Elizabeth Gall1

F, #48151, b. 4 May 1789
FatherGeorge Gall Jr.1 b. 28 Jun 1766, d. 1 Jul 1853
MotherSusannah Nicholas1 b. 25 Jan 1764, d. 1800
Last Edited4 Mar 2002
     Elizabeth Gall was born on 4 May 1789.1 She married John Clark in 1804.1

Family

John Clark

Citations

  1. [S1223] Olice Gall Newcomer, The Gall and Williams Genealogy (n.p.: n.pub., 1953). Hereinafter cited as The Gall and Williams Genealogy.

John Clark1

M, #48152
Last Edited4 Mar 2002
     John Clark married Elizabeth Gall, daughter of George Gall Jr. and Susannah Nicholas, in 1804.1

Family

Elizabeth Gall b. 4 May 1789

Citations

  1. [S1223] Olice Gall Newcomer, The Gall and Williams Genealogy (n.p.: n.pub., 1953). Hereinafter cited as The Gall and Williams Genealogy.

Margaret Arbogast1

F, #48153
Last Edited4 Mar 2002
     Margaret Arbogast was born at Highland Co., Virginia, USA.1 She married John Gall, son of George Gall Jr. and Susannah Nicholas, on 3 January 1817.1

Family

John Gall b. 7 Nov 1790, d. 8 Jan 1878

Citations

  1. [S1223] Olice Gall Newcomer, The Gall and Williams Genealogy (n.p.: n.pub., 1953). Hereinafter cited as The Gall and Williams Genealogy.

Sarah Williams1

F, #48155
Last Edited4 Mar 2002
     Sarah Williams married George Gall, son of George Gall Jr. and Susannah Nicholas, on 25 June 1817.1

Family

George Gall b. 8 Feb 1794, d. Oct 1851

Citations

  1. [S1223] Olice Gall Newcomer, The Gall and Williams Genealogy (n.p.: n.pub., 1953). Hereinafter cited as The Gall and Williams Genealogy.

Thomas Williams1

M, #48156
Last Edited4 Mar 2002
     Thomas Williams married Susannah Gall, daughter of George Gall Jr. and Susannah Nicholas, on 15 October 1815.1

Family

Susannah Gall b. 18 Oct 1797, d. 14 Apr 1882

Citations

  1. [S1223] Olice Gall Newcomer, The Gall and Williams Genealogy (n.p.: n.pub., 1953). Hereinafter cited as The Gall and Williams Genealogy.

Clovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy1,2,3,4

M, #48157, b. circa October 634, d. November 657
FatherDagobert I (?) King of Austraisa, King of the Franks1,5,3,4,6,7 b. bt 608 - 610, d. 19 Jan 639
MotherNantechildis/Nantilda (?) Queen of the Franks8,3,5,4,7 d. 645
ReferenceGAV36
Last Edited7 Sep 2020
     Clovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy was born circa October 634.3,5 He married Saint Bathilde (?) Queen of the Franks between 648 and 649; Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says m. 651; Catholic Encyclopedia says m. 649; Med Lands says m. 648.3,9,5,4,10
Clovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy was buried in November 657

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     635
     DEATH     27 Nov 657 (aged 21–22)
     French King. King of Neustria and Burgundy. Clovis was the son of Dagobert I, and grandson of Chlothar II and Haldetrude, half brother to Sigerbert III. Sigebert was the King of Austrasia since 634, and when their father died in 639, Clovis succeeded him as king of Nuestria and Burgundy with his mother, Nanthild, as regent. His mother died in 642 while Clovis was still under age, Clovis fell in love with a slave in the household of Erchinoald, the Mayor of the palace, Balthild, who gave her to him in royal favor. they produced three son who all became kings; Clotaire, Childeric and Theuderic. Clovis died before he reached the age of twenty one.
     Family Members
     Parents
          King Dagobert I 603–639
          Nanthild of Austrasia
     Spouse
          Saint Balthild Ascania 626–680
     Siblings
          Sigebert III King Of Austrasia
     Children
          Theuderic III of Austrasia
          King Chlothar of Neustria 652–673
          Childeric II King Of The Franks 653–675
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find a Grave Memorial 21068.11
Clovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy died in November 657; Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says d. Nov 657; Leo van de Pas says d. 657; Catholic Encyclopedia says d. 656.3,9,5
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.5 GAV-36.

; This is the same person as:
”Clovis II” at Wikipedia and as
”Clovis II” at Wikipédia (Fr.)12,13

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHLODOVECH [Clovis], son of DAGOBERT I King of the Franks & his second wife Nantechildis (633-[Oct/Nov] 657). The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Sighiberto et Chlodovecho" as the two sons of "Dagobertus rex…ex regina sua Nanthilde"[430]. The Gesta Dagoberti and Fredegar both record his birth in the 12th year of his father's reign[431]. From the moment of his birth, his father planned his succession in Neustria, while his older half-brother was to continue to rule in Austrasia. He succeeded his father in [638/39] as CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria, under the regency of his mother and maior domus Aega. After the death of the latter, his successor Erchinoald became effective ruler in Neustria. "Chlodovius rex Francorum" names "genitoris nostri Dagobercthi regis…genetrix nostra domna Nantechilda", the latter also subscribing the document, in his donation of property to the abbey of St Denis dated to [645][432]. King Clovis II was involved in the capture and execution of Grimoald maior domus of Austrasia. According to the Continuator of Fredegar, "in his latter years his mind became affected"[433]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum states that King Clovis was dedicated to fornication, gluttony and drink and died after reigning 16 years[434]. According to The Continuator of Fredegar, he died after reigning 18 years[435].
     "m (648) BATHILDIS, daughter of --- (-convent of Chelles [680], bur convent of Chelles, église Sainte-Croix). The Vita Sanctæ Balthildis names "Balthildaem reginam…ex genere Saxonum", without giving further details about her origin, and records her marriage to "Chlodoveum Dagoberti quondam regis filium"[436]. According to the Continuator of Fredegar, she was "a sensible and attractive woman"[437]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records the marriage of "Chlodovechum filium eius [=regis Daygoberti]" and "de genere Saxonorum…Balthilde[438]. She was regent in Neustria for her son King Clotaire III[439], and installed her son Childerich as king in Austrasia. "Chlothacharius rex Francorum" donated property to the monastery "in civitatis Trecassinæ" by charter dated to [657/58] which names "genitor noster Chlodoveus…genitrix nostra Baltildis regina", the latter also subscribing the charter[440]. She was forced to retire to the convent of Chelles in 664, when her son King Clotaire III reached the age of majority, by maior domus Ebroin."
Med Lands cites:
[430] Liber Historiæ Francorum 43, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 314.
[431] Gesta Dagoberti I Regis Francorum 32, MGH SS rer. Merov. II, p. 412, and Fredegar, IV, 76, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 159.
[432] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 18, p. 19.
[433] Fredegar (Continuator), 1, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 169.
[434] Liber Historiæ Francorum 44, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 316.
[435] Fredegar (Continuator), 1.
[436] Vita Sanctæ Balthildis, MGH SS rer. Merov. II, pp. 483 and 485.
[437] Fredegar (Continuator), 1, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 169.
[438] Liber Historiæ Francorum 43, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 315.
[439] Fredegar (Continuator), 1, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 169, and Liber Historiæ Francorum 44, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 317.
[440] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 33, p. 31.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Merovingians 2): “[2m.] Clovis II "Le Fainéant", *ca X.634, +XI.657, King of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans and Bourgogne (639-657), King of Metz (Austrasia) and all the Land of Franks (656-657); m.651 St.Bathilde (+Monastère de Chelles 685)”.3 He was King of Neustria and Burgundy between 639 and 657.1 He was King of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans and Bourgogne between 639 and 657.3 He was King of Metz (Austrasia) and all the Land of Franks (656-657) between 656 and 657.3

Family

Saint Bathilde (?) Queen of the Franks b. c 636, d. Jan 680
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIIdied657B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dagobert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199467&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#DagobertIdied638B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nantilda: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199470&tree=LEO
  9. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Bathilde: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02348b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199478&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 30 June 2020), memorial page for King Clovis II (635–27 Nov 657), Find a Grave Memorial no. 21068, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21068. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_II. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Clovis II: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_II. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199479&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199480&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199484&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodericIIIdied691

Chlothar/Chlothachar III (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4

M, #48158, b. circa 652, d. between 10 March 673 and 9 May 673
FatherClovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy1,2,3,5,4 b. c Oct 634, d. Nov 657
MotherSaint Bathilde (?) Queen of the Franks6,2,3,4,7 b. c 636, d. Jan 680
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Chlothar/Chlothachar III (?) King of the Franks was born circa 652; Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says b. ca 652; Leo van de Pas says b. 654.2,3
Chlothar/Chlothachar III (?) King of the Franks died between 10 March 673 and 9 May 673.2,3
     ; Chlothar III, *ca 652, +10.3./9.5.673, King of Metz (Austrasie) (656-600), of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Bourgogne, Orléans and all the Land of Franks (657-673.)2

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.3 He was King of all Franks between 656 and 660.1,2 He was King of Neustria between 657 and 673.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199479&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIIdied657B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO
  6. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Bathilde: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02348b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199478&tree=LEO

Childerich III (?) King the Franks1,2,3

M, #48159, b. circa 653, d. 675
FatherClovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy1,2,3,4,5 b. c Oct 634, d. Nov 657
MotherSaint Bathilde (?) Queen of the Franks3,6,2,5,7 b. c 636, d. Jan 680
Last Edited30 Jun 2020
     Childerich III (?) King the Franks was born circa 653.3 He married Bilchilde/Bilihilde/Blitilde (?), daughter of Saint Sigebert III (?) King of Austrasia and Hymnegilde/Immichilde (?), circa 668.8,2,3
Childerich III (?) King the Franks died in 675; murdered in the forest of Lognes.2,3
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.2

; Childerich II, *ca 653, +murdered in forrest of Lognes, 675, King of Metz (Austrasie) (660-675), Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne and all the Land of Franks (673-675); m.ca 668 Bilihilde (+675), dau.of King Sigebert III of Metz (Austrasie.)3 He was King of Austrasia between 662 and 675.1 He was King of all Franks between 673 and 675.1

Family

Bilchilde/Bilihilde/Blitilde (?) d. 675
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199480&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIIdied657B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Bathilde: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02348b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199478&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bilchilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199481&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dagobert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199483&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199482&tree=LEO

Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4

M, #48160, b. circa 653, d. 691
FatherClovis/Chlodovech II "le Fainéant" (?) King of Neustria and Burgundy5,6,7,2,4,3 b. c Oct 634, d. Nov 657
MotherSaint Bathilde (?) Queen of the Franks8,9,2,10,4,3 b. c 636, d. Jan 680
ReferenceGAV35
Last Edited8 Sep 2020
     Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks was born circa 653; Genealogics says b. ca 653; Med Lands says b. 651.1,4,3 He married Chlotilde/Doda/Chrothechildis/Rotilde (?), daughter of AnsegiselAnguiseAnchises (?) Mayor of Austrasia and Saint Begga (?) of Landen; his 1st wife.6,11,12,13,4,3 Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks married Amalberge (?), daughter of Wandregisis (?) and Farahild (?), before 674; Per Wikipedia: "He married Amalberge (Saint Amalaberga) before 674, daughter of Wandregisis and Farahild.“.1
Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks died circa 691; Med Lands and Genealogics say ca 2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691.1,4,3
Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks died in 691.14
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:2.4
GAV-35.

; This is the same person as ”Theuderic III” at Wikipedia and as ”Thierry III” at Wikipédia (FR).1,15 Theuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks was also known as Theodoric III King of the Franks.5,14,6

; Per Genealogy.EU (Meroveans 2): “D3. Theodoric III, *ca 12.4./2.9.652, +St.Vaast d'Arras I.691, King of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans and Bourgogne (673), King of Bourgogne and all the Land of Franks (675-691), King of Autrasie (679-691); 1m: Clotilde N; 2m: Doda N (+after 691)”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "THEODERICH, son of CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria & his wife Bathildis --- ([651]-[2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691], bur Arras, basilique Saint-Vaast). The Liber Historiæ Francorum names (in order) "Chlotharium, Childericum atque Theudericum" as the three sons of "Chlodoveus…ex Balthilde regina eius", recording in the following paragraph that Theoderich succeeded his brother after a reign of 4 years[469]. The parentage of "Theodorici regis" is given in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[470]. He succeeded his brother in 673 as THEODERICH III King of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy, under the protection of the maior domus Ebroin. After the latter was deposed and imprisoned at Luxeuil, King Theoderich was deposed, tonsured[471], forced to become a monk at Saint-Denis, and replaced by his younger brother Childerich. After the latter's assassination, King Theoderich was restored in Neustria end 675. After the maior domus Berthar was defeated by the Austrasians, King Theoderich was forced to flee but was captured by Pépin, maior domus in Austrasia. According to the Continuator of Fredegar, he died "after a reign of seventeen years"[472]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records the death of "Theudericus rex" after a reign of 19 years[473]. The Chronicon Sancti Medardi Suessionensis records the death in 693 of “Theodericus Rex” and the accession of “Clodoveus filius eius”[474].
     "m CHROTECHILDIS [Rotilde] [Doda], daughter of --- (-692 or after). "Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property at the request of "regine nostre Chrodochilde…et…Berchario maiorem domos nostre" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 30 Oct 688[475]. "Chrotechildis regina" is named as mother of King Clovis III in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin[476]. She was regent for her son King Chlodovech III until 692. The necrology of Arras Saint-Vaast names "Theodericus rex Galliæ, Doda uxor regina"[477]. The epitaph of King Theoderich III and his wife bore the inscription "rex Theodericus…cum coniuge Doda", assumed to be another name by which Rotilde was known[478]. Settipani approves the theory of Maurice Chaume that the wife of King Theoderich III was Doda, daughter of maior domus Ansegisel[479]. The primary source evidence which provides the evidence for this theory has not yet been identified. As noted in the document MEROVINGIAN NOBILITY, Doda was the possible name of Ansegisel’s mother, based only on a later source."
Med Lands cites:
[469] Liber Historiæ Francorum 44 and 45, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 317.
[470] Saint-Bertin, p. 33.
[471] Fredegar (Continuator), 2, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 169.
[472] Fredegar (Continuator), 6, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 172.
[473] Liber Historiæ Francorum 49, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 323.
[474] Chronica Sancti Medardi Suessionensis, Spicilegium II, p. 487.
[475] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 57, p. 51.
[476] Saint-Bertin, p. 36.
[477] Van Drival (ed.) Nécrologe de l'abbaye de Saint-Vaast d'Arras (1878) (Arras), p. 4.
[478] RHFG III, p. 367, quoted in Settipani, p. 115 footnote 491.
[479] Settipani (1993), p. 115, footnote 495 citing Chaume, M. 'La famille de saint Guillaume de Gellone' Annales de Bourgogne (1929), p. 48, n. 1 [not yet consulted].3


