Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #4741, b. between 1198 and 1199, d. 12 April 1237
FatherAlfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia1,3,7,5 b. 15 Aug 1171, d. 24 Sep 1230
MotherBerenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile1,8,3,7,5 b. b Aug 1180, d. 8 Nov 1246
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople was born between 1198 and 1199; Genealogics says b. 1198/99; Med Lands says b. 1204.3,7,5 She married Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople, son of Érard II de Brienne Comte de Brienne and Agnes de Montfaucon, in 1224 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain (now);
His 3rd wife.9,2,3,10,11,7,5,12
Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople died on 12 April 1237 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now).7,5
Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople was buried after 12 April 1237 at Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1204
     DEATH     12 Apr 1237 (aged 32–33)
     Berengaria of Leon was the third wife but only empress consort of John of Brienne, Latin Emperor of Constantinople
Berengaria was a daughter of King Alfonso IX of León and Queen Berengaria I of Castile. She was a younger sister of Ferdinand III of Castile and Alfonso of Molina. Their paternal grandparents were Ferdinand II of León and Urraca of Portugal. Their maternal grandparents were Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England.
     In 1217, Berengaria's brother Ferdinand III had inherited the throne of the Kingdom of Castile through abdication of their mother.
     In 1223, John of Brienne, aged 53, visited Santiago de Compostela, as a supposed pilgrim. He was by then twice a widower: first, in 1213 of Queen Maria of Jerusalem and then of Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.
     As a consequence of his visit to Santiago de Compostela, Alfonso IX invited him to marry Sancha and, presumably, through her inherit the Leonese throne.
However Berengaria of Castile, a long time divorced and an inheritor in her own right of the Castilian throne, main advisor of her son Ferdinand III, offered one of her own daughters to John instead.
     Aging John chose Berengaria of Leon, from Alfonso IX's second doomed marriage, who was a decade younger than her half-sister Sancha, from Alfonso IX's first doomed marriage. The marriage took place at Toledo in 1224.
     Berengaria and John of Brienne had four known children, known to have been residents in Spain with his cousin, King Alfonso X of Castile, signing widely in many documents for many years with other high nobility witnesses, Bishops and Archbishops, Royal legitimate and illegitimate offspring and so on :
-- Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.
-- Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France. Died of a plague while involved in the Eighth Crusade.
-- John of Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married Jeanne, Dame de Chateaudun, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount de Chateaudun, as his first wife. His second wife was Marie de Coucy, widow of King Alexander II of Scotland.
-- Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfonso IX de Leon 1171–1230
          Berenguela de Castilla y Plantagenet de León 1180–1246
     Spouse
          Jean de Brienne 1170–1237
     Siblings
          Constance de León 1200–1242
          Ferdinand of Castile III 1201–1252
     Half Siblings
          Fernando Of Leon 1192–1214
     Children
          Louis of Acre 1230–1297
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 21 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 87172716.13
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Berenguela was born about 1198, the eldest daughter of Alfonso IX, king of León, and his second wife Berenguela of Castile. In 1223 Jean de Brienne, king of Jerusalem, then aged 53, visited Santiago de Compostela as a supposed pilgrim. He was by then twice a widower: first in 1213 of Maria de Monferrato, queen of Jerusalem, and then of Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.
     "As a consequence of Jean's visit to Santiago de Compostela, Alfonso IX invited him to marry his daughter Sancha of León, elder daughter of his first marriage with Dona Teresa, infanta of Portugal, and presumably through her inherit the Leónese throne. However Berenguala of Castile, long divorced from Alfonso and an inheritor in her own right of the Castilian throne, the main advisor to her son Fernando III, king of Castile, offered her daughter Berenguela of León and Castile to Jean instead.
     "The aging Jean, son of Erard II, comte de Brienne and Agnès de Nevers, chose Berenguela, who was about five years younger than her half-sister Sancha. Their three sons Jean, Alfons and Louis, and daughter Marie, would all have progeny.
     "In 1229 the throne of the Latin Empire had been inherited by Baudouin II de Courtenay, a twelve-year-old boy. The barons of the empire decided to secure its safety by appointing a regent-emperor for Baudouin. They chose Jean who accepted the assignment as a sort of senior mentor. In 1229 Jean was proclaimed regent at Perugia. He and Berenguela did not arrive at Constantinople until 1231, when Jean was officially crowned in his new city.
     "Baudouin II remained the junior co-emperor and only heir to the throne. By agreement he had been betrothed since 19 April 1229 to the 4-5 years old Marie de Brienne, a daughter of Jean and Berenguela, to firmly establish the dynastic alliance of the two co-emperors and with Spain, the Western Land for Crusades. The marriage did not take place until 1234, when Marie was about 9 and Baudouin about 16. Their son Philippe, born in 1243, would have progeny.
     "The medieval Cistercian chronicler Alberic of Trois-Fontaines records that Jean died on 27 March 1237, aged around 61. The 'Obituaires de Sens Tome' of the Abbey of Maubuisson record that Berenguela died on 12 April 1237, aged around 33, surviving her husband by only sixteen days. She is buried in a beautiful marble coffin in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Spain."7

; This is the same person as:
”Berengaria of León” at Wikipedia, as
”Bérengère de León” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Berenguela de León” at Wikipedia (Es.)6,14,15 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 47
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 63.9,1,7


; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla y León (1204-Constantinople 12 Apr 1237, bur Constantinople). The Chronicon Mundi of Lucas Tudensis names "Alionoram primogenitam, Constanciam, et Berengariam" as the daughters of Alfonso IX King of León and his second wife[891]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "rex Ierusalem Iohannes" as daughter of "Berengaria" and "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and in a later passage records the marriage of "rex Iohannes Ierosolimitanus" and "filia regis Gallicie, sororem Fernandi de Castella", but in neither place is she named[892]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1223 of "le roi de Castille…sa sœur Bérengère, nièce de Blanche reine de France" and "Jean roi de Jérusalem"[893]. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berengaria imperatrix Constantinopolitane"[894]. "Jehan fiuz le roy Jehan de Jherusalem, bouteillier de France" instituted masses for "nostre pere le roy Jehan de Jherusalem et empereur de Costantinoble…et madame Berangiere sa fame jadis nostre mere" in the church of St Paul, Paris by charter dated Oct 1294[895].
     "m (Toledo 1224) as his third wife, JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem, son of ERARD II Comte de Brienne & Agnès de Nevers ([1170]-Constantinople 23 Mar 1237, bur Constantinople). Elected Emperor of Constantinople 1231."
Med Lands cites:
[891] Lucas Tudensis, Liber IV, p. 109.
[892] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212 and 1224, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 895 and 913.
[893] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 132.
[894] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655.
[895] Nouvelles Preuves I, p. 41.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “D6. [2m.] Infta Berenguela, *1198/99; m.Toledo 1224 Jean de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople (+1237)”.16
; Per Genealogy.EU (de Brienne 1): "F4. Jean de Brienne, King and Regent of Jerusalem (1210-25), Latin Emperor of Constantinople (1229-37), *ca 1148, +23.3.1237; 1m: Tyrus 1210 Maria of Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem (*1191 +1212); 2m: before V.1214 Stephanie (+1219) dau.of King Leon I of Armenia; 3m: Burgos 1224 Infta Berenguela of Castile."2
; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Brienne, son of ERARD [II] de Brienne & his wife Agnès de Montbéliard [Montfaucon] ([1170/75]-27 Mar 1237). "Johan de Briene" is named as brother of Gauthier de Brienne by William of Tyre (Continuator), after his brother Guillaume[311]. "Gualterius comes Brene" donated property to Beaulieu (Aube) by charter dated 1194 with the consent of "Willelmi et Johannis fratrum eius"[312]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Iohannis frater eiusdem comitis [Galteri comitis Briennensis" when recording that he succeeded as Comte de Brienne after the death of his brother[313]. "Johannes comes Brene" donated property to Basse-Fontaine by charter dated Apr 1210[314]. His first marriage was arranged by Philippe II King of France, who gave him a dower of 40,000 silver pounds, a sum which was equalled by Pope Innocent III[315]. He landed at Acre 13 Sep 1210, was married to his first wife the next day, and was crowned 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre as JEAN King of Jerusalem by Albert Patriarch of Jerusalem[316]. "Iohannes…Latinorum Ierusalem rex decimus et comes Brena et domina Maria uxor mea regina" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1 Jul 1211[317]. He retained the bailiship of the kingdom of Jerusalem after the death of his first wife[318], nominally in the name of his daughter. After a long siege, and with the help of western armies which were part of the Fifth Crusade, Damietta in Egypt was captured 5 Nov 1219 and added to the territory of the kingdom of Jerusalem[319]. Jean left the crusade in Feb 1220, intending to visit Armenia to claim the throne in the name of his second wife following the death of her father, but as both she and their infant son died before he sailed for Cilicia he had no further claim and abandoned the journey[320]. He arrived back with the Fifth Crusade 6 Jul 1221, which proceeded to march further into Egypt but was forced to retreat and return Damietta 8 Sep 1221[321]. After appointing Eudes de Montbéliard as regent, King Jean sailed from Acre in autumn 1222, to find a suitable husband for his daughter. He agreed to her marriage with Friedrich II King of Germany on condition that he continued as regent of Jerusalem for life. Matthew Paris records that “Johannes de Brennes rex Jerusalem et magister superioris Hospitalis fratrum Jerusalem” visited England “circa octavas Apostolorum Petri et Pauli” to seek help for the relief of “Terræ Sanctæ”[322]. His son-in-law reneged on his promise relating to the throne of Jerusalem immediately after his wedding and declared himself king of Jerusalem in 1225[323]. He was appointed regent of the Latin empire of Constantinople, by agreement at Perugia in Apr 1229, and was crowned JEAN Emperor of Constantinople on his arrival in the city in 1231. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1237 in Constantinople of "rex Iohannes"[324].
     "m firstly (Tyre 1210) MARIE Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato & his third wife Isabelle Queen of Jerusalem (Tyre Summer 1192-1212). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and specifies her parentage[325]. A continuator of Caffaro records the death in 1192 of "Conrado marchionis Montidferrati" leaving "uxore sua pregnante, ex quo nata est unica filia Maria"[326], which indicates that Maria must have been born in summer 1192, therefore after her mother's second marriage. She was known as "la Marquise", from her father's rank[327]. Her marriage was arranged by Philippe II King of France, who gave her husband a dower of 40,000 silver pounds, a sum which was equalled by Pope Innocent III[328]. She was crowned with her husband 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre[329]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records her death in childbirth within two years of her marriage[330].
     "m secondly ([23/30] Apr 1214) RITA [Stephanie] of Armenia, daughter of LEWON I King of Armenia & his first wife Isabelle --- (after 1195-[Acre] [Jun] 1220). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and her father when recording her marriage, specifying that she was the daughter of his first marriage[331]. The Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie of Constable Sempad names "une fille encore en bas âge…Ritha" as Leo's daughter by his first marriage, stating that she was brought up by her paternal grandmother[332]. Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle records that "King Lewon gave his daughter Rita to the king of Jerusalem" in [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215][333]. "Leo…rex Armenie" granted property to the Knights Hospitallers with the consent of "domini Rupini principis Antiochie…nepotis et heredis mei" by charter dated 23 Apr 1214, and declared having received a loan from the Knights Hospitallers by charter dated the same date, both documents specifying that they formed part of the arrangements for the marriage of "mee filie" and "regi Iherosolimitano"[334]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records that "li rois Johans", on hearing news of the death of “Livon le roi d’Ermenie, pere de sa feme”, left for Acre from where he intended to go to Armenia to claim the throne, but that he abandoned the journey because his wife died, and after 15 days later also “un fil que il en avoit de age de IV ans”[335].
     "m thirdly (Toledo 1224) Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla y León, daughter of don ALFONSO IX King of León & his second wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla (1204-Constantinople 12 Apr 1237, bur Constantinople). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "rex Ierusalem Iohannes" as daughter of "Berengaria" and "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and in a later passage records the marriage of "rex Iohannes Ierosolimitanus" and "filia regis Gallicie, sororem Fernandi de Castella", but in neither place is she named[336]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1223 of "le roi de Castille…sa sœur Bérengère, nièce de Blanche reine de France" and "Jean roi de Jérusalem"[337]. "Jehan fiuz le roy Jehan de Jherusalem, bouteillier de France" instituted masses for "nostre pere le roy Jehan de Jherusalem et empereur de Costantinoble…et madame Berangiere sa fame jadis nostre mere" in the church of St Paul, Paris by charter dated Oct 1294[338]. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berengaria imperatrix Constantinopolitane"[339]."
Med Lands cites:
[311] WTC XXVII.XIV, p. 235.
[312] Abbé Laloire (ed.) (1878) Chartes de Beaulieu (Aube), Collection des principaux cartularies du diocèse de Troyes Tome IV (Paris, Troyes), (“Beaulieu (Aube)”) 191, p. 284.
[313] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 879.
[314] Abbé Laloire (ed.) (1878) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Basse-Fontaine, Collection des principaux cartularies du diocèse de Troyes Tome III (Paris, Troyes) (“Basse-Fontaine”) 7, p. 13.
[315] WTC XXX.XIII, p. 307, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 132-3.
[316] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.
[317] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 145, p. 268.
[318] WTC XXXI.IX, p. 320.
[319] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 162.
[320] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 164-5.
[321] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 167.
[322] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (“MP”), Vol. III, 1223, p. 82.
[323] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 173-4.
[324] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 941.
[325] WTC XXX.XI, p. 305.
[326] Caffaro regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, Iacobus Avrie (continuator), p. 147.
[327] WTC XXX.XIV, p. 308.
[328] WTC XXX.XIII, p. 307, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 132-3.
[329] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.
[330] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[331] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[332] Sempad Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie, RHC, Documents arméniens, Tome I (Paris, 1869), 654, p. 642.
[333] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2005) Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle (Venice Manuscript) (New Jersey) 102, 663 A.E [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215], a vailable at (20 Aug 2007).
[334] Langlois, V. (ed.) (1863) Le Trésor des Chartes d'Arménie (Venice) ("Chartes d´Arménie"), VIII and IX, pp. 122 and 124.
[335] WTC XXXII.XVI, p. 349.
[336] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212 and 1224, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 895 and 913.
[337] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 132.
[338] Mas Latrie, L. de (ed.) (1873) Nouvelles Preuves de l'Histoire de Chypre sous le règne des princes de la maison de Lusignan, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des chartes, Tome XXXIII (Paris) ("Nouvelles Preuves I"), p. 41.
[339] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655.12

; Per Racines et Histoire (Brienne): “Jean 1er de Brienne ° ~1175 (Brienne) + 21 ou 23/03/1237 (Paris) bailli de Chypre, roi et régent de Jérusalem (1210-1225 - abdication), vice-empereur latin de Constantinople (1229-1237),
seigneur de Brienne pour son frère Gautier III
     ép. 1) 14/09/1200 ou 1209 ? (Tyr) Maria de Montferrat, reine de Jérusalem ° 1191/92 + 1212 (fille de Conrad de Montferrat, co-roi de Jérusalem, et d’Isabelle d’Anjou, reine de Jérusalem)
     ép. 2) dès 05/1214 Stéphanie (Isabelle, Rita) d’Arménie ° après 1195 + 06/1219/20 (fille de Léon 1er (ou II) «Le Grand», roi de Petite Arménie, et d’Isabelle d’Antioche)
     ép. 3) 1222 ou 1224 ? (Tolède ou Burgos) Berenguela (Bérengère) de Castille, infante de Castille ° ~1199 (Burgos, Castille) + 12/04/1237 (fille d’Alfonso IX, roi de Léon et de Castille, et de Berenguela, infante de Castille)”.17 She was Latin Empress consort of Constantinople between 1229 and 1237.6

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 114-28, pp. 104-105. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Leon and Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#BerenguelaLeondied1237. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berengaria_of_Le%C3%B3n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 120-29, p. 107.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026633&tree=LEO
  11. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#JeanBriennedied1237
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Berengaria of León (1204–12 Apr 1237), Find A Grave Memorial no. 87172716, citing Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/87172716/berengaria-of_le_n. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bérengère de León: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9reng%C3%A8re_de_Le%C3%B3n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Berenguela de León: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berenguela_de_Le%C3%B3n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Brienne, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brienne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139445&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013812&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfons/Aufons de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064501&tree=LEO
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 7.

Henry de Beaumont 1st Earl of Warwick1,2,3

M, #4742, b. circa 1048, d. 20 June 1119
FatherRoger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar2,3,4 d. c 29 Nov 1094
MotherAdeline (Adelise) de Meulan2,3,4 d. 8 Apr 1081
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited15 Aug 2020
     Henry de Beaumont 1st Earl of Warwick was born circa 1048; Burke's Peerage says born ca 1048; Genealogics says b. ca 1048.5,2,1,4 He married Margaret du Perche, daughter of Geoffroy II du Perche Comte du Perche et Mortagne, Seigneur de Mortagne et de Nogent and Beatrice/Beatrix de Montdidier, before 1100.6,7,3,4,8
Henry de Beaumont 1st Earl of Warwick died on 20 June 1119.9,10,7,3,11
Henry de Beaumont 1st Earl of Warwick was buried after 20 June 1119 at Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1046, Denneville, Departement de la Manche, Basse-Normandie, France
     DEATH     20 Jun 1119 (aged 72–73), Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     Henry of Newburgh, 1st Earl of Warwick
     Henry was the second of two three sons and third of four children of Sir Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan, daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan. Grandson of Humphrey de Vieilles, born at the castle of Newburg near Louviers, Normandy, which he inherited.
     Henry married Margaret, the daughter of Geoffrey de Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier and had five sons:
* Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick
* Robert de Beaumont, Steward of Normandy
* Rotrou, Bishop of Evreux, Archbishop of Rouen, Chief Justiciar and Steward of Normandy
* Geoffrey de Neubourg, ducal justice in Normandy
* Henry de Neubourg, Henry of Gower, held the Gower lordship

     The historian Orderic Vitalis stated Henry was with William II on his 1088 campaign in the Midlands when he was given the charge of Warwick Castle as Constable, and William made him Earl of Warwick the same year and awarded Henry with Warwick Castle, along with it's borough and manor. Henry founded the Church of All Saints within the castle walls by 1119, but the Bishop of Worcester felt it was an inappropriate location for a church and removed it in 1127 or 1128. The castle left the family when his son's wife, Gundred de Warenne, was tricked into believing her husband was dead and turned the castle over to King Henry II's invading army in 1153.
     Henry also received an unprecedented group of royal estates in Rutland and the royal forest of Sutton, the current day Sutton Chase, believed to have been an arrangement to protect his earldom between his father, brother and King William. His brother, Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, a proven companion to William at the Battle of Hastings, is mentioned in the Domesday Book with English holdings.
     Henry was in high favor at court after he had assisted in the reconciliation of King William and his son, Robert Curthouse in 1081. Both Henry and his brother were also with the royal hunting party at Hampshire that fateful day when William was killed by an arrow. Both Beaumonts swore their allegiance to William's brother Henry I, the few who would remain loyal to Henry as the barons supported Duke Robert Curthose for the throne.
     King Henry I awarded Henry with the lordship of Gower, Wales around 1107 where Henry built a castle at Swansea that withstood an attack by the Welsh in 113. Henry also captured the Gower Peninsula in south west Glamorgan. Either Henry or his barons built more castles at Penrhys, Llanrhidian and Swansea, Oystermouth and Loughor, but little remains today besides a mound and keep.
     Henry was by disposition quiet and retiring, and was overshadowed by his elder brother Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, reputedly one of the most brilliant men in England. Odericus recorded that "he earned this honor by his valor and loyalty" and Wace writes he was "a brave man".
     Henry retired to the Abbey at Preaux as a monk, where the eighteenth century woodcut of his tomb, and that of his father and brother, can still be seen.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Roger de Beaumont 1015–1094
     Siblings
          Robert de Beaumont 1049–1118
     Children
          Rotrou de Beaumont unknown–1183
          Robert De Newburgh 1100–1159
     BURIAL     Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 20 Sep 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 58931051
     SPONSORED BY The Pathfinder.7,4,12
     ; Per Burke's: "HENRY de BEAUMONT, 1st EARL OF WARWICK (E), so cr between July and Dec 1088 and granted lands which up till two years previously had belonged to a Saxon Thane, Thurkill or Turchil of Arden (an ancestor of William Shakespeare); b c 1048; granted feudal Ldship of Gower, S Wales, by HENRY I some time between 1106 and 1116; m Margaret (d in or after 1156), dau of Geoffrey, Count de Perche, and d most probably 20 June 1119."1 He was Seigneur of Beaumont, Pont-Audemar, Brionne and Vatteville in Normandy.7 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick or Henry de Newburgh[1] (died 20 June 1119) was a Norman nobleman who rose to great prominence in the Kingdom of England.
Origins
     "Henry was a younger son of Roger de Beaumont by Adeline of Meulan,[2] daughter of Waleran III, Count of Meulan, and Oda de Conteville.
Early career
     "Henry was given by his father the modest lordship of Le Neubourg, in central Normandy, 12 km (7.5 mi) to the northeast of his father's caput of Beaumont-le-Roger on the River Risle. From this lordship he adopted for himself and his descendants the surname Anglicised to "de Newburgh", frequently Latinised to de Novo Burgo (meaning "from the new borough/town").
     "Henry was said, by Orderic Vitalis the Norman monk historian, to have been with William the Conqueror on his 1068 campaign in the Midlands when he was supposedly given charge of Warwick Castle, but there is no supporting evidence for this late source.[3] Little is in fact known of his career before 1088. However, he took a leading role in reconciling the Conqueror with his eldest son Robert Curthose in 1081, so he stood high in the Conqueror's favour. In 1088 he was a royal agent in the arrest and trial of the traitorous bishop of Durham, William de Saint-Calais.
Under William II
     "Henry acquired a much greater land-holding in England when, in reward for help in suppressing the Rebellion of 1088, King William II made him Earl of Warwick in 1088.[2] The lands of the earldom were put together from several sources. The bulk was provided by the majority of the lands in Warwickshire and elsewhere recorded as those of his elder brother Robert, Count of Meulan in the Domesday Survey of 1086. He also received large royal estates in Rutland and the royal forest of Sutton, which became Sutton Chase. The complicated arrangement to endow his earldom is unprecedented, and must have been the result of a three way arrangement between his father, his brother and the king.
Under Henry I
     "Henry became the companion and friend of King Henry I, William II's successor. When a division took place among the barons who had gathered together in the aftermath of the king's sudden death in 1100 to choose a successor, it was mainly owing to de Beaumont's advice that Henry, the conqueror's fourth son, was selected. However, in the following year most of the barons were openly or secretly disloyal and favoured the attempt of Henry's elder brother Robert Curthose, now Duke of Normandy, to gain the Crown. Henry de Beaumont and his brother Robert, King Henry's foremost advisors,[4] were among the few that remained faithful to the King.
     "Henry acquired the Lordship of Gower in Wales around 1107 from the favour of King Henry and built a castle at Swansea, which was unsuccessfully attacked by the Welsh in 1113; he also captured the Gower Peninsula in south west Glamorgan. He or his barons built other castles at Penrhys, Llanrhidian and Swansea in 1120, together with the others at Oystermouth and Loughor, the only remains of the latter are a mound and a keep.[5][6][6]
Marriage and offspring
     "Before 1100 Henry married Margaret (died after 1156), daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier, daughter of Hilduin IV, Count of Montdidier.[2] They had two daughters and the following sons:
1. Roger, 2nd Earl of Warwick (c. 1102 – 1153), who succeeded Henry.
2. Robert de Neubourg (died 1159), who inherited Henry's Norman lands and was Steward of Normandy. Robert's eldest son Henry de Neubourgh (c. 1130 – 1214) inherited his lands in Normandy, while his younger son Roger de Newburgh (c. 1135 – 1192) inherited his lands in Dorset.
3. Rotrou (died 1183), who was successively Bishop of Évreux and Archbishop of Rouen, Chief Justiciar and Steward of Normandy. In 1167 he led the funeral service of Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I and mother of Henry II.
4. Geoffrey de Neubourg. He moved to England at the end of 1137 and resided thereafter with his eldest brother Earl Roger of Warwick. He made a number of appearances in Earl Roger's charters as "Geoffrey the earl's brother." When Roger died in 1153 and was succeeded by his son, Earl William, "Geoffrey the earl's uncle" continued to live in the Warwick household. He appears as a ducal justice in Normandy in his later years. See Haskins Society Journal 13 (2004): 50.
5. Henry de Neubourg, otherwise known as "Henry of Gower". He re-conquered the family's Welsh estates in around 1136, holding the lordship of Gower throughout the reign of King Stephen.

