Charles II "le Boiteux" (?) d'Anjou, King of Naples and Jerusalem1,2,3,4

M, #10231, b. 1254, d. 6 May 1309
FatherCharles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily3,4,5,6,7 b. 21 Mar 1226/27, d. 7 Jan 1284/85
MotherBéatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence3,4,8,9,6,7 b. 1234, d. 23 Sep 1267
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Charles II "le Boiteux" (?) d'Anjou, King of Naples and Jerusalem was born in 1254; Med Lands says b. 1252/54.3,4,6,7 He married Maria (?) of Hungary, daughter of Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria and Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary, between May 1270 and June 1270.10,11,3,4,6,7,12,13
Charles II "le Boiteux" (?) d'Anjou, King of Naples and Jerusalem died on 6 May 1309 at Villa di Poggioreale, Casanuova (near Naples), Campania, Italy.10,1,3,4,6,7
Charles II "le Boiteux" (?) d'Anjou, King of Naples and Jerusalem was buried after 6 May 1309 at Eglise de Saint-Barthelemi, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1254
     DEATH     6 May 1309 (aged 54–55)
     King of Naples, first buried at the Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth but was moved from there before its demolition.
     Family Members
          Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
          Beatrice de Provence 1234–1267
     Spouse
          Marie of Hungary 1257–1323
     Siblings
          Blanche d'Anjou 1250–1270
          Philippe d'Anjou 1255–1277
          Isabelle d'Anjou 1261–1304
     Children
          Charles Martel de Anjou 1271–1295
          Marguerite d'Anjou 1273–1299
          Louis of Toulouse 1274–1297
          Robert I of Anjou 1278–1344
          Blanche d'Anjou 1280–1310
          Eleonore d'Anjou 1289–1341
          Maria d'Anjou 1290–1347
     BURIAL     Eglise de Saint-Barthelemi, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 4 Mar 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 66470249
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.3,14
     He was Count of Provence.3

; Per Genealogics:
     “Charles II, king of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem, was born in 1254, the son of Charles I Etienne, king of Naples and Sicily, and Beatrice de Provence. His father made him prince of Salerno and gave him Maria of Hungary, daughter of Stephan V, king of Hungary, and Erzsebet of the Cumans, as his bride. They married in 1269; of their fourteen children, four sons and three daughters would have progeny. In 1282 his father lost Sicily to the king of Aragón. When he set out to regain it he left Charles II in charge of Naples. In 1284 the enemy's admiral, Ruggiero de Lauria, lured Charles out of Naples and he was captured. In 1285, while he was still imprisoned, his father Charles I Etienne died. It took until 1288 for him to arrange his own release with his promise to give up his claims to Sicily. However, once Charles was released and installed as king of Naples, Pope Nicholas IV absolved him from this promise, and so the war for Sicily continued.
     “Later, at the Peace of Caltabellotta in 1302, Charles II gave up his claim to Sicily for the lifetime of Fadrique III of Aragón, king of Sicily. Charles then built a set of alliances, usually sealed with the marriage of one of his children. In this way he increased or extended his control over Piedmont, Provence, Hungary, Athens, and Albania. Even though he was extremely pious and closely allied with the Church, he ruled over an enlightened court, eliminating many of his father's harsh measures. By fostering trade and the arts, patronising the university, and building monasteries and churches, he made Naples a European capital. Charles died on 6 May 1309, and was succeeded in Naples and Sicily by his son Robert.”.6

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau, Geldrop, 1965, Roo van Alderwerelt, G. F. de. ancestor 350.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:15.6
EDV-21 GKJ-21.

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES d’Anjou Sicily, son of CHARLES de France Comte d'Anjou, CHARLES I King of Sicily, & his first wife Béatrice Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier ([1252/54]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence). The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "secundus dominus Karolus, dominus Philippus" as the sons of "dominus Karolus" and his first wife[837]. His appointment by his father in 1271 suggests the unlikelihood of his birth later than [1254]. The testament of "Beatrix…Regina Sicilie, Ducatus Apuliæ et Principatus Capuæ, Andegavensis, Provinciæ et Forcalquerii Comitissa" is dated "die Mercurii in crastino Beatorum Peteri et Pauli Apostolorum" in 1266, with bequests to "…Carolus filius noster primogenitus…" whom she designated as heir to Provence[838]. He was created Principe di Salerno and Conte di Lesina by his father. He governed the kingdom (with the title Captain and Vicar-General) during his father’s absences in Rome 25 Feb 1271, from end Mar 1272 until beginning Jun 1272, from 3 Mar 1276 to Mar 1277, and finally after his father retired to Bordeaux 12 Jan 1283. Angevin forces were defeated by Aragon, under the leadership of Admiral Doria, in the bay of Naples 5 Jun 1284, during which he was captured. He was imprisoned in Sicily, later in Barcelona, by the king of Aragon[839]. He succeeded his father as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Naples, titular King of Jerusalem, Comte d’Anjou, while he was still in captivity. The Pope exercised authority in the kingdom during Charles II’s continuing imprisonment, through Governors Cardinal Gerald of Parma (appointed 16 Feb 1285 by Pope Martin IV) and Robert Comte d’Artois (appointed as an additional governor by Pope Honorius IV). He was released 8 Nov 1288, in return for leaving three of his sons as hostages in Barcelona. Pope Nicholas IV ordered him to assume the title King of Sicily, crowning him as such 29 May 1289 at Rieti cathedral. He returned to Naples 3 Jul 1289 to start his reign. He signed several treaties of peace with Aragon aimed at retaking the throne of Sicily, culminating in the Treaty of Caltabellotta 31 Aug 1302 under which he granted Sicily as dowry to his daughter Eléonore to be ruled for his life by her future husband Federigo de Aragón[840]. The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death 5 May 1309 of "Karolus II rex Siciliæ comesque Provinciæ, filius quondam primi Karoli regis Siciliæ"[841]. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death 5 May 1309 of "Re Carlo II"[842].
     "m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) MÁRIA of Hungary, daughter of ISTVÁN V King of Hungary & Elisabeth [née ---] of the Kumans ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "rex Stephanus quintus filius Bele regis…[filiam] Maria" married "Karolo claudo fiilio Karoli magni"[843]. She claimed the throne of Hungary 21 Sep 1290, following the death of her brother King Laszlo IV. She was crowned Queen by a Papal legate in Naples 1291, but transferred her rights to her son Charles Martel. The Pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary 30 Aug 1295. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "Venerdi Santo...25 di Marzo" in 1324 of "la Regina Maria moglie del Re Carlo II, madre di Re Roberto"[844]."
Med Lands cites:
[837] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, VI, p. 420.
[838] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 660.
[839] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 251.
[840] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 251-2.
[841] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 718.
[842] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.
[843] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 111.
[844] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 19): “King Charles II "le Boiteux" of Naples and Jerusalem (1285-1309), Ct of Provence, *1254, +Casanova 6.5.1309, bur Aix-en-Provence; m.1270 Maria of Hungary (*ca 1257 +25.3.1323)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “H2. Mária, *ca 1257, +25.3.1323, bur Naples; m.1270 King Charles II of Naples and Sicily (*1254 +6.5.1309.)3,15"

; Per Med Lands:
     "MÁRIA ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "rex Stephanus quintus filius Bele regis…[filiam] Maria" married "Karolo claudo fiilio Karoli magni"[980]. She claimed the throne of Hungary 21 Sep 1290, following the death of her brother King Laszlo IV. She was crowned Queen by a Papal legate in Naples 1291, but transferred her rights to her son Carlo Martelo. The Pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary 30 Aug 1295. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "Venerdi Santo...25 di Marzo" in 1324 of "la Regina Maria moglie del Re Carlo II, madre di Re Roberto"[981].
     "m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) CHARLES of Sicily Principe di Salerno, son of CHARLES I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his first wife Béatrice Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier ([1252/54]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence). He succeeded his father in 1285 as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Sicily and Jerusalem. Pope Nicolas IV ordered him to bear the title King of Sicily, crowning him such 29 May 1289 at Rieti cathedral."
Med Lands cites:
[980] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 111.
[981] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.13
He was King of Naples and Jerusalem between 1285 and 1309.3

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 226-7. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 6: p. 654. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004075&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIIdied1309B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004074&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIdied1285
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-31, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004076&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MariaMCharlesIIAnjouSicily
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 28 June 2020), memorial page for Charles II de Anjou (1254–6 May 1309), Find a Grave Memorial no. 66470249, citing Eglise de Saint-Barthelemi, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66470249. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html#MS5
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Martel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027064&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#CharlesMartelSicilydied1295B
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  20. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 7: pp. 654-5.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Margueritedied1299
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  23. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  24. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39057
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.11. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Maria (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #10232, b. circa 1257, d. 25 March 1323
FatherStephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria1,2,3,4,5,6 b. Dec 1239, d. 1 Aug 1272
MotherErzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary1,2,7,3,4,6 b. c 1240, d. a 1290
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Maria (?) of Hungary was born circa 1257.1,2,3,4 She married Charles II "le Boiteux" (?) d'Anjou, King of Naples and Jerusalem, son of Charles I Etienne (?) de France, Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, King of Naples and Sicily and Béatrice (?) Comtesse de Provence, between May 1270 and June 1270.8,1,9,2,10,11,3,4
Maria (?) of Hungary died on 25 March 1323 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now); murdered.8,12,1,2,3,4
Maria (?) of Hungary was buried after 25 March 1323 at Chiesa di Santa Maria Donna Regina, Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1257
     DEATH     25 Mar 1323 (aged 65–66). Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
     Royalty. Queen of Hungary and Queen consort of Naples. The eldest daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and his wife Elisabeth married Charles II in 1270. In 1290 after the death of her only brother she claimed the throne for herself. She was crowned queen a year later but transferred her rights to her eldest son.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Stephen V of Hungary 1239–1272
     Spouse
          Charles II de Anjou 1254–1309
     Children
          Charles Martel de Anjou 1271–1295
          Marguerite d'Anjou 1273–1299
          Louis of Toulouse 1274–1297
          Robert I of Anjou 1278–1344
          Blanche d'Anjou 1280–1310
          Eleonore d'Anjou 1289–1341
          Maria d'Anjou 1290–1347
     BURIAL     Chiesa di Santa Maria Donna Regina, Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 4 Mar 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 66468876
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.1,2,13
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES d’Anjou Sicily, son of CHARLES de France Comte d'Anjou, CHARLES I King of Sicily, & his first wife Béatrice Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier ([1252/54]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence). The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "secundus dominus Karolus, dominus Philippus" as the sons of "dominus Karolus" and his first wife[837]. His appointment by his father in 1271 suggests the unlikelihood of his birth later than [1254]. The testament of "Beatrix…Regina Sicilie, Ducatus Apuliæ et Principatus Capuæ, Andegavensis, Provinciæ et Forcalquerii Comitissa" is dated "die Mercurii in crastino Beatorum Peteri et Pauli Apostolorum" in 1266, with bequests to "…Carolus filius noster primogenitus…" whom she designated as heir to Provence[838]. He was created Principe di Salerno and Conte di Lesina by his father. He governed the kingdom (with the title Captain and Vicar-General) during his father’s absences in Rome 25 Feb 1271, from end Mar 1272 until beginning Jun 1272, from 3 Mar 1276 to Mar 1277, and finally after his father retired to Bordeaux 12 Jan 1283. Angevin forces were defeated by Aragon, under the leadership of Admiral Doria, in the bay of Naples 5 Jun 1284, during which he was captured. He was imprisoned in Sicily, later in Barcelona, by the king of Aragon[839]. He succeeded his father as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Naples, titular King of Jerusalem, Comte d’Anjou, while he was still in captivity. The Pope exercised authority in the kingdom during Charles II’s continuing imprisonment, through Governors Cardinal Gerald of Parma (appointed 16 Feb 1285 by Pope Martin IV) and Robert Comte d’Artois (appointed as an additional governor by Pope Honorius IV). He was released 8 Nov 1288, in return for leaving three of his sons as hostages in Barcelona. Pope Nicholas IV ordered him to assume the title King of Sicily, crowning him as such 29 May 1289 at Rieti cathedral. He returned to Naples 3 Jul 1289 to start his reign. He signed several treaties of peace with Aragon aimed at retaking the throne of Sicily, culminating in the Treaty of Caltabellotta 31 Aug 1302 under which he granted Sicily as dowry to his daughter Eléonore to be ruled for his life by her future husband Federigo de Aragón[840]. The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death 5 May 1309 of "Karolus II rex Siciliæ comesque Provinciæ, filius quondam primi Karoli regis Siciliæ"[841]. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death 5 May 1309 of "Re Carlo II"[842].
     "m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) MÁRIA of Hungary, daughter of ISTVÁN V King of Hungary & Elisabeth [née ---] of the Kumans ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "rex Stephanus quintus filius Bele regis…[filiam] Maria" married "Karolo claudo fiilio Karoli magni"[843]. She claimed the throne of Hungary 21 Sep 1290, following the death of her brother King Laszlo IV. She was crowned Queen by a Papal legate in Naples 1291, but transferred her rights to her son Charles Martel. The Pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary 30 Aug 1295. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "Venerdi Santo...25 di Marzo" in 1324 of "la Regina Maria moglie del Re Carlo II, madre di Re Roberto"[844]."
Med Lands cites:
[837] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, VI, p. 420.
[838] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 660.
[839] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 251.
[840] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 251-2.
[841] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 718.
[842] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.
[843] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 111.
[844] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.11


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 19): “King Charles II "le Boiteux" of Naples and Jerusalem (1285-1309), Ct of Provence, *1254, +Casanova 6.5.1309, bur Aix-en-Provence; m.1270 Maria of Hungary (*ca 1257 +25.3.1323)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “H2. Mária, *ca 1257, +25.3.1323, bur Naples; m.1270 King Charles II of Naples and Sicily (*1254 +6.5.1309.)9,14"

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau, Geldrop, 1965, Roo van Alderwerelt, G. F. de. ancestor 351.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2;155.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.3


; Per Genealogics:
     “Maria I, queen of Hungary, was born about 1257, the daughter of Stephan V, king of Hungary, and Erzsebet of the Cumans. She was the second of six children; her sisters Elisabeth and Katalin both became queens of Serbia. Another sister Anna married Andronikos II Palaiologos, emperor of Byzantium. Maria's only brother was Lászlo IV, king of Hungary.
     “In 1269, when she was only twelve, Maria married Charles II, the future king of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem, the eldest son and heir of Charles I Etienne, king of Naples and Sicily, and Beatrice de Provence. Of their fourteen children, four sons and three daughters would have progeny.
     “On 10 July 1290 Maria's brother Lászlo IV, king of Hungary, died childless, raising the issue of the succession. He had four sisters, of whom three outlived him; all four had married powerful rulers and had had their own children. On the 21 September 1290 Maria claimed the throne of Hungary. She faced counter-claims by her sisters Katalin and Elisabeth, and the children of her younger sister Anna. Maria was crowned Queen by the papal legate in Naples, though she transferred her rights to her eldest son Charles I Martel of Anjou. The pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary on 30 August 1295. In reality Charles Martel was only titular king of Hungary (from 1290 to 1295). The real king from 1290 to 1301 was András III, son of Stefan of Hungary, duke of Slavonia, and grandson of King András II. The death of András III in 1301 marked the extinction of the Arpad kings of Hungary. Wenceslaus III, son of Wenceslaus II, king of Bohemia and Poland, ruled Hungary from 1302 to 1306. However Charles I Martel's son Charles II Robert, Maria's grandson, became king in 1307. Ultimately the claims of her sisters Maria and Katalin were united in a common descendant when the pair's great-great-granddaughter Maria II of Hungary ascended the throne in 1382. She married Emperor Sigismund in 1386 but did not have progeny.
     “In 1290 Maria's sister Elisabeth fled from Bohemia when her husband Zawisch z Rozmberk had lost favour and was executed. Maria allowed Elisabeth to stay in Naples with her. Elisabeth became a nun for a time, but left and married Stefan Uros II Milutin, Ban of Serbia (brother of Katalin's husband).
     “Maria's husband died in May 1309. She lived in Naples for the rest of her life, and died there on 25 March 1323. She was buried in Naples at the Santa Maria Donna Regina.”.3

; This is the same person as:
”Mary of Hungary, Queen of Naples” at Wikipedia and as
”Marie de Hongrie (1257-1323)” at Wikipédia (Fr.)15,16 EDV-21 GKJ-21.

; Per Med Lands:
     "MÁRIA ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "rex Stephanus quintus filius Bele regis…[filiam] Maria" married "Karolo claudo fiilio Karoli magni"[980]. She claimed the throne of Hungary 21 Sep 1290, following the death of her brother King Laszlo IV. She was crowned Queen by a Papal legate in Naples 1291, but transferred her rights to her son Carlo Martelo. The Pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary 30 Aug 1295. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "Venerdi Santo...25 di Marzo" in 1324 of "la Regina Maria moglie del Re Carlo II, madre di Re Roberto"[981].
     "m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) CHARLES of Sicily Principe di Salerno, son of CHARLES I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his first wife Béatrice Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier ([1252/54]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence). He succeeded his father in 1285 as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Sicily and Jerusalem. Pope Nicolas IV ordered him to bear the title King of Sicily, crowning him such 29 May 1289 at Rieti cathedral."
Med Lands cites:
[980] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 111.
[981] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 6: p. 654. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004076&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MariaMCharlesIIAnjouSicily. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephan V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020689&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_V_1270-1272,.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Erzsebet of the Cumans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020690&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-31, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004075&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIIdied1309B
  12. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 28 June 2020), memorial page for Marie of Hungary (1257–25 Mar 1323), Find a Grave Memorial no. 66468876, citing Chiesa di Santa Maria Donna Regina, Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66468876. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html#MS5
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_of_Hungary,_Queen_of_Naples. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Marie de Hongrie (1257-1323): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_de_Hongrie_(1257-1323). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39055
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Martel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027064&tree=LEO
  19. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 7: pp. 654-5.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#Margueritedied1299
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.11. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria1,2,3

M, #10233, b. December 1239, d. 1 August 1272
FatherBela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia2,4,5 b. Nov 1206, d. 3 May 1270
MotherMarie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia2,4,5 b. c 1206, d. 1270
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria was born in December 1239; Genealogy.EU says b. Dec 1239; Genealogics says b. 1240.2,4 He married Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary, daughter of Kotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans, between 1253 and 1254; Genealogics says m. 1254; Med Lands says m. 1253.6,2,7,4,5
Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria died on 1 August 1272 at Csepel Island, Hungary, at age 32; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 page) says d. 6 Aug 1272.6,2,4
Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria was buried after 1 August 1272 at Margit Island, Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     8 Oct 1239, Hungary
     DEATH     6 Aug 1272 (aged 32), Hungary
     Stephen V was the eldest son of King Béla IV of Hungary and his queen, Maria Laskarina, a daughter of the Emperor Theodore I Lascaris of Nicaea. After his father's death (3 May 1270), Stephen inherited the whole Kingdom of Hungary. In about 1253, he married Elizabeth (1240 – after 1290), daughter of a chieftain of the Cuman tribes, they settled in Hungary and had the following children:
** Elizabeth (1255–1313/1326), wife firstly of Záviš of Falkenštejn and secondly of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia
** Catherine (1255/1257 – after 1314), wife of King Stefan Dragutin of Serbia
** Maria (c. 1257 – 25 March 1325), wife of King Charles II of Naples
** Anna (c. 1260 – c. 1281), wife of the Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos
** King Ladislaus IV (August 1262 – 10 July 1290)
** Andrew, Duke of Slavonia (1268–1278)

     Family Members
     Parents
          Bela IV King of of Hungary 1206–1270
     Siblings
          Elisabeth of Hungary 1236–1271
          Margaret of Hungary 1242–1271
     Children
          Marie of Hungary 1257–1323
     BURIAL     Margit Island, Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 6 Jan 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 122898326
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.2,8
     Reference: Gnealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 105.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 5.4
EDV-22 GKJ-22.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Stephan V, king of Hungary, was born about 1240, the eldest son of Béla IV, king of Hungary, whom he succeeded in 1270. His mother was Maria Laskarina, a daughter of Theodoros I Komnenos Laskaris, emperor of Nicea, and Anna Komnene Angelina, the daughter of Alexios III Komnenos Angelos, emperor of Byzantium.
     “As crown prince Stephan had exhibited considerable ability, but also a disquieting restlessness and violence. He was appointed duke of Transylvania, then duke of Styria. After the loss of Styria, he became duke of Transylvania again. In 1262 Stephan convinced his father Béla to give him twenty-nine counties as a reward for his assistance in the war against Bohemia; hence Hungary was virtually divided into two kingdoms. Stephan was crowned junior king of Hungary. Though Hungary was de facto divided into two kingdoms the legal unity remained, because Stephan theoretically ruled by the grace of God and his father. He subsequently seized the southern banate of Macsó and defeated his father in the ensuing civil war. In 1268 he undertook an expedition against the Bulgarians, penetrating as far as Veliko Tarnovo and styling himself as king of Bulgaria.
     “Stephan's father, attempting to bind the powerful but pagan Cuman tribe more closely to the dynasty, had arranged for Stephan's marriage in about 1254 to Erzsebet, the daughter of a Cuman chieftain. Though Erzsebet, in preparation for the marriage, had been baptised and remained a Christian, Western Europe almost universally considered Stephan as semi-pagan.
     “To secure foreign support, Stephan formed a double matrimonial alliance with the Angevins, chief partisans of the pope. The first of these was the marriage in 1270 of his daughter Maria of Hungary to Charles II, king of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem (they became grandparents of Charles II Robert, king of Hungary). The second alliance was the marriage of Stephan's infant son Lászlo to Charles II's sister Elisabeth d'Anjou.
     “Andronikus II Palaikologos, emperor of Byzantium, married Anna, another of Stephan's daughters, and Stefan Dragutin, king of Serbia, married Stephan's daughter Katalin.
     “Adversaries of Stephan, especially Przemysl Ottokar II, king of Bohemia, believed that Stephan was too great a friend of the mighty Cumans (who could field 16,000 men) to be a true Catholic. Ottokar endeavoured with the aid of the Hungarian malcontents to conquer the western provinces of Hungary, but they were utterly routed by Stephan in 1271 near Mosony. Ottokar relinquished all his conquests the same year in the Peace of Pressburg.
     “Stephan died suddenly on 1 August 1272 as he was raising an army to rescue his kidnapped infant son Lászlo from the rebellious vassals.”.4

