried in the Royal Monastery of San Benito in Sahagún, at the foot of the temple, in a stone chest covered with smooth, modern marble and in a tomb near equally plain, lie the remains of several of the king's wives, including those of Constance.[4]
References
1. Bouchard 1987, p. 256.
2. Bull 1993, p. 88.
3. Bouchard 1987, p. 145.
4. Elorza et al 1990, p. 54.
5. Arco y Garay 1954, p. 195.
Bibliography
** Arco y Garay, Ricardo del (1954). Sepulcros de la Casa Real de Castilla (in Spanish). Madrid: Instituto Jerónimo Zurita. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. OCLC 11366237.
** Bouchard, Constance Brittain (1987). Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980-1198. Cornell University Press.
** Bull, Marcus Graham (1993). Knightly Piety and the Lay Response to the First Crusade: The Limousin and Gascony, C. 970-c. 1130. Clarendon Press.
** Elorza, Juan C; Vaquero, Lourdes; Castillo, Belén; Negro, Marta (1990). Junta de Castilla y León. Consejería de Cultura y Bienestar Social (ed.) El Panteón Real de las Huelgas de Burgos. Los enterramientos de los reyes de León y de Castilla (in Spanish). Publisher Evergráficas S.A. ISBN 84-241-9999-5."13



; Per Fletcher [1990:150]: "niece of Abbot Hugh of Cluny."14



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1968.
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. 7.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:20.9


; Per Genealogics:
     "Constance was born on 8 May 1046, the daughter of Robert I, duc de Bourgogne, and Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais. In 1065 she married her first husband Hugues II, comte de Châlons-sur-Saône. They were married for fourteen years until Hugues' death in 1079 but had no children.
     "In late 1079 Constance married Alfonso VI 'the Brave', king of Castile and León, son of Fernando I 'the Great', king of Castile, and Sancha of León. The marriage appears to have been orchestrated via the Cluniac connections at Alfonso's court. He had previously been married to Agnès de Poitou, whom he appears to have divorced as she died in 1080, the year after his marriage to Constance. The marriage initially faced papal opposition, apparently due to a kinship between Constance and Agnès.
     "Constance and Alfonso had several children but only Urraca lived to adulthood. She would have progeny with her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne and from a relationship with Conde Pedro González de Lara.
     "Constance was instrumental in having the Roman Rite replace the Visigothic Rite in the churches of Castile. She died in September or October 1093, leaving her fourteen-year-old daughter and her husband a widower. He went on to marry three further wives after her death, but he only had a son by his Muslim mistress Zaida of Seville. The boy, Sancho of Castile, lived to 1108 but was killed at Ucles in battle, without leaving progeny."9

GAV-25 EDV-25.

; per Farmerie: Thanks to Nat Taylor, I have recently read through a new article on the subject of Zaida, royal mistress and (as some would have it) queen of Alfonso VI of Leon and Castile.
     "To review, Alonso had a complex marriage history. The early-12th century Bishop Pelayo of Oviedo wrote that Alfonso married Agnes of Aquitaine, Constance of Burgundy, Bertha of Tuscany, Isabel, and Beatrice, and further had children by mistresses Jimena and Zaida, a moorish princess who was baptized as Isabel. Several questions remain about these women, their parentage and identities. Agnes can be definitively placed as daughter of Guy-Geoffrey alias William VIII of Aquitaine by his second wife, and Constance has always been clearly identified as daughter of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy. Zaida is said by the Bishop to be daughter of the deposed ruler of Seville, but muslim sources make it clear that she was actually his daughter-in-law. At various times, various theories have been proposed regarding the others, while the fate of Agnes has also been subject to debate.
     "The problem with Agnes is that Orderic has her marrying Helias, Count of Maine, 30 years after she is last recorded as Alfonso's wife (22 May 1077). This would require a divorce followed by a long seclusion, or else an intermediate marriage that has escaped notice. As further evidence for divorce, authors have cited an undated papal latter thought to be from the late 1070s or earliest 1080s that condemns Alfonso for continuing in an incestuous so-called marriage. Presumably, it is argued, Alfonso divorced Agnes to satisfy the pope. The alternative explanation is that Orderic was mistaken, and that Helias married someone else. These authors would argue that the papal letter refers not to his old marriage, but to his new one to Constance, contracted prior to 8 May 1080. At least this latter part does seem to be the case, as the letter decries the behavior of a certain Clunaic monk who is known to have been instrumental in arranging the marriage to Constance, and Constance was a near relative of Agnes (and if it was the relationship of Constance to Agnes that was the problem, it would suggest that Alfonso's marriage to Agnes was never annulled). It hasn't helped that Agnes had a half-sister who was also an Iberian queen, and the death date of the latter has been erroneously given to the former by some authors.
     "Constance last appears 2 Sep. 1093, and is absent by 25 October of that year.
     "With regard to Bertha, Szabolcs de Vajay wrote an article dedicate to her identification, but I have been unable to get hold of a copy to see what he concludes. I have seen nothing else, other than some vague speculation. Bertha first appears 28 Apr. 1095 (as Alberta) and last on 17 Nov. 1099 (Berta), being dead by 15 Jan. 1100.
     "By 14 May 1100, Alfonso is married to Isabel(/Elizabeth - the names were not distinct at the time), and he continues to appear with a queen of that name through 1107. She is called daughter of Luis, King of France, by Lucas de Tuy, writing a century after bishop Pelayo, but at the time she would have been born, no Louis had reigned in France since the last of the Carolingians, nor was the name Isabel used for a royal daughter until after she was married. While this identification also appears on a tomb memorial, it was clearly carved in a later hand, and both accounts giving her this parentage are generally dismissed. Reilly hypothesized that she was daughter of WIlliam, Count of Burgundy (but on nothing more than that it would be consistent with the pattern of political alliances Alfonso operated in). Most intriguing, because she was mother of a daughter with known descent, some modern authors have identified her with mistress Zaida, even though bishop Pelayo makes no indication that this is the case.
     "As to Beatrice, she likewise has been subject to unsupported speculation, most notably by Reilly, who suggested she was niece of Agnes. (One does wonder that if a pope went apoplectic over Alfonso marrying a distant cousin of Agnes in Constance, it would not raise a stink to marry her neice, but this does allow one to suggest that Orderic's only mistake was in the name of Alfonso's wife marrying Helias.)
     "Jimena has drawn much more attention, there being abounding theories regarding her. Traditionally she has been called daughter of count Nuno Rodriguez by a granddaughter of one of Vermudo II's bastards. However, she was actually Jimena Munoz, daughter of a Munio (on the other hand, Nuno Rodriguez was actually named Munio Rodriguez), and it is clear that her identification with this family is of late origin. Quintana Prieto suggested that she was daughter of an otherwise obscure Munio Munoz, yet this doesn't seem to match with her description as being of a most-noble family. Canal Sanchez-Pagin looked at the 'most noble' Munios in the prior generation and found three who could be so described. By process of elimination (one, Munio Munoz, names all of his children in a charter, while another seems not fo fit for chronological reasons), he concludes that she was daughter of count Munio Gonzalez, who he also makes grandfather of counts Pedro and Rodrigo Gonzalez de Lara (this last appears not to be the case - their father is clearly called Gonzalo Nunez, not Munoz). There are also two works that I have been unable to access, one by Mello Vaz de Sao Payo, which concludes that she was daughter of a Count Munio Munoz (although I do not know the basis, or precisely which man of this name is being suggested), and secondly, Salazar y Acha published a paper in the same publication as the Vajay article on Bertha, and I have yet to see it as well. However, recently a new article by Canal clarified Vajay's conclusion. While not specifically naming Jimena, he cites Salazar as indicating that count Rodrigo Munoz, thought by Canal to be brother of Jimena, was son of Munio Rodriguez and descendant of Vermudo II. Thus, it looks like Salazar has returned to the traditional descent, although his reasoning
remains to be seen.
     "This brings us back to Zaida and the subject of the newly acquired Salazar y Acha work. In the same article that he discussed Jimena, he also concluded that Zaida and Queen Isabel were one and the same. His arguments had to do with chronology, family politics, and one particularly interesting document (although I have not seen the original, his new article reviews his arguments from the old). Sancho is absent from royal documents prior to the marriage to Isabel, and then immediately appears. This coincidence of timing suggests to Salazar that the two are related - that the marriage to Isabel legitimated Sancho, allowing him to become the heir. That he did become the heir is beyond dispute, and Salazar also questions whether an unlinked queen Isabel would have permitted her own potential children to be superseded (I have to wonder if Alfonso would have cared what his wife thought of the matter). Finally, there is a donation charter found in the Tumbo de Lorenzana, which is confirmed by Alfonso, "eiusdemque Helisabeth regina sub maritali copula legaliter aderente". This suggests that Isabel was once Alfonso's mistress, which points directly to Zaida/Isabel. However, this is somewhat odd, as by this time (1106) Alfonso and Isabel had been married for 6 years, leading Reilly to conclude that there were two queens Isabel in succession, and that only shortly before this 1106 confirmation did he marry Zaida.
     "In his new article, Salazar adds several novel points, and then drops a bombshell for the very end. To refute Reilly's 'two Isabels' theory, he cites a charter of Urraca, which names her step-mothers Berta, Isabel, and Beatrix, meaning that both she and Bishop Pelayo would have had to leave out one Isabel. He also points to the chronology between marriages, taking las and first appearance as an indication. We see three years between Agnes and Constance, and one and a half between Constance and Bertha, but less than six months between Bertha and Isabel. He concludes that this left insufficient time for the arranging of a political union, but is perfectly consistent with Alfonso simply marrying his mistress. Finally, he draws attention to a previously overlooked charter in which a grant is made by Alfonso, "cum uxore mea Elisabet et filio nostro Sancio". It is clear that he is not using the 'royal we', as he does not call Isabel "our wife" but "my wife". This would seem prima facie evidence that Sancho, known to be son of Zaida, was son of queen Isabel, meaning that she and Zaida were one and the same. (It would, however, be useful to see how he refers to Urraca, Elvira and Teresa under similar contexts).
     "If one accepts that Salazar had 1) refuted Reilly's suggestion, and 2) shown that Sancho was son of Queen Isabel, it would indicate that the Infantas Elvira, wife of Roger, King of Sicily, and Sancha, known daughters of Queen Isabel, are daughters of the moor Zaida. This is of particular interest with regard to Elvira, as she has numerous documented descendants (while lines from Sancha are found across the internet, none of them are factual).