Death and legacy
     "Henry entered the Abbey of Saint-Pierre de Préaux before his death and died as a monk there on 20 June 1119. An eighteenth-century woodcut of his tomb in the chapter house, with those of his brother and father beside him, survives, though the abbey is long ruined.
References
1. David, Crouch. "Beaumont [Newburgh], Henry de, first earl of Warwick", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 23 September 2004. Accessed 11 January 2019.
2. Thompson 2002, p. 50.
3. George Edward Cokayne, edited by Geoffrey H. White (1959). The Complete Peerage Vol. 12 part 2, p.358
4. Hollister, C. Warren. "Henry I", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 23 September 2004. Accessed 15 January 2019.
5. "Swansea Castle; New Castle, Swansea – Site Details – Coflein". The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales website. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2008-09-11.
6. "Loughor Castle – Site Details – Coflein". The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales website. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2008-09-11.
Sources
** Thompson, Kathleen (2002). Power and Border Lordship in Medieval France: The County of the Perche, 1000–1226. The Boydell Press.
** Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850–1850. Oxford.
** Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Henry de Beaumont, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
** David Crouch "The Local Influence of the Earls of Warwick, 1088–1242: A Study in Decline and Resourcefulness", Midland History, xxi (1996), 1–23."11

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:704.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. XII/2 357.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "Henry was probably born about 1048, the son of Roger 'Barbatus' de Beaumont, sire de Beaumont et de Pont-Audemer, and Adeline de Meulan. In 1068 when William the Conqueror built Warwick Castle he made Henry its constable. Henry is recorded attesting a royal charter at Le Mans in 1073. In 1077 he was with the king at Caen; and in 1079 he was one of the nobles at Rouen who tried to reconcile the king and his eldest son.
     "He was with William in Normandy in 1080 and 1082; and he was again in Normandy in 1086. Almost at the end of William's reign he was with the king at Westminster. In 1088 he supported William's son and successor William II Rufus against the rebels, and in the same year Henry was created earl of Warwick. To support the earldom the king gave him the lands of an English noble, Turchil of Arden, who had still held large estates in 1086. Probably in 1088 he witnessed, as earl, a charter of Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy.
     "On his father's death in 1094 he succeeded to the Norman barony of Annebecq. He was probably in the royal hunting party when William Rufus was killed in the New Forest on 2 August 1100. He was present the next day when the nobles met at Winchester to choose the king's successor, and he took a leading part in the election of Henry I. Immediately after the coronation at Winchester on 5 August 1100, Warwick witnessed Henry's charter of liberties.
     "He remained loyal to Henry for the rest of his life and often attested royal charters. He founded a priory of Austin canons at Warwick and was a benefactor of Mary's Church there and of the abbeys of Préaux in Normandy and St.Taurin in Evreux. Henry and his wife Marguerite du Perche, daughter of Geoffrey II, comte du Perche et Mortagne, and Beatrice de Montdidier, had two sons who would both have progeny. He died in 1119, probably on 20 August, and was buried at Préaux Abbey."4

Reference: Weis [1992:133] Line 151-25.2 Henry de Beaumont 1st Earl of Warwick was also known as Henry de Newburgh 1st Earl of Warwick.7,1

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY de Beaumont, son of ROGER Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger & his wife Adeline de Meulan ([1048]-[20 Jun] 1119, bur Préaux). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites” and that Henry received “comitatum Warwik” from “Willelmi regis in Anglia”[1280]. Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England constructed “castrum apud Guarevicum” [Warwick] and entrusted it to “Henrico Rogerii de Bellomonte filio”, dated to 1068[1281]. "…Rotgerius de Bello monte, Hainricus filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1282]. “Rogerius et filii mei Robertus et Henricus” donated “decimam tocius Brotonie” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 13 Jan 1086[1283]. After supporting William II King of England against the rebellion of 1088, the king created him Earl of Warwick in [Jul/Dec] 1088. Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Henricum” as the heirs of “Rogerius...de Bellomonte”, adding that Henry was granted “comitatum de Guarewico”[1284]. "Rogerus de Bellomonte" founded la Sainte-Trinité de Beaumont-le-Roger, with the consent of "liberis meis Roberto comite Mellentensi et Henrico comite de Warwic", by charter dated [1088/89][1285]. He opposed the invasion of England by Robert Duke of Normandy in Jun 1101, and remained loyal to Henry I King of England throughout his life[1286]. "…Henrici comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[1287]. “Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1288]. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1119 of “comes Henricus de Warewic”[1289].
     "m MARGUERITE de Perche, daughter of GEOFFROY Comte de Mortagne et de Perche & his wife Beatrix de Ramerupt [Roucy] (-27 Aug after 1156). Orderic Vitalis names “Margaritam...Julianam” as the daughters of “Goisfredus Rotronis Mauritaniæ comitis filius” and his wife “Beatricis”, adding that Marguerite married “Henrico comiti de Covarevico”[1290]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names " Rotaldum eiusdem loci comitem et Iulainam de Aquila matrem regine Navarrensis, et Margaretam uxorem Gisleberti de Novo-burgo" as children, incorrectly, of "Rotaldo comiti de Pertica" & his wife Beatrix de Roucy, specifying that Marguerite had children "Rotaldum Ebrodiensem episcopum cum aliis liberis utriusque sexus"[1291]. “Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1292]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "comitisse de Warwic" in Wiltshire[1293]. The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "27 Aug" of "Margarita mater Rotrodi episcopi"[1294]."
Med Lands cites:
[1280] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, IV, p. 269.
[1281] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 184.
[1282] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 33, p. 36.
[1283] Saint-Wandrille, 41, p. 95.
[1284] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXV, p. 427.
[1285] Beaumont-le-Roger Sainte-Trinité, A, II, p. 2.
[1286] CP XII/2 358-9.
[1287] Bath St Peter 42, p. 46.
[1288] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, College of St Mary, Warwick I, p. 1326.
[1289] Annales de Margan, p. 10.
[1290] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 302.
[1291] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 14, MGH SS XIII, pp. 254-5.
[1292] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, College of St Mary, Warwick I, p. 1326.
[1293] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Wiltshire, p. 23.
[1294] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario ecclesiæ Ebroicensis, p. 463.13


; Per Med Lands:
     ""MARGUERITE du Perche (-27 Aug after 1156). Orderic Vitalis names “Margaritam...Julianam” as the daughters of “Goisfredus Rotronis Mauritaniæ comitis filius” and his wife “Beatricis”, adding that Marguerite married “Henrico comiti de Covarevico”[1710]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names " Rotaldum eiusdem loci comitem et Iulainam de Aquila matrem regine Navarrensis, et Margaretam uxorem Gisleberti de Novo-burgo" as children, incorrectly, of "Rotaldo comiti de Pertica" & his wife Beatrix de Roucy, specifying that Marguerite had children "Rotaldum Ebrodiensem episcopum cum aliis liberis utriusque sexus"[1711]. “Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1712]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "comitisse de Warwic" in Wiltshire[1713]. 1156. The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "27 Aug" of "Margarita mater Rotrodi episcopi"[1714].
     "m HENRY de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, son of ROGER Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger & his wife Adeline de Meulan ([1048]-[20 Jun] 1119, bur Préaux)."
Med Lands cites:
[1710] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 302.
[1711] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 14, MGH SS XIII, pp. 254-5.
[1712] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, College of St Mary, Warwick I, p. 1326.
[1713] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Wiltshire, p. 23.
[1714] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario ecclesiæ Ebroicensis, p. 463.14
He was 1st Earl of Warwick (1st creation) between 1088 and 1119.15,1,3,11

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Warwick, Brooke Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 151-25, p. 133. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00291690&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 193, de PERCHE 2:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite du Perche: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020635&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 151-25, p. 133 - give 20 June 1123.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 17, de BEAUMONT-5: gives date of death as 1119.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_de_Beaumont,_1st_Earl_of_Warwick. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 19 November 2019), memorial page for Henry de Beaumont (1046–20 Jun 1119), Find A Grave Memorial no. 58931051, citing Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/58931051/henry_de-beaumont. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HenryBeaumontWarwickdied1119B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#MargueritePercheMHenryBeaumontWarwick
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 17, de BEAUMONT-5.
  16. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1:iii.
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1:iv.
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1:v.
  20. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1:vi.
  21. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 179, de NEWBURGH 1:vii.

Roger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar1,2

M, #4743, d. circa 29 November 1094
FatherHumphrey/Honfroy (?) de Vielles, seigneur de Vieilles and Pont Audemer3,2 b. c 980, d. c 28 Sep 1044
MotherAubrey de la Haie3,2 b. 984, d. c 20 Sep 1045
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited19 Nov 2019
     Roger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar married Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan, daughter of Waleran/Galeran III de Meulan Comte de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, in 1040.4,2
Roger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar died circa 29 November 1094.4,2
Roger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar was buried after 29 November 1094 at Preaux, France (now).2


     He was Seigneur (feudal Lord) of Beaumont, Pontaudemer, Brionne and Vatteville at Normandy, France.1 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

; Roger de Beaumont was not himself at the Battle, being left in Normandy as chief adviser of the Duchess Maud.5

; Boyer (2001, p. 17): ...built a castle at Beaumont-le-Roger, above Vieilles... Apparently he was faithful to William the Conqueror during disurbances early in the Duke's reign, and was said to have defeated and slain Roger de Towny. He was credited with having furnished sixty ships for teh invasion of England, but in 1066 he remained in Normandy as advisor to the Duchess Maud....Until 1082 he witnessed many charters of William the Conqueror. In 1086 he was recorded as holding land in Dorset and Gloucestershire, which later devolved to his grandson, Waleran, Count of Meulan. About 1088 he founded the collegiate church of the Holy Trinity at Beaumont-le-Roger for the canons of St. Frideswide of Oxford, and he was a benefactor of St. Pierre-de-Preaux and St. Wandrille. Shortly after 1090 he became a monk at the abbey of Preaux.4

; Weis AR 151-25.6

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Warwick, Brooke Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 16-17, de BEAUMONT-4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 17, de BEAUMONT-5.
  5. [S1770] Anthony J. Camp, My Ancestors Came with the Conqueror: Those Who Did, and Some of Those Who Probably Did Not (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998), p. 31. Hereinafter cited as Camp (1998): My Ancestors Came with the Conquero.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 151-25, p. 133. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00291690&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 42. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120986&tree=LEO

Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan

F, #4744, d. 8 April 1081
FatherWaleran/Galeran III de Meulan Comte de Meulan1,2
MotherOda de Conteville3
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited19 Nov 2019
     Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan married Roger de Beaumont Seigneur de Beaumont, Pont-Audemar, son of Humphrey/Honfroy (?) de Vielles, seigneur de Vieilles and Pont Audemer and Aubrey de la Haie, in 1040.3,2
Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan died on 8 April 1081.2
Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan was buried after 8 April 1081 at Abbaye du Bec, France (now).2


     Adeline (Adelise) de Meulan lived at Meulan, France.4

; weis 50-24.5 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-25.4

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 42. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 17, de BEAUMONT-5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-24, p. 52. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 151-25, p. 133.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00291690&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120986&tree=LEO

Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy1,2,3,4,5

F, #4745, b. circa 1045, d. circa 1110
FatherHildouin IV de Montdidier comte de Montdidier, seigneur de Ramerupt, d’Arcis et de Breteuil, comte de Roucy6,3,7,4,1,5 b. c 1010, d. c 1063
MotherAdele (Adelix) de Roucy6,3,8,7,4,1,5 b. c 1014, d. 1062
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited27 Nov 2020
     Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy was born circa 1045 at Montdidier, Somme, France.9 She married Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, son of Renaud de Clermont Great Chamberlain of France and Ermengardis de Clermont, before 1060.10,11,12,13,1,5
Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy died circa 1110.9
     GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-25.10

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europaische Stammtafeln, J. A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III/4 653.1 Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy was also known as Margaret de Roucy.14 Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy was also known as Marguerite de Ramerupt.15

; Per Shamà: “Margaret (or Marguerite) de Rameu, b. abt. 1050; m. abt. 1080, Hugh de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, d. 1101, Count of Clermont in beauvaisis. (CP X:348, ES III.4/677; Seversmith, 2,542-2,543).”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Ramerupt . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "secundam filiam comitis Helduini de Rameruth dictam Margaretam" as wife of "Hugo comes de Claro-monte"[664]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta" as third daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy and names her husband "comiti Hugonis de Claromonte Baluacensi"[665].
     "m HUGUES de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] dit de Mouchy, son of RENAUD Camerarius & his wife Ermentrude --- (-after Nov 1099)."
Med Lands cites:
[664] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[665] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES [II] de Creil (-after Nov 1099). Joint holder of the castle of Creil: an undated charter names "Hugo Rainaldi camerarii filius, regis beneficio Credulii dominus" and "[Galerannus] ipsi Hugoni et consanguinitate et eiusdem castelli participatione conjunctus"[18]. "Hugo filius Reginaldi camerarii" donated "tributum navium…per Cretellum transeuntium" to Fécamp by undated charter, witnessed by "Haimericus de Haurecey nepos Hugonis…"[19]. "Rainaldus…senioris camerarius" renounced rights relating to "Villare" in favour of Fécamp by undated charter, dated to before 1060, witnessed by "Hugo filius meus cum uxore sua et uxor mea Ermentrudis…"[20]. "Hugues fils de Renaud" consented to the donation of "la moitié de la terre de Rungis" by "son cousin le chambrier Galeran" to Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs by charter dated 1067[21]. An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[22]. Seigneur de Mouchy: "…Hugo de Montiaco" witnessed the charter dated to [before 1092] under which "Radulphus de Basincourt et Helvidis uxor eius…" donated property "juxta Manusdivillam" to Pontoise Saint Martin[23]. Seigneur de Clermont: "Hugo Clarimontis dns" confirmed his donations to the church of Saint-Germer-de-Flay, with the consent of "filiis meis Rainaldo et Guidone", by charter dated to before Nov 1099[24].
     "m (before 1060) MARGUERITE de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] de Montdidier et de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Adelaide de Roucy. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta" as third daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy and names her husband "comiti Hugonis de Claromonte Baluacensi"[25]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "secundam filiam comitis Helduini de Rameruth dictam Margaretam" as wife of "Hugo comes de Claro-monte"[26]. Her marriage date is estimated from the undated charter, dated to before 1060, under which "Rainaldus…senioris camerarius" renounced rights relating to "Villare" in favour of Fécamp, witnessed by "Hugo filius meus cum uxore sua et uxor mea Ermentrudis…"[27]. An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[28]."
Med Lands cites:
[18] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, footnote 284, quoting Afforty, XIII, 429, and Archives de l’Oise, H 612.
[19] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, footnote 285, quoting Collection Moreau, XL, 220, "extrait d’un cartulaire de la fin du XI siècle".
[20] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 302, quoting Collection Moreau, XXI, 193.
[21] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, citing Mss lat. 10977, fol. 38.
[22] Esserent Saint-Leu, LIX, p. 59.
[23] Pontoise Saint-Martin, XXI, p. 18.
[24] Lépinois (1877), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 421.
[25] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.
[26] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[27] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 302, quoting Collection Moreau, XXI, 193.
[28] Esserent Saint-Leu, LIX, p. 59.13


; Per Racines et Histoire (Clermont-en-Beauvaisis): “Hugues II de Clermont (alias Hugues 1er Creil ou de Senlis) dit «de Mouchy» ° ~1030 (Clermont) + 1101/03 seigneur de Creil et Clermont (1067), Mouchy, Roucy et Montdidier (don de l’église de Brulevert à l’Abbaye de Saint-Germer)
     ép. ~1052 (ou ~1067, 70 ?) Marguerite de Roucy (dite de Ramerupt, ou encore Madeleine, dite d’Arcis) ° ~1031/45 + après 1103 dame de Luzarches (fille d’Hilduin III ou IV de Ramerupt, comte d’Arcis-sur-Aube (10), de Montdidier et de Roucy (02), seigneur de Ramerupt, et d’Adèle (Adélaïde, Alix) de Châtillon dite «de Roucy») (certaines sources [Alberic de Trois-Fontaines] lui donnent Ebles, comte de Roucy, pour père)
     [ une erreur commune lui fait épouser 2) Emma de Sicile le confondant avec Guilhem VI d’Auvergne ° 1069 + 1136 alors seulement titré «de Clermont» qui ép. ~1087 Emma de Sicile ° ~1063/65 + après 1119 (fille de Roger 1er de Hauteville, dit «de Sicile», duc de Calabre, et de Judith d’Evreux)) ]”

Per Racines et Histoire (Roucy): “Marguerite de Montdidier ° ~1031/45 + ~1103/10
     ép. avant 1060 Hugues II de Creil (Clermont) ° ~1030 + après 11/1099”.16

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Montdidier: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164671&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 246-23, p. 221. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  4. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 246-23, p. 221.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#MargueriteRoucyMHuguesClermont. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildouin IV de Montdidier: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020522&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#HilduinIVMontdidierdied1063
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (Alice) de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020523&tree=LEO
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 1 page (The family of Beaumont-sur-Oise): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Clermont dit de Mouchy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164670&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#HuguesClermontMMargueriteMontdidier
  14. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I2059
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#AdelineClermontMGilbertClare
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Clermonten-Beauvaisis & de Clermont-Nesle, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Clermont-Beauvaisis-Nesle.pdf
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrude de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330759&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#ErmentrudeClermontMHuguesAvranchesCheste
  19. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32827
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106205&tree=LEO
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beaumont-dur-Oise.pdf, p. 2.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164145&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#Renauddiedbefore1162

Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis1,2,3,4

M, #4746, b. circa 1030, d. after November 1099
FatherRenaud de Clermont Great Chamberlain of France4,5 b. 1010, d. a 1098
MotherErmengardis de Clermont4,5 b. 1010, d. WFT Est. 1034-1104
ReferenceGAV26 EDV25
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis was born circa 1030 at Clermont, Oise, France.6 He married Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy, daughter of Hildouin IV de Montdidier comte de Montdidier, seigneur de Ramerupt, d’Arcis et de Breteuil, comte de Roucy and Adele (Adelix) de Roucy, before 1060.7,8,3,4,9,10
Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis died after November 1099.4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Ramerupt . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "secundam filiam comitis Helduini de Rameruth dictam Margaretam" as wife of "Hugo comes de Claro-monte"[664]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta" as third daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy and names her husband "comiti Hugonis de Claromonte Baluacensi"[665].
     "m HUGUES de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] dit de Mouchy, son of RENAUD Camerarius & his wife Ermentrude --- (-after Nov 1099)."
Med Lands cites:
[664] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[665] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.10


; Per Shamà: “Margaret (or Marguerite) de Rameu, b. abt. 1050; m. abt. 1080, Hugh de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, d. 1101, Count of Clermont in beauvaisis. (CP X:348, ES III.4/677; Seversmith, 2,542-2,543).”.11 Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis was also known as Hugh de Clermont Earl of Bevois.12

; This is the same person as ”Hugh I, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis” at Wikipedia and as ”Hugues Ier de Clermont” at Wikipédia (FR).13,14

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europaische Stammtafeln, J. A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III/4 653.3 GAV-26 EDV-25 GKJ-25. Hugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis was also known as Hugues de Clermont dit de Mouchy, Seigneur de Creil.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES [II] de Creil (-after Nov 1099). Joint holder of the castle of Creil: an undated charter names "Hugo Rainaldi camerarii filius, regis beneficio Credulii dominus" and "[Galerannus] ipsi Hugoni et consanguinitate et eiusdem castelli participatione conjunctus"[18]. "Hugo filius Reginaldi camerarii" donated "tributum navium…per Cretellum transeuntium" to Fécamp by undated charter, witnessed by "Haimericus de Haurecey nepos Hugonis…"[19]. "Rainaldus…senioris camerarius" renounced rights relating to "Villare" in favour of Fécamp by undated charter, dated to before 1060, witnessed by "Hugo filius meus cum uxore sua et uxor mea Ermentrudis…"[20]. "Hugues fils de Renaud" consented to the donation of "la moitié de la terre de Rungis" by "son cousin le chambrier Galeran" to Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs by charter dated 1067[21]. An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[22]. Seigneur de Mouchy: "…Hugo de Montiaco" witnessed the charter dated to [before 1092] under which "Radulphus de Basincourt et Helvidis uxor eius…" donated property "juxta Manusdivillam" to Pontoise Saint Martin[23]. Seigneur de Clermont: "Hugo Clarimontis dns" confirmed his donations to the church of Saint-Germer-de-Flay, with the consent of "filiis meis Rainaldo et Guidone", by charter dated to before Nov 1099[24].
     "m (before 1060) MARGUERITE de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] de Montdidier et de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Adelaide de Roucy. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta" as third daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy and names her husband "comiti Hugonis de Claromonte Baluacensi"[25]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "secundam filiam comitis Helduini de Rameruth dictam Margaretam" as wife of "Hugo comes de Claro-monte"[26]. Her marriage date is estimated from the undated charter, dated to before 1060, under which "Rainaldus…senioris camerarius" renounced rights relating to "Villare" in favour of Fécamp, witnessed by "Hugo filius meus cum uxore sua et uxor mea Ermentrudis…"[27]. An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[28]."
Med Lands cites:
[18] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, footnote 284, quoting Afforty, XIII, 429, and Archives de l’Oise, H 612.
[19] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, footnote 285, quoting Collection Moreau, XL, 220, "extrait d’un cartulaire de la fin du XI siècle".
[20] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 302, quoting Collection Moreau, XXI, 193.
[21] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 303, citing Mss lat. 10977, fol. 38.
[22] Esserent Saint-Leu, LIX, p. 59.
[23] Pontoise Saint-Martin, XXI, p. 18.
[24] Lépinois (1877), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 421.
[25] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.
[26] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[27] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 302, quoting Collection Moreau, XXI, 193.
[28] Esserent Saint-Leu, LIX, p. 59.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Clermont-en-Beauvaisis): “Hugues II de Clermont (alias Hugues 1er Creil ou de Senlis) dit «de Mouchy» ° ~1030 (Clermont) + 1101/03 seigneur de Creil et Clermont (1067), Mouchy, Roucy et Montdidier (don de l’église de Brulevert à l’Abbaye de Saint-Germer)
     ép. ~1052 (ou ~1067, 70 ?) Marguerite de Roucy (dite de Ramerupt, ou encore Madeleine, dite d’Arcis) ° ~1031/45 + après 1103 dame de Luzarches (fille d’Hilduin III ou IV de Ramerupt, comte d’Arcis-sur-Aube (10), de Montdidier et de Roucy (02), seigneur de Ramerupt, et d’Adèle (Adélaïde, Alix) de Châtillon dite «de Roucy») (certaines sources [Alberic de Trois-Fontaines] lui donnent Ebles, comte de Roucy, pour père)
     [ une erreur commune lui fait épouser 2) Emma de Sicile le confondant avec Guilhem VI d’Auvergne ° 1069 + 1136 alors seulement titré «de Clermont» qui ép. ~1087 Emma de Sicile ° ~1063/65 + après 1119 (fille de Roger 1er de Hauteville, dit «de Sicile», duc de Calabre, et de Judith d’Evreux)) ]”

Per Racines et Histoire (Roucy): “Marguerite de Montdidier ° ~1031/45 + ~1103/10
     ép. avant 1060 Hugues II de Creil (Clermont) ° ~1030 + après 11/1099”.5 He was living in 1067.3

Family

Marguerite de Montdidier of Roucy b. c 1045, d. c 1110
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 1 page (The family of Beaumont-sur-Oise): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont1.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Clermont dit de Mouchy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164670&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#HuguesClermontMMargueriteMontdidier. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Clermonten-Beauvaisis & de Clermont-Nesle, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Clermont-Beauvaisis-Nesle.pdf
  6. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  7. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 1 page (The family of Beaumont-sur-Oise): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Montdidier: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164671&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#MargueriteRoucyMHuguesClermont
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 246-23, p. 221.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 1. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_I,_Count_of_Clermont-en-Beauvaisis. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hugues Ier de Clermont: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_de_Clermont. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Clermont dit de Mouchy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164670&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrude de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330759&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#ErmentrudeClermontMHuguesAvranchesCheste
  18. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32827
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106205&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#AdelineClermontMGilbertClare
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beaumont-dur-Oise.pdf, p. 2.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164145&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#Renauddiedbefore1162

Alice (Adeliza) Fitz Gilbert de Clare1

F, #4747, d. circa 1166
FatherGilbert fitz Richard de Clare 2nd Earl of Clare, Lord of Tunbridge2,3 b. b 1066, d. bt 1114 - 1117
MotherAdeliza (Adelaide, Alice) de Clermont2 b. 1058, d. a 1117
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited14 May 2020
     Alice (Adeliza) Fitz Gilbert de Clare married Aubrey II de Vere of Great Addington & Drayton, co. Northampton, son of Aubrey I de Vere and Beatrice (?) of Ghent.4,5
Alice (Adeliza) Fitz Gilbert de Clare died circa 1166.6,1
     ; weis 246-25.4 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 251-252, de VERE of Oxford 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert FitzRichard de Tonbridge: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030540&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#GilbertFitzRichardClaredied1117. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 246-25, p. 208. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Saint Albans Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  7. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 155-1, p. 187. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 251-252, de VERE of Oxford 2:ii.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 251-252, de VERE of Oxford 2:iii.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 251-252, de VERE of Oxford 2:iv.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 251-252, de VERE of Oxford 2:viii.
  12. [S1838] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004."
  13. [S1639] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 23 May 2004: "Re: Peter de Valognes/Peter de Valence/Piers de Valoins"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v8KdQqA2zSY/m/uz35oFhwDgwJ) to e-mail address, 23 May 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 23 May 2004."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aubrey de Vere: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00109444&tree=LEO
  15. [S2063] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 April 2006: "Re: de Clavering family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 April 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 April 2006."

Auberée/Maud de Beaumont de Meulan1,2,3

F, #4748, d. after 1189
FatherSir Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester, Comte de Beaument et Meulan Meulan1,4,2,3 b. 1049, d. 5 Jun 1118
MotherIsabelle/Elisabeth de Vermandois Countess of Leicester1,4,2,3 b. c 1081, d. 13 Feb 1131
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited16 May 2009
     Auberée/Maud de Beaumont de Meulan married Guillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval.1,2
Auberée/Maud de Beaumont de Meulan died after 1189.1
     ; weis 215-25.1 EDV-25.5 She was living in 1189.1

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-25, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 42. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).

Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #4749, b. 1080, d. 28 February 1142
FatherEudes I Borel (?) Duc de Bourgogne2,8,9,4,6,5,7 b. c 1058, d. 23 Mar 1103
MotherSibylle de Bourgogne Duchess of Burgundy2,10,8,11,6,4,5,7 b. c 1065, d. a 1103
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited12 Dec 2020
     Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne was born in 1080; Genealogics and Geneagrpahie say b. 1080 Med Lands says b. 1180/83.2,4,5,7 She married Bertrand II de Saint Gilles (?) Comte de Toulouse, Count of Tripolis, son of Raimond IV de Toulouse Cte de Toulouse, de St. Gilles et de Tripoli, Duc de Narbonne and (?) (?) de Provence, on 16 June 1095;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.2,8,6,4,5,7,12,13,14 Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne married Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil., son of Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes and Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu, between 1112 and 1115;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.15,16,17,18,4,6,5,7
Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne died on 28 February 1142; Genealogics, Geneagraphie and Weis say d. 28 Feb 1142; Med Lands says d. 28 Feb 1141.2,4,6,5,7
     ; This is the same person as ”Helie of Burgundy” at Wikipedia and as ”Hélène de Bourgogne” at Wikipédia (FR).19,20

; Per Genealogics:
     “Hélie was born about 1080, the daughter of Eudes I, duke of Burgundy, and Sibylle de Bourgogne.
     “In June 1095 she became the second wife of Bertrand de Saint Gilles, comte de Toulouse, count of Tripolis, son of Raimond VI, comte de Toulouse. They had a son Ponce who would have progeny, and two daughters.
     “Bertrand succeeded his father as count of Toulouse in 1105, and in 1108 he set out for Outremer to claim his father's rights as Count of Tripolis. Hélie accompanied him on this expedition, which resulted in the capture of Tripolis in 1109; shortly after, their nephew Guillermo Jordán, conde de Cerdañas, died of wounds, giving Bertrand an undisputed claim to Tripolis.
     “Bertrand died in 1112, and Ponce succeeded him in Tripolis. Hélie returned to France, where in 1115 she married Guillaume I Talvas, comte de Ponthieu et Alençon, son of Robert de Bellême, 3rd earl of Shropshire and of Shrewsbury, and Agnes de Ponthieu. They had twelve children of whom Guy II, Jean I, Clémence and Ela would have progeny.
     “Hélie died on 28 February 1142, in the abbey de Perseigne.”.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.)
2:20; 3:638.