; This is the same person as:
”Stephen V of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as
”Étienne V de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (FR),
and as ”V. István magyar király” at Wikipedia (HU).3,9,10 Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria was also known as István V (?) King of Hungary.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “King István V (Stephen V) of Hungary (1270-72) -cr before 1246, *Buda XII.1239, +Csepel Island 6.8.1272, bur Margaret Island (now part of Budapest); m.1253 Elizabeth (*1240, +after 1290), dau.of Zayhan, a prince of the Cuman tribe, which had been pushed into Hungary by the invasions of Chinghis-Khan”.2,11

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISTVÁN, son of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia (18 Oct 1239-1 Aug 1272, Csepel Island, Dominican Monastery). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…dux Bela" as the two sons of "rex Bela quartus"[966]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth "in festo beati Luce 1239" of "regi Hungarie filius masculus…Stephanum"[967]. The Altahenses Annales name "Stephanum filium [Belæ regis Ungarie]" when recording his succession to his father[968]. His father appointed him Prince of Transylvania in 1257. He led the Hungarian troops which invaded Bulgaria in 1261, restoring his brother-in-law Rostislav, who was one of the claimants to the Bulgarian throne after Tsar Koloman II was deposed in 1258, at Vidin. Duke of Slavonia, Dalmatia and Croatia, his father transferred these territories to his younger brother Béla in 1262, whereupon István revolted, although peace was concluded 5 Dec 1262 under which the country was divided and István retained the territory north of the Danube along the border with Bulgaria with the titles "rex iunior" and "dominus Cumanorum". Civil war broke out again in 1264, peace once more being confirmed in István's favour in 1266[969]. He succeeded his father in 1270 as ISTVÁN V King of Hungary. The Altahenses Annales record the death "1272 circa Kal Aug" of "Stephanus rex Ungarie"[970]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "in magna insula" of "Stephanus" and his burial "in ecclesia beate Virginis in insula Budensi in loco Beginarum"[971]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King István was buried "in insula…Beatæ Virginis"[972].
     "m (1253) --- of the Kumans, daughter of --- Khan of the Kumans (1240-after 1290). This marriage was agreed as part of King Béla's arrangements for settling the Kumans on empty land on either side of the River Tisza[973]. She was baptised with the name ERSZÉBET. Regent for her son King László IV in 1272, she was hated by the Hungarians[974]. "
Med Lands cites:
[966] Chronicon Varadiense, 20, p. 259.
[967] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947.
[968] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1270, MGH SS XVII, p. 406.
[969] Horváth (1989), pp. 68-9.
[970] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1272, MGH SS XVII, p. 407.
[971] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 106.
[972] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 71, p. 149.
[973] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[974] Fine (1994), p. 204, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter (1240-after 1290). Her marriage was agreed as part of King Béla's arrangements for settling the Kumans on empty land on either side of the River Tisza[23]. She was baptised with the name ELISABETH. Regent for her son King László IV 1272, she was hated by the Hungarians[24].
     "m (1253) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia (18 Oct 1239-1 Aug 1272, Csepel Island, Dominican Monastery). He succeeded his father in 1270 as ISTVÁN V King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[23] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[24] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 204, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.12
He was Duke of Styria between 1258 and 1260.3 He was King of Hungary between 1270 and 1272.6,13,2

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephan V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020689&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_V_1270-1272,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-30, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Erzsebet of the Cumans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020690&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 15 July 2020), memorial page for Stephen V of Hungary (8 Oct 1239–6 Aug 1272), Find a Grave Memorial no. 122898326, citing Margit Island, Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122898326. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne V de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_V_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  10. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, V. István magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/V._Istv%C3%A1n_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TURKS.htm#dauKumanMIstvanVHungary
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 270. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020730&tree=LEO
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 6: p. 654. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004076&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MariaMCharlesIIAnjouSicily

Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary1

F, #10234, b. circa 1240, d. after 1290
FatherKotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans2,3,4 d. bt 1240 - 1241
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited27 Oct 2020
     Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary was born circa 1240.1 She married Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria, son of Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, between 1253 and 1254; Genealogics says m. 1254; Med Lands says m. 1253.5,2,1,6,7
Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary died after 1290.3,1
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “King István V (Stephen V) of Hungary (1270-72) -cr before 1246, *Buda XII.1239, +Csepel Island 6.8.1272, bur Margaret Island (now part of Budapest); m.1253 Elizabeth (*1240, +after 1290), dau.of Zayhan, a prince of the Cuman tribe, which had been pushed into Hungary by the invasions of Chinghis-Khan”.2,8

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISTVÁN, son of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia (18 Oct 1239-1 Aug 1272, Csepel Island, Dominican Monastery). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Stephanus postea rex, secundus…dux Bela" as the two sons of "rex Bela quartus"[966]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth "in festo beati Luce 1239" of "regi Hungarie filius masculus…Stephanum"[967]. The Altahenses Annales name "Stephanum filium [Belæ regis Ungarie]" when recording his succession to his father[968]. His father appointed him Prince of Transylvania in 1257. He led the Hungarian troops which invaded Bulgaria in 1261, restoring his brother-in-law Rostislav, who was one of the claimants to the Bulgarian throne after Tsar Koloman II was deposed in 1258, at Vidin. Duke of Slavonia, Dalmatia and Croatia, his father transferred these territories to his younger brother Béla in 1262, whereupon István revolted, although peace was concluded 5 Dec 1262 under which the country was divided and István retained the territory north of the Danube along the border with Bulgaria with the titles "rex iunior" and "dominus Cumanorum". Civil war broke out again in 1264, peace once more being confirmed in István's favour in 1266[969]. He succeeded his father in 1270 as ISTVÁN V King of Hungary. The Altahenses Annales record the death "1272 circa Kal Aug" of "Stephanus rex Ungarie"[970]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "in magna insula" of "Stephanus" and his burial "in ecclesia beate Virginis in insula Budensi in loco Beginarum"[971]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King István was buried "in insula…Beatæ Virginis"[972].
     "m (1253) --- of the Kumans, daughter of --- Khan of the Kumans (1240-after 1290). This marriage was agreed as part of King Béla's arrangements for settling the Kumans on empty land on either side of the River Tisza[973]. She was baptised with the name ERSZÉBET. Regent for her son King László IV in 1272, she was hated by the Hungarians[974]. "
Med Lands cites:
[966] Chronicon Varadiense, 20, p. 259.
[967] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947.
[968] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1270, MGH SS XVII, p. 406.
[969] Horváth (1989), pp. 68-9.
[970] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1272, MGH SS XVII, p. 407.
[971] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 106.
[972] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 71, p. 149.
[973] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[974] Fine (1994), p. 204, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.7


; Per Genealogics:
     "Her parentage is not properly established. Erzsebet was born about 1239/1240, the only child of a unnamed khan of the Kun (or Kuni) clan of Cumans. No near-contemporary source names her father. However the historian István Vásáry has concluded that she was daughter of the Kipchak Khan Seyhan, who was otherwise mentioned as being in Hungary at that time.
     "The Cumans were the western tribes of the Kipchaks, a confederation of Turkic people who spoke the Kipchak language. Erzsebet's people followed a Shamanist religion and were considered pagans by the Christians of Europe.
     "In 1238 the Cumans under their leader Köten/Kuthen invaded the kingdom of Hungary while fleeing from the advancing hordes of the Mongol empire. Béla IV of Hungary negotiated an alliance with Köten and his people, granting them asylum in exchange for their conversion to the Catholic Church and loyalty to the king. However, just before the Mongol invasion of Hungary in 1240-1241, Köten, who was considered a dangerous alien, was murdered; the Cumans left Hungary but were resettled there by Béla in 1245. The kinship of Erzsebet's father to the earlier, murdered khan Köten is not known, but it has long been believed they were related.
     "To seal the Cumans' allegiance to Béla IV, about 1246 the six-year-old Kun princess Erzsebet was betrothed to the seven-year-old Stephan, eldest son and heir of Béla. Erzsebet was converted to Roman Catholicism in preparation of her marriage, which occurred in 1253.
     "In 1262 Stephan convinced his father to give him twenty-nine counties as a reward of assistance in the war against Przemysl Ottokar II of Bohemia. He was crowned junior co-ruler and in practice ruled his regions as a separate kingdom, setting up his own capital and adopting foreign policies directly contrary to those of his father. Erzsebet, who was now Stephan's queen, had six children, of whom three daughters would have progeny. She gave birth to her eldest child, her daughter Maria, in 1257.
     "In 1270 Stephan succeeded his father as king of all Hungary. When he died on 6 August 1272 Erzsebet became regent for their ten-year-old son Lászlo IV of Hungary. Her regency lasted until 1277 and saw palace revolutions and civil wars. Erzsebet's Cuman allies filled many positions of the court and of the administration of Hungary during the reigns of her husband and her son.
     "Erzsebet's upbringing of her son would cause problems for his reign. Laszlo favoured the society of the Cumans, from whom he was descended through his mother. He wore Cuman dress and surrounded himself with Cuman concubines, alienating the Hungarian nobility. His later attempts to regain their loyalty alienated some of the Cumans. On 10 July 1290 he was murdered in his tent by Cumans while camped in Bihar county.
     "Erzsebet's eldest daughter Maria, queen-consort of Naples through her marriage to Charles II, king of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem, became the heiress of her childless younger brother Lászlo IV. She claimed the Hungarian throne as Queen Maria I, being crowned as queen by order of the pope (though her reign would be only titular).
     "By then Erzsebet had probably also died. There is no mention of her in the reign of Lászlo's cousin András III of Hungary. There is a tradition that she died in 1290, the year of Lászlo's death."1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 105
2. Cumans and Tatars: Oriental Military in the Pre-Ottoman Balkans, 2005, Vásáry, István.1


; This is the same person as:
”Elizabeth the Cuman” at Wikipedia, as
”Élisabeth la Coumane” at Wikipédia (FR),
and as ”Kun Erzsébet magyar királyné” at Wikipedia (HU).9,10,11 EDV-21. Erzsébet (?) of the Kumans, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary was also known as Elizabeth (?) of Kumania, Queen Consort & Regent of Hungary.12,13,4,9

; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter (1240-after 1290). Her marriage was agreed as part of King Béla's arrangements for settling the Kumans on empty land on either side of the River Tisza[23]. She was baptised with the name ELISABETH. Regent for her son King László IV 1272, she was hated by the Hungarians[24].
     "m (1253) ISTVÁN of Hungary, son of BÉLA IV King of Hungary & his wife Maria Laskarina of Nikaia (18 Oct 1239-1 Aug 1272, Csepel Island, Dominican Monastery). He succeeded his father in 1270 as ISTVÁN V King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[23] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[24] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 204, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.14


; Per Williams email [2004]: "I am fairly certain that Kuthen's wife was not a daughter of Mstislav and that the whole thing is a mistranslation and misunderstanding of the original sources. Baumgarten states that Mstislav married a daughter of "Kotian, Prince de Coumanie" (obviously the Kuthan under discussion) and had six children, NOT including a daughter married to another or the same Kuthen. Probably this was originally a mistake of son-in-law for father-in-law. The _Chronicle of Novgorod_ as translated by Robert Michell & Neville Forbes (Camden Society 3rd Series, XXV, London, 1914) clearly states (p. 64) that Kotyan, a Polovets Knyaz [Prince] was father-in-law of Mstislav in Galich (i.e. Mstislav the Daring). Thus, I think that the following genealogical fragment can be reconstructed:
1. Suthoi, Khan of the Kumans [1]. Father of,
2. Kuthen (a.k.a. Kotian), Khan of the Kumans. Murdered 1240-41 in Hungary [2]. Father of,
i. Na. m. by 1223 to Mstislav Mstislavich, Prince of Novgorod & Galicia [3].
ii. Erzsebet. d. aft. 1290. m. to Istvan V, King of Hungary [4].

Sources:
[1] _Encyclopedia Brockhaus_, Russian Edition, 31: 448-49.
[2] _Encyclopaedia Britannica_, 1986 Edition, 3: 786.
[3] Robert Michell & Neville Forbes, _The Chronicle of Novgorod, 1016-1471_ (Camden Society 3rd Series, XXV, London, 1914), 64.
[4] Wilhelm Karl, Prinz von Isenburg, & Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, _Europaische Stammtafeln_ (Marburg, 1960), II: 105.”.3

;      Per Wikipédia (HU): "Ismeretlen, valószín?leg Szejhán[1][2] kun fejedelem leánya.” (Unknown, probably the daughter of Prince Sejhan [1] [2] Kun.)
Wikipédia (HU) cites:
[1] Kristó Gyula - Makk Károly: Az Árpád-házi uralkodók. Budapest : Interpress, 1988., 283. p.
[2] Kristó Gyula: Magyarország története 895-1301. Budapest : Osiris, 2003, 308. p.



     Per Wikipedia: "Stephen's wife, Elizabeth, was born around 1239, according to historian Gyula Kristó.[59] A charter of her father-in-law, Béla IV, refers to one Seyhan, a Cuman chieftain as his kinsman, implying that Seyhan was Elizabeth's father.[59][60]"
Wikipedia cites:
[59] Kristó, Gyula; Makk, Ferenc (1996). Az Árpád-ház uralkodói [Rulers of the House of Árpád] (in Hungarian). I.P.C. Könyvek. ISBN 963-7930-97-3. p. 268.
[60] Klaniczay, Gábor (2002). Holy Rulers and Blessed Princes: Dynastic Cults in Medieval Central Europe. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-42018-0. p. 439.


     Genealogics: "...the historian István Vásáry has concluded that she was daughter of the Kipchak Khan Seyhan, who was otherwise mentioned as being in Hungary at that time."
Genealogics cites:
-- Cumans and Tatars: Oriental Military in the Pre-Ottoman Balkans, 2005, Vásáry, István.



     Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): “...Elizabeth (*1240, +after 1290), dau.of Zayhan, a prince of the Cuman tribe, which had been pushed into Hungary by the invasions of Chinghis-Khan"

     Per Med Lands the father of Erzsébet was a Khan elected after the murder of Kotian/Kuthen, not Kotian/Kuthen himself: "--- Khan of the Kumans . His name is not known, but he was probably elected Khan by the Kumans who left Hungary in [1241] after the murder of Kuthen Khan. He was baptised in 1254 at the Dominican monastery in Buda[22]."
Med Lands cites:
[22] Horváth, András Pálóczi (1989) Pechenegs, Cumans, Iasians: Steppe peoples in medieval Hungary (Corvina), p. 78.

See attached map of the Kingdom of Hungary ca 1250-1300 (from Wikipedia: By Fz22 - Own work (Source:http://www.historicaltextarchive.com/hungary/hu13.gif), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3967002.)14,8,11,15
She was Queen consort of Hungary between 1270 and 1272.11,9

Family

Stephen/István V (?) King of Hungary & Croatia, Duke of Styria b. Dec 1239, d. 1 Aug 1272
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Erzsebet of the Cumans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020690&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 24 Feb 2004 "Re: Kuman lines into European( and other )Royalty"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 16 Feb 2004."
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 6: p. 654. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-30, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephan V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020689&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_V_1270-1272,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_the_Cuman. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Élisabeth la Coumane: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89lisabeth_la_Coumane. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, Kun Erzsébet magyar királyné: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kun_Erzs%C3%A9bet_magyar_kir%C3%A1lyn%C3%A9. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I8115
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TURKS.htm#dauKumanMIstvanVHungary
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary#/media/File:Hungary_13th_cent.png
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020730&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004076&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MariaMCharlesIIAnjouSicily
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 270. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Kotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans1,2

M, #10235, d. between 1240 and 1241
FatherSuthoi (?) Khan of the Kumans3
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited15 Jul 2020
     Kotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans died between 1240 and 1241 at Hungary; murdered, per William email: "Here is the relevant quote from the _Encyclopaedia Britannica_ (3:786): "In 1239 he [Bela IV of Hungary] granted asylum to the Cumans and their prince Kuthen, who had earlier tried unsuccessfully to organize Russian resistance to the Mongols. Just before the Mongol invasion of Hungary in 1240-41, however, Kuthen, who was considered a dangerous alien, was murdered . . .3 "
     Reference: Weis [1992:98] line 103-30.4 Kotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans was also known as Zayhan Prince of the Kumans.5 Kotian/Kuthyen (?) Khan of the Kumans was also known as Kotak Prince of the Polowzes.6

;      Per Wikipédia (HU): "Ismeretlen, valószín?leg Szejhán[1][2] kun fejedelem leánya.” (Unknown, probably the daughter of Prince Sejhan [1] [2] Kun.)
Wikipédia (HU) cites:
[1] Kristó Gyula - Makk Károly: Az Árpád-házi uralkodók. Budapest : Interpress, 1988., 283. p.
[2] Kristó Gyula: Magyarország története 895-1301. Budapest : Osiris, 2003, 308. p.



     Per Wikipedia: "Stephen's wife, Elizabeth, was born around 1239, according to historian Gyula Kristó.[59] A charter of her father-in-law, Béla IV, refers to one Seyhan, a Cuman chieftain as his kinsman, implying that Seyhan was Elizabeth's father.[59][60]"
Wikipedia cites:
[59] Kristó, Gyula; Makk, Ferenc (1996). Az Árpád-ház uralkodói [Rulers of the House of Árpád] (in Hungarian). I.P.C. Könyvek. ISBN 963-7930-97-3. p. 268.
[60] Klaniczay, Gábor (2002). Holy Rulers and Blessed Princes: Dynastic Cults in Medieval Central Europe. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-42018-0. p. 439.


     Genealogics: "...the historian István Vásáry has concluded that she was daughter of the Kipchak Khan Seyhan, who was otherwise mentioned as being in Hungary at that time."
Genealogics cites:
-- Cumans and Tatars: Oriental Military in the Pre-Ottoman Balkans, 2005, Vásáry, István.



     Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): “...Elizabeth (*1240, +after 1290), dau.of Zayhan, a prince of the Cuman tribe, which had been pushed into Hungary by the invasions of Chinghis-Khan"

     Per Med Lands the father of Erzsébet was a Khan elected after the murder of Kotian/Kuthen, not Kotian/Kuthen himself: "--- Khan of the Kumans . His name is not known, but he was probably elected Khan by the Kumans who left Hungary in [1241] after the murder of Kuthen Khan. He was baptised in 1254 at the Dominican monastery in Buda[22]."
Med Lands cites:
[22] Horváth, András Pálóczi (1989) Pechenegs, Cumans, Iasians: Steppe peoples in medieval Hungary (Corvina), p. 78.

See attached map of the Kingdom of Hungary ca 1250-1300 (from Wikipedia: By Fz22 - Own work (Source:http://www.historicaltextarchive.com/hungary/hu13.gif), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3967002.)7,8,9,10


; Per Williams email [2004]: "I am fairly certain that Kuthen's wife was not a daughter of Mstislav and that the whole thing is a mistranslation and misunderstanding of the original sources. Baumgarten states that Mstislav married a daughter of "Kotian, Prince de Coumanie" (obviously the Kuthan under discussion) and had six children, NOT including a daughter married to another or the same Kuthen. Probably this was originally a mistake of son-in-law for father-in-law. The _Chronicle of Novgorod_ as translated by Robert Michell & Neville Forbes (Camden Society 3rd Series, XXV, London, 1914) clearly states (p. 64) that Kotyan, a Polovets Knyaz [Prince] was father-in-law of Mstislav in Galich (i.e. Mstislav the Daring). Thus, I think that the following genealogical fragment can be reconstructed:
1. Suthoi, Khan of the Kumans [1]. Father of,
2. Kuthen (a.k.a. Kotian), Khan of the Kumans. Murdered 1240-41 in Hungary [2]. Father of,
i. Na. m. by 1223 to Mstislav Mstislavich, Prince of Novgorod & Galicia [3].
ii. Erzsebet. d. aft. 1290. m. to Istvan V, King of Hungary [4].