Refs:
** Canal Sanchez-Pagin, Jose Maria. Jimena Munoz, Amiga de Alfonso VI. Anuario de Estudios Medievales. 21:11-40 (1991).
** Canal Sanchez-Pagin, Jose Maria. El conde Gómez González de Candespina: su historia y su familia.Anuario de estudios medievales. Nº 33:37-68 (2003)
** Mello Vaz de Sao Payo, Luiz. A Ascendencia de D. Afonso Henriques. Raizes & Memorias, vols. 2 through 8, various pages. (relevant part not seen)
** Quintana Prieto, Augusto. Jimena Muñiz, madre de Doña Teresa de Portugal. Revista Portuguesa de Historia. 12:223-80 (1969).
** Salazar y Acha, Jaime de. De nuevo sobre la mora Zaida. Hidalguía: la revista de genealogía, nobleza y armas. Nº. 321:225-242 (2007).
** Salazar y Acha, Jaime de. Contribución al estudio del reinado de Alfonso VI de Castilla: algunas aclaraciones sobre su política matrimonial. Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Heráldica y Genealogía. Nº. 2:299-336 (1992-3) (not seen)
** Vajay, Szabolcs de. Reflexiones en torno a Berta, tercera mujer de Alfonso VI. Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Heráldica y Genealogía. Nº. 2:337-344 (1992-3) (not seen.)15