Geneagraphie cites: Royal Ancestors of Some American Families, Michel L. Call, (printed by the author, 1991 , Repository: Mid-Continent Library Genealogy Reference section, Independence, MO), chart 11355 (Reliability: 0).7 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-24.21 Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne was also known as Alice de Bourgogne.22

Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne lived at Burgundy, France.21

; Per Weis:
     "Hélie (Elal, Alix) of Burgundy, b. 1080, d. 28 Feb. 1142, m. (1) 1095, Bertrand, Count of Toulouse, d. 1112;m. (2) abt. 1115, William I (III) Talvas, Count of Alençon & Ponthieu, d. 30 June 1171, son of Robert de Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, Seigneur of Bellême, Domfront and Alençon, bapt. Sées 1056, d. 8 May, aft. 1130, by his wife, Agnes, liv. 1100, dau. of Guy I, d. 1100, Count of Ponthieu and Montreuil. (CP XI:689, 696-697, XII(1):497; ES II/20, III:4/635, 638; Anselme III:289-292, 299).“.6

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 9): “C3. Hélie, *1080, +28.2.1142; 1m: VI.1095 Cte Bertrand de Toulouse (+1112); 2m: ca 1115 Guillaume, Cte d'Alençon”.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "HELIE de Bourgogne ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and names her eldest son by each marriage[236]. The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[237]. If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83]. A bull of Pope Pascal II dated 4 Feb 1107 names "Bertrannus comes" and comments that he had been "propter uxorem abiectam et multiplicata adulteria iamdiu excommunicationi subiectus"[238]. The document gives no more details of these charges, which from the context appear to have been brought some time before the date of the bull, whose main purpose was a threat of further excommunication against Bertrand for having attacked the monastery of Saint-Gilles. She accompanied her husband to Palestine[239]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias”[240]. "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[241].
     "m firstly (Jun 1095) as his second wife, BERTRAND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND IV "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse & his first wife --- [de Provence] ([1065]-in Palestine 21 Apr 1112). Regent for his father in Toulouse from Oct 1096, when the latter left for Palestine. He succeeded his father in 1105 as BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse. He conquered Tripoli 12 Jun 1109, declaring himself BERTRAND Count of Tripoli.
     "m secondly ([late 1112/1115]) [as his second wife,] GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT [II] Comte d'Alençon Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès Ctss de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171, bur La Hoguette, Calvados, église abbatiale de Saint-André)."
Med Lands cites:
[236] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[237] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn., Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738.
[238] Bullaire de Saint-Gilles, XXV, p. 44.
[239] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 561.
[240] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[241] Cîteaux, 113, p. 104.5


; Per Boyer: William Talvas, Count of Ponthieu, died 30 June 1171.
     “
He married Ela of Burgundy (daughter of Eudes Borel, Duke of Burgundy, by Maud, sister of William Testard, Count of Burgundy), widow of Bertrand, Count of Toulouse.
On 4 March 1105/6 He and his father confirmed to the Abbey of Marmontier all their possessions in Ponthieu and elsewhere, without using the title of Count, but in 1110 or 111 as Count of Ponthieu he made a gift to the Abbey of Cluny. In June 1119 Henry I restored to him his father's lands in Normandy. He resigned Ponthieu to his son Guy about 1126, certainly before 17 Oct. 1129, but retained the title. When Henry I confiscated his Norman lands in 1135, William Talvas joined Geoffrey Plantagenet.
His nickname, "Talvas," was given to him by Orderic and Robert de Torigny; but he did not use it. His ancestor of the first house of Bellême had used the nickname earlier, and his great-grandson, William II, Count of Ponthieu, used it later.
Children:
i. Guy, 1. 1129.
ii. Ela, d. 10 Oct. 1174; m. (1) William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey, m. (2) in or before 1152 Patrick d'Evereux de Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury, who was slain c. April 1168,
“.1
; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême" Seigneur d'Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu, Earl of Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171). Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum” as the son of “Rodbertum Belesmensem” and his wife “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem”[615]. He succeeded his father [4 Mar 1106/1110][616] as Comte de Ponthieu. "Wilelmus comes Pontivi" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême to Marmoutier by charter dated to [1112/14][617]. Henry I King of England restored Comte Guillaume to his father's lands in Normandy in Jun 1119[618]. He resigned Ponthieu [before 1129] in favour of his son Guy: Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “filiorum primogenitus Wido” was made “patre vivente...comes Pontivi”[619]. "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "his predecessors earl Roger and Mabel his wife, count Guy and Adda his wife, his father Robert de Belesmo and his mother Agnes and…Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[620]. Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[621]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes nepos suus…ex Guidone primogenito suo"[622]. The Obituaire of Saint-Martin de Séez records the death 30 Jun of "Guillelmus Pontivorum comes"[623]. The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "30 Jun" of "Willelmus comes Talevat"[624].
     "[m firstly ---. The name of Guillaume’s supposed first wife is not known. This first marriage is strongly suggested by the marriage date of Guillaume’s daughter Clémence. She is named in Jul 1128 with her son "Gaufrido primogenito" (see below). The addition of the word "primogenito" suggests that there was at least one other younger child at that date. This would place her marriage in late 1125 at the very latest. It is extremely unlikely, therefore, that she could have born from Guillaume’s marriage to Hélie de Bourgogne, the death of whose first husband is recorded in late Apr 1112. The other indication is the unlikelihood that Hélie de Bourgogne could have had eleven children by her second husband, considering her own estimated birth date.]
     "m [secondly] ([late 1112/1115]) as her second husband, HELIE de Bourgogne, widow of BERTRAND de Toulouse Count of Tripoli, daughter of EUDES I Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his wife Sibylle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and the names of her eldest sons by each marriage[625]. The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[626]. If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias”[627]. "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "…Ela his wife…" by charter dated 1127[628]. "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[629]. "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[630]."
Med Lands cites:
[615] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300.
[616] CP XI 697.
[617] Marmoutier-Perche, 20, p. 32.
[618] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 225.
[619] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[620] Round (1899) 970, p. 346.
[621] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1166, p. 360.
[622] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28.
[623] Obituaire de Saint-Martin de Séez, Bibl.Nat. Ms français 18953, p. 227, quoted in Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28 footnote 3.
[624] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 487.
[625] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI XIII, p. 431.
[626] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738.
[627] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[628] Round (1899) 970, p. 346.
[629] Cîteaux, 113, p. 104.
[630] Ponthieu, I, p. 9.17

; Per Racines et Histoire (Ponthieu): “Guillaume 1er ou II de Ponthieu (III Talvas d’Alençon) ° ~1095 + 29/06/1171 comte de Ponthieu (04/03/1106/1110) et d’Alençon, seigneur de Bellême et de Montgomery (restauré dans ses titres et ses biens normands par le Roi Henry 1er 06/1119 ; reçoit des biens d’Henry II (Alençon, etc.) en 1166) (transfère le Ponthieu à son fils Gui 1126)
     ép. 1) Mathilde ?
     ép. 2) ~1115 Hélie (Alix) Borel de Bourgogne ° ~1080 + dès 28/02/1142 (fille d’Eudes 1er Borel «Le Roux», duc en Bourgogne (1058-1103) et de Sybille de Bourgogne (-comté, 1065-1102) ; veuve de Bertra”.24

; Per Genealogy.EU (Toulouse 1): “H1. [1m.] Cte Bertrand II de Toulouse (1105-12), Ct of Tripoli, *before 1080, +I.1112; 1m: NN; 2m: 16.6.1095 Alix/Ela de Bourgogne (*1080 +1142), dau.of Eudes I Borel, Duke de Bourgogne and Mathilde=Sybille, Dame de Bourgogne”.8

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTRAND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND IV "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse & his first wife --- [de Provence] ([1065]-in Palestine 21 Apr 1112). William of Tyre names him as son of Comte Raymond IV[9]. Caffaro names "Beltramo Çauata…bastardus comitis Raymundi comitis sancti Egidii" when recording that he captured Tripoli[10]. He was regent for his father in Toulouse from Oct 1096, when the latter left for Palestine. He succeeded his father in 1105 as BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse. A series of bulls of Pope Pascal II dated between 15 Apr 1105 and 14 May 1108 reveal that "Bertrannus comes" failed to respect his father's abandonment of rights concerning the altar offerings at the monastery of Saint-Gilles, that he was excommunicated, recanted but attacked the monastery again[11]. After the arrival in Toulouse of his step-mother and infant half-brother, Bertrand left for Palestine in Summer 1108, and swore fidelity to Emperor Alexis I Comnenos at Constantinople. Albert of Aix records that "Bertrannus filius comitis Reimundi" arrived in Tortosa in March, dated to 1109 from the context, and demanded the territories formerly held by his father from Guillem Jordan Comte de Cerdanya[12]. At a council of crusader rulers outside Tripoli in Jun 1109, it was decided that Bertrand should receive Jebail, and Tripoli once it was captured, under the suzerainty of Baudouin I King of Jerusalem, while Guillem Jordan retained Tortosa and Arqa. On the death of either, the other would inherit his lands[13]. Bar Hebræus records that Tripoli was captured "par les Francs" in A.H. 503 (1109/10)[14]. Tripoli finally surrendered 12 Jul 1109, and he was installed as BERTRAND Count of Tripoli, under the suzerainty of the king of Jerusalem. Jebail was given to Ugo Embriaco, the Genoese admiral who had helped Bertrand[15]. Comte Bertrand inherited Tortosa and Arqa on the death of Guillem Jordan shortly after[16]. "Bertrandus…comes Raimundi Sancti Egidii filius" donated property for the soul of "Guillelmi Iordanis consanguinei mei" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem with the consent of "Poncio filio suo", by undated charter[17].
     "m (Jun 1095) as her first husband, HELIE de Bourgogne, daughter of EUDES I Duke of Burgundy & his wife Sibylle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and the names of her eldest sons by each marriage[18]. The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[19]. If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83]. “Bertrannus comes et uxor eius Adelaitz” relinquished claims to “monasterio Sancte Marie quod dicitur Monoasca” in favour of “[abbas] Beati Egidii”, in the presence of "Raimundo comite", by charter dated to "1096 after 12 Jul" in the compilation, signed by "Raimundi comitis, Bertranni et uxoris eius…Petri de Castlar, Ademarii vicecomitis…"[20]. The date does not appear in the document as reproduced, and the basis for the dating is unclear. If the date is correct, Bertrand was already married to Hélie de Bourgogne and "Adelaitz" must be a transcription or other error. If the dating is incorrect, it is possible that Adelais was an earlier wife of Count Bertrand. A bull of Pope Pascal II dated 4 Feb 1107 names "Bertrannus comes" and comments that he had been "propter uxorem abiectam et multiplicata adulteria iamdiu excommunicationi subiectus"[21]. The document gives no more details of these charges, which from the context appear to have been brought some time before the date of the bull, whose main purpose was a threat of further excommunication against Bertrand for having attacked the monastery of Saint-Gilles. She accompanied her husband to Palestine[22]. She married secondly ([1115]) Guillaume [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu. "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[23]."
Med Lands cites:
[9] WT XI.IX, p. 465.
[10] Belgrano, L. T. (ed.) (1891) Annali Genovesi di Caffaro e de´ suoi continuatori, Vol. 1, Fonti per la Storia d´Italia (Genoa), Regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, p. 128.
[11] L'abbé Goiffon (ed.) (1882) Bullaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Gilles (Nîmes) ("Bullaire de Saint-Gilles"), XX, XXIV, XXV, XXVIII, and XXX, pp. 38, 42, 44, 46 and 48.
[12] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XI, Cap. IV, p. 664.
[13] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 68.
[14] Bar Hebræus, RHC Historiens orientaux I, p. 10.
[15] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 69.
[16] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 70.
[17] Rozière, E. de (ed.) (1849) Cartulaire de l'église de Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem (Paris) ("Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem"), 97, p. 190.
[18] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[19] Devic, Dom C., Dom Vaissete, Dulaurier, E. (1875) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738.
[20] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 29, p. 33.
[21] Bullaire de Saint-Gilles XXV, p. 44.
[22] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 561.
[23] Marilier, J. (ed.) (1961) Chartes et documents concernant l'abbaye de Cîteaux 1098-1182 (Rome)113, p. 104.13

Family 1

Bertrand II de Saint Gilles (?) Comte de Toulouse, Count of Tripolis b. c 1067, d. Jan 1112
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 164, de MONTGOMERY 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140290&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#HelieBourgognedied1141. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 108-25, pp. 109-110. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  7. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Helie Borel: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40247&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020163&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sibylle de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120356&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sibylla_of_Burgundy,_Duchess_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand de Saint Gilles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416726&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TRIPOLI.htm#BertrandToulousedied1112
  14. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Comte Bertrand de Toulouse: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40252&tree=1
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I Talvas: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140289&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GuillaumeIPonthieudied1171B
  18. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Comte Guillaume Talvas de Ponthieu: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14686&tree=1
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helie_of_Burgundy
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hélène de Bourgogne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9l%C3%A8ne_de_Bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  22. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I3018
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Ponthieu, & Montreuil, Saint-Pol, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ponthieu.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ponce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161624&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand de Saint Gilles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00416726&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Ponthieu: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175553&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140290&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026914&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#JeanIAlencondied1091B
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#Eladied1174
  32. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 108-26, p. 110.

Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil.1,2,3,4

M, #4750, b. circa 1095, d. 30 June 1171
FatherRobert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes5,6,2,1,3,4 b. c 1056, d. a 8 May 1130
MotherAgnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu7,8,1,2,3,4 d. bt 1100 - 1103
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited12 Dec 2020
     Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil. married Mathilde ? (?);
His 1st (?) wife.3 Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil. was born circa 1095 at Ellington, Lincolnshire, England; Genealogics says b. ca 1095; Geneagraphie says b. 1100.2,4 He married Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Eudes I Borel (?) Duc de Bourgogne and Sibylle de Bourgogne Duchess of Burgundy, between 1112 and 1115;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.9,2,3,4,10,11,12,13
Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil. died on 30 June 1171; Genealogics says d. ca Jun 1172; Med Lands, Geneagraphie, Boyer and Weis say d. 30 June 1171.11,14,2,3,4
     ; Per Weis:
     "Hélie (Elal, Alix) of Burgundy, b. 1080, d. 28 Feb. 1142, m. (1) 1095, Bertrand, Count of Toulouse, d. 1112;m. (2) abt. 1115, William I (III) Talvas, Count of Alençon & Ponthieu, d. 30 June 1171, son of Robert de Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, Seigneur of Bellême, Domfront and Alençon, bapt. Sées 1056, d. 8 May, aft. 1130, by his wife, Agnes, liv. 1100, dau. of Guy I, d. 1100, Count of Ponthieu and Montreuil. (CP XI:689, 696-697, XII(1):497; ES II/20, III:4/635, 638; Anselme III:289-292, 299).“.11
; Per Med Lands:
     "HELIE de Bourgogne ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and names her eldest son by each marriage[236]. The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[237]. If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83]. A bull of Pope Pascal II dated 4 Feb 1107 names "Bertrannus comes" and comments that he had been "propter uxorem abiectam et multiplicata adulteria iamdiu excommunicationi subiectus"[238]. The document gives no more details of these charges, which from the context appear to have been brought some time before the date of the bull, whose main purpose was a threat of further excommunication against Bertrand for having attacked the monastery of Saint-Gilles. She accompanied her husband to Palestine[239]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias”[240]. "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[241].
     "m firstly (Jun 1095) as his second wife, BERTRAND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND IV "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse & his first wife --- [de Provence] ([1065]-in Palestine 21 Apr 1112). Regent for his father in Toulouse from Oct 1096, when the latter left for Palestine. He succeeded his father in 1105 as BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse. He conquered Tripoli 12 Jun 1109, declaring himself BERTRAND Count of Tripoli.
     "m secondly ([late 1112/1115]) [as his second wife,] GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT [II] Comte d'Alençon Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès Ctss de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171, bur La Hoguette, Calvados, église abbatiale de Saint-André)."
Med Lands cites:
[236] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.
[237] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn., Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738.
[238] Bullaire de Saint-Gilles, XXV, p. 44.
[239] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 561.
[240] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[241] Cîteaux, 113, p. 104.12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 9): “C3. Hélie, *1080, +28.2.1142; 1m: VI.1095 Cte Bertrand de Toulouse (+1112); 2m: ca 1115 Guillaume, Cte d'Alençon”.15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 638.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.



Geneagraphie cites: Royal Ancestors of Some American Families, Michel L. Call, (printed by the author, 1991 , Repository: Mid-Continent Library Genealogy Reference section, Independence, MO), chart 11355 (Reliability: 0).2

; This is the same person as ”William III, Count of Ponthieu” at Wikipedia and as ”Guillaume Ier de Ponthieu” at Wikipédia (FR).16,17

; Per Genealogics:
     “Guillaume was born about 1095, the son of Robert de Bellême, 3rd earl of Shropshire and of Shrewsbury, and Agnès de Ponthieu. About 1115 he married Hélie de Bourgogne, widow of Bertrand de Saint Gilles, comte de Toulouse, Count of Tripolis, and daughter of Eudes I, duc de Bourgogne, and Sibylle de Bourgogne. They had five children of whom two sons and two daughters would have progeny.
     “Guillaume assumed the county of Ponthieu some time before 1111, upon the death of his mother. His father escaped capture at the battle of Tinchebrai in 1106. In 1112, as envoy for King Louis of France, he went to the English court. However he was arrested by King Henry I over past conspiracies to depose Henry and to free Henry's brother Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy, and he was never released from prison. Guillaume was driven by this to oppose Henry, who seized certain of Guillaume's castles in Normandy.
     “Guillaume died on 20 June 1172.”.2 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-24.18 Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil. was also known as Guillaume III Talvas Comte d'Alencon et de Ponthieu.19 Guillaume I 'Talvas' (?) Comte de Alençon. Duc de Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu & Montreuil. was also known as William III Talvas Comte d'Alencon et de Ponthieu.14,19

; Per Boyer: William Talvas, Count of Ponthieu, died 30 June 1171.
     “
He married Ela of Burgundy (daughter of Eudes Borel, Duke of Burgundy, by Maud, sister of William Testard, Count of Burgundy), widow of Bertrand, Count of Toulouse.
On 4 March 1105/6 He and his father confirmed to the Abbey of Marmontier all their possessions in Ponthieu and elsewhere, without using the title of Count, but in 1110 or 111 as Count of Ponthieu he made a gift to the Abbey of Cluny. In June 1119 Henry I restored to him his father's lands in Normandy. He resigned Ponthieu to his son Guy about 1126, certainly before 17 Oct. 1129, but retained the title. When Henry I confiscated his Norman lands in 1135, William Talvas joined Geoffrey Plantagenet.
His nickname, "Talvas," was given to him by Orderic and Robert de Torigny; but he did not use it. His ancestor of the first house of Bellême had used the nickname earlier, and his great-grandson, William II, Count of Ponthieu, used it later.
Children:
i. Guy, 1. 1129.
ii. Ela, d. 10 Oct. 1174; m. (1) William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey, m. (2) in or before 1152 Patrick d'Evereux de Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury, who was slain c. April 1168,
“.14

; Per Racines et Histoire (Ponthieu): “Guillaume 1er ou II de Ponthieu (III Talvas d’Alençon) ° ~1095 + 29/06/1171 comte de Ponthieu (04/03/1106/1110) et d’Alençon, seigneur de Bellême et de Montgomery (restauré dans ses titres et ses biens normands par le Roi Henry 1er 06/1119 ; reçoit des biens d’Henry II (Alençon, etc.) en 1166) (transfère le Ponthieu à son fils Gui 1126)
     ép. 1) Mathilde ?
     ép. 2) ~1115 Hélie (Alix) Borel de Bourgogne ° ~1080 + dès 28/02/1142 (fille d’Eudes 1er Borel «Le Roux», duc en Bourgogne (1058-1103) et de Sybille de Bourgogne (-comté, 1065-1102) ; veuve de Bertra”.20

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême" Seigneur d'Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu, Earl of Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171). Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum” as the son of “Rodbertum Belesmensem” and his wife “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem”[615]. He succeeded his father [4 Mar 1106/1110][616] as Comte de Ponthieu. "Wilelmus comes Pontivi" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême to Marmoutier by charter dated to [1112/14][617]. Henry I King of England restored Comte Guillaume to his father's lands in Normandy in Jun 1119[618]. He resigned Ponthieu [before 1129] in favour of his son Guy: Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “filiorum primogenitus Wido” was made “patre vivente...comes Pontivi”[619]. "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "his predecessors earl Roger and Mabel his wife, count Guy and Adda his wife, his father Robert de Belesmo and his mother Agnes and…Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[620]. Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[621]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes nepos suus…ex Guidone primogenito suo"[622]. The Obituaire of Saint-Martin de Séez records the death 30 Jun of "Guillelmus Pontivorum comes"[623]. The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "30 Jun" of "Willelmus comes Talevat"[624].
     "[m firstly ---. The name of Guillaume’s supposed first wife is not known. This first marriage is strongly suggested by the marriage date of Guillaume’s daughter Clémence. She is named in Jul 1128 with her son "Gaufrido primogenito" (see below). The addition of the word "primogenito" suggests that there was at least one other younger child at that date. This would place her marriage in late 1125 at the very latest. It is extremely unlikely, therefore, that she could have born from Guillaume’s marriage to Hélie de Bourgogne, the death of whose first husband is recorded in late Apr 1112. The other indication is the unlikelihood that Hélie de Bourgogne could have had eleven children by her second husband, considering her own estimated birth date.]
     "m [secondly] ([late 1112/1115]) as her second husband, HELIE de Bourgogne, widow of BERTRAND de Toulouse Count of Tripoli, daughter of EUDES I Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his wife Sibylle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and the names of her eldest sons by each marriage[625]. The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[626]. If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias”[627]. "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "…Ela his wife…" by charter dated 1127[628]. "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[629]. "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[630]."
Med Lands cites:
[615] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300.
[616] CP XI 697.
[617] Marmoutier-Perche, 20, p. 32.
[618] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 225.
[619] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[620] Round (1899) 970, p. 346.
[621] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1166, p. 360.
[622] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28.
[623] Obituaire de Saint-Martin de Séez, Bibl.Nat. Ms français 18953, p. 227, quoted in Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28 footnote 3.
[624] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 487.
[625] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI XIII, p. 431.
[626] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738.
[627] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311.
[628] Round (1899) 970, p. 346.
[629] Cîteaux, 113, p. 104.
[630] Ponthieu, I, p. 9.3

Family 1

Mathilde ? (?)

Family 2

Hélie/Alice/Ela (?) de Bourgogne b. 1080, d. 28 Feb 1142
Children

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de BOUBERS, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I Talvas: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140289&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GuillaumeIPonthieudied1171B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Guillaume Talvas de Ponthieu: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14686&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bellême: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177486&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#RobertMontgommerydied1131
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf, p. 2.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177487&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140290&tree=LEO
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 108-25, pp. 109-110. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#HelieBourgognedied1141
  13. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Helie Borel: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40247&tree=1
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 164, de MONTGOMERY 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III,_Count_of_Ponthieu. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Guillaume Ier de Ponthieu: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Ier_de_Ponthieu. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Ponthieu, & Montreuil, Saint-Pol, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ponthieu.pdf
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175553&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#ClemencePonthieuMJuhaelMayenne
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026914&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#JeanIAlencondied1091B
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#Eladied1174
  26. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 108-26, p. 110.

Adeliza (Alice) Fitz Richard de Clare1

F, #4751
FatherRichard fitz Gilbert de Clare Lord of Clare and Tonbridge2,3 b. b 1100, d. 15 Apr 1136
MotherAlice/Adeliza (?) of Chester2
Last Edited28 Apr 2006
     Adeliza (Alice) Fitz Richard de Clare married Cadwallader (?)4
     ; weis 161-24.

Family

Cadwallader (?)

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 52, de CLARE 7:iv
    p. 194, de PERCY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027603&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 52, de CLARE 7:iv.

Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare1,2

M, #4752, b. before 1035, d. circa 1090
FatherGilbert (Giselbert) I Crispin (?) Comte de Brionne, Comte d'Eu3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 979, d. Mar 1040
MotherGunnora (?) d'Anjou9,2 b. c 1000
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited13 Mar 2020
     Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare was born before 1035 at Brionne, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France (now); Find a Grave says b. 30 Oct 1030.3,2,8,10 He married Rohese Giffard, daughter of Gauthier Giffard Seigneur de Longueville and Ermengarde Flaitel, in 1054.2,11,8,7,12,10
Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare was buried circa 1090 at St. Neots Priory, St. Neots, Huntingdonshire district, Cambridgeshire, Haute-Normandie, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     30 Oct 1030, Brionne, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     DEATH     15 Mar 1091 (aged 60), St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
[Text copied from Wikipedia entry]
     Family Members
     Parents
          Gilbert de Brionne 1000–1040
     Spouse
          Rohese De Giffard De Clare 1034–1118
     Siblings
          Baldwin de Brionne 1022–1090
          Emma De Crispin De Conde 1030 – unknown
     Children
          Gilbert De Clare 1055–1117
          Rohese FitzRichard 1060–1121
          Richard fitz Richard de Clare 1062–1107
          Robert FitzRichard De Clare 1064–1136
          Walter De Clare 1075–1138
     BURIAL     St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 24 Apr 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 89091104.10
Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare died circa 1090 at St. Neots, Huntingdonshire district, Cambridgeshire, England (now); Find a Grave says d. 15 Mar 1091.13,1,2,8,10
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: "Richard FitzGilbert de Tonbridge ° avant 1035 + fin 04/1090 seigneur de Bienfaite et d’Orbec, Lord de Clare et de Tonbridge, reçoit 176 seigneuries en Angleterre (Suffolk, Clare et Kent), Régent d’Angleterre (1075), réfugié en Flandres après le meurtre de son père
     ép. Rohaise Giffard + après 1113 (fille de Walter (Gautier) 1er Giffard, seigneur de Longueville, et d’Ermengarde.)7" He was Seigneur of Bienfaite and Orbec at Normandy, France.14

; RICHARD Fitz GILBERT, also known as de BIENFAITE (from the quantity of his fiefs), de CLARE or de TONBRIDGE (from actual fiefs); b by 1035; went with his cousin WILLIAM I THE CONQUEROR to England and was granted 176 Lordships, 95 of them associated with the Honour (feudal unit of administration) of Clare, Suffolk, and others with Tonbridge, Kent; m Rohese, dau of Walter Giffard the er, and d c 1090.3 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; After their father's assassination, [Richard] and his brother Baldwin fled to the court of Baldwin V de Lille, Count of Flanders, but William the Conqueror restored them to Normandy...Richard served with William de Warenne as regent of England in 1075. Clare is now a small parish on the River Stour in Suffolk. It had been a frontier town of the Kingdom of East Anglia and contains a castle of which considerable remains exist.1 Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare was also known as Richard de Brionne Lord of Clare and Tonbridge.15,8

; weis AR 184-2.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Richard fitz Gilbert (before 1035–c.?1090) was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and was styled "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and of "Tonbridge"[n 1][1] from his holdings.[2][3]
Biography
     "He was the son of Gilbert, Count of Brionne in Normandy[2] (fitz was a variant spelling of filz > French fils, that means "son"). Gilbert was a guardian of the young duke William and when he was killed by Ralph de Wacy in 1040, his two older sons Richard and Gilbert fled to Flanders.[4] On his later return to Normandy Richard was rewarded with the lordship of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy.[4] In 1066, Richard came into England with his kinsman William the Conqueror, and received from him great advancement in honour and possessions.[2]
     "The Dictionary of National Biography and other sources are vague and sometimes contradictory about when the name de Clare came into common usage, but what we do know is that Richard fitz Gilbert (of Tonbridge), the earliest identifiable progenitor of the family, is once referred to as Richard of Clare in the Suffolk return of the Domesday Book.[5]
Rewards
     "He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard fitz Gilbert received the lordship of Clare, in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.[6] He was thus Lord of Clare. Some contemporaneous and later sources called him Earl of Clare, though many modern sources view the title as a "styled title".
     "He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.
Rebel baron
     "On the Conqueror's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain, and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.[7]
Death and succession
     "He was buried in St. Neot's Priory in 1091. His widow was still living in 1113. His lands were inherited by his son, Gilbert fitz Richard.
Marriage
     "Richard married Rohese Giffard, daughter of Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville and Agnes Flaitel,[3] and they had at least the following children:
** Roger fitz Richard de Clare, received Norman lands and d. 1131, apparently without issue.[3]
** Gilbert fitz Richard, d. 1115, succeeded his father as Earl of Clare.[3]
** Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent, d. 1138.[3]
** Isabel de Clare, d. 1088, m. Humphrey d'Isle.[3]
** Richard fitz Richard de Clare, Abbot of Ely.[3]
** Robert fitz Richard,[3] Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard, d. 1136.[8]
** Alice (or Adeliza) de Clare, d. 1138. m. Walter Tirel.[3][9]
** Rohese de Clare, d. 1121, m. (ca. 1088), Eudo Dapifer.[3]
** Godfrey

