Eirene Diplosynadene1

F, #56311
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited9 Nov 2020

Family

Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor b. 1115, d. 1174
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1 page ("The Komnenos family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html#TKK
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  3. [S1699] Doug McDonald, "McDonald email 2 Jan 2005 email "Re: Alexios Komnenos, Protostrator 1136-1183"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "McDonald email 2 Jan 2005."

Theodora Kamaterina1

F, #56312, d. 1144
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Theodora Kamaterina married Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor, son of Ioannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium and Saint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary, in 1134; his 1st wife.1,2
Theodora Kamaterina died in 1144.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1 page ("The Komnenos family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html#TKK
  2. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1190. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330270&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Jeanne/Joanne de Bar1,2,3,4

F, #56313, b. 1295, d. 31 August 1361
FatherHenri III de Bar Comte de Bar, Seigneur de Torcy en Brie, graf von Nassau2,5,3,4 b. 1259, d. Sep 1302
MotherEleanor (?) Princess of England2,3,4 b. 18 Jun 1269, d. 29 Aug 1298
Last Edited15 May 2009
     Jeanne/Joanne de Bar was born in 1295.2 She married John de Warenne 8th Earl of Surrey and Warren, son of William de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey and Joan de Vere, on 25 May 1306.1,2,6,3,7,8,4
Jeanne/Joanne de Bar died on 31 August 1361.1,2,4
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: vol III/2 page 355.2

Family

John de Warenne 8th Earl of Surrey and Warren b. 30 Jun 1286, d. 29 Jun 1347

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015409&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.19. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007051&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015408&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015408&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8.

Ingelger (?)1,2

M, #56314, d. 927
FatherFoulques I "le Roux" (?) Vcte de Tours et d'Anjou, Cte de Nantes, Cte d'Anjou1,2,3,4 b. c 870, d. bt 941 - 942
MotherRoscille/Roscilla de Loches Dame de Loches, La Haye et Villandry1,2,4 b. c 874, d. Jul 929
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Ingelger (?) died in 927; killed in battle.1,2
     He was living in 919.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques I, Comte d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020234&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIdied941. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Gisela de Lorraine1,2

F, #56315, b. between 860 and 865, d. after 21 May 907
FatherLothaire II "The Saxon" (?) King of Lorraine1,2,3,4 b. 835, d. 8 Aug 869
MotherWaldrada (?)1,2,4,5 b. bt 835 - 836, d. a 868
Last Edited14 Dec 2020
     Gisela de Lorraine was born between 860 and 865.1,2 She married Gottfried/Godefrid (?) Duke of Friesland in 882.6
Gisela de Lorraine was buried after 21 May 907 at Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     869, Lorraine, France
     DEATH     26 Oct 907 (aged 37–38), Lorraine, France
     Family Members
     Parents
          Lothair II of Lotharingia
          Waldrada d'Alsace
     Spouse
          Gottfried of Frisia unknown–885
     Siblings
          Bertha Of Lotharingia
     Children
          Siegfried the Dane unknown–965
     BURIAL     Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 7 Feb 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial 157919103.7
Gisela de Lorraine died after 21 May 907; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says d. aft 18 Jan 908.1,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 90.1 Gisela de Lorraine was also known as Gisella of Lotharingia.8

Family

Gottfried/Godefrid (?) Duke of Friesland b. c 830, d. Jun 885

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304039&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020451&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#LothaireIILotharingia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waldrada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020453&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 1 page - Kings of Haithabu: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway1.html
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 November 2019), memorial page for Gisele of Lorraine (869–26 Oct 907), Find A Grave Memorial no. 157919103, citing Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157919103/gisele-of_lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44095

Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude1,2,3,4,5

M, #56316, d. circa 975
FatherBertrand (?) vicomte de Gévaudan3,5,6,7,8 d. bt 943 - 954
MotherEmilde/Emilgarde (?) de Brioude3,5,6,9,8 d. a 943
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited1 Oct 2020
     Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude married Anne (?) before 943.10 Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude married Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse, daughter of Foulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine, circa 955;
Her 1st husband. His 2nd wife.
     Genealogics says m. bef 960; Wikipedia says m. c 955; Med Lands says m. 950/960.1,3,4,11,12,13,5
Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude died in 970.14
Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude died circa 975; Bunot says d. ca 975; The Henry Project says d. prob. 970x5.1,3,4,15
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou ([940/50]-[29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles]). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[60], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude (for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis")[61]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[62]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[63]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[64]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[65]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[66]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[67]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[68]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[69]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ("eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[70]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[71]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[72]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018 (this document makes no mention of Adelais’s supposed fifth husband)[73]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others: it is difficult to interpret all these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's second wife is named Adelais in several charters[74], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[75], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelais-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[76]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[77]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[78]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[79]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[80].
     "m firstly ([950/60]) as his second wife, ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND --- & his wife Emilgarde [Emilde] --- (-before [970/75]).
     "m secondly ([970/75]) RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "Carazo" [972/79]).
     "m thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) LOUIS associate King of the Franks, son of LOTHAIRE King of the Franks & Emma d'Arles [Italy] ([966/67]-Compiègne 21 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille). Crowned King of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982. He succeeded his father in 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franks.
     "m fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia [de Vienne] ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).
     "[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]"
Med Lands cites:
[60] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[61] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[62] Richer, III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[63] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[64] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d’Anjou, p. 382.
[65] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[66] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum I.7, p. 17.
[67] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[68] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[69] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[70] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 110.
[71] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[72] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[73] Marseille Saint-Victor I, 630, p. 626.
[74] Mâcon, 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721.
[75] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[76] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[77] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[78] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[79] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[80] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.13

; Per Bunot email:
     “In his recent La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien,Christian Settipani has a slightly different version for the ancestry of Ermengarde d’Auvergne, comtesse of Blois. You will notice that Settipani proposes the existence of another new daughter of Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne and duc d’Aquitaine, an Engelberge, married to Dalmatius, vicomte et abbe de Brioude. I am not summarizing his (rather convincing though circumstancial) argument in favor of this hypothesis because of its exceptional density and invite you simply to read it and make yourself an opinion. It is based (as usual) on onomastics and also the transmission of important properties in Auvergne. Jean Bunot.
     “It goes like this :
1. Ermengarde d’Auvergne (+ 1042), m. 1005, Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Tours, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre (+ 1037)
2. Robert I, comte d’Auvergne 1010/16 (+ 1022/43)
3. m. c. 990/95, Ermengarde de Gevaudan (+ after 1010), half-sister of Constance d’Arles, queen of France
4. Guillaume, vicomte de Clermont, comte d’Auvergne 989 (+ 1003/13)
5. Humberge (+ 1016)
6. Etienne, comte de Gevaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude (+ c. 975)
7. m. c. 970, Adelaide d’Anjou (+ after 1026)
8. Robert II, vicomte de Clermont 962 (+ 962/74)
9. Engelberge de Brioude, dame en partie de Beaumont (+ after 962)
12. Bertrand, vicomte de Gevaudan 925/39 (+939/54)
13. Emilgarde de Brioude
14. Foulques II le Bon, comte d’Anjou (+ 958)
15. m. 937, Gerberge de Gatinais (+ c. 952)
16. Robert I, vicomte de Clermont 915/62
17. Adalgarde/Aldearde
18. Dalmatius, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 922/47 (+ 947/54)
19. Engelberge (possibly d’Auvergne) (+ after 962)
24. Heraclius, seigneur d’Antoing 892/926
25. Goda
26. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
27. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
32. Eustorge, noble d’Auvergne
33. Arsinde de Velay
34. Hubert, noble d’Auvergne
35. ép. Ermengarde
36. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
37. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
38. possibly Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne et de Macon, duc d’Aquitaine, abbe laique de Brioude (+ 918)
39. possibly Engelberge de Provence
48. Vivien, seigneur d’Antoing (+ after 898)
52. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
53. Ne... de Velay
66. Armand, vicomte de Velay 895 (+ c. 913)
67. Bertilde d’Antoing 895 (+ 913/26)
72. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
73. Ne... de Velay
76. Bernard II Plantevelue, comte d’Auvergne et de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ after 883)
77. ép. Ermengarde d’Auvergne
78. Boson, roi de Provence
79. Ermengarde d’Italie
96. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
97. Viviana
106. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
107. Engelmode
132. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
133. Engelmode
134. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
135. Viviana
146. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 977/900 (+ c. 900)
147. Engelmode
152. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne, marquis de Gothie 824/44, s/o saint Guillaume, comte et duc de Toulouse and Cunegonde
153. Dhuoda/Doda de Gascogne
154. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne (+ 868)
155. Liedgarde (+ after 868)
156. Buvinus, comte de Metz, abbe laique de Gorze 842/62
157. Ne... d/o Boson le Vieux, comte d’Arles et en Italie
158. Louis II, roi d’Italie, empereur
159. Engelberge”.3

; This is the same person as ”Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan” at Wikipedia and as ”Étienne de Gévaudan” at Wikipédia (FR).10,14

; According to The Henry Project: Étienne de Brioude, fl. 936-957, d. prob. 970×5.
     "Étienne was son of Bertrand and his wife Emilde ["... quod Stephanus, filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis... eadem domina Adaliz omnia ista prædicta propter remedium animæ suæ, mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni..." Cart. Brioude, 122-3 (#105)]. He first appears on 28 August 936 [Cart. Brioude, 347 (#337)] and in 937×8 [2 Louis IV, ibid., 94-5 (#74)]. Étienne was married first to a wife Anne who is known from a charter of April 943 ["... quodam homine nomine Bertrando et uxore ejus Emilgarde, et eorum filio nomine Stephano et uxore ejus Annane..." Cart. Brioude, 300 (#293)]. Étienne's last dated appearance is in 957 [Cart. Brioude, 227 (#216)], but judging from the likely chronology of the marriages of Adélaïde, he certainly lived well into the 960's, and probably into the early 970's."15

; Per Wikipedia (Fr.): "954-970 : Étienne († avant 975), vicomte de Gévaudan († 970), fils de Bertrand et d'Ermengarde. Il prend le titre de comte de Gévaudan.
** marié en premières noces vers 943 à Anne (fille du vicomte Bertand Dalmas?)
** marié en secondes noces vers 966 à Adélaïde d'Anjou (947 -† 1026), fille de Foulques II, comte d'Anjou, et de Gerberge du Maine."16


Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried. 176.5 GAV-29. Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude was also known as Étienne de Gévaudan Vicomte de Gévaudan.14 He was comte de Gevaudan.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND & his wife Emilde --- (-before [970/75]). "Bertrandus et uxor mea Emildis et Stephanus filius noster" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitoris mei et genetricis meæ Godanæ" by charter dated 937[16]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[17]. According to Settipani, Etienne was not "Comte de Gévaudan", although his descendants by his second wife later possessed the counties of Gévaudan, Brioude and Forez[18].
     "m firstly ANNE, daughter of ---. "Bertrandus et et Emilgardis uxor eius et Stephanus, eorum filius et uxor eius Annanis" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude by charter dated 943[19].
     "m secondly ([950/60]) as her first husband, ADELAIS d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([940/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[20], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude, for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis"[21]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[22]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[23]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[24]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[25]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[26]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[27]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[28]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[29]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[30]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[31]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[32]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[33]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[34]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others, as it is difficult to interpret these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[35], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[36], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[37]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[38]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[39]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[40]. She married secondly ([970/75]) [as his second wife,] Raymond IV Comte de Toulouse, thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) Louis associate King of the Franks [later Louis V King of the Franks], fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, Guillaume II "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, and fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, Othon Guillaume Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté].] An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[41]."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Brioude 74, p. 94.
[17] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[18] Settipani (1993), p. 336 footnote 996.
[19] Brioude 293, p. 300.
[20] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[21] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[22] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[23] Richer, Tome III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[24] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[25] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 382.
[26] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[27] Rodulfus Glaber, I.7, p. 17.
[28] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[29] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[30] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[31] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, p. 110.
[32] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[33] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[34] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[35] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[36] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[37] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[38] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[39] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[40] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[41] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.17
He was Vicomte de Gévaudan between 954 and 970.14

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S1778] Roger Tansey, "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005 "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/FYPj-jP7R0sJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne I de Brioude: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331118&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#Etiennedied975A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand de Gévaudan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00571856&tree=LEO
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emilgarde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00571857&tree=LEO
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_Viscount_of_G%C3%A9vaudan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020247&tree=LEO
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide-Blanche_of_Anjou
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Comtes d'Anjou: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne de Gévaudan: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_de_G%C3%A9vaudan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela000.htm
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des vicomtes et comtes de Gévaudan: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_vicomtes_et_comtes_de_G%C3%A9vaudan
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#Etiennedied975
  18. [S4806] Généalogie de la famille de Carné, online <http://www.decarne.com/gencar/gencar.html>, Gévaudan (de), "Philippa" ou Philippine: http://a.decarne.free.fr/gencar/gencar.htm. Hereinafter cited as Généalogie de Carné.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#PonsGevaudandied10161018
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de Gévaudan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196680&tree=LEO

Anne (?)1

F, #56317
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited23 Jul 2020
     Anne (?) married Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude, son of Bertrand (?) vicomte de Gévaudan and Emilde/Emilgarde (?) de Brioude, before 943.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND & his wife Emilde --- (-before [970/75]). "Bertrandus et uxor mea Emildis et Stephanus filius noster" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitoris mei et genetricis meæ Godanæ" by charter dated 937[16]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[17]. According to Settipani, Etienne was not "Comte de Gévaudan", although his descendants by his second wife later possessed the counties of Gévaudan, Brioude and Forez[18].
     "m firstly ANNE, daughter of ---. "Bertrandus et et Emilgardis uxor eius et Stephanus, eorum filius et uxor eius Annanis" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude by charter dated 943[19].
     "m secondly ([950/60]) as her first husband, ADELAIS d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([940/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[20], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude, for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis"[21]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[22]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[23]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[24]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[25]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[26]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[27]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[28]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[29]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[30]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[31]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[32]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[33]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[34]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others, as it is difficult to interpret these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[35], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[36], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[37]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[38]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[39]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[40]. She married secondly ([970/75]) [as his second wife,] Raymond IV Comte de Toulouse, thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) Louis associate King of the Franks [later Louis V King of the Franks], fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, Guillaume II "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, and fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, Othon Guillaume Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté].] An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[41]."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Brioude 74, p. 94.
[17] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[18] Settipani (1993), p. 336 footnote 996.
[19] Brioude 293, p. 300.
[20] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[21] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[22] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[23] Richer, Tome III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[24] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[25] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 382.
[26] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[27] Rodulfus Glaber, I.7, p. 17.
[28] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[29] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[30] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[31] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, p. 110.
[32] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[33] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[34] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[35] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[36] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[37] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[38] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[39] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[40] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[41] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.2
GAV-29.