; Per Med Lands: "CONSTANCE de Bourgogne ([after 1045]-[Jan/Feb] or [3 Apr/25 Oct] 1093, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Trenorciensi records that "Constantiæ…filia Roberti Ducis" married firstly "Hugonis Cabilonensis Comitis" and secondly "Hispaniæ Rex Adefonsus"[202]. Considering the estimated date of her first marriage, it is unlikely that Constance was born before [1045]. She was therefore considerably younger than her brothers. A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum"[203]. "Infanta donna Urraka Regis domni Adefonsi filia" names her mother "Constantie regina" in her donation to Cluny dated 22 Feb 1117 "Spanish Era"[204], although the date was presumably AD as 1117 Spanish Era was equivalent to 1079 AD. An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "filiam Roberti ducis Bugundionem…Constantiam" married Alfonso VI King of Castile and was mother of a daughter who married "Raymundo comiti"[205]. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Queen Constance" as the second of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[206]. Her second marriage date is estimated based on the likely estimated death date of her first husband in [Nov/early Dec] 1079 and her subscribing a document dated 25 Dec 1079 at Dueñas with her second husband[207]. Queen Constance was instrumental in having the Roman rite replace the Visigothic rite in the churches of Castile. "Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[208]. The date of her death is fixed by her last known mention in a charter dated 25 Jul 1093 and a donation by King Alfonso to the monastery of Sahagún dated 25 Oct 1093, which does not include Queen Constanza's name in the subscription list[209]. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[210]. m firstly ([1065]) HUGUES [II] Comte de Chalon, son of THIBAUT Comte de Chalon & his wife Ermentrude--- (-in Spain [Nov/early Dec] 1079). m secondly (late 1079 or 8 May 1081) as his second wife, ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León, son of FERNANDO I King of Castile & his wife Sancha de León (Compostella [1036] or before Jun 1040-29 or 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo)."
Med Lands cites:
[202] Ex Chronico Trenorciensi, RHGF XI, p. 112.
[203] Chifflet (1664), Preuves, p. 331.
[204] Cluny, Tome IV, 3533, p. 654, dated 1117 "Spanish Era".
[205] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596.
[206] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[207] Referred to by Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, footnote 58.
[208] San Salvador de Oña (1950) I, 99, p. 127.
[209] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 240.
[210] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of FERNANDO I "el Magno" King of Castile and León & his wife Sancha de León (Compostela [1038/40]-Toledo 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names (in order) "Urraca, Sancho, Alfonso, García and Elvira" and the children of King Fernando and Queen Sancha[457]. According to the Chronicle of Sahagún, Alfonso was 72 years old when he died[458], but this must be overstated if he was his parents' fourth child as stated in Historia Silense[459]. It is more likely that he was born in [1038/40]. Ferdinand I King of Castile confirmed the union of the monastery of San Martín del Río with San Pedro de Cardeñas by charter dated 31 Aug 1050, subscribed by "Sanctius prolis regis, Adefonsus filius regis, Garsea filio regis, Urraca filia regis, Tegridia filia regis…"[460]. "Fredernandus…Legionensis rex…cum coniuge mea regina dna Sancia et filiis meis" confirmed the privileges of Santiago de Compostela by charter dated 10 Mar 1065, subscribed by "Sancius filius regis, Adefonsus filius regis, Garsea filius regis, Urraca filia regis, Geloira filia regis…"[461]. Under the partition of lands in his father’s will, he received León and the parias from the Taifa state of Toledo, succeeding in 1065 as ALFONSO VI King of León. Relations between Alfonso and his two brothers were tense. Although Alfonso and Sancho cooperated to deprive their brother García of Galicia, Sancho turned against Alfonso soon afterwards and defeated him at Golpejera Jan 1072. He was exiled to Toledo, seeking refuge with the Dhul-Nunid King[462]. He returned to León after the murder of his brother, arriving [10] Nov 1072, and was accepted before 8 Dec 1072 as ALFONSO VI King of Castile. Pursuing his father's close connections with the monastery of Cluny, he granted the order its first monastic house in Castile at San Isidro de Dueñas 29 May 1073, as well as doubling the annual census payment to Cluny in 1077[463]. The Roman liturgy was adopted in Castile and León in 1076. After the death in Jun 1076 of Sancho IV “él de Peñalén” King of Navarre, King Alfonso succeeded as King of Navarre: a charter dated 1076 records that Alfonso VI King of Castile ("Adefonsus filius Fredinandi regis") succeeded to the kingdom after "impiisima fraude interfecto rege Sancio, Garsie...regis filius"[464]. Pope Gregory VII asserted papal suzerainty over Spain 28 Jun 1077, although King Alfonso's response appears to have been to declare himself "imperator totius hispaniae", the first known use of this title being 17 Oct 1077[465]. King Alfonso VI took advantage of the assassination of Sancho IV King of Navarre in 1076 to invade Navarre, annexing La Rioja, Álava, Vizcaya and Guipúzcoa to Castile. Turning his attention to the reconquest of Moorish territories, Alfonso recaptured Toledo 25 May 1085, besieged Zaragoza in 1086, and also imposed his Government on the kingdom of Valencia, where he installed as ruler the deposed al-Qadir ex-taifa King of Toledo. His ambitions were, however, thwarted by al-Mu'tamid King of Seville who, with the help of Yusuf bin Tashfin Emir of the Almoravids, defeated King Alfonso at Sagrajas near Badajoz 23 Oct 1086. The Almoravids rapidly consolidated their position, absorbing the taifa kingdoms of Granada and Seville and subduing Jaén, Almería, Denia and Murcia. Undeterred, Alfonso recaptured Córdoba in 1091, and persuade Al-Mutawakkil of Badajoz to cede him Lisbon, Santarem and Sintra between 30 Apr and 8 May 1093, although Badajoz itself was captured by the Almoravids in early 1094. Meanwhile Rodrigo Díaz "el Cid" recaptured Valencia, establishing himself there as an autonomous prince. Previously his bitter enemy, Alfonso eventually united with him to fight the Moors. He also spread the call overseas, especially in France, for a general crusade to fight 'the infidel'. "Adefonsus rex Legionis et totius Hispanie imperator atque Fredenandi filius regis" granted privileges to Santiago de Compostela, with the advice of "generis mei comitis domini Raimundi", by charter dated 28 Jan 1090[466]. The end of his reign was marred by a crushing defeat at Uclés 29 May 1108, where his son was killed. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium records that King Alfonso lived for 79 years and reigned for 43 years and six months, died in Toledo 1 Jul "in the era 1147 (1109)" and was buried "in the church of saints Facundus and Primitivus"[467]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death “III Kal Jul” in 1147 (1109) of “Rex D. Alfonsus Regis D. Fernandi filius”[468].
     "Betrothed (by proxy Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity before [1069]) to AGATHE de Normandie, daughter of WILLIAM I King of England Duc de Normandie & his wife Mathilde de Flandres ([1064]-before 1074, bur Bayeux Cathedral). According to William of Malmesbury, an unnamed daughter of King William was "affianced by messengers" to King Alfonso[469]. Orderic Vitalis names her Agatha, identifying her as the daughter who had been betrothed to Harold Godwinson (see above), and says that she was betrothed to "Amfursio regi Galliciæ"[470]. Matthew of Paris places her as the fifth daughter (unnamed) betrothed to "Aldefonso Galiciæ regi" but different from the daughter betrothed to Harold[471]. Orderic says that she died en route to Spain, her body being brought back to Bayeux for burial[472]. The betrothal to Alfonso must have been a short-lived arrangement as he married his first wife in 1069[473].
     "m firstly (betrothed 1069, [late 1073/early 1074], repudiated after 22 May 1077) [as her first husband,] AGNES d’Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his second wife Mathilde --- ([1059]-[6 Jun 1078 or after 1099], bur [Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo]). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that the only daughter of "Goffredus" and his second wife was the wife of "Hildefonsi regis, filii Freelandi et nepotis Garsii", in a later passage recording their marriage in 1069[474]. She was known as INÉS in Castile. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Ines" ("Agnetam") as the first of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[475]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Agnes" as first wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[476]. "Agnes regina" confirmed the donation to Cluny by "Adefonsus…princeps" dated 22 May 1077[477]. No later reference has been found in charters to Queen Inés. Reports of her subsequent history are mutually contradictory. Orderic Vitalis refers to the second marriage of "Agnetem filiam Guillelmi Pictavorum ducis relictam Hildefonsi senioris Galiciae regis" with Hélie Comte du Maine[478]. However, Sandoval records that "la Reyna Doña Ines" died 6 Jun 1078 according to "las memorias del tumbo negro de Santiago"[479]. The accuracy of this statement is uncertain as, in the same passage, Sandoval states that the same source records the death in the same year "II Kal Jun" of "Sancius Rex filius Alfonsi Regis". This latter entry presumably refers to the death of Sancho, son of King Alfonso VI, at the battle of Uclés in 1108, but it casts doubt on the accuracy of the year of the death of Queen Inés. Another date is introduced by the Annales Compostellani which record the death "VIII Id Jun" in 1098 of “Regina Agnes”[480]. This is the same day and month as stated in the tumbo negro, so it is possible that the year is wrongly given, although it is also possible that the Annales Compostelani are referring to the death of the wife of Pedro I King of Aragon (who must have died in 1097 or before). Reilly[481] says that Queen Constanza was buried next to Queen Inés, which implies that the latter predeceased her successor. The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified, although if it is correct it does seem surprising that the repudiated queen remained in Castile until she died and that she was buried in the royal monastery. If Orderic Vitalis is correct, Queen Inés must have been repudiated by her husband and later returned to France where she married secondly (after 1099) as his second wife, Hélie Comte du Maine. Another possibility is that Orderic´s passage misstates the name "Agnetem" for "Beatricem", and that the second wife of Comte Hélie was King Alfonso VI´s widow Beatrix whose family origin is not otherwise recorded and who would therefore have been a younger daughter of Duke Guillaume VIII (see below). According to Kerrebrouck[482], Agnès d'Aquitaine never existed. He says that the first wife of King Alfonso VI was Inés de Guzmán, although he does not name her parents or precise origin.
     "m secondly (Dec 1079) as her second husband, CONSTANCE de Bourgogne, widow of HUGUES [II] Comte de Chalon, daughter of ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his first wife Hélie de Semur ([after 1045]-[25 Jul/25 Oct] 1093, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Trenorciensi records that "Constantiæ…filia Roberti Ducis" married firstly "Hugonis Cabilonensis Comitis" and secondly "Hispaniæ Rex Adefonsus "[483]. Considering the estimated date of her first marriage, it is unlikely that Constance was born before [1045]. A charter dated 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" recalls a donation to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum"[484]. "Infanta donna Urraka Regis domni Adefonsi filia" names her mother "Constantie regina" in her donation to Cluny dated 22 Feb 1117 "Spanish Era"[485], although the date was presumably AD as 1117 Spanish Era was equivalent to 1079 AD. An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "filiam Roberti ducis Bugundionem…Constantiam" married Alfonso VI King of Castile and was mother of a daughter who married "Raymundo comiti"[486]. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Queen Constance" as the second of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[487]. Her second marriage date is estimated based on the likely estimated death date of her first husband in [Nov/early Dec] 1079 and her subscribing a document dated 25 Dec 1079 at Dueñas with her second husband[488]. Queen Constance was instrumental in having the Roman rite replace the Visigothic rite in the churches of Castile. "Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[489]. The date of her death is fixed by her last known mention in a charter dated 25 Jul 1093 and a donation by King Alfonso to the monastery of Sahagún dated 25 Oct 1093, which does not include Queen Constanza's name in the subscription list[490]. The 13th century history of Sahagún monastery records that "la Reyna Doña Constanza" was buried in the monastery[491]. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[492].
     "m thirdly ([Dec] 1094) BERTA, daughter of --- (-early Jan 1100, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Berta, who was of Tuscan descent" as the third of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[493]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berta ex Tusca oriunda" as third wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[494]. Las crónicas anónimas de Sahagún refer to her as "otra mugger de la nacion de Lombardia llamada Berta". The precise origin of Berta is not known. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[495], she was Berta de Bourgogne [Comté], daughter of Guillaume I Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Comte de Vienne et de Macon, which is inconsistent with the "Tuscan descent" reported in the Chronicon Regum Legionensium. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that she was the daughter of Guillaume Comte de Bourgogne[496]. Reilly does not mention this possible Burgundian origin of Berthe, implying that the Castilian king chose his third wife from outside the Burgundian circle in order to diminish the influence of the Burgundians at court. As Berthe de Bourgogne would have been the sister of Raymond de Bourgogne who married Infanta Urraca, oldest legitimate daughter of King Alfonso, around the same time that King Alfonso married Queen Berta, it is surprising that the chronicles do not refer to this relationship if it is correct. The references to "Tuscia" and "Lombardia" in the chronicles could be consistent with the family of Bourgogne [Comté] having originated in northern Italy, their ancestors being Marchesi of Ivrea until 968, although this was nearly 130 years before the date of Queen Berta's marriage. Reilly dates this marriage to "during the Christmas season of 1094", but does not state his source[497]. In a later passage, Reilly states that the first reference to Berta as queen is dated 28 Apr 1095[498]. "Adefonsus…Ispanie imperator" permitted the abbey of Silos to establish outposts near the abbey, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 20 Jan [1096/98], confirmed by "Garcia Ordoniz et comes…Gomiz Gonçalviz armiger regis, Fernando Munoz maiordomus regis, Didago Albariz, Fernando Ansuriz, Gutier Munoz, Ruderico Gonçalviz, Monio Roderiquiz, Didago Bermudez, Petro Gonçalviz…"[499]. "Adefonsus…totius Hispanie imperator" granted rights to the abbey of Silos, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 19 May 1097[500]. "Adefonsus…tocius Ispanie imperator" donated property to the abbey of Silos, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 30 Sep 1098, confirmed by the same persons as in the earlier charter dated 20 Jan [1096/98][501]. "…Berta…regina…" subscribed the charter dated 14 Mar 1099 under which Alfonso VI King of Castile donated the monastery of Santa María de Algadefe to the monastery of Eslonza[502]. According to Reilly, Queen Berta died shortly after the new year 1100, probably before 16 Jan[503]. In another passage, he notes that the last notice of her is dated 17 Nov 1099[504]. She was dead in 25 Jan 1100, the date of the charter under which "Adefonsus…Toletani imperii rex" donated the churches of "Sancti Facundi et Sancti Primitivi…cum sua villa…Villaverde", ceded by "comitis Monini Fernandis…in vita sua dederam uxori mee Berte regine", to Cluny, confirmed by "Raimundus totius Gallecie comes et gener regis, Urraca soror regis, Urraca regis filia et Raimundi comitis uxor, Enricus Portugalensis comes, uxor ipsius Tarasia filia regis…"[505]. The 13th century history of Sahagún monastery records that "la Reyna Doña Berta" died "apenas cumplidos seis años en el matrimonio" and was buried in the monastery[506]. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[507].
     "[m fourthly ([Burgos] 1100 before 14 May) ISABEL [Elisabeth], daughter of --- (-before Mar 1106, bur Royal Pantheon of San Isidor de León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Elizabeth" as the fourth of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso, stating that she was the mother of "Sancha the wife of count Rodrigo and Elvira who married Duke Roger of Sicily"[508]. According to Reilly, her first documentary mention is dated 14 May 1100, but he does not cite the reference[509]. "Adefonsus…totius Hispanie imperator" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña with the consent of "uxoris mee Helisabeth regine" by charter dated 12 Dec 1075[510], although this date is clearly incorrect. "Aldefonsus rex Yspaniarum…cum…coniuge mee Helisabeth regine" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1086[511], also clearly misdated. "Adefonsus Rex Imperator Ispanie et Regina Elisabeth" protected the grazing rights of Valladolid Santa María by charter dated 1100[512]. "Adefonsus totius Ispanie imperator" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña with the consent of "uxoris mee Helisabet regine" by charter dated 23 Mar 1103[513]. Her origin is not known. Reilly assumes a French origin, speculating that she belonged to a younger branch of the house of Burgundy, but quotes no documentary evidence for this or any other French origin[514]. It used to be widely accepted that she was the daughter of Louis VI King of France, based on a funerary inscription, but this is chronologically impossible. Her existence is questionable and it is possible that she was in fact the same person as Isabel née Zaïda, shown below as King Alfonso's fifth wife. The question of the separate existence of King Alfonso VI's fourth wife would be resolved if we knew there had been two different memorials to "Queen Elisabeth" in the Royal Pantheon, but it appears that a record of these memorials no longer exists. According to Reilly, she is last named in a charter dated 14 May 1107[515], but it is more likely that this document refers to Queen Isabel/Elisabeth née Zaïda (see below).]
     "m fifthly (Mar 1106) as her second husband, ZAÏDA, widow of ABU NASIR al Fatah al Ma'Mun Emir of Córdoba, daughter of --- (-13 Sep 1107, bur Royal Pantheon of San Isidor at León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Zaida, the daughter of King Abenabeth of Seville, who was baptised…Elisabeth" as the second of two concubines of King Alfonso, and their son "Sancho who died at the battle of Ucles"[516]. The Chronicon de Cardeña records that King Alfonso married “Mora, que decien la Cayda, sobrina de Abenafanle” who was mother of his son Sancho[517]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the Bayan al Mugrib of Ibn Idari which names "le fils d´Alphonse, Sancho, qu´il avait eu de l´épouse d´Al Mamun ibn Abbad" when recording the battle of Uclés[518]. Salazar y Acha attempts to explain these three apparently contradictory sources by suggesting that Zaida could have been the daughter of "un hermano mayor…Ismail ibn Abbad" of Mohammed al-Mutamid, noting particularly the practice of endogamous marriages in the Muslim dynasties[519]. As noted above, Ismail is recorded as the brother of al-Mutatid and so would have been the paternal uncle of al-Mutamid. From a chronological point of view therefore Salazar y Acha´s suggestion appears untenible, although Zaida could have been another relative, maybe the daughter of an otherwise unrecorded brother of al-Mutamid. Alberto Montaner Frutos also discusses Zaïda, in particular relating to legends which have developed in connection with her history[520]. Reilly[521] dates the start of her relationship with King Alfonso to late 1091 or 1092, suggesting its diplomatic importance would have been greatest after the fall of Córdoba in Mar 1091 but before the fall of Badajoz in early 1094. This seems supported by the likelihood that their son Sancho was at least 15 years old when he was killed at the battle of Uclés in May 1108. Zaïda was christened ISABEL[522], date not known. Reilly cites a document of Galician origin dated 27 Mar 1106 which indicates that King Alfonso had married "Helisabet" shortly before[523]. Reilly[524] quotes a charter granted at Oviedo 19 Mar 1106 which lists members of the royal family, naming "Elisabeth" directly before "Sancho", which presumably refer to Zaïda and her son. "…Helisabet Regina, Reimundus comes, Urraca regis filia, Sancius filius regis…" subscribed the charter dated 14 May 1107 under which "Adefonsus…Toletani imperii rex…cum…uxore mea Helisabet regina" approved the mint of Santiago de Compostela[525]. Reilly assumes that the reference is to King Alfonso´s presumed fourth wife Isabel (Elizabeth)[526], but it appears more likely that the document refers to Zaïda. Reilly says that her sepulchral inscription (presumably now lost) reportedly stated that she had died in childbirth on 13 Sep, without giving the year, and in a later passage that the inscription stated that this was the "second ferial day", which he interprets as meaning a Monday or Thursday[527]. If the charters dated 1106 and 1107 correctly refer to Zaida, the year must have been 1107 assuming that King Alfonso married his sixth wife in 1108. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that Queen Isabel was buried "en la Capilla mayor" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[528].
     "m sixthly ([Apr] 1108) [as her first husband,] BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-after 1109). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Beatrice" as the fifth of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[529]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Beatrix ex partibus Gallicanis" as fifth wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[530]. According to the Chronicon Regum Legionensium, she "returned to her own country" after the king died[531]. No primary source has been identified which indicates her family origin. Orderic Vitalis refers to the second marriage of "Agnetem filiam Guillelmi Pictavorum ducis relictam Hildefonsi senioris Galiciae regis" with Hélie Comte du Maine[532]. As noted above, it appears unlikely that this passage could refer to King Alfonso´s first wife named Agnes, whose death before the king´s second marriage is indicated (although not conclusively) by primary sources. It is therefore possible that the entry relates to the king´s sixth wife, the name "Agnetem" being an error for "Beatricem". If this was correct, she would have been Beatrix, daughter of Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet], this parentage being the most probable from a chronological point of view if she was the daughter of one of the dukes of Aquitaine. In this case, she would have married secondly (after Jun 1109) as his second wife, Hélie Comte du Maine.
     "[533]Mistress (1): ([1080]) JIMENA Muñoz, daughter of [MUNIO Muñoz & his wife Velasquita ---] (-Espinareda del Bierzo 1128, after 25 May, maybe 23 Jul, bur San Andres de Espinareda). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Jimena Muñoz" as the first of two concubines of King Alfonso, and their daughters "Elvira the wife of count Raymond of Toulouse…and Teresa the wife of Count Henry"[534]. The Chronicon de Cardeña names “Ximena Nuñez” as mother of the king´s daughters “la Infant Doña Elvira è la Infant Doña Teresa”[535]. The precise parentage of Jimena Muñoz has been the subject of considerable debate over recent years. The common connection with Ulver, where she was recorded, appears conclusive in determining that she was closely related to Munio Muñoz who was also recorded in the same castle (see the document GALICIA NOBILITY). Her birth date, estimated from her having given birth to two children in the early 1080s, suggests that she was his daughter rather than his sister (assuming that Munio´s parents are correctly identified as Munio Rodríguez and Jimena Ordóñez). Kerrebrouck states that Jimena Múñoz was King Alfonso VI's second wife, married before the end of 1078 (marriage annulled), but this is chronologically difficult to maintain. King Alfonso's relationship with Jimena lasted long enough to produce two children. As noted above, the last documentary reference to Queen Inés was dated 22 May 1077 while King Alfonso's marriage to Queen Constance took place in late 1079. This leaves insufficient time for the king to have married and had two legitimate children by Jimena. The reference in Kerrebrouck to the annulment of King Alfonso's alleged marriage to Jimena is presumably based on Pope Gregory VII's letter of 27 Jun 1080 which, among other things, objected to King Alfonso's "marriage" on the grounds of consanguinity. The letter does not name the wife whose marriage was objected to, but Reilly appears correct in concluding that "it can be no other than Queen Constance herself", given the likely date of her marriage and the likely date of birth of her daughter Urraca[536]. Reilly suggests that King Alfonso VI's relationship with Jimena started in [1081/82][537]. "Monnio Moniz, uxor sua Velasquita, Xemena Moniz, Petro Velaz, Sol Sancxiz…" subscribed the charter dated 1 Oct 1085 under which "Gelvira Petriz…cum viro meo…Godino Citiz" donated property in Priaranza to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes[538]. The dating clause of a charter dated 7 Feb 1093, under which "Petro Quizaz" sold property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "Scemena Monniz in Ulver"[539]. "Garcia Monnuiz…cum uxor mea Fronille Annalaz cognomento Sol et Pelayo Monniuz et Auro Villito et Monniuz" donated property in Jagoaza to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, and "Xemeno Monniuz" sold "mea porcione quam habui inter fratres meos" of the sam[e property, by charter dated 26 Sep [1095][540]. It is possible that "Xemeno Monniuz" in this document is an error for "Xemena Monniuz". However, the dating clause which names "Comes Froyla Didaz imperante in ipsa terra de Iorres" suggests that the property was in a different area from "Ulver" and therefore that the two families were unrelated.] The dating clause of a charter dated 17 Dec 1096, under which "Vellite Ferrudiz et uxor mea Falella" sold property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "…Xemena Munniz in Ulver"[541]. The dating clause of a charter dated 21 Mar 1097, under which "Maria" donated property in Rimor to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "Donna Xemena Monniz imperante ipsa terra de Ulver"[542]. "Xemena Munniz" donated property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes by charter dated 26 Apr 1101[543]. "Potestas in illa terra donna Xemena" and "Xemena Monnuz imperante terra de Ulver" is named in dating clauses of other charters which record donations to San Pedro de Montes, dated 1099, 29 Jun 1100, 26 Aug [1103], 19 Apr [1104], 19 Jan [1107][544]. The dating clause of charters dated between [1115] and 15 May 1118 name "Johanne Petriz potestate in Ulver", and from 6 Mar 1126 "Ramiro Froilaz"[545], suggesting that the Muñoz family moved from the castle in [1107/15]. "Ximena Munniz" donated property in "Trebalio et Turres" to "nepotis mei…Garcie Fernandiz" by charter dated 18 Apr 1127[546]. Jimena Muñoz donated property in "la villa de Torres, discurrente rivulo Orbico, territorio Astoricensis" to the Order of St John by charter dated 18 Sep 1127[547]. "Jimena Muñiz" donated property "en Villar de Salas en el Bierzo" to Astorga Cathedral by charter dated 25 May 1128[548]. Doña Jimena retired to the Benedictine convent of Esinareda del Bierzo. The necrology of León Cathedral records the death “X Kal Aug” of “Xemena Moniz”[549]. Sandoval records that "Ximena Nuñez" was buried in "San Andres de Espinareda"[550]. An inscription in the monastery of Espinareda records the death in 1128 of "Semena Alphonsi vidui regis amica", although Rodríguez González highlights the opinion that the monument is a later forgery[551]. Sandoval records that "Ximena Nuñez" was buried in "San Andres de Espinareda"[552]."
Med Lands cites:
[457] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 81.
[458] Chronicle of Sahagún, cited in Barton and Fletcher The World of El Cid.
[459] Historia Silense, Chapter 81, p. 45.
[460] Berganza (1721) Secunda parte, Appendice XCIV, p. 428.
[461] López Ferreiro (1899), Tomo II, Apéndice, XCVI, p. 242.
[462] Kennedy (1996), p.. 151.
[463] Reilly (1988), Chapter 5, p. 95.
[464] San Millán de la Cogolla II, 1, p. 7.
[465] Reilly (1988), Chapter 5, p. 104.
[466] López Ferreiro (1900), Tomo III, Apéndice, V, p. 31.
[467] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[468] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, p. 420.
[469] Malmesbury, III.276, p. 256.
[470] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 115, the editor in footnote 1 highlighting that elsewhere Orderic referred to King Alfonso as "Hildefonsus" and the possibility that the king of Galicia in question was in fact Alfonso's brother Garcia.
[471] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1086, p. 22.
[472] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 115.
[473] Reilly (1988) Chapter 3, p. 47.
[474] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 400 and 405.
[475] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[476] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[477] Cluny Tome IV, 3508, p. 625.
[478] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 307.
[479] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 212.
[480] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 321.
[481] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 241.
[482] Kerrebrouck, p. 557 footnote 30.
[483] Ex Chronico Trenorciensi, RHGF XI, p. 112.
[484] Chifflet, P. F. (1644) Histoire de l´abbaye royale et de la ville de Tournus (Dijon), Preuves, p. 331.
[485] Cluny Tome IV, 3533, p. 654, dated 1117 "Spanish Era".
[486] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596.
[487] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[488] Referred to by Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, footnote 58.
[489] San Salvador de Oña I, 99, p. 127.
[490] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 240.
[491] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice I, Historia del monasterio de Sahagun, Cap. VII, p. 300.
[492] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72.
[493] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[494] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[495] ES II 57.
[496] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Bourgogne, Lorraine et Espagne', pp. 233-4, n. 1, cited in Bouchard, p. 273.
[497] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 247.
[498] Chapter 12, p. 247 footnote 68.
[499] Silos 24, p. 30.
[500] Silos 25, p. 31.
[501] Silos 26, p. 33.
[502] Eslonza, Part I, VI, p. 10.
[503] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 296.
[504] Reilly (1988), Chapter 1, p. 32 footnote 68.
[505] Cluny, Tome V, 3735, p. 83.
[506] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice I, Historia del monasterio de Sahagun, Cap. VIII, p. 300.
[507] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72.
[508] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[509] Reilly (1982) Chapter 1, p. 33.
[510] San Salvador de Oña I, 71, p. 107.
[511] San Salvador de Oña I, 86, p. 121.
[512] Mañueco Villalobos, M. & Zurita Nieto, J. (1917) Documentos de la Iglesia Colegial de Santa María la Mayor de Valladolid (Valladolid) ("Valladolid Santa María"), Tome I, X, p. 62.
[513] San Salvador de Oña I, 116, p. 149.
[514] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 297.
[515] Reilly (1988), Chapter 15, p. 325.
[516] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[517] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[518] Salazar y Acha, J. de ´Política matrimonial de Alfonso VI de Castilla´, Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Héraldica y Genealogía, Vol. II (1992-93, Madrid), p. 319, quoting in translation an extract quoted in Levi Provençal, E. ´La mora Zaida, femme d´Alphonse VI de Castille, et leur fils l´infant don Sancho´, Hesperis 18 (1934), pp. 1-8 and 200-1.
[519] Salazar y Acha ´Política matrimonial de Alfonso VI de Castilla´, p. 320.
[520] Montaner Frutos, A. ‘La mora Zaida, entre historia y leyenda’, Taylor, B. & West, G. (eds.) (2005) Historicist Essays on Hispano-Medieval Narrative: In Memory of Roger M. Walker (Leeds), p. 272, available in Google Book “Limited Preview”.
[521] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 234.
[522] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[523] Reilly (1988), Chapter 16, p. 339.
[524] Reilly (1988), p. 339.
[525] López Ferreiro (1900), Tomo III, Apéndice, XXIII, p. 70.
[526] Reilly (1988), Chapter 15, p. 325.
[527] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 234, and Chapter 16, p. 339 footnote 46. .
[528] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.3, p. 73.
[529] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[530] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[531] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[532] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 307.
[533] Jimena is discussed in José M. Canal Sánchez-Pagín 'Jimena Muñoz, amiga de Alfonso VI' Anuario de estudios medievales 21 (1991), pp. 11-40.
[534] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[535] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[536] Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, p. 109.
[537] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 192.
[538] Quintana Prieto, A. (ed.) (1971) Tumbo Viejo de San Pedro de Montes (León) ("San Pedro de Montes"), 42, p. 127.
[539] San Pedro de Montes, 63, p. 149.
[540] San Pedro de Montes, 79, p. 166.
[541] San Pedro de Montes, 94, p. 181.
[542] San Pedro de Montes, 97, p. 184.
[543] San Pedro de Montes, 110, p. 198.
[544] San Pedro de Montes, 106, 107, 113, 117, and 121, pp. 194, 195, 202, 208, and 213.
[545] San Pedro de Montes, 127, 131, 132, and 135, p. 221, 225, 226, and 230.
[546] Rodríguez González, M. C. ´Concubina o esposa. Reflexiones sobre la unión de Jimena Muñiz con Alfonso VI´, Studia Historica, Historia Medieval No. 25 (2007), p. 164, citing Ayala Martínez, C. (1995) Libro de privilegios de la Orden de San Juan de Jerusalén en Castilla y León (siglos XII-XV) (Madrid), doc. 21.
[547] Rodríguez González ´Concubina…Jimena Muñiz´, p. 164, citing Ayala Martínez (1995), doc. 22.
[548] Cavero Domínguez, G. & Martín López, E. (eds.) (2000) Colección documental de la Catedral de Astorga (León) ("Astorga Cathedral"), Vol. II, 642, p. 61.
[549] Herrero Jiménez, M. (ed.) (1994) Colección documental del archivo de la catedral de León, Vol. X, Obituarios medievales (León) (“León Cathedral Necrology”).
[550] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 347.
[551] Rodríguez González ´Concubina…Jimena Muñiz´, p. 166, quoting text of inscription now in Museo de San Marcos de León.
[552] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 347.16
She was Empress of Spain, Queen consort of León and Castile between 1079 and 1093.13