Sources:
[1] _Encyclopedia Brockhaus_, Russian Edition, 31: 448-49.
[2] _Encyclopaedia Britannica_, 1986 Edition, 3: 786.
[3] Robert Michell & Neville Forbes, _The Chronicle of Novgorod, 1016-1471_ (Camden Society 3rd Series, XXV, London, 1914), 64.
[4] Wilhelm Karl, Prinz von Isenburg, & Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, _Europaische Stammtafeln_ (Marburg, 1960), II: 105.”.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik10.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 6: p. 654. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 24 Feb 2004 "Re: Kuman lines into European( and other )Royalty"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 16 Feb 2004."
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-30, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28330
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TURKS.htm#dauKumanMIstvanVHungary. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, Kun Erzsébet magyar királyné: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kun_Erzs%C3%A9bet_magyar_kir%C3%A1lyn%C3%A9. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_V_of_Hungary#/media/File:Hungary_13th_cent.png. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2

M, #10236, b. November 1206, d. 3 May 1270
FatherAndras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2,3,4 b. 1176, d. 26 Oct 1235
MotherGertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran1,2,5,4 b. c 1185, d. 8 Sep 1213
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited20 Oct 2020
     Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia was born in November 1206.1,2 He married Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, daughter of Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea and Anna Komnene Angelina, in 1218; Arpad 2 page says m. 1218; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 1216; Weis gives no date.6,1,2
Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia was buried in 1270 at Esztergom, Hungary.1


Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia died on 3 May 1270 at age 63; Weis (AR7) line 103-29 says d. ca 1275; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2 page) says d. 3 May 1270; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1270; wikipedia says d 3 May 1270.6,1,2,7
     EDV22 GKJ-23. He was King of Hungary, 1235-1270: BELA IV. A strong ruler who tried desperately to make good the losses of the preceding reign. The magnates, in reply, attempted to set up a rival ruler, and Bela in turn allowed some 40,000 families of Cumans, who were driven westward by the Mongol invasions, to settle in the Theiss (Tisza) region in the hope of securing support against the magnates.

1241: The great Mongol invasion, which took the country by surprise, in the midst of its own dissensions. Bela's army was overwhelmingly defeated at Muhi on the Theiss, and he was obliged to flee to the Adriatic. The Mongols followed him, but suddenly gave up their conquests when news arrived of the death of the Great Khan. Nevertheless, the Mongol invasion left the country devastated. For defense purposes, the nobility was allowed to build castles, and these soon became bases for feudal warfare and for campaigns against the king himself.

1246: Bela defeated Frederick of Austria, the last of the Babenbergs, who had taken advantage of the Mongol invasion to appropriate some of the western provinces.

1265-1270: Wars of Bela against Ottokar II of Bohemia. between 1235 and 1270.6,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andras II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004823&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ANDR%C3%81S_II_1205-1235,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-29, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_IV_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38779
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020722&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AnnaMRostislavIBulgaria
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephan V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020689&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_V_1270-1272,.
  14. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: Bl. Margaret of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09654a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helene (Jolenta) of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020742&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IolandaMBoleslawKalisch

Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia1,2,3,4

F, #10237, b. circa 1206, d. 1270
FatherTheodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea3,5 b. 1175, d. Aug 1222
MotherAnna Komnene Angelina6 b. c 1156, d. 1212
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited10 Nov 2020
     Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia was born circa 1206 at Nicaea, Turkey (now).3 She married Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia, son of Andras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia and Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran, in 1218; Arpad 2 page says m. 1218; Rudt-Collenberg says m. 1216; Weis gives no date.7,2,5
Marie Laskarina of Nicaea, Queen of Hungary & Croatia died in 1270.3,5
     EDV-23.

Family

Bela IV (?) King of Hungary and Croatia b. Nov 1206, d. 3 May 1270
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 6 page (The Laskaris Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant6.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Laskarina. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-29, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38779
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020722&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AnnaMRostislavIBulgaria. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephan V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020689&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ISTV%C3%81N_V_1270-1272,.
  13. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: Bl. Margaret of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09654a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helene (Jolenta) of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020742&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IolandaMBoleslawKalisch

Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea1,2,3,4

M, #10238, b. 1175, d. August 1222
FatherManuel Lascaris3 b. c 1140
MotherIoanna Karatzaina3 b. c 1148
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited10 Nov 2020
     Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea was born in 1175; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1173.3,4 He married Anna Komnene Angelina, daughter of Alexios III Komnenos Angelos Emperor of Byzantium and Euphrosyne Dukaina Kamaterina, in 1199; her 2nd husband; his 1st wife; Rudt Collenberg says m. 1200.5,3,4 Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea married Philippa (?) of Armenia, daughter of Rupen III (?) of Armenia, Lord of the Mountains and Isabelle (?) de Thoron, on 24 November 1214; his 2nd wife.3,6,4,7 Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea and Philippa (?) of Armenia were divorced in 1215; Rudt-Collenberg says marriage dissolved for religious reasons.3,6 Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea married Marie de Courtenay, daughter of Pierre II de Courtenay Emporer of Constantinople, Cte de Courtenay, de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Marquis de Namur and Yolande (?) Mgvne of Namur, Countess of Flanders, in 1219; his 3rd wife.3,8,9,4
Theodoros I Komnenos Lascaris Emperor of Nicaea died in August 1222.3,2,4
     EDV-24.

He was Emperor of Nicaea between 1205 and 1222.2,3

Family 3

Marie de Courtenay b. 1204, d. Sep 1222

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 6 page (The Laskaris Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant6.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart I (Rup.).
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 1 page - The Rupenids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia1.html
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 237. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-29, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html

Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran1,2,3,4,5

F, #10239, b. circa 1185, d. 8 September 1213
FatherBerthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia3,6,7,8,9 b. 1153, d. 12 Aug 1204
MotherAgnes (?) von Rochlitz10,3,8,9 d. 25 Mar 1195
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran was born circa 1185 at Andechs, Landkreis Starnberg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).8,11 She married Andras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia, son of Béla III (?) King of Hungary and Agnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary, before 1203;
His 1st wife.1,2,3,12,9,13,14,8
Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran died on 8 September 1213; murdered; Weis AR7 103-28 says d. 1213/14.1,3,9,8
Gertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran was buried after 8 September 1213 at Pilisszentkereszt Abbey, Pilisszentkereszt, Szentendrei járás, Pest, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1185, Andechs, Landkreis Starnberg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     DEATH     8 Sep 1213 (aged 27–28), Hungary
     Queen of Hungary. She was the daughter of the Count of Andechs-Meran and married Andras the 2nd of Hungary. Her daughter was Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. Brutally murdered in 1213. Bio by: girlofcelje
     Family Members
     Parents
          Berthold IV von Andechs 1153–1204
          Agnes of Rochlitz unknown–1195
     Spouse
          Andrew II of Hungary 1177–1235 (m. 1203)
     Siblings
          Hedwig of Andechs 1174–1243
          Agnes Marie of Andechs 1175–1201
          Otto I von Andechs 1180–1234
     Children
          Bela IV King of of Hungary 1206–1270
     BURIAL     Pilisszentkereszt Abbey, Pilisszentkereszt, Szentendrei járás, Pest, Hungary
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 6 Jul 2003
     Find a Grave Memorial 7658215.11
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "E3. King András II of Hungary and Croatia (1205-35) -cr 29.5.1205, *1176, +21.9.1235, bur Egres; 1m: before 1203 Gertrude von Andechs (+murdered 8.9.1213); 2m: 1215 Yolande de Courtenay (*1200 +1233); 3m: Székesfehérvár 14.5.1234 Beatrice d'Este (*1215 +1245.)2"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "D7. Gertrud, +murdered 8/28.9.1213; m.before 1203 King Andras II of Hungary (*1176, +21.9.1235.)15"

; Per Med Lands:
     "ANDRÁS, son of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1176-21 Sep 1235, bur Egres, Cistercian Abbey). The Chronicon Varadiense names "primus…dux Henricus…secundus dux Andreas…tertius dux Salamon et quartus…dux Stephanus" as the four sons of "rex Bela tertius filius Geysæ"[809]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" and his wife Agnes[810]. After the accession of his brother, András demanded Croatia and Dalmatia as an appanage but this was refused. He revolted, and by 1198 obtained his demands and became Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia[811]. He and subsequent dukes acted as the king of Hungary's deputy in the kingdom of Croatia. "Andreas, tertii Belæ regis filius…Dalmatiæ, Croatiæ, Ramæ, Culmæque dux" appointed "Pharensi episcopum" by charter dated 1198, witnessed by "Andrea Bano, comite Macharia, comite Ioseph, comite Marco, comite Andronico filio Bani camerario ducis Wenceslao…"[812]. He conquered western Hum [Hercegovina] as far as the river Neretva in 1198[813]. The Continuatio Admuntensis records that he was arrested in 1203, suspected of plotting to take over the kingdom, and imprisoned "in palacio Strigoniensi quod alio nomine Gran vocatur"[814]. He ousted his nephew in 1205 and succeeded as ANDRÁS II King of Hungary. He played an active part in the dismemberment of Galich-Volynia after the death of Roman Mstislavich Prince of Galich in 1205, Hungary and Poland eventually agreeing the division of the territories between them under the treaty of Spisz in 1214, although Hungary expelled Poland from Peremyshl and Lyubachev in 1215/1216[815]. In 1211, King András hired the Order of Teutonic Knights, who had been expelled back to Europe from Palestine, to defend the eastern frontier of Transylvania against the Kumans[816], but they attempted to establish their autonomy there under the protection of the Pope. King András set sail from Split for Palestine on crusade in Oct 1217, but left Acre in early 1218 having achieved little besides acquiring a small collection of religious relics[817]. He returned by the land route, via Constantinople, but at the end of 1218 he was seized in Bulgarian territory and released only after agreeing the marriage of his daughter to Ivan Asen II Tsar of Bulgaria[818]. He threatened war with Serbia after Grand Župan Stefan was crowned king of Serbia by the papal legate in 1217, claiming that he alone had the right to this title, but did not carry out the threat[819]. King András's abuses caused the Hungarian nobles to rebel in 1222 and forced him to issue the Golden Bull, a charter defining the rights of the nobility and restricting the king's right to appoint foreigners to office without the consent of the Council[820]. According to Goldstein, this reform was forced by the rebellion of the lower nobility in Croatia[821]. King András expelled the Teutonic Knights in 1225[822] on the pretext of their having disobeyed his orders. In 1227, Bortz Khan of the Kumans swore allegiance to the king of Hungary after ordering the baptism of his people, rex Cumaniæ being added to the titles of the Hungarian king soon after[823]. King András attacked north-west Bulgaria in 1232 and recaptured Beograd and Brani?evo/Barancs which he had been forced to cede as part of the dowry of his daughter Maria. He crossed the Danube into Wallachia where the Hungarians created a Banate in the Severin region[824]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death in 1235 of "Andreas filius Bele" and his burial "in monasterio de Egrus"[825]. The Chronicon Zagrabiense records the death "XI Kal Oct" in 1235 of "rex Andreas filius regis Belæ III" and his burial "in monasterio suo Egres"[826]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1235 of "Andreas rex Hungarie" and his burial "in civitate Waradino"[827].
     "m firstly (before 1203) GERTRUD von Andechs-Merano, daughter of BERTHOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese of Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin (-murdered 8 Sep 1213). The Continuatio Admuntensis refers to "filiam Perhtoldi ducis Meranie" as wife of "Andream fratrem suum [=rex Heinricus Ungarorum]", recording that she was deprived of all her goods and sent back home when her husband was arrested in 1203, but recalled after the death of King Imre in 1204[828]. She was killed by a conspiracy of nobles shocked by the life of luxury she led and favouritism she showed to her German relatives, recounted in József Katona's historical drama Bánk bán[829]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "Gerdrudis de Alamana" wife of "Andreas filius Bele" was killed by "Bankbanus de genere Bor oriundus" and buried "in monasterio griseorum monachorum de Pelys"[830]. The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie" was killed "campestri tentorio IV Kal Oct 1213, eo quot fratri suo carnali patriarche Aquilegensi uxorem Bantzi procaverat, qui teutonice Prenger vocatur"[831]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie ab hominibus illius terre interfecta…filia Berhtoldi ducis Meranie"[832]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" was killed "IV Kal Oct" in 1200, although the year is incorrect[833].
     "m secondly (Feb 1215) YOLANDE de Courtenay, daughter of PIERRE II de Courtenay Seigneur de Courtenay, Comte de Nevers, d’Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Marquis de Namur [later Latin Emperor of Constantinople] & his wife Yolande de Flandre ([1200]-1233, bur Egres Abbey). William of Tyre (Continuator) specifies that the queen of Hungary (unnamed) was the sister of the Latin emperor of Constantinople[834]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "unam filiarum eius [Namucensis comitis Petri] Hyolenz" as the wife of "Andreas rex Ungarie"[835]. Her marriage was arranged by her uncle, Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople, to obtain Hungarian support for his new ally Boril Tsar of Bulgaria[836]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1233 of "regina Hoilanz de Hungaria" and her burial "in abbatia de Egis"[837].
     "m thirdly (Székesfehérvár 14 May 1234) BEATRICE d'Este, daughter of ALDOBRANDINO I d'Este Marchese di Ancona & his wife --- (1215-1245 before 8 May, bur Gemmola). Her origin is deduced from the Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam which refers to "domnus Stephanus filius regis Hungarie" as "nepos marchionis Hestensis"[838]. The Chronica of Rolandino Patavino records the marriage in 1235 of "dompna Beatrix olim filia marchionis Aldrevandini" and "regem Ungarie"[839]. The Annales S. Iustinæ Patavino record that "Beatrix filia quondam Aldrevandini marchionis Estensis" married "Andree regi Ungarie" in 1235, despite opposition from "filiis regis Bele…et Colomanno"[840]. A later passage in the same source records that Beatrix left Hungary "gravida" after her husband died, later gave birth "in Alemaniam" to "filium…Stephanum", and then returned with her child "ad paternam domum"[841]."
Med Lands cites:
[809] Chronicon Varadiense, 16, pp. 256-7.
[810] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[811] Fine (1994), p. 22.
[812] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 318.
[813] Fine (1994), p. 45.
[814] Continuatio Admuntensis 1203, MGH SS IX, p. 590.
[815] Martin, J. (1995) Medieval Russia 980-1584 (Cambridge), p. 127, and Fennell, J. (1983) The Crisis of Medieval Russia 1200-1304 (Longman), p. 37.
[816] Christiansen (1997), p. 82.
[817] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 147-9.
[818] Fine (1994), pp. 108 and 129.
[819] Fine (1994), p. 108.
[820] Fine (1994), p. 149, and Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[821] Goldstein, I., trans. Jovanovi?, N. (1999) Croatia: A History (Hurst & Company, London), p. 22.
[822] Lázár (1996), p. 45.
[823] Horváth (1989), p. 48.
[824] Fine (1994), p. 129.
[825] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 103.
[826] Chronicon Zagrabiense, 19, p. 258.
[827] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1235, MGH SS XXIII, p. 937.
[828] Continuatio Admuntensis 1203 and 1204, MGH SS IX, p. 590.
[829] Lázár (1993), Chapter 5. See also Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 227.
[830] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 102.
[831] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1213, MGH SS, p. 726.
[832] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[833] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.
[834] WTC XXIX.XVIII, p. 294.
[835] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1217, MGH SS XXIII, p. 906.
[836] Fine (1994), p. 101.
[837] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933.
[838] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem, MGH SS XXXII, pp. 166-67.
[839] Rolandini Patavini Chronica, Lib. III, 9, MGH SS XIX, p. 60.
[840] Annales S. Iustinæ Patavini, MGH SS XIX, p. 154.
[841] Annales S. Iustinæ Patavini, MGH SS XIX, p. 155.14


Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol I page 26a.8

; This is the same person as Gertrude of Merania at Wikipedia and as Gertrude de Méran at Wikipédia (Fr.)16 EDV-23.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Gertrud was born about 1185, the daughter of Berthold VI von Andechs, duke of Meran and Dalmatia, and Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz. Her sister Agnés, a famous beauty, married King Philippe II August of France. Another sister Hedwig, married to Henryk I 'the Bearded', Herzog von Schlesien und Krakau, was canonised as St. Hedwig of Meran.
     "Before 1203 Gertrud married András II, son of Béla III, king of Hungary, and his second wife Agnes of Antioch. András succeeded his father as king of Hungary in 1205. They had five children of whom Béla IV, Elisabeth and Maria would have progeny. Béla IV would succeed his father, Elisabeth became the wife of Ludwig IV 'der Heilige', Landgraf von Thüringen, and be canonised as St. Elisabeth of Hungary, and Maria became the wife of Iwan Asen II, tsar of Bulgaria.
     "Gertrud had made herself hated by her frequent interferences in Hungary's politics, supporting German influence, and by her greed. On 24 September 1213 when her husband was at war, she was murdered by Hungarian noblemen. Due to the political situation at the time most of her murderers remained unpunished during the rule of András. However Gertrud's son Béla IV took revenge on them after he became king. Gertrud is the main character in Ferenc Erkel's opera _Bánk bán,_ based on a stage play of the same title by József Katona. Bánk, a nobleman who was bán (viceroy) of King András in Croatia and Slavonia, and palatine of Hungary in 1213, joined the conspiracy that led to the murder of Gertrud, though his precise role in the deed is unclear. He was seen as a man of state who was torn between loyalty to his king and loyalty to his compatriots, who were incensed by the German queen's prodigality and the growing influence of her entourage."8


; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD (-murdered 8 Sep 1213). The Continuatio Admuntensis refers to "filiam Perhtoldi ducis Meranie" as wife of "Andream fratrem suum [=rex Heinricus Ungarorum]", recording that she was deprived of all her goods and sent back home when her husband was arrested in 1203, but recalled after the death of King Imre in 1204[375]. She was killed by a conspiracy of nobles shocked by the life of luxury she led and favouritism she showed to her German relatives, recounted in Józsel Katona's historical drama Bánk bán[376]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "Gerdrudis de Alamana" wife of "Andreas filius Bele" was killed by "Bankbanus de genere Bor oriundus" and buried "in monasterio griseorum monachorum de Pelys"[377]. The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie" was killed "campestri tentorio IV Kal Oct 1213, eo quot fratri suo carnali patriarche Aquilegensi uxorem Bantzi procaverat, qui teutonice Prenger vocatur"[378]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie ab hominibus illius terre interfecta…filia Berhtoldi ducis Meranie"[379]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" was killed "IV Kal Oct" in 1200, although the year is incorrect[380].
     "m (before 1203) as his first wife, ANDRÁS II King of Hungary, son of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1176-21 Sep 1235, bur Egrecz, Cistercian Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[375] Continuatio Admuntensis 1203 and 1204, MGH SS IX, p. 590.
[376] Lázár, I. (1993), trans. Albert Tezla, Hungary - A Brief History (Budapest, Corvina), Chapter 5, Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, (20 Jul 2003). See also Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 227.
[377] Florianus, M. (ed.) (1884) Chronicon Dubnicense, Historiæ Hungaricæ fontes domestici, Pars prima, Scriptores, Vol. III (Lipsia) ("Chronicon Dubnicense"), p. 102.
[378] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1213, MGH SS, p. 726.
[379] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[380] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.9


; Per Med Lands: "GERTRUD (-murdered 8 Sep 1213). The Continuatio Admuntensis refers to "filiam Perhtoldi ducis Meranie" as wife of "Andream fratrem suum [=rex Heinricus Ungarorum]", recording that she was deprived of all her goods and sent back home when her husband was arrested in 1203, but recalled after the death of King Imre in 1204[375]. She was killed by a conspiracy of nobles shocked by the life of luxury she led and favouritism she showed to her German relatives, recounted in Józsel Katona's historical drama Bánk bán[376]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "Gerdrudis de Alamana" wife of "Andreas filius Bele" was killed by "Bankbanus de genere Bor oriundus" and buried "in monasterio griseorum monachorum de Pelys"[377]. The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie" was killed "campestri tentorio IV Kal Oct 1213, eo quot fratri suo carnali patriarche Aquilegensi uxorem Bantzi procaverat, qui teutonice Prenger vocatur"[378]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie ab hominibus illius terre interfecta…filia Berhtoldi ducis Meranie"[379]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records that "Gerdrudis regina Ungarie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" was killed "IV Kal Oct" in 1200, although the year is incorrect[380]. m (before 1203) as his first wife, ANDRÁS II King of Hungary, son of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1176-21 Sep 1235, bur Egrecz, Cistercian Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[375] Continuatio Admuntensis 1203 and 1204, MGH SS IX, p. 590.
[376] Lázár, I. (1993), trans. Albert Tezla, Hungary - A Brief History (Budapest, Corvina), Chapter 5, Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, (20 Jul 2003). See also Bak, János B. 'Queens as Scapegoats in Medieval Hungary', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 227.
[377] Florianus, M. (ed.) (1884) Chronicon Dubnicense, Historiæ Hungaricæ fontes domestici, Pars prima, Scriptores, Vol. III (Lipsia) ("Chronicon Dubnicense"), p. 102.
[378] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1213, MGH SS, p. 726.
[379] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[380] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.9
She was Queen consort of Hungary between 1205 and 1213.16

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-28, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen2.html
  4. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Elizabeth of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05389a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold VI von Andechs: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033350&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#BertoldIIIAndechsMeranodied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#GertrudMeranodied1213
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033351&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 May 2020), memorial page for Gertrude von Andechs-Meran (1185–8 Sep 1213), Find a Grave Memorial no. 7658215, citing Pilisszentkereszt Abbey, Pilisszentkereszt, Szentendrei járás, Pest, Hungary ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7658215/gertrude-von_andechs_meran. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andras II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004823&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ANDR%C3%81S_II_1205-1235,.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/diessen1.html#GB3
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_of_Merania. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Saint Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary1,2

F, #10240, b. 1207, d. 17 November 1231
FatherAndras II (Andrew) (?) King of Hungary and Croatia1,2,3,4 b. 1176, d. 26 Oct 1235
MotherGertrude (?) von Andechs-Meran1,2,5,4 b. c 1185, d. 8 Sep 1213
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Saint Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary was born in 1207 at Bratislava (Pressburg), Slovakia (now).1,2 She married Ludwig IV "der Heilige" (?) Landgraf von Thüringen, Pfalzgraf von Sachsen, son of Hermann I (?) Landgraf von Thüringen, Pfalzgraf von Sachsen and Sophia (?) von Wittelsbach, between 1220 and 1221 at Wartburg Castle, Eisenach.6,1,7,8,9
Saint Elizabeth/Erzsébet (?) of Hungary died on 17 November 1231.10,1,2
     ; St. Elizabeth of Hungary

Also called St. Elizabeth of Thuringia, born in Hungary, probably at Pressburg, 1207; died at Marburg, Hesse, 17 November (not 19 November), 1231.