; Per Med Lands:
     "[DODA [Chrothechildis/Rotilde] (-692 or after). Settipani "[croit] exacte" the theory of Maurice Chaume according to which Doda, wife of King Theoderic III, was the daughter of Ansegisel[103]. The primary source evidence which provides the evidence for this theory has not yet been identified. As noted above, Doda was the possible name of Ansegisel’s mother, based only on a later source. "Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property at the request of "regine nostre Chrodochilde…et…Berchario maiorem domos nostre" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 30 Oct 688[104]. "Chrotechildis regina" is named as mother of King Chlodovech III in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin[105]. She was regent for her son King Chlodovech III until 692. The epitaph of King Theoderic III and his wife bore the inscription "rex Theodericus…cum coniuge Doda", assumed to be another name by which Rotilde was known[106].
     "m THEODERIC III King of the Franks in Neustria, son of CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria & his wife Bathildis --- ([651]-[2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691], bur Arras, basilique Saint-Vaast).]"
Med Lands cites:
[103] Settipani (1993), p. 115, footnote 495 citing Chaume, M. 'La famille de saint Guillaume de Gellone' Annales de Bourgogne (1929), p. 48, n. 1 [not yet consulted].
[104] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 57, p. 51.
[105] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris), p. 36.
[106] RHGF, Tome III, p. 367, quoted in Settipani, p. 115 footnote 491.13
He was King of Neustria between 673 and 698.5 He was King of all Franks between 678 and 691.5 He was King of the Franks between 679 and 691.1

Family 1

Chlotilde/Doda/Chrothechildis/Rotilde (?) b. bt 650 - 651, d. a 5 Jun 692
Children

Family 2

Amalberge (?) d. a 691

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theuderic_III. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIIdied657B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodericIIIdied691
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199484&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199477&tree=LEO
  8. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Bathilde: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02348b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199478&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert,_Count_of_Hesbaye.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199485&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#DodaMTheodericIII
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodorich III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199484&tree=LEO
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Thierry III: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thierry_III. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).

Chilperich II (?) King of the Franks1,2,3

M, #48161, b. circa 670, d. 13 February 721
FatherChilderich III (?) King the Franks1,2,3,4 b. c 653, d. 675
MotherBilchilde/Bilihilde/Blitilde (?)2,5,3 d. 675
Last Edited15 Aug 2004
     Chilperich II (?) King of the Franks was born circa 670.2
Chilperich II (?) King of the Franks died on 13 February 721 at Noyon, France (now); Genealogy.EU Merove 2 page says d. 13 Feb 721; Leo van de Pas says d. 720.2,3
     ; Chilperich II, *ca 670, +Noyon 13.2.721, King of Metz (Austrasie) (715-721), King of Soissons (Neustrie), Bourgogne, Paris, Orléans and all the Land of Franks (715-721); m.NN (a princesse.)2

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.3 He was King of Neustria between 715 and 721.1 He was King of all Franks between 719 and 720.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199482&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199480&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bilchilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199481&tree=LEO

Childeric III (?) King of the Franks1

M, #48162
FatherChilperich II (?) King of the Franks1 b. c 670, d. 13 Feb 721
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Childeric III (?) King of the Franks was King of all Franks between 743 and 751.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Clovis III/IV (?) King of the Franks1,2,3

M, #48163, b. 682, d. 695
FatherTheuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks1,2,4,5 b. c 653, d. 691
MotherChlotilde/Doda/Chrothechildis/Rotilde (?)2,6,5 b. bt 650 - 651, d. a 5 Jun 692
Last Edited7 Sep 2020
     Clovis III/IV (?) King of the Franks was born in 682.2
Clovis III/IV (?) King of the Franks died in 695 at Compiègne, France (now).2
     ; [1m.] Clovis III, *682, +Compiègne 695, King of Metz (Austrasie), King of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne and all the Land of Franks (691-695.)2 He was King of all Franks between 691 and 695.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_IV. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199484&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodericIIIdied691. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199485&tree=LEO

Childebert III (?) King of the Franks1,2

M, #48164, b. circa 683, d. 14 April 711
FatherTheuderic/Theodorich III (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4 b. c 653, d. 691
MotherChlotilde/Doda/Chrothechildis/Rotilde (?)2,5,4 b. bt 650 - 651, d. a 5 Jun 692
Last Edited7 Sep 2020
     Childebert III (?) King of the Franks married Ermenchilis (?)2 Childebert III (?) King of the Franks was born circa 683.2
Childebert III (?) King of the Franks died on 14 April 711 at Compiègne, France (now).2
     ; [1m.] Childebert III, *ca 683, +Compiègne 14.4.711, King of Soissons (Neustrie), King of Metz (Austrasie), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne and all the Land of Franks (695-711); m.Ermenchilis N.2 He was King of all Franks between 695 and 711.1

Family

Ermenchilis (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199484&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodericIIIdied691. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199485&tree=LEO

Dagobert III (?) King of the Franks1,2

M, #48165, b. circa 699, d. 31 December 715
FatherChildebert III (?) King of the Franks1,2 b. c 683, d. 14 Apr 711
MotherErmenchilis (?)2
Last Edited15 Aug 2004
     Dagobert III (?) King of the Franks was born circa 699.2
Dagobert III (?) King of the Franks died on 31 December 715.2
     ; Dagobert III, *ca 699, +31.12.715, King of Metz (Austrasie), de Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne and all the Land of Franks (711-715); m.NN.2 He was King of all Franks between 711 and 716.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html

Theodoric IV (?) King of the Franks1,2

M, #48166, b. circa 713, d. 737
FatherDagobert III (?) King of the Franks1,2 b. c 699, d. 31 Dec 715
Last Edited15 Aug 2004
     Theodoric IV (?) King of the Franks was born circa 713.2
Theodoric IV (?) King of the Franks died in 737.2
     ; Theodorich IV de Chelles, *ca 713, +737, King of Soissons (Neustrie), Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne, Metz (Austrasie) (721-737.)2 He was King of all Franks between 721 and 737.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 2 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove2.html

Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks1,2,3

M, #48167, b. between 499 and 502, d. 29 November 561
FatherClovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks4,5,6,3,7,8 b. 466, d. 27 Nov 511
MotherSaint Clotilde/Chrotechilde (?) of Burgundy3,6,4,7,8 b. c 475, d. 3 Jun 545
ReferenceGAV40 EDV40
Last Edited15 Sep 2020
     Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks was born between 499 and 502; Desc. of King Clodion says b. 0499; Genealgy.EU Merove 1 page says b. ca 497; Genealogics says b. 500; Med Lands says v. 501/502.5,3,6,4 He married Guntheuca (?), daughter of Gondebaut/Gondebad I (?) King of the Burgundians at Vienne and Gontheuque (?) of the Ostrogoths, in 524;
His 1st/2nd? wife' her 2nd husband.6,9,3,4 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks married Ingunde/Ingonde (?) des Francs, daughter of Baderic/Baderich/Balderich/Boderic (?) Co-King of the Thuringii., in 532; his 1st/3rd? wife; Genealogics says m. ca 516; Med Lands says m. 532.10,3,4 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks married Aregunde (?) Queen of the Franks, daughter of Baderic/Baderich/Balderich/Boderic (?) Co-King of the Thuringii., between 533 and 534; per Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page, sister of his first wife, Ingonde.11,12,4 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks married Saint Radegonda (?), daughter of Berthaire (?) King of Thuringia, circa 540; Med Lands says m. 531.5,6,13,3,4 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks married Walderada/Vuldetrada (?), daughter of Wacho (?) King of the Lombards and Austrigusa (?), circa 555;
Her 2nd(?) husband. Waldrada may have been Clothaire's mistress or they may have married.14,6,3,15,16,4
Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks died on 29 November 561 at Compiègne, France (now); Med Lands says d. "[30 Nov/31 Dec] 561."17,5,3,18,4
Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks was buried after 29 November 561 at Abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons, Soissons, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     497
     DEATH     29 Nov 561 (aged 63–64)
     Nobility, King of Soissons and King of the Franks from 558 on. Born around 497 he succeeded his father Clovis I in 511. He was married at least five times and had at least six children. When he died in 561 in Compiègne his four sons divided the Kingdom among each other.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Clovis I 465–511
      Saint Clotilde
     Spouses
      Ingonde des Francs 499–563
      Radegunde of Thuringia unknown–587
      Aregund of Thuringia
     Siblings
      Clotilde of The Franks unknown–531
      King Chlodomer of Orléans 495–524
      King Childebert I 496–558
     Children
      Chilperic de Neustria unknown–584
      Charibert I de Paris 517–567
      Sigebert I d'Austrasia 535–575
     BURIAL     Abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons (Defunct), Soissons, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 14 Mar 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 49674207
     SPONSORED BY Elizabeth Morrow.18
     ; Per Descendants of King Clodion: "CLOTHAIRE I5 (Clovis I4, Childeric I3, Merovaeus2, Clodion1), son of (4) King Clovis I4 the Great and (GU-4) Saint Chlotilda, was born in 499, and died in 561. He married RADEGONDA. [1]
     "Clothaire was the youngest son of Clovis I.
     "He was king of Soissons, 511-561, which consisted of Soissons, Laon, Amiens, Cambrai, Terouanne and Limoges, being largely the original Merovingian kingdom.
     "He conquered Burgundy and provence, 534-536; from 558 until his death, 561, he was the sole king of the Franks.
Child:
     "+     6     i.     KING CHILPERIC I6 OF NEUSTRIA of Neustria, France, b. in 539, d. in 584; m. FREDEGONDA."19 GAV-40 EDV-40.

; Per Genealogics: "By the middle of the sixth century the Merovingians had become by far the most powerful of the barbarian heirs to the Roman Empire. Almost all Gaul was under their direct rule; they had a foothold in Italy and overlordship over the Thuringians, Alamans, and Bavarians in Germany; and the suzerainty they claimed over south-east England may have been more of a reality than most English historians have thought. The dying words of Chlotar I were quite understandable: 'Wa! What kind of king is it in heaven, who kills off kings as great as me?20'"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Chlothar I "Le Vieux" "The Old" (Chlothar), *ca 497, +Compiègne 29.11.561, King of Soissons (Neustrie) (511-561), of Orléans (532-561), of Bourgogne (534-561), of Autrasie (55-561), of Paris and Land of Franks (558-561); 1m: ca 517 Ingonde N; 2m: 524, Haregonde N, sister of previous; 3m: Chunsene /Gunsine /Gunsinde N; 4m: 538 St.Radegonde (*519 +587), dau.of King Berthaire of Thuringia; 5m: Gondiuque, a widow of Clodomir, King of Orléans; 6m: ca 555 Waldrade, a dau.of Wacho, King of Lombards and Ostrogoths."3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: I-1 1.20
Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks was also known as Lothair (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks.21 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks was also known as Chlothachar (?) King of the Franks.4 Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks was also known as Clathar I "the Old/le Vieux" (?) King of the Franks.22