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  3. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgdautun.htm#HelieSemurdiedafter1055
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020897&tree=LEO
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 December 2019), memorial page for Constance Of Burgundy (8 May 1046–Jan 1093), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8192215, citing Sahagun Monastery, Sahagun, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8192215/constance-of-burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VI 'the Brave': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020895&tree=LEO
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid, p. 150.
  15. [S2183] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie email 22 Sept 2007: "Zaida (& Isabel, Jimena and the others)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/m6k-8wSZxSs/m/dxuh84rN86QJ) to e-mail address, 22 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 22 Sept 2007."
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIdied1109B

Robert de Bourgogne Regent of Burgundy and Sicily1,2

M, #6368, b. 1040, d. 1113
FatherRobert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre1,3,4,5,2 b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
MotherElla/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais1,5,2,6 b. 1016, d. 22 Apr 1109
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Robert de Bourgogne Regent of Burgundy and Sicily was born in 1040 at Bourgogne, France.1,2 He married Sibylle de Hauteville of Sicily, daughter of Roger I de Hauteville Count of Sicily and Eremburge (?) de Mortain, between 1102 and 1103.7,8,5,2
Robert de Bourgogne Regent of Burgundy and Sicily died in 1113; died of poisoning.1,7,5,2
     ; Robert, *1040, +of poisoning 1113; m.N, a dau of Ct Roger of Sicily.1