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_Viscount_of_G%C3%A9vaudan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#Etiennedied975. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Bouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome1,2,3,4

M, #56318, d. 26 February 1007
FatherFoulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,5,6,7 b. bt 905 - 910, d. 11 Nov 958
MotherGerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine1,5,8,7 b. bt 913 - 915, d. b 952
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited15 Jul 2020
     Bouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome married Elisabeth (?) in 975;
Her 2nd husband.1,9,3,2,7,4
Bouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome died on 26 February 1007 at Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France (now); Genealogics says d. 26 Feb 1007; Med Lands says d. 9 Jan 1007.1,5,7,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 139.7

; This is the same person as ”Bouchard Ier de Vendôme” at Wikipédia (FR.)10 GAV-30.

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.): "956..967-1005 : Bouchard Ier le Vénérable, comte de Vendôme ; nommé par Hugues Capet comte de Paris ; par mariage comte de Corbeil et châtelain de Melun ; avoué de l'abbaye Saint-Maur-des-Fossés
épouse Elisabeth Le Riche, veuve du comte Haimon de Corbeil1”.11

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou): “C2. Bouchard, Cte de Vendôme, +1007; m.Elisabeth, widow of Hamon Cte de Corbeil”.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD [IV] "le Vieux/le Vénérable" de Vendôme (-Saint-Maur-des-Fossés 9 Jan 1007, bur Saint-Maur-des-Fossés). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Vendôme. Comte de Corbeil, de iure uxoris. Vicomte de Paris. "Burchardus comes" consented to the donation by "fidelis meus…Arduinus" by charter dated 1 Sep 976, subscribed by "Burcardi comitis Vindocinensis, Rainaldi filii"[3]. "Gaufridus atque Burchardus comites" confirmed the donation by "collibertam nostram Ermengardam" at the request of "fidelis nostri Fulchardi vicecomitis" by charter dated 19 Jul 985, subscribed by "Gaufredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius"[4]. A presumably spurious charter dated May 989 records that "Buchardus comes Parisiensis, Milduni et Corbolii et senescallus Franciæ" granted "castra Vindocini, Lavarzini et Montis-Aurei", held by "Fulco quondam pater meus", to "Fulconi comiti Andecavorum, nep[oti meo et Adellæ uxori suæ qui fuit filia Aimonis quondam comitis et Isabellis uxoris meæ"[5]. This document misrepresents the genealogy of the family which is confirmed in other primary sources, and ignores the fact that Bouchard´s son Bishop Renaud inherited Vendôme before it passed to the family of the comtes d´Anjou.] "…Burchardi comitis…" subscribed the charter dated 997 under which Robert II King of France donated property to "congregationem SS Bartolomæi atque Maglorii" in Paris[6]. "Buchardus comes et eius filius Parisiensis episcopus Rainaldus" confirmed a donation of revenue to Marmoutier by "vassallus…Dodo" by charter dated 998[7]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[8]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quidam eius miles...Walterius” captured his castle from “Burchardus Milidunensis castri comes”, who was living “apud regis Francorum curiam”, and handed it secretly to “Odoni comiti”, and that the castle was recaptured on[ his behalf by the king with the help of Richard II Duke of Normandy[9]. It is probable that this passage relates to Bouchard Comte de Vendôme, in his capacity as comte de Corbeil, as later comtes de Corbeil were recorded as holders of Melun.] "Burchardus…castri comes Curbolii…cum filio meo Rainaldo…Parisensium episcopo" authorised donations to the abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés by charter dated 1 Mar 1006, subscribed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Nanterii et Joscelini eius filiorum…Joscelini Miliduni vicecomites"[10]. The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "V Id Jan 1007" of "Burgandus comes"[11].
     "m as her second husband, ELISABETH, widow of HAMON Comte de Corbeil, daughter of ---. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records the marriage of "uxor comitis Haimonis, Elizabeth…nobili progenie" and "Burchardi comitis"[12]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[13]."
Med Lands cites:
[3] Chartes Vendômoises XXII, p. 31.
[4] Chartes Vendômoises XXIII, p. 33.
[5] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, IV, p. 11.
[6] RHGF, Tome X, II, p.574.
[7] Marmoutier-Tours, p. 8.
[8] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.
[9] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, XIV, p. 255.
[10] Chartes Vendômoises XXVIII, p. 39.
[11] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 5.
[12] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.
[13] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.


; Per Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): “Bouchard Ier «Le Vénérable» ° ~940 + 26/02/1007 comte de Vendôme (~970) et de Paris fidèle de Hugues «Capet», duc puis Roi de France,
     ép. Elisabeth Le Riche ° ~954 + 1007, dame de Sceaux-en-Gâtinais et de Larchant, dite de Corbeil, dame de Corbeil et de Melun (veuve de Aymon, comte de Corbeil) Bouchard se retire et meurt au Monastère de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés”


Per Racines et Histoire (Vendôme): “Bouchard II «Le Vieux» (ou «Petit-Vieux» (Vetulus) ou «Le Vénérable» ° ~940 + 09/01/1007 (Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, retiré comme moine entre 05 et 12/1006) comte de Vendôme (peu avant 959/60), Corbeil et Melun (peu après 960), vicomte ou comte royal de Paris (~987), fidèle d’Hugues Capet, duc puis Roi de France, conquiert la Vallée du Loir, X avec Hugues Capet en Flandres et en Ponthieu ~ 980, accompagne le même en Italie vers l'Empereur (03/981), remplit les prérogatives de Sénéchal de France sans en porter le titre, Avoué de l'Abbaye Royale de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés (dès 06/989), proche de Mayeul, Abbé de Cluny, Sénéchal de France, le château de Melun est pris par surprise ou trahison par Eudes II de Blois (999), mais vite repris par la riposte royale (avec les Normands et les Angevins ; le vicomte & capitaine de Melun,Gautier, est pendu pour trahison et sa femme suppliciée, pendue nue par les pieds), Bouchard II bat l'armée de Blois à Orsay (avant 26/10/999), X aux sièges de Sens et Avallon (25/08/1005) (teste officiellement à Corbeil 01/05/1006 ; partage définitif dès 02/12/1006 ; consent à une donation 01/09/976 ; en confirme une autre 19/07/985 avec son vicomte Fulchard ; souscrit une charte du roi Robert II en 997 ; bienfaiteur de nombreuses Abbayes de son ressort (Marmoutiers, Saint-Guénaud, Saint-Père de Melun, Saint-Magloire, Saint-Maur, Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme ; confirme avec son fils Renaud une donation à Marmoutier 998 ; donation à Saint-Maur 01/03/1006 souscrite par le vicomte Robert et ses fils Nantier et Joscelin ; Saint-Maur ou se retire Bouchard pour y mourir)
     ép.peu après 960 (mariage arrangé par Hugues Capet) Elisabeth Le Riche dite «de Corbeil», dame de Sceaux-en-Gâtinais, Larchant, Corbeil et Melun + un 18/01 peu de temps après 1007 (veuve d’Hamon (ou Aymon), comte de Corbeil)”.3,13

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD [IV] "le Vieux/le Vénérable" de Vendôme (-Saint-Maur-des-Fossés 9 Jan 1007, bur Saint-Maur-des-Fossés). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Vendôme. Comte de Corbeil, de iure uxoris. Vicomte de Paris. "Burchardus comes" consented to the donation by "fidelis meus…Arduinus" by charter dated 1 Sep 976, subscribed by "Burcardi comitis Vindocinensis, Rainaldi filii"[3]. "Gaufridus atque Burchardus comites" confirmed the donation by "collibertam nostram Ermengardam" at the request of "fidelis nostri Fulchardi vicecomitis" by charter dated 19 Jul 985, subscribed by "Gaufredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius"[4]. A presumably spurious charter dated May 989 records that "Buchardus comes Parisiensis, Milduni et Corbolii et senescallus Franciæ" granted "castra Vindocini, Lavarzini et Montis-Aurei", held by "Fulco quondam pater meus", to "Fulconi comiti Andecavorum, nep[oti meo et Adellæ uxori suæ qui fuit filia Aimonis quondam comitis et Isabellis uxoris meæ"[5]. This document misrepresents the genealogy of the family which is confirmed in other primary sources, and ignores the fact that Bouchard´s son Bishop Renaud inherited Vendôme before it passed to the family of the comtes d´Anjou.] "…Burchardi comitis…" subscribed the charter dated 997 under which Robert II King of France donated property to "congregationem SS Bartolomæi atque Maglorii" in Paris[6]. "Buchardus comes et eius filius Parisiensis episcopus Rainaldus" confirmed a donation of revenue to Marmoutier by "vassallus…Dodo" by charter dated 998[7]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[8]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quidam eius miles...Walterius” captured his castle from “Burchardus Milidunensis castri comes”, who was living “apud regis Francorum curiam”, and handed it secretly to “Odoni comiti”, and that the castle was recaptured on[ his behalf by the king with the help of Richard II Duke of Normandy[9]. It is probable that this passage relates to Bouchard Comte de Vendôme, in his capacity as comte de Corbeil, as later comtes de Corbeil were recorded as holders of Melun.] "Burchardus…castri comes Curbolii…cum filio meo Rainaldo…Parisensium episcopo" authorised donations to the abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés by charter dated 1 Mar 1006, subscribed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Nanterii et Joscelini eius filiorum…Joscelini Miliduni vicecomites"[10]. The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "V Id Jan 1007" of "Burgandus comes"[11].
     "m as her second husband, ELISABETH, widow of HAMON Comte de Corbeil, daughter of ---. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records the marriage of "uxor comitis Haimonis, Elizabeth…nobili progenie" and "Burchardi comitis"[12]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[13]."
Med Lands cites:
[3] Chartes Vendômoises XXII, p. 31.
[4] Chartes Vendômoises XXIII, p. 33.
[5] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, IV, p. 11.
[6] RHGF, Tome X, II, p.574.
[7] Marmoutier-Tours, p. 8.
[8] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.
[9] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, XIV, p. 255.
[10] Chartes Vendômoises XXVIII, p. 39.
[11] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 5.
[12] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.
[13] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.4
He was Comte de Vendôme between 967 and 1007.10 He was Comte de Corbeil before 1007.10

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/vendome.htm#BouchardIVendomedied1007. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020237&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020347&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020238&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020348&tree=LEO
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bouchard Ier de Vendôme: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouchard_Ier_de_Vend%C3%B4me. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des comtes et ducs de Vendôme: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_et_ducs_de_Vend%C3%B4me
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Anjou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs, comtes, vicomtes & familles de Vendôme & Vendômois, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vendome.pdf
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 2.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/vendome.htm#ElisabethVendomedied999
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth de Vendôme: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020349&tree=LEO