She was a daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary (1205-35) and his wife Gertrude, a member of the family of the Counts of Andechs-Meran; Elizabeth's brother succeeded his father on the throne of Hungary as Bela IV; the sister of her mother, Gertrude, was St. Hedwig, wife of Duke Heinrich I, the Bearded, of Silesia, while another saint, St. Elizabeth (Isabel) of Portugal (d. 1336), the wife of the tyrannical King Diniz of that country, was her great-niece.

In 1211 a formal embassy was sent by Landgrave Hermann I of Thuringia to Hungary to arrange, as was customary in that age, a marriage between his eldest son Hermann and Elizabeth, who was then four years old. This plan of a marriage was the result of political considerations and was intended to be the ratification of a great alliance which in the political schemes of the time it was sought to form against the German Emperor Otto IV, a member of the house of Guelph, who had quarrelled with the Church. Not long after this the little girl was taken to the Thuringian court to be brought up with her future husband and, in the course of time, to be betrothed to him.

The court of Thuringia was at this period famous for its magnificence. Its centre was the stately castle of the Wartburg, splendidly placed on a hill in the Thuringian Forest near Eisenach, where the Landgrave Hermann lived surrounded by poets and minnesingers, to whom he was a generous patron. Notwithstanding the turbulence and purely secular life of the court and the pomp of her surroundings, the little girl grew up a very religious child with an evident inclination to prayer and pious observances and small acts of self-mortification. These religious impulses were undoubtedly strengthened by the sorrowful experiences of her life.

In 1213 Elizabeth's mother, Gertrude, was murdered by Hungarian nobles, probably out of hatred of the Germans. On 31 December, 1216, the oldest son of the landgrave, Hermann, who Elizabeth was to marry, died; after this she was betrothed to Ludwig, the second son. It was probably in these years that Elizabeth had to suffer the hostility of the more frivolous members of the Thuringian court, to whom the contemplative and pious child was a constant rebuke. Ludwig, however, must have soon come to her protection against any ill-treatment. The legend that arose later is incorrect in making Elizabeth's mother-in-law, the Landgravine Sophia, a member of the reigning family of Bavaria, the leader of this court party. On the contrary, Sophia was a very religious and charitable woman and a kindly mother to the little Elizabeth.

The political plans of the old Landgrave Hermann involved him in great difficulties and reverses; he was excommunicated, lost his mind towards the end of his life, and died, 25 April, 1217, unreconciled with the Church. He was succeeded by his son Ludwig IV, who, in 1221, was also made regent of Meissen and the East Mark. The same year (1221) Ludwig and Elizabeth were married, the groom being twenty-one years old and the bride fourteen. The marriage was in every regard a happy and exemplary one, and the couple were devotedly attached to each other. Ludwig proved himself worthy of his wife. He gave his protection to her acts of charity, penance, and her vigils, and often held Elizabeth's hands as she knelt praying at night beside his bed. He was also a capable ruler and brave soldier. The Germans call him St. Ludwig, an appellation given to him as one of the best men of his age and the pious husband of St. Elizabeth.

They had three children: Hermann II (1222-41), who died young; Sophia (1224-84), who married Henry II, Duke of Brabant, and was the ancestress of the Landgraves of Hesse, as in the war of the Thuringian succession she won Hesse for her son Heinrich I, called the Child; Gertrude (1227-97), Elizabeth's third child, was born several weeks after the death of her father; in after-life she became abbess of the convent of Altenberg near Wetzlar.

Shortly after their marriage, Elizabeth and Ludwig made a journey to Hungary; Ludwig was often after this employed by the Emperor Frederick II, to whom he was much attached, in the affairs of the empire. In the spring of 1226, when floods, famine, and the pest wrought havoc in Thuringia, Ludwig was in Italy attending the Diet at Cremona on behalf of the emperor and the empire. Under these circumstances Elizabeth assumed control of affairs, distributed alms in all parts of the territory of her husband, giving even state robes and ornaments to the poor. In order to care personally for the unfortunate she built below the Wartburg a hospital with twenty-eight beds and visited the inmates daily to attend to their wants; at the same time she aided nine hundred poor daily. It is this period of her life that has preserved Elizabeth's fame to posterity as the gentle and charitable chételaine of the Wartburg. Ludwig on his return confirmed all she had done. The next year (1227) he started with the Emperor Frederick II on a crusade to Palestine but died, 11 September of the same year at Otranto, from the pest. The news did not reach Elizabeth until October, just after she had given birth to her third child. On hearing the tidings Elizabeth, who was only twenty years old, cried out: "The world with all its joys is now dead to me."

The fact that in 1221 the followers of St. Francis of Assisi (d. 1226) made their first permanent settlement in Germany was one of great importance in the later career of Elizabeth. Brother Rodeger, one of the first Germans whom the provincial for Germany, Caesarius of Speier, received into the order, was for a time the spiritual instructor of Elizabeth at the Wartburg; in his teachings he unfolded to her the ideals of St. Francis, and these strongly appealed to her. With the aid of Elizabeth the Franciscans in 1225 founded a monastery in Eisenach; Brother Rodeger, as his fellow-companion in the order, Jordanus, reports, instructed Elizabeth, to observe, according to her state of life, chastity, humility, patience, the exercise of prayer, and charity. Her position prevented the attainment of the other ideal of St. Francis, voluntary and complete poverty. Various remarks of Elizabeth to her female attendants make it clear how ardently she desired the life of poverty. After a while the post Brother Rodeger had filled was assumed by Master Conrad of Marburg, who belonged to no order, but was a very ascetic and, it must be acknowledged, a somewhat rough and very severe man. He was well known as a preacher of the crusade and also as an inquisitor or judge in cases of heresy. On account of the latter activity he has been more severely judged than is just; at the present day, however, the estimate of him is a fairer one. Pope Gregory IX, who wrote at times to Elizabeth, recommended her himself to the God-fearing preacher. Conrad treated Elizabeth with inexorable severity, even using corporal means of correction; nevertheless, he brought her with a firm hand by the road of self-mortification to sanctity, and after her death was very active in her canonization. Although he forbade her to follow St. Francis in complete poverty as a beggar, yet, on the other hand, by the command to keep her dower she was enabled to perform works of charity and tenderness.

Up to 1888 it was believed, on account of the testimony of one of Elizabeth's servants in the process of canonization, that Elizabeth was driven from the Wartburg in the winter of 1227 by her brother-in-law, Heinrich Raspe, who acted as regent for her son, then only five years old. About 1888 various investigators (Börner, Mielke, Wenck, E. Michael, etc.) asserted that Elizabeth left the Wartburg voluntarily, the only compulsion being a moral one. She was not able at the castle to follow Conrad's command to eat only food obtained in a way that was certainly right and proper. Lately, however, Huyskens (1907) tried to prove that Elizabeth was driven from the castle at Marburg in Hesse, which was hers by dower right. Consequently, the Te Deum that she directed the Franciscans to sing on the night of her expulsion would have been sung in the Franciscan monastery at Marburg. Accompanied by two female attendants, Elizabeth left the castle that stands on a height commanding Marburg. The next day her children were brought to her, but they were soon taken elsewhere to be cared for. Elizabeth's aunt, Matilda, Abbess of the Benedictine nunnery of Kitzingen near Würzburg, took charge of the unfortunate landgravine and sent her to her uncle Eckbert, Bishop of Bamberg. The bishop, however, was intent on arranging another marriage for her, although during the lifetime of her husband Elizabeth had made a vow of continence in case of his death; the same vow had also been taken by her attendants. While Elizabeth was maintaining her position against her uncle the remains of her husband were brought to Bamberg by his faithful followers who had carried them from Italy. Weeping bitterly, she buried the body in the family vault of the landgraves of Thuringia in the monastery of Reinhardsbrunn. With the aid of Conrad she now received the value of her dower in money, namely two thousand marks; of this sum she divided five hundred marks in one day among the poor. On Good Friday, 1228, in the Franciscan house at Eisenach Elizabeth formally renounced the world; then going to Master Conrad at Marburg, she and her maids received from him the dress of the Third Order of St. Francis, thus being among the first tertiaries of Germany. In the summer of 1228 she built the Franciscan hospital at Marburg and on its completion devoted herself entirely to the care of the sick, especially to those afflicted with the most loathsome diseases. Conrad of Marburg still imposed many self-mortifications and spiritual renunciations, while at the same time he even took from Elizabeth her devoted domestics. Constant in her devotion to God, Elizabeth's strength was consumed by her charitable labours, and she passed away at the age of twenty-four, a time when life to most human beings is just opening.

Very soon after the death of Elizabeth miracles began to be worked at her grave in the church of the hospital, especially miracles of healing. Master Conrad showed great zeal in advancing the process of canonization. By papal command three examinations were held of those who had been healed: namely, in August, 1232, January, 1233, and January, 1235. Before the process reached its end, however, Conrad was murdered, 30 July, 1233. But the Teutonic Knights in 1233 founded a house at Marburg, and in November, 1234, Conrad, Landgrave of Thuringia, the brother-in-law of Elizabeth, entered the order. At Pentecost (28 May) of the year 1235, the solemn ceremony of canonization of the "greatest woman of the German Middle Ages" was celebrated by Gregory IX at Perugia, Landgrave Conrad being present. In August of the same year (1235) the corner-stone of the beautiful Gothic church of St. Elizabeth was laid at Marburg; on 1 May, 1236, Emperor Frederick II attended the taking-up of the body of the saint; in 1249 the remains were placed in the choir of the church of St. Elizabeth, which was not consecrated until 1283. Pilgrimages to the grave soon increased to such importance that at times they could be compared to those to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela. In 1539 Philip the Magnanimous, Landgrave of Hesse, who had become a Protestant, put an end to the pilgrimages by unjustifiable interference with the church that belonged to the Teutonic Order and by forcibly removing the relics and all that was sacred to Elizabeth. Nevertheless, the entire German people still honour the "dear St. Elizabeth" as she is called; in 1907 a new impulse was given to her veneration in Germany and Austria by the celebration of the seven hundredth anniversary of her birth. St. Elizabeth is generally represented as a princess graciously giving alms to the wretched poor or as holding roses in her lap; in the latter case she is portrayed either alone or as surprised by her husband, who, according to a legend, which is, however, related of other saints as well, met her unexpectedly as she went secretly on an errand of mercy, and, so the story runs, the bread she was trying to conceal was suddenly turned into roses.2

; Saint Elisabeth (Erzsébet), canonized 28.5.1235, *Bratislava (Presburg) 1207, +Marburg 17.11.1231; m.1221 Ldgve Ludwig IV of Thuringia (+1227.)1

Family

Ludwig IV "der Heilige" (?) Landgraf von Thüringen, Pfalzgraf von Sachsen b. 28 Oct 1200, d. 11 Sep 1227
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Elizabeth of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05389a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andras II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004823&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_ANDR%C3%81S_II_1205-1235,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  6. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 270. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Thuring page (Landgraves of Thuringia): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/thuring/thuring.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig IV 'der Heilige': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014228&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIA.htm#LudwigIVdied1227
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 498 (Chart 34). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-28, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Thuring page - Landgraves of Thuringia: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/thuring/thuring.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00029960&tree=LEO
  14. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sophia von Thüringen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008760&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/THURINGIA.htm#Sofiedied1275
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Thüringen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00029961&tree=LEO

Berthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia1,2

M, #10241, b. 1153, d. 12 August 1204
FatherBerthold II/V von Andechs Graf von Andechs & Krain, Marchese di Istria1,2,3,4 b. c 1122, d. 14 Nov 1188
MotherHedwig (?) von Wittelsbach1,2,4,5 d. 16 Jul 1174
ReferenceEDV25 GKJ25
Last Edited12 Nov 2020
     Berthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia was born in 1153.1,2 He married Agnes (?) von Rochlitz, daughter of Dedo V "der Feiste" (?) Markgraf der Nieder-Lausitz, Graf von Rochlitz, Graf von Groitzsch and Matilde von Heinsberg Heiress von Sommerschenburg, in 1170.1,2,6,7,8,9
Berthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia died on 12 August 1204.1,2,9
Berthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia was buried after 12 August 1204 at Diessen.9


     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 26a.
2. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: 199, 217.10
He was Graf von Andechs, Markgraf von Istrien.1,2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Berthold VI was the son of Berthold V, Graf von Andechs, and Hedwig von Wittelsbach. In 1175 he was raised to the margraviate of Istria and in 1185 he was made the duke of the region called 'Merania' after the Adriatic Sea (_mare_ is Latin for 'sea'), and encompassing the seacoast of Dalmatia and Istria, the same area as the old margraviate, but its ruler now gained much prestige from his new title.
     "In 1170 he married Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz, daughter of Dedo V, Markgraf der Nieder-Lausitz, and Matilde von Heinsberg, heiress of Sommerschenburg. They had nine children of whom Otto I, Hedwig (the future Sankt Hedwig von Meran), Agnès and Gertrud would have progeny.
     "In 1186 Berthold accompanied Emperor Heinrich VI to the kingdom of Sicily. In 1189 he led the third division of the imperial army and was its standard-bearer on the Third Crusade. In 1195 he appeared as steward _(Vogt)_ of Tegernsee Abbey. After Emperor Heinrich's death in 1197 he sided with the claimant Philipp von Hohenstaufen, Heinrich's younger brother. At this juncture the duke of Meran was at the height of his power and influence. He possessed lands from Franconia to the Adriatic.
     "Berthold died on 12 August 1204, and was buried in Diessen."10

EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Reference: Weis [1992:98] Line 103-28.11

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Berthold IV (c. 1159 – 12 August 1204), a member of the House of Andechs, was Margrave of Istria and Carniola (as Berthold II). By about 1180/82 he already bore the title of Duke of Merania, that is, the Adriatic seacoast of Dalmatia and Istria.
Life
     "Berthold was the son of Count Berthold III of Andechs and his wife Hedwig of Wittelsbach. His father had been a loyal liensman of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and in turn was enfeoffed with the Istrian march upon the death of the Sponheim margrave Engelbert III.
     "Young Berthold IV first appeared in 1170 and was mentioned as Count of Andechs in an 1172 deed. In 1175 he served as co-ruler in the March of Istria. After Emperor Frederick deposed Duke Henry the Lion in 1180, his mother's relative Otto of Wittelsbach received the Duchy of Bavaria, while Berthold was received the Duchy of Merania.[1] The rule over "Merania" actually encompassed the same area as the old Istrian margraviate, but its ruler now gained much prestige from his new title and the comital House of Andechs was elevated to Princes of the Holy Roman Empire.
     "In 1186, he accompanied Emperor Frederick's son Henry VI to Italy and his marriage with Constance of Sicily. In 1189, he led the third division of the imperial army and was its standard-bearer on the Third Crusade. In 1195, he appeared as Vogt (reeve) of Tegernsee Abbey in Bavaria. Berthold committed himself to join the Crusade of 1197, however, he did not participate until Henry's death in the same year. Though he had opposed the emperor's Erbreichsplan, he backed the claims of Henry's younger brother Philip of Swabia against the politics of Pope Innocent III who supported Philip's Welf rival Otto IV. At this juncture, the House of Andechs was at the height of its power and influence, with extended possessions stretching from Franconia down to the Adriatic.
     "Berthold died in 1204 and was buried at the Andechs private monastery in Dießen, Bavaria.
Marriage and issue
     "About 1180, Berthold married Agnes of Rochlitz (died 25 March 1195), a daughter of Margrave Dedi III of Lusatia from the Saxon House of Wettin. They had the following children:
** Otto I (d. 1234), succeeded his father as Duke of Merania, married Beatrice II of Hohenstaufen, daughter of Count Otto I of Burgundy, became Count palatine of Burgundy in 1211
** Ekbert (d. 1237), Bishop of Bamberg from 1203, guardian of his nephew Otto II from 1234
** Henry (d. 1228), Margrave of Istria and Carniola from 1204, married Sophia of Weichselburg, heiress of the estates in Windic March and Metlica
** Hedwig (1174–1243), married Henry I the Bearded, Duke of Silesia, became High Duchess of Poland in 1232, canonized by the Catholic Church in 1267
** Gertrude (d. 1213), married Andrew II, brother of King Emeric of Hungary, became Queen of Hungary in 1205, murdered
** Agnes (d. 1201), married King Philip II of France and became French consort in 1196, repudiated in 1200
** Berthold (d. 1251), Archbishop of Kalocsa from 1206, Patriarch of Aquileia from 1218
** Matilda (Mechtild, d. 1254), wife of Engelbert III, Count of Gorizia.

     "While passing through Serbia on the Third Crusade, Frederick Barbarossa met the Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja in Niš on 27 July 1189. There it was negotiated that a daughter of Berthold would marry Tohu, son of Prince Miroslav of Zahumlje on the feast of Saint George next (24 April 1190). This marriage does not seem to have taken place and the Historia de Expeditione Friderici Imperatoris does not name the daughter. Scholars are divided over whether it was one of Berthold's known daughters or else a fifth daughter not otherwise recorded.[2]
References
1. Le Mesurier Chepmell, Havilland. A short course of history, Vol. II, Whittaker and Co., London, 1857
2. G. A. Loud, ed. (2010), The Crusade of Frederick Barbarossa: The History of the Expedition of the Emperor Frederick and Related Texts, Ashgate, pp. 61–62; Jonathan Lyon (2013), Princely Brothers and Sisters: The Sibling Bond in German Politics, 1100–1250, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, p. 154 n. 10."12



; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTOLD von Andechs, son of BERTOLD I Marchese di Istria Graf von Andechs & his first wife Hedwig --- (-12 Aug 1204, bur Diessen). The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Pertoldus dux Meranie marchio Ystrie…filius Pertoldi marchionis" when recording his death in 1204[344]. He succeeded his father in 1188 as Graf von Andechs. Marchese of Istria, Duke of Merano. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1204 III Id Aug" of "Berhtoldus dux Meranie et marchio Ystrie" specifying that he was buried "in capitolio"[345]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Aug" of "Bertoldus dux Meranie"[346].
     "m (before 1180) AGNES von Wettin, daughter of DEDO [V] "der Feiste" Markgraf der Niederlausitz, Graf von Eilenburg & his wife Mathilde von Heinsberg heiress of Sommerschenburg (-25 Mar 1195, bur Diessen). The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Tidericum…Philippum Scantensem preopositum, Gozwinum et Heinricum…et Conradum marchionem et filiam Agnetem" as children of "Dedo comes de Rochelitz" & his wife, specifying that Agnes married "duci de Meran"[347]. The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1195 VIII Kal Apr" of "Agnes ducissa" specifying that she was buried "in capitolio"[348]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VIII Kal Apr" of "Agnes comitissa Meragnie"[349]."
Med Lands cites:
[344] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.
[345] Notæ Diessenses 1204, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[346] Obituaires de Sens Tome I, 1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.
[347] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229.
[348] Notæ Diessenses 1195, MGH SS XVII, p. 325.
[349] Obituaires de Sens Tome I, 1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 313.9
He was Dike of Meranie between 1185 and 1204.12 He was Margrave of Istria and Carniola between 1188 and 1204.12

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold VI von Andechs: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033350&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028118&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#BernhardIIAndechsdied1188B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig von Wittelsbach: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028119&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033351&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wettin 1 page (The House of Wettin): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin1.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm#Agnesdied1248
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#BertoldIIIAndechsMeranodied1204
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold VI von Andechs: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033350&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-28, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berthold,_Duke_of_Merania. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Meran: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033353&tree=LEO
  14. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Elizabeth of Hungary at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05389a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  15. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Merania
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004025&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#AgnesMeranodied1201
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020145&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020145&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#OttoIMeraniendied1234
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014227&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#GertrudMeranodied1213

Henri I de Châtillon1

M, #10242
FatherGaucher I de Châtillon Seigneur de Châtillon2,1 d. c 1096
MotherMahaut (?) de Louvain3 b. c 1043, d. c 1112
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Henri I de Châtillon married Ermengard de Montjai, daughter of Alberic/Aubry de Montjai.4,1,5
     EDV-26.

; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VII 18.1

; Weis AR7 line 103-26.6 Henri I de Châtillon was living in 1117.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027555&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gaucher I de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027554&tree=LEO
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 268. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde de Montjay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027556&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-26, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page - de Valois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chatillon.pdf, p. 3.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gaucher II de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020658&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027557&tree=LEO
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4.