Notes and references
Notes
1. Seen in the Domesday book variously as ""de Tonebridge/Tonebrige/Tonbridge"
References
1. Domesday Map website - image of Betchworth's entry and transcription in summary Archived 2014-09-24 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 2012-10-30 Normally de Tonebridge in Surrey
2. G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. III (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1913), p. 242
3. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 156
4. J.H. Round, 'The Family of Clare', The Archaeological Journal, Vol. 56 2nd series Vol 6 (1899), p. 224
5. The Suffolk return of the Domesday Survey (c. 1086) (ed. A. Rumble, Suffolk, 2 vols (Chichester, 1986), 67 ~ 1)
6. The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal ancestors of 300 American Families By Michel L. Call ISBN 1-933194-22-7 (chart 1696)
7. A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217–1314 by Michael Altschul (Baltimore, Johns Hopkins, 1965)
8. I.J. Sanders, English Baronies; A Study of their Origin and descent 1086-1327 (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1963), p. 129
9. C. Warren Hollister, 'The Strange Death of William Rufus', Speculum, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Oct., 1973), pp. 645-46."16

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, FitzWalter Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Wake Family Page.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106208&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#GeoffreyBrionnedied1015B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I42033
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Richard FitzGilbert (30 Oct 1030–15 Mar 1091), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89091104, citing St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89091104/richard-fitzgilbert. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rohese Giffard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106211&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Rohese De Giffard De Clare (1034–1118), Find A Grave Memorial no. 159273740, citing St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK (contributor 48673746), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/159273740/rohese-de_clare
  13. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 210, Figure 6: The earls of the house of Clare, 1138-1230.
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-25, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_fitz_Gilbert. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:iii.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478461&tree=LEO
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:iv.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478462&tree=LEO
  21. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:viii.
  22. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:ix.
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#AviceClareMRaoulFougeres
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Avice de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478633&tree=LEO
  25. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:vii.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478463&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286797&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3D-K.htm#RobertFitzRichardClaredied1134
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert FitzRichard de Tonbridge: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030540&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rohais de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313143&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RoheseFitzRichardClaredied1121
  32. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:v.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478465&tree=LEO

Rohese Giffard1,2,3

F, #4753, b. 1034, d. 1118
FatherGauthier Giffard Seigneur de Longueville2,3,4,5 b. c 1030, d. 1084
MotherErmengarde Flaitel6
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited13 Mar 2020
     Rohese Giffard was born in 1034 at Longueville, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France (now).7 She married Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare, son of Gilbert (Giselbert) I Crispin (?) Comte de Brionne, Comte d'Eu and Gunnora (?) d'Anjou, in 1054.2,3,8,9,7,10
Rohese Giffard was buried in 1118 at St. Neots Priory, St. Neots, Huntingdonshire district, Cambridgeshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1034, Longueville, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     1118 (aged 83–84), St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
     Rohese de Giffard was the daughter of Walter Giffard, Seigneur de Longueville (1010-1085) and Agnes Ermentrude Fleitel (1014-1103). She married Richard "fitzGilbert" de Clare (1024-1090) midsummer in 1054 and had eight children by that marriage.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Walter De Giffard 1010–1085
          Agnes Ermentrude Fleitel 1014–1103
     Spouse
          Richard FitzGilbert 1030–1091
     Children
          Gilbert De Clare 1055–1117
          Rohese FitzRichard 1060–1121
          Richard fitz Richard de Clare 1062–1107
          Robert FitzRichard De Clare 1064–1136
          Walter De Clare 1075–1138
     BURIAL     St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 11 Mar 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial 159273740.7
Rohese Giffard died in 1118 at St. Neots, Huntingdonshire district, Cambridgeshire, England (now); Racines et Histoire says d. aft 1113; Find A Grave says d. 1118.2,7
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:156 & date Peter Stewart.3


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Rohese Giffard (sometimes Rose,[1] or Rohais;[2] died after 1113) was a Norman noblewoman in the late 11th and early 12th century.
Early life
     "Giffard was the daughter of Walter Giffard. Her maternal grandfather was Gerard Fleitel.[3] Walter Giffard was the lord of Longueville-sur-Scie in upper Normandy.[2]
Marriage
     "Giffard was the wife of Richard fitzGilbert, the son of Gilbert, Count of Brionne.[3] Domesday Book records him as the eighth richest landowner in England, with lands centered on two locations – lands in Kent and Surrey grouped around Tonbridge and lands in Essex and Suffolk grouped around Clare.[2] Their children were Roger, Gilbert, Walter, Robert, Richard,[4] Godfrey,[2] Rohese (or Rohais), and Adelisa.[4]
     "Roger received the Norman lands after Richard fitzGilbert's death, Gilbert received his father's English lands, Walter was given a Welsh lordship by King Henry I of England, and Robert was given lands around London by King Henry I.[2] Richard became a monk at Bec Abbey and was later abbot of Ely Abbey.[4] The last son, Godfrey, is known only from his burial at Clare.[2] Rohais married Eudo Dapifer and Adelisa married Walter Tirel.[4] A daughter of Richard, who is unnamed, is said to have married Ralph de Fougères, but it is not known whether this refers to another marriage for either Rohais or Adelisa or if this is a third daughter. Some of the children were born before 1066, as a gift to Jumièges Abbey in 1066 mentions the souls of their children.[2]
Landowner
     "Giffard occurs in Domesday Book as a landowner in her own right.[3] Richard died between 1085 and 1087, as his son Gilbert witnesses a charter of King William II of England in that year. Rohese survived him and was still alive in 1113, when she gave a gift to St Neot's Priory which had been founded as a dependent priory of Bec on Rohese's own manor of Eynesbury.[2] Rohese's descendants eventually were the heirs to the lands held by her father,[5] receiving half the honour of Long Crendon in Buckinghamshire in the reign of King Richard I of England (r. 1189–1199).[1]
Citations
1. Sanders English Baronies p. 34
2. Mortimer "Clare, Richard de" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
3. Keats-Rohan Domesday People p. 413
4. Keats-Rohan Domesday People p. 363
5. Cockayne Complete Peerage III p. 242
References
** Cokayne, George E. (1982) [1913]. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant. III (Microprint ed.) Gloucester, UK: A. Sutton. ISBN 0-904387-82-8.
** Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Domesday Book. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-722-X.
** Mortimer, Richard (2004). "Clare, Richard de (1030x35–1087x90)" ((subscription or UK public library membership required)). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5445. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
** Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660."11 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Weis AR 148-25, 184-2.12

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rohese Giffard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106211&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294144&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#ErmengardeFlaitelMWalterGiffard. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Giffard,_Lord_of_Longueville. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Rohese De Giffard De Clare (1034–1118), Find A Grave Memorial no. 159273740, citing St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK (contributor 48673746), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/159273740/rohese-de_clare. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Richard FitzGilbert (30 Oct 1030–15 Mar 1091), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89091104, citing St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89091104/richard-fitzgilbert
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rohese_Giffard
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-25, p. 130; line 184-2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:iii.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478461&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:iv.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478462&tree=LEO
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:viii.
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:ix.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#AviceClareMRaoulFougeres
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Avice de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478633&tree=LEO
  22. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:vii.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478463&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286797&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3D-K.htm#RobertFitzRichardClaredied1134
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert FitzRichard de Tonbridge: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030540&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rohais de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313143&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RoheseFitzRichardClaredied1121
  29. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 51, de CLARE 4:v.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478465&tree=LEO

Alix de Coucy1

F, #4754, b. circa 1219, d. circa 13 October 1283
FatherEnguerrand III de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Cte de Roucy et de Perche2,3,1,4,5 d. 1243
MotherMarie de Montmirail6,1,5
ReferenceEDV23 GKJ21
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Alix de Coucy was born circa 1219.4 She married Arnoul III 'le Vieux' (?) Comte de Guînes, châtelain de Bourbourg, Seigneur d'Ardres, de Tourcoing et d'Alost,, son of Baudoin III de Guines Comte de Guines, Châtelain de Bourbourg and Mahaut de Fiennes.4,1,7,8,9,5
Alix de Coucy died circa 13 October 1283;
ed Lands says d. 13 Oct 1283 or after.5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ARNOUL [III] de Guines (-after Feb 1282). The testament of "Baudewins cuens de Ghisnes et castelains de Broborgh", dated 1244, made gifts "par le creancement Mahaut me femme e Ernol mon fil ainnei e mon hoir"[1316]. He succeeded his father as Comte de Guines. "Arnulphus comes Guinensis" sold "iuris dominii et possessionis habebam…in villis et territoriis de Guinis, de le Montoire, de Tornehem" to Philippe III King of France, while providing for "Aelidis uxor nostra" should she survive him, by charter dated Feb 1282[1317].
     "m ALIX de Coucy, daughter of ENGUERRAND [III] Seigneur de Coucy & his third wife Marie de Montmirail (-13 Oct, 1283 or after). The Lignages de Coucy (written in 1303) records that "la seconde fille de monsieur Enguerrant, qui fist faire le chastel de Coucy…Alix" married "au conte Ernoul de Guignes"[1318]. "Arnulphus comes Guinensis" sold "iuris dominii et possessionis habebam…in villis et territoriis de Guinis, de le Montoire, de Tornehem" to Philippe III King of France, while providing for "Aelidis uxor nostra" should she survive him, by charter dated Feb 1282[1319]. The necrology of Joyenval records the death “13 Oct“ 1354 [which is too late considering the chronology of the family] of "dominæ Aelidis de Coci comitissæ de Guines” and her donation of “1000 librarum in vasis tum argenteis tum aureis”[1320]."
Med Lands cites:
[1316] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 283.
[1317] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 293.
[1318] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 301.
[1319] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 293.
[1320] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Joyenval, p. 303.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Guines): "E1. Cte Arnould III de Guines, +after II.1282/1283; m.Alix de Coucy"


Per Genealogy.EU (de Coucy): "D5. Alix de Coucy, *ca 1219; m.Cte Arnould III de Guines (+1283.)10,11"

; Per Racines et Histoire (Guines): "Arnould III de Guines + après 02/1282/83 comte de Guines, Châtelain de Bourbourg (59), seigneur d’Ardres (62) (vend 02/1282 son comté au roi Philippe III «Le Hardi»)
ép. Alix de Coucy ° 1219 (fille d’Enguerrand III, seigneur de Coucy et de Marie de Montmirail)"


Per Racines et Histoire (de Coucy): "Alix de Coucy ° ~1219 dame de Coucy (1311) et de Sablonnières (77)
ép. Arnould III de Guines, chevalier, comte de Guines (62) et de Namur, seigneur d’Ardres (62), Châtelain de Bourbourg + 1283 (fils de Baudouin III et de Mahaut de Fiennes.)12,13" EDV-23 GKJ-21.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALIX de Coucy (-13 Oct, 1283 or after). The Lignages de Coucy (written in 1303) records that "la seconde fille de monsieur Enguerrant, qui fist faire le chastel de Coucy…Alix" married "au conte Ernoul de Guignes"[170]. "Arnulphus comes Guinensis" sold "iuris dominii et possessionis habebam…in villis et territoriis de Guinis, de le Montoire, de Tornehem" to Philippe III King of France, while providing for "Aelidis uxor nostra" should she survive him, by charter dated Feb 1282[171]. The necrology of Joyenval records the death “13 Oct“ 1354 [which is too late considering the chronology of the family] of "dominæ Aelidis de Coci comitissæ de Guines” and her donation of “1000 librarum in vasis tum argenteis tum aureis”[172].
     "m ARNOUL [III] Comte de Guines, son of BAUDOUIN Comte de Guines & his wife Mathilde de Fiennes (-after Feb 1282). "
Med Lands cites:
[170] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 301.
[171] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 293.
[172] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Joyenval, p. 303.5

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108748&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand III de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164622&tree=LEO
  3. [S1522] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 23 Aug email "Re: Margaret, wife of Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/U3B2iF_lZfQ/m/epGQsqNYtxsJ) to e-mail address, 23 Aug 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 23 Aug 2003."
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#AlixCoucyMArnoulIIIGuines. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Montmirail: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164623&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mabilia de Guines: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121883&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnould III de Guines: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108747&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#ArnoulIIIGuinesdied1282
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Guines Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/guines.html#A3
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Coucy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Guines, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Guines.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, seigneurs de Coucy, Boves & Vervins, Montmirail (alias Montmirel) & Chimay, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Coucy.pdf
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin de Guines: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295188&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Guines page (Guines family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/guines.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand V de Guines, Seigneur de Coucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108743&tree=LEO

Joan Marshal of Pembroke1,2

F, #4755, d. before November 1234
FatherWilliam Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke b. c 1146, d. 14 May 1219
MotherIsabella de Clare Countess of Strigoil b. 1173, d. 1220
ReferenceGAV22
Last Edited12 Apr 2009
     Joan Marshal of Pembroke married Warin de Munchensy Lord of Swanscombe, son of William de Munchensy of Swanscombe, co. Kent and Aveline de Clare of Hereford, after 14 May 1219.3,1,4
Joan Marshal of Pembroke died before November 1234.1,5
     ; weis 80-28. GAV-22 EDV-20 GKJ-23.

Family

Warin de Munchensy Lord of Swanscombe d. c 20 Jul 1255
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 149, MARSHAL 3:x. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 80-28, p. 77. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 175, de MUNCHENSI 3.
  5. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 175, de MUNCHENSI 3:i.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html

Mary (?) of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne1,2,3,4

F, #4756, b. circa 1082, d. 31 May 1116
FatherMáel-Coluim (Malcolm III) mac Donnchada "Canmore") (?) King of Scotland (Alba)5,2,6,7,8,9,10 b. 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093
MotherSaint Margaret (?) Queen of Scotland5,11,2,3,7,8,10,12 b. c 1045, d. 16 Nov 1093
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited3 Dec 2020
     Mary (?) of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne was born circa 1082; Genealogics says b. ca 1082; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 1085.2,7 She married Eustache III (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens, son of Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens and Ida de Lorraine, in 1102.1,5,13,2,14,3,15,16,7,8
Mary (?) of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne died on 31 May 1116; Genealogics says d. 31 May 1116; Med Lands says d. 31 May 1116 or 18 Apr 1118.1,5,2,3,7,8
Mary (?) of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne was buried after 31 May 1116 at Bermondsey Abbey, Bermondsey, London Borough of Southwark, Greater London, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1082, Scotland
     DEATH     31 May 1116 (aged 33–34), England
     Parents
          Malcolm III 1031–1093
          Saint Margaret of Scotland 1045–1093
     Spouse
          Eustace De Boulogne unknown–1125
     Siblings
          Donnchadh Duncan II 1060–1094
          Edward Prince of Scotland 1068–1093
          Edmund of Scotland 1070–1105
          Aethelred of Scotland 1072–1093
          Edgar, King of Scots 1074–1107
          Alexander I, King of Scots 1077–1124
          Matilda Dunkeld 1079–1118
          David I, King of Scots
     BURIAL     Bermondsey Abbey, Bermondsey, London Borough of Southwark, Greater London, England
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 29 Dec 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 82596229.2,7,17
     ; This is the same person as ”Mary of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne” at Wikipedia and as ”Marie d'Écosse (1082-1116)” at Wikipédia (FR).18,4
Mary (?) of Scotland, Countess of Boulogne was educated; Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 314.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7
GAV-25 EDV-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Mary was born about 1082, the younger daughter, youngest of eight children of Malcolm III Canmore, king of Scots, and his second wife Margaret of Wessex.
     “In 1086 when Mary was about four years old, she and her sister Edith were sent by their parents to Romsey, where their maternal aunt Christina was abbess. The two girls spent their early life at the convent, where they received their education.
     “Mary left the convent in 1096. In 1100 Edith married Henry I, king of England, and after her marriage changed her first name to Matilda, in honour to her mother-in-law. Matilda wanted Mary also to marry, so Henry I married her in 1102 to Eustace III, comte de Boulogne et de Lens, son of Eustace II, comte de Boulogne, and Ida de Lorraine. The marriage lasted for fourteen years but only produced a daughter Matilda, who became countess of Boulogne after the death of her father. She would marry Stephen de Blois, king of England, and have progeny.
     “Mary died in 1116, nine years before her husband.”.7

; Per Weis: “Eustace III, d. aft 1125, Count of Boulogne and Lens, Crusader, m. 1102, Mary (Marie) of Scotland, d. 18 Apr. 1118, dau of Malcolm III Canmore (170-21) ane Margaret (1-2), dau. of Edward, the Atheling (1-20) by Agatha of Kiev.”.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARY (-31 May 1116 or 18 Apr 1118, bur Bermondsey Priory). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Mary and her sister Eadgyth to be brought up by their maternal aunt Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[404]. Florence of Worcester records that Henry I King of England arranged the marriage of "Mariam reginæ sororem" and "Eustatio Bononensium comiti" in [1102][405]. Her marriage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her daughter[406]. The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Eustachius, frater Balduini regis Iheruslame" married "Mariam filiam regis Scotiæ"[407]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum records the death "II Kal Jun" in 1116 of "Maria…comitissa" and her burial "apud Bermundseiam"[408]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Mary countess of Bouillon" died in "the third year before her sister’s death"[409].
     "m (1102) EUSTACHE [III] Comte de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [II] "Gernobadatus" Comte de Boulogne and Lens & his second wife Ida of Lotharingia (-after 1125)."
Med Lands cites:
[404] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[405] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 51.
[406] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 275.
[407] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, p. 301.
[408] Skene (1867), XVI, Chronicle of the Scots 1165, Cronica Regum Scottorum, p. 132.
[409] John of Fordun (Skene), Book V, XXIX, p. 219.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Boulogne): “B2. Cte Eustache III de Boulogne et de Lens, went on the First Crusade, +after 1125; m.1101/02 Marie of Scotland (+1115-18)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “C11. [2m.] Mary, *ca 1085, +London 31.5.1115/16, bur Abbey of St.Saviour, Bermondsey; m.1101/02 Cte Eustace III de Boulogne-sur-Mer (+after 1125)”.20,21

; Per Racines et Histoire (Boulogne): “Eustache III de Boulogne + 1125 ou peu après (retiré au Monastère Clunisien de Rumilly en 1125) comte de Boulogne (1087) et de Lens, croisé avec ses frères sous la bannière de Robert II, comte de Flandres (Constantinople, 1097 ; Palestine, 1099) désigné comme son successeur par son frère Baudouin 1er, Roi de Jérusalem (1118 mais pris de vitesse par Baudouin de Bourg) (cité charte de donation à SaintBertin en mémoire de son père datée de 1122 ; charte de donation à Cluny 1125)
     ép. 1102 Mary d’Ecosse + 31/05/1116 ou 18/04/1118 (fille de Malcolm III «Caenmore» ou «Bighead», Roi d’Ecosse, et de (Sainte) Margaret d’Angleterre)”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "EUSTACHE [III] de Boulogne (-1125 or after). His parentage is specified in his donation to Saint-Bertin dated 1122, for the souls of "Eustacii comitis patris mei et Yde matris mee comitisse"[472]. He is not named as one of her sons by "Ida comitisse Boloniensis" in the latter's charter for the soul of her husband[473]. William of Tyre records him as brother of Godefroi and Baudouin, naming him last of the three[474]. It is not known whether this indicates that he was the youngest of the three brothers, or was simply a reflection of his less significant role in affairs in Palestine. His inheritance of the paternal possessions and titles suggests that he was the oldest brother, at any rate older than his brother Baudouin. He succeeded as Comte de Boulogne, Comte de Lens. This would normally be an indication of his seniority in the family. However, given the superior position of his brother Godefroi as Duke of Lower Lotharingia, it may have been decided that the less important paternal inheritance would pass to a younger son. He was a member of the company of Robert II Count of Flanders on the First Crusade, joining his brothers after arriving in Constantinople in 1097[475]. Albert of Aix records the arrival in Constantinople of "Robertus Normannorum comes, Stephanus Blesensis, Eustachius frater prædicti Ducis", dated to early 1097 from the context[476]. In Palestine in 1099, he returned to Boulogne soon after. "Eustacius Bolonie comes" confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Samer by charter dated Jul 1112, subscribed by "Cononis de Fieules, Eustacii et Rogerii filiorum eius…"[477]. Albert of Aix records that Baudouin appointed "fratri Eustachio" as his successor on his deathbed if he would come to Jerusalem, or if he failed to come "Baldewinus de Burg"[478]. A legation left Jerusalem for Boulogne in Apr 1118 to invite him to succeed. Eustache left Boulogne for Jerusalem, but when he reached Apulia he received news that Baudouin du Bourg had been chosen as king. He refused to press his claim further, and retired to the Cluniac monastery at Rumilly in [1125]. "Eustachius olim comes Boloniensis nunc autem…monachus Cluniacensis" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 1125 which names "Maria uxore mea…[et] Mathildi filia mea", and is subscribed by "Stephani comitis Bolonie, Matildis comitisse"[479].
     "m (1102) MARY of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his second wife [St] Margaret of England (-31 May 1116 or 18 Apr 1118, bur Bermondsey Priory). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Mary and her sister Eadgyth to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[480]. Florence of Worcester records that Henry I King of England arranged the marriage of "Mariam reginæ sororem" and "Eustatio Bononensium comiti" in [1102][481]. Her marriage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her daughter[482]. The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Eustachius, frater Balduini regis Iheruslame" married "Mariam filiam regis Scotiæ"[483]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum records the death "II Kal Jun" in 1116 of "Maria…comitissa" and her burial "apud Bermundseiam"[484]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Mary countess of Bouillon" died in "the third year before her sister’s death"[485]."
Med Lands cites:
[472] Saint-Bertin II.17, 1122, p. 229.
[473] Saint-Bertin II.16, p. 227.
[474] William of Tyre I. XVII, p. 45.
[475] Murray (2000), p. 58.
[476] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXI, p. 314.
[477] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), II, p. 112.
[478] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XXVIII, p. 707.
[479] Cluny, Tome V, 3984, p. 340.
[480] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[481] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Tome II, p. 51.
[482] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 275.
[483] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, p. 301.
[484] Skene (1867), XVI, Chronicle of the Scots 1165, Cronica Regum Scottorum, p. 132.
[485] John of Fordun, Book V, XXIX, p. 219.16

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 226, SCOTLAND 23:x. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_of_Scotland,_Countess_of_Boulogne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison comtale de Boulogne, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary of Scotland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012364&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Marydied11161118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Máel Coluim mac Donnchada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002904&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#MalcolmIIIdied1093B
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Malcolm III Canmore: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002904&tree=LEO&PHPSESSID=4a6f1218fb877cf1c08e71441357136e
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Margaret of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002905&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page (Counts of Boulogne sur Mer): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  14. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eustace III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012363&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#EustacheIIIdied1125
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 28 July 2020), memorial page for Mary “Princess of Scotland” Canmore (1082–31 May 1116), Find a Grave Memorial no. 82596229, citing Bermondsey Abbey, Bermondsey, London Borough of Southwark, Greater London, England; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/82596229. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Marie d'Écosse (1082-1116): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_d%27%C3%89cosse_(1082-1116). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), p. 152, Line 158-23. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Counts of Boulogne sur Mer (Boulogne): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#MM3
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page ("TCounts of Boulogne sur Mer"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html#ME3
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 5.
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 5.