Elisabeth (?)1

F, #56319, b. circa 954, d. 1007
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited15 Jul 2020
     Elisabeth (?) was born circa 954.2 She married Hamon/Aymon (?) Cte de Corbeil;
Her 1st husband.3,4,5,6 Elisabeth (?) married Bouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome, son of Foulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine, in 975;
Her 2nd husband.3,1,4,5,7,8
Elisabeth (?) died in 1007.2
     ; Per Wikipédia (Fr.): "956..967-1005 : Bouchard Ier le Vénérable, comte de Vendôme ; nommé par Hugues Capet comte de Paris ; par mariage comte de Corbeil et châtelain de Melun ; avoué de l'abbaye Saint-Maur-des-Fossés
épouse Elisabeth Le Riche, veuve du comte Haimon de Corbeil1”.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD [IV] "le Vieux/le Vénérable" de Vendôme (-Saint-Maur-des-Fossés 9 Jan 1007, bur Saint-Maur-des-Fossés). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Vendôme. Comte de Corbeil, de iure uxoris. Vicomte de Paris. "Burchardus comes" consented to the donation by "fidelis meus…Arduinus" by charter dated 1 Sep 976, subscribed by "Burcardi comitis Vindocinensis, Rainaldi filii"[3]. "Gaufridus atque Burchardus comites" confirmed the donation by "collibertam nostram Ermengardam" at the request of "fidelis nostri Fulchardi vicecomitis" by charter dated 19 Jul 985, subscribed by "Gaufredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius"[4]. A presumably spurious charter dated May 989 records that "Buchardus comes Parisiensis, Milduni et Corbolii et senescallus Franciæ" granted "castra Vindocini, Lavarzini et Montis-Aurei", held by "Fulco quondam pater meus", to "Fulconi comiti Andecavorum, nep[oti meo et Adellæ uxori suæ qui fuit filia Aimonis quondam comitis et Isabellis uxoris meæ"[5]. This document misrepresents the genealogy of the family which is confirmed in other primary sources, and ignores the fact that Bouchard´s son Bishop Renaud inherited Vendôme before it passed to the family of the comtes d´Anjou.] "…Burchardi comitis…" subscribed the charter dated 997 under which Robert II King of France donated property to "congregationem SS Bartolomæi atque Maglorii" in Paris[6]. "Buchardus comes et eius filius Parisiensis episcopus Rainaldus" confirmed a donation of revenue to Marmoutier by "vassallus…Dodo" by charter dated 998[7]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[8]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quidam eius miles...Walterius” captured his castle from “Burchardus Milidunensis castri comes”, who was living “apud regis Francorum curiam”, and handed it secretly to “Odoni comiti”, and that the castle was recaptured on[ his behalf by the king with the help of Richard II Duke of Normandy[9]. It is probable that this passage relates to Bouchard Comte de Vendôme, in his capacity as comte de Corbeil, as later comtes de Corbeil were recorded as holders of Melun.] "Burchardus…castri comes Curbolii…cum filio meo Rainaldo…Parisensium episcopo" authorised donations to the abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés by charter dated 1 Mar 1006, subscribed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Nanterii et Joscelini eius filiorum…Joscelini Miliduni vicecomites"[10]. The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "V Id Jan 1007" of "Burgandus comes"[11].
     "m as her second husband, ELISABETH, widow of HAMON Comte de Corbeil, daughter of ---. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records the marriage of "uxor comitis Haimonis, Elizabeth…nobili progenie" and "Burchardi comitis"[12]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[13]."
Med Lands cites:
[3] Chartes Vendômoises XXII, p. 31.
[4] Chartes Vendômoises XXIII, p. 33.
[5] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, IV, p. 11.
[6] RHGF, Tome X, II, p.574.
[7] Marmoutier-Tours, p. 8.
[8] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.
[9] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, XIV, p. 255.
[10] Chartes Vendômoises XXVIII, p. 39.
[11] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 5.
[12] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.
[13] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou): “C2. Bouchard, Cte de Vendôme, +1007; m.Elisabeth, widow of Hamon Cte de Corbeil”.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "BOUCHARD [IV] "le Vieux/le Vénérable" de Vendôme (-Saint-Maur-des-Fossés 9 Jan 1007, bur Saint-Maur-des-Fossés). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Vendôme. Comte de Corbeil, de iure uxoris. Vicomte de Paris. "Burchardus comes" consented to the donation by "fidelis meus…Arduinus" by charter dated 1 Sep 976, subscribed by "Burcardi comitis Vindocinensis, Rainaldi filii"[3]. "Gaufridus atque Burchardus comites" confirmed the donation by "collibertam nostram Ermengardam" at the request of "fidelis nostri Fulchardi vicecomitis" by charter dated 19 Jul 985, subscribed by "Gaufredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius"[4]. A presumably spurious charter dated May 989 records that "Buchardus comes Parisiensis, Milduni et Corbolii et senescallus Franciæ" granted "castra Vindocini, Lavarzini et Montis-Aurei", held by "Fulco quondam pater meus", to "Fulconi comiti Andecavorum, nep[oti meo et Adellæ uxori suæ qui fuit filia Aimonis quondam comitis et Isabellis uxoris meæ"[5]. This document misrepresents the genealogy of the family which is confirmed in other primary sources, and ignores the fact that Bouchard´s son Bishop Renaud inherited Vendôme before it passed to the family of the comtes d´Anjou.] "…Burchardi comitis…" subscribed the charter dated 997 under which Robert II King of France donated property to "congregationem SS Bartolomæi atque Maglorii" in Paris[6]. "Buchardus comes et eius filius Parisiensis episcopus Rainaldus" confirmed a donation of revenue to Marmoutier by "vassallus…Dodo" by charter dated 998[7]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[8]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quidam eius miles...Walterius” captured his castle from “Burchardus Milidunensis castri comes”, who was living “apud regis Francorum curiam”, and handed it secretly to “Odoni comiti”, and that the castle was recaptured on[ his behalf by the king with the help of Richard II Duke of Normandy[9]. It is probable that this passage relates to Bouchard Comte de Vendôme, in his capacity as comte de Corbeil, as later comtes de Corbeil were recorded as holders of Melun.] "Burchardus…castri comes Curbolii…cum filio meo Rainaldo…Parisensium episcopo" authorised donations to the abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés by charter dated 1 Mar 1006, subscribed by "Roberti vicecomitis, Nanterii et Joscelini eius filiorum…Joscelini Miliduni vicecomites"[10]. The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "V Id Jan 1007" of "Burgandus comes"[11].
     "m as her second husband, ELISABETH, widow of HAMON Comte de Corbeil, daughter of ---. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records the marriage of "uxor comitis Haimonis, Elizabeth…nobili progenie" and "Burchardi comitis"[12]. "Robertus…Francorum Rex" confirmed donations to "monasterii Fossatensi" by "Parisiacensis ecclesiæ episcopus…Renoldus et pater eius…comes Burchardus" for the soul of "Elisabeth comitissæ" by charter dated 998[13]."
Med Lands cites:
[3] Chartes Vendômoises XXII, p. 31.
[4] Chartes Vendômoises XXIII, p. 33.
[5] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, IV, p. 11.
[6] RHGF, Tome X, II, p.574.
[7] Marmoutier-Tours, p. 8.
[8] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.
[9] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, XIV, p. 255.
[10] Chartes Vendômoises XXVIII, p. 39.
[11] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 5.
[12] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.
[13] RHGF, Tome X, III, p.574.


; Per Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): “Bouchard Ier «Le Vénérable» ° ~940 + 26/02/1007 comte de Vendôme (~970) et de Paris fidèle de Hugues «Capet», duc puis Roi de France,
     ép. Elisabeth Le Riche ° ~954 + 1007, dame de Sceaux-en-Gâtinais et de Larchant, dite de Corbeil, dame de Corbeil et de Melun (veuve de Aymon, comte de Corbeil) Bouchard se retire et meurt au Monastère de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés”


Per Racines et Histoire (Vendôme): “Bouchard II «Le Vieux» (ou «Petit-Vieux» (Vetulus) ou «Le Vénérable» ° ~940 + 09/01/1007 (Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, retiré comme moine entre 05 et 12/1006) comte de Vendôme (peu avant 959/60), Corbeil et Melun (peu après 960), vicomte ou comte royal de Paris (~987), fidèle d’Hugues Capet, duc puis Roi de France, conquiert la Vallée du Loir, X avec Hugues Capet en Flandres et en Ponthieu ~ 980, accompagne le même en Italie vers l'Empereur (03/981), remplit les prérogatives de Sénéchal de France sans en porter le titre, Avoué de l'Abbaye Royale de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés (dès 06/989), proche de Mayeul, Abbé de Cluny, Sénéchal de France, le château de Melun est pris par surprise ou trahison par Eudes II de Blois (999), mais vite repris par la riposte royale (avec les Normands et les Angevins ; le vicomte & capitaine de Melun,Gautier, est pendu pour trahison et sa femme suppliciée, pendue nue par les pieds), Bouchard II bat l'armée de Blois à Orsay (avant 26/10/999), X aux sièges de Sens et Avallon (25/08/1005) (teste officiellement à Corbeil 01/05/1006 ; partage définitif dès 02/12/1006 ; consent à une donation 01/09/976 ; en confirme une autre 19/07/985 avec son vicomte Fulchard ; souscrit une charte du roi Robert II en 997 ; bienfaiteur de nombreuses Abbayes de son ressort (Marmoutiers, Saint-Guénaud, Saint-Père de Melun, Saint-Magloire, Saint-Maur, Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme ; confirme avec son fils Renaud une donation à Marmoutier 998 ; donation à Saint-Maur 01/03/1006 souscrite par le vicomte Robert et ses fils Nantier et Joscelin ; Saint-Maur ou se retire Bouchard pour y mourir)
     ép.peu après 960 (mariage arrangé par Hugues Capet) Elisabeth Le Riche dite «de Corbeil», dame de Sceaux-en-Gâtinais, Larchant, Corbeil et Melun + un 18/01 peu de temps après 1007 (veuve d’Hamon (ou Aymon), comte de Corbeil)”.4,11

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 139.1 Elisabeth (?) was also known as Elisabeth (?) Le Riche, dame de Sceaux-en-Gâtinais, et de Larchant, dite de Corbeil, dame de Corbeil et de Melun.3,4,9 Elisabeth (?) was also known as Elisabeth (?) de Melun.4 GAV-30.

; Per Med Lands:
     "HAMON (-23 May ----). Comte de Corbeil. The necrology of Corbeil Saint-Spire records the death "X Kal Jun" of "Hamonis comitis qui ecclesiam nostram fundavit"[2]. The necrology of Corbeil Saint-Guénaud records the death "X Kal Jun" of "Haymonis comitis fundatoris ecclesie Beati Guynaili"[3]. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records that "Aymon comte du château de Corbeil" died during a pilgrimage to Rome[4].
     "m as her first husband, ELISABETH, daughter of ---. The Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis records the marriage of "uxor comitis Haimonis, Elizabeth…nobili progenie" and "Burchardi comitis"[5]. She married secondly Bouchard Comte de Vendôme."
Med Lands cites:
[2] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Collégiale de Corbeil Saint-Spire, p. 399.
[3] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise de Saint Guénaud de Corbeil, p. 411.
[4] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.
[5] Vita Burchardi Venerabilis Comitis, RHGF, Tome X, p. 350.6

Family 1

Hamon/Aymon (?) Cte de Corbeil

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020348&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parcorroc.htm#HamonCorbeil. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020347&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/vendome.htm#BouchardIVendomedied1007
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des comtes et ducs de Vendôme: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_et_ducs_de_Vend%C3%B4me. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Anjou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs, comtes, vicomtes & familles de Vendôme & Vendômois, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vendome.pdf
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/vendome.htm#ElisabethVendomedied999
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth de Vendôme: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020349&tree=LEO

Urvod/Hurwodius (?) de Bretagne1

M, #56320
FatherConan I "Le Tort" (?) Duc de Bretagne, Cte de Rennes2,1,3,4 b. c 927, d. 27 Jun 992
MotherErmengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Bretagne2,3 b. bt 958 - 965, d. c 1024
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Urvod/Hurwodius (?) de Bretagne was living in 1026.5

Citations

  1. [S1813] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin email 14 Oct 2004 "Loose ends: children of Conan I of Brittany"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 14 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email 14 Oct 2004."
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#ConanIdied992. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Conan I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/conan000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/conan000.htm

NN (?) de Bretagne1

F, #56321
FatherGurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne2,3 d. 877
MotherNN (?) de Bretagne4
Last Edited4 Apr 2020
     NN (?) de Bretagne married Berenger (?) Comte de ?5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "[daughter . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Borderie suggests that Judicael Comte de Rennes was the grandson of Duke Gurwent, but he does not cite any primary source which supports his reasoning[58].
     "m BERENGER Comte, son of ---. 889/before 931.]"
Med Lands cites: [58] Borderie (1898), Tome II, p. 412.6

Family

Berenger (?) Comte de ? d. bt 889 - 931

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html#C1
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#BerangerMDaughterGurvandBretagne
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#DaughterGurvandMBerengarBayeuxA

Judicael (?) Cte de Rennes, Duc de Bretagne1

M, #56322, d. between 1 August 888 and 8 November 888
FatherGurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne1,2 d. 877
MotherNN (?) de Bretagne1,2
Last Edited30 Mar 2020
     Judicael (?) Cte de Rennes, Duc de Bretagne died between 1 August 888 and 8 November 888; killed in battle.1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDICAËL (-killed in battle [1 Aug/8 Nov] 888). Comte [de Rennes]. Regino records that "Iudicheil, ex filia Herispoii regis natus" ruled Brittany jointly with "Alanus frater Pasquitani" after the death of Pascwethen in 876, and his death in battle against the Vikings[56]. He succeeded his father in 876 as joint Duke of Brittany, ruling jointly with Alain Comte de Vannes. Regino records disputes between "Alanum et Iudicheil duces Brittonium" in 890[57], which indicates that the date of his death recorded in the previous passage in the same source may not be accurate."
Med Lands cites:
[56] Reginonis Chronicon 874, MGH SS I, p. 587.
[57] Reginonis Chronicon 890, MGH SS I, p. 602.2
He was Duc de Bretagne between 876 and 888.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#Gurwentdied877. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Gurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne1,2

M, #56323, d. 877
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Gurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne married NN (?) de Bretagne, daughter of Erispoë (?) Duc de Bretagne.3,2
Gurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne died in 877.1,2
     GAV-31.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GURWENT [Gurvand], son of --- (-877). Regino records that "Pasquitano et Vurfando" killed "Salomon rex Brittonum" in 874, specifying that they divided the kingdom between them although Pascwethen received the larger share[53]. Duke of Brittany. They were deposed in 876 and succeeded by Judicaël, Gurwent's son, and Alain Comte de Vannes who was Pascwethen's brother[54].
     "m ([after 857]) --- of Brittany, daughter of ERISPOË Duke of Brittany & his wife [Marmohec ---]. Her parentage is deduced from the Annales Mettenses which names "Judicheil ex filia Heriospoii regis natus" when recording that he ruled jointly with "Alanus frater Pasquitani"[55]. Her marriage date is suggested on the assumption that she was the same daughter of Erispoe who was earlier betrothed to Louis, son of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks (see above), but this is not certain."
Med Lands cites:
[53] Reginonis Chronicon 874, MGH SS I, p. 586.
[54] McKitterick (1983), p. 245.
[55] Annales Mettenses 874, RHGF, Tome VII, p. 202.2


; Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Gurwant (ou Gurvan) est un comte breton qui avec Pascweten contribuera à la mort de Salaün.
Biographie
     "Gurwant était l’un des prétendants qui se disputèrent la couronne du duché de Bretagne après la mort de Salomon. Bien qu'aucun document contemporain ne lui donne ce titre il est désigné comme « comte de Rennes »1. Toutefois selon André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel « il n'est pas possible d'identifier avec certitude la région qu'il contrôlait, mais il parait vraisemblable que ce fut la Bretagne nord » 2. Selon Dom Morice, il aurait épousé, la fille du roi Erispoë3, et prétendait à ce titre succéder à Salomon.
     "En 874, il conspira avec le comte de Vannes, Pascweten et Wigon, fils de Rivelin, un neveu du Salomon, pour assassiner le roi4. Leur alliance ne dura cependant que le temps de faire taire les revendications des autres prétendants, notamment les comtes de Goëlo et de Léon. Il règnent ensuite conjointement sur la Bretagne comme en témoignent plusieurs chartes du Cartulaire de Redon : « Regnante Pascweten et Worhwant Britanniam » (acte du 29 juin 875) et « Pacsuethen et Gurwant ipsum Salomonem perimerunt...obtinuerunt et inter se diviserunt »5
     "En 875, Pascweten attaqua Rennes, la résidence principale de Gurwant mais échoua en dépit de ce qui semble avoir été une importante supériorité numérique. Gurwant tomba malade en 876, ce qui incita Pascweten à lancer une nouvelle attaque. Gurwant réussit à le repousser mais mourut quelque temps plus tard6.
Descendance
** Son fils putatif Judicaël, qui lui aurait succédé comme comte de Rennes7, sera en lutte avec Alain le Grand, comte de Vannes, pour le trône de Bretagne.
** Selon une hypothèse de Joëlle Quaghebeur Oreguen/Aourken une sœur de Judicaël aurait épousé Alain le Grand, comte de Vannes8
Annexes
Notes
1. Comte non héréditaire, c'est-à-dire officier du duc. On ne trouve personne qui porte ce titre depuis le légendaire Jutherd, fils d'Aldrien roi de Cornouaille, au début du vie siècle.
2. André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel La Bretagne des saints et des rois Ve-Xe siècle Editions Ouest-France (1984) (ISBN 2858826137) p. 357
3. Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome I p-45
4. Annales de Saint-Bertin: AD 874
5. Arthur de la Borderie Histoire de la Bretagne. Tome II p. 319 note n° 1
6. Arthur de la Borderie op.cit p. 322.
7. Il semble que ce titre lui soit attribué rétroactivement. Chronique de Réginon de Prüm: AD 874 Meurtre de Salomon par Paswethen et Gurwand qui partagent la Bretagne se combattent et meurent peu après et sont remplacés par Alain frère de Paswethen et Iudicheil né de la fille du roi Hérispoé
8. Joëlle Quaghebeur La Cornouaille du IXe au XIIe siècle PUR Rennes (2002) (ISBN 2 868477437) p. 66-67
Sources
** André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel La Bretagne des saints et des rois Ve-Xe siècle Editions Ouest-France (1984) (ISBN 2858826137)
** Arthur de La Borderie Histoire de Bretagne: Tome deuxième Gurwant et Pascweten 874-877 p. 318-322. Réédition Joseph Floch Imprimeur Éditeur à Mayenne (1975).
** Joëlle Quaghebeur La Cornouaille du IXe au XIIe siècle PUR Rennes (2002) (ISBN 2 868477437).
Voir aussi
** Duché de Bretagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duch%C3%A9_de_Bretagne
** Liste des ducs de Bretagne:https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_rois_puis_ducs_de_Bretagne.4 "



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Wrhwant, Gurwant, Gurwent or Gurvand (Latin: Vurfandus) (died 876) was a claimant to the Duchy of Brittany from 874 until his death in opposition to Pascweten, Count of Vannes.
     "Wrhwant was complicit in the conspiracy which assassinated Salomon in 874. However, he was of the faction which had been outside Salomon's court and he hailed from northwest Brittany. He was, however, never styled "Count".[1] He mustered 200 men to fight the Vikings in 874.[2] After Salomon's death, he and Pascweten divided the country between them, though Regino of Prüm records that the latter received a larger share. The two soon fell out and fought over the succession. He had died by the middle of 876 and his son Judicael had taken up his role.
     "His wife was a daughter of Erispoe, and in some reconstructed genealogies their one daughter was married to Berengar of Rennes.
** unknown daughter, married to Berengar of Rennes, Count of Rennes. grandmother or great-grandmother of Judicael Berengar.
** Cunégonde de Rennes[3], married to Pepin III, Count of Vermandois(c.846 – 893)
** Judicael
** Oreguen(?)
See also
Dukes of Brittany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rulers_of_Brittany
Sources
** Smith, Julia M. H. Province and Empire: Brittany and the Carolingians. Cambridge University Press: 1992.
Notes
1. Smith, 121.
2. Smith, 30 and n86.
3. Bernard Ier De Senlis: https://gw.geneanet.org/roxy26?lang=fr&p=gurvand&n=de+rennes."5

He was Duc de Bretagne (disputed with Pasquitan) between 874 and 877.1,5,4

Family

NN (?) de Bretagne
Children
  • NN (?) de Bretagne1,2
  • Judicael (?) Cte de Rennes, Duc de Bretagne1,6 d. bt 1 Aug 888 - 8 Nov 888
  • Oreguen (?)+; Per Wikipedia (Fr.): "Selon une hypothèse de Joëlle Quaghebeur Oreguen/Aourken une sœur de Judicaël aurait épousé Alain le Grand, comte de Vannes8"
    Wikikpedia cites: 8. Joëlle Quaghebeur La Cornouaille du IXe au XIIe siècle PUR Rennes (2002) (ISBN 2 868477437) p. 66-674

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html
  4. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurwant. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurvand. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#Gurwentdied877

NN (?) de Bretagne1

F, #56324
FatherErispoë (?) Duc de Bretagne1,2,3 d. bt 2 Nov 857 - 12 Nov 857
ReferenceGAV31 EDV30
Last Edited30 Mar 2020
     NN (?) de Bretagne married Gurwent/Gurvand (?) Duc de Bretagne.4,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter . Her parentage is deduced from the Annales Mettenses which names "Judicheil ex filia Heriospoii regis natus" when recording that he ruled jointly with "Alanus frater Pasquitani"[20]. Her marriage date is suggested on the assumption that she was the same daughter of Erispoe who was earlier betrothed to Louis, son of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks (see above), but this is not certain.
     "m ([after 857]) GURWENT [Gurvand], son of --- (-877). Regino records that "Pasquitano et Vurfando" killed "Salomon rex Brittonum" in 874, specifying that they divided the kingdom between them although Pascwethen received the larger share[21]. They were deposed in 876 and succeeded by Judicaël, Gurwent's son, and Alain Comte de Vannes who was Pascwethen's brother[22]."
Med Lands cites:
[20] Annales Mettenses 874, RHGF, Tome VII, p. 202.
[21] Reginonis Chronicon 874, MGH SS I, p. 586.
[22] McKitterick (1983), p. 245.3
GAV-31 EDV-30.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#DaughterEripsoeMGurvandBretagnedied877. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#Gurwentdied877

Erispoë (?) Duc de Bretagne1,2

M, #56325, d. between 2 November 857 and 12 November 857
FatherNominoë (?) Duc de Bretagne1,3 b. c 800, d. bt 8 Jun 851 - 22 Aug 851
ReferenceGAV32
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Erispoë (?) Duc de Bretagne died between 2 November 857 and 12 November 857; murdered.1,3
Erispoë (?) Duc de Bretagne was buried between 2 November 857 and 12 November 857 at Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
[Text copied from Wikipedia.]
     Family Members
     Parents
          Nominoe de Bretagne
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
     Created by: relative
     Added: 27 May 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 130484108.3,4
     ; Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Erispoë1, dont le nom est aussi reconstitué en latin tardif par Herispogius2 ou Hervspogius3 et même Respogius4, est un roi de Bretagne5 qui a régné, à la suite de son père Nominoë, de juillet ou août 8516 jusqu'à sa mort, survenue en novembre 857 à Talensac (actuelle Ille-et-Vilaine).
Introduction
Le contexte historique

     "Les Bretons, venus de la province romaine de Bretagne au début du ve siècle, contrôlent l'ouest et le nord de la péninsule armoricaine au moment de la disparition de l'empire d'Occident (476). Face au royaume franc constitué peu après par Clovis, ils apparaissent, bien que chrétiens, comme des barbares, soumettant à de fréquents raids de pillage les comtés de Nantes et de Rennes. Au début des années 770, Charlemagne établit la marche de Bretagne afin de mieux assurer la défense et fait procéder à plusieurs expéditions contre les Bretons. Louis le Pieux, son successeur, adopte une politique de coopération avec l'aristocratie bretonne, et de ce processus émerge la personnalité de Nominoë, placé à la tête des Bretons en tant que vassal de Louis.
     "Après la mort de Louis le Pieux (840), Nominoë entre en rébellion contre ses fils et s'assure une quasi indépendance. Son fils Erispoë conforte son pouvoir grâce à la victoire de Jengland (851) et obtient de Charles le Chauve la reconnaissance du titre royal.
Les sources
     "Une des principales sources est constituée par les annales de l'abbaye Saint-Bertin, qui sont plutôt favorables à la monarchie franque. On a aussi quelques chartes bretonnes datant du règne d'Erispoë, provenant de l'abbaye de Redon et de l'évêché de Nantes.
Biographie d'Érispoë
La bataille de Jengland et le traité avec Charles le Chauve (851)
     "Erispoë succède à son père à la tête de la Bretagne en mars 8517 et affronte victorieusement le roi Charles le Chauve le 22 août 851 à Jengland-Beslé près de la Vilaine. Le comte du Mans Vivien et le comte du palais Hildemar trouvent la mort dans cette bataille, aux côtés de plusieurs milliers de Francs. Les pertes bretonnes sont minimes.
     "Quelques semaines après cette bataille, Erispoë rencontre Charles le Chauve à Angers : un accord de paix est conclu.
     "Le texte de l'accord n'est pas connu directement, mais il est évoqué par les Annales de Saint-Bertin8, qui rapportent que : « Erispoé, fils de Nominoë, venant auprès de Charles, dans la ville d'Angers par la dation des mains est accueilli et lui sont donnés tant les insignes royaux que la puissance jadis dévolue à son père, étant ajouté en outre le Rennais, le Nantais et le pays de Retz9. » Ce texte est capital :
** par la « dation des mains », Erispoë engage sa fidélité et se reconnaît vassal de Charles le Chauve, ce qui, de fait, ne l'engage pas à grand-chose puisqu'il est en situation de force mais lui permet de bénéficier de la protection que le seigneur doit à son vassal.
** l'usage des insignes royaux lui est accordé, même si, de fait, il s'était attribué ceux abandonnés par Charles le Chauve, à Jengland-Beslé, au cours de sa fuite nocturne10. Cette concession symbolique signifie sa reconnaissance comme roi de Bretagne par le roi de la Francie occidentale.
** Erispoë se voit confirmer la possession des comtés de Rennes et de Nantes, et la Bretagne est agrandie du pays de Retz11.
La signification du titre royal
     "En ce qui concerne la titulature ultérieure d'Erispoë, on peut remarquer que plusieurs actes du Cartulaire de Redon datés de 852 et un diplôme pour l'Église de Nantes du 10 février 85612 le qualifient de princeps. Il ne semble pas exister de document (monnaie etc.) où il soit expressément appelé rex.
     "Quoi qu'il en soit, il ne faut pas oublier que les mots « roi » et « royaume » ont pour nous un sens un peu différent de celui des gens du haut Moyen Âge. Les rois francs portent, au moins depuis Clovis, le titre de rex Francorum (« roi des Francs ») et Charlemagne a été à la fois rex Francorum et rex Langobardorum (« roi des Lombards », en 774), avant d'ajouter le titre d’imperator (« empereur », en 800).
     "Or dans le royaume de Charlemagne, existent dès 781 un regnum Aquitaniae (« royaume d'Aquitaine », dévolu à Louis le Pieux) et un regnum Italiae (« royaume d'Italie », dévolu à Pépin d'Italie).
     "En 851, Erispoë se voit peut-être reconnu comme rex Britanniae, ce qui du point de vue du Carolingien Charles le Chauve, rex Francorum13, n'est pas totalement hors norme. La seule vraie nouveauté sur le plan institutionnel est qu'Erispoë n'est pas membre de la famille carolingienne, ce qui est dû à un rapport de forces dans lequel les Bretons ont nettement l'avantage.
     "Mais ces derniers ne parvinrent pas à maintenir très longtemps ce rapport de force et la Bretagne déchut au rang de duché du royaume de Francie occidentale, après avoir traversé une phase très critique au début du xe siècle.
     "On peut remarquer que, dès juin 877, dans le capitulaire de Quierzy, Charles le Chauve, avant son départ pour l'Italie, évoque, entre autres problèmes, l'accord d'Angers, mais pour le dénoncer sur le plan institutionnel : « Pour ce qui est du titre de royaume accordé aux Bretons par nécessité, et confirmé par serment, nos fidèles sont dispensés de le reconnaître parce qu'il n'y a plus de descendants de ceux auxquels il fut concédé. » (c'est-à-dire à la famille de Nominoë).
Suite du règne (851-857)
La défense de Nantes et l'alliance avec les Danois (853)
     "En 853, la ville de Nantes est pillée par les Normands. Apprenant la nouvelle, le Danois Cédric, neveu du roi du Danemark, honore l'alliance conclue entre Nominoë et le roi Horik Ier de Danemark en attaquant les Norvégiens responsables du pillage de Nantes. Il fait la jonction avec l'armée d'Erispoë, et ils font conjointement le siège de l'île de Bièce, dans laquelle les Norvégiens se sont retranchés. Les Norvégiens capitulent bientôt en offrant des présents aux vainqueurs. Cédric, blessé dans la bataille, repart en mer. Il mourra peu de temps après non loin du Havre, tué par les troupes de Charles le Chauve14.
L'entrevue de Louviers avec Charles le Chauve (856)
     "En 856, lors de l'entrevue de Louviers, il est question de marier Louis le Bègue, fils de Charles avec une fille d'Erispoë15. « Le roi Charles fait la paix avec le Breton Hérispoé, et fiance son fils Louis à la fille de celui-ci, auquel il donne le duché du Mans, jusqu'à la route qui conduit de Paris à Tours. ». Le mariage ne se fait pas mais cette maladresse est peut-être une des raisons du mécontentement d'un parti de noble dont son cousin Salomon à qui des domaines avait été accordés en Neustrie, et du complot qui entraîne sa mort16.
La mort d'Erispoë
     "Son règne s'achève entre le 2 et le 12 novembre 85716 par son assassinat sur l'autel de l'église de Talensac17, donc un lieu d'asile, par son successeur et cousin Salaün, aidé d'Alcmar18.
Postérité
     "Erispoë était marié à Marmohec et avait au moins deux enfants :
** un fils nommé Conan ;
** une fille qui, après avoir été fiancée par son père au prince Louis le Bégue, fils de Charles le Chauve, aurait épousé Gurwant, « comte de Rennes » et « cousin de Salomon »19 ». Les sources contemporaines indiquent seulement qu'elle est la mère du princeps Judicaël20. Le même Gurwant assassinera ou fera assassiner Salomon en 874.
Annexes
Bibliographie