Bohemond II de Hauteville Prince of Antioch1,2,3,4,5

M, #10243, b. 1107, d. 5 February 1130
FatherBohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento2,3,4,6,7,8 b. c 1054, d. 7 Mar 1111
MotherConstance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch2,3,4,5,9,8 b. c 1078, d. 24 Sep 1126
ReferenceEDV26 GKJ26
Last Edited7 Nov 2020
     Bohemond II de Hauteville Prince of Antioch was born in 1107; Genealogy.EU (Hauteville page) says b, 1107/09; Rudt Collenberg says b. 1110; Med Lands says b. 1107/8.10,2,3,11,5,12 He married Alix/Alice de Réthel Regent of Jerusalem, Lady of Laodicea and Gibel, daughter of Baudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa and Morphia (?) de Melitene, in October 1126.10,2,13,3,11,4,14,5,15,12
Bohemond II de Hauteville Prince of Antioch died on 5 February 1130 at near Anazarbus, Cilicia, Turkey (now); killed in battle; Weis (AR7, line 103-25) says d. 1131; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1131.10,2,3,11,4,5,12
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Bohemond II (1107/1108 – February 1130) was Prince of Taranto from 1111 to 1128 and Prince of Antioch from 1111/1119 to 1130. He was the son of Bohemond I, who in 1108 was forced to submit to the authority of the Byzantine Empire in the Treaty of Devol. Three years later, the infant Bohemond inherited the Principality of Taranto under the guardianship of his mother, Constance of France. The Principality of Antioch was administered by his father's nephew, Tancred, until 1111. Tancred's cousin, Roger of Salerno, managed the principality from 1111 to 1119. After Roger died in the Battle of the Field of Blood, Baldwin II of Jerusalem took over the administration of Antioch. However, he did acknowledge Bohemond's right to personally rule the principality upon reaching the age of majority.
     "Bohemond came to Antioch in autumn 1126. He launched successful military campaigns against the nearby Moslem rulers, but his conflict with Joscelin I of Courtenay enabled Imad ad-Din Zengi to secure Mosul and Aleppo. Meanwhile, Roger II of Sicily occupied the Principality of Taranto in 1128. Bohemond died fighting against Danishmend Emir Gazi Gümüshtigin during a military campaign against Cilician Armenia, and Gümüshtigin sent Bohemond's embalmed head to the Abbasid Caliph.
Early life
     "Bohemond II was the son of Bohemond I, Prince of Taranto and Antioch, and Constance of France.[1] He was born in 1107 or 1108.[2][3] In 1104, Bohemond I returned to Europe to seek military assistance against the Byzantine Empire and left his nephew Tancred in Syria to administer Antioch.[4] Two charters show that Tancred styled himself "prince of Antioch" in 1108.[5] In September of that year, Bohemond I was forced to sign the Treaty of Devol, which authorized the Byzantine Empire to annex the Principality of Antioch upon his death.[6]
     "Bohemond I died in Apulia in 1111. Bohemond II was still a minor,[7] so his mother took charge of the government of Taranto.[8] The Byzantine Emperor Alexios I Komnenos sent envoys to Tancred to demand control of Antioch, but Tancred refused to obey and continued to govern the principality.[9] Tancred died in 1112 and bequeathed Antioch to his sister's son, Roger of Salerno.[10][11]
     "Roger's legal status during his rule in Antioch is uncertain.[12] According to William of Tyre, Tancred made Roger his successor "with the understanding that, at the demand of Bohemond or his heirs, he should not refuse to return it," suggesting that Roger was simply regent for the child Bohemond.[13] Roger adopted the title of prince, which implies that he regarded himself the ruler of Antioch in his own right.[12][14] The contemporaneous Fulcher of Chartres accused Roger of depriving of "his inheritence his own lord, the son of Bohemond [I], then living in Apulia with his mother."[15] Charters issued in Bohemond's Italian domains between 1117 and 1119 emphasized that he was the son of the prince of Antioch, but did not style him prince.[16]
     "After Roger and most Antiochene noblemen perished in the Battle of the Field of Blood on 28 June 1119, Baldwin II of Jerusalem hurried to Syria to save Antioch from Ilghazi, the Artuqid ruler of Mardin.[17][18] The notables of Antioch proclaimed Baldwin ruler of Antioch, but they emphasized that Antioch was Bohemond's "rightful inheritance," according to Walter the Chancellor.[15][19] Baldwin promised to cede Antioch to Bohemond if Bohemond came to the principality.[15] Those who were present at the meeting agreed that Bohemond should marry Baldwin's daughter, Alice.[19][20] They also decreed that Bohemond would not be entitled to reclaim grants made during his absence from the principality.[20]
     "Baldwin II was captured in 1123,[21] and the burghers of Antioch sent envoys to Bohemond, urging him to come to his principality.[22] Bohemond reached the age of majority at the age of 16.[2] According to William of Tyre, he made an agreement with William II, Duke of Apulia, stipulating that the one who first died without issue was to will his principality to the other; however, the reliability of William's report is suspect.[23][24] Alexander of Telese recorded that before leaving for Syria, Bohemond entrusted his Italian domains to the Holy See, but Romuald of Salerno said that he made Alexander, Count of Conversano, the overseer of those lands.[23][25] Bohemond sailed from Otranto with a fleet of twenty-four ships in September 1126.[26]
Prince of Antioch
     "Bohemond landed at the port of St. Symeon in the Principality of Antioch in October or November.[20][22] He went to Antioch to meet Baldwin II of Jerusalem, who subsequently ceded Antioch to him.[26] Bohemond was officially installed as prince in Baldwin's presence.[27]
     "Matthew of Edessa portrayed Bohemond as "a forceful character and great power."[27] Badr ad-Daulah captured Kafartab shortly after Bohemond's arrival, but Bohemond quickly recaptured the fortress in early 1127.[26][27] According to historian Steven Runciman, Bohemond's attack against the Munqidhites of Shaizar, which was recorded by Usama ibn Munqidh, also occurred during this period.[26][27]
     "Bohemond came into conflict with Joscelin I of Edessa in 1127,[28][22] although sources do not reveal the reason behind the enmity of the two Christian rulers.[28] According to Runciman, Joscelin seized former Antiochene territories from Il-Bursuqi, governor of Mosul. Furthermore, Bohemond refused to cede Azaz to Joscelin, despite the fact that Roger of Salerno promised it to Joscelin as the dowry of his second wife, Maria of Salerno.[29] Taking advantage of Bohemond's absence due to a campaign, Joscelin invaded Antioch with the assistance of Turkish mercenaries, plundering the villages along the frontier.[29]
     "Bernard of Valence, Latin Patriarch of Antioch, imposed an interdict on the County of Edessa.[29] Baldwin II of Jerusalem hurried to Syria to mediate between Bohemond and Joscelin in early 1128.[22][29] Joscelin, who had become seriously ill, agreed to restore the property to Bohemond and to do homage to him.[30] However, the conflict between Bohemond and Joscelin enabled Imad ad-Din Zengi, Il-Bursuqi's successor as governor of Mosul, to seize Aleppo without resistance on 28 June 1128.[31]
     "Meanwhile, Bohemond's cousin, William II of Apulia, had died without issue on 25 July 1127.[24] Pope Honorius II tried to prevent Roger II of Sicily (the cousin of both William and Bohemond) from seizing Apulia, but Roger did not obey him.[25] In May 1128, he invaded Bohemond's Italian principality,[25] capturing Taranto, Otranto and Brindisi without resistance.[25] He completed the conquest of the whole principality around 15 June.[25]
     "Taking advantage of the disputes between the Assassins and Taj al-Muluk Buri, atabeg of Damascus, Baldwin II of Jerusalem invaded Damascene territory and laid siege to Banias in November 1129.[32] Bohemond and Joscelin joined Baldwin, but a heavy rainfall forced the crusaders to abandon the siege.[32][28]
     "Bohemond decided to recover Anazarbus and other territories which had been lost to the Cilician Armenia.[33] He invaded Cilicia in February 1130, traveling along the Ceyhan River.[34] Leo I of Cilicia sought assistance from the Danishmend Emir Gazi Gümüshtigin who made a surprise attack on Bohemond's army.[35] Bohemond and his soldiers were massacred in the battle.[36][37] According to Michael the Syrian, the Turks killed Bohemond because they did not recognize him; had they recognized him, they would have saved him so they could demand a ransom from him.[38] Gümüshtigin had Bohemond's head embalmed and sent to Al-Mustarshid, the Abbasid Caliph.[35]
Family
     "Bohemond's wife, Alice, was the second daughter of Baldwin II of Jerusalem and Morphia of Melitene.[41] Their only child, Constance, was two when Bohemond died in 1130.[42] Alice tried to secure the regency for Constance for herself, but the Antiochene noblemen preferred her father, Baldwin II of Jerusalem.[42] After Bohemond's death, Roger II of Sicily laid claim to Antioch, but he could never assert it against Constance.[43]
References
1. Runciman 1989, p. 125, Appendix III (Genealogical tree No. 2.)
2. Houben 2002, p. 31.
3. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica (2016). "Bohemond II Prince of Antioch". Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
4. Barber 2012, p. 83.
5. Asbridge 2000, p. 137.
6. Asbridge 2000, pp. 137–138.
7. Runciman 1989, p. 51.
8. Norwich 1992, p. 304.
9. Asbridge 2000, p. 138.
10. Barber 2012, p. 103.
11. Runciman 1989, p. 124.
12. Asbridge 2000, p. 139.
13. Asbridge 2000, pp. 141–142.
14. Runciman 1989, p. 126.
15. Asbridge 2000, p. 141.
16. Asbridge 2000, p. 142.
17. Barber 2012, pp. 123–124.
18. Runciman 1989, pp. 149, 152.
19. Runciman 1989, p. 152.
20. Asbridge 2000, p. 146.
21. Nicholson 1969, p. 419.
22. Nicholson 1969, p. 428.
23. Houben 2002, p. 43.
24. Norwich 1992, p. 307.
25. Norwich 1992, p. 312.
26. Runciman 1989, p. 176.
27. Asbridge 2000, p. 147.
28. Asbridge 2000, p. 127.
29. Runciman 1989, p. 181.
30. Nicholson 1969, pp. 428–429.
31. Runciman 1989, pp. 181–182.
32. Runciman 1989, p. 180.
33. Runciman 1989, p. 182.
34. Runciman 1989, pp. 182–183.
35. Runciman 1989, p. 183.
36. Nicholson 1969, p. 431.
37. Barber 2012, p. 152.
38. Barber 2012, p. 395.
39. Norwich 1992, pp. 116, 332.
40. Dunbabin 2000, p. 383.
41. Runciman 1989, p. 176, Appendix III (Genealogical tree No. 1.)
42. Runciman 1989, p. 184.
43. Houben 2002, pp. 44, 78.
Sources
** Asbridge, Thomas (2000). The Creation of the Principality of Antioch, 1098–1130. Boydell Press. ISBN 978-0-85115-661-3.
** Barber, Malcolm (2012). The Crusader States. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-11312-9.
** Dunbabin, Jean (2000). France in the Making, 843–1180. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-820846-4.
** Houben, Hubert (2002). Roger II of Sicily: Ruler between East and West. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-65208-1.
** Nicholson, Robert L. (1969). "The Growth of the Latin States, 1118–1144". In Setton, Kenneth M; Baldwin, Marshall W. (eds.) A History of the Crusades, Volume I: The First Hundred Years. The University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 410–447. ISBN 0-299-04844-6.
** Norwich, John Julius (1992). The Normans in Sicily. Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-015212-8.
** Runciman, Steven (1989). A History of the Crusades, Volume II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100–1187. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-06162-8.
Further reading
** Richard, Jean (1999). The Crusades: c. 1071-c. 1291. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-62566-1.
External links
** Cawley, Charles (30 May 2014). "Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families; Antioch, chapter 1: Princes of Antioch 1100–1130 (Hauteville)". Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 5 May 2016: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondIIB.16 "

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 117.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:625.17


; Per Genealogics:
     "Boemund was born in 1107, the son of Boemund I, prince of Antioch, prince of Tarente and Constance de France, daughter of Philippe I, king of France and Bertha of Holland. He succeeded his father in 1111 in his Italian possessions, under the regency of his mother. He appointed as administrator of his Italian lands either the Pope or Alessandro, conte di Conversano, and sailed from Otranto for Palestine in September 1126. He was invested as Boemund II, prince of Antioch in October 1126 by Baudouin II, king of Jerusalem. He captured Kafartab from the emir of Homs at the end of 1126.
     "In the autumn of 1126 Boemund married Alix de Jerusalem, daughter of Baudouin II du Bourg, king of Jerusalem and Morfia de Melitene. Boemund and Alix had a daughter Constance, who would marry twice and have progeny.
     "Boemund invaded the territories of Leo I, Lord of the Mountains (Armenia-Rupen) in February 1130, but his forces were massacred near Mamistra by the Danishmend emir Ghazi with whom Leo had entered into an alliance. The Danishmend emir had Boemund's head embalmed and sent it as a gift to the caliph."17 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Med Lands: "BOHEMOND of Antioch, son of BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch & his wife Constance de France ([1107/08]-killed in battle near Anazarbus, Cilicia Feb 1130). His parentage is recorded by William of Tyre and Orderic Vitalis, the latter specifying that his mother brought him up at Tarento[109]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Beymont" as the son of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille" & his wife[110]. He succeeded his father in 1111 in his Italian possessions, under the regency of his mother. He appointed as administrator of his Italian lands either the Pope or Alessandro Conte di Conversano[111], and sailed from Otranto for Palestine in Sep 1126. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Boamundis juvenis" left for Antioch in Sep 1127 (error for 1126) and appointed "comiti domino Alexandro consanguineo suo" as "vice sua" in "omnes civitates suas Apuliæ"[112]. He was invested as BOHEMOND II Prince of Antioch in Oct 1126 by Baudouin II King of Jerusalem. He captured Kafartab from the Emir of Homs end-1126[113]. William of Tyre records that Bohémond II invaded the territories of Lewon I Lord of the Mountains [Armenia - Rupen] in Feb 1130, but that he and his forces were massacred near Mamistra by the Danishmend Emir Ghazi (Gümü?tekin) with whom Lewon had entered an alliance. The Danishmend emir had Prince Bohémond's head embalmed and sent as a gift to the Caliph[114].
     "m (Betrothed 1119, Autumn 1126) ALIX of Jerusalem, daughter of BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem & his wife Morfia of Melitena [Armenia] ([1110]-after 1136). She is named "Haalis" by William of Tyre who records her parentage and also her marriage in Autumn 1126[115]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis la fille au roy Bauduin de Jerusalem" as wife of "Beymont…prince"[116]. Her marriage was arranged when her father became regent of Antioch, on behalf of her future husband, in 1119. The marriage took place when her father invested her husband as Prince of Antioch on his arrival at Antioch in Oct 1126[117]. Her husband settled Latakieh and Jabala on Alix as her dower[118]. She assumed the regency of Antioch in Feb 1130 for her infant daughter immediately on the death of her husband, without waiting for her father to appoint a regent. To protect her position, she sent an envoy to Zengi atabeg of Aleppo requesting him to become her overlord provided he guaranteed her continued possession of Antioch, but the envoy was intercepted by King Baudouin. When the king entered the city in May 1130, he removed his daughter from the regency and banished her to Latakieh and Jabala. King Baudouin assumed the regency himself, leaving Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa as guardian in Antioch when he returned to Jerusalem[119]. After her father's death in 1131, she reasserted her claim to the regency of Antioch, but her forces were defeated by Foulques d'Anjou King of Jerusalem[120]. She was allowed to return to Antioch in 1135, but forced into exile in May 1136."
Med Lands cites:
[109] WT XII.XXI, p. 589, and Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 133.
[110] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[111] Houben (2002), p. 43, which cites the two contradictory sources concerning this appointment.
[112] Cronica di Romualdo Guarna arcivescovo Salernitano (Chronicon Romualdi II archiepiscopi Salernitani) ("Romualdo Guarna"), Re, G. del (ed.) (1845) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 1 (Napoli), p. 7.
[113] Runciman (1978), p. 176.
[114] WT XIII.XXVI, pp. 598-601, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 183.
[115] WT XII.IV, p. 517, and XIII.XXI, p. 588, respectively.
[116] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[117] Runciman (1978), pp. 152 and 176.
[118] Runciman (1978), p. 184.
[119] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 183-4.
[120] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 188-90.12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “E5. [1m.] Constance, *1078, +I.1124/26; 1m: 1093/95 (div 1104) Hugues I de Blois, Cte de Troyes (+14.6.1126); 2m: Chartres 1106 Bohemund I de Hauteville, Pr of Antioch, Duke of Apulia (*ca 1054 +7.3.1111)”.18 He was Prince of Antiochia; Leo van de Pas says 1110/1131; Rudt-Collenberg says 1126/30 between 1110 and 1131.3,4

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 267. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Princes d’Antioche (Maison de Poitiers), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080250&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-25, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondIIB
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  14. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Jerusalem: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080248&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemond_II_of_Antioch. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080247&tree=LEO
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020908&tree=LEO

Alix/Alice de Réthel Regent of Jerusalem, Lady of Laodicea and Gibel1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #10244, b. 1110, d. after 1136
FatherBaudouin II (?) du Bourcq-Réthel, King of Jerusalem, Count of Edessa8,4,5,9,6,7,10 b. c 1058, d. 21 Aug 1131
MotherMorphia (?) de Melitene11,4,5,6,7 b. 1085, d. c 1 Oct 1126
ReferenceEDV2G GKJ26
Last Edited8 Nov 2020
     Alix/Alice de Réthel Regent of Jerusalem, Lady of Laodicea and Gibel was born in 1110.3,4,7,12 She married Bohemond II de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, son of Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento and Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch, in October 1126.13,3,4,14,5,9,6,7,12,15 Alix/Alice de Réthel Regent of Jerusalem, Lady of Laodicea and Gibel married Hugue de Ramigny;
Her 2nd husband.6
Alix/Alice de Réthel Regent of Jerusalem, Lady of Laodicea and Gibel died after 1136.3,4,9,6,7,12
     ; Per Med Lands: "ALIX of Jerusalem ([1110]-after 1136). She is named "Haalis" by William of Tyre who records her parentage and also her marriage in Autumn 1126[88]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis la fille au roy Bauduin de Jerusalem" as wife of "Beymont…prince"[89]. Her marriage was arranged when her father became regent of Antioch, on behalf of her future husband, in 1119. The marriage took place when her father invested her husband as Prince of Antioch on his arrival at Antioch in Oct 1126[90]. Her husband settled Latakieh and Jabala on Alix as her dower[91]. She assumed the regency of Antioch in Feb 1130 for her infant daughter immediately on the death of her husband, without waiting for her father to appoint a regent. To protect her position, she sent an envoy to Zengi atabeg of Aleppo requesting him to become her overlord provided he guaranteed her continued possession of Antioch, but the envoy was intercepted by King Baudouin. When the king entered the city in May 1130, he removed his daughter from the regency and banished her to Latakieh and Jabala. King Baudouin assumed the regency himself, leaving Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa as guardian in Antioch when he returned to Jerusalem[92]. After her father's death in 1131, she reasserted her claim to the regency of Antioch, but her forces were defeated by Foulques d'Anjou King of Jerusalem[93]. She was allowed to return to Antioch in 1135, but forced into exile in May 1136. m (Betrothed 1119, Autumn 1126) BOHEMOND II Prince of Antioch, son of BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch & his wife Constance de France ([1107/08]-killed in battle near Anazarbus, Cilicia Feb 1130). His parentage is recorded by William of Tyre and Orderic Vitalis[94]."
Med Lands cites:
[88] WT XII.IV, p. 517, and XIII.XXI, p. 588, respectively.
[89] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[90] Runciman (1978), pp. 152 and 176.
[91] Runciman (1978), p. 184.
[92] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 183-4.
[93] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 188-90.
[94] WT XII.XXI, p. 589, and Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 133.16


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 117.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:625.
3. The Templars, London, 1999 , Read, Piers Paul. 115, 116 biographical details.17
EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Alix de Réthel was born about 1110, the second daughter of Baudouin II, king of Jerusalem and Morfia de Melitene. In 1126 Alix married Boemund II, prince of Antioch. Her marriage was arranged in 1119 when her father became regent of Antioch on behalf of her future husband. The marriage took place when her father invested her husband as prince of Antioch on his arrival there in October 1126. Her husband settled Lattakia and Jabala on Alix as her dower. In 1127 they had their only child Constance. In February 1130 Boemund was killed fighting the Danishmend Turks. His embalmed head was sent by the Danishmend emir Ghazi as a gift to the caliph in Baghdad.
     "Alix assumed the regency of Antioch in February 1130 for her infant daughter immediately on the death of her husband, without waiting for her father to appoint a regent. To protect her position, she sent an envoy to Zengi, Saracen governor of Aleppo, requesting him to become her overlord provided he guaranteed her continued possession of Antioch, but the envoy was intercepted and hanged by Alix's father King Baudouin.
     "Alix shut the gates of Antioch to her father, probably with the support of the indigenous Christians. However the French barons would not support her and reopened the gates. When the king entered the city in May 1130, he removed his daughter from the regency and banished her to the port of Latakia, Baudouin assumed the regency himself, leaving Joscelin de Courtenay, count of Edessa as guardian in Antioch when he returned to Jerusalem.
     "Alix's disloyalty to her father no doubt hastened his end. Returning to Jerusalem a sick man, Baudouin was admitted as a canon of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. In August 1131 he died wearing the habit of a monk. Alix reasserted her claim to the regency, but her forces were defeated by Foulques V d'Anjou, king of Jerusalem. She was allowed to return to Antioch in 1135, but forced into exile in May 1136 and died that year."17