Philippe I (?) King of France1,2,3

M, #4757, b. before 23 May 1052, d. 29 July 1108
FatherHenri I (?) King of France4,3,5,6,7,8 b. 1006, d. 4 Aug 1060
MotherAnna Agnesa Yaroslavna (?) Grand Duchess of Kiev, Regent of France4,3,7,8 b. 1036, d. 5 Sep 1075
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Philippe I (?) King of France was born before 23 May 1052 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France.9,4,3,7,8 He and Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia were engaged between 1055 and 1059.8 Philippe I (?) King of France married Bertha (?) van Holland, daughter of Floris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland and Gertrude (?) von Sachsen, in 1071/72 at France;
His 1st wife.9,4,3,10,11,12,7,8 Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertha (?) van Holland were divorced in 1092.4,3,10,11,12,7,8 Philippe I (?) King of France married Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs, daughter of Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury and Agnès d'Évreux, on 15 May 1092 at France;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd (illegal) husband;
Per The Henry Project: "...she was carried off in 1092 by king Philippe I of France, who married her (illegally, as she was still married to Fulk). After years of disputes with the church, which included putting France under an interdict, Philippe finally agreed to have no relations with Bertrade, in 1104. Bertrade continued to use the title of queen, but retired to a monastery after Philippe's death in 1108."4,3,13,14,7,8,15,16,17 Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs were divorced in 1104.3
Philippe I (?) King of France died on 29 July 1108 at Meulan, Seine-Et-Marne, France.13,2,4,3,7,8
Philippe I (?) King of France was buried after 29 July 1108 at Abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     23 May 1052, Champagne-et-Fontaine, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France
     DEATH     29 Jul 1108 (aged 56), Melun, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     Capetian King of the Franks or Francia, King of France, Philip I of France, Philip the the Amorous. Son of Henry I, King of the Franks and Anne of Kiev, Grandson of Robert II, King of the Franks and Constance or Arles, Yaroslav I the Wise, Grand Prince of Kiev and Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden.
     Philip was the husband of Bertha, the daughter of Floris I, Count of Holland and Gertrude of Saxony, daughter of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony. They married in 1072 and produced five children:
* Constance, wife of Hugh of Champagne & Bohemund of Antioch
* Louis VI, King of the Franks
* Henry b 1083, died young
* Charles b 1085
* Odo 1087-1096

     Philip repudiated Bertha based on the fact she was too fat, and married a lady he had fallen in love with, Bertrade de Montfort, the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux, and the wife of Count Fulk IV of Anjou. They were married 15 May 1092, even though they both had living spouses, and had three children:
* Philip, Count of Mantes
* Fleury, Seigneur of Nangis
* Cecile of France, wife of Tancred, Prince of Galilee & Pons of Tripoli

     Despite being French, a Frank, and a Capetian line dating back to the Carolingians, Philip's mother chose a Greek name for her son. Phillip, as his ancestors, ruled for an unusual length of time for his era. Philip's father died in 1060 when Philip was still a youth, and crowned at the age of seven. His mother acted as regent as the first Frankish queen, until he was fourteen. Baldwin VI of Flanders assisted her in her duties until he died in 1070, at which point Flanders was taken by Robert Frisian. Baldwin's wife received help from Philip who defeated Robert at the Battle of Cassel in 1071. Philip was excommunicated in 1094 by Hugh, the Archbishop of Lyon, and again by Pope Urban II in 1095 for his second marriage. Phillip made peace with William the Conqueror in 1077, allowing Phillip to annex Vexin, and take Bourges in 1100. When the role started for the First Crusade, Phillip refrained due to his conflicts with the pope over his wife, and sent his brother, Hugh of Vermandois in his stead. Phillip died at the castle of Meulan, and her his request, was buried at the monastery of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire – instead of at St Denis with his ancestors. Phillip was succeeded by his son, Louis VI, but not without other contestants.
     Historian Abbot Suger wrote the following regarding Phillip's last days. "King Philip daily grew feebler. For after he had abducted the Countess of Anjou, he could achieve nothing worthy of the royal dignity; consumed by desire for the lady he had seized, he gave himself up entirely to the satisfaction of his passion. So he lost interest in the affairs of state and, relaxing too much, took no care for his body, well-made and handsome though it was. The only thing that maintained the strength of the state was the fear and love felt for his son and successor. When he was almost sixty, he ceased to be king, breathing his last breath at the castle of Melun-sur-Seine, in the presence of the [future king] Louis... They carried the body in a great procession to the noble monastery of St-Benoît-sur-Loire, where King Philip wished to be buried; there are those who say they heard from his own mouth that he deliberately chose not to be buried among his royal ancestors in the church of St. Denis because he had not treated that church as well as they had, and because among so many noble kings his own tomb would not have counted for much." Bio by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henri I 1008–1060
          Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna 1036–1075
     Spouses
          Bertha of Holland 1055–1093
          Bertrade de Montfort 1070–1117
     Siblings
          Hugues I de Vermandois 1057–1101
     Children
          Constance of France, Princess of Antioch 1078–1126
          Louis VI 1081–1137
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France
     Maintained by: Plantagenet Princess
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 14 Jun 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 53676134.2,3,18
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 14.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961.7


; Per Genealogics:
     “Philippe was the son of Henri I, king of France and Anna of Kiev. At age twenty, Philippe married Bertha of Holland, the stepdaughter of his first cousin, the count of Flanders. This marriage had been arranged to seal the reconciliation between the king and his first cousin. After six years Bertha had a daughter Constance, who was not the hoped for heir. Arnoul, a holy hermit of Saint-Médard in Soissons who was always consulted on family problems, prayed for them; however, it took another three years before the heir, the future King Louis VI, was born. Three more sons followed him.
     “Twenty years after the marriage, Philippe imprisoned Bertha in comfort in the château at Montreuil-sur-Mer. He then wed the still married Bertrade de Montfort l'Amauri, wife of the count of Anjou, and they produced four children. It is lost in time whether she seduced him or he her, but most likely Philippe had an understanding with the count of Anjou. In any case Bertrade was more than willing, as she did not want to be 'sent away like a whore', as her husband had done to her predecessors.
     “Philippe's remarriage caused a sensation but not disapproval. The only one who caused problems was Yves, bishop of Chartres, who had been appointed by Pope Urban II without consultation, which had been resented by Philippe.
     “The king invited all bishops to his second wedding but Yves declined, referring to Philippe as committing bigamy. Although Philippe had married with the blessing of the archbishop of Reims as well as the Papal legate, Yves wrote to the pope who then forbade the bishops to crown Bertrade and told Philippe to cease all relations with her or be excommunicated.
     “When his first wife Bertha died, Philippe gathered two archbishops and eight bishops in Reims who all confirmed the royal second marriage. The pope also put pressure on the womanising count of Anjou who then obediently complained about the king committing adultery with his wife. In 1096 Philippe pretended to have broken with Bertrade and his excommunication was lifted.
     “When it became obvious in 1099 that Bertrade was still with Philippe, the excommunication was renewed. It took until 1105 before peace was restored, and from then Philippe and Bertrade remained together until Philippe died in 1108.”.7 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-26.

; This is the same person as:
”Philip I of France” at Wikipedia and as
”Philippe Ier (roi des Francs)” at Wikipédia (Fr.)19,20

Reference: Weis [1992:97] Line 101-23.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “D1. King PHILIPPE I of France (1060-1108) cr 1059, *1053, +Meulan 29.7.1108, bur Abbaye St.Benoit-sur-Loire; 1m: 1072 (repudiated 1092) Bertha of Holland (*ca 1055, +1094); 2m: 15.5.1092 (separated 1104) Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury (+14.2.1117)”.21

; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[292]). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[293]. Orderic Vitalis names "Philippum et Hugonem Magnum Crispeii comitem" as the children of "Henricus…Francorum rex" and his wife "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[294]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[295]. He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims: the Hugonis Floriacensis Actum records the consecration in 1058 of “rex...Henricus...Philippum filium suum duodennum” at “Remis a Gervasio archiepiscopo”, in the presence of “duo Nicholai papæ legati, Hugo...Bisunciensis archiepiscopus et Hermenfredus Sedunensis episcopus”[296]. His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who later became regent until 1066/67. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France. The Bertholdi Annales record in 1060 the death of “Heinricus Galliarum rex” and the succession of “filius eius Philippus adhuc puer regnum cum matre gubernandum suscepit”[297]. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims. Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[298]. King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[299]. In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[300]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[301]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[302].
     "Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[303]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted.
     "m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 15 Oct 1094). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[304]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[305]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[306]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[307]. She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[308]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Victor records the death "Id Oct" of "Berta mater Ludovici regis"[309]. Clarius’s Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1094 of “Berta regina, quæ a rege Philippo prius fuerat derelicta”[310].
     "m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines). Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus”[311]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[312]. William of Tyre records this marriage[313]. Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[314]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[315]. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[316]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][317]. "
Med Lands cites:
[292] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[293] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[294] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[295] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.
[296] Hugonis Floriacensis Modernorum Regum Francorum Actus, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[297] Bertholdi Annales, 1060, MGH SS Tome V, p. 271.
[298] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70.
[299] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1.
[300] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[301] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.
[302] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.
[303] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[304] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[305] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.
[306] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[307] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[308] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71.
[309] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Victor, p. 593.
[310] Duru, L. M. (1863) Bibliothèque historique de l’Yonne (Auxerre, Paris), Tome II, Chronicon Sancti-Petri-Vivi Senonensis auctore Clario, p. 512.
[311] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386.
[312] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.
[313] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 606.
[314] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107.
[315] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.
[316] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.
[317] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHA of Holland ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 15 Oct 1094). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[361]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[362]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[363]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[364]. Her husband sent her to Montreuil after repudiating her. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Victor records the death "Id Oct" of "Berta mater Ludovici regis"[365]. Clarius’s Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1094 of “Berta regina, quæ a rege Philippo prius fuerat derelicta”[366].
     "m (1072, repudiated 1092) as his first wife, PHILIPPE I King of France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire)."
Med Lands cites:
[361] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[362] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 45, p. 85.
[363] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.
[364] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[365] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Victor, p. 593.
[366] Duru, L. M. (1863) Bibliothèque historique de l’Yonne (Auxerre, Paris), Tome II, Chronicon Sancti-Petri-Vivi Senonensis auctore Clario, p. 512.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 1): “D5. Bertha, *ca 1055, +Montreuil-sur-Mer 1094; m.1072 King Philippe I of France (*1053 +29.7.1108), who repudiated her 1092”.22
; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTRADE de Montfort (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Remy-l’Honoré, Yvelines). Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[511]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe whom he abducted from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[512]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus”[513]. William of Tyre records this marriage[514]. Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[515]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[516]. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[517]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][518].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced [15 May 1092]) as his fifth wife, FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou, son of GEOFFROY II Comte de Gâtinais, Seigneur de Château-Landon & his wife Ermengarde d'Anjou (1043-14 Apr 1109).
     "m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) bigamously as his second wife, PHILIPPE I King of France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). King Philippe I was excommunicated by Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun 16 Oct 1094 for this bigamous second marriage. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104."
Med Lands cites:
[511] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167.
[512] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS XIII, p. 257.
[513] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386.
[514] William of Tyre, XIV.I, p. 606.
[515] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 107.
[516] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.
[517] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.
[518] Fontevraud, Tome I, 156, p. 142.16

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montfort L'Amaury): “3) Bertrade de Montfort ° 1059/60 ou 1074? + 14/02/1117 (Fontevrault)
ép.1) 1089 Foulques IV “Le Réchin”, comte d’Anjou °~1043 + 14/04/1109 [ séparés 15/05/1092 ] (fils de Geoffroi II, comte de Gâtinais, seigneur de Château-Landon, et d’Ermengarde d’Anjou)
ép. 2) 15/05/1093 (excommuniés le 16/10/1094 puis leur mariage admis le 02/12/1104 par l’Eglise) Philippe 1er, Roi de France ° avant 23/05/1052/53 (Melun) + 29-30/07/1108 (Meulan) (fils d’Henri 1er et d’Anna Iaroslavna de Kiev)”.23
; Per Genealogy.EU (Montfort): “B3. [2m.] Bertrade, *ca 1059, +as a nun at Fontevrault 14.2.1117; 1m: 1089 (annulled 1089) Ct Foulques IV of Anjou (*1043, +14.4.1109); 2m: 15.5.1092 King Philippe I of France (+29.7.1108)”.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96]). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[403]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[404]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[405]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[406]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name "Iudite"[407]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[408]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[409]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[410].
     "[Betrothed ([1055/59]) to PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[411]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.]
     "m firstly (betrothed 1059, early 1063) SALOMON King of Hungary, son of ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-killed in battle 1087).
     "m secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102)."
Med Land cites:
[403] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[404] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[405] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[406] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[407] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[408] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[409] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[410] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 319.
[411] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.25
He was King of the Franks between 4 August 1060 and 29 July 1108.2,4,3,20,19

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia b. 1047, d. bt 1093 - 1095

Family 3

Bertha (?) van Holland b. bt 1054 - 1055, d. 15 Oct 1094
Children

Family 4

Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury Comtesse d'Anjou, Reine des Francs b. bt 1059 - 1061, d. 14 Feb 1117
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-23, p. 97. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007645&tree=LEOi. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Berthadied1093
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/bertr000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  14. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Bertrade de Montfort: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=82970. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#BertradeMontfortdied1115
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Simon I de Montfort l'Amaury: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/simon000.htm
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 19 June 2020), memorial page for Philip I of France (23 May 1052–29 Jul 1108), Find a Grave Memorial no. 53676134, citing Abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France; Maintained by Plantagenet Princess (contributor 49922906), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53676134. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_I_of_France
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Philippe Ier (roi des Francs): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippe_Ier_(roi_des_Francs). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#P1
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html#W1
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montfort (act. -L’Amaury), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montfort.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfort family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/montfort.html#BS2
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#JudithMariaM1SalomonHungaryM2WladyslawI.
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Princes d’Antioche (Maison de Poitiers), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080250&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Constancedied1126
  31. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-24, p. 96.
  32. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 3.

Bertha (?) van Holland1,2,3

F, #4758, b. between 1054 and 1055, d. 15 October 1094
FatherFloris (Florent) I (?) Graaf van Holland4,2,3,5,6,7 b. c 1017, d. 28 Jun 1061
MotherGertrude (?) von Sachsen2,3,5,7,8 b. c 1028, d. 4 Aug 1113
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited31 Jul 2020
     Bertha (?) van Holland was born between 1054 and 1055 at Vlaardingen, Vlaardingen Municipality, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands; Genealogics says b. 1055; Med lands says b. 1058.9,1,2,3,5 She married Philippe I (?) King of France, son of Henri I (?) King of France and Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna (?) Grand Duchess of Kiev, Regent of France, in 1071/72 at France;
His 1st wife.9,4,10,2,3,5,11,12 Bertha (?) van Holland and Philippe I (?) King of France were divorced in 1092.4,10,2,3,5,11,12
Bertha (?) van Holland died on 15 October 1094 at Montreuil-Sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts-de-France, France (now).1,13,4,2,3,5
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “D1. King PHILIPPE I of France (1060-1108) cr 1059, *1053, +Meulan 29.7.1108, bur Abbaye St.Benoit-sur-Loire; 1m: 1072 (repudiated 1092) Bertha of Holland (*ca 1055, +1094); 2m: 15.5.1092 (separated 1104) Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury (+14.2.1117)”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[292]). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[293]. Orderic Vitalis names "Philippum et Hugonem Magnum Crispeii comitem" as the children of "Henricus…Francorum rex" and his wife "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[294]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[295]. He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims: the Hugonis Floriacensis Actum records the consecration in 1058 of “rex...Henricus...Philippum filium suum duodennum” at “Remis a Gervasio archiepiscopo”, in the presence of “duo Nicholai papæ legati, Hugo...Bisunciensis archiepiscopus et Hermenfredus Sedunensis episcopus”[296]. His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who later became regent until 1066/67. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France. The Bertholdi Annales record in 1060 the death of “Heinricus Galliarum rex” and the succession of “filius eius Philippus adhuc puer regnum cum matre gubernandum suscepit”[297]. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims. Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[298]. King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[299]. In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[300]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[301]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[302].
     "Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[303]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted.
     "m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 15 Oct 1094). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[304]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[305]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[306]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[307]. She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[308]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Victor records the death "Id Oct" of "Berta mater Ludovici regis"[309]. Clarius’s Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1094 of “Berta regina, quæ a rege Philippo prius fuerat derelicta”[310].
     "m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines). Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus”[311]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[312]. William of Tyre records this marriage[313]. Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[314]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[315]. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[316]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][317]. "
Med Lands cites:
[292] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[293] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[294] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[295] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.
[296] Hugonis Floriacensis Modernorum Regum Francorum Actus, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[297] Bertholdi Annales, 1060, MGH SS Tome V, p. 271.
[298] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70.
[299] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1.
[300] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[301] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.
[302] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.
[303] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[304] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[305] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.
[306] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[307] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[308] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71.
[309] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Victor, p. 593.
[310] Duru, L. M. (1863) Bibliothèque historique de l’Yonne (Auxerre, Paris), Tome II, Chronicon Sancti-Petri-Vivi Senonensis auctore Clario, p. 512.
[311] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386.
[312] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.
[313] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 606.
[314] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107.
[315] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.
[316] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.
[317] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142.12


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: 12.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia
.3

; Per Genealogics:
     “Daughter of Floris I, count of Holland and Gertrud of Saxony, Bertha was born in 1055. After her father died in 1061, her mother married Robert I 'the Friesian', Graaf van Vlaanderen. In 1072 her stepfather concluded a peace treaty with Philippe I, king of France. As part of its terms Bertha was married to Philippe that year. Nine years passed before Bertha produced the desired son and heir, Louis (the future King Louis VI). Reportedly her fertility was only restored thanks to the prayers of a hermit, Arnoul, who also named the child. Berthe and Philippe had three more sons, but only Louis and their first-born Constance would have progeny.
     “In 1092 Philippe repudiated Bertha, alleging that she was too fat. He confined her in great comfort in the fortress of Montreuil-sur-Mer, and married Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury, still married to Foulques IV 'Rechin', comte d'Anjou. Bertha died in 1093. Despite being excommunicated for a time, Philippe remained with Bertrade until his death in 1108.”.3

; This is the same person as:
”Bertha of Holland” at Wikipedia and as
”Berthe de Hollande” at Wikipédia (Fr.)15,16

Reference: Weis [1992:97] Line 101-23.1 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-26.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Holland 1): “D5. Bertha, *ca 1055, +Montreuil-sur-Mer 1094; m.1072 King Philippe I of France (*1053 +29.7.1108), who repudiated her 1092”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHA of Holland ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 15 Oct 1094). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[361]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[362]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[363]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[364]. Her husband sent her to Montreuil after repudiating her. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Victor records the death "Id Oct" of "Berta mater Ludovici regis"[365]. Clarius’s Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1094 of “Berta regina, quæ a rege Philippo prius fuerat derelicta”[366].
     "m (1072, repudiated 1092) as his first wife, PHILIPPE I King of France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire)."
Med Lands cites:
[361] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[362] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 45, p. 85.
[363] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.
[364] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[365] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Victor, p. 593.
[366] Duru, L. M. (1863) Bibliothèque historique de l’Yonne (Auxerre, Paris), Tome II, Chronicon Sancti-Petri-Vivi Senonensis auctore Clario, p. 512.5

Family

Philippe I (?) King of France b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-23, p. 97. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#Berthadied1093. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Floris I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018662&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#FlorisIdied1061
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018661&tree=LEO
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B
  13. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#P1
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Holland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Berthe de Hollande: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berthe_de_Hollande. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Holland 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/holland/holland1.html#W1
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080250&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Constancedied1126
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-24, p. 96.

Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France1,2,3,4,5

F, #4759, b. circa 1092, d. 18 August 1154
FatherUmberto II "il Rinforzato" (?) Count of Maurienne, Aosta & Savoy, Margrave of Turin2,6,3,4,7 b. c 1070, d. 18 Sep 1103
MotherGisela (?) Countess of Burgundy-Ivrea2,3,4,8 b. c 1075, d. a 1133
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited3 Oct 2020
     Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France was born circa 1092 at Savoie, France.4,3 She married Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France, son of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertha (?) van Holland, circa April 1115 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now); her 1st husband, his 2nd wife; Leo van de Pas says m. April 1115.9,10,6,11,3,4,12,5 Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France married Mattieu I de Montmorency Baron de Montmorency, son of Bouchard III/IV de Montmorency seigneur de Montmorency, Marly, Ecouen, Verneuil, Saint-Brice, Epinay et Hérouville and Agnes de Beaumont Dame de Conflans, in 1141; her 2nd husband.13,3,4 Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France and Mattieu I de Montmorency Baron de Montmorency were divorced.14
Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France died on 18 August 1154; Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1 page) says d. 18 Nov. 1154; Leo van de Pas says d. 18 Nov. 1154; Wikipedia says d. 18 Nov. 1154; Weis [1992:105-6] says d. 1 Aug 1154.15,3,4,16
Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France was buried after 18 November 1154 at l'église Saint-Pierre de Montmartre, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1092
     DEATH     18 Nov 1154 (aged 61–62)
     Royalty. She was born around 1092 as the daughter of Humbert II, Count of Maurienne and Marquis of Savoy and his wife Gisela of Burgundy. She became the second wife of Louis VI in 1115 and bore him eight children, including Louis VII and Pierre of whom the Latin emperors of Constantinople descended.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Humbert II of Savoy 1065–1103
     Spouse
          Louis VI 1081–1137
     Siblings
          Amadeus de Savoy 1092–1148
     Children
          Philippe de France 1116–1131
          King Louis VII 1120–1180
          Henry of France 1121–1175
          Robert I de Dreux 1123–1188
          Peter I of France 1126–1183
          Philippe de France 1133–1161
     BURIAL     l'église Saint-Pierre de Montmartre, aris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Apr 2009
     Find A Grave Memorial 36523021.17
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide of Savoy (or Adelaide of Maurienne) (Italian: Adelaide di Savoia or Adelasia di Moriana, French: Adélaïde or Alix or Adèle de Maurienne)[1] (1092 – 18 November 1154) was, by birth, a member of the House of Savoy. She was the second spouse, but first queen consort, of Louis VI of France (1115-1137). After Louis' death, Adelaide was married to Matthew I of Montmorency.
Family
     "Adelaide was the daughter of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, daughter of William I of Burgundy.[2] Adelaide's older brother, Amadeus III of Savoy succeeded their father as count of Savoy in 1103.[3] Adelaide had the same name as her paternal great-grandmother Adelaide of Turin, ruler of the mark of Turin, and her second cousin, Adelaide del Vasto, queen of Jerusalem.[4] Through her father, Adelaide was also related to the German emperor, Henry V. On her mother's side, Adelaide's relatives included: her uncle, Pope Callixtus II, who visited Adelaide at court in France, and her first cousin, Alfonso VII of León and Castile.[5]
Queen of France
     "Adelaide became the second wife of Louis VI of France, whom she married on 3 August 1115 in Paris, France.[6] They had nine children, the second of whom became Louis VII of France.
     "Adelaide was one of the most politically active of all France's medieval queens.[7] Her name appears on 45 royal charters from the reign of Louis VI.[8] During her tenure as queen, royal charters were dated with both her regnal year and that of the king.[9] Among many other religious benefactions, she and Louis founded the monastery of St Peter's (Ste Pierre) at Montmartre, in the northern suburbs of Paris.[10]
Queen dowager and second marriage
     "After Louis VI's death, Adelaide did not immediately retire to conventual life, as did most widowed queens of the time. Instead she married Matthieu I of Montmorency,[11] with whom she had one child. She remained active in the French court and in religious activities.
Death
     "In 1153 she retired to the abbey of Montmartre, which she had founded with Louis VII. She died there on 18 November 1154.[11] She was buried in the cemetery of the Church of St. Pierre at Montmartre. The abbey was destroyed during the French Revolution, but Adelaide's tomb is still visible in the church of St Pierre.[12]
Seventeenth century legend
Adelaide is one of two queens in a legend related in the seventeenth century by William Dugdale. As the story goes, Queen Adélaide of France became enamoured of a young knight, William d'Albini, at a joust. But he was already engaged to Adeliza of Louvain and refused to become her lover. The jealous Adélaide lured him into the clutches of a hungry lion, but William ripped out the beast's tongue with his bare hands and thus killed it. This story is almost without a doubt apocryphal.[13]
Issue
     "Louis and Adelaide had seven sons and two daughters:
1. Philip of France (1116–1131).
2. Louis VII (1120 – 18 November 1180), King of France.
3. Henry (1121–1175), Archbishop of Reims.
4. Hugues (b. c. 1122).
5. Robert (c. 1123–11 October 1188), Count of Dreux.
6. Constance (c. 1124–16 August 1176), married first Eustace IV, Count of Boulogne and then Raymond V of Toulouse.
7. Philip (1125–1161), Bishop of Paris. Not to be confused with his elder brother.
8. Peter (c. 1125–1183), married Elizabeth, Lady of Courtenay.
9. a daughter, whose name is not known, who died in infancy and was interred at the Abbey of Saint-Victor, Paris.

     "With Matthieu I of Montmorency, Adelaide had one daughter:
10. Adèle (or Aelis or Alix) of Montmorency.
Notes
1. Micheline Dupuy, Françaises, reines d'Angleterre, 1968, p. 374.
2. Previte-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy, pp. 276-277; Germain, Personnages illustres des Savoie, p. 370.
3. Previte-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy p. 278.
4. Ripart, 'La tradition d'Adélaïde'.
5. Thiele, Erzählende genealogische Stammtafeln, table 397.
6. Mary Stroll, Calixtus the Second, 1119-1124, (Brill, 2004), 192; Lewis, 'La date'.
7. Facinger, 'Study of Medieval Queenship'.
8. Huneycutt, 'Creation of a Crone,' p. 28.
9. Facinger, 'Study of Medieval Queenship', pp. 28-9.
10. Huneycutt, 'Creation of a Crone,' p. 30.
11. Adelaide of Savoy, John Bell Henneman, Jr., Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, ed. William W. Kibler and Grover A. Zinn, (Routledge, 1995), 7.
12. Nolan, 'Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne'.
13. Huneycutt, 'Creation of a Crone', pp. 27-8.
Sources
** Kathleen Nolan, 'The Queen’s Body and Institutional Memory: The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne,' in Elizabeth Valdez del Alamo and Carolo Stamatis Pendergast, eds., Memory and the Medieval Tomb (Brookfield, Aldershot, 2000), pp. 249-267.
** Nolan, Kathleen D. Capetian Women (Palgrave MacMillan, 2004).
** Kathleen Nolan, 'The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne and the Visual Imagery of Capetian Queenship,' in Kathleen Nolan, ed., Capetian Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004), pp. 45-76.
** Lois L. Huneycutt, 'The Creation of a Crone: The Historical Reputation of Adelaide of Maurienne,' in Kathleen Nolan, ed., Capetian Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004), pp. 27-43.
** Facinger, Marion F. 'A Study of Medieval Queenship: Capetian France, 987–1237,' Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History 5 (1968): 3–48.
** A. Thiele, Erzählende genealogische Stammtafeln zur europäischen Geschichte Band II, Teilband 2 Europäische Kaiser-, Königs- und Fürstenhäuser II Nord-, Ost- und Südeuropa
** Laurent Ripart, 'La tradition d’Adélaïde dans la maison de Savoie,' in Adélaïde de Bourgogne, genèse et représentations d’une sainteté impériale (Actes du colloque international du Centre d’études médiévales, Auxerre, 10-11 décembre 1999), ed. P. Corbet - M. Goullet - D. Iogna-Prat (Dijon, 2002), pp. 55-77.
** Andrew W. Lewis, 'La date du mariage de Louis VI et d'Adelaïde de Maurienne', Bibliothèque de l'École des chartes 148 (1990), 5-16.
Michel Germain, Personnages illustres des Savoie (Autre Vue, 2007).
** C.W. Previte-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy (Cambridge University Press, 1912)."16

GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-25.