** André Chédeville et Hubert Guillotel, La Bretagne des saints et des rois ve-xe siècle. Rennes, Éditions Ouest France, 1984 (ISBN 2858826137)
** Arthur de La Borderie, Histoire de Bretagne. Mayenne, Joseph Floch, 1975, tome 2 : « Règne d'Erispoe 851-857 », p. 73-83.
** Reynald Secher et René Le Honzec, Histoire de Bretagne. Noyal-sur-Vilaine, Éditions Reynald Secher, collection « Mémoire du futur », 1994.
** Noël-Yves Tonnerre, Naissance de la Bretagne. Géographie historique et structures sociales de la Bretagne méridionale (Nantais et Vannetais) de la fin du viiie à la fin du xiie siècle, Angers, Presses de l'Université d'Angers, 1994, 625 p. (ISBN 2-903075-58-1).
Postérité littéraire
** Julien Meunier, Les Marches de Bretagne - Tome 2 - Erispoë - Le Fils du Libérateur. Les Éditions des Montagnes Noires, 2017 ( (ISBN 978-2-919305-96-4))
Articles connexes
** Royaume de Bretagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royaume_de_Bretagne
** Liste des souverains de Bretagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_rois_puis_ducs_de_Bretagne
Notes et références
1. A. de Courson, Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Redon en Bretagne, p. 17 & 29, Impr. impériale, Paris, 1863.
2. Dom Morice, Mémoires pour servir de preuves à l'Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, t. I, p. 140, Charles Osmont impr., Paris, 1742
3. A. Cousteau, Les chroniques annalles des pays d'Angleterre et bretaigne faictes et compilees par noble et sage maistre Allain Bouchart., f. LXIIII v., Jean Petit & Galliot, Paris, 1631.
4. F. Grat, J. Vielliard & S. Clemencet, Annales de Saint-Bertin, in Bulletin de la Société d'Histoire de France, p. 72, Paris, 1964.
5. Philippe Tourault, Les rois de Bretagne, 2005, p. 102 et sqq.
6. A. Lemoyne de La Borderie, Examen chronologique des chartes du cartulaire de Redon antérieures au xie siècle [archive], in BECh, t. XXV, p. 280, Société de l'École des chartes, Paris, 1864.
7. Généalogie d'Erispoë sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
8. Annales de Saint-Bertin : AD 851 [archive], p. 151
9. Cité par Hubert Guillotel, in La Bretagne des saints et des rois, 1984 p. 283
10. André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel op.cit p. 285
11. Ph. Tourault, op. cit., p. 111.
12. André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel op. cit. p. 288, Appendices no 31, 34, 40.
13. Les rois de France utilisent la formule rex Francorum jusqu'au xiie siècle, devenant alors rex Franciae.
14. Prudence Guillaume de Roujoux, Histoire des rois et des ducs de Bretagne, volume 1, Dufey, 1829, p. 362-363.
15. Annales de Saint-Bertin, ad annum 856 Le Roi Charles fait la paix avec le breton Hérispoé, et fiance à la fille de celui-ci, son fils Louis [archive], p. 159
16. André Chédeville et Hubert Guillotel, op. cit., p. 294
17. Biographie de tous les Bretons qui se sont fait un nom, Prosper Jean Levot [archive]
18. Annales de Saint-Bertin, ad annum 857 Hérispoé duc des Bretons, est tué par les Bretons Salaün et Almar depuis longtemps en querelle avec lui [archive], p. 161, 162
19. Dom Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, tome I, p. 45.
20. Chronique de Réginon de Prüm : AD 874."5



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Erispoe (French: Erispoë; Latin: Herispoius, Herispogius, or Respogius; d. 2 or 12 November 857) was Duke of Brittany from 851. After the death of his father Nominoe, he led a successful military campaign against the Franks, culminating in his victory at the Battle of Jengland. He is subsequently referred to as "King of Brittany".
     "Erispoe's recorded titles include provinciæ Brittaniæ princeps ("prince of the province of Brittany"), dux Brittonum ("duke of the Bretons"), and rex tyrannicus Brittonum ("usurping king of the Bretons"). However, if Erispoe was usurping regality in Brittany at that time (857), it is not attested in other sources. It may imply continued Frankish resentment of the title.[1] He is called rex Brittonum ("king of the Bretons") by Regino of Prüm (d. 915).
War with the Franks
     "Erispoe was born to Nominoe's wife Argentaela, but the date of his birth is not known. He was involved in his father's campaigns to take control of the Frankish counties of Rennes and Nantes. In 843, in alliance with Lambert II of Nantes, Erispoe took command of the Breton army while his father was ill. Lambert had been displaced as ruler of Nantes by Charles the Bald, king of West Francia, who had installed Renaud d'Herbauges in his place. Ambushed by Count Renaud, Erispoe was badly defeated at the initial engagement at Messac. However, the Brittons quickly rallied their troops and took the complacent Franks by surprise shortly thereafter at the Battle of Blain, inflicting a serious defeat resulting in the death of Count Renaud.
     "Having regained his health, Nominoe took command once more. The victory at Blain having secured control of Nantes and Rennes, he raided into Frankish territory, defeating the Franks at the Battle of Ballon in 845. A truce followed, but after Charles regained control of Nantes, Nominoe and Erispoe renewed their offensive in 849. While on campaign, Nominoe died suddenly. Erispoe was proclaimed leader, but immediately after his father's death, his power was challenged by Charles the Bald, still his nominal suzerain. Charles crossed the river Vilaine with an army. Erispoe defeated Charles in the decisive Battle of Jengland on 22 August 851.
Treaty of Angers
     "Erispoe met Charles in Angers (possibly in secret[2]) in the days following the battle and concluded a peace treaty in return for being invested with the counties of Rennes and Nantes.[3] South of the Loire, the Pays de Retz was detached from the County of Poitou and granted to him as well.[3] Charles and Erispoe also created a baptismal alliance, whereby Charles stood as godfather at the baptism of Erispoe's infant son Conan, but whether in 851 or 856 is unknown.[4] Finally, in 851 Charles gave Erispoe royal regalia (robes at least) and Erispoe in turn pledged himself to Charles with the giving of hands and an oath of fidelity.[5] Erispoe subsequently overate at the banquet given in his honour.[5]
     "According to the Annales Bertiniani, at Louviers in February 856 Erispoe's daughter (unnamed in the sources) was betrothed to Charles's young son, Louis the Stammerer, who was granted the ducatus Cenomannicus as subking of Neustria with Le Mans as his capital.[6] With the consent of the Frankish magnates, Louis received the regnum Neustriae from his father:
Karlus rex cum Respogio Brittone paciscens, filiam eius filio suo Ludoico despondet, dato illi ducatu Cenomannico usque ad viam quae a Lotitia Parisiorum Cesaredunum Turonum ducit.[7]
King Charles, making peace with Erispoe of Brittany, the daughter of whom was betrothed to his son Louis, gave the duchy of Maine as far as the road from Paris to Tours as duke.

     "Erispoe was at peace with Charles for the whole of his reign after Jengland and he governed as a typical Carolingian regional official might, with the added dignity of a consors regni (royal consort). Erispoe's use of a royal seal has led to the false belief that he was a king (rex), but in fact he probably received the right to use such a seal from Charles, who himself used an imperial seal.[8]
Later life
     "Erispoe was a benefactor of the abbey of Redon, as his father had been; his power base lay in the Vannetais and southeast Brittany (even more easterly than his father).[9] In 853 the town of Nantes was plundered by the Vikings. Erispoe launched a war against them but it came to an end when they departed a few years later.[10]
Family
     "By his wife Marmohec (who predeceased him) he had at least two children, the aforementioned Conan and a girl, who eventually married Gurvand of Rennes.
Succession
     "In November 857 he was assassinated at the altar of a church, which was then considered a place of asylum, by his cousin and successor Salomon, aided by an obscure Almarchus (Almarus).[11] He was buried at Redon Abbey.
See also
** Dukes of Brittany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rulers_of_Brittany
Notes
1. Julia M. H. Smith (1992), Province and Empire: Brittany and the Carolingians (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
2. Smith, 110 n92, based on Lupus of Ferrières.
3. Smith, 87.
4. Smith, 110–111. Erispoe and Charles signed documents in 856 as compatri, "co-fathers'.
5. Smith, 111.
6. Smith, 102–103.
7. AB, 856, ed. Georg Waitz (Hannover: 1886), 46.
8. Smith, 117 and n2. The authenticity of the preserved seals has been called into question.
9. Smith, 130 and 135.
10. Smith, 199.
11. Smith, 103."6



; Per Med Lands:
     "ERISPOË (-murdered [2/12] Nov 857, bur Redon). Regino names "filius Nomenoi Herispoius" when recording that he succeeded his father in Brittany[10]. The Chronica Fontanellensis names "Respogio filio Nomenoi, tyranno Brittonum"[11]. The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Rainaldo…comite Nannetensium" was killed in 843 while fighting "Herispoium, Noremoi filium at alios Britannos apud Metiacum"[12]. "Erispoius…provinciæ Brittaniæ princeps" names "genitoris mei Nominoe…consobrini mei Salomonis filiique mei Conan episcoporumque" in a charter dated 19 May [851/57][13]. He succeeded his father in 851 as Duke of Brittany. Although "Respogius filius Nomenogii" swore allegiance to Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, he defeated the king's army at Jengland, on the river Vilaine, and was ceded Rennes, Nantes and the pays de Retz[14], although peace was agreed and confirmed by the betrothal of Erispoë's daughter to the king's son. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Respogius dux Brittonum" was killed in 857 by "Salamone et Almaro Brittonibus"[15]. The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Herispoius rex tyrannicus Britonum" was killed in 857 by "Salomone" [his cousin][16].
     "m MARMOHEC, daughter of --- (-[856/57]). The Chronicle of Nantes records a donation by "Herispogii" for the soul of "Marmohec coniugis nostræ" dated 857[17], which suggests that she was then deceased. No indication has been found that Marmohec was the mother of Erispoë's children who are shown below. Erispoë & [his wife] had three children:
     "i) daughter .
     "ii) daughter .
     "iii) CONAN (-after 857)."
Med Lands cites:
[10] Reginonis Chronicon 862, MGH SS I, p. 571.
[11] Fragmentum Chron. Fontanellensis, 851, MGH SS II, p. 303.
[12] Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 5.
[13] Redon, Appendix XXXI, p. 365.
[14] Annales Bertiniani II 851, 856 and 857, discussed in McKitterick (1983), p. 243.
[15] Annales Bertiniani II 857.
[16] Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 6.
[17] Chronique de Nantes, XIV, p. 45.3
GAV-32. He was Duc/Roi de Bretagne (See attached map of Bretagne (Brittany) ca 845-867 from Wikipedia Par France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svg: (Sémhurderivative work: Fab5669 (talk) — France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svgLouis Élegoët, Bretagne une histoire, CRDP de Bretagne, 2000, p. 54 : Limites successives de la Bretagne au IXe siècle.Il était une fois l'Ouest, éditions Ouest-France, 2009, p.11 : Les frontières de la Bretagne des origines au XVe siècle., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12049589 ) between 851 and 857.5,6,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#DaughterEripsoeMGurvandBretagnedied877. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 March 2020), memorial page for Erispoe I de Bretagne (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 130484108, citing Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France ; Maintained by relative (contributor 47268827), at: findagrave.com/memorial/130484108/erispoe_i-de_bretagne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erispo%C3%AB. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erispoe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Nominoë (?) Duc de Bretagne1,2

M, #56326, b. circa 800, d. between 8 June 851 and 22 August 851
ReferenceGAV33
Last Edited30 May 2020
     Nominoë (?) Duc de Bretagne was born circa 800.3
Nominoë (?) Duc de Bretagne died between 8 June 851 and 22 August 851; Murdered.1,2
Nominoë (?) Duc de Bretagne was buried between 8 June 851 and 22 August 851 at Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Bretagne, France
     DEATH     unknown, Nantes, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France
[Test copied from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Children
          Erispoe I de Bretagne
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
     Created by: relative
     Added: 27 May 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 130484482.2,4
     ; Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Nominoe or Nomenoe (French: Nominoë; Breton: Nevenoe; b. c. 800, d. 7 March 851) was the first Duke of Brittany from 846 to his death. He is the Breton pater patriae and to Breton nationalists he is known as Tad ar Vro ("father of the country").
Origins
     "He was the second son of Count Erispoë I of Poher, King of the Browaroch (775 - 812), and younger brother of Count Riwallon or Rivallon III of Poher (? - 857).
Rise and titulature under Louis the Pious
     "After a general rebellion which had enveloped the entire Carolingian Empire was put down, a general assembly was held at Ingelheim in May 831. It was probably there that the emperor Louis the Pious appointed Nominoe, a Breton, to rule the Bretons (which corresponded to "almost all" of Brittany).[1] Regino of Prüm in his famous Chronicon writes, inaccurately for the year 837, that:
Murmanus rex Brittonum moritur et Numenoio apud Ingelheim ab imperator ducatus ipsius gentis traditur.
Morman, king of the Bretons, died and Numenoi [Nominoe] was created duke of that same people by the emperor at Ingelheim.[2]