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire/Lothar], son of CHLODOVECH King of the Franks & his second wife Chrotechildis of Burgundy ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard). Gregory of Tours names Clotaire as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Childebert[145]. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[146]. He succeeded his father in 511 as CLOTAIRE I King of the Franks, at Soissons, his territory covering Soissons, Laon, Noyon, Arras, Cambrai, Tournai and the lower Meuse, the lands which were later to become the kingdom of Neustria. Gregory of Tours records that King Clotaire and his half-brother King Theoderich invaded Thuringia in 531, deposed King Hermanfred and annexed the kingdom, specifying that Clotaire brought his second wife back as part of his booty[147]. He and his brother King Childebert launched a third attack on Burgundy, besieged Autun and occupied the whole kingdom, deposing King Gondemar II[148] in 534. He invaded Spain, with his brother King Childebert, and besieged Zaragoza but was forced to withdraw[149]. He inherited the territories of his great-nephew King Theodebert in 555 and those of his brother King Childebert in 558, when he became sole king of the Franks. Gregory of Tours records his death, in the fifty-first year of his reign on the first anniversary of the killing of his son Chramn, at Soissons from a fever caught while hunting in the forest of Cuise, and his burial at Soissons Saint Medard[150]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 561 of "Chlothachrius rex"[151].
     "m firstly ([524]) as her second husband, his sister-in-law, GUNTHEUCA [Gondioque], widow of CHLODOMER King of the Franks, daughter of --- [King of Burgundy]. Gregory of Tours names Guntheuc as widow of King Chlodomer and records her second marriage with his brother Clotaire, but does not give her origin[152]. Settipani suggests, for onomastic reasons only, that she may have belonged to the Burgundian royal family which, if correct, means that she must have been the daughter of either King Gondebaud or his brother Godogisel[153]. However, Gregory makes no mention of this in his lengthy description of King Chlodomer's campaigns in Burgundy, an omission which is surprising if the king’s wife was related to his opponents.
     "m secondly (531, repudiated) RADEGUND of Thuringia, daughter of BERTHECHAR [Bertaire] King of the Thuringians & his wife --- (Erfurt 518-Poitiers 13 Aug 587, bur Poitiers, basilique Sainte-Marie-hors-les-Murs). Gregory of Tours names Radegund as the orphaned daughter of Berthar[154]. The Vitæ Sanctæ Radegundis names "Radegundis natione barbare de regione Thoringa" and her "avo rege Bessino, patruo Hermenfredo, patre rege Bertechario"[155]. In a later passage, Gregory records that, after the Frankish invasion of Thuringia, Radegund formed part of the booty taken home by Clotaire I King of the Franks, who later married her[156]. The testament of Radegund dated to [584/87] survives[157]. Gregory of Tours records the death of St Radegund on 13 Aug[158]. She was canonised, her feast day is 13 Aug[159].
     "[m] thirdly ([532]) INGUNDIS [Ingonde], daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Ingund as the wife of King Clotaire and mother of six of his children[160]. She was King Clotaire's concubine from [517][161].
     "[m] fourthly ARNEGUNDIS [Aregonde], sister of his third wife Ingonde, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours specifies that King Clotaire's wife Aregonde was the sister of his wife Ingonde, making clear that the marriage was polygamous as he records that Clotaire reported his "marriage" to Aregonde to his wife Ingonde[162]. She is named "Chæregundem" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum[163].
     "[m] [fifthly] (555, repudiated) [as her second husband], WALDRADA, widow of THEODEBALD King of the Franks, daughter of WACCHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides. According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria"[164], which does not imply that Clotaire married Waldrada. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus"[165]. She married thirdly (after 555) Garibald Duke in Bavaria.
     "Mistress (1): CHUNSINA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Chunsina as the mistress of King Clotaire, mother of Chramn[166]. She is named "Gunsinam" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum[167].
     "Mistress (2): ---. The name of King Clotaire's second mistress is not known.
     "King Clotaire & his third [wife] had [seven] children."
Med lands cites:
[145] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
[146] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
[147] Gregory of Tours III.7, pp. 167-8.
[148] Gregory of Tours III.11, p. 171.
[149] Gregory of Tours III.29, pp. 186-7.
[150] Gregory of Tours IV.21, p. 217.
[151] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
[152] Gregory of Tours III.6, pp. 166-7.
[153] Settipani (1993), p. 66.
[154] Gregory of Tours III.4, p. 164.
[155] Vita Sanctæ Radegundis Liber I, 2, MGH SS rer. Merov. II, p. 365.
[156] Gregory of Tours III.7, p. 168.
[157] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 7, p. 8.
[158] Gregory of Tours IX.2, p. 481.
[159] Attwater, p. 295.
[160] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
[161] Settipani, p. 70.
[162] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
[163] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 286.
[164] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.
[165] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 553, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[166] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
[167] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 286.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "WALDRADA. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda…secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald"[141]. The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum"[142]. Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald"[143]. Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald[144]. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus"[145]. According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria"[146], which does not imply that King Clotaire married Waldrada.
     "m firstly ([554]) THEODEBALD I King of the Franks, son of THEODEBERT I King of the Franks & his first wife Deoteria ([534]-555).
     "[m secondly (555, repudiated) as his fifth wife, CHLOTHACHAR I [Clotaire] King of the Franks, son of CHLODOVECH King of the Franks & his second wife Chrotechildis of Burgundy ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).]
     "m [secondly/thirdly] (after 555) GARIBALD, son of ---. He became Duke of Bavaria in 590."
Med lands cites:
[141] Origo Gentis Langobardorum 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 4.
[142] Historia Langobardorum Codicis Gothani 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 9.
[143] Pauli Historia Langobardorum I.21, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 59.
[144] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 202.
[145] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 553, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[146] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.16


; Per Med Lands:
     "Mistress (1): CHUNSINA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Chunsina as the mistress of King Clotaire, mother of Chramn[166]. She is named "Gunsinam" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum[167]."
Med lands cites:
[166] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
[167] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 286.4
He was King of Soissons between 511 and 561.21,5,3 He was King of Orléans between 532 and 561.3 He was King of Austrasie between 555 and 561.3 He was King of all Franks between 558 and 561.21,5,3

Family 2

Guntheuca (?)

Family 4

Aregunde (?) Queen of the Franks b. bt 515 - 520, d. 580
Child

Family 5

Saint Radegonda (?) b. 518, d. 587

Family 6

Walderada/Vuldetrada (?) b. c 530, d. 570

Citations

  1. [S1646] Alasdair Friend, "Friend email 7 July 2004: "DFA: Scipio - Philagrius - Alfred"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 7 July 2004, Provides theoretical descent from Scipio Africanus to Alfred the Great, suggested by M. Settipani's latest book about the nobility of the Midi. Hereinafter cited as "Friend email 7 July 2004."
  2. [S1647] The Royal French Monarcy, online http://www.scotlandroyalty.org/france.html. Hereinafter cited as The Royal French Monarcy.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClotaireIdied561B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1648] Descendants of King Clodion, online http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_127_main.html. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of King Clodion.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199450&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIB
  8. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online <https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/>, Royaume des Francs: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/merovingiens/roi/#francs_3roi. Hereinafter cited as Royaume Europe.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guntheuca: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199451&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingunde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199453&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aregunde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199454&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Merovingians: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Radegunde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199455&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vuldetrada: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199457&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldrada. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#WaldradaM1TheodebaldIM2ChlothacharI
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 October 2019), memorial page for Clothaire I (497–29 Nov 561), Find A Grave Memorial no. 49674207, citing Abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons (Defunct), Soissons, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/49674207/clothaire_i. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S1648] Descendants of King Clodion, online http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_127_main.html, http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_127_main.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199450&tree=LEO
  21. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 170.
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlothar_I
  23. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faux_M%C3%A9rovingiens#Ansbert_le_s%C3%A9nateur. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ChlodesindisMAlboinLombarddied572
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charibert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314765&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199486&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#SigebertIdied575B
  28. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Sigebert Ier (Mérovingiens): http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=4283569. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chilperich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199458&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ChilpericIdied584B

Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris1,2

M, #48168, b. between 532 and 534, d. 28 March 592
FatherClothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks1,2 b. bt 499 - 502, d. 29 Nov 561
MotherIngunde/Ingonde (?) des Francs2 b. c 499, d. 15 Aug 563
Last Edited5 Apr 2020
     Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris was born between 532 and 534.2,3 He married Marcatrude (?), daughter of Magnachar (?) Dux of Transjurania, in 556;
His 1st wife.2,3 Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris married Austregilde "Bobile" (?) in 566;
His 2nd wife.2,3
Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris died on 28 March 592.2,3
Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris was buried after 28 March 592 at basilique Saint-Marcel, near Chalon-sur-Saône.3


     ; [1m.] Saint Gontrant, *525, +28.3.592, King of Orléans (561-592), of Bourgogne (561-592), of Paris (584-592); 1m: Venerande N; 2m: 556 Marcatrude N (+ca 566) reputiated 565, dau.of Magnachaire, Duke of Franks; 3m: ca 566 Austregilde dit "Bobile" (*ca 548 +580.)2

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUNTCHRAMN [Gontran] ([532/34]-28 Mar 592, bur basilique Saint-Marcel, near Chalon-sur-Saône). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[190]. He succeeded his father in 561 as GONTRAN King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Chlodomer, with Orléans as his capital[191]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561[192]. He adopted his nephew King Childebert II as his successor in 577, the arrangement being renewed under the treaty of Andelot dated 28 Nov 587[193]. Fredegar records the death of King Guntram "anno 33 regni…V Kal Apr" and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Marcelli" in the monastery which he had built[194].
     "m firstly ([556]) MARCATRUDIS, daughter of MAGNACHAR Duke of the Transjuranian Franks & his wife --- (-after [556]). Gregory of Tours names Marcatrude, daughter of Magnachar, as the wife of King Gontran, specifying that she poisoned her stepson Gundobald but died soon after her own son[195].
     "m secondly (566) AUSTRECHILDIS [Bobilla], daughter of --- ([548]-Sep 580). Gregory of Tours names Austrechild "also called Bobilla" as the second wife of King Gontran[196]. She was a servant in the household of his first wife's father. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Austrechild, specifying that "this wicked woman" requested as a dying wish that the two doctors who had unsuccessfully treated her should have their throats cut[197]. An epitaph to “Austrigildis Reginæ” refers to her as “Regum genetrix et Regia conjunx”[198]. The record of the Council of Valence dated 22 Jun 585 names “Guntramni Regis…bonæ memoriæ iugalis sua Austrechildis regina vel filiæ eorum Deo sacratæ puellæ…bonæ memoriæ Clodeberga vel Clodehildis”[199].
     "Mistress (1): (before [549]) VENERANDA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Veneranda, servant of one of his subjects, as the mistress of King Gontran before his first marriage[200]."
Med lands cites:
[190] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
[191] Gregory of Tours IV.22, p. 217.
[192] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
[193] Gregory of Tours V.17 and IX.20, pp. 274-5 and 503-7.
[194] Fredegar, IV, 14, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 127.
[195] Gregory of Tours IV.25, pp. 218-19.
[196] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 219.
[197] Gregory of Tours V.26, pp. 298-9.
[198] RHGF II, p. 536.
[199] MGH Conc. I, p. 162.
[200] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 218.
[201] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 218.3
Saint Gontrant/Guntram (?) King of Orléans, Bourgogne and Paris was also known as Guntchramn/Gontran (?)3

; Per Med Lands:
     "Mistress (1): (before [549]) VENERANDA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Veneranda, servant of one of his subjects, as the mistress of King Gontran before his first marriage[200]."
Med lands cites: [200] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 218.3 He was King of Burgundy between 561 and 592.1 He was King of the Franks between 561 and 592.3 He was King of Orleans between 561 and 592.2 He was King of Paris between 584 and 592.2

Family 1

Marcatrude (?) d. c 566

Family 2

Austregilde "Bobile" (?) b. c 548, d. 580

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#Gontrandied592. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Charibert I (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4

M, #48169, b. circa 520, d. December 567
FatherClothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks1,5,3,4 b. bt 499 - 502, d. 29 Nov 561
MotherIngunde/Ingonde (?) des Francs6,3,4 b. c 499, d. 15 Aug 563
ReferenceGAV40
Last Edited5 Dec 2020
     Charibert I (?) King of the Franks married Marcovefa (?);
His 4th wife.3,7 Charibert I (?) King of the Franks was born circa 520.3,7 He married Ingoberga (?) Queen of the Franks, daughter of Hilarius III (?) and unknown (?);
His 1st wife; later repudiated.2,3,4,7,8 Charibert I (?) King of the Franks married MerofledeMirefleur (?) after 561;
His 2nd wife.3,7 Charibert I (?) King of the Franks married Theodichilde (?) after 561;
His 3rd wife.3,7
Charibert I (?) King of the Franks was buried in December 567 at Saint-Germain-des-Prés Church, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     517, Germany
     DEATH     Dec 567 (aged 49–50), City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     King of the Franks at Paris, 561-567 aka de Neustria.
     Charibert I c. 517 – December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and his first wife Ingund. His elder brother Gunthar died sometime before their father's death. He shared in the partition of the Frankish kingdom that followed his father’s death in 561, receiving the old kingdom of Childebert I, with its capital at Paris. Wikipedia
     Charibert I (French: Caribert; Latin: Charibertus; c. 517 - December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and Ingund. His elder brother was Gunthar, who died sometime before their father's death. When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charibert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c. 568.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Clothaire I 497–561
          Ingonde des Francs 499–563
     Spouse
          Ingoberga de Paris 520–589
     Siblings
          Sigebert I d'Austrasia 535–575
     Half Siblings
          Chilperic de Neustria unknown–584
     Children
          Charibert de Haspengau 555–636
          St Bertha of Kent 565–601
     BURIAL     Saint-Germain-des-Prés Church, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 30 Mar 2015
     Find a Grave Memorial 144374855.7,9
Charibert I (?) King of the Franks died in December 567.10,7
     GAV-39.

; This is the same person as ”Charibert I” at Wikipedia and as ”Caribert Ier” at Wikipédia (FR).11,12

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I-1 1.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARIBERT ([520]-Paris end 567, bur [Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés]). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[171]. It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate. He succeeded his father in 561 as CHARIBERT King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Childebert, with Paris as his capital[172]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561[173]. Herimannus names "Hariberti rex libidini deditus" when recording his marriages[174]. After his death, his kingdom was divided among his brothers.
     "m firstly (repudiated) INGOLBERGA [Ingelberge], daughter of --- ([520]-Tours 589). Gregory of Tours names Ingoberg as the wife of King Charibert, but records that he dismissed her and took Merofled in her place[175]. Herimannus records the repudiation by "Hariberti" of his wife "Ingoberga"[176]. She retired to Tours after her repudiation. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Ingoberg, widow of Charibert, in the fourteenth year of King Childebert's reign, saying he thought that she was in her 70th year[177], although this age seems exaggerated considering the likely birth date of her daughter.
     "[m] secondly (after 561) MEROFLEDIS, daughter of ---, a wool-worker. Gregory of Tours records that King Charibert fell in love with the two daughters of a wool-worker, Marcovefa and Merofled, and that after Queen Ingoberg humiliated their father by making him prepare wool for the royal household he dismissed the Queen and replaced her by Merofled[178].
     "[m] thirdly (after 561) THEODECHILDIS, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Theudechild, daughter of the shepherd who looked after King Charibert's flocks, as another of the king's women and that after Charibert died she offered her hand in marriage to King Gontran, who seized most of her goods and packed her off to a nunnery at Arles from which she unsuccessfully tried to escape[179].
     "[m] fourthly his sister-in-law, MARCOVEFA, sister of MEROFLEDIS, daughter of --- (-before end 567). Gregory of Tours records the marriage of King Charibert and Marcovefa, sister of Merofled, for which they were excommunicated by "Saint Germanus the Bishop", as well as Marcovefa's death soon after before her husband[180]."
Med lands cites:
[171] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
[172] Gregory of Tours IV.22, p. 217.
[173] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
[174] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 563, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[175] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 219.
[176] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 563, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[177] Gregory of Tours IX.26, p. 513.
[178] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 219.
[179] Gregory of Tours IV.26, pp. 219-21.
[180] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 220.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Meroveans 1): "[1m.] Charibert, *ca 520, +Paris 568, King of Paris (561-568); 1m: Ingoberge N (*ca 520 +589); 2m: Meroflede/Mirefleur N; 3m: Marcovefa N (+ca 570); 4m: Theodichilde N (+after 570.)3" He was living in 561.4 He was King of the Franks. See attached map of Charibert's kingdom in 561 ("Royaume de Paris") (from Wikipedia:By Romain0 - Travail personnel sur un fond de carte de historicair : Image:Blank map of Gaul 1st century BC.svg. D'après Paul Vidal de La Blache, Gaule à la mort de Clotaire (561) Image:Division of Gaul - 561.jpg, Atlas général d'histoire et de géographie (1894), Frédéric Armand, Chilpéric Ier, La Louve éditions, 2008, p. 77 et Bruno Dumézil, La reine Brunehaut, éditions Fayard, 2008, p. 536., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9732597) between 561 and 567.1,2