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 24.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de Bourgogne (-poisoned [1113]). He is named as son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis[211]. Petit, followed by Jean Richard, suggests that Robert and Simon were sons of Duke Robert by his second marriage[212]. Given his active career in the early 12th century, a birth date in the 1050s is more likely than in the late 1030s/early 1040s, but there appears to be no surviving primary source which points either way. Orderic Vitalis records that he was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy by his father, after his older [half-]brother died, but was dispossessed by his nephew Duke Hugues I[213]. A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum", subscribed by "Rotberti avunculi ducis fratris Reginæ", the charter signed at León[214]. Orderic Vitalis records that he "made a friendly alliance" with Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, who arranged his marriage and appointed him co-regent for her son[215]. He was murdered by his mother-in-law with a poisoned draught after Count Roger II came of age[216]. His death date is estimated from Orderic Vitalis recording that "for ten years he defended the principality [Sicily] vigourously against all attacks"[217].
     "m (1102 or 1103) [SIBYLLE] of Sicily, daughter of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his second wife Eremburge de Mortain. Orderic Vitalis records that Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, arranged the marriage of "her daughter" (unnamed) to Robert de Bourgogne whom she appointed co-regent for her son[218]. Kerrebrouck says that Sibylle was the possible name of this daughter and that she was born from his third marriage[219], presumably reading the passage in Orderic Vitalis literally. It seems more likely chronologically that she was the daughter of Count Roger's second marriage."
Med Lands cites:
[211] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[212] Petit, Vol. IX, p. 506, and Marcigny-sur-Loire, p. 14.
[213] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[214] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 331.
[215] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429, the editor in footnote 6 highlighting the absence of corroboration in Italian chronicles for this statement.
[216] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433.
[217] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433.
[218] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429.
[219] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 555.
[220] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[221] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[222] Bouchard (1987), p. 257.5


; Per Racines et Histoire: "2) Violante (Yolande) ép. 1103 Robert de Bourgogne + 1113 Régent de Sicile (1113.)9"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B9. [2m.] Violante; m.1103 Robert of Burgundy, Regent of Sicily (+1113.)10"

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026655&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#Robertdied1113
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#SibylleM1102RobertBourgogne
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Hauteville, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hauteville.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Hauteville: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html

Hugues (?) de Bourgogne1

M, #6369, b. circa 1034, d. between 1059 and 1060
FatherRobert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre1,2,3 b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
MotherElla/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais1,4,5 b. 1016, d. 22 Apr 1109
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Hugues (?) de Bourgogne was born circa 1034 at Bourgogne, France.1
Hugues (?) de Bourgogne died between 1059 and 1060; killed in battle.1
     

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgdautun.htm#HelieSemurdiedafter1055
  6. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Simon (?) de Bourgogne1

M, #6370, b. between 1040 and 1045, d. after 1087
FatherRobert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre1,2,3 b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
MotherElla/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais1,4 b. 1016, d. 22 Apr 1109
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Simon (?) de Bourgogne was born between 1040 and 1045.1
Simon (?) de Bourgogne died after 1087.1
     

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Richard (?) Earl of Suffolk1,2,3

M, #6371, b. July 1101, d. 1120
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England4,3 b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135
MotherMatilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland4 b. bt 1079 - 1080, d. 1 May 1118
Last Edited20 Aug 2004
     Richard (?) Earl of Suffolk was born in July 1101 at England.5,3
Richard (?) Earl of Suffolk died in 1120; died in ship wreck.6,3

Citations

  1. Died young.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:ix. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:vii.
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 504 (Chart 36). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales1,2

F, #6372, b. circa 1073, d. 1163
FatherRhys ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales d. 1093
MotherGwladys ferch Rhiwallon
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales married Gerald Fitz Walter Constable of Pembroke Castle, son of Walter Fitz Other of Windsor and Beatrice (?).3,4 Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales was born circa 1073 at Dynevor Castle, Carmarthenshire, Wales.5
Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales died in 1163 at Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England (now).6
Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales was buried in 1163 at Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1073, Carmarthenshire, Wales
     DEATH     1163 (aged 89–90), Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     There is currently a scam going on now to try and say she was buried at Garth Celyn, there is no evidence of that. From historical notes and research shows she was buried at Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales. See the story at the link below. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-22672787
     Was born at Wales, Carmarthenshire, Llandyfeisant, Dynevor.
     Daughter of Rhys Ap Tewdwr (King of Dyfed in South Wales) and Gwladys ap Cynfyn.
     Nesta (Princess of Deheubarth) was known as the most beautiful woman in Wales. She had many lovers.
     In 1090 Nesta was sent to the court of Henry I as a hostage for the good conduct of her people. Henry I, attracted by her good looks, she had a male child from him, and thus started the FitzHenry line. After years of peace she was returned to Geraldus and her people.
     Nest returned home to find the kingdom of Dyfed under Norman tutelage. The Norman's were colonizing the former kingdom of Dyfed and establishing a colony of Flemish soldiers intermixed with English settlers in what is now Pembroke.
     On Christmas 1108 Owain ap Cadwgan of Cardigan a cousin, came to visit Gerald and Nesta. He so lusted after her that he, that night, attacked the castle. According to the Brut y Tywysogion, Owain and his men infiltrated the couple's home (assumed by historians to be either Cilgerran Castle or Little Cenarch) and set fire to the buildings. When Gerald was woken by the noise, Nest advised him to escape by climbing out through the privy hole. Owain then seized Nest and her children. However, some sources suggest that she went with him willingly. After the "abduction", Owain ap Cadwgan carried her off and she had a male child from him, thus starting the FitzStevens line.
     This upset Henry I so much that the incident started a war. Gerald's influence was such that Owain and his father soon lost much of their territory of Powys as a result of Owain's actions. Owain himself was obliged to go into exile in Ireland. When he returned, in 1116, Gerald hunted him down and killed him. The "Annals of Cambria" record 1116 as the date of Owain's death.
     Only legitimate daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last king of Deheubarth in Wales, by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn of Powys. Nest was brought as a prized hostage to the court of William Rufus, where she came to the attention of his younger brother Henry Beauclerc (the future King Henry I), to whom she bore one of his numerous illegitimate children, Henry FitzHenry. Nest was the wife of Gerald de Windsor (c. 1075 – 1135), constable of Windsor Castle in Berkshire, by whom she was the ancestress of the FitzGerald dynasty and of the prominent Carew family. After Gerald's death, Nest's sons married her to Stephen, her husband's constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen (d. 1182), one of the Norman conquerors of Ireland.
     Nest was a descendanr of Hywel Dda, King of Wales, grandson of Rhodri Mawr.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Rhys ap Tewdwr unknown–1093
     Spouses
          Geraldus FitzWalter de Windsor 1070–1135
          Henry I of England 1068–1135
     Children
          Maurice FitzGerald 1100–1177
     BURIAL     Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     Created by: Linda Sibley Zimmerman
     Added: 16 Sep 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 136009002.6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.7
She and Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England were associated; Mistress.7

; per Opel: "I was looking through the Welsh Biographies on line through the National Library of Wales and found this information:
[quote] NEST (fl. 1120), a princess of Deheubarth, daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr (q.v.) by Gwladus, daughter of Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn. About 1100 she m. Gerald of Pembroke; there were at least three sons of the union-William, Maurice, and David Fitz-Gerald (qq.v.)-and a daughter, Angharad, wife of William of Manorbier and mother of Giraldus Cambrensis (q.v.) Clearly a woman of great charm and beauty, she became the mistress of many lovers. Her romantic abduction (almost in her husband's presence) by her kinsman, Owain ap Cadwgan (q.v.), in 1109, has earned her notoriety as the 'Helen of Wales.' Her numerous offspring included Robert Fitz-Stephen (q.v.) and Henry 'filius regis'-her child by king Henry I. The date of her death is unknown, but she lived until well after 1136. There were others of the same name less famous than the subject of this notice: Nest, daughter of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn (q.v.), Nest, the wife of Bernard Newmarch, and Nest, daughter of Gruffydd ap Rhys (q.v.)
Hist. W; D.N.B; Gir. Camb..
T.J.P.
[end quote]"8 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-24.

; His daughter Nesta, was known for her beauty and had many lovers. She married Gerald of Pembroke, with whom she had several children, and became the grandmother of Giraldus Cambrensis, but she was also the mistress of HENRY I by whom she had at least one son. In 1109 she was abducted by OWAIN AP CADWGAN, for which reason she became known as Helen of Wales. It is tempting to think that Nesta served as a model for Guinevere in the Arthurian stories that began to emerge in the twelfth century, as many would remember her beauty and escapades.9 Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales was living in 1120.8

Family 3

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135
Children

Citations

  1. A descendant of Rhodri Mawr.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 178-2, p. 153. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Leinster Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 26 October 2020), memorial page for Nesta ferch Rhys (1073–1163), Find a Grave Memorial no. 136009002, citing Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; Maintained by Linda Sibley Zimmerman (contributor 48374111), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/136009002. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1852] Theresa Opel, "Opel email 14 Jan 2005: "Re: Nest of South Wales"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 14 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Opel email 14 Jan 2005."
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 337-338. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:v.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:vii.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:viii.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:ix.
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:x.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:iii.
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:i.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:iii.
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:iv.

Henry Fitz Henry Prince1

M, #6373, b. circa 1105, d. between 1157 and 1158
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White2,3
MotherNesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales3 b. c 1073, d. 1163
ReferenceGAV23 EDV25
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Henry Fitz Henry Prince was born circa 1105 at South Wales, England (now).4,5
Henry Fitz Henry Prince died between 1157 and 1158 at Angelsey, Caernarvonshire, North Wales; Killed in battle.5,6,3
     GAV-23 EDV-25.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 186, NORMANDY 10. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-24, p 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 89, Fitz GERALD 2:vi.
  7. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 33A-23, p 36.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 186, NORMANDY 10:iii.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 186, NORMANDY 10:i.
  11. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001.

Sibylla Corbet of Alcester1

F, #6374, b. circa 1075, d. after 1157
FatherRobert Fitz Corbet Domesday Baron of Longdon and Alcester1 b. b 1070, d. a 1135
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Sibylla Corbet of Alcester married Herbert Fitz Herbert, son of Herbert FitzHenry of Winchester and Emma "bâtarde de Blois" (?) of Blois.2,1 Sibylla Corbet of Alcester was born circa 1075 at Alcester, Warwickshire, England.3
Sibylla Corbet of Alcester died after 1157.4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.5
She and Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England were associated; Mistress.5 GAV-23 EDV-23.

Family 2

Herbert Fitz Herbert b. b 1127, d. c 1155
Child

Citations

  1. [S1629] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 April 2004: "CP Addition: Ancestry of the Lords Botreaux"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Apr 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 April 2004."
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 61, CORBET 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 262-27, p. 238. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 262-28, p. 238: "...daughter and heiress of Robert Corbet, mistress of Henry I.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xiv.
  9. [S1820] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Stanton FitzWarren, co. Wilts. and the Descendants of Sibyl Corbet"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Herbert FitzHerbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00284743&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntdk.htm#HerbertFitzHerbertdied1204B

Rohese (?) Princess of England1,2

F, #6375, b. circa 1114, d. after 1176
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White; Phillips says "very doubtful"3,4
MotherSibylla Corbet of Alcester4 b. c 1075, d. a 1157
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Rohese (?) Princess of England was born circa 1114 at England.5 She married Henry de la Pomerai, son of Joscelin de la Pomerai, before 1146.1,2
Rohese (?) Princess of England died after 1176 at England.5,2
     ; Rohese de Pomeroy was almost certainly a uterine half-sister of Reynold, Earl of Cornwall, and not a bastard daughter of King Henry I.6

; Stewart Baldwin wrote:

>> (11) Rohese, married Henry de la Pomerai
>
>
>
> She was described as a sister of earl Reginald of Cornwall, but never
> as a daughter of Henry, so it cannot be ruled out that she was a
> sister of Reginald only through their mother.


Sheppard, in AR7, argued that William de Tracy (II), son of Henry's bastard William, married the daughter of Henry de Pomerai and Rohese, sister of Earl Reginald, and hence Rohese would not have been Henry's daughter.

taf.7

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 15 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003."
  7. [S1518] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie 14 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 14 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 14 Nov 2003."