     "Nominoe was a staunch ally of Louis the Pious until the emperor's death in 840. He supported Louis in the several civil wars of the 830s and he supported the monastery of Redon Abbey, even ordering the monks to pray for Louis in light of the emperor's "strife".[3] Nominoe's power base was in the Vannetais and two charters refer to him as Count of Vannes, though it is unknown when that title was held, be it as early as 819 or as late as 834. Nominoe may not have possessed any land outside Vannes and his ability to gather revenue in Breton-speaking territories was probably no greater than any other aristocrat of those regions.[4] His chief source of income after he broke with his overlord was plunder from raids into Frankish territory and from the despoliation of churches.[4] He did have the political authority to exact payment (wergild) in the form of land from a man who had murdered his follower Catworet.
     "The title Duke of Brittany is primarily a chronicler's invention of the tenth century. Nominoe never held a title from the emperor, who refers to him in charters as merely fidelis, "faithful one", or as missus imperatoris, "imperial emissary", which was probably the title he was granted at Ingelheim.[5] In Breton charters, Nominoe was known inconsistently by several titles from February 833 until his death:
** Nominoe magistro in Britanniam ("Nominoe, master in Brittany")
** Nominoe possidente Brittanniam ("Nominoe, possessing Brittany")
** gubernante Nominoe totam Brittanniam ("Nominoe, governing all Brittany")
** Nominoe principe in Brittannia ("Nominoe, prince in Brittany")
** regnante Nominoe in Brittannia ("Nominoe, reigning in Brittany")
** Nominoe duce in Britannia ("Nominoe, duke in Brittany")
** Nomenoius dux ("duke Nominoe")
** Nominoius princeps ("prince Nominoe")
** Nomenogius Britto ("Breton Nominoe")

Loyalty and falling out with Charles the Bald
     "The relations between Nominoe and Charles the Bald, Louis's successor after 840, were initially amicable. In the midst of a revolt of his men in Neustria, Charles sent from Le Mans to see if Nominoe would submit to him in the spring of 841 and Nominoe agreed to do so. It is clear from the wording of the account of this event in Nithard that Nominoe was too powerful to be compelled to submit; later in 841 he rebuffed the overtures of the new emperor, Lothair I, who claimed Neustria.[6] Nominoe remained loyal to Charles throughout the next year, even making a donation "in alms for the king" to the abbey of Redon on 25 January 842.[7] Breton soldiers, as well as Gascons, certainly took part in the military show of the Oaths of Strasbourg.
     "In the summer of 843, Lothair or perhaps his supporter Lambert II of Nantes succeeded in persuading Nominoe to abandon Charles and go over to the emperor.[8] Nominoe was thereafter a constant enemy of Charles and his authority in Neustria, often acting in concert with Lothair, Lambert, and Pepin II of Aquitaine. Breton troops fought under Lambert in Neustria and when, in June 844, Charles was besieging Toulouse, Nominoe raided into Maine and plundered the territory.[9] In November 843, Charles had marched as far as Rennes to compel Breton submission, but to no effect.
     "At the synod of Yutz in October 844, presided over by Charles' uncle Drogo of Metz, the bishops sent orders to Nominoe, Lambert, and Pepin commanding them to renew their fealty to Charles or be prepared to accept military consequences.[10] Lambert and Pepin complied, but Nominoe ignored the Frankish bishops. However, some Bretons had connived against him with Charles and the king tried to enter Brittany in support of the defectors, but without success: he was defeated at the Battle of Ballon just north of Redon across the Vilaine on 22 November 845.[10] It is probable that in the Vannetais Nominoe's authority had been weakened after his split with Charles in 843 and Lupus of Ferrières reports "unrest" in Brittany during this period.
     "In 844 and 847 according to the Annales Bertiniani, Nominoe made war on the Vikings.[11]
Renewed loyalty and second rebellion
     "In Summer 846, Charles marched on Brittany and again took no military action, instead coming to peace with Nominoe and exchanging oaths. The details of the peace arrangements are unknown, but Prudentius of Troyes uses the title "duke" (dux) for the first time in this context and this may indicate that Nominoe was created Duke of the Bretons in return for recognising Charles' lordship.[12] As another part of the agreement, Nominoe had Charles remove Lambert from Nantes and put him in power in Sens further away.
     "By Christmas time, Nominoe's Bretons were raiding Neustria, this time near Bayeux, again. This was probably instigated by Lothair, for he, Charles, and their brother Louis the German met at Meerssen in February 847 and agreed to send orders to Nominoe and Pepin II to desist from making war on Charles.[12] Nominoe, probably being paid by Lothair, did not in fact desist; neither did Pepin. In two campaigns in the spring and then fall of 849, Charles was in Aquitaine and Nominoe took the opportunity to raid Neustria. Charles reestablished Lambert in Nantes after Nominoe invaded Anjou.[13]
     "In 850, Lambert (and his brother Warnar) had renewed their friendship with Nominoe and together were raiding Maine "with unspeakable fury" according to the Chronicon Fontanellense. In August, Charles marched on Rennes, again avoided fighting, and installed garrisons there and at Nantes. Immediately after he left, Lambert and Nominoe defeated the garrisons and captured the new Count of Nantes, Amalric.[13] On 7 March 851, Nominoe died near Vendôme while ravaging the Nantais and Anjou; he was buried at Redon Abbey. By his wife Argentaela, Nominoe left a son named Erispoe, who succeeded him. Nominoe was thus the founder of a political tradition in Brittany which had not thitherto existed; though his charters did not mimic Carolingian ones, his successors would imitate the legitimising Carolingian language in theirs.[14]
Deposition of the bishops
     "In 849 at a place called Coitlouh, Nominoe held a synod whereat he deposed the five Breton bishops of Alet, Saint-Pol, Vannes, Quimper, and Dol.[15] The charges he levelled against them are unknown. Pope Leo IV sent a letter to Nominoe and the bishops (whether before or after the deposition is unknown) informing him that the depositions could only be enacted by a panel of twelve bishops with seventy-two witnesses. The later popes Benedict II and Nicholas I believed that Nominoe had forced the bishops to admit to crimes they had not committed and that their depositions were thus invalid. A Frankish synod of 850 held at either Angers or Tours accused Nominoe of simony by unlawfully removing bishops and replacing them with mercenarii (mercenaries of his own). These mercenarii were excommunicated, as indicated by an epistle of the synod of Savonnières in 859 sent to what remained of the Breton church in communion with the Archdiocese of Tours. Nominoe sacked Rennes and Nantes, replacing the new Frankish bishop of the latter with his own nominee.
     "Susannus was deposed in Vannes and replaced by Courantgen. Salocon was deposed in Dol, but his replacement is unknown. At Quimper, Felix was replaced by Anaweten and at Saint-Pol, Clutwoion replaced Garnobrius. The two bishops of Alet, first Rethwalatr and then Mahen are very obscure figures. The bishop of Nantes whom Nominoe succeeded in removing for about a year was Actard. His replacement was the obscure Gislard. In the end the synod of Coitlouh and the bringing of the bishoprics of Rennes and Nantes into the Breton fold meant that the church of Brittany was an actively independent ecclesiastic polity from its nominal metropolitan, the Metropolitan of Tours.
Succession
     "At his death Nominoe was succeeded by his son Erispoe. Nominoe was buried at Redon Abbey.
See also
** Dukes of Brittany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rulers_of_Brittany
References
** Smith, Julia M. H. Province and Empire: Brittany and the Carolingians. Cambridge University Press: 1992.
Notes
1. Smith, 80.
2. Smith, 80 and n81.
3. Smith, 82.
4. Smith, 129–135.
5. Smith, 83.
6. Smith, 93.
7. Smith, 93, suggests that this date was the anniversary of the oath of the previous year, but this contradicts the statement that Charles only procured the oath in springtime.
8. Smith, 94.
9. Smith, 95.
10. Smith, 96.
11. Smith, 199.
12. Smith, 97.
13. Smith, 98.
14. Smith, 117 and 119.
15. Smith, 154–157."3

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Nominoë (Nevenou ou Nevenoe en breton n. 1, Nomenoius1 ou Numenoius2 en latin, en français la graphie Nominoé est aussi utilisée), né vers 800, mort le 7 mars 851 près de Vendôme3, fut souverain de Bretagne de 845 à 851. Il fut à l'origine de la naissance d'une Bretagne unifiée et indépendante, d'où le qualificatif de père de la Patrie (« Tad ar Vro ») que lui attribue l'historien Arthur de La Borderie au xixe siècle4.
Biographie
Ses origines
     "Son nom, assez rare, est peut-être issu du vieux breton « nom » c'est-à-dire « temple », à rapprocher du gaélique irlandais « nomh » saint et gaulois « nemeto » sanctuaire ou « nemo » ciel avec comme variantes Nevenoe/Nevenou en breton, Naomhin, Nevin, Niven en irlandais5.
     "Dom Morice, s'appuyant sur une vie du roi Judicaël rédigée au xie siècle par le moine Ingomar dans laquelle ce dernier précise que « tous les princes qui ont régné en Bretagne depuis Judicaël étaient issus de ce roi », indique que Nominoë était « fils d'Erispoë comte de Rennes et de la race des anciens rois de Bretagne »6.
     "Les moines de l'abbaye de Saint-Florent-le-Vieil dont il avait incendié le monastère ont complaisamment reproduit, dans une prose rythmée nommée « Versiculi » ou « Versus de eversione monasterii Glonnensis », une légende qui indique que Nominoë était fils d'un paysan enrichi par la découverte d'un trésor, indications reprises par les Francs d'Anjou de la famille Foulques (Plantagenêt), hypothèse totalement fantaisiste car à l'époque carolingienne seuls les laïcs issus de familles de la haute aristocratie avaient le quasi-monopole des charges publiques 7.
     "Une charte de 834 le qualifie de prince des Vénètes, mais c'est seulement en raison de sa fonction de comte de Vannes. Il semblerait qu'il soit originaire du Poher, peut-être de "Botmel" (Botnumel) en Callac8,9, ou bien encore de "Bonnevel" en Priziac10. J. Quaghebeur fait de Nominoë un petit fils du roi Murman11.
Hypothèse
     "D'autres[Qui ?] ont situé ses origines à Dinan ou dans ses environs, hypothèse appuyée par les bienfaits qu'il prodigua aux moines de Léhon, près de Dinan. Autre indice : Renac (lieu du domicile préféré de Nominoë) se situait, certes, sur le territoire de la cité des Vénètes comme il convenait à un comte de Vannes, mais dans ses confins limitrophes de la cité des Riedones, juste à côté du lieudit « Roton », où Conwoïon fit construire en 832 une abbaye grâce au soutien actif de Nominoë. On sait combien Lambert tenait à Nantes, mais Nominoë ne tenait-il pas tout autant à Rennes ? En 850, c'est d'abord de Rennes qu'ils sont venus s'emparer, juste avant de récidiver dans la foulée à Nantes. Leurs demeures respectives de Craon et de Renac n'étant pas très éloignées avec un bon cheval, on peut penser[évasif] que ces deux cavaliers confirmés se rendaient visite à domicile pour parler politique[réf. nécessaire].
     "Renac faisait sûrement[évasif] souvent campagne à côté de Craon, la ville antique avec son abbaye Saint-Clément et son prieuré, toutefois Conwoïon avait déjà bien compensé en faisant construire en 832, avec l'accord et la protection de Nominoë, l'abbaye Saint-Sauveur sur le chantier du lieudit « Roton », actuel Redon[réf. nécessaire].
     "À Redon, une plaque apposée sur l'ancien rempart dit : « À la gloire de Nominoë, premier roi de Bretagne, fondateur de la ville de Redon avec saint Convoyon (...) en souvenir du XIe centenaire de la cité »12.
Comte carolingien
     "Selon Arthur de La Borderie, Nominoë est comte de Vannes dès juillet 81913. Toutefois le titulaire de ce comté carolingien Gui II de Vannes exerçait encore sa fonction de comte de Vannes dans un acte du 16 janvier 830 daté de la 17e année de Louis le Pieux14. Il semble donc que l'autorité de Nominoë se limitait à une partie du comté n. 2 avant qu'il ne soit reconnu comme gubernans in Brittanniam à partir de 833, missus in Brittanniam à partir de 837 par Louis le Pieux15.
     "Nominoë apparaît pour la première fois dans un acte exerçant une charge publique comme « Nominoe magistro in Britanniam » lors d'une donation en faveur du l'abbaye de Redon le 9 février 833, vingtième année du règne de Louis le Pieux16.
Rebelle
     "À la mort de l'empereur Louis en 840, il soutient dans un premier temps Lothaire Ier avant de se rallier à Charles le Chauve17 qui lui reconnaît le titre de missus dominicus ducatus, lorsque Nominoë lui rend l'hommage au printemps 841. Puis il entre en rébellion ouverte contre l'administration franque. Nominoë trouve à cette époque un allié local en la personne de Lambert II de Nantes, fils d'un précédent comte de Nantes lui aussi ancien partisan de Lothaire, mais non confirmé dans cette charge par Charles le Chauve18.
     "À la suite des batailles de Messac (843) et de Ballon (845), le roi Charles doit reconnaître l'autorité de Nominoë sur la Bretagne n. 3. Au cours de l'été 846, Charles et Nominoë concluent un traité. Charles accorde au Breton le titre officiel de « dux » et le dispense de tribut en échange de la reconnaissance de sa suzeraineté personnelle sur la Bretagne19. En 847-848, Nominoë, occupé à résister difficilement aux attaques des Vikings sur la Bretagne qui lui infligent trois défaites20 n. 4, ne mène aucune expédition contre la Neustrie21.
Vers la fondation du royaume breton
     "Le pouvoir carolingien disposait en Bretagne d'évêques acquis à son autorité à Quimper, Vannes, Dol-de-Bretagne et Saint-Pol-de-Léon. Cette situation était inacceptable pour Nominoë qui désirait affirmer son émancipation. Ne pouvant rien attendre du pouvoir franc ni de l'archevêque de Tours dont dépendait la Bretagne, Nominoë se tourne vers le Pape Léon IV et lui envoie en 848 une délégation menée par Conwoïon l'abbé de Redon. Le Pape réserve aux Bretons un bon accueil, il donne quelques reliques à Conwoïon mais refuse de se prononcer sur la déposition des évêques 22. Il se contente de préconiser la tenue d'un synode de douze évêques devant lesquels les prélats en cause doivent comparaître23.
     "Comme il était impossible de réunir une telle assemblée en Bretagne, Nominoë se résout à un coup de force. En avril 849 il réunit à Coët Louh une assemblée de clercs et de laïcs, et les évêques Suzannus de Vannes, Félix de Quimper, Salacon de Dol et Liberalis de Léon (?) sont condamnés pour simonie, déposés et remplacés par des « évêques bretons »24. Selon la chronique de Nantes citée par Arthur de la Borderie25, le pape aurait aussi reconnu à Nominoë sous le titre de duc le droit de porter une couronne d'or, et donc de se faire sacrer par l'« archevêque » de Dol n. 5.
     "Bien que la promotion de Dol-de-Bretagne à la tête de l'église bretonne, mise au crédit de Nominoë par Arthur de la Borderie26, doive être attribuée à l'accord de 866 entre Salomon de Bretagne et le Pape Nicolas Ier27, l'installation de ces nouveaux évêques (de nouveaux évêchés sont créés à Alet, Tréguier et Saint-Brieuc) marque une étape essentielle pour Nominoë, il ne s'agit plus d'une révolte mais de la revendication d'une prérogative royale.
     "Les incursions bretonnes s'étendent jusqu'aux abords de Bayeux28. En 849 Nominoë est de nouveau en guerre contre Charles le Chauve qui rappelle Lambert II et lui confie de nouveau la marche de Bretagne. En février 850 Nominoë reprend ses agressions 29 et occupe Angers et ses alentoursn. 6. Lambert II trahit une nouvelle fois son suzerain et s'allie avec le chef breton. Alors que vers le 15 août 850 Charles le Chauve s'avance vers la Vilaine, Nominoë et Lambert II s'emparent de Rennes et de Nantes dont il détruisent les fortifications et lancent ensuite des raids sur le Bessin et le comté du Maine dont Le Mans qui est prise à son tour.
     "Nominoë meurt subitement au cours d'une expédition en profondeur dans la Beauce près de Vendômen. 7, le 7 mars 85130 après avoir une nouvelle fois occupé le Maine et l'Anjou. Il est inhumé dans l'abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon31.
     "Même s'il en avait les prérogatives, il ne semble pas que Nominoë ait jamais porté le titre de roi bien que le chroniqueur de la fin du ixe siècle Réginon de Prüm lui donne ce titre. Dans le cartulaire de Redon, il est tour à tour qualifié de duc des Bretons, de duc en Bretagne, de duc de toute la Bretagne, de prince de Bretagne et de prince de toute la Bretagne. C'est son fils et successeur Erispoë qui a été reconnu officiellement comme roi par Charles le Chauve après la bataille de Jengland, fondant ainsi le royaume de Bretagne. Roi sous condition d'hommage. Le roi de Bretagne est donc théoriquement vassal du roi de la Francia Occidentalis 32.
Titres
** Comes Venetice civitatis en 832
** Princeps Venetice civitatis en 834
** Gubernans in Brittanniam 833,834 831-837
** Magister in Britanniam 833
** Missus in Britannia en 837, 839,
** Dux in Britannia 834, 840
** Dominans in Britanniam 837
** Regnans in Britannia 833, 835 33,34