Family 2

Ingoberga (?) Queen of the Franks b. c 520, d. 589
Child

Family 4

Theodichilde (?) d. a 570

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1646] Alasdair Friend, "Friend email 7 July 2004: "DFA: Scipio - Philagrius - Alfred"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 7 July 2004, Provides theoretical descent from Scipio Africanus to Alfred the Great, suggested by M. Settipani's latest book about the nobility of the Midi. Hereinafter cited as "Friend email 7 July 2004."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charibert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314765&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1648] Descendants of King Clodion, online http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_127_main.html. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of King Clodion.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingunde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199453&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClotaireIdied561B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingoberga: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314766&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 05 December 2020), memorial page for Charibert I de Paris (517–Dec 567), Find a Grave Memorial no. 144374855, citing Saint-Germain-des-Prés Church, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/144374855. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert_I
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Caribert Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caribert_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charibert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314765&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314590&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#BertaMEthelbertKentdied616

Sigebert I (?) King of Metz (Austrasia)1,2,3,4,5

M, #48170, b. circa 535, d. circa November 575
FatherClothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks1,3,4,5 b. bt 499 - 502, d. 29 Nov 561
MotherIngunde/Ingonde (?) des Francs6,3,4,5 b. c 499, d. 15 Aug 563
ReferenceGAV40
Last Edited24 Nov 2020
     Sigebert I (?) King of Metz (Austrasia) was born circa 535; Genealogics and Med Lands say b. ca 535.2,7,3,4,5 He married Brunichilde/Brunechildis (?) Queen of the Franks, daughter of Athanagild/Atanagildo (?) King of the Visigoths and Galswinthe of The Vandals (?), between 566 and 568;
Her 1st husband. Genealogics and Roglo say m. 566; Genealogy.EU (Merove 1) says m. 568; Med Lands says m. "early 566."2,8,9,10,3,4,5
Sigebert I (?) King of Metz (Austrasia) was buried circa November 575 at Abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons (Defunct), Soissons, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France.5


Sigebert I (?) King of Metz (Austrasia) died circa November 575 at Vitry, France (now); Murdered. Genealogics says d. Nov 575; Med Lands says d. Nov/Dec 575.2,3,4,5
     He was Per Genealogics:
     “In 561 King Chlotar I died and, according to Frankish custom, his kingdom was divided among his four sons. Sigebert I became king of the north-eastern portion, known as Austrasia, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother Charibert I.
     “Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, compelled him to move his capital from Reims to Metz. In 562 and about 568 he had to repel further attacks.
     “About 567 he married Brunichilde (Brunhilde), daughter of Athanagild, King of the Visigoths, whose other daughter, Galsvintha, was married to Sigebert I's brother Chilperich I. When Chilperich I murdered his wife in order to marry Fredegunde, Sigebert was obliged to seek revenge for Galsvintha. This started a family feud which would be taken over by their descendants.
     “Sigebert defeated Chilperich, conquered most of his kingdom, and forced him to hide in Tournai. However, at the moment of his triumph when he was acclaimed king by Chilperich's subjects, he was murdered by two assassins in the service of Fredegunde.”.3

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.3 GAV-40.

; This is the same person as ”Sigebert I” at Wikipedia and as ”Sigebert Ier” at Wikipédia (FR).11,12

; Per Roglo:
     "Le partage de Clotaire 1er lui attribua l'Austrasie avec Reims et Laon, L'Auvergne et une partie de la Provence (décembre 561).
     "Assassiné en 575 par son demi-frère Chilpéric à Vitry-en-Artois. En effet, Brunehaut avait réussi à faire entrer son mari en guerre contre son frère, pour se venger du meurtre de Galswinthe, tuée sous les ordres de Frédégonde sa concubine."
Roglo cites:
- individual: Y.Gazagnes-Gazanhe, S.Fourlinnie (Histoire des rois de France d'après Pascal Arnoux)
- birth: S.Fourlinnie (Histoire des rois de France par Pascal Arnoux)
- spouse: J-C de Vaugiraud (P.Van Kerrebrouck: La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 1993) 29/05/2006
- family: Y.Gazagnes-Gazanhe, R.Sekulovich http://web.genealogie.free.fr/Les_dynasties/Les_dynasties_celebres/France/Dynastie_Merovingienne.htm [Lien brisé].5


; Per Med Lands:
     "SIGEBERT, son of CLOTAIRE I [Chlothachar] King of the Franks & his third wife Ingundis [Ingonde] ([535]-murdered Vitry [Nov/Dec] 575, bur Lambres transferred to Soissons Saint-Médard). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[238]. He succeeded his father in 561 as SIGEBERT I King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by King Theoderich, with Reims as his capital[239]. These lands were referred to for the first time by Gregory of Tours as Austrasia in 577[240]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561[241]. After the death of his brother King Charibert, Sigebert seized his lands, retaining in particular Poitiers and Tours against the rival claim of his brother King Chilperich[242]. Gregory of Tours records that King Sigebert died 18 days after his nephew Theodebert and 29 years after the death of King Theodebert, specifying in a later passage that he was killed at Vitry, buried first in the village of Lambres then transferred to the church of Saint-Médard in Soissons[243]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "Sigibertus rex Francorum" was killed by men of his brother King Chilperich[244]. Paulus Diaconus records that "Sigispertus rex Francorum" was killed through the treachery of "Hilperici germani sui"[245]. He was probably murdered on the orders of Queen Frédégonde.
     "m (early 566) as her first husband, BRUNECHILDIS [Brunequilda/Brunechilde] of the Visigoths, daughter of ATANAGILDO King of the Visigoths & his wife Gosvinta --- ([545/50]-Renève-sur-Vingeanne Autumn 613, bur Autun, abbaye de Saint-Martin). Gregory of Tours records the marriage of King Sigebert and Brunechildis, daughter of King Atanagildo, describing her as "elegant in all she did, lovely to look at, chaste and decorous in her behaviour, wise in her generation and of good address", specifying that she converted from Arianism to Catholicism and came to France with a large dowry[246]. After her husband's death, her brother-in-law King Chilperich seized her treasure in Paris and banished her to Rouen[247]. Paulus Diaconus records that "Brunihilde matre" became regent after the accession of her son "Childepertus…adhuc puerulus"[248]. She married secondly (Rouen after Easter 576) Merovech, son of King Chilperich I, who was murdered in 577 by Frédégonde. Herimannus records her second marriage to "Meroveus, Hilperici filius"[249]. Her power in Austrasia appears to have increased when her son King Childebert II assumed more direct control from [584], confirmed under the Treaty of Andelot in 587 which recognised her right to protection[250]. According to Fredegar, after her son's death in 596, she was regent for her grandson King Theodebert until 599 when she was "hunted out of Austrasia"[251]. Wood highlights that Pope Gregory I's correspondence with Queen Brunechildis concerning reform of the Frankish church appears to indicate that she still retained power in Austrasia as late as 602[252]. Fredegar reports that she was found "wandering alone near Arcis in Champagne" by a poor man (who was rewarded with the bishopric of Auxerre for his service)[253], and taken to the court of her grandson Theoderich II King of the Franks at Orléans, where she plotted against King Theodebert, culminating in the latter's overthrow and murder in 612 by King Theoderich. Fredegar records that she was the "bedfellow" of Protadius, a Roman, whom she "loaded with honours" and appointed patrician over the territory east of the Jura in [603][254]. After King Clotaire II defeated and captured her great-grandsons in 613, Brunechildis was arrested at the villa of Orbe by the constable Herpo and taken to Clotaire. According to Fredegar, she was tortured for three days, led through the ranks on a camel, and finally tied by her hair, one arm and a leg to the tail of an unbroken horse, being cut to shreds by its hoofs as it ran[255]."
Med Lands cites:
[238] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
[239] Gregory of Tours IV.22, p. 217.
[240] Settipani (1993), p. 78.
[241] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
[242] Settipani (1993), p. 78.
[243] Gregory of Tours IV.51 and V.1, pp. 248 and 254.
[244] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 576, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 239.
[245] Pauli Historia Langobardorum III.10, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 97.
[246] Gregory of Tours IV.27, p. 221. It should be recalled that Brunhild was still alive when Gregory wrote his History.
[247] Gregory of Tours V.1, p. 254.
[248] Pauli Historia Langobardorum III.10, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 97.
[249] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 576, MHG SS V, p. 89.
[250] Gregory of Tours, IX 11 and 20.
[251] Fredegar, IV, 19, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 128.
[252] Wood (1994), p. 131.
[253] Fredegar, IV, 19, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 128.
[254] Fredegar, IV, 24, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 130.
[255] Fredegar, IV, 42, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 141.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Merovingians 1): “D5. [1m.] Sigebert I, *535, +murdered Vitry 575, King of Metz (Austrasie) (561-575); m.568 Brunehaut/Brunhilde (*ca 543, +Renève 613), a widow of Merove, a son of Chilperic I, a dau.of Athanagilde, King of Wisigoths in Spain”.2
; Per Doria: “'Afonso I “o Católico.' Rei das Astúrias e da Galiza (739-757), n. 693, † 757. C.c. Ermesenda, †757, filha de Pelágio, † 737, primeiro rei das Astúrias, em 718, neta de Fávila, duque de Cantábria, † 705 por Witiza, bisneta de Chindaswinth, † 653, e de Rekiberga, e trineta de Swintila II, rei visigodo, filho de Reccared I, n. 566, † 601, rei (586-601), c. (2) em 594 c. Chlodoswinthe, filha de Sigebert II, rei de Austrasia, e de Brünnhilde, esta filha de Athanagild, † 566, rei visigodo. Reccared I era filho de Leodegild I, † 586, rei visigodo (568-586), c.c. Theodosia, dada como neta de Theoderic o Grande, rei da Itália.”.13

; Per Roglo:
     "Brunehilde ou Brunichildis (en germanique Déesse cuirassée, de Brunia qui veut dire broigne et Khildis la déesse de la Victoire), est une princesse wisigothe devenue reine des Francs qui dans les faits va régner sur au moins un royaume mérovingien (Austrasie et/ou Burgondie) pendant 33 ans. Elle est née en Hispanie wisigothique vers 547 et morte exécutée en 613 à Renève. Elle est nommée Brunehaut, forme française de son nom, à partir du XIIIe siècle. Certains historiens contemporains comme Roger-Xavier Lantéri préfèrent la forme Brunehilde. Cependant, d’autres historiens comme Bruno Dumézil conservent la forme traditionnelle pour la distinguer du personnage mythologique, la valkyrie Brunehilde.
     "Also known as Brunhilde, the Visigothic princess exerted great influence over political life in the Frankish kingdoms of Austrasia, Neustria, and Burgundy. Brunhilde married King Sigebert of Austrasia in 567, while her sister Galswintha married Sigebert's brother Chilperic, king of Neustria. Rivalry between the brothers developed into open war when Chilperic had Galswintha murdered and Brunhilde demanded that her sister's death be revenged. When Sigebert was assassinated on the orders of Fredegunde, Chilperic's second wife, in 575, Chilperic claimed his lands. Brunhilde resisted this claim in the name of her son Childebert II. However, her nobles deserted her and she fled to Burgundy. Childebert remained in Austrasia and in 592 inherited Burgundy. When Childebert died in 595, Brunhilde attempted to assert her control as regent over Burgundy and Austrasia, which her grandsons Theodoric II and Theodebert II had inherited. After successfully resisting attacks by Chilperic's heir Clotaire II, Brunhilde tried and failed to conquer Neustria in 600 and again in 603-04. In 612 Theodoric murdered his brother Theodebert at her instigation. Theodoric himself died in 613. When Brunhilde tried to make her great-grandson Sigebert II king, the nobles rebelled and acknowledged Clotaire as king. In the autumn of 613, near Dijon, France, Clotaire had both Sigebert and Brunhilde executed.
     "Brunehaut fut horriblement suppliciée pendant trois jours. Il existe manifestement une controverse quant à sa date de naissance : Pour certains (D. Feuer & J. d'Hendecourt dans "Dictionnaire des rois et des reines de France", Quid-2000) elle serait née en 534, ce qui fait qu'elle se marie tard, pour l'époque. Pour d'autres (Prof. Dr. Luiz de Mello Vaz de São-Payo, «Ascendência de D. Afonso Henriques», cité par Manuel Abranches de Soveral, elle est née en 511). On trouve même dans Quid (éd. 2000), à une autre page, qu'elle serait née en 543, mais quand même morte à près de 80 ans (donc vraisemblablement une faute de frappe).
     "La figure de Brunehaut est l'une des plus connue et des plus controversées de son siècle. Sa guerre mortelle avec Frédégonde ne saurait être rapportée ici. Rappelons brièvement les faits. Après les noces de Sigebert et de Brunehaut, son frère Chilpéric obtient la main de Galwintha, la soeur aînée de Brunehaut. Mais Frédégonde, la concubine de Chilpéric fait étrangler la jeune femme. Il en résulta une haine impitoyable entre les deux reines. Frédégonde assassine Merovech, deuxième époux de Brunehaut, qui est aussi le fils de son mari, mais Brunehaut élimine Chilpéric. Brunehaut, en dépit de la haine des chroniqueurs, notamment Frégédaire, fut certainement une grande reine. Elle gouverna le royaume d'une main de fer pendant 38 ans, durant la minorité de son fils, puis de ses petits-fils, se tenant à Metz ou en Alsace. A la suite d'une révolution de palais au profit de Chlothaire II, elle doit se réfugier en Bourgogne. A la fin, Brunehaut est capturée à Orbe et amlenée auprès de son neveu Chlothaire II, le fils de Frédégonde, qui lui fait subir les derniers outrages avant de la faire traîner par des chevaux emballés, à Renève-sur-Vingeanne (Côte-d'Or) à l'automne 613; elle est inhumée à l'abbaye Saint Martin à Autun (Saône et Loire) qu'elle avait fondée.
     "Je retiens les dates de naissance et mariage données par P.Van Kerrebrouck: La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 1993 qui se base sur les travaux de Kurth, Nelson, Ewig, Martindale et Rouche.[J-C de Vaugiraud - 29/05/2006]
     "Fille d’Athanagilde, roi des Visigots, Brunehaut épousa vers 566-568 un petit-fils de Clovis, Sigebert Ier, qui régnait sur l’Austrasie. Vers le même moment sa sœur Galswinthe épousa le roi de Neustrie Chilpéric Ier mais celui-ci ne tarda pas à l’assassiner à l’instigation de sa concubine Frédégonde. La vengeance que Brunehaut exigea de ce meurtre entraîna pendant près d’un demi-siècle un conflit entre les deux royaumes. Veuve depuis 575, en butte à une forte opposition en Austrasie, Brunehaut orienta son fils Childebert II vers une alliance avec son beau-frère Gontran qui régnait alors sur l’ancien royaume des Burgondes. Cette alliance aboutit après la mort de Gontran en 587 à l’union de la Bourgogne et de l’Austrasie. Au lendemain de la mort de Childebert (595), Brunehaut fut régente de toute la Gaule de l’Est et du Sud-Est au nom de ses deux petits-fils. Mais son autorité fut minée autant par le conflit qui éclata entre ces derniers que par un parti de seigneurs austrasiens dévoués au fils de Chilpéric et de Frédégonde, Clotaire II, roi de Neustrie. Les chefs de ce parti, Pépin de Landen et l’évêque Arnould de Metz, appelèrent Clotaire en Austrasie. Brunehaut lui fut livrée et subit une mort ignominieuse à Renève (est de Dijon). Très diversement jugée par ses contemporains, Brunehaut semble avoir été une femme autoritaire, efficace, rusée et sans scrupules. Son souvenir survit dans un certain nombre de toponymes et dans l’expression « chaussées de Brunehaut » qui désigne quelques routes censées avoir été construites par la reine d’Austrasie.
auteur: E.U - Robert Folz"
Roglo cites:
- individual: Manuel Abranches de Soveral, J-C de Vaugiraud (P.Van Kerrebrouck: La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 1993) 29/05/2006, J-P de Palmas (Encyclopaedia Universalis) xi2009
- birth, spouse 1: J-C de Vaugiraud (P.Van Kerrebrouck: La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 1993) 29/05/2006
- family 1: Y.Gazagnes-Gazanhe, R.Sekulovich http://web.genealogie.free.fr/Les_dynasties/Les_dynasties_celebres/France/Dynastie_Merovingienne.htm [Lien brisé]
- spouse 2: S.Fourlinnie (Jean-P Lafond sur le forum du 12 juillet 2005)
- family 2: E.Polti (d'après "Dictionnaire des rois et des reines de France", de D. Feuer & J. d'Hendecourt ; saisie du 07.12.2004)
- death: S.Fourlinnie (Jean-P Lafond sur le forum du 27 juillet 2005)
- burial: C.Chéneaux (Dictionnaire des Rois et des Reines de France.)10"