Sibylla (?)1,2,3

F, #6376, b. circa 1091, d. 12 July 1122
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White4,3,5
MotherSibylla Corbet of Alcester6,5 b. c 1075, d. a 1157
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Sibylla (?) was born circa 1091 at Westminster, London, City of London, Greater London, England.7 She married Alexander I "The Fierce" (?) King of Scots, son of Máel-Coluim (Malcolm III) mac Donnchada "Canmore") (?) King of Scotland (Alba) and Saint Margaret (?) Queen of Scotland, circa 1107.8,9,10,3
Sibylla (?) died on 12 July 1122 at Island of Loch Tay, Perthshire, Scotland.1,10,3
     ; [illegitimate by Sybil Corbet] Sybil, *Domfront, Normandy ca 1092, +Isle of the Woman -Eileen ham Bam-, Loch Tay 12/13.7.1122, bur there/Dunfermline Abbey; m.Alexander I of Scotland (*1078 +25.4.1124.)11

Family

Alexander I "The Fierce" (?) King of Scots b. 1077, d. 23 Apr 1124

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xiii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 402-403. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  4. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1629] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 April 2004: "CP Addition: Ancestry of the Lords Botreaux"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Apr 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 April 2004."
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 95, Fitz PIERS 2.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 226, SCOTLAND 23:vi.
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html

William (?) Prince of England1

M, #6377, b. 1105, d. after 1187
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White2,3
MotherSibylla Corbet of Alcester3 b. c 1075, d. a 1157
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     William (?) Prince of England married Alice (?)1 William (?) Prince of England was born in 1105 at England.4
William (?) Prince of England died after 1187.1
     

Family

Alice (?)

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xi. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall1,2

M, #6378, b. circa 1110, d. 1 July 1175
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White3,4
MotherSibylla Corbet of Alcester5,4 b. c 1075, d. a 1157
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall married Beatrice/Mabel Fitz William, daughter of William fitz Richard and Anor (?).6,5 Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall was born circa 1110 at Dunstanville, co. Kent, England.7,8
Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall died on 1 July 1175 at Chertsey, co. Surrey, England.1,5,2
Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall was buried after 1 July 1175 at Reading Abbey, Berkshire, England.1,5


     GAV-25.

; Robert, Earl of Gloucester, and Reynold, Earl of Cornwall, are well documented bastard sons of King Henry I. Both were known as "filius Regis" in their lifetimes, that is, son of the King. To the best of my knowledge, Earl Robert never used "de Caen" as part of his name, nor was Earl Reynold ever known as "de Dunstanville." Reynold was, however, known infrequently as Reynold de Mortain.9

; Saturday, 15 November, 2003

Dear Chris, Cris, et al.,

I recall that substantial work was done on SGM (and doubtless elsewhere) that has shown Reynold, Earl of Cornwall [styled 'de Dunstanville', correctly or no] was (A) an illegitimate son of Henry I of England, and (B) not the same individual as Reynold/Reginald de Dunstanville.

Anyone looking for more detailed discussion of the subject should definitely refer to the SGM archives (via Google or otherwise) for the following threads at least (there are more):

1. , Jan 30, 1999 by Douglas Richardson et al.
2. , Dec 17, 2000 by Chris Phillips et al.
3. , Dec 17, 2000 by Chris Phillips
4. , Dec 17, 2000 by Chris Phillips and Douglas Richardson

The names Reginald/Rainald and Gundreda do seem to strongly imply a connection to the family of the Earls of Surrey. Chris' concerns re: the placement of Gundreda, ca. 1130 as sister of a Reynold de Dunstanville who d. before 1115 are certainly well founded: perhaps a valid reconstruction would look like this:

[ NOTE: the following chart is conjectural, esp. with regard to the filiation of the 'first' Reginald de Dunstanville shown ]

William de Warenne = Gundreda de Gand
E of Surrey; d. 1088 I d. 1085
_______________________I__________
I I I
William Edith Reynold/Rainald ? = Adeliza de
2nd Earl = 1) Gerard supporter of Duke ? Insula
d. 1138 de Gournay Robert at Tinchebrai, ?
= Ada de I 1106 (? d bef 1115? ) ?
I I ?
_____I_________ I__________ ????????????????????
I I I I I ? ?
William I I Hugh Gundreda Reginald Gundreda
____I I IV de Gournay de Dunstanville fl. 1130
I I = Nigel de of Winterburn
Gundreda Reginald Aubigny and Poulton, Wilts.
d.aft 1165 de Warenne I
of Wormegay I
_________I_______________
I I
Robert de Dunstanville Alan de Dunstanville
of Castle Combe, Winterburne of Nyetimber, Sussex
and Heytesbury, co. Wilts. and Colyton, Devon.
d. bef Sept 1168 d. bef 1157

~ I previously had shown Adeliza de Insula as likely the wife of the first Reynold de Dunstanville (shown as son of Reynold/ Rainald de Warenne of Tinchebrai), but perhaps the above is 'more correct' - ?

Cheers, John.10


; "Reginald de Dunstanvill 3rd of the fourteen illegitimate sons of King Henry I, by the dau. of Robert Corbet, was made Earl of Cornwall, by King Stephen, anno 1140. Notwithstanding which, he subsequently espoused the cause of the Empress Maud, and was in rebellion, until the fall of Stephen's power at the battle of Lincoln. From which period we find nothing remarkable of him until the 10th Henry II, when he appears to have been an unsuccessful mediator between that monarch and the haughty prelate, Thomas a Becket. His lordwhip was afterwards in arms on the side of the king, against Robert, Earl of Leicester (who had reared the standard of revolt in favour of Prince Henry, the king's son), and joined Richard de Luci, justice of England, in the siege of Leicester; the town of which they carried, but not the castle. His lordship m. Beatrice, dau. of William Fitz-Richard, a potent man of Cornwall, and d. in 1175, when leaving no legitimate male issue, the Earldom of Cornwall reverted to the crown, and was retained by King Henry II for the use of John, his younger son, excepting a small proportion which devolved upon the deceased lord's daus., viz.,
Hawyse, m. to Richard de Redvers.
Maud, m. to Robert, Earl of Mellent.
Ursula, m. to Walter de Dunstanvill.
Sarah, m. to the Viscount of Limoges.
Reginald de Dunstanvill d. 1175.11



; Reginald fitz Roy*
----------------------------------------
Death: 1 Jul 1175, Chertsey, Surrey[2]
Burial: Reading Abbey
Occ: Earl of Cornwall[2]

illegitimate son
held extensive lands in Cornwall de jure uxoris.
created Earl of Cornwall by Empress Matilda, ca. April 1141.

received lands of Alan, former Earl of Cornwall, incl. Launceston,
Cornwall (Sanders, p. 60)[6]
Sheriff of Devon , 1173-1175[2]

later known as Reynold de Dunstanville[7],[8]

' Reginald, earl of Cornwall, d. 1175 [W3, T3].
[GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)]
Son of a woman [Sibyl in later sources] who later married
Herbert Fitz Herbert. (see the part on the mothers for more) '
- Stewart Baldwin[9]


Spouse: Mabel 'filia Willelmi'
Father: William fitz Richard (->1130)
Mother: Anor

Children: Sarah
Maud
Joan
Denise

Other Spouses NN

Sources:
2. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage,"
The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great
Britain and the United Kingdom.
6. I. J. Sanders, "English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and
Descent, 1086-1327," Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.
7. Chris Phillips, "Dunstanville postscript: Part l," Jan 28,
2001, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com
8. Ivor West, "Re: Reynold de Dunstanville," Dec 19, 2000.5 Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall was also known as Reginald de Dunstanville Earl of Cornwall.13 Reynold/Rainald "de Dunstanville" (?) Earl of Cornwall was also known as Reginald Fitz Roy Earl of Cornwall.5

He was Earl of Cornwall in April 1141.11,5

Family 2

Beatrice/Mabel Fitz William d. 1162
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:x. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1629] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 April 2004: "CP Addition: Ancestry of the Lords Botreaux"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Apr 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 April 2004."
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-26, p. 52. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  9. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 15 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003."
  10. [S1517] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 15 Nov 2003: "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 15 Nov 2003."
  11. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Dunstanville - Earl of Cornwall, p. 184. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 50-26, p. 52, line 121-26, p. 108.
  13. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Dunstanvill - Earl of Cornwall, p. 184.
  14. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Courtenay- Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon, p. 140.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#EmmaCornwallMGuyVLaval
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ursula de Dunstanville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148731&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sarah de Dunstanville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139543&tree=LEO

Gundred (?) Princess of England1

F, #6379, b. circa 1114
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White; Phillips says "very doubtful"2,3
MotherSibylla Corbet of Alcester3 b. c 1075, d. a 1157
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Gundred (?) Princess of England married Joel de Pomeranius Baron de Barry Pomeroy, co. Devon.1 Gundred (?) Princess of England was born circa 1114 at England.4
     ; Gundred, sister of Reynold de Dunstanville, has been discussed elsewhere. She clearly was not a bastard daughter of King Henry I.5,6

Family

Joel de Pomeranius Baron de Barry Pomeroy, co. Devon

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 95, Fitz PIERS 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 15 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003."

Beatrix St. Maur1

F, #6380
FatherNicholas de Saint Maur (Seymour) Lord St. Maur2 d. 8 Nov 1316
MotherElena/Ellen La Zouche2 b. c 1288, d. a Oct 1334
Last Edited3 Feb 2008
     Beatrix St. Maur married John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex, son of John (2) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, co Middlesex, and Puck Shipton, co Wiltshire.1
     ; mjcar@btinternet.com schrieb:

> mardicar@yahoo.com schrieb:
>
> > According to Alfred Beaven, ALDERMEN OF LONDON....., John Wroth who was
> > mayor in 1360-1 died in 1376. This is close, but if his son died in
> > 1375, as I have it, then it is the elder John who was the mayor. This
> > is also the John Wrothe who m. Margaret Enfield. Frederick Weaver, in
> > VISITATIONS OF THE COUNTY OF SOMERSET, gives John Wrothe the younger a
> > wife named Beatrix St. Maur. I haven't seen this anywhere else and her
> > father is not named.

According to CP, Nicholas, 1st Baron St Maur, married twice, firstly to Eve de Meysy and secondly to Elena Zouche. His heir was his son by the first marriage, Thomas (de jure 2nd Baron), who died without issue in 1358. His IPM (Cal IPMs Vol X, #437) states that - while his half-brother Nicholas, son of the second marriage, succeeded to the peerage - his heir was John Worthy (sic), son of his full-sister Beatrice [a reference to the Close Rolls 1354-1360 p 552 is also given].

I wonder whether the pedigrees purporting to take the Wroths back through the Worthy family to the de Wrothams are merely based on the similarity of names. I would be surprised if Roskell, for instance, missed the link to the St Maurs, given that John Worthy was their heir general.2

Citations

  1. [S2011] Mardi Car, "Mardi Car email 5 Dec 2005 : "Re: The early Wroths of Enfield, Middlesex"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 Dec 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mardi Car email 5 Dec 2005."
  2. [S2008] MJ Carr, "Carr email 18 Dec 2005: "Re: The early Wroths of Enfield, Middlesex "," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Dec 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Carr email 18 Dec 2005."