; Per Genealogcis:
     "Adèle was born about 1092, the daughter of Umberto II, comte de Savoie, and Gisela de Bourgogne, and niece of Pope Calixtus II, who once visited her court in France. Her father died in 1103, and her mother married Raniero, marchese de Monferrato as her second husband.
     "On 3 August 1115 she became the second wife of Louis VI, king of France, son of Philippe I, king of France, and Bertha of Holland. They had seven sons and one daughter, of whom three sons and their daughter Constance would have progeny. Their second son would become Louis VII of France. Adèle was one of the most politically active of all France's medieval queens consort. Her name appears on 45 royal charters from the reign of Louis VI. During her tenure as queen, royal charters were dated with both her regnal year and that of the king. Among many other religious benefactions, she and Louis founded the Abbey of St. Pierre at Montmartre, in the northern suburbs of Paris. She was reputed to be 'ugly', but attentive and pious.
     "After Louis VI's death, Adèle did not immediately retire to convent life, as did most widowed queens of the time. Instead she married Matthieu I de Montmorency, connetable de France, son of Bouchard IV, sire de Montmorency, and Agnès de Beaumont, dame de Conflans. She remained active in the French court and in religious activities.
     "Adèle is one of two queens in a legend related by William Dugdale. As the story goes, Queen Adèle became enamoured of a young knight, Guillaume d'Albini, at a joust. But he was already engaged to Adeliza of Louvain, queen widow of England, and refused to become her lover. The jealous Adèle lured him into the clutches of a hungry lion, but Guillaume ripped out the beast's tongue with his bare hands and killed it. This story is certainly apocryphal.
     "In 1153 she retired to the Abbey of St. Pierre at Montmartre, which she had founded with Louis VII. She died there on 18 November 1154. She was buried in the cemetery of the abbey church, but her tomb was destroyed during the Revolution."4

; Adelaide, *ca 1092, +18.11.1154; 1m: Paris 25/30.4.1115 King Louis VI of France (*1081 +1.8.1137); 2m: 1141 (separated) Mathieu I de Montmorency (+after 1.8.1160.)19

Reference: Genealogcis cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961 12.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:11.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4
Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France was also known as Adèle/Adelaide de Savoie, Countess of Savoy, Queen of France.16,4

; weis 101-24.2 She was Queen consort of France between 1115 and 1137.16

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-24, p. 97. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIdied1137B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 06 December 2019), memorial page for Humbert II of Savoy (1065–14 Oct 1103), Find A Grave Memorial no. 168025027, citing Cathédrale Saint-Pierre, Moutiers, Departement de la Savoie, Rhône-Alpes, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/168025027/humbert_ii-of_savoy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026532&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, lin 101-24, p. 97.
  10. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 64: says marriage "about 1120". Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xxiii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Morency 1 page - Montmorency family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/morency/morency1.html
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 117-24, pp. 105-6.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Maurienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 November 2019), memorial page for Adelaide of Savoy (1092–18 Nov 1154), Find A Grave Memorial no. 36523021, citing l'église Saint-Pierre de Montmartre, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078). at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/36523021/adelaide-of_savoy
  18. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-25, p. 97.
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000211&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIIdied1180B
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baudément.pdf, p. 2.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013794&tree=LEO
  26. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 135-26, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#RobertIDreuxdied1188B
  28. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1

Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France1,2,3,4

M, #4760, b. 1120, d. 18 September 1180
FatherLouis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France2,5,3,4,6,7,8 b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137
MotherAdelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France2,5,3,9,10,7,8 b. c 1092, d. 18 Aug 1154
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France was born in 1120 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).1,5,11,4,7,12,8 He married Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou, daughter of Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine, on 22 July 1137 at Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France;
His 1st wife.13,14,5,3,7,12,8 Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France and Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou were divorced on 21 March 1152; Genealogy.EU says div. 21 March 1152.15,5,13,3,16,10,8 Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France married Doña Constance (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of France, daughter of Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia and Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona, before 18 November 1153 at Orléans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France;
His 2nd wife; Louda & Macalagan says m. 1154. Genealogics says m. ca 1153.2,17,3,18,7,12,19,20,8 Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France married Adelaide (Alix, Adèle, Ala) de Blois Countess of Champagne, daughter of Thibaud (Theobald) IV «Le Grand» ou « Le Vieux» de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Meaux et Troyes, comte de Champagne and Mathilde (Maud) (?) von Sponheim, of Carinthia, on 13 November 1160;
His 3rd wife; Genealogy.EU (Capet 4 page) say m. 13 Nov. 1160; Genealogics says m. 3 Nov 1160; Wikipedia says m. 13 Nov 1160.2,5,21,3,7,12,22,10,8
Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France died on 18 September 1180 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.7,1,5,12,10,8
Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France was buried after 18 September 1180 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1120, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     18 Sep 1180 (aged 59–60), Saint-Pont, Departement de l'Allier, Auvergne, France
     King of France. He was reinterred in 1817 to St Denis Basilique.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis VI 1081–1137
          Adelaide of Savoy 1092–1154
     Spouses
          Constance de Castille 1141–1160
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1123–1204
          Adèle de Blois-Champagne 1140–1206
     Siblings
          Philippe de France 1116–1131
          Henry of France 1121–1175
          Robert I de Dreux 1123–1188
          Peter I of France 1126–1183
          Philippe de France 1133–1161
     Children
          Marie de Champagne 1145–1198
          Alix Capet 1150 – unknown
          Marguerite Capet Árpád 1157–1198
          Adélaïde Capet 1160–1160
          AdèLe De France De Ponthieu 1160–1213
          Philippe II Augustus of France 1165–1223
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21090.23
     ; This is the same person as:
”Louis VII of France” at Wikipedia and as
”Louis VII le Jeune” at Wikipédia (Fr.)12,24

Reference: Weis [1992:97] Line 101-25.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Louis was born in 1120, the son of Louis VI 'the Fat', king of France, and Adèle of Savoie. In 1131, at the age of eleven, he was anointed as his father's successor; and when his father died in 1137 he became sole ruler of France. In the same year he married Eleanore de Poitou, duchess of Aquitaine, so extending the Capetingian lands to the Pyrenees. Louis and Eleanore had three children of whom a son was still born and two daughters would have progeny.
     "He continued his father's program of appointing trustworthy people of lower origin to the administration of his government, so improving the prestige of the monarchy. From 1141 to 1143 he was involved in a fruitless conflict with Thibaut, count of Champagne, and with the papacy. After this period his relations with the popes improved to such an extent that he supported Pope Alexander II against Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa and even allowed the pope refuge in France.
     "In 1163 the construction began of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. It would take until 1235 before it was finished.
     "The main threats to his kingdom came from Geoffrey, count of Anjou, and later from Geoffrey's son, the future Henry II, king of England. When Louis VII went on crusade he took his wife with him. However, on their return he divorced her, the grounds officially being consanguinity, but the reasons were her rumoured affairs. Almost immediately she married King Henry II of England, taking Aquitaine with her. Louis VII then married Constance of Castile, with whom he had two daughters of whom Alix would have progeny. When Constance died he married Alix de Champagne who became the mother of his son and heir, the future King Philippe II August.
     "Louis VII might have defeated King Henry II had he made a concerted attack instead of the half-hearted attacks on Normandy; at the same time France was spared attacks from the Anglo-Normans because of their internal quarrels. Louis also benefited from the long-standing quarrel between Henry II and Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, and from a revolt by Henry's sons."7

Reference: Genealogiics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 14.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser . yr 1961.7
GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau[427], transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[428]. He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother in 1131. Consecrated associate-king 25 Oct 1131, Notre-Dame de Reims, he received effective power from his father 28 Oct 1135, due to the latter's ill health. He succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France. Duke of Aquitaine, by right of his first wife, 8 Aug 1137 at Bordeaux. He declared war against Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, who was fighting Raoul Comte de Vermandois, laid siege to and captured Vitry, where he signed a peace treaty in 1143. After the fall of Edessa in 1146, Pope Eugenius III addressed a bull to Louis VII 1 Dec 1145 urging a new crusade[429]. The king assembled his army at Metz 15 Jun 1147 and arrived in Constantinople 4 Oct 1147. He left the government of France in the hands of Suger Abbé de Saint-Denis, his brother Henri Archbishop of Reims and his cousin Raoul Comte de Vermandois. Although the crusade failed in its aim of capturing Damascus end-Jul 1148, Louis VII gained prestige as the first western king to lead a crusading army. After leaving Palestine in Summer 1149, he landed in Calabria where he discussed launching a new crusade with Roger II King of Sicily and Pope Eugenius III aimed at taking vengeance on Byzantium, but the scheme was later dropped for lack of support from Konrad III King of Germany who had entered an alliance with Emperor Manuel I[430]. The king arrived back in Paris end-1149. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1180 that “Ludovicus rex Francorum” was buried “aput abbatiam Barbel quam ædificavit”[431]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "XV Kal Oct" of "rex Ludovicus pius" and his burial "abbatiam Cisterciensis ordinis de Sancto Portu…Barbel"[432]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Oct" of "Ludovicus rex"[433].
     "m firstly (Bordeaux, Cathedral of Saint-André 22 Jul 1137, annulled for reasons of consanguinity Château de Beaugency 21 Mar 1152) as her first husband, ELEONORE Dss of Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou] & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[434]. She succeeded her father 9 Apr 1137 as Dss of Aquitaine Ctss de Saintonge, Angoûmois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux & Agen. She left France with her husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[435]. She married secondly (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) Henri Comte d'Anjou et du Maine Duke of Normandy, who succeeded in 1153 as Henry II King of England. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[436].
     "m secondly (Cathedral of Sainte Croix, Orléans ([Jan/Jul] 1154) Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VII King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona ([1138]-6 Oct 1160, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). This second marriage of King Louis is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who calls her father "Aldefonsi regis Hispaniæ cuius regni caput civitas est Tholetum"[437]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam", specifying that "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia) married "Ludovico Regi Francorum"[438]. She was consecrated queen in 1154 at Orléans, église Sainte-Croix. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter[439]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1160 the death of “regina Francorum” in childbirth[440]. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “regina Francorum filia Athelfunsi imperatoris Hispaniarum” died while giving birth to a daughter who survived (“incolumi filia”)[441]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Oct" of "Constantia regina filia regis Hispanie"[442].
     "m thirdly (Paris, Cathedral of Notre-Dame 13 Nov 1160) ALIX de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT IV “le Grand” Comte de Blois, Comte de Troyes/Champagne & his wife Mathilde von Sponheim [Carinthia] ([1140]-Paris 4 or 13 Jun 1206, bur Pontigny, Yonne, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne). William of Tyre names her as "Ala filia Theobaldi senioris" when recording her marriage[443]. The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Alam sororem…Henrici comitis Campanensis" as the wife of "Ludovicus rex"[444]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Adela Francorum regina" as the youngest of the six daughters of "comes Campanie Theobaldus", and in a later passage names "filia comitis Theobaldi…Adala" as mother of the wife of Alexios Komnenos[445]. She was anointed queen after her marriage in Notre-Dame de Paris. Regent of France for her son King Philippe II Jun-Dec 1191, during his absence abroad. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1206…Non Iun" of "Adela regina Francorum mater regis Philippi"[446]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Jun" of "Ala Francorum regina, mater Philippi regis"[447]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1206 of "la reine Adèle, mère de Philippe roi de France" at Paris and her burial "en Bourgogne, à Pontion"[448].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of the mistress of King Louis VII is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[427] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1180, p. 315.
[428] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[429] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 248.
[430] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 286-7.
[431] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 517.
[432] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 857.
[433] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 326.
[434] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841.
[435] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 262.
[436] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 166.
[437] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1155, p. 210.
[438] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[439] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329.
[440] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[441] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532.
[442] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.
[443] William of Tyre XXII.IV, p. 1068.
[444] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 515.
[445] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152 and 1164, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 841 and 848.
[446] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1206, MGH SS XXIII, p. 886.
[447] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 319.
[448] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis, Collection des Mémoires relatifs à l'histoire de France (Paris) (“Guillaume de Nangis”), p. 94.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “F3. [2m.] King LOUIS VII "le Jeune" of France (1137-80) cr 1131, Duc de Aquitaine (1137-80), *1120, +Paris 18.9.1180, bur Notre Dame, Barbeaux nr Fontainebleau; 1m: Bordeaux 22.7.1137 (div 1152) Aliénor d'Aquitaine (*1122 +31.3.1204); 2m: Orleans 1153/54 Constance of Castile (*1140 +4.10.1160); 3m: 13.11.1160 Alix de Blois (*1140 +4.6.1206)”.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Castilla ([1138]-6 Oct 1160, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam", specifying that "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia) married "Ludovico Regi Francorum"[685]. The second marriage of King Louis is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who calls his wife daughter of "Aldefonsi regis Hispaniæ cuius regni caput civitas est Tholetum"[686]. She was consecrated Queen Consort in 1154 at Orléans, église Sainte-Croix. She died in childbirth. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1160 the death of “regina Francorum” in childbirth[687]. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “regina Francorum filia Athelfunsi imperatoris Hispaniarum” died while giving birth to a daughter who survived (“incolumi filia”)[688]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Oct" of "Constantia regina filia regis Hispanie"[689].
     "m (Cathedral of Sainte Croix, Orléans [Jan/Jul] 1154) as his second wife, LOUIS VII King of France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his [second] wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau, transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). "
Med Lands cites:
[685] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[686] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1155, p. 210.
[687] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[688] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532.
[689] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.20


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “B7. Infta Constanza, *1141, +4.10.1160, bur Saint Denis; m.Orleans before 18.11.1153 King Louis VII of France (*1120 +1180)”.25

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "LOUIS VII (the Young). Pious and therefore popular with the clergy. He remained under the influence of Suger until the latter's death in 1151. A papal interdict on the royal lands, resulting from Louis's insistence on his feudal rights, led to intervention by Bernard of Clairvaux.
     "1147: Louis inspired the Second Crusade. He induced the German king, Conrad III, and Bernard of Clairvaux to join him, and, leaving the kingdom in the hands of Suger, he set out for the east. He returned (1149) beaten, humiliated, and estranged from his wife, Eleanor, who had accompanied him. The marriage was annulled (1152), probably due to lack of a male heir. This step cost the Capetians the territories of Poitou, Guienne, and Gascony, for Eleanor at once married Henry, duke of Normandy, who in 1151 had succeeded his father as count of Anjou, Maine, and Touraine. The acquisition of Eleanor's domains made Henry master of more than half of France and put him in a position to bring pressure on the holdings of the king of France both from the north and the south. When Henry in 1154 became king of England, the so-called Angevin Empire extended roughly from the Tweed to the Pyrenees.
     "1147-1149: The Second Crusade. Bernard of Clairvaux, persuaded by Pope Eugenius III, preached (1145) the Second Crusade. Conrad III and King Louis VII of France took the Cross. To avoid conflicts, the two monarchs went by separate routes; there never was coherent direction or unity of command. The Norman Roger of Sicily took advantage of the Second Crusade to seize the Greek islands and to attack Athens, Thebes, and Corinth. Nothing of importance was achieved by the Second Crusade, and the movement was discredited throughout Europe.
     "1165-1170: Louis supported Thomas Becket [>] against Henry II of England and was saved from Henry's wrath only through the mediation of the pope, Alexander III, a refugee in France against whom the Emperor Frederick had raised an antipope. It was in Louis's interest to support the anti-imperial party, because of the emperor's pressure upon Burgundy."26 He was Duc d'Aquitaine between 25 July 1137 and 21 March 1152.11,12,24 He was King of the Franks between 1 August 1137 and 18 September 1180.27,2,5,3,12,24

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
Children

Family 3

Doña Constance (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of France b. bt 1138 - 1140, d. 4 Oct 1160
Children

Family 4

Adelaide (Alix, Adèle, Ala) de Blois Countess of Champagne b. c 1140, d. 4 Jun 1206
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 64. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-25, p. 97. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VI 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000211&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIIdied1180B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_VII_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  14. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  16. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.3. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  17. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014170&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Constanzadied1160MLouisVIIFrance
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adela_of_Champagne
  23. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 31 October 2019), memorial page for King Louis VII (1120–18 Sep 1180), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21090, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21090/king_louis_vii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  24. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Louis VII le Jeune: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_VII_le_Jeune. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  26. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 199-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  27. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Mariedied1198
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003840&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Alixdiedafter1195
  31. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.4.
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Margueritedied1197
  33. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.5.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014171&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Alixdiedafter1200MGuillaumeIIIPonthieu
  36. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-26, p. 97.

Elizabeth de Courtenay1

F, #4761, b. circa 1135, d. after 14 September 1205
FatherRenaud de Courtenay Lord of Courtenay1,2 b. c 1125, d. Oct-Dec 1190
MotherHawise/Hedwige du Donjon b. c 1113, d. bt 1151 - 1208
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited9 Aug 2020
     Elizabeth de Courtenay was born circa 1135 at Courtenay, Galinois, France; Genealogy.EU (Capet 7 page) say b. 1127.1,2 She married Pierre I Constantinople (?) Seigneur de Courtenay, de Tanlay, de Champignelles, etc., son of Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France and Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France, after 1150 at France; Genealogy.EU (Capet 7 page) say m. 1150/55.1,3,2
Elizabeth de Courtenay died after 14 September 1205 at France.4,1,2
     ; weis 107-25.5

; Elizabeth; m c 1150 Peter/Pierre de Courtenay (took his w's name and the arms of Courtenay, viz. or three roundlets gules (to which his descendants sometimes added an escutcheon of France), and d 1183), 7th s of LOUIS VI OF FRANCE, and d in or after 1205, having had, with other issue (including Eustachie, m William, 2nd s of Erard II Count of Brienne, see BEAUMONT, Bt; and Alice, m Aymer, Count of Angoulême, and had issue; see GREY, B.3 GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-24. Elizabeth de Courtenay was also known as Elizabeth de Joinville Dame de Courtenay.2

; Elizabeth de Joinville, Dame de Courtenay (*Courtenay 1127, +after 14.9.1205) dau.of Renaud de Courtenay.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 107-25, p. 100. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre II de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004821&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20EMPERORS.htm#PierreIEmpdied1219B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 117-26, p. 106.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix|Alice de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007616&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#Alixdied1218
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de Courtenay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00197605&tree=LEO

Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle1,2,3,4,5

M, #4762, b. circa 1123, d. 11 October 1188
FatherLouis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France2,3,6,4,7,5 b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137
MotherAdelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France2,8,3,4,7,5 b. c 1092, d. 18 Aug 1154
ReferenceEDV25 GKJ24
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle was born circa 1123; Weis and Genealogics say b. ca 1123; Med Lands says b. 1124/26.1,2,4,9,5 He married Agnès de Garlande dame de Rochefort, daughter of Anseau/Ansel I de Garlande Cte de Rochefort, Seigneur de Garlande, Seneschal of France and NN (?) de Rochefort-en-Yvelines, between 1139 and 1141;
His 1st wife. NB: This marriage is mentioned by Genealogics and Genealogy.EU, but disputed by Med Lands and Racines et Histoire (Dreux).1,2,4,5,10,11,12 Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle married Hawise (?) of Salisbury, daughter of Walter Fitz Edward d'Evreux of Salisbury and Sybil de Chaworth, circa 1144;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.13,1,14,15,16,4,5 Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle married Agnès de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy, daughter of Gui de Baudément seigneur de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Quincy, de Longueville, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois et de Pontarcy and Alix (?) dame de Braine, between 1152 and 1153;
Her 2nd husband; his 3rd (?) wife.1,2,4,9,5,17,18,19
Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle died on 11 October 1188 at Braine, Aisne, France (now).1,9,2,4,5
Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle was buried after 11 October 1188 at L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1123, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     DEATH     11 Oct 1188 (aged 64–65), Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great, was the fifth son of Louis VI of France and Adélaide de Maurienne. Through his mother he was related to the Carolingians and to the Marquess William V of Montferrat. In 1137 he received the County of Dreux as an appanage from his father. He held this title until 1184 when he granted it to his son Robert II. Through his marriages he also received the County of Braine-sur-Vesle, and the lordships of Fère-en-Tardenois, Pontarcy, Nesle, Longueville, Quincy-en-Tardenois, Savigny, and Baudemont. Robert I participated in the Second Crusade and was at the Siege of Damascus in 1148. In 1158 he fought against the English and participated in the Siege of Séez in 1154.
     In 1139 he married Agnes de Garlande.
     In 1145, he married Hawise of Salisbury. They had a daughter named Alix, who married Guy II de Châtillon
     By his third marriage to Agnes de Baudemont in 1152, Robert and Agnes children were:
* Robert II (1154–1218), count of Dreux and Braine.
* Henry (1155–1199), bishop of Orléans
* Alix (1156 – aft. 1217), married Raoul I, lord of Coucy
* Philippe (1158–1217), bishop of Beauvais.
* Isabella (1160–1239), married Hugh III of Broyes
* Peter (1161–1186)
* William (1163 – aft. 1189), lord of Braye, Torcy, and Chilly
* John (1164 – aft. 1189)
* Mamilie (1166–1200)
* Margaret (1167–?), nun
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis VI 1081–1137
          Adelaide of Savoy 1092–1154
     Spouses
          Hawise de Salisbury de Dreux 1118–1151
          Agnes de Baudemont 1130–1204
     Siblings
          Philippe de France 1116–1131
          King Louis VII 1120–1180
          Henry of France 1121–1175
          Peter I of France 1126–1183
          Philippe de France 1133–1161
     Children
          Adèle de Dreux de Châtillon, de Nesle 1145–1210
          Robert II de Dreux 1154–1218
          Philippe de Dreux, de Beauvais 1158–1217
          Jean I de Dreux 1164–1208
     BURIAL     L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 9 Jun 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 91657941.2,20
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Robert was born about 1123, the fifth son of Louis VI 'the Fat', king of France, and his second wife Adèle de Savoie. In 1137 he received the county of Dreux as an appanage from his father. He held it until 1184 when he granted it to his son Robert II.
     “In 1139 Robert married Agnès de Garlande, widow of Amaury III de Montfort, comte d'Evreux, sire de Montfort, and the daughter of Anceau de Garlande, comte de Rochefort, and a lady of the Rochefort-en-Yvelines family. They had a son Simon who died in childhood. Agnès died in 1143, and about 1144 Robert married Havise de Salisbury, daughter of Walter FitzEdward and Sibyl de Chaorces. Their daughter Adèle would have progeny by each of her four husbands. Havise died in 1152, and soon after Robert married Agnès de Baudement, dame de Braine, de Fère-en-Tardenois, de Nesle, daughter of Gui de Baudement, seigneur de Baudement, and his wife Alix. They had ten children of whom Robert II and two daughters would have progeny. He adopted the arms of his wife, and received the county of Braine-sur-Vesle and the lordships of Fère-en-Tardenois, Pontarcy, Nesle, Longueville, Quincy-en-Tardenois, Savigny, and Baudemont.
     “With his brother Louis VII, king of France, Robert participated in the Second Crusade in 1147 and was at the Siege of Damascus in 1148. Before the end of the crusade he returned to France and mounted a conspiracy against his brother the king, in the hope of gaining power. However his actions were successfully countered by Abbé Suger of Saint-Denis, who ensured the preservation of the regency in the absence of the king.
     “In 1158 Robert fought against the English and in 1154 he participated in the siege of Séez in Normandy. In 1180 he granted a communal charter to the town of Dreux, and he founded the town of Brie-Comte-Robert which carries his name. He died in 1188, and was buried in the church of Saint-Yved de Braine.”.4

Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle lived at Dreux, France.21

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 29.
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. 241.4
EDV-25 GKJ-24.

; This is the same person as ”Robert I, Count of Dreux” at Wikipedia and as ”Robert Ier de Dreux” at Wikipédia (FR).22,23

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 6): “Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle, *1123, +Braine 11.10.1188, bur there; 1m: 1139/41 Agnes (*1122 +1143), dau.of Anseau de Garlande, Cte de Rochefort; 2m: ca 1144 Havise (*1118 +1152) dau.of Gautier d'Evreux, Earl of Salisbury; 3m: 1152 Agnes, Cts de Braine (*1130 +1202/18) dau.of Guy de Baudement, Cte de Braine”.1

; Per Racines et Histoire (Dreux): “Robert de France = Robert 1er «Le Grand» de Dreux ° 1124/26 + 11/10/1188 (Braine, 02) comte de Dreux (1137, 1152), croisé (06/1147), Régent et comte du Perche (par sa 2° femme), seigneur de Braine (1152, par sa 3° femme), investi du comté de Dreux par son frère Louis VII (il cède le comté à son fils aîné dès 1184 en conservant quelques droits sur Rochefort et Bréthencourt du fait de 1ère femme) (édifie après 1160 un fort château à Dreux, en lisière de forêt (La Robertière) renforcé ~1180 ; et une résidence de plaisance à Chailly, (depuis Chilly(-Mazarin)))
[ selon du Chesne : aurait ép. 1) ~1139/41 Agnès de Garlande ° ~1112 + 1143 dame de Rochefort, Gometz et Gournay (-sur-Marne, 93) (fille d’Anseau, comte de Rochefort, Sénéchal de France, et de Béatrice de Monthléry ; veuve d’Amauri III, seigneur de Montfort, comte d’Evreux + 19/04/1137) mais cette thèse ne résiste pas à l’analyse ]
ép. 1) ~1144/45 Hawise de Salisbury ° ~1118 + un 13/01 avant 1152 (fille de Walter FitzEdward = Gautier d’Evreux, earl of Salisbury et de Sybille de Chaource ou Sourches (Chaworth) ; veuve de Rotrou II, comte du Perche, seigneur de Bellême +X 06-08/05/1144)
ép. 3) fin 1152 Agnès de Baudément ° ~1130 + 24/07/1204 dame de Braine (-sur-Vesle, 02), Fère (-en-Tardenois, 02), Brie (-Comte-Robert, 77), Pontarcy (ou Pont-Arcy), Baudément, Longueville, Torcy, Longjumeau, Savigny-sur-Ardres, Quincy (-sous-Le-Mont, 77), Néelle (ou Nesles), Aisne, etc. (fille de Gui de Baudément (51), comte de Braine, et d’Alix de Monthléry, dame de Braine ; veuve de Milon II, comte de Bar-sur-Seine)”.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] ([1124/26]-Braine [10/12] Oct 1188, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "patruus regis Philippi, comes Robertus" when recording his marriages and children[15]. William of Tyre names him as brother of Louis VII King of France[16]. He left on the Second Crusade with his brother King Louis VII in Jun 1147[17]. Regent and Comte du Perche, by right of his second wife, during the minority of her sons. Seigneur de Braine 1152, by right of his third wife. In compensation for the loss of Perche, his brother Louis VII installed him as Seigneur de Dreux in 1152. "Robertus…comes Drocarum et Brane et…et uxor mea Agnes comitissa Brane" donated revenue from property "apud Qualliacum" to Paris Hôtel-Dieu, with the consent of "Roberti filii nostri", by charter dated 1178[18]. He resigned Dreux to his eldest son in 1184. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "VI Id Oct" of "Robertus Drocensis comes frater Ludovici regis Francorum"[19]. The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “IV Id Oct” of “Robertus comes”[20].
     "[Du Chesne suggests that Agnes de Garlande, widow of Amaury [III] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux, married, as her second husband and his first wife, Robert de France Seigneur de Dreux[21]. He bases this on a charter dated to [1 Nov 1183/31 Mar 1184] in which Philippe II King of France confirmed the property of Notre-Dame de Colombs, including property "in loco Campus à la Drouë" donated by "Robertus comes de Drocis et de Montfort" and "domum de là Nouë" donated by "Simon de Drocis in sua ultima voluntate"[22]. Du Chesne’s argument is that Robert Seigneur de Dreux could only have been entitled to "le titre de comte de Montfort, don’t le roy le rehausse" from "un mariage fait avec la douairiere de la mesme comté". He also suggests that "Simon de Drocis", also named in the same charter, was the son of this marriage. There are three difficulties with Du Chesne’s argument. Firstly, Amaury [III] de Montfort was comte d’Evreux not "comte de Montfort", a title which does not appear ever to have been borne by members of his family. Secondly, the chronology is unfavourable for the widow of Amaury [III], who was probably born in [1110/15] at the latest, to have married Robert de Dreux whose birth is estimated to [1124/26]. Thirdly, it is unlikely that Agnes would have given the name Simon to a son born from this supposed second marriage, given that she already had a son of that name by her marriage to Amaury. In conclusion, the evidence of the [1183/84] charter alone is insufficient to corroborate this marriage.]
     "m firstly ([1144/45]) as her second husband, HAWISE de Salisbury, widow of ROTROU [II] Comte du Perche Seigneur de Bellême, daughter of WALTER FitzEdward Earl of Salisbury & his wife Sibylle de Chaources [Chaworth] (-13 Jan before 1152). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the first wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum" as "matrem…comitis Rotroldi de Pertico, natam de Salesberia"[23]. Robert of Torigny records that "uxorem…suam [comitis Perticensis Rotrodi]" was later given by "Ludovicus rex Francorum [to] Roberto fratri suo"[24]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "Id Jan" of "Amicia comitissa Perticensis mater Rotrodi militis"[25], although if this entry correctly refers to Hawise it is surprising that there is no reference which would indicate her second marriage.
     "m secondly (1152) as her second husband, AGNES de Baudémont Dame de Braine, widow of MILON [II] Comte de Bar-sur-Seine, daughter and heiress of GUY de Baudément Seigneur de Braine & his wife Alix Dame de Braine (1130-24 Jul 1204, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnes nobilis de Barro super Sequanam" as second wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum", specifying that she was "mater comitisse Petronille"[26]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. "Robertus…comes Drocarum et Brane et…et uxor mea Agnes comitissa Brane" donated revenue from property "apud Qualliacum" to Paris Hôtel-Dieu, with the consent of "Roberti filii nostri", by charter dated 1178[27]. "R comes dominus Droc et Bran" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "Agnetis uxoris eius [R patris meis]…comitisse matris mee…et Yolande comitisse uxore mee et liberorum meorum " by charter dated Jul 1212[28], although the document is incorrectly dated assuming that the death date of Agnes is correct as shown above. The Chronicon Fiscannensis Cœnobii records the death in 1204 of "Agnes Comitissa Branæ"[29]. The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “IX Kal Aug” of “Agnes comitissa de Brena”[30]."
Med Lands cites:
[15] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 909.
[16] William of Tyre XXI.XXX, p. 1058.
[17] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 253 and 259.
[18] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 13, p. 6.
[19] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 102.
[20] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 109.
[21] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, p. 14.
[22] Duchesne (1624), Preuves, p. 47.
[23] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845, and 1219, p. 909 where it is specified that she was "nata…de Anglia filia comitis Salesberiensis".
[24] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1144, p. 234.
[25] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 33.
[26] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846.
[27] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 13, p. 6.
[28] Notre-Dame de la Trappe II, p. 2.
[29] Ex Chronico Fiscannensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 350.
[30] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 79.5