; Per Med Lands:
     "BRUNECHILDIS [Brunequilda/Brunehaut] ([545/50]-Renève-sur-Vingeanne Autumn 613, bur Autun, abbaye de Saint-Martin). Gregory of Tours records the marriage of King Sigebert and Brunechildis, daughter of King Atanagildo, describing her as "elegant in all she did, lovely to look at, chaste and decorous in her behaviour, wise in her generation and of good address", specifying that she converted from Arianism to Catholicism and came to France with a large dowry[184]. After her husband's death, her brother-in-law King Chilperic seized her treasure in Paris and banished her to Rouen[185]. Paulus Diaconus records that "Brunihilde matre" became regent after the accession of her son "Childepertus…adhuc puerulus"[186]. Herimannus records her second marriage to "Meroveus, Hilperici filius"[187]. Her power in Austrasia appears to have increased when her son King Childebert II assumed more direct control from [584], confirmed under the Treaty of Andelot in 587 which recognised her right to protection[188]. According to Fredegar, after her son's death in 596, she was regent for her grandson King Theodebert until 599 when she was "hunted out of Austrasia"[189]. Wood highlights that Pope Gregory I's correspondence with Queen Brunechildis concerning reform of the Frankish church appears to indicate that she still retained power in Austrasia as late as 602[190]. Fredegar reports that she was found "wandering alone near Arcis in Champagne" by a poor man (who was rewarded with the bishopric of Auxerre for his service)[191], and taken to the court of her grandson Theoderic II King of the Franks at Orléans, where she plotted against King Theodebert, culminating in the latter's overthrow and murder in 612 by King Theoderic. Fredegar records that she was the "bedfellow" of Protadius, a Roman, whom she "loaded with honours" and appointed patrician over the territory east of the Jura in [603][192]. After King Clotaire II defeated and captured her great-grandsons in 613, Brunechildis was arrested at the villa of Orbe by the constable Herpo and taken to Clotaire. According to Fredegar, she was tortured for three days, led through the ranks on a camel, and finally tied by her hair, one arm and a leg to the tail of an unbroken horse, being cut to shreds by its hoofs as it ran[193].
     "m firstly (early 566) SIGEBERT I King of the Franks, son of CLOTAIRE I [Chlothachar] King of the Franks & his third wife Ingundis [Ingonde] ([535]-murdered Vitry [Nov/Dec] 575, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).
     "m secondly (576) MEROVECH of the Franks, son of CHILPERICH I King of the Franks & his first wife Audovera (-Thérouanne, Pas-de-Calais 577, bur Paris Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés). He was murdered on the orders of Frédégonde, the concubine of Merovech's father."
Med Lands cites:
[184] Gregory of Tours IV.27, p. 221. It should be recalled that Brunhild was still alive when Gregory wrote his History.
[185] Gregory of Tours V.1, p. 254.
[186] Pauli Historia Langobardorum III.10, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 97.
[187] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 576, MHG SS V, p. 89.
[188] Gregory of Tours, IX 11 and 20.
[189] Fredegar, IV, 19, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 128.
[190] Wood, I. (1994) The Merovingian Kingdoms (Longman), p. 131.
[191] Fredegar, IV, 19, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 128.
[192] Fredegar, IV, 24, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 130.
[193] Fredegar, IV, 42, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 141.9
He was King of Austrasia between 561 and 575.1 He was King of Metz (Austrasie) between 561 and 575.2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199486&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#SigebertIdied575B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Sigebert Ier (Mérovingiens): http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=4283569. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingunde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199453&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199486&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Brunichilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199487&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/VANDALS,%20SUEVI,%20VISIGOTHS.htm#BrunechildisVisigothdied613.
  10. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Brunehaut (Wisigoths): http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=4283586.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigebert_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Sigebert Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigebert_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S1703] Francisco Antonio Doria, "Doreia email 7 Apr 2005, Re: "A long, old, Portuguese line into mid-level nobility: Moreira"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/0kttoew5Sdw/m/bSi0-Yuw6H4J) to e-mail address, 7 April 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/0kttoew5Sdw/m/bSi0-Yuw6H4J. Hereinafter cited as "Doria email 7 Apr 2005."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childebert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294131&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClodesindeMRecaredoVisigothdied601
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingunda of Austrasia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199491&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#IngundisMHermenegildoVisigoth

Childebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy1,2,3

M, #48171
FatherSigebert I (?) King of Metz (Austrasia)1,2,3,4,5,6 b. c 535, d. c Nov 575
MotherBrunichilde/Brunechildis (?) Queen of the Franks2,3,7,8,5 b. c 543, d. Oct 613
Last Edited9 Sep 2020
     Childebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy and Theudelinde (?) were engaged.9,10 Childebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy married Faileube (?) circa 586.11,3,10
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.12

; See Wikipedia entry for more information.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHILDEBERT (570-[2/28] Mar 596). Gregory of Tours names Childebert as the son of Sigebert and Brunhild, specifying that he was barely five years old when he succeeded his father under the protection of "Duke Gundovald"[261]. "Hildebertus" is named as son of "Sigibertus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[262]. After the assassination of his father, he was taken to Metz and there recognised 25 Dec 575 as CHILDEBERT II King of the Franks. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica names "Childebertus filius ipsius" when recording that he succeeded after his father was killed[263]. He was able to increase his own power in Austrasia largely due to the patronage of his uncle Gontran King of the Franks at Orléans, who adopted him as his successor in 577, recognised him as fit to rule in 584, and confirmed his succession at Andelot in 587[264]. He finally succeeded his uncle in Burgundy in 592, but died "in the fourth year after succeeding" according to Fredegar[265]. Paulus Diaconus states that it was alleged that "Childepertus rex Francorum" was poisoned aged 25 "cum uxore propria"[266].
     "Betrothed to THEODELINDIS, daughter of GARIBALD Duke of Bavaria & his wife Waldrada of the Lombards. Fredegar records that "Ago rex" married "Grimoaldi et Gundoaldi germanam…Teudelendæ ex genere Francorum", specifying that she had been betrothed to "Childebertus"[267].
     "m FAILEUBA, daughter of --- (-[596]). King Childebert's queen is named Faileuba in the Treaty of Andelot dated 28 Nov 587[268]. Paulus Diaconus says that it was alleged that "Childepertus rex Francorum" was poisoned aged 25 "cum uxore propria", although no reference to his wife's death has been identified in the Frankish sources[269].
[Mistress ---. As is shown below, one of the sources which reports the birth of Childebert's son Theodebert says that his mother was the king's concubine.]"
Med lands cites:
[261] Gregory of Tours V.1, p. 254.
[262] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732, and Chesnius T.I.P. 793), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
[263] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 576, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 239.
[264] Fredegar, IV, 7, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 125.
[265] Fredegar, IV, 16, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 127.
[266] Pauli Historia Langobardorum IV.11, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 120.
[267] Fredegar, IV, 34, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 133.
[268] Gregory of Tours IX.20, p. 505, the complete text of the treaty being set out in MGH LL 1, p. 5.
[269] Pauli Historia Langobardorum IV.11, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 120.10


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Childebert II, *2.3.570, +poisonned 28.03.595/596, King of Metz (Austrasie) (575-595), King of Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne (592-595), by his uncle Gontran he inherited Kingdom of Bourgogne; m.Faileube N."11 Childebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy was King of Austrasia between 575 and 595.1 He was King of Burgundy between 593 and 595.1

Family 1

Theudelinde (?) d. 625

Family 2

Faileube (?) b. c 573, d. a 596
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childebert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294131&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigebert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199486&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#SigebertIdied575B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Sigebert Ier (Mérovingiens): http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=4283569. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Brunichilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199487&tree=LEO
  8. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Brunehaut (Wisigoths): http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=4283586.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#Theodelindis
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ChildebertIIdied596
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childebert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294131&tree=LEO
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childebert_II. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theudebert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310267&tree=LEO

Theudebert II (?) King of Austrasia1,2,3

M, #48172, b. 585, d. after May 612
FatherChildebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy1,4,2,3,5
MotherFaileube (?)3 b. c 573, d. a 596
Last Edited5 Apr 2020
     Theudebert II (?) King of Austrasia was born in 585; Leo van de Pas says b. 585; Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page says b. 586.2,3 He married Bilchide/Bilichilde (?) in 608; his 1st wife.3 Theudebert II (?) King of Austrasia married Thodichilde/Teudichilde (?) in 609; his 2nd wife.3
Theudebert II (?) King of Austrasia died after May 612; murdered.2,3
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I-1 1.2 He was King of Austrasia between 595 and 612.1,3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theudebert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310267&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childebert II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294131&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ChildebertIIdied596. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Theodoric II (?) King of Austrasia (Metz), Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne1,2

M, #48173, b. 587, d. 613
FatherChildebert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy1,2,3
Last Edited5 Apr 2020
     Theodoric II (?) King of Austrasia (Metz), Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne was born in 587.2 He married Eremberge (?) in 606.2 Theodoric II (?) King of Austrasia (Metz), Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne and Eremberge (?) were divorced in 607.2
Theodoric II (?) King of Austrasia (Metz), Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne died in 613.2
     ; Theodorich II, *587, +613, King of Paris, Orléans, Bourgogne (595-613), King of Metz (Austrasie) (612-613); m.606 Ermenberge N (reputiated 607.)2 He was King of Burgundy between 595 and 612.1 He was King of Metz (Austrasie) between 595 and 612.2 He was King of Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne between 595 and 613.2 He was King of Austrasia between 612 and 613.1

Family 2

Eremberge (?)