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Alice of Jerusalem (also Haalis, Halis, or Adelicia; c. 1110 - after 1136) was a Princess consort of Antioch by marriage to Bohemond II of Antioch. She engaged in a longlasting power struggle during the reign of her daughter Constance of Antioch.
Life
     "Alice was the second daughter of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem and Morphia of Melitene. She had three sisters. She was an aunt of Kings Baldwin III and Amalric I. Of her other sisters, Hodierna married Raymond II of Tripoli, and Ioveta became abbess of the convent in Bethany.
Princess consort of Antioch
     "Baldwin II had become regent of Antioch after the defeat of the principality at the Battle of Ager Sanguinis in 1119. In 1126, the 18-year-old Bohemond, son of Bohemond I, the first prince of Antioch, arrived to claim his inheritance. Immediately after the principality was handed over to him, Bohemond was married to Alice; the marriage was likely part of the negotiations prior to Bohemond's arrival.
Power struggle with Baldwin
     "In 1130 Bohemond was killed in battle with the Danishmends, and Baldwin returned to Antioch to assume the regency, but Alice wanted the city for herself. She attempted to make an alliance with Zengi, the Seljuk atabeg of Mosul and Aleppo, offering to marry her daughter to a Muslim prince. The messenger sent by Alice to Zengi was captured on the way by Baldwin, and was tortured and executed. Alice refused to let Baldwin enter Antioch, but some of the Antiochene nobles opened the gates for Baldwin's representatives, Fulk, Count of Anjou (Alice's brother-in-law) and Joscelin I of Edessa. Alice at first fled to the citadel but finally flung herself on her father's mercy and they were reconciled. She was expelled from Antioch, but was allowed to keep for herself Latakia and Jabala, the cities which had been her dowry when she had married Bohemond. Baldwin left Antioch under the regency of Joscelin, ruling for Alice and Bohemond's young daughter Constance.
Power struggle with Fulk
     "Baldwin also died in 1131. Baldwin was succeeded in Jerusalem by his eldest daughter, Alice's sister Melisende and her husband Fulk. Joscelin, too, died soon afterwards, and Alice again attempted to take control of Antioch, not wishing her young daughter to inherit the principality. The Antiochene nobles appealed to Fulk for help, and Alice allied with the rulers of the other two northern Crusader states, Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin I's son Joscelin II. Pons would not allow Fulk to pass through the County of Tripoli, and Fulk was forced to travel to Antioch by sea. Both Pons and Joscelin probably feared that Fulk wanted to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over the northern states, although it was also rumoured that Alice had simply bribed them. Fulk and Pons fought a battle near Rugia, but peace was eventually made, and Fulk restored the regency in Antioch, placing the principality under the control of Reynald Masoier.
Marriage of Constance
     "Around 1135, Alice again attempted to take control of Antioch, negotiating with the Byzantine Empire for a husband for Constance; the future emperor Manuel Comnenus was a candidate. Some of the nobles of the principality, however, not wanting a Greek alliance, secretly summoned Raymond of Poitiers to marry Constance. The Patriarch, Ralph of Domfront, convinced Alice that Raymond was coming to marry her, but instead he himself performed the wedding of Raymond and the still-underage Constance. Alice was humiliated and left Antioch, never to return. She died in Latakia after 1136.
References
** William of Tyre, A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea, Volume II. Trans. Emily Atwater Babcock and A. C. Krey. Columbia University Press, 1943.
** Steven Runciman, A History of the Crusades, Volume II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187. Cambridge University Press, 1952."18 She was Regent of Jerusalem in 1130.4 She was Regent of Jerusalem between 1135 and 1136.4

Family 2

Hugue de Ramigny

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 267. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 217. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 1 page (Rethel family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  5. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076233&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#BaudouinIIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Morfia de Melitene: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076234&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Jerusalem: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080248&tree=LEO
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-25, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondIIB
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#HodierneMRaymondIITripoli
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_II,_Count_of_Tripoli.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_of_Antioch. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020908&tree=LEO

Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #10245, b. circa 1054, d. 7 March 1111
FatherRobert I "Guiscard/Weasel" de Hauteville Count then Duke of Apulia, Calabria, and Sicily, Pr of Salerno3,4,7,8,9 b. c 1015, d. 17 Jul 1085
MotherAubree/Alvareds de Buonalberga3,4,5,7,6 b. 1033, d. Jul 1122
ReferenceEDV27 GKJ27
Last Edited7 Nov 2020
     Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento was born circa 1054; Genealogics says b. 1058; Rudt-Collenberg says b. 1052; Racines et Histoire says b. 1052/4; Med Lands says b. 1052.3,10,5,7,6 He married Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch, daughter of Philippe I (?) King of France and Bertha (?) van Holland, between 25 March 1105 and 26 May 1106 at Chartres, Departement de l'Eure-et-Loir, Centre-Val de Loire, France (now);
Her 2nd husband.11,12,2,3,13,10,5,14,15,7,6
Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento was buried on 7 March 1111 at Cathedral of San Sabino, Canossa di Puglia, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1058, San Marco Argentano, Provincia di Cosenza, Calabria, Italy
     DEATH     7 Mar 1111 (aged 52–53), Canosa di Puglia, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy
     Crusader. The Count of Taranto, and the oldest son of Duke Robert Guiscard and his first wife Alberada, he was one of the leaders of the first Crusade. He was the first to get into position before the city of Antioch in Palestine, and was responsible for the successful end of the siege in 1098. He was able to persuade one of the commanders in the city to betray his people. He was unwilling to act before he wasn't assured that the city would be his possession. He was taken prisoner in August 1100 and was released in 1103 after Baldwin of Boulonge had paid a ransom. In 1104 he went to Europe to gather an army to fight Emperor Alexios I of Byzantinum. He married Constance of France, daughter of King Philipp I in 1106, and died without returning to Antioch. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Constance of France, Princess of Antioch 1078–1126
     BURIAL     Cathedral of San Sabino, Canosa di Puglia, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 5 Dec 1998
     Find a Grave Memorial 4103.16,7,6,17
Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento died on 7 March 1111 at Canossa, Apulia, Italy; Leo van de Pas says d. 3 Mar 1110.11,16,2,3,13,5
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 117.7

; Per Genealogics:
     “Boemund was born in 1058, the eldest son of Robert Guiscard, duke of Apulia, and his first wife Alberade di Buonalberga, who was divorced by his father in 1058. He inherited Robert's large size and height. His father gave him command of the campaign against Byzantine Illyria in 1081. He captured Valona, was defeated in a naval battle by the Venetians allied with Byzantium, but then laid siege to Durazzo. During his father's temporary absence attacking Rome, Boemund lost most of the conquered territory. On the death of his father, he fought his half-brother Roger, whom his father had designated sole heir in Apulia. Moving southwards from his castle at Tarento, he captured Oria and Otranto, and was able to force peace in return for the grant, not only of Oria and Otranto, but also of Gallipoli, Tarento and Brindisi together with the region between Conversano and Brindisi, with the title Prince of Tarento. In 1090 he annexed Bari, but was faced with rebellion by the count of Conversano and the lord of Montescaglioso.
     “As one of the leaders of the First Crusade, Boemund swore allegiance to Emperor Alexios I Komnenos of Byzantium in April 1097, agreeing that the emperor should become overlord of any new principalities founded by the crusaders and that any land captured which had previously belonged to the empire should be handed back to Byzantium. He played a decisive role in the capture of Antioch on 28 June 1098 after a siege lasting eight months. The leaders of the crusade disagreed about which of them should control Antioch. After Raymond 'de Saint-Gilles', comte de Toulouse, finally marched south in January 1099 to continue the crusade, Boemund remained in possession of Antioch.
     “He declared himself Boemund I, prince of Antioch in defiance of his oath of allegiance to the emperor. He was confirmed as prince of Antioch in Jerusalem at Christmas 1099 by Daibert, the newly elected patriarch of Jerusalem, although with doubtful authority as John of Oxeia had been appointed patriarch of Antioch. He enlarged his principality by taking Edessa. He was captured by the Danishmend emir Malik Ghazi in 1100 while defending his new acquisition against the Turks. While in captivity he is said to have had an affaire with either the emir's daughter or one of his wives. He negotiated his release in 1103 for a payment of a ransom of 100,000 besants, and returned to Antioch where he resumed his position in place of his nephew Tancred who had been installed as regent in his absence. Together with Joscelin de Courtenay, he captured Muslimiye in the summer of 1103 and Basarfut in March 1104, both in the territory of Aleppo. In the summer of 1104 the Byzantines recaptured Tarsus, Adana and Mamistra.
     “Faced with these attacks from both the Turks and Byzantium, both of whose interests were threatened by the establishment of the new principality of Antioch on their borders, Boemund appointed his nephew Tancred as regent in Antioch and returned to Europe in 1104 for reinforcements, with a view particularly to attacking Alexios I, emperor of Byzantium.
     “On 25/26 May 1106 at Chartres he married Constance de France, daughter of Philippe I, king of France, and Bertha of Holland, and divorced wife of Hugues I, comte de Troyes. Boemund and Constance had two sons, Boemund, who would succeed his father in 1126, marry and have progeny, and Jean.
     “With English, French and Papal support, Boemund marched on Byzantium, but was defeated at Avlona near Durazzo in October 1107. Emperor Alexios confirmed him as prince of Antioch, but obliged him to accept Byzantine suzerainty in the Treaty of Devol of 1108. Boemund lived the rest of his life in Apulia, and died at Bari in 1111.”.13

; This is the same person as:
”Bohemond I of Antioch” at Wikipedia and as
”Bohémond de Tarente” at Wikipédia (Fr.)18,19

; Per Fletcher [1990:81-85]:
     "While it would be idle to deny that many participants in the First Crusade were fired by motives of the most exalted idealism, or that such motives could co-exist with self-interested ones, it is undoubtedly the case that large numbers of the crusaders were out for what they could get. Among the leaders this was especially true of Robert Guiscard's son Bohemond.
     "The emperor Alexius Comnenus was apprehensive when he heard that Bohemond had joined the crusade in 1096. As we have seen, Bohemond had accompanied his father in the invasion of the Balkan provinces of the empire in 1081-4. Bohemond had been promised that he could hold any lands conquered there as his own principality. He was unshakeably hostile to the empire and had perhaps convinced himself that he had some sort of claim upon a part of its territory. His reception in Constantinople in the spring of 1097 was of the most guarded kind, while Bohemond for his part feared that the emperor might try to poison him. 'He not only refused to taste any of the food, but would not even touch it with his finger-tips,' recalled the emperor's daughter Anna in her memoir of her father. Alexius's apprehensions were fully justified. After the crusading armies had crossed Asia Minor they settled down to besiege Antioch in October 1097. The city was betrayed to them in June 1098. The leaders of the crusade had sworn to Alexius that they would restore any formerly Roman territories which they might re-conquer to his control. But when early in the new year of 1099 they moved on towards Jerusalem under the leadership of Raymond of Toulouse, Bohemond did not accompany them. He stayed put as - in a title he took for himself soon afterwards - 'Prince of Antioch'.
     "Bohemond devoted the rest of his life to an attempt to consolidate his hold on Antioch and its surrounding territories, and to fight off his Byzantine Christian and Syrian Muslim enemies. He expelled the Greek clergy from Antioch and replaced them with Latins. He granted commercial privileges to the Genoese in return for naval assistance. He sought recruits and settlers from his Apulian estates. But he was not lucky. In the summer of 1100 he was captured by one of the Anatolian Turkish amirs and spent three years in captivity. During this period his nephew Tancred governed the principality of Antioch as his regent. Released on payment of a colossal ransom in 1103, Bohemond returned to Antioch. Military reverses in 1104 convinced him that it was vital to raise larger forces than were available to him in the East, so he returned to Western Europe -again deputing the regency to Tancred - and spent the years 1105 and 1106 in Italy and France raising men and money. In 1107 he opened hostilities with the Byzantine empire by laying siege to Durazzo. The Emperor Alexius was by this date in a far stronger position than he had been a quarter century earlier when Bohemond and his father had first campaigned in the Balkans. Outmanoeuvred by the Byzantine troops, Bohemond was compelled to make a humiliating peace in 1108. After this he retired to Apulia where he died in 1111, and was buried in the exquisite little mausoleum which still stands at Canossa di Puglia.
     "Bohemond may have died desolate, but his descendants ruled the principality of Antioch which he had founded until 1268. His career furnishes a notable example of the possibilities that unfolded before the aristocratic adventurers of the eleventh century."20 EDV-27 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARCO [Bohémond] of Apulia, son of ROBERT "Guiscard/the Weasel" Duke of Apulia & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia). The Annals of Romoald name "Boamundum" as the son of Robert "Guiscard" and his first wife[6]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Beymont" as son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille", stating that he was "prince de Tarente" before he was granted Antioch[7]. William of Tyre records "Boamundus" as son of Robert Guiscard in 1097[8]. He inherited the large size and height of his father[9]. His father gave him command of the campaign against Byzantine Illyria in 1081. He captured Valona, was defeated in a naval battle by the Venetians allied with Byzantium, but then laid siege to Durazzo. During his father's temporary absence attacking Rome, Bohémond lost most of the conquered territory. After his father died in 1085, Bohémond fought his half-brother Roger, whom his father had designated as sole heir in Apulia. Moving southwards from his castle at Tarento, he captured Oria and Otranto, and was able to force peace in return for the grant, not only of Oria and Otranto, but also of Gallipoli, Tarento and Brindisi together with the region between Conversano and Brindisi, with the title Prince of Tarento. In 1090, Bohémond annexed Bari, but was faced with rebellion by the Count of Conversano and the Lord of Montescaglioso. As one of the leaders of the First Crusade, he acceptance to swear allegiance to Emperor Alexios I Komnenos in Apr 1097, agreeing that the emperor should become overlord of any new principalities founded by the crusaders and that any land captured which had previously belonged to the empire should be handed back to Byzantium[10]. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus" swore allegiance to the emperor and agreed not to conquer any territory within the empire without the emperor’s consent[11]. Bohémond played a decisive role in the capture of Antioch 28 Jun 1098, after a siege lasting eight months[12]. Bar Hebræus records that "les Francs" invaded Syria in A. H. 491 (1097/98), captured Antioch from "Yaghi-Sian" in "le mois de djomada premier" (Apr/May 1098) after a nine month siege, and slaughtered the Muslims[13]. The leaders of the crusade disagreed about which of them should control Antioch. After Raymond "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse finally marched south to continue the crusade in Jan 1099[14], Bohémond remained in possession of Antioch. He declared himself BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch in defiance of his oath of allegiance to the emperor. He was confirmed as Prince of Antioch in Jerusalem at Christmas 1099 by Daibert, newly elected Patriarch of Jerusalem[15], although with doubtful authority as John of Oxeia had been appointed Patriarch of Antioch. Bohémond enlarged his principality by taking Edessa, but he was captured by the Danishmend Emir Malik Ghazi in 1100 while defending his new acquisition against the Turks[16]. Albert of Aix records that "Gaveras Armenici ducis principis et domini…Malatinam" requested help against "Donimannus quidam princeps Turcorum" from Bohémond Prince of Antioch who was captured with "eiusque propinquo Richardo" and taken to Nixandria, dated to 1100 from the context[17]. Vardan's History records that "Danishman lord of Sebastia, whom they say was of Armenian nationality, came against Melitene" in 1100 and captured "Pemond and Rajard who were at Edessa [and] who came against him"[18]. During his captivity he is said to have had an affair with either the Emir's daughter or one of his wives: Orderic Vitalis recounts how "Melaz, daughter of the Danishmend" helped Prince Bohémond I during his captivity, returned with him to Antioch, was baptised and married his nephew Roger[19], but the story does not appear to be corroborated elsewhere. He negotiated his release in 1103 for a payment of a ransom of 100, 000 besants, and returned to Antioch where he resumed his position in place of his nephew Tancred who had been installed as regent in his absence[20]. Together with Joscelin de Courtenay, he captured Muslimiye in Summer 1103 and Basarfut in Mar 1104, both in the territory of the emirate of Aleppo[21]. In Summer 1104, the Byzantines recaptured Tarsus, Adana and Mamistra[22]. Faced with these attacks from both the Turks and Byzantium, both of whose interests were threatened by the establishment of the new principality of Antioch on their borders, Bohémond appointed his nephew Tancred as regent in Antioch and returned to Europe for reinforcements in 1104, with a view particularly of attacking Emperor Alexios I[23]. Albert of Aix records the return of "Boemundo" to "Italiam sed et Galliam" to request reinforcements "adversus Alexium regem Græcorum", while Tancred returned to Antioch "vice avunculi sui", dated to 1105 from the context[24]. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus" returned with reinforcements and arrived at "Valonam", dated to [1107] from the context, besieged Durazzo in the Spring and defeated the emperor [presumably referring to Emperor Alexios I] who marched there to relieve the city, a subsequent passage stating that the siege lasted one year and that "Wido filius sororis Boemundi, Willelmus Claret et ceteri" tried to persuade Bohémond to lift the siege before the latter left and returned to Apulia[25]. With English, French and Papal support, he marched on Byzantium but was defeated at Avlona near Durazzo in Oct 1107. Emperor Alexios confirmed Bohémond as Prince of Antioch, but obliged him to accept Byzantine suzerainty under the Treaty of Devol in 1108[26]. Bohémond lived the remaining years of his life in Apulia. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus avunculus Tancredi" died at Bari and was buried "Beati Nicolai" at the time Emperor Heinrich V was attacking Rome[27].
     "m (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) as her second husband, CONSTANCE de France, divorced wife of HUGUES de Blois Comte de Troyes, daughter of PHILIPPE I King of France & his first wife Bertha of Holland ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[28]). William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her marriage[29]. Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum”[30]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[31]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[32]. Constance's second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[33]. She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her husband[34]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France. The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[35]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[36]."
Med Lands cites:
[7] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[8] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) II.XIII, p. 90.
[9] Norwich, J. J. (1992) The Normans in the South 1016-1130 and The Kingdom in the Sun 1130-1194 (Penguin Books), p. 227.
[10] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 149-52.
[11] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. XVIII, p. 312.
[12] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. V, Book IX, pp. 73-95.
[13] Bar Hebræus, RHC Historiens orientaux I, p. 3.
[14] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 261.
[15] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 305.
[16] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 321.
[17] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VII, Cap. XXVII, p. 524.
[18] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2007) Vardan Areweltsi's Compilation of History (New Jersey), 65.
[19] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, pp. 359-79.
[20] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 38-9.
[21] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 40.
[22] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 46.
[23] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 47.
[24] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IX, Cap. XLVII, p. 620.
[25] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber X, Caps. XL and XLIV, pp. 650 and 651.
[26] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 49-50.
[27] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XI, Cap. XLVIII, p. 686.
[28] See Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ????????? Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.
[29] WT XI.I, p. 450.
[30] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390.
[31] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.
[32] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[33] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.
[34] Houben (2002), p. 31.
[35] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.
[36] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Antioche): “1) Bohémond 1er, Prince d’Antioche (Marco Bohémond d’Apulie) ° 1052/54 + 06-07/03/1111 (Canosa di Puglia) X en Illyrie contre les Byzantins (1081), comte puis duc de Tarente (1085, titres conquis contre son demi-frère Roger), Prince d’Antioche (28/06/1098 (prise de la ville) - 01/1099 (seul maître de la cité) - Noël 1099 (confirmé par le Patriarche de Jérusalem, Dalbert) - 1110/11), prend Edesse, est capturé par l’Emir Malik Ghazi (1100), libéré (1103, rançon de 100.000 besants), prend 2 cités dépendant d’Alep : Muslimiye (été 1103) et Basarfut (03/1104) , combat les Byzantins et les Turcs (1104), assiège Durazzo (1106), défait l’Empereur Alexios 1er, défait à son tour à Avlona près Durazzo (10/1107), doit se reconnaître vassal de l’Empereur (Traité de Devol, 1108), finit ses jours en Apulie
     ép. entre 25/03 et 26/05/1106 (Chartres) Constance de France ° 1078 + 14/09/1126 (fille de Philippe 1er, Roi de France, et de Bertha de Hollande ; divorcée de Hugues 1er, comte de Troyes) (mariage arrangé par Adèle, comtesse de Blois ; elle vécut toujours en Apulie et ne se rendit jamais en Palestine ; revendiqua le titre de Reine comme fille de Roi ; emprisonnée à Bari par Grimoald Alferanites, seigneur auto-proclamé de Bari ; relâchée 1120 après intervention de Roger II, comte de Sicile, en renonçant à Bari)”.9

; Per Genealogy.EU (de Hauteville): “B1. [1m.] Bohemond I, Duke of Tarento, Duke of Antioch (1098-1108/11), *1054, +7.3.1111; m.Chartres 1106 Constance of France (*1078 +1124/26)”.21
; Per Med Lands:
     "CONSTANCE de France ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[318]). Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[319]. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis", specifying that Constance married firstly "Hugoni Trecharum comiti", from whom she was separated for consanguinity, and secondly "Boamundo apud Carnotho"[320]. Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum”[321]. "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[322]. William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her (second) marriage[323]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[324]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[325]. Her second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her second marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[326]. She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her second husband[327]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France. The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[328]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[329].
     "m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[330]) as his first wife, HUGUES de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Crépy-Valois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126).
     "m secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch, son of ROBERT “Guiscard” Duke of Apulia and Calabria [Sicily] & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia)."
Med Lands cites:
[318] Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ????????? Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.
[319] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[320] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[321] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390.
[322] Molesme II, 19, p. 26.
[323] William of Tyre XI.I, p. 450.
[324] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.
[325] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[326] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.
[327] Houben (2002), p. 31.
[328] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.
[329] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.
[330] Ivo of Chartres, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158, cited in Chibnall, Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5.15
He was Prince of Taranto between 1088 and 1111.18 He was Prince of Antioch between 1098 and 1111.18