; Per Weis: “Robert I, Count of Dreux, b. abt. 1123, d. 1188; m. (3) 1152, Agnes de Baudemont. (Not Vaudemont as in earlier editions). (ES III.1/63, XIV/51).”.24
; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES (1130-24 Jul 1204, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnes nobilis de Barro super Sequanam" as second wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum", specifying that she was "mater comitisse Petronille"[834]. The foundation charter of the abbey of Mores, undated but dated to 1152, records the donations of "Agnes, Barri comitissa…pro anima viri sui comitis Milonis"[835]. The cartulary of Troyes Saint-Pierre records a charter dated [1148/53] which recalls a donation by "Helisabeth mater Milonis comitis Barensis et ipsius uxor Agnes"[836]. Dame de Braine. "Agnes Branæ domina" donated property to Saint-Yved de Braine, for the welfare of the souls of "suæ…Milonis mariti sui", by charter dated 1150[837]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnes nobilis de Barro super Sequanam" as second wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum", specifying that she was "mater comitisse Petronille"[838]. "Robertus…comes Drocarum et Brane et…et uxor mea Agnes comitissa Brane" donated revenue from property "apud Qualliacum" to Paris Hôtel-Dieu, with the consent of "Roberti filii nostri", by charter dated 1178[839]. "R comes dominus Droc et Bran" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "Agnetis uxoris eius [R patris meis]…comitisse matris mee…et Yolande comitisse uxore mee et liberorum meorum " by charter dated Jul 1212[840], although the document is incorrectly dated assuming that the death date of Agnes is correct as shown above. The Chronicon Fiscannensis Cœnobii records the death in 1204 of "Agnes Comitissa Branæ"[841].
     "m firstly (before 1150) MILON [II] Comte de Bar-sur-Seine, son of GUY Comte de Bar-sur-Seine [Brienne] & his wife Petronille-Elisabeth de Chacenay (-1 Oct 1151).
     "m secondly (1153) as his second wife, ROBERT de France Seigneur de Dreux, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] ([1124/26]-Braine 11 Oct 1188, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived)."
Med Lands cites:
[834] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846.
[835] Mores, p. 45.
[836] Troyes Saint-Pierre, 14, p. 18.
[837] Du Chesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 234, quoting Extrait du cartulaire de l’abbaye de S. Yved de Braine.
[838] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846.
[839] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 13, p. 6.
[840] Notre-Dame de la Trappe II, p. 2.
[841] Ex Chronico Fiscannensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 350.19

; Per Racines et Histoire (Baudément): “Agnès de Baudément ° 1130 + 07/1204 dame de Braine (fondation de l’Abbaye de Mores 1152 ; citée charte 1148/53 de Saint-Pierre de Troyes ; donation à Notre-Dame de La Trappe 07/1212)
     ép. 1) dès 1145 Milon II, comte de Bar-sur-Seine + 01/10/1151 (fils de Gui ou Gautier, comte de Barsur-Seine (Brienne), et de Péronelle-Elisabeth de Chacenay)
     ép. 2) ~1152/53 Robert (de France), comte de Dreux ° 1124/26 + 11/10/1188 (Braine) (fils de Louis VI, Roi de France, et d’Adélaïde de Maurienne-Savoie ; veuf de ? de Montfort)”.18
; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES (-after 1136). The Chronicon Mauriniacensi records that "Stephanus Cancellarius" arranged the marriage of "nepti sua" and "Amalrico de Monteforti", adding that her dowry was "honore de Rupe-forti" [Rochefort][592]. The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified.
     "Du Chesne suggests that the widow of Amaury [III] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux married, as her second husband and his first wife, Robert de France Seigneur de Dreux[593]. He bases this on a charter dated to [1 Nov 1183/31 Mar 1184] in which Philippe II King of France confirmed the property of Notre-Dame de Colombs, including property "in loco Campus à la Drouë" donated by "Robertus comes de Drocis et de Montfort" and "domum de là Nouë" donated by "Simon de Drocis in sua ultima voluntate"[594]. Du Chesne’s argument is that Robert Seigneur de Dreux could only have been entitled to "le titre de comte de Montfort, don’t le roy le rehausse" from "un mariage fait avec la douairiere de la mesme comté". He also suggests that "Simon de Drocis", also named in the same charter, was the son of this marriage. There are three difficulties with Du Chesne’s argument. Firstly, Amaury [III] de Montfort was comte d’Evreux not "comte de Montfort", a title which does not appear ever to have been borne by members of his family. Secondly, the chronology is unfavourable for the widow of Amaury [III], who was probably born in [1110/15] at the latest, to have married Robert de Dreux whose birth is estimated to [1124/26]. Thirdly, it is unlikely that Agnes would have given the name Simon to a son born from this supposed second marriage, given that she already had a son of that name by her marriage to Amaury. In conclusion, the evidence of the [1183/84] charter alone is insufficient to corroborate this marriage.
     "m (before 1127) as his second wife, AMAURY [III] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux, son of SIMON [I] Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d'Evreux (-[18/19] Apr [1136/38], bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère)."
Med Lands cites:
[592] Ex Chronico Mauriniacensi, II, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 77.
[593] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, p. 14.
[594] Duchesne (1624), Preuves, p. 47.12

; Per Racines et Histoire (Garlande): “Agnès (Anselde) de Garlande ° 1122 + 1143/49 comtesse de Rochefort, dame de Gournaysur-Marne, La Queue-en-Brie et Gometz
     ép. 1) avant 1120 Amauri III de Montfort + 1136/37 (fils de Simon 1er, seigneur de Montfort, et d’Agnès d’Evreux)
     ép. 2) ~1139/40 Robert 1er, comte de Dreux, seigneur de Brie-Comte-Robert, Baudément, Torcy, Chilly, Longjumeau, Fère-en-Tardenois ° ~1125 + 11/10/1188 (fils du Roi Louis VI «Le Gros» et d’Adélaïde de Savoie ; ép. 2) Harnise d’Evreux puis 3) Agnès de Baudément, dame de Braine-sur-Vesle) postérité Montfort & Dreux (Simon)”.25
; Per Med Lands:
     "HAWISE ([1120]-13 Jan before 1152). William of Tyre refers to Rotrou's marriage with the sister of Earl Patrick after the marriage of his daughter Philippa[1445]. Philippa’s marriage is dated to [1120]. The chronology of Hawise’s children suggests their births after [1135/40] at the earliest. If that is correct, Hawise would presumably have been an infant if she had married soon after [1120]. It appears more likely that the marriage took place in the early 1130s, which would place Hawise’s birth in [1120], which would suggest that she was one of her parents’ older children. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the first wife of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum" as "matrem…comitis Rotroldi de Pertico, natam de Salesberia"[1446]. Robert of Torigny records that "uxorem…suam [comitis Perticensis Rotrodi]" was later given by "Ludovicus rex Francorum [to] Roberto fratri suo"[1447]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "Id Jan" of "Amicia comitissa Perticensis mater Rotrodi militis"[1448], although if this entry correctly refers to Hawise it is surprising that there is no reference which would indicate her second marriage.
     "m firstly (after [1120]) as his third wife, ROTROU Comte du Perche, son of GEOFFROY I Comte de Mortagne, Comte du Perche & his wife Béatrix de Roucy (-killed in battle Rouen [20 Jan/23 Apr] 1144).
     "m secondly ([1144/45]) as his first wife, ROBERT de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] ([1124/26]-Braine 11 Oct 1188, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). His brother King Louis VI installed him as Seigneur de Dreux in 1152."
Med Lands cites:
[1445] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 607.
[1446] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845.
[1447] Robert de Torigny I, 1144, p. 234.
[1448] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 33.16
He was Comte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle between 1137 and 1184.2,22

Family 1

Agnès de Garlande dame de Rochefort b. 1122, d. 1143
Child

Family 2

Hawise (?) of Salisbury b. c 1118, d. b 13 Jan 1152
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baudément.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013794&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#RobertIDreuxdied1188B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO
  7. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 135-26, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO
  9. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 135-27, p. 130.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Dreux, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Dreux.pdf
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Garlande: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120973&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#AgnesGarlandeM1AmauryMontfort
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 193, de PERCHE 2:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#R1
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Havise de Salisbury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120879&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#HawiseSalisburyM1RotrouPercheM2RobDreux
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Baudement: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013795&tree=LEO
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Baudément, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baudement.pdf
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#AgnesBrainedied1217
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 03 October 2020), memorial page for Robert I de Dreux (1123–11 Oct 1188), Find a Grave Memorial no. 91657941, citing L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91657941/robert_i-de_dreux. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  21. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Dreux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Robert Ier de Dreux: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ier_de_Dreux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  24. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, lin 135-27, p. 130.
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Garlande, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Garlande.pdf
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027533&tree=LEO
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chatillon.pdf, p. 3.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#AdeleAlixDreuxdied12051210
  29. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013796&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028230&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#AlixAdeleDreuxdied1217
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth (Isabelle) de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164485&tree=LEO
  34. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#IsabelleDreuxdied1239

Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles1,2,3

F, #4763, b. 1124, d. 16 August 1176
FatherLouis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France4,1,5 b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137
MotherAdelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France1,6 b. c 1092, d. 18 Aug 1154
Last Edited1 Nov 2019
     Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles was born in 1124. She married Eustache IV (?) comte de Boulogne, Prince of England, son of Stephen (Etienne) (?) de Blois, King of England and Mathilde I (?) comtesse de Boulogne ed de Lens, circa February 1140.7,8,9,1,10,11,3 Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles married Raimund VII (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Margrave of Provence, son of Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de and Faydiva/Faydide (?) d'Uzes, in 1154.12,1,13,11 Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles and Raimund VII (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Margrave of Provence were divorced in 1165.12,1,13,11
Constance (?) of France, Countess of St. Gilles died on 16 August 1176 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).4,1,10,3
     

; weis 169a-2.

; Constance, *1124, +Rheims 16.8.1176; 1m: II.1140 Eustache IV de Blois, Cte de Boulogne (*1127 +10.8.1154); 2m: 1154 (div 1165/66) Cte Raimond V de Toulouse (*1134 +1194.)1

Family 1

Eustache IV (?) comte de Boulogne, Prince of England b. bt 1124 - 1128, d. 16 Aug 1153

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.7. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 169A-26, p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 516. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  10. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  11. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html#R5
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106025&tree=LEO
  14. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00327040&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond VI: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028520&tree=LEO

Hawise Fitz Geoffrey1

F, #4764, b. WFT Est. 1188-1212, d. 1243
FatherGeoffrey Fitz Piers 4th Earl of Essex b. c 1166, d. 14 Oct 1213
MotherAveline de Clare of Hereford d. b 4 Jun 1225
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited28 Jun 2006
     Hawise Fitz Geoffrey was born WFT Est. 1188-1212.2 She married Sir Reynold/Reginald de Mohun 5th Lord of Dunster, Somerset, son of Sir Reynold de Mohun Baron of Dunster, Somerset and Alice de Briwere, before 1227.3
Hawise Fitz Geoffrey died in 1243.2
     ; Weis AR 246b-2. GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Family

Sir Reynold/Reginald de Mohun 5th Lord of Dunster, Somerset b. c 1206, d. bt 20 Jan 1257 - 1258
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 87-88, Fitz GEOFFREY 2:vii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 143-28, p. 126. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 153A-6, p. 186. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Mohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125469&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Lucy (?) of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock1,2,3,4

F, #4765, b. before 1143, d. between 1219 and 1220
FatherMiles Fitz Walter 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord of Brecknock2,3,4 b. c 1097, d. 24 Dec 1143
MotherSibyl de Neufmarche3,2,4 d. a 1139
ReferenceGAV24 EDV22
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Lucy (?) of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock was born before 1143 at Gloucester, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.4,5 She married Herbert Fitz Herbert of Stanton, co. Wilts, son of Herbert Fitz Herbert and Sibylla Corbet of Alcester, before 1196.1,2,3,4,6
Lucy (?) of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock died between 1219 and 1220 at London, City of London, Greater London, England.4,5
Lucy (?) of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock was buried circa 1220 at Llanthony Secunda Priory, Hempsted, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1136, Gloucester, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
     DEATH     1220 (aged 83–84), London, City of London, Greater London, England
     Lucy of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwlch y Dinas. Lucy was the daughter of Miles FitzWalter de Gloucester and Sibyl Neufemarche, and the great granddaughter of Osbern FitzRichard and Nest verch Gruffydd, Gruffydd Llywelyn, the King of Wales and Ealdgyth of Mercia, Queen Consort of England. Lucy was born about 1134 and died about 1219 in London. Lucy married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester and Lord Chamberlain, the son of Eudes II, Count of Blois. They were married before 1163 and had the following children:
** Piers FitzHerbert, Baron of Barnstable, Devonshire
** Matthew Fitzherbert
** Isabel FitzHerbert
** Mary FitzHerbert
** Petronilla Fitzherbert
** Reginald Fitzpiers

     After her parents and brothers had died, her parents' honour and wealth passed onto Lucy and her sisters, making these families the most powerful and richest of the families in the Welsh marches.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Miles Fitz Walter 1100–1143
          Sibyl Neufmarche Fitz Walter 1100 – unknown
     Spouse
          Herbert FitzHerbert unknown–1204
     Siblings
          Mahel de Hereford unknown–1165
          Roger Fitzmiles unknown–1155
          Margaret of Hereford 1122–1187
          Henry FitzMiles 1128–1162
          Bertha Hereford de Braose 1130 – unknown
     Children
          Piers FitzHerbert 1163–1235
     BURIAL     Llanthony Secunda Priory, Hempsted, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
     PLOT     In the Chapter House.
     Maintained by: Helen Rineer
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 28 Oct 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 79418031.1,7,4,5
     Lucy (?) of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock lived at Herefordshire, England.8 GAV-24 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter. 238.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 5:465.3


; Per Med Lands:
     "LUCY (before 1143-[1219/20] or after, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Lucy married “Herberto filio Hereberti” and inherited “foresta de Dene et aliis terries in Anglia”[408]. King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "duas partes de Onedesleye" made by "Margar de Bohun", in accordance with the division made "inter ipsam et Luciam sororem suam"[409]. The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from bishop of Worcester, whose assets had been confiscated by King John, dated to [1208/13]: "Henricus de Boun comes Herefordie et domina Lucia que fuit uxor Herberti filii Herberti" held "manerio in Suham et Brokhamt ii milites…in comitatu Glouc"[410]. A feodary of the bishop of Worcester’s estates drawn up in [1219/20] records that "Dame Lucia, widow of Herbert fitz Herbert" held shares in two Gloucestershire manors[411]. A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…Luce the third daughter of the seid Milo Erle…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[412].
     "m HERBERT FitzHerbert [II], son of HERBERT FitzHerbert [I] & his wife Sibyl Corbet (-before 18 Jul 1204)."
Med Lands cites:
[408] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Cartæ I, p. 615.
[409] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 7.
[410] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 39.
[411] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 152, citing Testa de Nevill, p. 42.
[412] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XX, p. 169.4


; Per Weis: “Lucy of Hereford, dau. & coh., liv. 1219/20, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich u dinas, co. Brecknock, bur. Chapter House of Lanthony, near Glocester, heir to a 1/3 interest in the barony of her father; m. by 1196, Herbert Fitz Herbert (262-28), adult y 1165, d. sh. bef. June 1204, son and eventual h. of Herbert Fitz Herbert, dead by 1155, by his wife, Sibyl corbet (121-26, 199-26).”.2

; Per Weis: “Herbert Fitz Herbert, s. and event. h., adult by 1165, d. sh. bef. June 1204; m. Lucy of Hereford (237-5), liv. 1219/20, bur. Chapter House of Lanthony new Gloucester, lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwich y Dinas, co. Brecknock, dau. and coh. of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, by Sibyl de Newumarche (177-4, 193-4, 237-4). (Eyton, cit; CP, cit., VI:457 note c, NGSQ, cit; Sanders, 8-9).”.9

Family

Herbert Fitz Herbert of Stanton, co. Wilts b. bt 1125 - 1135, d. b Jun 1204
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 95-96, Fitz PIERS 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 237-5, p. 215.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucy of Hereford: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00284744&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#LucyHereforddiedafter1193. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 15 December 2020), memorial page for Lucy of Hereford FitzHerbert (1136–1220), Find a Grave Memorial no. 79418031, citing Llanthony Secunda Priory, Hempsted, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; Maintained by Helen Rineer (contributor 47062386), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/79418031. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Herbert FitzHerbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00284743&tree=LEO
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 112, HEREFORD 3:viii.
  8. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  9. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 262-28, p. 254.

Bertha de Braiose1

F, #4766
FatherWilliam II de Braiose 3rd Lord Bramber of Brecknock, Abergavenney, & Gowr2,3,4,5 b. c 1100, d. a 1179
MotherBertha (?) de Gloucester-Hereford6,4
ReferenceGAV22
Last Edited19 Jun 2020
     Bertha de Braiose married Walter I de Beauchamp, son of William de Beauchamp and Joane Waleries, circa 1175 at Bramber, co. Sussex, England.7,2
     GAV-22.

; weis 222-28.

Family

Walter I de Beauchamp b. c 1173, d. 1235
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 39-40, de BRAIOSE 3:vi. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited & Extinct Peerages, p. 30. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Braose: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139656&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#WilliamBraosedied1192. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Braose (anc. Briouze ; alias Breuse, Braiose, Brewes), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Braose.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha of Hereford: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139657&tree=LEO
  7. [S648] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family #0320 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence1,2

M, #4767, b. circa 1180, d. 2 February 1209
FatherAlfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon3,1,2,4,5 b. 4 Apr 1152, d. 25 Apr 1196
MotherSancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon3,2,6,4,7,8 b. 21 Sep 1154, d. 9 Nov 1208
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited23 Sep 2020
     Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence was born circa 1180 at Barcelona, Provinicia de Barcelona, Cateluna, Spain.2,6,4 He married Gersinda II de Sabran Cts de Forcalquier, Cts of Castellar, daughter of Comte Rainon/Raimond I de Sabran de Sabran et du Cailar, seigneur de Castellar et d'Ansouis and Garsinde (?) Comtesse de Forcalquier, in July 1193 at Aix-en-Provence, France (now).2,3,6,4,9,10
Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence died on 2 February 1209 at Palermo, Città Metropolitana di Palermo, Sicilia, Italy; Genealogy.EU Says d. 2 Feb 1209; Genealogics says d. 1 Dec 1209; Med Lands says d. Feb 1209.11,6,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:70.6


Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence lived at Provence, France.12

; This the same person as Alfonso II of Aragon at Wikipedia and as Alphonse II de Provence at Wikipédia (Fr.)13,14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Alfonso II, comte de Provence, was born about 1180 in Barcelona, the second son of Alfonso II 'the Chaste', king of Aragón, and Sancha of Castile. He succeeded his father in 1195 as Alphonse II, comte de Provence, Millau et Razès.
     "In 1193 Alfonso married Gersende de Sabran, daughter of Rainon I de Sabran dit du Caylar, seigneur du Caylar et d'Ansouis, and Garsinde 'comtesse' de Forcalquier. Their son Raimond Berengar and daughter Gersinde would have progeny.
     "According to explanations in the manuscripts of the troubadour Gaucelm Faidit's poems, Alfonso was a rival of Gaucelm for the love of Jourdaine d'Embrun.
     "Alfonso died in Palermo on 1 December 1209."6

Reference: Weis [1992:103] Line 111-28.15 Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence was also known as Don Alfonso Berenguer (?) Infante de Aragón.16 GAV-21 EDV-22 GKJ-23.17

Reference: Per Weis: "Alfonso, d. 1209, Count of Provence; m. 1193, Gersenda of Sabran, dau. of Rainou, Count of forcalquier. (ES II/70, 190; Moriarty, cit.)"18

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don ALFONSO BERENGUER de Aragón ([1180]-Palermo Feb 1209). The "Corónicas" Navarras name "al yfant don Pedro, rey d'Aragón, et al marqués de Provença don Alfonso, et a don Ferrando, abbat de Mont aragón, et una filla que casaron en Ongría" as the children of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón" and his wife[418]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrus…Alfonsus" as the oldest two of the three sons of "Ildefonsi", specifying that Alfonso succeeded his father in "Ducatum Provinciæ"[419]. The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro…Alfonso…y Fernando" as the three sons of King Alfonso II[420]. "Ildefonsus…comes et marchio Provincie filius Ildefonsi…quondam Regis Aragonie, comitis Barchinonie et marchionis Provincie" made donations to the church of Aix dated May 1199[421]. He succeeded his father in 1195 as ALPHONSE II Comte de Provence, Millau & Razès.
     "m (Aix-en-Provence Jul 1193) GERSENDE de Sabran Ctss de Forcalquier, daughter of RAINON [I] de Sabran Seigneur du Caylar et d’Ansouis & his wife Gersende Ctss de Forcalquier [Barcelona-Urgel]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "Sanctio [frater rege Petro de Arragonum" [presumably an error for "Alfonso"] as "neptem…comitis de Forcalcarie"[422]. Rodrigo of Toledo´s De rebus Hispaniæ records that "Aldefonso" married "neptem comitis Folocalquerii"[423]. A Brevis historia comitum Provinciæ records that "Idelfonsus...comes Provinciæ" married "Gersendem neptem comitis Folocalquerii"[424]. This marriage reunited two of the rival branches of the family of the earlier comtes de Provence, extinct in the male line in the late 11th century (see Part B above). “Garsendis uxor quondam Ildefonsi comitis Provinciæ” donated her rights “in comitatu Forcalqueriensi”, granted by “Guillelmo quondam comite Forcalqueriensi avo meo”, to “Raymundo Berengario filio meo” with “filiæ meæ sororis tuæ Garsendis” as substitute should he die, with the consent of “patre meo Raines de Castelar”, by charter dated 30 Nov 1209[425]. Nun at Celle 1222."
Med Lands cites:
[418] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32.
[419] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380.
[420] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIII, p. 132.
[421] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Tome I, Aix, Instrumenta, Col. 21-22, no. XVII.
[422] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898.
[423] Ex Roderici archiepiscopi Toletani, De rebus Hispaniæ, Liber VI, III, RHGF, Tome XIX, p. 229.
[424] Ex brevi historia comitum Provinciæ ex familia comitum Aragonensium, RHGF, Tome XIX, p. 231.
[425] Papon, Tome II (1778), Preuves, XXXVI, p. xxxviii.4


; Per Genealogy.EU: "B2. Ct Alfonso II of Provence (1196-1209), *1180, +Palermo 2.2.1209; m.Aix-en-Provence 1193 Gersende, Cts de Forcalquier (*1180 +1218), dau.of Raimon I de Sabran, Sire de Caylar by Gersende, Cts de Forcalquier."11

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERSENDE de Sabran . Ctss de Forcalquier. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "Sanctio [frater rege Petro de Arragonum" [presumably an error for "Alfonso"] as "neptem…comitis de Forcalcarie"[325]. Rodrigo of Toledo’s De rebus Hispaniæ records that "Aldefonso" married "neptem comitis Folocalquerii"[326]. A Brevis historia comitum Provinciæ records that "Idelfonsus...comes Provinciæ" married "Gersendem neptem comitis Folocalquerii"[327]. “Garsendis uxor quondam Ildefonsi comitis Provinciæ” donated her rights “in comitatu Forcalqueriensi”, granted by “Guillelmo quondam comite Forcalqueriensi avo meo”, to “Raymundo Berengario filio meo” with “filiæ meæ sororis tuæ Garsendis” as substitute should he die, with the consent of “patre meo Raines de Castelar”, by charter dated 30 Nov 1209[328]. Nun at Celle 1222.
     "m (Aix-en-Provence Jul 1193) Infante don ALFONSO BERENGUER de Aragón, son of ALFONSO II King of Aragon & his wife Infanta doña Sancha de Castilla ([1180]-Palermo Feb 1209). He succeeded his father in 1195 as ALFONSO II Comte de Provence, Millau & Razès. "
Med Lands cites:
[325] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898.
[326] RHGF XIX, Ex Roderici archiepiscopi Toletani, De rebus Hispaniæ, Liber VI, III, p. 229.
[327] RHGF XIX, Ex brevi historia comitum Provinciæ ex familia comitum Aragonensium, p. 231.
[328] Papon, Tome II (1778), Preuves, XXXVI, p. xxxviii.10
He was Count of Provence between 1196 and 1209.1

Citations

  1. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 5: Rulers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia, and Provence, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#AlfonsoIIdied1209A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II 'the Chaste': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007662&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027265&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#childrenAlfonsoII
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gersende de Sabran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027266&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/provaixmar.htm#GersendeSabranMAlfonsoIIProvence
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  12. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_II_of_Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Alphonse II de Provence: Alphonse II de Provence. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), p. 103, Line 111-28. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  17. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  18. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 111-28, p. 112. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 111-29, p. 103.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund Berengar V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004071&tree=LEO

Isabella de Clare1,2

F, #4768, b. 8 November 1226, d. before 10 May 1275
FatherSir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, 4th Earl of Gloucester3,4,5,2 b. c 1180, d. 25 Oct 1230
MotherIsabel Marshal4,6,2 b. 9 Oct 1200, d. 17 Jan 1240
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited17 Dec 2020
     Isabella de Clare was born on 8 November 1226; van de Pas says b. 2 Nov 1226.4,7,2 She married Sir Robert "the Competitor" de Brus 6th Lord of Anandale, Earl of Carrick, son of Robert V de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale and Isabella de Huntingdon, in May 1240; his 1st wife.7,1,3,4,2
Isabella de Clare died before 10 May 1275.7,4,2
     ; weis 252-28. EDV-23.