Sir Ralph le Scrope Knt., 9th Baron Srope of Masham1

M, #6381, d. 17 September 1515
FatherThomas le Scrope 5th Lord Scrope of Masham1,2,3 b. c 1430, d. 1475
MotherElizabeth Greystoke1,4,3 d. a 20 Dec 1483
Last Edited19 Dec 2012
     Sir Ralph le Scrope Knt., 9th Baron Srope of Masham married Eleanor Windsor, daughter of Sir Andrews Windsor KB, PC, 1st Lord Windsor of Stanwell and Elizabeth Blount; her 1st husband.5,1,6 Sir Ralph le Scrope Knt., 9th Baron Srope of Masham married Cecily (?) Princess of England, daughter of Edward IV (?) King of England and Elizabeth Wydeville Queen of England, after June 1482; http://medievalbritain.cis.to/pipermail/lmb/1999-October/032581.html
[quote:]
Cecily of York was married during the reign of Richard III to Ralph Scrope, younger brother of Thomas sixth Lord Scrope of Masham and Upsall, a member of Richard's own household. (Source Ricardian June 1993, article by Pauline Sheppard Routh). She was divorced from Ralph Scrope to enable her to marry Viscount Welles, but whether by her own agency or that of Henry VII cannot be demonstrated. In social terms Welles was a better husband for her than Scrope, though not as prestigious as a foreign prince, admittedly.
[end quote]

Ralph Scrope was a member of Richard's household. and Vergil's explanation that
Richard married her to Ralph because he did not want Henry Tudor to be able to
marry a girl of the Plantagenet line would make sense (even if the actual
motivation was to void the agreements made with the Scots). Polydore Vergil
was writing after the fact (born ca. 1470).7 Sir Ralph le Scrope Knt., 9th Baron Srope of Masham and Cecily (?) Princess of England were divorced in 1486.7
Sir Ralph le Scrope Knt., 9th Baron Srope of Masham died on 17 September 1515; dsp.1

Family

Cecily (?) Princess of England b. 24 Mar 1469, d. 24 Aug 1507

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Le Scrope: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00308271&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Danby 12: p. 255. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Greystoke: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104859&tree=LEO
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, ABERGAVENNY Family Page.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Bergavenny 13.ii: p. 94.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Cicely of York: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001732&tree=LEO

Ansfride (?)1

F, #6382, b. circa 1069, d. WFT Est. 1105-1164
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Ansfride (?) died WFT Est. 1105-1164.2 She married Sir Anskill (?)1 Ansfride (?) was born circa 1069 at Sparshalt, Berkshire, England.2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.3
She and Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England were associated; Mistress.3

Family 1

Sir Anskill (?)

Family 2

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135
Children

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Richard (?) of Lincoln1,2

M, #6383, b. before 1101, d. 25 November 1120
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White3,4
MotherAnsfride (?)4 b. c 1069, d. WFT Est. 1105-1164
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Richard (?) of Lincoln was born before 1101 at Abingdon Abbey, Berkshire, England.5,1
Richard (?) of Lincoln died on 25 November 1120 at at sea, Barfleur, Manche, France; wreck of the White Ship.1
     

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Fulk (?) Prince of England1

M, #6384, b. circa 1102
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White2,3,4
MotherAnsfride (?)4 b. c 1069, d. WFT Est. 1105-1164
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Fulk (?) Prince of England was born circa 1102 at Abingdon Abbey, Berkshire, England.5
     He was a monk.6

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xvix. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  7. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Juliane (?)1,2

F, #6385, b. circa 1090, d. 1136
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White3,4
MotherAnsfride (?)4 b. c 1069, d. WFT Est. 1105-1164
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Juliane (?) was born circa 1090.5 She married Eustace de Pacy (?) bâtard de Breteuil, son of Guillaume II (?) de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil, châtelain d’Ivry, in 1103.1,2,6
Juliane (?) died in 1136 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France.7,5

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Edith (Eda) Sigulfson de Greystoke1,2

F, #6386, b. circa 1071, d. WFT Est. 1087-1165
Father(?) de Greystoke1
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Edith (Eda) Sigulfson de Greystoke died WFT Est. 1087-1165.3 She was born circa 1071 at England.3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.4
She and Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England were associated; Mistress.4

Family

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 99, FLEMING 2:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xvii.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert FitzEdith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076156&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes d’Avranches, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avranches.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#RobertFitzEdithdied1172.

Maud/Mathiulde/Matilda Fitz Roy1,2,3,4,5

F, #6387, b. 1086, d. 25 November 1120
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White6,3,4,5,7
MotherEdith (?)8,4,5
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Maud/Mathiulde/Matilda Fitz Roy was born in 1086 at England.9,1 She married Routrou I/III du Perche Count du Perche, son of Geoffroy II du Perche Comte du Perche et Mortagne, Seigneur de Mortagne et de Nogent and Beatrice/Beatrix de Montdidier, in 1103;
His 2nd wife.1,10,11,12,4,13,5,14
Maud/Mathiulde/Matilda Fitz Roy died on 25 November 1120; died in the wreck of the White Ship.9,1,2,4,5
     ; This is the same person as ”Matilda FitzRoy, Countess of Perche” at Wikipedia.15

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 12.4 Maud/Mathiulde/Matilda Fitz Roy was also known as Maud FitzEdidt.16

; Per Racines et Histoire (Normandie): “X5) Maud FitzEdith + noyée 25/11/1120 (Barfleur) bâtarde de Normandie
     ép.1103 comte Rotrou 1er (ou II ?) du Perche + 04/1144”.17

; Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “H19. [illegitimate] Maud FitzEdidt, +drowned in the ship wreck 25.11.1120; m.1103 Cte Rotrou I du Perche (+IV.1144)”.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATHILDE (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120). She is named as daughter of King Henry I by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that the king "built up [her husband's] power by greatly augmenting his estates and wealth in England"[215]. Orderic also specifies that the king arranged her marriage at the same time as that of her half-sister Juliane[216]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to, but does not name, the wife of "Rotaldus comes" as "filiam regis Anglie", specifying that she had daughters[217]. Her father gave her lands in Wiltshire as her dowry[218]. "Rotrocus comes et Beatrix mater eius atque Mathildis uxor comitis" subscribed the charter dated to [1105/07] under which "Guillermus de Loiscel" made donations to Saint-Denis de Nogent[219]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "…filia regis comitissa de Perceio…" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[220]. William of Malmesbury also records that she drowned in the sinking of the “Blanche Nef [White Ship]”[221].
     "m (1103) as his first wife, ROTROU [I] Comte du Perche, son of GEOFFROY Comte du Perche & his wife Béatrix de Roucy (-killed in battle Rouen [20 Jan/23 Apr] or 6 May 1144)."
Med Lands cites:
[215] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 399.
[216] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 41.
[217] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 14, MGH SS XIII, pp. 254-5.
[218] Domesday Descendants, p. 236.
[219] Nogent-le-Rotrou, XI, p. 39.
[220] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 74.
[221] William of Malmesbury, 419, p. 364.5

; Per Racines et Histoire (Perche): “Rotrou 1er «Le Grand» du Perche +X selon les chroniqueurs entre 20/01 et 23/04 ou 06/05/1144 (bataille de Rouen) comte du Perche (confirmations de donations à Saint-Denis de Nogent 1080 et 1099 ; donations à Tiron 1120), accompagne le duc Robert III de Normandie en croisade (09/1096), combat pour son cousin Alfonso 1° «El Batallador», Roi d’Aragon contre les Maures (1105, 1114 puis 1125), fonde l’Abbaye de Tiron (1109), participe au siège du roi Henry 1er d’Angleterre contre Bellême (1114) - qu’il revendique comme héritage de son aïeule paternelle et qu’il reçoit en don du Roi ainsi que de nombreux fiefs en Angleterre -, partisan du Roi Etienne dont il reçoit Moulin (1135)
     ép. 1) ?
     ép. 2) Mathilde bâtarde d’Angleterre + 25/11/1120 (noyée à Barfleur dans le naufrage de la «Blanche Nef» (fille d’Henry 1er, Roi d’Angleterre, et de sa maîtresse Edith ; mariée par son père dans le même temps que sa demi-soeur Juliane, elle reçoit en douaire de celui-ci des terres dans le Wiltshire) (citée dans une charte de donation à Saint-Denis de Nogent datable de 1105/07)
     ép. 3) avant 1126 Hawise de Salisbury ° 1118 + un 13/01 avant 1152 (fille de Walter FitzEdward, earl of Salisbury, et de Sybille de Chaources (Chaworth) ; soeur de l’earl Patrick ; elle ép. 2) 1144/45 Robert de France qui deviendra plus tard comte de Dreux) ”.14
; Per Med Lands:
     "ROTROU "le Grand" du Perche, son of GEOFFROY [I] Comte de Mortagne, Comte du Perche & his wife Béatrix de Ramerupt [Roucy] (-killed in battle Rouen [20 Jan/23 Apr] or 6 May 1144). He is named and his parentage given by Orderic Vitalis[2135]. "Beatrice uxor mea et filio meo Rotroco nec non fratribus meis" confirmed the confirmation of donations to Saint-Denis de Nogent by "Gaufridus castri Mauritaniæ comes" dated [1080][2136]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Rotaldum eiusdem loci comitem et Iulianam de Aquila matrem regine Navarrensis, et Margaretam uxorem Gisleberti de Novo-burgo" as children, incorrectly, of "Rotaldo comiti de Pertica" & his wife Beatrix de Roucy[2137]. He succeeded his father as Comte du Perche. He accompanied Robert III Duke of Normandy on the First Crusade Sep 1096[2138]. William of Tyre names Rotrou Comte de Perche among those who left on the First Crusade in 1096 with Robert Count of Flanders[2139]. "Rotrocus filius domini Gauffridi comitis Mauritaniensis" confirmed donations to Saint-Denis de Nogent by charter dated 1099 after returning from Jerusalem and visiting his father's tomb[2140]. He fought for his first cousin Alfonso I "el Batallador" King of Aragon against the Moors in 1105 and 1114[2141]. He founded the abbey of Tiron in 1109[2142]. In 1114, he assisted Henry I King of England at the siege of Bellême, which he had previously claimed by hereditary right from his paternal grandmother and which the king granted to him after its capture. "Perticensis comes Rotrocus" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron with the consent of "genere mei Helie filiique mee Philippe" by charter dated [1120] witnessed by "Juliane soror mea"[2143]. "Comes Rotro" donated property to the monastery of Subiano, confirmed by "Aldefonsus rex", by charter dated Apr 1123[2144]. He returned to France after another expedition in Spain in 1125[2145]. "Rotroldus comes Perticensis et dominus Belismensis, filius Gaufredi comitis Perticensis et comitissæ Beatricis" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême to Marmoutier by charter dated 1126[2146]. He supported Stephen King of England who gave him Moulin in 1135[2147]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1144 at the siege of Rouen of "comes Perticensis Rotrodus"[2148]. The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "II Non Mai" of "Rotrocus comes Perticensis"[2149].
     "m firstly ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
     "m secondly (1103) MATHILDE, illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress Edith --- (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120). She is named as daughter of King Henry I by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that the king "built up [her husband's] power by greatly augmenting his estates and wealth in England"[2150]. Orderic also specifies that the king arranged her marriage at the same time as that of her half-sister Juliane[2151]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to, but does not name, the wife of "Rotaldus comes" as "filiam regis Anglie", specifying that she had daughters[2152]. Her father gave her lands in Wiltshire as her dowry[2153]. "Rotrocus comes et Beatrix mater eius atque Mathildis uxor comitis" subscribed the charter dated to [1105/07] under which "Guillermus de Loiscel" made donations to Saint-Denis de Nogent[2154]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "…filia regis comitissa de Perceio…" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[2155]. William of Malmesbury also records that she drowned following the sinking of the “Blanche Nef [White Ship]”[2156].
     "m thirdly (after [1120]) as her first husband, HAWISE de Salisbury, daughter of WALTER FitzEdward Earl of Salisbury & his wife Sibylle de Chaources [Chaworth] (-13 Jan before 1152). William of Tyre refers to Rotrou's marriage with the sister of Earl Patrick after the marriage of his daughter Philippa[2157]. Philippa’s marriage is dated to [1120]. The chronology of Hawise’s children suggests their births after [1135/40] at the earliest. If that is correct, Hawise would presumably have been an infant if she had married soon after [1120]. It appears more likely that the marriage took place in the early 1130s, which would place Hawise’s birth in [1120], which would suggest that she was one of her parents’ older children. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the first wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum" as "matrem…comitis Rotroldi de Pertico, natam de Salesberia"[2158]. Robert of Torigny records that "uxorem…suam [comitis Perticensis Rotrodi]" was later given by "Ludovicus rex Francorum [to] Roberto fratri suo"[2159]. She married secondly ([1144/45]) as his first wife, Robert de France, who was later installed as Seigneur de Dreux. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "Id Jan" of "Amicia comitissa Perticensis mater Rotrodi militis"[2160], although if this entry correctly refers to Hawise it is surprising that there is no reference which would indicate her second marriage."
Med Lands cites:
[2135] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, pp. 301 and 331.
[2136] Nogent-le-Rotrou VII, p. 24, and Cluny Tome IV, 3563, p. 698.
[2137] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 14, MGH SS XIII, pp. 254-5.
[2138] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book IX, p. 34, and Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 395.
[2139] William of Tyre I.XVII, p. 45.
[2140] Nogent-le-Rotrou X, p. 36.
[2141] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 394-6 and 401.
[2142] ES III 689.
[2143] Tiron Sainte-Trinité XXXIII, p. 53.
[2144] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro' (1952) 308, p. 533.
[2145] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 405.
[2146] Marmoutier-Perche, 21, p. 33.
[2147] CP XI Appendix D, pp. 112-3.
[2148] Robert de Torigny, Vol. I, 1144, p. 234.
[2149] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Saint-Père-enVallée, p. 188.
[2150] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 399.
[2151] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 41.
[2152] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 14, MGH SS XIII, pp. 254-5.
[2153] Domesday Descendants, p. 236.
[2154] Nogent-le-Rotrou XI, p. 39.
[2155] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 74.
[2156] William of Malmesbury, 419, p. 364.
[2157] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 607.
[2158] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845.
[2159] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1144, p. 234.
[2160] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 33.13