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ChildebertIIdied596. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Sigibert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy1,2

M, #48174
FatherTheodoric II (?) King of Austrasia (Metz), Paris, Orléans, and Bourgogne1,2 b. 587, d. 613
Last Edited14 Aug 2004
     Sigibert II (?) King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy was King of Austrasia, King of Burgundy in 613.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html

Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4,5

M, #48175, b. 466, d. 27 November 511
FatherChildéric I (?) King of the Salian Franks6,7,8,9,3,4,5 b. c 436, d. 26 Nov 481
MotherBasina (?) de Thuringes, Reine des Francs saliens2,10,11,9,3,4,5 b. c 438, d. 477
ReferenceGAV39
Last Edited15 Sep 2020
     Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks married Unknown (?);
His 1st wife.2,3,4,5 Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks was born in 466 at Tournai, Belgium (now); Enc. of World History says b. 481; Genealogy.EU, Catholic Enc., and Genealogics say b. 466; Med Lands says b. 464/97.1,2,7,3,4 He married Saint Clotilde/Chrotechilde (?) of Burgundy, daughter of Chilperic II (?) King of the Burgundians of Lyons and Caretena and Caratène Aggripine la Suèves (?), circa 492; his 2nd wife.2,12,13,3,4,5 Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks was baptized in 496 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now); baptized by St. Remigius.14
Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks died on 27 November 511 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now).1,2,14,7,3,4
Clovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks was buried after 27 November 511 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     465
     DEATH     27 Nov 511 (aged 45–46)
     Frank Monarch. He reigned as King of the Franks from 482 to 511. He united the various Frankish tribes in what is now modern-day France, and established the Merovingian dynasty, which ruled the Franks until 751.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Childeric I Of The Salian Franks 436–481
      Basina of Thuringen Of The Salian 438–477
     Spouse
      Saint Clotilde
     Half Siblings
      Baderic von Thuringen unknown–529
     Children
      Clotilde of The Franks unknown–531
      King Chlodomer of Orléans 495–524
      King Childebert I 496–558
      Clothaire I 497–561
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21067.15
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval Europe Oxford, 1988, Editor George Holmes, Reference: bio 70.
2. Encyclopaedia Britannica Chicago,London,Toronto, 1961.
3. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.3


; Per Genealogics:
     "Usually regarded as the real founder of Frankish power in Gaul, he united the Romans of north Gaul under his rule by force of arms and the expedience of converting to their own religion, Catholic Christianity. He then united the Franks under his own rule by having all rival kings assassinated.
     "With success he led his armies against other Germans; he conquered the Thuringians to the east, and also the Alamans who were moving from their homes in south-west Germany into what is now Alsace and northern Switzerland. In 507 Clovis led his followers south across the Loire to destroy the Visigothic kingdom of Alaric II. When he died in 511, the kingdom was ruled jointly by his four sons; it was they who destroyed the Burgundian kingdom and who, by offering military aid to the Ostrogoths in exchange, annexed Provence to their kingdom.”.3

; Per Catholic Encyclopedia:
     “Clovis - (CHLODWIG, or CHLODOWECH): Son of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion's monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres and Cologne. Although a Pagan, Childeric had kept up friendly relations with the bishops of Gaul, and when Clovis ascended the throne he received a most cordial letter of congratulation from St. Remigius, Archbishop of Reims. The young king early began his course of conquest by attacking Syagrius, son of Aegidius, the Roman Count. Having established himself at Soissons, he acquired sovereign authority over so great a part of Northern Gaul as to be known to his contemporaries as the King of Soissons. Syagrius, being defeated, fled for protection to Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, but the latter, alarmed by a summons from Clovis, delivered Syagrius to his conqueror, who had him decapitated in 486. Clovis then remained master of the dominions of Syagrius and took up his residence at Soissons. It would seem as if the episode of the celebrated vase of Soissons were an incident of the campaign against Syagrius, and it proves that, although a pagan, Clovis continued his father's policy by remaining on amicable terms with Gaulish episcopate. The vase, taken by the Frankish soldiers while plundering a church, formed part of the booty that was to be divided among the army. It was claimed by the bishop (St. Remigius?), and the king sought to have it awarded to himself in order to return it intact to the bishop, but a dissatisfied soldier split the vase with his battle-axe, saying to this king: "You will get only the share allotted you by fate". Clovis did not openly resent the insult, but the following year, when reviewing his army he came upon this same soldier and, reproving him for the the defective condition of his arms, he split his skull with an axe, saying: "It was thus that you treated the Soissons vase." This incident has often been cited to show that although in time of war a king has unlimited authority over his army, after the war his power is restricted and that in the division of booty the rights of the soldiers must be respected.
     “After the defeat of Syagrius, Clovis extended his dominion as far as the Loire. It was owing to the assistance given him by the Gaulish episcopate that he gained possession of the country. The bishops, it is quite certain mapped out the regime that afterwards prevailed. Unlike that adopted in other barbarian kingdoms founded upon the ruins of the Roman Empire, this regime established absolute equality between the Gallo-Roman natives and their Germanic conquerors all sharing the same privileges. Procopius, a Byzantine writer has given us an idea of this agreement, but we know it best by its results. There was no distribution of Gaulish territory by the victors; established in the Belgian provinces, they had lands there to which they returned after each campaign. All the free men in the kingdom of Clovis, whether they were of Roman or of Germanic origin, called themselves Franks, and we must guard against the old mistake of looking upon the Franks after Clovis as no more than Germanic barbarians.
     “Master of half of Gaul, Clovis returned to Belgium and conquered the two Salic kingdoms of Cambrai and Tongres (?), where his cousins Ragnacaire and Chararic reigned. These events have been made known to us only through the poetic tradition of the Franks which has singularly distorted them. According to this tradition Clovis called upon Chararic to assist him its his war against Syagrius, but Chararic's attitude throughout the battle was most suspicious, as he refrained from taking sides until he saw which of the rivals was to be victorious. Clovis longed to have revenge. Through a ruse he obtained possession of Chararic and his son and threw them into prison; he then had their heads shaved, and both were ordained, the father to the priesthood and the son to the diaconate. When Chararic bemoaned and wept over this humiliation his son exclaimed: "The leaves of a green tree have been cut but they will quickly bud forth again; may he who has done this perish as quickly!" This remark was reported to Clovis, and he had both father and son beheaded.
     “Tradition goes on to say that Ragnacaire King of Cambrai, was a man of such loose morals he hardly respected his own kindred, and Farron, his favourite, was equally licentious. So great was the king's infatuation for this man that, if given a present, he would accept it for himself and his Farron. This filled his subjects with indignation and Clovis, to win them over to his side before taking the field, distributed among them money, bracelets, and baldries, all in gilded copper in fraudulent imitation of genuine gold. On different occasions Ragnacaire sent out spies to ascertain the strength of Clovis's army, and upon returning they said: "It is a great reinforcement for you and your Farron." Meanwhile Clovis advanced and the battle began. Being defeated, Ragnacaire sought refuge in flight, but was overtaken; made prisoner, and brought to Clovis, his hands bound behind him. "Why", said his conqueror have you permitted our blood to be humiliated by allowing yourself to be put in chains? It were better that you should die." And, so saying, Clovis dealt him his death-blow. Then, turning to Richaire, Ragnacaire's brother, who had been taken prisoner with the king, he said: "Had you but helped your brother, they would not have bound him", and he slew Richaire also. After these deaths the traitors discovered that they had been given counterfeit gold and complained of it to Clovis, but he only laughed at them. Rignomir, one of Ragnacaire's brothers, was put to death at Le Mans by order of Clovis, who took possession of the kingdom and the treasure of his victims.
     “Such is the legend of Clovis; it abounds in all kinds of improbabilities, which cannot be considered as true history. The only facts that can be accepted are that Clovis made war upon Kings Ragnacaire and Chararic, put them to death and seized their territories. Moreover, the author of this article is of opinion that these events occurred shortly after the conquest of the territory of Syagrius, and not after the war against the Visigoths, as has been maintained by Gregory of Tours, whose only authority is an oral tradition, and whose chronology in this matter is decidedly misleading. Besides Gregory of Tours has not given us the name of Chararic's kingdom; it was long believed to have been established at Therouanne but it is more probable that Tongres was its capital city, since it was here that the Franks settled on gaining a foothold in Belgium.
     “In 492 or 493 Clovis, who was master of Gaul from the Loire to the frontiers of the Rhenish Kingdom of Cologne, married Clotilda, the niece of Gondebad, King of the Burgundians. The popular epic of the Franks has transformed the story of this marriage into a veritable nuptial poem the analysis of which will be found in the article on Clotilda. Clotilda, who was a Catholic, and very pious, won the consent of Clovis to the baptism of their son, and then urged that he himself embrace the Catholic Faith. He deliberated for a long time. Finally, during a battle against the Alemanni--which without apparent reason has been called the battle of Tolbiac (Zulpich)--seeing his troops on the point of yielding, he invoked the aid of Clotilda's God, promised to become a Christian if only victory should be granted him. He conquered and, true to his word was baptized at Reims by St. Remigius, bishop of that city, his sister Albofledis and three thousand of his warriors at the same time embracing Christianity. Gregory of Tours, in his ecclesiastical history of the Franks has described this event, which took place amid great pomp at Christmas, 496. "Bow thy head, O Sicambrian", said St. Remigius to the royal convert "Adore what thou hast burned and burn what thou hast adored." According to a ninth-century legend found in the life of St. Remigius, written by the celebrated Hinemar himself Archbishop of Reims, the chrism for the baptismal ceremony was missing and was brought from heaven in a vase (ampulla) borne by a dove. This is what is known as the Sainte Ampoule of Reims, preserved in the treasury of the cathedral of that city and used for the coronation of the kings of France from Philip Augustus down to Charles X.
     “The conversion of Clovis to the religion of the majority of his subjects soon brought about the union of the Gallo-Romans with their barbarian conquerors. While in all the other Germanic kingdoms founded on the ruins of the Roman Empire the difference of religion between the Catholic natives and Arian conquerers was a very active cause of destruction, in the Frankish kingdom, on the contrary, the fundamental identity of religious beliefs and equality of political rights made national and patriotic sentiments universal and produced the most perfect harmony between the two races. The Frankish Kingdom was thenceforth the representative and defender of Catholic interests throughout the West, while to his conversion Clovis owed an exceptionally brilliant position. Those historians who do not understand the problems of religious psychology have concluded that Clovis embraced Christianity solely from political motives, but nothing is more erroneous. On the contrary, everything goes to prove that his conversion was sincere, and the opposite cannot be maintained without refusing credence to the most trustworthy evidence.
     “In the year 500 Clovis was called upon to mediate in a quarrel between his wife's two uncles, Kings Gondebad of Vienne and Godegisil of Geneva. He took sides with the latter, whom he helped to defeat Gondebad at Dijon, and then, deeming it prudent to interfere no further in this fratricidal struggle, he returned home, leaving Godegisil an auxiliary corps of five thousand Franks. After Clovis's departure Gondebad reconquered Vienne, his capital in which Godegisil had established himself. This reconquest was effected by a stratagem seconded by treachery, and Godegisil himself perished on the same occasion. The popular poetry of the Franks has singularly misrepresented this intervention of Clovis, pretending that, at the instigation of his wife Clotilda, he sought to avenge her grievances against her uncle Gondebad (see CLOTILDA) and that the latter king, besieged in Avignon by Clovis, got rid of his opponent through the agency of Aredius, a faithful follower. But in these poems there are so many fictions as to render the history in them indistinguishable.
     “An expedition, otherwise important and profitable was undertaken by Clovis in the year 506 against Alaric II, King of the Visigoths of Aquitaine. He was awaited as their deliverer by the Catholics of that kingdom, who were being cruelly persecuted by Arian fanatics, and was encouraged in his enterprise by the Emperor Anastasius, who wished to crush this ally of Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths. Despite the diplomatic efforts made by the latter to prevent the war, Clovis crossed the Loire and proceeded to Vouille, near Poitiers, where he defeated and slew Alaric, whose demoralized troops fled in disorder. The Franks took possession of the Visigoth Kingdom as far as the Pyrenees and the Rhone, but the part situated on the left bank of this river was stoutly defended by the armies of Theodoric, and thus the Franks were prevented from seizing Arles and Provence. Notwithstanding this last failure, Clovis, by his conquest of Aquitaine, added to the Frankish crown the fairest of its jewels. So greatly did the Emperor Anastasius rejoice over the success attained by Clovis that, to testify his satisfaction, he sent the Frankish conqueror the insignia of the consular dignity, an honour always highly appreciated by the barbarians.
     “The annexation of the Rhenish Kingdom of Cologne crowned the acquisition of Gaul by Clovis. But the history of this conquest, also, has been disfigured by a legend that Clovis instigated Chloderic, son of Sigebert of Cologne, to assassinate his father, then, after the perpetration of this foul deed, caused Chloderic himself to be assassinated, and finally offered himself to the Rhenish Franks as king, protesting his innocence of the crimes that had been committed. The only historical element in this old story, preserved by Gregory of Tours, is that the two kings of Cologne met with violent deaths, and that that Clovis, their relative, succeeded them partly by right of birth, partly by popular choice. The criminal means by which he is said to have reached this throne are pure creation of the barbarian imagination.
     “Master now of a vast kingdom, Clovis displayed the same talent in governing that he had displayed in conquering it. From Paris, which he had finally made his capital, he administered the various provinces through the agency of counts (comites) established in each city and selected by him from the aristocracy of both races, conformably to the principle of absolute equality between Romans and barbarians, a principle which dominated his entire policy. He caused the Salic Law (Lex Salica) to be reduced to written form, revised end adapted to the new social conditions under which his fellow barbaricans were subsequently to live. Acknowledging the Church as the foremost civilizing force, he protected it in every way possible, especially by providing for it the National Council of Orleans (511), at which the bishops of Gaul settled many questions pertaining to the relations between Church and state. Hagiographic legends attribute to Clovis the founding of a great many churches and monasteries throughout France, and although the accuracy of this claim cannot be positively established, it is nevertheless certain that the influence of the council in this matter must have been considerable. However, history has preserved the memory of foundation which was undoubtedly due to Clovis: the church of the Apostles, later of Sainte-Geneviève, on what was then Mons Lucotetius, to the south of Paris. The king destined it as a mausoleum for himself and his queen Clotilda, and before it was completed his mortal remains were there interred. Clovis died at the age of forty-five. His sarcophagus remained in the crypt of Sainte-Geneviève until the time of the French Revolution, when it was broken open by the revolutionists, and his ashes scattered to the winds, the sanctuary of the beautiful church being destroyed.
     “The history of this monarch has been so hopelessly distorted by popular poetry and so grossly disfigured by the vagaries of the barbarian imagination as make the portrayal of his character wellneigh impossible. However, from authentic accounts of him it may be concluded that his private life was not without virtues. As a statesman he succeeded in accomplishing what neither the genius of Theodoric the Great nor that of any contemporary barbarian king could achieve: upon the ruins of the Roman Empire he built up a powerful system, the influence of which dominated European civilization during many centuries, and from which sprang France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, and Switzerland, without taking into account that northern Spain and northern Italy were also, for a time, under the civilizing regime of the Frankish Empire.
     “Clovis left four sons. Theodoric, the eldest, was the issue of union prior to that contracted with Clotilda, who was, however, the mother of the three others, Clodomir, Childebert, and Clotaire. They divided their father's kingdom among themselves, following the barbarian principle that sought promotion of personal rather than national interests, and looked upon royalty as the personal prerogative of the sons of kings. After the death of Clovis his daughter Clotilda, named after her mother, married Amalric, king of the Visigoths. She died young, being cruelly abused by this Arian prince, who seemed eager to wreak vengeance on the daughter of Clovis for the tragic death of Alaric II.
GODEFROID KURTH, Transcribed by Joseph P. Thomas
     “The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume IV, Copyright © 1908 by Robert Appleton Company, Online Edition Copyright © 2003 by K. Knight, Nihil Obstat. Remy Lafort, Censorm Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York”.7

; This is the same person as ”Clovis I” at Wikipedia and as ”Clovis Ier” at Wikipédia (FR).16,17 GAV-39 EDV-41.