Family

Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch b. c 1078, d. 24 Sep 1126
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 267. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  4. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VI (A): The House of the Princes of Antiochia. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert Guiscard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080255&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Princes d’Antioche (Maison de Poitiers), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf
  10. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-24, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080250&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Constancedied1126
  16. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 85. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 01 July 2020), memorial page for Bohemond of Hauteville (1058–7 Mar 1111), Find a Grave Memorial no. 4103, citing Cathedral of San Sabino, Canosa di Puglia, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/4103. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemond_I_of_Antioch. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bohémond de Tarente: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boh%C3%A9mond_de_Tarente. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  20. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid, pp. 84-85.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Hauteville: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html#B1A
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean of Antiochia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00194743&tree=LEO

Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch1,2,3

F, #10246, b. circa 1078, d. 24 September 1126
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France4,1,2,3,5,6,7 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertha (?) van Holland4,8,9,5,6,7 b. bt 1054 - 1055, d. 15 Oct 1094
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch was born circa 1078.4,1,10,11,8,6,7 She married Hugues I de Blois comte de Troyes, comte en Champagne, son of Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne and Adelaide (?) de Valois-Crépy, comtesse de Bar-sur-Aube, in 1094;
Her 1st husband, his 1st wife. Med Lands says m. 1093/95.4,1,6,7,2,12,13 Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch and Hugues I de Blois comte de Troyes, comte en Champagne were divorced in 1104.4,14,15,6,13 Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch married Bohemond I (Marco) de Hauteville Prince of Antioch, Duke of Apulia, Duke of Tarento, son of Robert I "Guiscard/Weasel" de Hauteville Count then Duke of Apulia, Calabria, and Sicily, Pr of Salerno and Aubree/Alvareds de Buonalberga, between 25 March 1105 and 26 May 1106 at Chartres, Departement de l'Eure-et-Loir, Centre-Val de Loire, France (now);
Her 2nd husband.16,4,1,10,17,11,8,6,7,18,19
Constance (?) de France, Princess of Antioch died on 24 September 1126; Genealogy.EU (Hauteville page) says d. 1124/26; Genealogics says d. ca 1125.4,10,11,15,8,6,7
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARCO [Bohémond] of Apulia, son of ROBERT "Guiscard/the Weasel" Duke of Apulia & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia). The Annals of Romoald name "Boamundum" as the son of Robert "Guiscard" and his first wife[6]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Beymont" as son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille", stating that he was "prince de Tarente" before he was granted Antioch[7]. William of Tyre records "Boamundus" as son of Robert Guiscard in 1097[8]. He inherited the large size and height of his father[9]. His father gave him command of the campaign against Byzantine Illyria in 1081. He captured Valona, was defeated in a naval battle by the Venetians allied with Byzantium, but then laid siege to Durazzo. During his father's temporary absence attacking Rome, Bohémond lost most of the conquered territory. After his father died in 1085, Bohémond fought his half-brother Roger, whom his father had designated as sole heir in Apulia. Moving southwards from his castle at Tarento, he captured Oria and Otranto, and was able to force peace in return for the grant, not only of Oria and Otranto, but also of Gallipoli, Tarento and Brindisi together with the region between Conversano and Brindisi, with the title Prince of Tarento. In 1090, Bohémond annexed Bari, but was faced with rebellion by the Count of Conversano and the Lord of Montescaglioso. As one of the leaders of the First Crusade, he acceptance to swear allegiance to Emperor Alexios I Komnenos in Apr 1097, agreeing that the emperor should become overlord of any new principalities founded by the crusaders and that any land captured which had previously belonged to the empire should be handed back to Byzantium[10]. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus" swore allegiance to the emperor and agreed not to conquer any territory within the empire without the emperor’s consent[11]. Bohémond played a decisive role in the capture of Antioch 28 Jun 1098, after a siege lasting eight months[12]. Bar Hebræus records that "les Francs" invaded Syria in A. H. 491 (1097/98), captured Antioch from "Yaghi-Sian" in "le mois de djomada premier" (Apr/May 1098) after a nine month siege, and slaughtered the Muslims[13]. The leaders of the crusade disagreed about which of them should control Antioch. After Raymond "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse finally marched south to continue the crusade in Jan 1099[14], Bohémond remained in possession of Antioch. He declared himself BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch in defiance of his oath of allegiance to the emperor. He was confirmed as Prince of Antioch in Jerusalem at Christmas 1099 by Daibert, newly elected Patriarch of Jerusalem[15], although with doubtful authority as John of Oxeia had been appointed Patriarch of Antioch. Bohémond enlarged his principality by taking Edessa, but he was captured by the Danishmend Emir Malik Ghazi in 1100 while defending his new acquisition against the Turks[16]. Albert of Aix records that "Gaveras Armenici ducis principis et domini…Malatinam" requested help against "Donimannus quidam princeps Turcorum" from Bohémond Prince of Antioch who was captured with "eiusque propinquo Richardo" and taken to Nixandria, dated to 1100 from the context[17]. Vardan's History records that "Danishman lord of Sebastia, whom they say was of Armenian nationality, came against Melitene" in 1100 and captured "Pemond and Rajard who were at Edessa [and] who came against him"[18]. During his captivity he is said to have had an affair with either the Emir's daughter or one of his wives: Orderic Vitalis recounts how "Melaz, daughter of the Danishmend" helped Prince Bohémond I during his captivity, returned with him to Antioch, was baptised and married his nephew Roger[19], but the story does not appear to be corroborated elsewhere. He negotiated his release in 1103 for a payment of a ransom of 100, 000 besants, and returned to Antioch where he resumed his position in place of his nephew Tancred who had been installed as regent in his absence[20]. Together with Joscelin de Courtenay, he captured Muslimiye in Summer 1103 and Basarfut in Mar 1104, both in the territory of the emirate of Aleppo[21]. In Summer 1104, the Byzantines recaptured Tarsus, Adana and Mamistra[22]. Faced with these attacks from both the Turks and Byzantium, both of whose interests were threatened by the establishment of the new principality of Antioch on their borders, Bohémond appointed his nephew Tancred as regent in Antioch and returned to Europe for reinforcements in 1104, with a view particularly of attacking Emperor Alexios I[23]. Albert of Aix records the return of "Boemundo" to "Italiam sed et Galliam" to request reinforcements "adversus Alexium regem Græcorum", while Tancred returned to Antioch "vice avunculi sui", dated to 1105 from the context[24]. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus" returned with reinforcements and arrived at "Valonam", dated to [1107] from the context, besieged Durazzo in the Spring and defeated the emperor [presumably referring to Emperor Alexios I] who marched there to relieve the city, a subsequent passage stating that the siege lasted one year and that "Wido filius sororis Boemundi, Willelmus Claret et ceteri" tried to persuade Bohémond to lift the siege before the latter left and returned to Apulia[25]. With English, French and Papal support, he marched on Byzantium but was defeated at Avlona near Durazzo in Oct 1107. Emperor Alexios confirmed Bohémond as Prince of Antioch, but obliged him to accept Byzantine suzerainty under the Treaty of Devol in 1108[26]. Bohémond lived the remaining years of his life in Apulia. Albert of Aix records that "Boemundus avunculus Tancredi" died at Bari and was buried "Beati Nicolai" at the time Emperor Heinrich V was attacking Rome[27].
     "m (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) as her second husband, CONSTANCE de France, divorced wife of HUGUES de Blois Comte de Troyes, daughter of PHILIPPE I King of France & his first wife Bertha of Holland ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[28]). William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her marriage[29]. Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum”[30]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[31]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[32]. Constance's second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[33]. She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her husband[34]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France. The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[35]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[36]."
Med Lands cites:
[7] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[8] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) II.XIII, p. 90.
[9] Norwich, J. J. (1992) The Normans in the South 1016-1130 and The Kingdom in the Sun 1130-1194 (Penguin Books), p. 227.
[10] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 149-52.
[11] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. XVIII, p. 312.
[12] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. V, Book IX, pp. 73-95.
[13] Bar Hebræus, RHC Historiens orientaux I, p. 3.
[14] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 261.
[15] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 305.
[16] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 321.
[17] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VII, Cap. XXVII, p. 524.
[18] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2007) Vardan Areweltsi's Compilation of History (New Jersey), 65.
[19] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, pp. 359-79.
[20] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 38-9.
[21] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 40.
[22] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 46.
[23] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 47.
[24] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IX, Cap. XLVII, p. 620.
[25] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber X, Caps. XL and XLIV, pp. 650 and 651.
[26] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 49-50.
[27] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XI, Cap. XLVIII, p. 686.
[28] See Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ????????? Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.
[29] WT XI.I, p. 450.
[30] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390.
[31] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.
[32] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[33] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.
[34] Houben (2002), p. 31.
[35] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.
[36] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.19


; Per Genealogy.EU (de Hauteville): “B1. [1m.] Bohemond I, Duke of Tarento, Duke of Antioch (1098-1108/11), *1054, +7.3.1111; m.Chartres 1106 Constance of France (*1078 +1124/26)”.20

; Per Racines et Histoire (Antioche): “1) Bohémond 1er, Prince d’Antioche (Marco Bohémond d’Apulie) ° 1052/54 + 06-07/03/1111 (Canosa di Puglia) X en Illyrie contre les Byzantins (1081), comte puis duc de Tarente (1085, titres conquis contre son demi-frère Roger), Prince d’Antioche (28/06/1098 (prise de la ville) - 01/1099 (seul maître de la cité) - Noël 1099 (confirmé par le Patriarche de Jérusalem, Dalbert) - 1110/11), prend Edesse, est capturé par l’Emir Malik Ghazi (1100), libéré (1103, rançon de 100.000 besants), prend 2 cités dépendant d’Alep : Muslimiye (été 1103) et Basarfut (03/1104) , combat les Byzantins et les Turcs (1104), assiège Durazzo (1106), défait l’Empereur Alexios 1er, défait à son tour à Avlona près Durazzo (10/1107), doit se reconnaître vassal de l’Empereur (Traité de Devol, 1108), finit ses jours en Apulie
     ép. entre 25/03 et 26/05/1106 (Chartres) Constance de France ° 1078 + 14/09/1126 (fille de Philippe 1er, Roi de France, et de Bertha de Hollande ; divorcée de Hugues 1er, comte de Troyes) (mariage arrangé par Adèle, comtesse de Blois ; elle vécut toujours en Apulie et ne se rendit jamais en Palestine ; revendiqua le titre de Reine comme fille de Roi ; emprisonnée à Bari par Grimoald Alferanites, seigneur auto-proclamé de Bari ; relâchée 1120 après intervention de Roger II, comte de Sicile, en renonçant à Bari)”.3

; Per Genealogics:
     “Daughter of Philippe I, king of France and Bertha of Holland, Constance was born about 1078. About 1094/1095 she married Hugues I, count of Troyes but they divorced in 1104. On 25/26 May 1105 at Chartres Constance married Boemund I, prince of Antioch and of Tarente, the eldest son of Robert Guiscard, duke of Apulia and his first wife Alberade di Buonalberga. The marriage was arranged by Adèle, comtesse de Blois while Boemund was in France canvassing support against Byzantium.
     “Constance and Boemund had two sons, Boemund who would succeed his father in 1126, marry and have progeny, and Jean who died young.
     “After her marriage Constance remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine. She was regent for her son Boemund in Italy after the death of her husband in 1111. She claimed the title of Queen as daughter of the king of France. She was imprisoned at Bari by Grimoald Alferanites, who had set himself up as lord of Bari, but was released in 1120 after the intervention of Roger II, the Norman king of Sicily, after agreeing to renounce her lordship over the town. Constance died about 1125.”.6

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 117.6

; This is the same person as:
”Constance of France, Princess of Antioch” at Wikipedia and as
”Constance de France (1078-1126)” at Wikipédia (Fr.)21,22

Reference: Weis [1992:98] Line 103-24.16 EDV-26.

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONSTANCE de France ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[318]). Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[319]. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis", specifying that Constance married firstly "Hugoni Trecharum comiti", from whom she was separated for consanguinity, and secondly "Boamundo apud Carnotho"[320]. Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum”[321]. "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[322]. William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her (second) marriage[323]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[324]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[325]. Her second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her second marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[326]. She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her second husband[327]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France. The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[328]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[329].
     "m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[330]) as his first wife, HUGUES de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Crépy-Valois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126).
     "m secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch, son of ROBERT “Guiscard” Duke of Apulia and Calabria [Sicily] & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia)."
Med Lands cites:
[318] Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ????????? Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.
[319] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[320] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[321] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390.
[322] Molesme II, 19, p. 26.
[323] William of Tyre XI.I, p. 450.
[324] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.
[325] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.
[326] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.
[327] Houben (2002), p. 31.
[328] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.
[329] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.
[330] Ivo of Chartres, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158, cited in Chibnall, Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “E5. [1m.] Constance, *1078, +I.1124/26; 1m: 1093/95 (div 1104) Hugues I de Blois, Cte de Troyes (+14.6.1126); 2m: Chartres 1106 Bohemund I de Hauteville, Pr of Antioch, Duke of Apulia (*ca 1054 +7.3.1111)”.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES de Blois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Philippum episcopum Cathalauensem et Hugonem Campanie comitem" as the two sons of "comiti Campanie Theobaldo" & his wife Adela[63]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Stephanus et Hugo" sons of "comes Tetbaudus", specifying that Hugues "factus est …Trecassinorum comes" on their father's death[64]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Stephanus Blesensis palatinus comes” had “consules Odonem et Hugonem fratres”[65]. He succeeded his brother in 1093 as Comte de Troyes. Friend and counsellor of Philippe I King of France. He went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land 1104-1107, 1114 and Jun 1126. "Hugo comes Campanie, Theobaldi comitis filius" founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Cheminon by charter dated 1110[66]. After repudiating his second wife, he became a Knight Templar. Pope Calixtus II sent him to welcome the Archbishop of Mainz on his arrival at the synod of Reims in Oct 1119[67]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Hugo comes Campanie" became a Knight Templar in 1125 and was succeeded by "Theobaldus nepos eius"1125[68].
     "m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[69]) as her first husband, CONSTANCE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE I King of France & his first wife Bertha of Holland ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[70]). Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum”[71]. "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[72]. She married secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) Bohémond I Prince of Antioch.
     "m secondly ([1110], repudiated) ISABELLE de Mâcon, daughter of ETIENNE de Bourgogne[-Comté] “le Hardi” Comte de Mâcon Seigneur de Varais & his wife Béatrice de Lorraine ([1090/95]-after 1125). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Elizabeth sororem comitis Raynaldi de Burgundia" as wife of "Hugo comes Campanie"[73], but the primary source which confirms their precise parentage has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[63] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1062, MGH SS XXIII, p. 793.
[64] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[65] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XI, p. 393.
[66] Cheminon Notre-Dame 1110, p. 42.
[67] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 253.
[68] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1125, MGH SS XXIII, p. 826.
[69] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5, citing Ivo of Chartres, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patroligiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158.
[70] Houben (2002), p. 39 footnote, citing Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ????????? Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994).
[71] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390.
[72] Molesme, Tome II, 19, p. 26.
[73] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1125, MGH SS XXIII, p. 826.13
She was Princess of Antioch between 1106 and 1111.21

Family 1

Hugues I de Blois comte de Troyes, comte en Champagne b. c 1065, d. 14 Jun 1126

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Princes d’Antioche (Maison de Poitiers), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080250&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Constancedied1126
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 2.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hautvle page (de Hauteville): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html
  11. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart VII (C): The House of the Kings of Cyprus. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080251&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamtroyes.htm#HuguesITroyesdied1126
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080251&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 103-24, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANTIOCH.htm#BohemondI
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Hauteville: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/hautvle.html#B1A
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_of_France,_Princess_of_Antioch. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  22. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Constance de France (1078-1126): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_de_France_(1078-1126). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boemund II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080249&tree=LEO
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Antioche.pdf, p. 4.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean of Antiochia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00194743&tree=LEO

William Lovel 7th Lord Lovel of Titchmarsh, 4th Lord Holand1

M, #10248, b. 1397, d. 13 June 1455
FatherSir John Lovel Knt., 6th Lord Lovel of Titchmarsh, Lord Holand1,2,3 b. c 1378, d. 19 Oct 1414
MotherAlianor/Eleanor La Zouche1,2
Last Edited28 Nov 2012
     William Lovel 7th Lord Lovel of Titchmarsh, 4th Lord Holand was born in 1397.1 He married Alice Deincourt Baroness d'Eyncourt and Grey, of Rotherfield, daughter of John Deincourt 5th Lord Deincourt, 12th Lord d'Eyncourt and Joane Grey, before 31 August 1422.1,4,5
William Lovel 7th Lord Lovel of Titchmarsh, 4th Lord Holand died on 13 June 1455.1,6
     He was 7th LORD (Baron) LOVEL (of Titchmarsh.)1 He was 4th LORD (Baron) HOLAND (on his grandmother's death.)1

; WILLIAM LOVEL, 7th LORD (Baron) LOVEL (of Titchmarsh) and on his grandmother's death 4th LORD (Baron) HOLAND, JP (1441); b 1397; Constable Wallingford Castle 1450; m by 31 Aug 1422, as her 1st husb, Alice (b 25 Feb 1403/4; m 2nd 1463 1st and last Baron Sudeley (qv) of the 1441 cr; d 10 Feb 1473/4), dau of 5th Lord (Baron) Deincourt and sis and ultimate heir of 6th Lord (Baron) Deincourt, thus according to later doctrine Baroness Deincourt in her own right, also according to the same doctrine Baroness Grey (of Rotherfield) through her mother, and d 13 June 1455.1

Family

Alice Deincourt Baroness d'Eyncourt and Grey, of Rotherfield b. bt 25 Feb 1403 - 1404, d. bt 10 Feb 1473 - 1474
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Lovel 12: p. 464. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Lovel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00348555&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page.
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), D'Eyncourt - Barons D'Eyncourt, p. 170. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), D'Eyncourt - Barons D'Eyncourt, pp. 170-1.
  7. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), D'Eyncourt - Barons D'Eyncourt, p. 171.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Lovel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161612&tree=LEO

Hawise de Louvaine1,2

F, #10249
FatherSir Matthew de Louvaine of Little Easton, Essex2 d. b Jun 1258
MotherMuriel (?)2 d. a 1275
ReferenceGAV22 EDV21
Last Edited15 Feb 2020
     Hawise de Louvaine married Sir Philip Basset of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, son of Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe and Aline de Gai.3,2,4
     GAV-22 EDV-21.

Family

Sir Philip Basset of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire b. c 1218, d. 21 Oct 1271
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 132, de LOUVAIN 3:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 72-31, p. 73. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1713] David Utz, "Utz email #1 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Anne Arundell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #1 29 May 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aliva Bassett: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177427&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#AlineBassetM1HughDespencer. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Sir Matthew de Louvaine of Little Easton, Essex1,2

M, #10250, d. before June 1258
FatherSir Godfrey de Lovaine3,2 d. b 26 Apr 1226
MotherAgnes de Hastings3,2,4
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited5 Sep 2007
     Sir Matthew de Louvaine of Little Easton, Essex married Muriel (?)5,2
Sir Matthew de Louvaine of Little Easton, Essex died before June 1258.5,1,3,2
     GAV-23 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 132, de LOUVAIN 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Hastings: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0477612&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 155A-27, p. 136. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 132, de LOUVAIN 3:i.
  7. [S2098] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 7 Sept 2006: "Re: CP Correction: Helisant 'du Perche', wife of Matthew de Lovaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/GiQpulF-RTk/m/sxTFfasJiiwJ) to e-mail address, 7 Sept 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 7 Sept 2006."

Sir Gerard de Furnivalle Lord Hallamshire1,2

M, #10251, d. before 18 October 1261
FatherSir Thomas de Furnivalle of Sheffield, Yorkshire2,3 d. c 1238
MotherBertha de Ferrers2,3 d. a 10 Feb 1267
Last Edited10 Sep 2005
     Sir Gerard de Furnivalle Lord Hallamshire married Maud fitz John, daughter of Sir John Fitz Geoffrey and Isabel (Isabella) le Bigod.4,5,1,6
Sir Gerard de Furnivalle Lord Hallamshire died before 18 October 1261.7,2,3
     ; Gerard (Sir); feudal Ld Hallamshire; m Maud (m 2nd c 1270 9th Earl of Warwick (see WARWICK, BROOKE and, E) of the 1088 cr and d April 1301), est dau of Sir John fitz Geoffrey and sis and eventual coheir of Sir Richard fitz John, of Shere and Fambridge, and dsp by 18 Oct 1261.2

Sir Gerard de Furnivalle Lord Hallamshire lived at Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.7

Family

Maud fitz John b. c 1237, d. 18 Apr 1301

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 100-101, de FURNIVALL 3:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Petre Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/F9_d7JZUuk0/m/5jgR9n064yQJ) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 72-30, p. 73. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 88, Fitz GEOFFREY 3:i.
  6. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited & Extinct Peerages, p. 30. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  7. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 4-4, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.