Postérité littéraire
     "Le Tribut de Noménoë est un poème du Barzaz Breiz par Théodore Hersart de La Villemarqué qui le qualifie dans l’argument de « plus grand roi que la Bretagne ait eu »35. Il est à noter que cette ballade est l'un des faux fabriqués par La Villemarqué, comme l'a démontré Francis Gourvil après François-Marie Luzel, dans le but de construire une historiographie nationaliste bretonne.
     "Nominoë est le héros du roman de Colette Geslin « La chevauchée de Nominoë »36. Il est également l'un des principaux personnages « historiques » du roman de Yann Brekilien « Les Cavaliers du Bout du Monde »37. Enfin, son histoire est également romancée dans le roman de Julien Meunier « Nominoë - Père de la Bretagne», paru en mai 201638.
Notes et références
Notes
1. La forme habituelle en breton moderne est Nevenou (cf. noms de famille Nevenou et Evenou, Eveno). On trouve aussi des variantes comme Neumenoiou, graphie pseudo-savante utilisée dans le Barzaz Breiz notamment.
2. « On observe cette dualité des fonctionnaires civils. Gui reste comte jusqu'en 831 or dès 820 le breton Nominoë apparaît comme « princeps Veneticæ » et en 827 il est dit « come Veneticæ civitatis ». Pendant 10 ans au moins il y eut en Vannetais simultanément deux comtes, le comte franc Guy et le comte Breton Nominoë ». Léon Levillain « La Marche de Bretagne, ses marquis et ses comtes » dans: Annales de Bretagne. Tome 58, numéro 1, 1951. p. 89-117.
3. Annales de Saint-Bertin: AD 846 « Charles marchant avec une armée contre le pays de Bretagne, la paix fut traitée entre lui et Noménoé » [archive]
4. Annales de Saint-Bertin AD 847 « Les Danois viennent dans les parties de la Gaule habitée par les Bretons, et l'emportent trois fois sur eux dans les combats. Noménoé vaincu fuit avec les siens, puis par des présents qu'il leur envoie, il écarte les Danois de son pays »
5. Chronique de Nantes ch. XII [archive] « quand il eut déposé ainsi lesdits évesques, il assembla ceux qu'il avoit substituez en leurs lieux, et tous les autres prélats de sa région, au monastère de Dol, où il se fist oindre en roy ». Toutefois les historiens considèrent généralement que le chroniqueur, non contemporain, n'est pas fiable, nombre de ses affirmations étant contredites par les textes contemporains.
6. Annales de Saint-Bertin: AD 849 : « Le Breton Nominoë avec sa perfidie accoutumée s’empare d’Angers et des pays circonvoisins...et se répandit en armes hors de son pays avec son insolence accoutumée »
7. le chroniqueur Adémar de Chabannes, n'hésite pas à prétendre qu'il périt « au commandement de Dieu frappé par un ange » ! Chronique Brepols, Turnhout, Belgique (ISBN 2503511198), Livre III § 18 p. 216
Références
1. Dom Morice, Mémoires pour servir de preuves à l'Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, t. I, p. 139, Charles Osmont impr., Paris, 1742
2. Réginon, Chronique, in G. H. Pertz, Monumenta Germaniae historica, Script I, p. 567, Weidmann, Berlin, 1861.
3. René Merlet, La Chronique de Nantes (570 environ-1049) [archive], Alphonse Picard, 1896, p. 42
4. La Borderie 1975
5. Alain Stéphane Les prénoms celtiques éditions Jean-Paul Gisserot 1999 (ISBN 2877473953) p. 96
6. Pierre-Hyacinthe Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de la Bretagne [archive], 1836, p. 432
7. Chédeville et Guillotel 1984, p. 229-231
8. Les Bretons de Nominoé, Brasparts, Éditions Beltan, 1990 (réimpr. Presses Universitaires de Rennes, Rennes, 2003)
9. Chédeville et Guillotel 1984, p. 231
10. Bernard Tanguy, « Autour de l’adoption de la règle bénédictine par l’abbaye de Redon », Bulletin de la Société archéologique du Finistère, t. 118.,? 1989, p. 145-146
11. Joëlle Quaghebeur, « Censum, tributa et munera : la perception de l’impôt en Bretagne au haut Moyen Âge », dans Le prince, l'argent, les hommes au Moyen Âge, Presses universitaires de Rennes (ISBN 978-2-7535-0602-2, lire en ligne [archive]), p. 49–59
12. Françoise Surcouf, "80 symboles pour raconter la Bretagne", Les éditions du Palais, 2013.
13. La Borderie 1975, p. 27, toutefois les données chronologique de cet acte sont contradictoires selon Chédeville et Guillotel 1984, p. 227.
14. Cartulaire de Redon, acte no 155 p. 119-120: Uuidone comite in Venedia, Reginario episcopo, Portitoë machtierno et Uuoruili frater eju (il s'agit de deux fils de Iarnithin)
15. Chédeville et Guillotel 1984, p. 233
16. Chédeville et Guillotel 1984, p. 227 Cartulaire de Redon acte VII p. 7-8
17. Janet Nelson Charles le Chauve, Aubier, Paris 1994 (ISBN 2700722612) p. 134
18. Janet Nelson op.cit p. 159-160.
19. Janet Nelson op.cit p. 170
20. Jean Renaud Les Vikings et les Celtes éditions Ouest-France, Rennes 1992 (ISBN 9782737309014) p. 122
21. Janet Nelson op.cit p. 176
22. Barthélémy-Amédée Pocquet du Haut-Jussé Les Papes et les Ducs de Bretagne COOP Breizh Spézet (2000) (ISBN 284346 0778) p. 15-17
23. Noël-Yves Tonnerre Naissance de la Bretagne Presses de l'Université d'Angers (1994) (ISBN 2903075581) p. 86-88
24. Noël-Yves Tonnerre, op.cit p. 87
25. La Borderie 1975, p. 55 note n°3
26. La Borderie 1975, p. 57
27. Noël-Yves Tonnerre op.cit p. 92 note no 1
28. Louis Halphen Charlemagne et l'empire carolingien éditions Albin Michel, Paris réédition 1968, p. 296.
29. Janet Nelson op.cit p. 179
30. Annales de Saint-Bertin: AD 851
31. Jean Verdon Chronique de Saint-Maixent, Les Belles Lettres, 1979, p. 57 : « Noménoé, tyran des Bretons plutôt que roi, est frappé par la volonté céleste ; Erispoë, son fils, lui succéda dans le royaume d'une manière indue »
32. Paul Jeulin « L'hommage de la Bretagne en droit et dans les faits ». Dans: Annales de Bretagne. Tome 41, numéro 3-4, 1934. p. 380-473
Histoire de Bretagne p. 197 [archive]
33. Nominoe missus imperatoris Ludovici [archive].
34. Lire en ligne sur Wikisource : Le Tribut de Noménoë (1846, quatrième édition, vol 1) ou Le Tribut de Noménoë (1883, huitième édition, p. 112-119)
35. éditions Terre de Brume littérature Rennes 2001 (ISBN 2843621100).
36. éditions du Rochers, Paris 1990 (ISBN 2268009289).
37. Éditions des Montagnes Noires (ISBN 2919305891)
Sources
** Arthur de La Borderie, Histoire de Bretagne, t. 2, Mayenne, Joseph Floch, 1975 (1re éd. 1898), 556 p., p. 27-72
** Barthélemy-Amédée Pocquet du Haut-Jussé, Nominoë et la naissance de la Bretagne, Société d'histoire et d'archéologie de Bretagne, 1945
** Henri Poisson, Nominoë : Fondateur de l'État breton, Saint-Brieuc, Les Presses Bretonnes, 1967
** Hervé Le Boterf, Nominoë et l'épopée des Rois de Bretagne, Paris, France-Empire, 1981 (ISBN 2-70480-875-9)
** André Chédeville et Hubert Guillotel, La Bretagne des saints et des rois ve - xe siècle, Éditions Ouest-France, 1984, 423 p. (ISBN 2-85882-613-7)
** Noël-Yves Tonnerre, Naissance de la Bretagne. Géographie historique et structures sociales de la Bretagne méridionale (Nantais et Vannetais) de la fin du viiie à la fin du xiie siècle, Angers, Presses de l'Université d'Angers, 1994 (ISBN 2-903075-58-1)
** Janet Nelson, Charles le Chauve, Paris, Aubier Histoires, 1994 (ISBN 27007-2261-2)
** Barthélémy-Amédée Pocquet du Haut-Jussé, Les Papes et les Ducs de Bretagne, Spézet, COOP Breizh, 2000 (ISBN 2843-46077-8.)5" He was Comte de Vannes.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "NOMINOË (-[8 Jun/22 Aug] 851, bur Redon). Emperor Louis I "le Pieux" installed him as missus imperatoris in Brittania (sole ruler) in [831]. Duke of Brittany. Emperor Louis I confirmed the donation of "fideli nostri Nominoë" to the monastery "Rotonensi S. Salvatoris…in pago Broweroch" by charter dated 834[4]. His forces defeated the Frankish army of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks at Redon 22 Nov 845, following their attack in retaliation for the murder of Renaud Comte de Nantes by Erispoë, Nominoë's son. The two sides made peace in 846[5]. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Nomenoius dux" captured and destroyed "Redonas civitatem et Nannetis" before returning to Brittany, the event being dated from the context to the early 850s[6]. "Nominoio tyranno Britonum" fought "Lambertus comes et Warnarius frater eius" in 850, and died "851 indictione 14"[7]. The Annales Bertiniani record the death in 851 of "Nomenogius Britto"[8]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Nominoius princeps…cum Erispoe filio" were buried at the abbey of Redon[9].
     "m ---. The name of Nominoë's wife is not known. Nominoë & his [wife] had three children:
     "a) ERISPOË (-murdered [2/12] Nov 857, bur Redon).
     "b) PASTHENETEN .
     "c) GURWENT ."

Med Lands cites:
[4] RHGF, Tome VI, CXCIV, p. 597.
[5] McKitterick (1983), pp. 242-3.
[6] Adémar de Chabannes, III, 18, p. 135.
[7] Fragmentum Chron. Fontanellensis, 850 and 851, MGH SS II, p. 303.
[8] Annales Bertiniani II 851.
[9] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 450.2
GAV-33. He was Duc de Bretagne (See attached map of Bretagne (Brittany) ca 845-867 from Wikipedia Par France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svg: (Sémhurderivative work: Fab5669 (talk) — France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svgLouis Élegoët, Bretagne une histoire, CRDP de Bretagne, 2000, p. 54 : Limites successives de la Bretagne au IXe siècle.Il était une fois l'Ouest, éditions Ouest-France, 2009, p.11 : Les frontières de la Bretagne des origines au XVe siècle., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12049589 ) between 846 and 851.3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne1.html#N
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominoe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 March 2020), memorial page for Nominoe de Bretagne (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 130484482, citing Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France ; Maintained by relative (contributor 47268827), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/130484482/nominoe-de_bretagne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomino%C3%AB. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).

Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou1,2

F, #56327, b. 968, d. between 1029 and 1047
FatherGeoffroi I "Grisegonelle" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,3 b. bt 938 - 940, d. 21 Jul 987
MotherAdèle de Troyes4
Last Edited26 Apr 2020
     Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou married Guillaume/William IV (?) Cte de Provence.1 Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou was born in 968.2
Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou died between 1029 and 1047.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020193&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Guillaume/William IV (?) Cte de Provence1

M, #56328, d. 1037
Last Edited23 Jun 2003
     Guillaume/William IV (?) Cte de Provence married Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou, daughter of Geoffroi I "Grisegonelle" (?) Comte d'Anjou and Adèle de Troyes.1
Guillaume/William IV (?) Cte de Provence died in 1037.1

Family

Adele/Adelaide (?) d'Anjou b. 968, d. bt 1029 - 1047

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm

Maurice (?) d'Anjou1,2

M, #56329, b. after March 979, d. 1012
FatherGeoffroi I "Grisegonelle" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2,3 b. bt 938 - 940, d. 21 Jul 987
MotherAdélaïde/Adelais (?)4,5,6,7 d. a 999
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Maurice (?) d'Anjou was born after March 979; His parents married in March 979.1
Maurice (?) d'Anjou was buried in 1012 at Basilique de St-Martin, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     1012
     Born in 980 as the only child of of Geoffrey I and his second wife.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Geoffroy I de Anjou unknown–987
     Siblings
          Fulk III Anjou unknown–1040
          Ermengarde D'Anjou Bretagne De Rennes 958–1022
     BURIAL     Basilique de St-Martin, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 5 Sep 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 135451910.8
Maurice (?) d'Anjou died in 1012.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffroy I "Grisegonelle" (Geoffrey Greycloak, Gaufridus/Gauzfredus Grisegonella): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/geoff001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maurice de Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00637924&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffroy I "Grisegonelle": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/geoff001.htm
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela003.htm
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177412&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 November 2019), memorial page for Maurice de Anjou (unknown–1012), Find A Grave Memorial no. 135451910, citing Basilique de St-Martin, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/135451910/maurice-de_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Adelaide/Anne (?) d'Anjou1,2

F, #56330, b. circa 1015
FatherFoulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2 b. bt 970 - 972, d. 21 Jun 1040
MotherHildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou b. c 964, d. 1 Apr 1046; Racines et Histoire says her mother (Elisabeth or Hildegarde) is uncertain1,2
Last Edited8 Dec 2019
     Adelaide/Anne (?) d'Anjou married Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil.1 Adelaide/Anne (?) d'Anjou was born circa 1015.2
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: "1 ou 2 ?) Anne (ou Adélaïde) d’Anjou ° ~1015 ép. Giraud «Le Bon», seigneur de Montreuil ° ~1010 + 1066 (Angers.)2"

Family

Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil b. 1010, d. 1066

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil1,2

M, #56331, b. 1010, d. 1066
Last Edited18 Apr 2009
     Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil married Adelaide/Anne (?) d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou and Hildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou.1 Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil was born in 1010.2
Giraud le Bon (?) Sire de Montreuil died in 1066.1,2

Family

Adelaide/Anne (?) d'Anjou b. c 1015

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours1,2

M, #56332, b. 14 October 1006, d. 14 November 1067
FatherFoulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2,3,4,5 b. bt 970 - 972, d. 21 Jun 1040
MotherHildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou1,2 b. c 964, d. 1 Apr 1046
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours was born on 14 October 1006.1,2,6 He married Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy, daughter of Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy and Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims, on 15 January 1032;
His 1st wife.1,7,8,2,6,9,10 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours and Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy were divorced between 1049 and 1050; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says div between 1049 and 1052; Genealogics says div. 1050; Med Lands says div. 1049/52.7,2,9,10 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours married Graecia/Grécie (?) of Langeais before 15 August 1052;
His 2nd wife.1,2,6 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours and Graecia/Grécie (?) of Langeais were divorced on 15 August 1052.1 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours married Adèle/Adelheid (?), daughter of Eudes (Odo) II de Blois Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Tours, de Beauvais, de Troyes, de Meaux et de Sancerre;
His 3rd wife.11 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours and Adèle/Adelheid (?) were divorced.12 Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours married Adelheid "le Teutonne" (?) before 22 May 1060;
His 4th wife.1,2,6,13
Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours died on 14 November 1067 at age 61.1,2,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES de Mâcon ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[105]. Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth date range of her mother. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[106]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][107]. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[108]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[109]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[110]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[111]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installed her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[112]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[113]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restored it to the abbey[114]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[115]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][116]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[117]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[118].
     "m firstly (1019) as his third wife, GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou, GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Abbaye de Maillezais 31 Jan 1030).
     "m secondly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as his first wife, GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde [de Metz] (14 Oct [1006/07]-14 Nov 1060). He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou."
Med Lands cites:
[105] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[106] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107.
[107] Cluny, Tome III, 2742, p. 765.
[108] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF, Tome X, p. 176.
[109] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, pp. 23 and 24.
[110] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, pp. 135-6.
[111] Château-du-Loir, 13, p. 5.
[112] Angers Cathedral, 45, p. 93.
[113] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas, 27, p. 32.
[114] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 72, p. 89.
[115] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398.
[116] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5.
[117] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 5, p. 12.
[118] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.10

; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea): "Agnes de Bourgogne, *ca 995, +Poitou 10.11.1068; 1m: 1019 Guillaume III de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine (*ca 969 +31.1.1030); 2m: 1032 (div 1049/52) Cte Geoffroy II Martel d'Anjou."7

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Geoffroy II Martel, Cte d'Anjou (1040-60), *1006, +1067; 1m: 1032 (div 1049/52) Agnés of Burgundy (*ca 995 +1068); 2m: before 15.8.1052 (div) Grace N, widow of Berlay de Montreuil; 3m: before 22.5.1060 Adelheid "Le Teutonne" (+after 1062.)1"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Geoffrey II, called Martel ("the Hammer"), was Count of Anjou from 1040 to 1060 and Count of Vendôme from 1032 to 1056. He was the son of Fulk the Black. He was bellicose and fought against William VII, Duke of Aquitaine, Theobald I, Count of Blois, and William, Duke of Normandy. During his twenty-year reign he especially had to face the ambitions of the Bishop of Le Mans, Gervais de Château-du-Loir, but he was able to maintain his authority over the County of Maine. Even before the death of his father in 1040, he had extended his power up to the Saintonge, where he founded the Abbey aux Dames.Geoffrey Martel and his wife Agnes also founded the Abbaye de la Trinité at Vendôme. The first mention of Geoffrey in the Gesta Normannorum Ducum reads: "Geoffrey, count of the Angevins, nicknamed Martel, a treacherous man in every respect, frequently inflicted assaults and intolerable pressure on his neighbors."[1]
     ""In alliance with King Henry I of France, Count Geoffrey laid siege to Tours in the winter of 1042–3. After the battle of Nouy on 21 August 1044 Count Theobald I of Blois-Chartres (1039–89) was taken prisoner by [Count Geoffrey], to whom he surrendered Tours with Chinon and Langeais, excluding, however, the monastery of Marmoutier."[1] Henry and Geoffrey became estranged after this, and were not reconciled again until c. 1052, when their names appear together in a charter of August of that year. This is in conjunction with the rebellion of William of Talou against the duke of Normandy, and Count Geoffrey's taking possession of the city of Mans (shortly after 26 March 1051).
     "Allied once again with King Henry, Count Geoffrey assaulted Normandy and seized the towns of Domfront and Alençon, evidently with the help of treachery within. Duke William laid siege to Domfront, which resisted his efforts to retake it throughout the winter of 1052. At this point Talou withdrew from the siege and started his rebellion. Duke William rapidly retook Alençon and then Domfront, driving Count Geoffrey back across the Norman border into Maine.
     "While Count Geoffrey was off balance, Duke William laid siege to Talou's castle at Arques. King Henry failed to relieve Arques, and Talou's rebellion had failed and he was exiled by late 1053. In late January, early February 1054, Count Geoffrey and King Henry together invaded Normandy and marched down the Seine toward Rouen. The King had divided his army and sent the other wing through eastern Normandy under the command of his brother Eudes, supported by Count Reginald of Clermont, Count Ralph of Montdidier, and Guy I, Count of Ponthieu. This army was defeated in a battle near Mortemer. Upon learning of this reverse, King Henry insisted upon retreating from Normandy, and Count Geoffrey accompanied him.
     "For the next several years, the war was centered in the County of Maine, with Duke William on the offensive. But King Henry in 1057, "burning to avenge the insult inflicted on him by the duke, summoned Geoffrey, count of Anjou, to prepare a large army for another expedition into Normandy." (GND) This combined effort placed Duke William temporarily on the defensive. He retreated before the invaders as they moved deeper into Normandy. After penetrating to the Bessin, the Franco-Angevin army began to ford the River Dives near the estuary which is tidal. After the king and Count Geoffrey had crossed over, the remainder of their army got stuck on the opposite bank by the incoming tide. Duke William launched a sudden attack and defeated them. King Henry and Count Geoffrey withdrew again from Normandy and never returned. Count Geoffrey continued to offer resistance in Maine against the Norman expansion until his death on 14 November 1060.
Family
     "An unusual entry in the cartulary of Ronceray describes a dispute over a vineyard seized by Geoffrey Martel and granted to his "wives, or rather concubines", Agnes, Grécie, Adele, and Adelaide. Whether these women were his wives or concubines, each relationship can be described.
     "Geoffrey II's first wife was Agnes of Burgundy,[2] the widow of William V, Duke of Aquitaine; she and Geoffrey married in 1032, but had divorced by 1050.
     "His second wife was Grécie of Langeais. Geoffrey II dismissed her to marry Adèle, the daughter of a "Count Odo", perhaps Odo II, Count of Blois. He also divorced Adèle, and took Grécie back as his wife. His last wife was a German woman named Adelaide.
     "Despite these marital escapades, Geoffrey died childless. He became a monk in Saint-Nicolas d'Angers in 1060.
Succession
     "He was the last member of his paternal House to rule Anjou. He was succeeded by his distaff nephew Geoffrey III of the House of Gâtinais.
References
1. Van Houts, p. 123.
2. Jessee 2000, p. 26.
Sources
-- Jessee, W. Scott (2000). Robert the Burgundian and the Counts of Anjou, Ca. 1025-1098. The Catholic University of America Press.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 140.6

; Comte d'Anjou.1,2

Family 1

Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy b. c 995, d. 10 Nov 1068

Family 4

Adelheid "le Teutonne" (?) d. a 1062

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques III 'Nerra': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020210&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_III,_Count_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Foulques (Fulk, Fulco) III "Nerra": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/fulk0003.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey II Martel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020214&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#Ag
  8. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesBourgognedied1068. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020878&tree=LEO
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_II,_Count_of_Anjou.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020879&tree=LEO

Adelheid "le Teutonne" (?)1,2

F, #56333, d. after 1062
Last Edited19 Oct 2019
     Adelheid "le Teutonne" (?) married Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours, son of Foulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou and Hildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou, before 22 May 1060;
His 4th wife.1,2,3,4
Adelheid "le Teutonne" (?) died after 1062.1,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 140.4

Family

Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours b. 14 Oct 1006, d. 14 Nov 1067

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey II Martel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020214&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020879&tree=LEO

Blanche (?) d'Anjou1,2

F, #56334, d. circa 1035
FatherFoulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2 b. bt 970 - 972, d. 21 Jun 1040
MotherHildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou1,2 b. c 964, d. 1 Apr 1046
Last Edited18 Apr 2009
     Blanche (?) d'Anjou died circa 1035.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Gui (?) d'Anjou, Bishop of Le Puy1,2

M, #56335, d. before 995
FatherFoulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2,3 b. bt 905 - 910, d. 11 Nov 958
MotherGerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine1,2 b. bt 913 - 915, d. b 952
Last Edited30 Mar 2020
     Gui (?) d'Anjou, Bishop of Le Puy died before 995.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIIdied958B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Drogon/Dreu (?) d'Anjou, Bishop of Le Puy1,2

M, #56336, d. 998
FatherFoulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2,3 b. bt 905 - 910, d. 11 Nov 958
MotherGerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine1,2 b. bt 913 - 915, d. b 952
Last Edited30 Mar 2020
     Drogon/Dreu (?) d'Anjou, Bishop of Le Puy died in 998.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIIdied958B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Humbert (?) d'Anjou1,2

M, #56337, d. after 957
FatherFoulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2 b. bt 905 - 910, d. 11 Nov 958
MotherGerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine1 b. bt 913 - 915, d. b 952
Last Edited18 Apr 2009
     Humbert (?) d'Anjou died after 957.1
     He was living in 957.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Renaud (?) Comte de Vendome, Bishop of Paris1,2,3

M, #56338, d. 1020
FatherBouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome1,2,3 d. 26 Feb 1007
MotherElisabeth (?)1,2,3 b. c 954, d. 1007
Last Edited12 Sep 2009
     Renaud (?) Comte de Vendome, Bishop of Paris died in 1020.1
     He was comte de Vendome, eveque de Paris.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 2.

Bouchard (?) Comte de Vendome1

M, #56339, d. 1012
FatherBouchard Ier (IV) «Le Vénérable» (?) d'Anjou, Comte de Vendome1,2 d. 26 Feb 1007
MotherElisabeth (?)1,2 b. c 954, d. 1007
Last Edited18 Apr 2009
     Bouchard (?) Comte de Vendome died in 1012.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.