; Per Enc. of World History:
     “Clovis (Chlodovech), son of Childeric, in the service of Julius Nepos and Zeno. He defeated the Gallo-Roman general Syagrius at Soissons (486), expanding Salian power to the Loire. Friendly relations existed between Clovis and Bishop Remigius, who later baptized him. Sigebert, the Ripuarian, defeated an Alamannic invasion at Tolbiac (496) with Salian support. Clovis, in the same year, defeated the Alamanni (Strasburg?) and later, after election as king of the Ripuarians, emerged as master of the Franks on both sides of the Rhine.
     “The traditional date of the conversion of Clovis to Roman Catholicism is 496. He had previously married a Burgundian, Clotilda, who was of the Roman communion. The Burgundians in general were Arians, and Clovis's choice may have been deliberate. In any case his conversion won him papal support and opened the way to wide conquests from the heretic (i.e., Arian) German peoples. Burgundy was conquered (after 500); the Visigoths defeated at Vouillé (507); and their whole kingdom north of the Pyrenees (except Septimania and Provence) was soon subjugated. These conquests were supported by the Gallo-Roman clergy as a religious war. Clovis founded the Church of the Holy Apostles (Ste. Geneviève) at Paris, and shortly moved his “capital” from Soissons to Paris. He was made an honorary consul by Emperor Anastasius, a proceeding that brought the Franks technically into the empire.
     “Frankish Administration. The old Roman civitas, city and surrounding territory, served as the basis of Merovingian and (later) Carolingian administration. Comites, later called counts, royal officials of Gallo-Roman descent, presided over the civitas, collected taxes, heard lawsuits, enforced justice, and raised troops. Clovis and his descendants issued capitulares, legislative and administrative orders divided by chapters, that tried to reduce violence; these showed the strong influence of Roman law.”.1

; Per Royaume Europe: "Chlodwig erster der Franken il est né en 466 et décédé le 27 novembre 511 à Paris fils de Childeric erster der Franken et de Bazine von Köln.
     "Il a le titre Royal de :
? — ? fünfter König der Franken le 26 décembre 481
?? — ? Vème Roy des Francs

     "Il reçoit le baptême le 25 décembre 499 des mains du :
? — † quintusd?c?mus ?pisc?pus D?r?cort?rum — Saint Remi

     "Unification de tout les clans Francs sous sa souveraineté à sa mort son royaume est divisé entre ces quatre fils
     "Épouse ou Concubine une Inconnue
     "Épouse en 492 Chl?tildis Burgund??nes née en 476 à Lyon et décédée un 3 juin en 544 ou en 548 à Tours fille de Chilperich zweiter der Burgunden et de Caratène Aggripine la Suèves – Sainte Clotilde“.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Merovingians): “B1. Clovis I (Chlodwig), King of Franks (481-511), *Tournai 466, +Paris 27.11.511), baptized in Reims 24.12.496; 1m. NN, concubine; 2m: ca 492 Clotilde of Burgundy (*ca 475 +Tours 3.6.548), 2nd dau.of King Chilperic II of Burgundy”.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHLODOVECH [Clovis], son of CHILDERICH I King of the Franks & his wife Basina --- ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names Clovis as son of Childerich & Basina[37]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Childerico" as father of "Chlodovecho rege"[38]. He succeeded his father in [481/82] as CLOVIS I King of the Franks. He defeated Syagrius, ruler at Soissons, in 486. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlodovechus" expanded his kingdom "usque Sequanam" and afterwards "usque Ligere fluvio"[39]. He remained a pagan after his marriage to a Catholic wife, but converted to Christianity in [496] allegedly having vowed to do so if successful in a battle against the Alamans[40]. He allied with Godegisel against Gondebaud King of Burgundy in [500][41]. He defeated and killed Alaric II King of the Visigoths at the campus Vogladensis[42], probably Voulan, near Poitiers, athough this is popularly known as the battle of Vouillé[43], in 507. Gregory of Tours records that Clovis took control of the territory of Sigebert King of the Franks of the Rhine, after persuading Sigeric's son Chloderic to kill his father and then killing Chloderic, as well as the territory of Chararic King of the Salian Franks[44]. Gregory of Tours records the death of King Clovis in Paris "five years after the battle of Vouillé" and his burial in the church of the Holy Apostles, which he and Queen Clotilde had built[45].
     "[m firstly] ---, daughter of --- [of the Franks of the Rhine]. According to Gregory of Tours, the mother of Theoderich was one of King Clovis's concubines not his first wife[46]. Settipani[47] suggests that Theoderich’s mother was a Frank from the Rhine region, based on the inheritance of Austrasia by Theoderich and the roots "Theode-" and "-rich" in his name, possibly transmitted through his mother from Theodemer and Richomer who were both 4th century Frankish kings.
     "m [secondly] (492) CHROTECHILDIS [Clotilde/Rotilde[48]] of Burgundy, daughter of CHILPERICH King of Burgundy & his wife --- ([480]-Tours, monastery of Saint-Martin 544 or 548, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names "Clotilde" as the younger daughter of Chilperich, recording that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, but that the latter accepted a request for her hand in marriage from Clovis King of the Franks[49]. Fredegar states that she was driven into exile to Geneva by her uncle, after he allegedly murdered her father, and that King Clovis requested her hand in marriage as a means of controlling Gundobad's power[50]. A charter dated 2 Oct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" names "uxoris meæ Chrochildis…patris Chilperici regis Burgundiorum"[51]. Gregory of Tours records Clotilde's lack of success in converting her husband to Christianity until the fifteenth year of his reign, when he and his people were baptised by St Rémy Bishop of Reims[52]. Gregory of Tours records that Queen Clotilde became a nun at the church of St Martin at Tours after her husband died, and in a later passage records her death in Tours and burial in Paris next to her husband in the church which she had built[53]. She was canonised by the Catholic church, feast day 3 Jun[54]."
Med Lands cites:
[37] Gregory of Tours II.12, p. 129.
[38] Liber Historiæ Francorum 6, MGH Auct. Ant. II, p. 246.
[39] Liber Historiæ Francorum 14, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 260.
[40] Wood (1994), p. 48, suggests that Clovis's conversion may have taken place in 508.
[41] Gregory of Tours II.32, pp. 145-6, and the Chronicle of Marius of Avenches, cited in Wood (1994), pp. 41 and 43.
[42] Gregory of Tours II.37, pp. 153-4.
[43] Wood (1994), p. 46.
[44] Gregory of Tours II.40 and 41, pp. 155-6.
[45] Gregory of Tours II.43, p. 158.
[46] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
[47] Settipani (1993), p. 56.
[48] Settipani (1993), p. 57, footnote 68, points out that "Rotilde" is the correct form.
[49] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
[50] Fredegar, III 17-20, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 99.
[51] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Spuria I, no. 2, p. 114.
[52] Gregory of Tours II.30 and 31, pp. 143-4.
[53] Gregory of Tours II.43 and IV.1, pp. 158 and 197.
[54] Attwater, D. (1970) The Penguin Dictionary of Saints (Penguin Books), p. 89.4


; Per Royaume Europe: "Clotilde der Burgunden, Clotilde des Burgondes, Chrotechildis de Burgundia née en 476 à Lyon et décédée un 3 juin en 544 ou en 548 à Tours – Sainte CLotilde
     Épouse en 492 Chlodwig erster der Franken né en 466 et décédé le 27 novembre 511 à Paris fils de Childeric erster der Franken et de Bazine von Köln“.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHROTECHILDIS [Clotilde/Rotilde[30]] ([480]-Tours, monastery of Saint-Martin 544 or 548, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names "Clotilde" as the younger daughter of Chilperich, recording that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, but that the latter accepted a request for her hand in marriage from Clovis King of the Franks[31]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that, after the murder of her parents, "filia…iunior…Chrotchilde" was kept in Burgundy where she attracted the attention of Chlodoveo King of the Franks[32]. Fredegar states that Clotilde was driven into exile to Geneva by her uncle, after he allegedly murdered her father, and that King Clovis requested her hand in marriage as a means of controlling Gundobad's power[33]. Gregory of Tours records Clotilde's lack of success in converting her husband to Christianity until the fifteenth year of his reign, when he and his people were baptised by St Rémy Bishop of Reims[34]. Gregory of Tours records that Queen Clotilde became a nun at the church of St Martin at Tours after her husband died[35]. Clotilde was canonised by the Catholic church, her feast day is 3 Jun[36].
     "m (492) as his second wife, CLOVIS I [Chlodovech] King of the Franks, son of CHILDERICH I King of the Franks & his wife Basina ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève])."
Med Lands cites:
[30] Settipani (1993), p. 57, footnote 68, points out that "Rotilde" is the correct form.
[31] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
[32] Liber Historiæ Francorum 11, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 254.
[33] Fredegar, III 17-20, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 99.
[34] Gregory of Tours II.30 and 31, pp. 143-4.
[35] Gregory of Tours II.43, p. 158.
[36] Attwater (1970), p. 89.13
He was King of the Franks
See attached map of the conquests of Clovis 481-511 (from Wikipedia: By Altaileopard - Own work - based on File:Europe relief laea location map.jpg by Alexrk2, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22911450) between 481 and 511.2,19
; Remigius baptized Clovis I, King of the Franks, leading to the conversion of the entire Frankish people to Christianity.20

Family 1

Unknown (?)
Child

Family 2

Saint Clotilde/Chrotechilde (?) of Burgundy b. c 475, d. 3 Jun 545
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170-171. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199447&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online <https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/>, Royaume des Francs: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/merovingiens/roi/#francs_3roi. Hereinafter cited as Royaume Europe.
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 170.
  7. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Clovis: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04070a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Childerich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199445&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#Childericdied481
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basina_of_Thuringia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Basina: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199446&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrotechilde (Clotilde): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199448&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#ChrotechildisOrClotildedied544
  14. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Clotilda: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04066a.htm
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 October 2019), memorial page for Clovis I (465–27 Nov 511), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21067, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21067/clovis_i. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_I
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Clovis Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/, les Rois Burgondes: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/germains/burgond/#burgond_roil
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_I#/media/File:Conquests_of_Clovis.png
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Remigius
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodorich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199520&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis I 'the Great': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199447&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingomer: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310264&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlodomer: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310265&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClotaireIdied561B
  26. [S1648] Descendants of King Clodion, online http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_127_main.html. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of King Clodion.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlotar I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199450&tree=LEO

Childebert I (?) King of Paris1,2

M, #48176, b. between 496 and 497, d. 13 December 558
FatherClovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4,5 b. 466, d. 27 Nov 511
MotherSaint Clotilde/Chrotechilde (?) of Burgundy2,6,4,5 b. c 475, d. 3 Jun 545
Last Edited15 Sep 2020
     Childebert I (?) King of Paris was born between 496 and 497.2,7 He married Vultrobother (?) before 541.2
Childebert I (?) King of Paris died on 13 December 558 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now).1,2,7,8
Childebert I (?) King of Paris was buried after 13 December 558 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     496
     DEATH     13 Dec 558 (aged 61–62)
     Family Members
     Parents
      Clovis I 465–511
      Saint Clotilde
     Siblings
      Clotilde of The Franks unknown–531
      King Chlodomer of Orléans 495–524
      King Childebert I 496–558
      Clothaire I 497–561
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21071.7
     He was King of Paris between 511 and 558.1,2 He was King of Bourgogne between 534 and 558.2

Family

Vultrobother (?) d. a 558

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199447&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online <https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/>, Royaume des Francs: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/merovingiens/roi/#francs_3roi. Hereinafter cited as Royaume Europe.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrotechilde (Clotilde): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199448&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 October 2019), memorial page for King Childebert I (496–13 Dec 558), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21071, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21071/king_childebert_i. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childebert_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Chlodomer (?) King of Orleans1,2,3