Family

Routrou I/III du Perche Count du Perche b. c 1070, d. bt 20 Jan 1144 - 23 Apr 1144
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-184, NORMANDY 8:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda bastarddaughter of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005942&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Mahautdied1120. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 153-24a, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 153-24, p. 148. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rotrou I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026910&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RotrouIdied1144B
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes du Perche & Comtes de Mortagne, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Perche.pdf
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_FitzRoy,_Countess_of_Perche. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is

Elizabeth de Courtenay1,2,3,4

F, #6388, b. circa 1426, d. 1 September 1493
FatherSir Philip Courtenay Knt., of Powderham Castle1,2,3,5,4 b. 18 Jan 1404, d. 16 Dec 1463
MotherElizabeth Hungerford1,2,3,4 d. 14 Dec 1476
Last Edited3 Jan 2009
     Elizabeth de Courtenay was born circa 1426.2 She married Sir James Luttrell Knt., of Dunster Castle, Somerset, son of Sir John Luttrell of Dunster Castle and Margaret Tuchet (Audley), between 13 January 1440 and 1441 at Chudleigh, England; license dated 1450 per Richardson.6,7,2,3,4 Elizabeth de Courtenay married Sir Humphrey Audley of Carlton, Suffolk, son of Sir James Tuchet (Audley) 5th Lord Audley and Alianor/Eleanor Holand, after February 1461; her 2nd husband.8,2,3,4 Elizabeth de Courtenay married Thomas Malet Esq., of Enmore and Lydeard Punchardon, Somerset in 1478; her 3rd husband.4
Elizabeth de Courtenay died on 1 September 1493.1,2

Family 1

Sir James Luttrell Knt., of Dunster Castle, Somerset b. bt 1426 - 1427, d. bt 17 Feb 1460 - 1461

Family 2

Sir Humphrey Audley of Carlton, Suffolk b. a 1430, d. 6 May 1471
Child

Citations

  1. [S1519] Brandon Fradd and Douglas Richardson, "The Royal Ancestry of Percival Lowell", The New Engalnd Historical and Genealogical Register Vol. 157, pp. 309-319 (October 2003). Hereinafter cited as "Royal Ancestry of Percival Lowell."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Courtenay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060834&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Davie 12: p. 258. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Lowell 13: p. 470.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Philip Courtenay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028621&tree=LEO
  6. [S1519] Brandon Fradd and Douglas Richardson, "Royal Ancestry of Percival Lowell", Fradd and Richardson cite:
    1. H. C. Maxwell Lyte, "A History of Dunster and of the Families of Mohun and Luttrell", 2 vols. (London: St. Catherine Press, 1909), 1:118-28
    2. J. L. Vivian, ed., "The Visitations of the County Devon, Comprising the Herald's Visitations of 1531, 1564, & 1620" (Exeter, England: the editor, 1895), 537.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir James Luttrell: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060833&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Humphrey Audley: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148253&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Audley: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00148252&tree=LEO

Isabella (?) of Ross1

F, #6389
FatherWilliam (?) 3rd Earl of Ross1 d. 1323
MotherEuphemia (?)2
Last Edited9 Oct 2005
     Isabella (?) of Ross married Edward de Brus King of Ireland, Earl of Carrick, son of Sir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick and Marjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick, circa 1317; In addition to the dispensations for the marriages of Robert Stewart (later Robert II, King of Scots) provided by Andrew Stuart, he also obtained and had printed a number of other interesting dispensations in his work [1]. The first among these is a dispensation (1317) for Edward Bruce, brother of Robert I, King of Scots (aka Robert _the_ Bruce) and Isabella of Ross, the entire text of which (as given in Stuart) follows:


' DISPENSATIO Nobili Viro Edwardo de Bruys,
Comiti de Carryk, Glasguen. Diocese, et Isabellae
Filiae Gulielmi Comitis de Ross.

Joannes Epus, Servus Servor. Dei, Venerabili Fratri...
Episcopo Rossen. Salut. &c.
Petitio dilecti filii nobilis viri Edwardi de Brux Comitis
de Catrilz (sic) Glasguen. Dioc., ac dilecte in Christo filie
nobilis mulieris Ysabellis nate nobilis viri Gulielmi Comitis
de Ros Rossan. Dioc. nobis exhibita continebat, quod olim
intentore malorum hoste humani generis procurante inter
comunes eorum parentes consanguineos et amicos graves
inimicitie fuerunt exorte, et ex eis graviora guerrarum
discrimina subsecuta, ita quod exinde non modice
strages hominum processerunt. Cumque temeretur verisimiliter
posse pejora imposterum provenire intervenientibus nonnullis
nobilibus amicis communibus eorundem, pacemque firmari
zelantium inter eos tractatus communiter fuerit habitus
inter ipsos, quod Edwardus et Isabellis prefati
matrimonialiter copulentur, sed quia quarto ex uno latere
et tertio ex altero affinitatis gradibus invicem se
contingunt matrimonium hujusmodi contrahere nequeunt
dispensatione super hoc sedis apostolice non obtenta, nobis
humiliter supplicarunt, ut ad tollend. huoi discordias,
et multorum materia scandalorum, et firmand. perpetuam
pacem et concordiam inter communes parentes, et
consanguineos eorumdem providere ipsis super hoc de
oportune dispensationis beneficio dignaremur. Nos igitur,
qui salutem querimus singulorum, et libenter Christi
fidelibus quietis comoda procuramus hujusmodi amputare
discordiam, ac inter eundem Eduardum, dictumque Guillelmum
patrem ejusdem Isabellis, eorumque comunes consanguineos
intervenire pacem e concordiam cupientes, gerentes quoque
de circumspectione tua fiduciam in Domino pleniorem,
Fraternitati tue presentium auctoritate committimus et
mandamus, quatenus si tibi constiterit ita esse, super quod
tuam intendimus conscientiam onerare cum eisdem Eduardo et
Isabelli impedimentis, que ex predicta affinitate
proveniunt nequaquam obstantibus matrimonium hujusmodi
contrahere valeant, et in sic contracto licite remanere
auctoritate apostolica dispensare procures, prolem
suscipiendam ex eis legitimam nuntiando. Datum Avignone,
Kalen. Junii, Pontificatus nostri anno primo. ' [2]


This dispensation is interesting genealogically, in that it states that Edward Bruce and Isabella of Ross were related in the 4th and 3rd degrees of affinity [" sed quia quarto ex uno latere et tertio ex altero affinitatis gradibus invicem..."]. It does not name the other party (spouse or otherwise) for either individual whose ancestry gave rise to the affinity in question, but an examination of the careers of the two provides the answer. Edward Bruce had earlier seduced Isabel of Athol, daughter of John de Strathbogie, Earl of Athol (ex. 1306). As there is no other known individual with whom either Isabella of Ross or Edward Bruce had a relationship (marital or otherwise), the affinity must then arise from the same degree of consanguinity between Isabel of Athol and Isabella of Ross (i.e., 4th and 3rd degrees).

While not providing any 'new' information, this confirms the alleged common descent of Isabella of Ross (and thereby her brother Hugh, Earl of Ross k. 1333) and Isabel of Athol from William Comyn, lord of Badenoch and Earl of Buchan (d. 1233).

This provides additional certainty as to the following relationships:

A. Donald, Earl of Mar was the son of William by Elizabeth
Comyn.

B. Isabel of Athol was the daughter of John de Strathbogie
by Marjory (elsewhere Mary) of Mar.

C. William, Earl of Ross (d. 1323) was the son of William of
Ross by his wife Jean Comyn.

Good luck, and good hunting to all.

John *



P.S. - In re: the prior discussion concerning the later marriage
of Robert Stewart (later Robert II of Scots) and Elizabeth
Mure [3], it is interesting to note:

A. In this dispensation of 1317, there evidently was
a desire to not name the party (Isabel of Athol) whose
non-marital relationship gave rise to the problematic
affinity out of consideration or politeness; whereas

B. In the 1347 dispensation for Robert Stewart and Elizabeth
Mure, we find the name of Isabella 'Boucellier'
('Boutellier' acc. to Stuart) thrown into the text
"without a second thought".



NOTES

[1] Andrew Stuart, Genealogical History of the Stewarts: from the earliest period of their authentic history to the present times (London: Printed for A. Strahan, and T. Cadell Jun. and W. Davies, in the Strand, 1798), pp. 427 et seq.

[2] Ibid., pp. 427-428.

[3] , SGM, 7 November 2003 et seq.

* John P. Ravilious.1

Citations

  1. [S1520] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Nov 2003: "Edward Bruce, Earl of Carrick and Isabella of Ross (1317)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 12 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Nov 2003."
  2. [S1822] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004 "Euphemia, Countess of Ross (was Re: Magna Carta line of Eufemia)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004."

Richard (?) of Normandy1,2

M, #6390, b. circa 1055, d. 1081
FatherWilliam I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England1,3,4,5 b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
MotherMathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England1,6,7,5 b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Richard (?) of Normandy was born circa 1055 at Normandy, France.1
Richard (?) of Normandy died in 1081 at New Forest, co. Hampshire, England; Fraser says d. 1075; Genealogy.EU Normandy page says d. ca 1081.8,1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015365&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  8. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.