; Per Med Lands:
     "HERBERT FitzHerbert [II], son of HERBERT FitzHerbert [I] & his wife Sibyl Corbet ([1125/35]-before 18 Jul 1204). “Willelmus filius Hugonis de Bridssale” donated property “de feudo Herberti filii Herberti” to Watton convent by charter dated to [1175/95][590]. His birth date range is estimated based on the latest birth date of his wife, bearing in mind the probable date of birth of his half-brother Renaud Earl of Cornwall and his own date of death. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Herbertus filius Herberti i m" in Wiltshire in [1161/62][591]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Herbertus filius Herberti camerarii senioris" used to hold two knights` fees in Hampshire now held by "Herbertus filius eius"[592]. The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Herbertus filius Herberti" in Hampshire[593]. Benedict of Peterborough records that Henry II King of England granted the kingdom of Limerick to "Hereberti filio Hereberti, et Willelmo fratri comitis Reginaldi, et Joellano de la Pumerai nepoti eorum" at a council in Oxford in May 1177, but that "Herbertus et Willelmus, fratres Reginaldi comitis Cornubiæ, et Joellanus de Pumeria nepos eorum" declined it at a council at Marlborough 3 Jun 1177[594]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Herbertus filius Herbertus" paying "xx s, ii milites" in Berkshire and "x s, i militem" in Wiltshire[595]. The Pipe Roll at Michaelmas 1194 records “Herbertus f Herberti” owing for “legalem portionem suam versus Margaretam de Bohun” also in Gloucestershire[596]: the property in question was presumably inherited from Miles of Gloucester, the father of Margaret de Bohun and of Herbert’s wife. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Herbertus filius Herberti" paying "xxv s, i militem et tertiam" in Hampshire[597].
     "m LUCY of Hereford, daughter of MILES of Gloucester Earl of Hereford & his wife Sibylle de Neufmarché (before 1143-[1219/20] or after, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Lucy married “Herberto filio Hereberti” and inherited “foresta de Dene et aliis terries in Anglia”[598]. King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "duas partes de Onedesleye" made by "Margar de Bohun", in accordance with the division made "inter ipsam et Luciam sororem suam"[599]. The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from bishop of Worcester, whose assets had been confiscated by King John, dated to [1208/13]: "Henricus de Boun comes Herefordie et domina Lucia que fuit uxor Herberti filii Herberti" held "manerio in Suham et Brokhamt ii milites…in comitatu Glouc"[600]. A feodary of the bishop of Worcester’s estates drawn up in [1219/20] records that "Dame Lucia, widow of Herbert fitz Herbert" held shares in two Gloucestershire manors[601]. A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…Luce the third daughter of the seid Milo Erle…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[602]."
Med Lands cites:
[590] Early Yorkshire Charters I, 33, p. 40.
[591] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 32.
[592] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 205.
[593] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), Hampshire, p. 172.
[594] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. I, pp. 163 and 172.
[595] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, pp. 73 and 74.
[596] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Gloucestershire, p. 239.
[597] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 91.
[598] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Cartæ I, p. 615.
[599] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 7.
[600] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 39.
[601] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 152, citing Testa de Nevill, p. 42.
[602] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XX, p. 169.9

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 55, de CLARE 12:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027617&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2086] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 5 Aug 2006: "re: Eupheme de Brus"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 Aug 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 5 Aug 2006."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027608&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel Marshal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027633&tree=LEO
  7. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 41-3, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  8. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntdk.htm#HerbertFitzHerbertdied1204B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0165794&tree=LEO
  11. [S1826] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 Nov 2004 "The 'Turnberry Band' : A Genealogical Perspective"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 Nov 2004."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027619&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#RobertBrusdied1304

Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester1,2

M, #4769, b. circa 1090, d. 31 October 1147
FatherHenry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White3,4
MotherNesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales5 b. c 1073, d. 1163
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester was born at England.6 He married Maud Mabel Fitz Hamon, daughter of Robert Fitz Hamon Lord of Tewkesbury, Seigneur of Creully in Calvados and Sybil de Montgomery.7 Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester was born circa 1090 at Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France.5
Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester was buried in 1147 at Priory of St. James, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.2


Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester died on 31 October 1147 at Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.5
     ; Robert, Earl of Gloucester, and Reynold, Earl of Cornwall, are well documented bastard sons of King Henry I. Both were known as "filius Regis" in their lifetimes, that is, son of the King. To the best of my knowledge, Earl Robert never used "de Caen" as part of his name, nor was Earl Reynold ever known as "de Dunstanville." Reynold was, however, known infrequently as Reynold de Mortain.8 GAV-24 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert FitzRoy, 1st Earl of Gloucester (c. 1090 – 31 October 1147[1]) (alias Robert Rufus, Robert de Caen, Robert Consul[2][3]) was an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England. He was the half-brother of the Empress Matilda, and her chief military supporter during the civil war known as The Anarchy, in which she vied with Stephen of Blois for the throne of England.
Early life
     "Robert was probably the eldest of Henry's many illegitimate children.[1] He was born before his father's accession to the English throne, either during the reign of his grandfather William the Conqueror or his uncle William Rufus.[4] He is sometimes and erroneously designated as a son of Nest, daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last king of Deheubarth, although his mother has been identified as a member of "the Gay or Gayt family of north Oxfordshire",[5] possibly a daughter of Rainald Gay (fl. 1086) of Hampton Gay and Northbrook Gay in Oxfordshire. Rainald had known issue Robert Gay of Hampton (died c. 1138) and Stephen Gay of Northbrook (died after 1154). A number of Oxfordshire women feature as the mothers of Robert's siblings.[5][6]
     "Robert may have been a native of Caen[1] or he may have been only Constable and Governor of that city, jure uxoris.[2]
     "Robert's father had contracted him in marriage to Mabel FitzHamon, daughter and heir of Robert Fitzhamon, but the marriage was not solemnized until June 1119 at Lisieux.[1][7] His wife brought him the substantial honours of Gloucester in England and Glamorgan in Wales, and the honours of Sainte-Scholasse-sur-Sarthe and Évrecy in Normandy, as well as Creully. After the White Ship disaster late in 1120, and probably because of this marriage,[8] in 1121 or 1122 his father created him Earl of Gloucester.[9]
Family
     "Robert and his wife Mabel FitzHamon married in 1114, and they had seven children:
     "***William FitzRobert (1116 – 1183): succeeded his father as 2nd Earl of Gloucester
     "***Roger FitzRobert (c. 1118 – 1179): Bishop of Worcester
     "***Hamon FitzRobert, knight (c. 1122 – 1159): killed at the siege of Toulouse.
     "***Richard FitzRobert, Lord of Creully (c. 1125 – 1175): succeeded his mother as Sire de Creully.
     "***Matilda FitzRobert (c. 1126 – 1189): married in 1143 Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester.
     "***Mabel FitzRobert: married Aubrey de Vere
     "***Philip FitzRobert, Lord of Cricklade (c. 1130 – 1148)
     "He also had four illegitimate children:
     "***Richard FitzRobert (died 1142): Bishop of Bayeux [mother: Isabel de Douvres, sister of Richard de Douvres, bishop of Bayeux (1107–1133)]
     "***Robert FitzRobert (died 1170): Castellan of Gloucester, married in 1147 Hawise de Reviers (daughter of Baldwin de Reviers, 1st Earl of Devon and his first wife Adelisa), had daughter Mabel FitzRobert (married firstly Jordan de Chambernon and secondly William de Soliers)
     "***Mabel FitzRobert: married Gruffud, Lord of Senghenydd, son of Ifor Bach.
     "***Thomas FitzRobert
Relationship with King Stephen
     "There is evidence in the contemporary source, the Gesta Stephani, that Robert was proposed by some as a candidate for the throne, but his illegitimacy ruled him out:
     "Among others came Robert, Earl of Gloucester, son of King Henry, but a bastard, a man of proved talent and admirable wisdom. When he was advised, as the story went, to claim the throne on his father's death, deterred by sounder advice he by no means assented, saying it was fairer to yield it to his sister's son (the future Henry II of England), than presumptuously to arrogate it to himself.
     "This suggestion cannot have led to any idea that he and Stephen were rivals for the Crown, as Geoffrey of Monmouth in 1136 referred to Robert as one of the 'pillars' of the new King's rule.
     "The capture of King Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 gave the Empress Matilda the upper hand in her battle for the throne, but by alienating the citizens of London she failed to be crowned Queen. Her forces were defeated at the Rout of Winchester on 14 September 1141, and Robert of Gloucester was captured nearby at Stockbridge.
     "The two prisoners, King Stephen and Robert of Gloucester, were then exchanged, but by freeing Stephen, the Empress Matilda had given up her best chance of becoming queen. She later returned to France, where she died in 1167, though her son succeeded Stephen as King Henry II in 1154.
     "Robert of Gloucester died in 1147 at Bristol Castle, where he had previously imprisoned King Stephen, and was buried at St James' Priory, Bristol, which he had founded.
In popular culture
     "Robert of Gloucester is a figure in many of the novels by Ellis Peters in the Cadfael Chronicles (written between 1977 and 1994) where he is seen as a strong moderating force to his half-sister (see Saint Peter's Fair). His efforts to gain the crown for his sister by capturing King Stephen and her own actions in London are part of the plot in The Pilgrim of Hate. His capture by Stephen's wife Queen Mathilda is in the background of the plot of An Excellent Mystery. The exchange of the imprisoned Robert for the imprisoned Stephen is in the background of the plot of The Raven in the Foregate. Robert's travels to persuade his brother-in-law to aid Empress Maud militarily in England is in the background of the novel The Rose Rent. His return to England when Empress Maud is trapped in Oxford Castle figures in The Hermit of Eyton Forest. Robert's return to England with his young nephew Henry, years later the king succeeding Stephen, is in the background of the plot of The Confession of Brother Haluin, as the battles begin anew with Robert's military guidance. Robert's success in the Battle of Wilton (1143) leads to the death of a fictional character, part of the plot of The Potter's Field. In the last novel, he is a father who can disagree with then forgive his son Philip (see the last novel, Brother Cadfael's Penance). In that last novel, Brother Cadfael speculates on the possibly different path for England if the first son of old King Henry, the illegitimate Robert of Gloucester, had been recognised and accepted. In Wales of that era, a son was not illegitimate if recognized by his father, and to many in the novels, Robert of Gloucester seemed the best of the contenders to succeed his father.
     "Robert is also a central character in Sharon Penman's 1995 novel When Christ and His Saints Slept. He was also central in the struggle during The Anarchy as portrayed in Ken Follet's 1989 novel The Pillars of the Earth and in the 2010 mini-series of the same name.
Citations
     "1. David Crouch, ‘Robert, first earl of Gloucester (b. c. 1090, d. 1147)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 1 Oct 2010
     "2. "Complete Peerage" Vol IV(1892), p38, "Gloucester", "Robert filius Regis" quoting Round "Consul is often used for Earl in the time of the first age of the Norman Kings"
     "3. The Complete Peerage claims only that he is "described" as consul, as are most Earls of his time.
     "4. William (of Malmesbury) 1904, p. 1.
     "5. David Crouch, Historical Research, 1999
     "6. C. Given-Wilson & A. Curteis. The Royal Bastards of Medieval England (London, 1984) (ISBN 0-415-02826-4), page 74
     "7. "Complete Peerage", "Gloucester"
     "8. "In the aftermath of the White Ship disaster of 1120, when his younger and legitimate half-brother, William, died, Robert shared in the largesse that the king distributed to reassert his political position. Robert was given the marriage of Mabel, the heir of Robert fitz Haimon, whose lands in the west country and Glamorgan had been in royal wardship since 1107. The marriage also brought Robert the Norman honours of Evrecy and St Scholasse-sur-Sarthe. Robert was raised to the rank of earl of Gloucester soon after, probably by the end of 1121." David Crouch, ‘Robert, first earl of Gloucester (b. before 1100, d. 1147)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 1 Oct 2010
     "9. CP citing Round for between May 1121 and the end of 1122, but see William of Malmesbury, ed Giles who cites 1119 Archived 22 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
Further reading
     "*J. Bradbury, Stephen and Matilda: The Civil War of 1139–53 (Stroud, 1996)
     "*D. Crouch, "Robert of Gloucester's Mother and Sexual Politics in Norman Oxfordshire", Historical Research, 72 (1999) 323–332.
     "*D. Crouch, "Robert, earl of Gloucester and the daughter of Zelophehad," Journal of Medieval History, 11 (1985), 227–43.
     "*D. Crouch, The Reign of King Stephen, 1135–1154 (London, 2000).
     "*C. Given-Wilson & A. Curteis. The Royal Bastards of Medieval England (London, 1984)
     "*The Personnel of the Norman Cathedrals during the Ducal Period, 911–1204, ed. David S. Spear (London, 2006)
     "*Earldom of Gloucester Charters, ed. R.B. Patterson (Oxford, 1973)
     "*R.B. Patterson, "William of Malmesbury's Robert of Gloucester: a re-evaluation of the Historia Novella," American Historical Review, 70 (1965), 983–97.
     "*R.B. Patterson. 2019. The Earl, the Kings, and the Chronicler: Robert Earl of Gloucester and the Reigns of Henry I and Stephen. Oxford University Press
     "*William (of Malmesbury) (1904). Sharpe, John; Giles, John Allen (eds.) William of Malmesbury's Chronicle of the Kings of England: From the Earliest Period to the Reign of King Stephen. George Bell and Sons.
     "*K. Thompson, "Affairs of State: the illegitimate children of Henry I," Journal of Medieval History, 29 (2003), 129–151.
     "*W.M.M. Picken, "The Descent of the Devon Family of Willington from Robert Earl of Gloucester" in A Medieval Cornish Miscellany, Ed. O.J. Padel. (Phillimore, 2000.)9

; weis 124-26.

; per Bartlett [2000] p. 5, Robert was the illegitmate son of Henry I.10,6

He was Earl of Gloucester between 1122 and 1147.7

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 49-50, CHESTER 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9.
  3. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:iii.
  6. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 124-26, p. 112. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 15 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003."
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert,_1st_Earl_of_Gloucester. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  11. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:vi.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:ii.
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:iii.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:v.
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 124A-26, p. 112.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:vii.
  18. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I45350
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Gloucester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027602&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudFitzRobertdied1189
  21. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 125-27, p. 125.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.

Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester1,2

M, #4770, b. before 1100, d. 16 December 1153
FatherRanulph III "the Young" (?) de Meschine, 1st Earl of Chester, vicomte de Bayeux et du Bessin3,1,4,2 b. c 1055, d. c 27 Jan 1129
MotherLucia (?) of Alkborough5,6,1,4,2 b. c 1070, d. 1141
ReferenceGAV24 EDV23
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester was born before 1100 at Castle of Gernon, Normandy, France.7,1,4,8,2 He married Maud FitzRobert de Caen of Gloucester, daughter of Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester and Maud Mabel Fitz Hamon, circa 1141.9,7,1,10,11,8,2
Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester died on 16 December 1153; per Genealogics - possibly poisoned.7,8,4,1,2
Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester was buried after 16 December 1153 at Chester Cathedral, Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1100, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     DEATH     16 Dec 1153 (aged 52–53), Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England
     Ranulph of Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester, son of Ranulph le Meschin, 1st 3rd Earl of Chester and Lucy of Bolingbroke. He was born about 1100 in Normandy, France at the Cheateau Guernon.
     Husband of Maud Fitz Robert, the daughter of Robert de Caen, the 1st Earl of Gloucester and the granddaughter of King Henry I of England. They married about about 1141 and had one surviving son, Hugh de Levelioc. Other possible children include Richard of Chester who died at the age of five, and a Beatrice who married Raoul de Malpas. Ranulph also had an illegitimate son, Robert FitzCount who died before 1166.
     Both parents were influential landowners, his father having created the Earl of Chester lineage. Ranulf succeeded to the title of Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy about 1129, then succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Chester, and held the office of Constable of Lincoln in 1136 for King Stephen. He also founded an abbey in Wales for the monks from the Norman congregation of Savigny.
     When King David of Scotland invaded England during Stephen's reign, he took many parts of Cumberland, including lands once belonging to Ranulph's father. At the Treaty of Durham in 1139, Stephen gave David even more of Ranulph's family lands, Ranulph prepared a revolt to take back his lordship in the north. When Ranulph's plant to capture Matilda's son, Prince Henry, went awry, Ranulph turned to Lincoln Castle, aided by his and his brother's wives dressed in ordinary clothes, escorted by knights. They were able to seize the castle and expel the royal guards. Stephen gave Ranulph control of Lincolnshire and Derby, returned to London only to received pleas from the citizens to imprison the brothers based on the treatment the brothers imposed. Stephen returned to Lincoln with reinforcements, resulting in Ranulph's new fidelity to Empress Matilda and the Battle of Lincoln on 02 February 1141 when Stephen was deposed and Matilda ruled again until she exchanged Stephen and the crown for her brother, Robert. Ranulph was again on the wrong side of the crown.
     After the unsuccessful siege of Lincoln Castle, Ranulph switched his loyalties back to Stephen, leaving Ranulph to quarrel directly with King David of Scotland for his properties. Stephen was about to support Ranulph in a campaign against the Welsh when Stephen was warned by his advisors the Earl had planned a conspiracy against Stephen, who instead provoked Ranulph with the demand for all royal properties. Ranulph refused and was imprisoned, seized at court on 29 August 1146 at Northampton. Ranulph was finally released on the condition he would surrender the royal lands and promise to never resist Stephen again. When he was released, Ranulph immediately flew into a raged revolt, this time forcing the Clares of Hertford into the conflict.
     Ranulph met with Prince Henry and King David at Carlisle to plan an attack on York against Stephen's son, Eustace, which failed miserably. Eventually, Stephen lost control and soon to be King Henry II granted Staffordshire to Ranulph.
     Ranulph was poisoned while a guest in the home of William Peverell in Nottingham, along with three of his men. The men died immediately, Ranulph died an agonizing death late that year, leaving his lands to his son, Hugh. The lands Ranulph held when Stephen took command were honored while remaining lands were revoked. When young Henry became king, he exiled Peverell for the murder.
     It was rumored Ranulph's wife, Maud, had a hand in his murder, but nothing was ever proved. Ranulph did grant her a servant on his death bed, and she served as her minor son's guardian for nine years.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Ranulf Le Meschin 1070–1128
          Lucy de Bolingbroke le Meschin 1079–1138
     Spouse
          Maud de Caen 1120–1189
     Siblings
          William I de Roumare
     Half Siblings
          Beatrix de Taillebois of Middleham unknown–1122
          Christiana de Taillebois de Kendal unknown–1138
     Children
          Hugh de Kevelioc 1147–1181
     BURIAL     Chester Cathedral, Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 25 Feb 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 85696826
     SPONSORED BY Steve Goodrich.12
Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester was buried after 16 December 1153 at St. Werberg's, Chester, Cheshire, England.7


     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Ranulph was born about 1100 at Gernon Castle, Normandy, the son of Ranulph de Meschines, 1st earl of Chester, vicomte de Bayeux, and Lucia of Alkborough. He inherited the earldom of Chester on the death of his father in 1128 or 1129. About 1141 he married Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert de Caen, 1st earl of Gloucester, an illegitimate son of King Henry I, and Mabel FitzHamon. They had four children, of whom Hugh and Joanna would have progeny.
     “His father had held extensive lands in Cumberland, which he surrendered to Henry I upon receiving the earldom of Chester. Ranulph took the view that his father had been forced to give up these lands. This deeply compromised his relationship with Henry's successor Stephen de Blois, who in 1136 granted Doncaster and Carlisle to David I, king of Scots, the latter included much of Cumberland. In 1139 Stephen was even more generous, granting David's son Henry the earldom of Northumbria which included Carlisle, Cumberland, Westmoreland and Lancashire north of the river Ribble. This led Ranulph to revolt against Stephen in order to win back what he regarded as rightfully his.
     “Ranulph and his half-brother William de Roumare seized Stephen's Lincoln Castle. Stephen reached an accommodation with the brothers, not wishing to alienated Ranulph and push him into the camp of the Empress Matilda. Ranulph was rewarded with administrative and military powers over Lincolnshire and the town and castle of Derby.
     “Soon after, Stephen reneged on his agreement with Ranulph and in January 1141 he attacked Lincoln Castle. Ranulph escaped and appealed to his father-in-law Robert of Gloucester, on grounds that his wife Maud, Robert's daughter, was besieged in Lincoln. Robert was the key supporter of Empress Matilda, and in return for Robert's assistance, Ranulph pledged fidelity to the empress.
     “Robert and Ranulph joined forces and routed Stephen's army before Lincoln, and Stephen himself was captured, along with many of his magnates. Ranulph took the opportunity to capture the earl of Richmond's northern castles in the weeks after the battle.
     “In September 1141 Ranulph was with Empress Matilda at Winchester, where her force was besieging the town. Stephen's queen rushed to Winchester with her own army, led by William of Ypres, and surrounded the besieging force. Its commander Robert of Gloucester decided to fight his way out, but the battle was a disaster for the army of the empress. Robert was captured, but Ranulph escaped and fled back to Chester. Later that year Robert was exchanged for Stephen.
     “In 1145 Ranulph defected from the empress to Stephen, seeing an opportunity to recover his northern lands, as David, king of Scots was an ally of Stephen. However Ranulph's accommodation with Stephen was short lived; Ranulph was told that the king would not help him unless he restored all the property he had taken and delivered hostages for his future loyalty. Ranulph refused, on the basis that this had not been his understanding of his agreement with the king. He was arrested and imprisoned in chains, and was released only when he agreed to surrender all the royal lands and castles he had seized, including Lincoln, gave hostages and took an oath not to resist the king in future.
     “However Ranulph was furious at the king's failure to keep his word, and immediately revolted against him. He attempted unsuccessfully to recover the castles of Lincoln and Coventry.
     “In 1149 Ranulph resolved his territorial disputes with David of Scotland in Carlisle, reaching a compromise whereby the southern portion of the honour of Lancaster, the land between the Ribble and the Mersey, was conceded to Ranulph, who in return resigned his claim on Carlisle. A marriage was arranged between one of Ranulph's sons and one of David's granddaughters.
     “In the same year the young Prince Henry, trying to escape south after an aborted attack on York, was forced to avoid the ambushes of Eustace, King Stephen's son. Ranulph created a diversion to help Henry by attacking Lincoln. He was unable to take Lincoln, but he drew Stephen there, allowing Henry to escape.
     “Ranulph's territorial power now extended into Leicestershire and Warwickshire, bringing him face-to-face with Robert de Beaumont, 2nd earl of Leicester. Between 1149 and 1153 Ranulph and Robert negotiated a careful treaty to govern their relationship.
     “In 1153 Henry, while still duke, granted Staffordshire to Ranulph. In that year Ranulph barely survived an attempt at murder by one of his arch enemies, William Peverel 'the Younger', when he and his men were guests at Peverel's house. William had poisoned the wine they had drunk. Three of Ranulph's men died, but he appeared to recover as he had drunk less than his men. Peverel was exiled from England after Henry became king. Ranulph died on 16 December 1153, possibly from the effect of the poisoning. He was succeeded by his son Hugh.”.1 He was Vicomte d'Avranches at Normandy, France.9

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 365.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: 11.1


; This is the same person as ”Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester” at Wikipedia.13 GAV-24 EDV-23 GKJ-24.14 Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester was also known as Ranulph de Gernons 2nd Earl of Chester.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "RANULF "de Gernon", son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin "le Meschin" & his wife Lucy --- (Château de Gernon, Normandy before 1100-[murdered] 16 Dec 1153, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[90]. He succeeded his father in [1129] as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches. The Annales Cestrienses record in 1128 the death of “Ranulphus Miscinus comes Cestrie” and the succession of “Rannulphus comes filius eius”[91]. Stephen King of England appointed him Constable of Lincoln. Earl Ranulf fought against King Stephen at Lincoln in 1141 and was seized by the king at court in Northampton 29 Aug 1146. The Annales Cestrienses record in 1141 “III Non Feb” that King Stephen was captured “a duobus comittibus...Ranulpho comite Cestriæ et a Roberto comite Gloucestrie...in bello apud Lincolniam” and in 1146 that “Ranulphus comes de Cestrie” was captured by King Stephen “apud Northamantiam IV Kal Sep”[92]. King Stephen nevertheless granted him the castle and city of Lincoln, probably after 1151. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "Ranulfus comes Cestriæ"[93]. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1154 of "Radulphus comes Urbis Legionum"[94]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1153 of “Ranulphus II comes Cestrie”[95]. A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “XVI Kal Jan” of “Ranulfus de Gernons” and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[96]. It was alleged that he was poisoned by his wife and by William Peverell of Nottingham[97]. Ralph de Diceto records that "Willelmus Peverel de Notingeham" was disinherited in 1155 for poisoning "Ranulfo comiti Cestriæ"[98].
     "m ([1141]) MATILDA of Gloucester, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Matilda or Sibylle] FitzRobert (-29 Jul 1190). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Ranulfus comes Cestriæ" as "filia Roberti comitis Gloecestriæ"[99]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie” held by “Matillis comitissa Cestrie…filia Roberti comitis Gloecestrie, filii regis Henrici primi”[100]. It was alleged that she and William Peverell of Nottingham poisoned her husband[101]. "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[102]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “IV Kal Aug” in 1190 of “Matildis comitissa Cestria”[103]."
Med Lands cites:
[90] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[91] Annales Cestrienses, p. 16.
[92] Annales Cestrienses, p. 20.
[93] Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 281.
[94] Annales Cambriæ, p. 45.
[95] Annales Cestrienses, p. 22.
[96] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Priory, Lincolnshire XI, Hugonis primi Comitis Cestriæ…, p. 218.
[97] CP III 167.
[98] Ex Radulfi de Diceto imaginibus historiarum, RHGF XIII, p. 185.
[99] Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 281.
[100] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Balteslawe Wapentak, p. 8.
[101] CP III 167.
[102] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Greenfield, 150, p. 99.
[103] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 54.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA FitzRobert (-29 Jul 1190). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Ranulfus comes Cestriæ" as "filia Roberti comitis Gloecestriæ"[1708]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie” held by “Matillis comitissa Cestrie…filia Roberti comitis Gloecestrie, filii regis Henrici primi”[1709]. It was alleged that she and William Peverell of Nottingham poisoned her husband[1710]. "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[1711]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “IV Kal Aug” in 1190 of “Matildis comitissa Cestria”[1712].
     "m ([1141]) RANULF “de Gernon” Earl of Chester, son of RANULPH “le Meschin” Vicomte de Bayeux & his wife Lucy --- (Château de Gernon, Normandy before 1100-[murdered] 16 Dec 1153, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburg)."
Med Lands cites:
[1708] Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 281.
[1709] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Balteslawe Wapentak, p. 8.
[1710] CP III 167.
[1711] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Greenfield, 150, p. 99.
[1712] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 54.11

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ranulph de Meschines: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027601&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RanulfChesterdied1153. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RanulfChesterdied1129B
  4. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 132A-27, p. 128.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  5. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucia of Alkborough: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027599&tree=LEO
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 49-50, CHESTER 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  8. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 125-27, p. 125.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 125-27, p. 114. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Gloucester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027602&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudFitzRobertdied1189
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 21 December 2020), memorial page for Ranulf of Gernons (1100–16 Dec 1153), Find a Grave Memorial no. 85696826, citing Chester Cathedral, Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85696826. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_de_Gernon,_4th_Earl_of_Chester. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 49-50, CHESTER 6:ii.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joanna de Meschines: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027713&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027679&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HughChesterdied1181