Walter de Ridelisford1

M, #10252, d. before 12 December 1244
FatherWalter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare d. a 1226
MotherAmabilis Fitz Henry
ReferenceGAV21 EDV23
Last Edited2 Jan 2009
     Walter de Ridelisford married Annora (?)2
Walter de Ridelisford died before 12 December 1244.2,1
     GAV-21 EDV-23.

Family

Annora (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 212, de RIDELISFORD 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-26, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emmeline de Ridelisford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028347&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Annora (?)

F, #10253
ReferenceGAV21 EDV23
Last Edited2 Jan 2009
     Annora (?) married Walter de Ridelisford, son of Walter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare and Amabilis Fitz Henry.1
     GAV-21 EDV-23 GKJ-22.

Family

Walter de Ridelisford d. b 12 Dec 1244
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-26, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 212, de RIDELISFORD 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emmeline de Ridelisford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028347&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Walter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare1

M, #10254, d. after 1226
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited18 Feb 2003
     Walter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare married Amabilis Fitz Henry, daughter of Henry Fitz Henry Prince.2,3,1
Walter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare died after 1226.2,1
     GAV-24 EDV-24.

Family

Amabilis Fitz Henry
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 212, de RIDELISFORD 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-25, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 186, NORMANDY 10:iii.

Amabilis Fitz Henry1

F, #10255
FatherHenry Fitz Henry Prince1 b. c 1105, d. bt 1157 - 1158
ReferenceGAV22 EDV24
Last Edited14 Feb 2003
     Amabilis Fitz Henry married Walter de Ridelisford of Carriebenan, in Kildare.2,1,3
     GAV-22 EDV-24.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 186, NORMANDY 10:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-25, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 212, de RIDELISFORD 1.

Meiler Fitz Henry1

M, #10256, d. 1220
FatherHenry Fitz Henry Prince1 b. c 1105, d. bt 1157 - 1158
Last Edited24 Apr 2002
     Meiler Fitz Henry died in 1220.2
     He was Justiciar of Ireland.3

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 186, NORMANDY 10:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 511 (Chart 37). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 33A-24, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury1,2,3,4

M, #10257, b. circa 1150, d. 17 April 1196
FatherPatrick d'Evreux 1st Earl of Salisbury5,2,6,7,8,4,3 b. c 1122, d. c 7 Apr 1168
MotherEla Talvas (?) de Ponthieu9,4,3 b. c 1110, d. 10 Oct 1174
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury was born circa 1150.10,4 He married Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury, daughter of Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré and Emma de Dinan, circa 1189;
Her 3rd husband; his 2nd? wife. Genealogics says m. ac 190.10,1,6,11,12,13,14,4
William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury died on 17 April 1196 at Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France (now).10,1,15,4,16,3
William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury was buried after 17 April 1196 at Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire Unitary Authority, Wiltshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1154, Salisbury, Wiltshire Unitary Authority, Wiltshire, England
     DEATH     17 Apr 1196 (aged 41–42), Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury was an Anglo-Norman peer. Though he is generally known as such, his proper title was Earl of Wiltshire, which title was conferred on his father by the Empress Maud around 1143. He was also called William FitzPatrick. He was the son and heir of Patrick of Salisbury, Earl of Wiltshire, styled Earl of Salisbury, and of Ela Talvas. He married Eleanor de Vitré, daughter of Robert III de Vitré of Tilliers and Emma de Dinan about 1190. He died without male issue. Their only daughter and heiress, was Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury who married William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, who was half-brother to the king. He bore the golden sceptre with the dove at the first coronation of King Richard I on 3 Sep 1189. At the second coronation of Richard, the Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state. William FitzPatrick died in 1196 at Normandy, and is buried at Bradenstoke Priory. (Bio by William Fitzpatrick's 22nd great granddaughter Audrey DeCamp Hoffmen)
     Family Members
     Parents
          Patrick d' Evereux 1122–1168
          Ela Talvas FitzWalter 1118–1174
     Spouse
          Eleanor de Vitre d'Evereux 1157–1233
     Half Siblings
          Isabella De Warenne 1136–1199
     Children
          Ela fitzPatrick d'Evereux Longspee 1187–1261
     BURIAL     Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire Unitary Authority, Wiltshire, England
     Maintained by: Billie Jasper
     Originally Created by: Audrey DeCamp Hoffman
     Added: 21 Apr 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 88886184
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.16
     GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-22.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 11:377.17

; Per Burke's: "William de Evereux, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, who, at the coronation of King Richard I, bore the golden sceptre with the dove on the head of it; but the next year, when the king became a prisoner in Almaine, his lordship was one of those who adhered to John, Earl of Moreton. In the 6th Richard I, the earl was with the king in the expedition then made into Normandy, and, upon his return to England, was one of the great council assembled at Nottingham. At the second coronation of Richard, in the same year, the Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state. His lordship m. Alianore de Vitrei, dau. of Tirrel de Mainers, and left, at his decase, an only dau. and heiress, Ela..."2

; This is the same person as ”William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury” at Wikipedia.17

; Per Genealogics:
     “William was born about 1150, the son of Patrick de Salisbury, 1st earl of Salisbury, and his second wife Ela de Ponthieu.
     “William married twice. By his first wife, whose name is unknown, he had no children.
     “About 1190 he married Eleanor de Vitré, widow of William Paynel and Gilbert Crespin, seigneur de Tillières, and daughter of Robert III, sire de Vitré and Emma de Dinan. By Eleanor he had a daughter, Ela, who would be his heir and marry William Longespee, 3rd earl of Salisbury, and have progeny.
     “William bore the golden sceptre at the coronation of King Richard I, but the next year, when the king became a prisoner in Germany, he was one of those who adhered to Richard's younger brother John. In 1195 William was back with King Richard in the expedition into Normandy, and upon his return to England he was a member of Richard's great council assembled at Nottingham. William was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state at the second coronation of Richard that year.
     “William died in 1196.”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLIAM FitzPatrick (-[Normandy] 1196, bur Bradenstoke Priory). “Comes Willielmus Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Elæ comitissæ matris meæ…patris mei comitis Patricii…fratris mei Patricii”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus et Walterus fratres mei…”[1427]. He succeeded his father in 1168 as Earl of Wiltshire, but was always styled Earl of Salisbury. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus filius comitis Patricii lvi l xvi s, de novo xl s" in Wiltshire in [1171/72][1428]. “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[1429]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death of "Willelmus comes Saresberiensis filius comitis Patricii" in [1196][1430]. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus comes Saresbiriæ”[1431]. The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus comes Sarum”[1432]. The Book of Lacock records that “Ela…pater” died in 1196 and was buried “apud Bradenestok”[1433].
     "m ([1190]) as her third husband, ELEONORE de Vitré, widow firstly of WILLIAM Paynell of Hambye and secondly of GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières, daughter of ROBERT de Vitré & his wife Emma de Dinan (-20 Jul [1232/33]). “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[1434]. She married fourthly Gilbert de Malesmains. The Book of Lacock records that “Ela…mater” died two years before her father and was buried “apud Bradenestok”[1435]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "20 Jul" of "Alienor comitissa Salesberiensis"[1436]."
Med Lands cites:
[1427] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, II, p. 338.
[1428] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 58.
[1429] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[1430] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 161.
[1431] Annales de Margan, p. 23.
[1432] Annales de Wigornia, p. 389.
[1433] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. ii.
[1434] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[1435] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. ii.
[1436] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 473.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "ELEONORE de Vitré (-20 Jul [1232/33]). “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[938]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "20 Jul" of "Alienor comitissa Salesberiensis"[939].
     "m firstly (before 1168) WILLIAM Paynell of Hambye, son of FULK [I] Paynell of Hambye & his wife Lesceline de Subligny (-Jun 1184).
     "m secondly GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières, son of --- (-Palestine 1190).
     "m thirdly WILLIAM FitzPatrick Earl of Salisbury, son of PATRICK FitzWalter Earl of Salisbury & his second wife Ela de Ponthieu (-[Normandy] 1196, bur Bradenstoke).
     "m fourthly GILBERT de Malesmains, son of ---."
Med Lands cites:
[938] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[939] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 473.14
He was 2nd Earl of Salisbury: Patrick's son succeeded him as Earl but died leaving an only child, a daughter called Ela or Isabel between 1168 and 1196.17

Family

Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury b. c 1160, d. b 12 Aug 1233
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 79, d'EVEREUX 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), D'Evereux - Earls of Salisbury, p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#WilliamSalisburydied1196. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William FitzPatrick: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030564&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Salisbury Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Patrick de Salisbury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140288&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#SibylChaourcesMWalterSalisbury
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), p. 101, Line 108-26. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 108-27, p. 101.
  11. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison du Bec-Crespin, Crispin, Tillières, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Vitré: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140299&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EleonoreVitredied1232
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf, p. 3.
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 August 2020), memorial page for William Fitzpatrick (1154–17 Apr 1196), Find a Grave Memorial no. 88886184, citing Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire Unitary Authority, Wiltshire, England; Maintained by Billie Jasper (contributor 48331425), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/88886184/william-fitzpatrick. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_of_Salisbury,_2nd_Earl_of_Salisbury. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ela FitzPatrick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028336&tree=LEO
  19. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Longespee 3: pp. 456457. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury1,2,3

F, #10258, b. circa 1160, d. before 12 August 1233
FatherRobert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré1,2,4,5,6 d. c 11 Nov 1173
MotherEmma de Dinan1,3,5,6 d. 18 Dec 1208
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury was born circa 1160.3 She married William Paynell of Hambye, son of Fulk I Paynell Hambye and Bréhal, Normandy and Drax, Yorkshire and Lesceline de Subligny Dame du Grippon, before 1168;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.7,1,8,9,5,6,10 Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury married Gilbert V Crespin de Tillières seigneur de Tillières, Damville et Bourth, son of Gilbert IV Crespin seigneur de Tillières et de Damville and Juliana de L'Aigle, before 1185 at Tillières, France (now);
Her 2nd husband.7,1,5,4,6,11 Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury married William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury, son of Patrick d'Evreux 1st Earl of Salisbury and Ela Talvas (?) de Ponthieu, circa 1189;
Her 3rd husband; his 2nd? wife. Genealogics says m. ac 190.12,7,1,13,4,5,6,14 Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury married Gilbert de Malesmains after 1196;
Her 4th husband; his 2nd wife.7,1,5,6,15
Eleanor (Eléonore, Aliénor) de Vitré Countess of Salisbury died before 12 August 1233 at Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; Med Lands says d. 20 Jul 1232/33.7,4,5,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLIAM FitzPatrick (-[Normandy] 1196, bur Bradenstoke Priory). “Comes Willielmus Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Elæ comitissæ matris meæ…patris mei comitis Patricii…fratris mei Patricii”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus et Walterus fratres mei…”[1427]. He succeeded his father in 1168 as Earl of Wiltshire, but was always styled Earl of Salisbury. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus filius comitis Patricii lvi l xvi s, de novo xl s" in Wiltshire in [1171/72][1428]. “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[1429]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death of "Willelmus comes Saresberiensis filius comitis Patricii" in [1196][1430]. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus comes Saresbiriæ”[1431]. The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus comes Sarum”[1432]. The Book of Lacock records that “Ela…pater” died in 1196 and was buried “apud Bradenestok”[1433].
     "m ([1190]) as her third husband, ELEONORE de Vitré, widow firstly of WILLIAM Paynell of Hambye and secondly of GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières, daughter of ROBERT de Vitré & his wife Emma de Dinan (-20 Jul [1232/33]). “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[1434]. She married fourthly Gilbert de Malesmains. The Book of Lacock records that “Ela…mater” died two years before her father and was buried “apud Bradenestok”[1435]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "20 Jul" of "Alienor comitissa Salesberiensis"[1436]."
Med Lands cites:
[1427] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, II, p. 338.
[1428] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 58.
[1429] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[1430] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 161.
[1431] Annales de Margan, p. 23.
[1432] Annales de Wigornia, p. 389.
[1433] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. ii.
[1434] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[1435] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. ii.
[1436] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 473.16
GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-22.

; Per Ravilious:
     "     "In Nov 1177 Andrew de Vitre gave to William son of Fulk Paynel, with his sister in free marriage, that moiety of his land in Normandy that was jointly divided by Fulk Paynel and himself, which he had chosen in Andrew's manors of Ryes, Trungy, and Ducy [all in Calvados], with a yearly rent of 20 li. from his manor of Cooling, Suffolk. '[2]
     "Concerning her maritagium, 'Battle Abbey Roll' states, ' Gilbert Malesmains, in 1198 held Cooling in right of his wife, together with the lands in England of her dower, viz. Westcote in Surrey, Kingsbury and Edgeware, Middlesex, Wooton, in Oxon, and Gatesden in Herts, and held them to the year of the conquest of Normandy by Philip Augustus, when they were in the King's hands as an escheat of the land of the Normans."- _T Stapleton._[7]
     "NOTE: She was previously held to be the one wife of William, Earl of Salisbury and the mother of his heiress Ela [cf. CP Vol. XI(Salisbury), p. 379][1]
     "Given the probable birth date of Ela based on her children's birth, she was undoubtedly not born in 1191 but sometime earlier (1187?), and the daughter of a previous wife not recorded in CP.
     "Peter Sutton suggests the 'Gundre comitissa' noted in the Liber Vitae of Durham[8],[9]
     "had a charter for a fair to be held at Cowlinge, Suffolk: 'feria gr 2 Oct 1225, by K Hen III to Alienor countess of Salisbury. To be held at the manor until the king came of age (RLC, ii, p. 63). Order to the sh of Suffolk to allow Alienora, countess of Salisbury to hold the fair regardless of the king’s prohibition of all markets and fairs raised during the minority, dated 16 Jul 1227 (RLC, ii, p. 192b).'[10]
Spouse:     William, Earl of Salisbury [3rd husband]
Death:     1196[1]
Father:     Patrick de Salisbury (-ca1168)
Mother:     Alice of Ponthieu (-1174)
Marr:     ca 1190[1]
Children:     Ela (ca1187-1261)
Sources:
1. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.
2. Rosie Bevan, "Re: Eleanor de Vitre," August 15, 2002, paper copy: library of John P. Ravilious, citations from Rosie Bevan : rbevan@paradise.net.nz, citation from Victoria County History of Northants., vol. 3, p. 181 [which cites Red Book of Exchequer, Rolls series, 331-2; Great Roll of the Pipe (Pipe Roll Soc.), xi, 119; xii, 54; xxi, p.53].
3. K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Domesday Descendants," The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2002.
4. Mike Talbot, "Vitri," June 24, 1998, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com additional commentary by Todd A. Farmerie (taf2@po.cwru.edu).
5. Frederick L. Weis (add/corr, Walter L Sheppard Jr.), "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists," Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co.
6. John Carmi Parsons, "More Angevin Bastards," Sept 7, 1998, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com
7. Adrian Channing, "Malemaine was Joan Knowght," Jan 27, 2002, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com cites DUCHESS OF CLEVELAND's "Battle Abbey Roll", 1889, Vol ii pp 246-8, re: Malesmains.
8. Rosie Bevan, "Liber Vitae and the family of Roger and Ida Bigod," July 31, 2002, paper copy: library of John P. Ravilious, citations
from Rosie Bevan : rbevan@paradise.net.nz, Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13: Nec Non Obituaria Duo Ejusdem Ecclesiae, ed. J. Stevenson (1841), Vol. 136: A Collotype Facsimile of the Original Manuscript, ed. A. H. Thomson (1926), followup post by Rosie, 'Re: Liber Vitae...' Aug 5, 2002, notes " Duncan' fil' ei' " correction, " Margareta soror ei' " addition.
9. Peter Sutton, "Liber Vitae and the family of Roger and Ida Bigod," August 1, 2002, paper copy: library of John P. Ravilious, based on citations from Rosie Bevan : rbevan@paradise.net.nz, Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13: Nec Non Obituaria Duo Ejusdem Ecclesiae, ed. J. Stevenson (1841), Vol. 136: A Collotype Facsimile of the Original Manuscript, ed. A. H. Thomson (1926).
10. "Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516,“.17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 11:378.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 14:136.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "ELEONORE de Vitré (-20 Jul [1232/33]). “Willielmus comes Sarum” donated property to Bradenstoke priory, for the souls of “Alianoræ de Viterio comitissæ meæ…Patricii patris mei et Elæ matris meæ et Patricii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Waltero filio meo…”[938]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "20 Jul" of "Alienor comitissa Salesberiensis"[939].
     "m firstly (before 1168) WILLIAM Paynell of Hambye, son of FULK [I] Paynell of Hambye & his wife Lesceline de Subligny (-Jun 1184).
     "m secondly GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières, son of --- (-Palestine 1190).
     "m thirdly WILLIAM FitzPatrick Earl of Salisbury, son of PATRICK FitzWalter Earl of Salisbury & his second wife Ela de Ponthieu (-[Normandy] 1196, bur Bradenstoke).
     "m fourthly GILBERT de Malesmains, son of ---."
Med Lands cites:
[938] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire, III, p. 338.
[939] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 473.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLIAM Paynell (-Jun 1184). “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…”[157]. “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Isabellæ comitissæ de Norhamton”, by charter dated 1187 which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus”, witnessed by “Simone comite Northamptoniæ, Isabella comitissa matre eius…Fulcone Paganello, Wilielmo fratre eius…Wilielmo Paganello et Bernardo filio eius…”[158].
     "m as her first husband, ELEONORE de Vitré, daughter of ROBERT de Vitré & his wife Emma de Dinan (-20 Jul [1232/33]). She married secondly Gilbert Crispin Seigneur de Tillières. She married thirdly William FitzPatrick Earl of Salisbury. She married fourthly Gilbert de Malesmains. "
Med Lands cites:
[157] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204.
[158] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 203.9


; Per Racines et Histoire (Crespin): “Gilbert V Crespin de Tillières ° 1159 (Tillières, 27) + 13/07/1191 (Saint-Jean d’Acre, Palestine) baron de Tillières, Damville, Bourth, et de fiefs en Leicestershire & Warwickshire, allié en 1173 à Robert de Leicester contre le Roi Henry II qui ravage son château de Tillières en 08/1173 et y place Raoul de Verdun comme Capitaine royal (~1180) croisé avec le Roi Richard (~1190)
     ép. après 06/1184 dès 1185 (Tillières) Eléonore (Aliénor) de Vitré ° ~1158/60 + un 20/07 (ou 12/08 ?) en 1232/33 (Salisbury) (armes : «De gueules, au lion d’argent») (fille de Robert III + 11/11/1173, et d’Emma de Dinan + 1186 ; veuve de Guillaume III Paynel d’Hambye et de Drax, baron de Marcey + 1184 ; ép. 3) ~1187 William FitzPatrick, earl of Salisbury & Wiltshire (1168), comte d’Evreux + 1196 (Normandie) ; ép. 4) dès 1198 Gilbert de Malesmains + après 1205)
     leur postérité est sous tutelle de Philippe de Creully, fils du comte de Gloucester ”.8

Family 1

William Paynell of Hambye d. Jun 1184

Family 3

William Fitz Patrick d'Evreux 2nd Earl of Salisbury b. c 1150, d. 17 Apr 1196
Child

Citations

  1. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Longespee 3: pp. 456457. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison du Bec-Crespin, Crispin, Tillières, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Vitré: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140299&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EleonoreVitredied1232. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 79, d'EVEREUX 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs du Bec-Crespin, Crispin, Tillières, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#WilliamPaynelldied1184
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Paynel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175563&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert VI Crespin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175564&tree=LEO
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 108-27, p. 101. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William FitzPatrick: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030564&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert de Malesmains: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175565&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#WilliamSalisburydied1196
  17. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004," e-mail to e-mail address, 18 June 2004, https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/soc.genealogy.medieval/Re$3A$20CP$20-$20ES$20correction$20needed$3F/soc.genealogy.medieval/0skJxRkNrBQ/gd_o9--9mMYJ.
  18. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), D'Evereux - Earls of Salisbury, p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.

Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré1

M, #10259, d. circa 11 November 1173
FatherRobert II de Vitre2 d. c 1161
MotherEmma de La Guerche2
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré married Emma de Dinan, daughter of Alan de Dinan vicomte de Dinan and Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre.3,1,2,4
Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré died circa 11 November 1173; John Ravilious says d. ca 1184, citing Mike Talbot, "Vitri," June 24, 1998, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com additional commentary by Todd A. Farmerie (taf2@po.cwru.edu).1,2
     GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI 378
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 136.1

; Weis AR 108-27.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175561&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 108-27, p. 101. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain de Vitré: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00178110&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, André II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313139&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#AndreIVitreMMathilde. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Longespee 3: pp. 456457. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison du Bec-Crespin, Crispin, Tillières, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Vitré: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140299&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EleonoreVitredied1232

Emma de Dinan

F, #10260, d. 18 December 1208
FatherAlan de Dinan vicomte de Dinan1,2 b. c 1090, d. b 1166
MotherEleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre3,4,2
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Emma de Dinan married Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré, son of Robert II de Vitre and Emma de La Guerche.5,6,3,2
Emma de Dinan died on 18 December 1208.3
     GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan (Olivier II) de Dinan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0175568&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."
  3. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aginore de Penthievre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0438933&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 108-27, p. 101. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00175561&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain de Vitré: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00178110&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, André II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313139&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#AndreIVitreMMathilde. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crespin.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Vitré: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140299&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EleonoreVitredied1232