M, #48177, b. between 494 and 495, d. 21 June 524
FatherClovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks1,2,3,4,5,6 b. 466, d. 27 Nov 511
MotherSaint Clotilde/Chrotechilde (?) of Burgundy2,3,7,5,6 b. c 475, d. 3 Jun 545
Last Edited15 Sep 2020
     Chlodomer (?) King of Orleans was born between 494 and 495.2 He married Guntheuca (?), daughter of Gondebaut/Gondebad I (?) King of the Burgundians at Vienne and Gontheuque (?) of the Ostrogoths, between 514 and 521; her 1st husband.8,3
Chlodomer (?) King of Orleans died on 21 June 524 at Vezeronce-Curtin, Departement de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France (now); Leo van de Pas says d. 21 June 524; Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page says d. 25 Jun 524.1,2,3,9
Chlodomer (?) King of Orleans was buried after 25 June 524 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     495
     DEATH     25 Jun 524 (aged 28–29), Vezeronce-Curtin, Departement de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France
     Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer (c. 495 - 524) was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. On the death of his father, in 511, he divided the kingdom of the Franks with his three brothers: Theuderic I, Childebert I, and Clotaire I. Although Theuderic, the eldest, had a better claim, Chlodomer divided half of the kingdom with his two other brothers. This was the kingdom of Orléans, taken from the former kingdom of Syagrius. This kingdom included, most notably, the bishoprics of Tours, Poitiers and Orléans. Chlodomer married Guntheuc, with whom he had three sons: Theodebald, Gunthar, and Clodoald.
     In 523–24, possibly at the instigation of his mother Clotilde, who was eager to avenge her nephew who had been assassinated by Sigismund of Burgundy, Chlodomer joined with his brothers in an expedition against the Burgundians. After capturing Sigismund, Chlodomer returned to Orléans. However, Sigismund's brother Gondomar returned triumphantly to Burgundy at the head of the troops sent by his ally, the Ostrogothic king Theodoric the Great. There, he massacred the garrison the Franks had left behind.
     Although victorious, Chlodomer had Sigismund and his sons Gisald and Gondebaud assassinated on 1 May 524. He then led a second expedition against the Burgundians. He was killed on this expedition, in the spring or summer of the same year, at the Battle of Vézeronce. His three sons were entrusted to his mother until his widow married Clotaire I. Clotaire, however, had Chlodomer's children killed, although Clodoald managed to escape. Better known as Saint Cloud, he later became abbot of Nogent, having given up his hair, the symbol of the Frankish royalty, rather than giving up his life
     Family Members
     Parents
      Clovis I 465–511
      Saint Clotilde
     Siblings
      Clotilde of The Franks unknown–531
      King Childebert I 496–558
      Clothaire I 497–561
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Our Family History
     Added: 13 May 2018
     Find A Grave Memorial 189703138.9
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I-1 1.2

; "...Clodomir, son-in-law of Gondebad, made war against his cousin Sigismund, who had succeeded Gondebad on the throne of Burgundy, captured him, and put him to death with his wife and children at Coulmiers, near Orléans. According to the popular epic of the Franks, he was incited to this war by Clotilda, who thought to avenge upon Sigismund the murder of her parents; but, as has already been seen Clotilda had nothing to avenge, and, on the contrary, it was probably she who arranged the alliance between Clovis and Gondebad. Here the legend is at variance with the truth, cruelly defaming the memory of Clotilda, who had the sorrow of seeing Clodomir perish in his unholy war on the Burgundians; he was vanquished and slain in the battle of Veseruntia (Vezeronce), in 524, by Godomar, brother of Sigismund. Clotilda took under her care his three sons of tender age, Theodoald, Gunther, and Clodoald. Childebert and Clotaire, however, who had divided between them the inheritance of their elder brother, did not wish the children to live, to whom later on they would have to render an account. By means of a ruse they withdrew the children from the watchful care of their mother and slew the two eldest, the third escaped and entered a cloister, to which he gave his name (Saint-Cloud, near Paris).10 He was King of Orléans between 511 and 524.1,3

Family

Guntheuca (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chlodomer: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310265&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199447&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online <https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/>, Royaume des Francs: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/merovingiens/roi/#francs_3roi. Hereinafter cited as Royaume Europe.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrotechilde (Clotilde): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199448&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guntheuca: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199451&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 October 2019), memorial page for King Chlodomer of Orléans (495–25 Jun 524), Find A Grave Memorial no. 189703138, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Our Family History (contributor 47719401), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/189703138/king_chlodomer-of_orl_ans. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Clotilda: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04066a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.

Theodoric I (?) King of Metz/King at Reims1,2,3

M, #48178, b. circa 486, d. circa 534
FatherClovis I 'the Great' (?) King of the Franks1,2,4,3,5,6 b. 466, d. 27 Nov 511
MotherUnknown (?)2,3,5,6
Last Edited15 Sep 2020
     Theodoric I (?) King of Metz/King at Reims was born circa 486; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 486; Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page says b. ca 485.4,3 He married Eustere (?); his 1st wife.3 Theodoric I (?) King of Metz/King at Reims married Suavegotta (?), daughter of Sigismund II (?) King of the Burgundians and Ostrogotha (?), in 522; his 2nd wife.7,2,3
Theodoric I (?) King of Metz/King at Reims died circa 534 at Metz, Departement de la Moselle, Lorraine, France (now).1,4,3
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1
2. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: 23.4

; [1m.] Theodorich I, *ca 485, +Metz 533/534, King of Reims (Austrasie) et d'Auvergne (511-534), King of Thuringia (531-533); m.Suavégote (*ca 516/517), princesse of Burgundy; 1m: Eustere, dau.of Alarich II, King of Wisigoths; 2m: Suavegothe, dau.of St.Sigismond, King of Bourgogne.3 He was King of Metz between 511 and 534.1 He was King of Reims (Austrasie) et d'Auvergne between 511 and 534.3 He was King of Thuringia between 531 and 533.3

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Eustere (?)

Family 3

Suavegotta (?) b. c 504, d. a 554
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodorich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199520&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clovis I 'the Great': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199447&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClovisIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4805] Royaume Europe, online <https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/>, Royaume des Francs: https://royaumeurope.wordpress.com/merovingiens/roi/#francs_3roi. Hereinafter cited as Royaume Europe.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sauvegotta: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199521&tree=LEO
  8. [S1898] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 23 June 2005: "Re: Theodogotha/Theodogotho"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 23 June 2005."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodebert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199522&tree=LEO

Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia1,2,3,4

M, #48179, b. circa 504, d. circa 548
FatherTheodoric I (?) King of Metz/King at Reims1,5,2,3 b. c 486, d. c 534
MotherSuavegotta (?) b. c 504, d. a 554; Leo van de Pas says Theudebert I's mother was Suavegotta (his father's 2nd wife), but Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page says she was Eustere (his father's 1st wife)6,2,3
Last Edited5 Apr 2020
     Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia and Deoteria (?) were divorced.7,8 Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia was born circa 504.3 He married Deoteria (?) in 532; His 1st wife, her 1nd husband; Genealogics and Med Lands say Deoteria was 1st wife and Wisigarda, 2nd; Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page switches the order; Med Lands.2,3,9,7 Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia married Wisigarda (?), daughter of Wacho (?) King of the Lombards and Austrigusa (?), before 533; his 2nd wife; reputiated 534 and again 540. Genealogics and Med Lands say Deoteria was 1st wife and Wisigarda, 2nd; Genealogy.EU Merove 1 page switches the order; Med Lands.10,2,3,9,11 Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia married Unknown (?) between 542 and 547;
His 3rd wife.9
Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia died circa 548.1,3,8
     ; Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 1.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:1.8


; See Wikipedia articles.4,12

; [1m.] Theodebert I, *ca 504, +548, King of Metz (Austrasie) (534-548); 1m: 533 Wisigarde N (+after 540), (reputiated 534 and again 540), dau.of Wacho, King of Lombards and Ostrogoths; 2m: 535 Deoteria/Deuterie N (reputiated 540.)3 Theudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia was also known as Theodebert I (?) King of the Franks.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "
THEODEBERT ([499/504]-end 547). Gregory of Tours names Theodebert as son of Theoderich, specifying that he was born before the death of his paternal grandfather[67]. His birth date range is narrowed more precisely to [499/504] on the assumption that he was a young adolescent when he led the Frankish campaign against the Danes, dated to 515: Gregory of Tours records that his father sent him "with a powerful army" to repel the Danish invasion led by Chlochilaich[68]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Theudericus et Theudobertus filius eius et Chlotharius rex" invaded Thuringia and attacked "Ermenfredum regem Toringorum"[69]. He succeeded his father in 533 as THEODEBERT I King of the Franks at Reims, Gregory of Tours recording that his childless uncle Childebert then adopted him as his heir[70]. Gregory records King Theodebert's campaign in northern Italy, which he appears to date to before the death of Queen Wisigardis which is recorded in the following section[71]. Theodebert subjugated Pannonia and threatened to attack Byzantium across the Danube. He was killed while hunting[72]. Gregory of Tours records that he died in the fourteenth year of his reign, and 37 years after the death of his paternal grandfather[73]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 548 of "Theudebertus rex magnus Francorum"[74].
m firstly ([end 533/early 534]) as her second husband, DEOTERIA, widow of ---, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours records that Theodebert seduced Deoteria, wife of an inhabitant of Cabrières near Béziers, after his betrothal to Wisigardis, and in a later passage that he married her after the death of his father[75]. According to Gregory of Tours, Theodebert deserted her after being pressured to marry his previous betrothed, but refused to take her back after his second wife died[76].
m secondly (betrothed before 533, 540) WISIGARDIS, daughter of WACHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides (-[541/42]). Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Wisigarda married "Theodeperto regi Francorum[77]. Gregory of Tours records that Theoderich betrothed his son Theodebert to "Wisigard, a king's daughter" and in a later passage that Theodebert married her "seven years [after he] had become engaged to [her]" after being pressured to desert Deoteria but that Wisigardis "soon died"[78].
m thirdly ([542/47]) ---. Gregory of Tours records that Theodebert "married another woman" after his second wife died but gives no details[79]."
Med lands cites:
[67] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
[68] Gregory of Tours III.3, pp. 163-4.
[69] Liber Historiæ Francorum 22, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 277.
[70] Gregory of Tours III.24, p. 184.
[71] Gregory of Tours III.32, p. 189.
[72] Settipani (1993), p. 63.
[73] Gregory of Tours III.37, p. 193.
[74] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 548, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 236.
[75] Gregory of Tours III.22 and III.23, pp. 183 and 184.
[76] Gregory of Tours III.27, p. 185.
[77] Pauli Historia Langobardorum I.21, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 59.
[78] Gregory of Tours III.20, p. 183.
[79] Gregory of Tours III.27, p. 185.9
He was Merovingian King of Austrasia - King of Rheims between 533 and 548.4 He was King of Metz between 534 and 548.1

Family 1

Deoteria (?)
Child

Family 2

Wisigarda (?) d. bt 541 - 542

Family 3

Unknown (?)

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodebert I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199522&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theudebert_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodorich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199520&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sauvegotta: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199521&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Deutérie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199523&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodebert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199522&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodebertIdied547. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wisigarda: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199524&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#WisigardisMTheodebertIFranks
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Thibert Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibert_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodobald: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199526&tree=LEO

Theudebald I (?) King of Metz1,2,3,4

M, #48180, b. between 534 and 535, d. circa 555
FatherTheudebert I (?) King of Metz/Austrasia1,2,3,5 b. c 504, d. c 548
MotherDeoteria (?)6,2,3
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Theudebald I (?) King of Metz was born between 534 and 535.3,4 He married Walderada/Vuldetrada (?), daughter of Wacho (?) King of the Lombards and Austrigusa (?), in 554;
Her 1st husband.7,8,9
Theudebald I (?) King of Metz died circa 555.1,2,3,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 1.10

; See Wikipedia articles.8,11

; [2m.] Theodebald I, *535, +555, King of Metz (Austrasie) (548-555); m.552, Vuldetrade/Waltrade, dau.of Wacho, King of Lombards and Ostrogoths.3 Theudebald I (?) King of Metz was also known as Thibaut (?) Roi des Francs.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "THEODEBALD ([534]-555). Gregory of Tours names Theodebald as the son of Theodebert and his wife Deoteria, implying that he was born after his parents' marriage[82]. He succeeded his father in 547 as THEODEBALD I King of the Franks at Reims, "sous la régence de sa tante Theodechildis"[83]. Settipani does not provide the source reference on which he bases this last statement. On Theodebald’s death, his territory was taken by his great uncle King Clotaire. Gregory of Tours records that he had a stroke and could not move from the waist down, dying in the seventh year of his reign[84]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 555 of "Theudebaldus rex Francorum"[85].
     "m ([554]) as her first husband, WALDRADA, daughter of WACHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda…secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald"[86]. The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum"[87]. Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho and his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald"[88]. Gregory of Tours names "Vuldetrada" as the wife of King Theodebald[89]. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus"[90]. According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria"[91], which does not imply that Clotaire married Waldrada. She [married secondly], her first husband's great-uncle, Clotaire I King of the Franks, and thirdly (after 555) Garibald Duke in Bavaria."
Med lands cites:
[82] Gregory of Tours III.27, p. 185.
[83] Settipani (1993), p. 65.
[84] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.
[85] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 555, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 236.
[86] Origo Gentis Langobardorum 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 4.
[87] Historia Langobardorum Codicis Gothani 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 9.
[88] Pauli Historia Langobardorum I.21, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 59.
[89] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 202.
[90] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 553, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[91] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "WALDRADA. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda…secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald"[141]. The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum"[142]. Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald"[143]. Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald[144]. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus"[145]. According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria"[146], which does not imply that King Clotaire married Waldrada.
     "m firstly ([554]) THEODEBALD I King of the Franks, son of THEODEBERT I King of the Franks & his first wife Deoteria ([534]-555).
     "[m secondly (555, repudiated) as his fifth wife, CHLOTHACHAR I [Clotaire] King of the Franks, son of CHLODOVECH King of the Franks & his second wife Chrotechildis of Burgundy ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).]
     "m [secondly/thirdly] (after 555) GARIBALD, son of ---. He became Duke of Bavaria in 590."
Med lands cites:
[141] Origo Gentis Langobardorum 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 4.
[142] Historia Langobardorum Codicis Gothani 4, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 9.
[143] Pauli Historia Langobardorum I.21, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 59.
[144] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 202.
[145] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 553, MHG SS V, p. 88.
[146] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.9
He was King of Metz/King of Rheims (See attached map of the Kingdom of the Franks ca 548 from Wikipedia: Par Romain0 — Travail personnel sur un fond de carte hydrographique de historicair. D'après Michel Rouche, Clovis, éditions Fayard, 1996, p. 370., Domaine public, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8851649) between 548 and 555.1,3,8,12

Family

Walderada/Vuldetrada (?) b. c 530, d. 570

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 170. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodobald: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199526&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Merove 1 page (Merovingians): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/merove/merove1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#TheodebaldIdied555. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodebert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199522&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Deoteria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199523&tree=LEO
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldrada. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theudebald
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#WaldradaM1TheodebaldIM2ChlothacharI
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodobald: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199526&tree=LEO
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Thibaut (roi des Francs): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibaut_(roi_des_Francs). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibaut_(roi_des_Francs)#/media/Fichier:Le_royaume_des_Francs_en_548.svg