Sir William Hopton of Swellington1

M, #14161
FatherJohn Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall1 b. c 1408, d. 10 Nov 1478
MotherMargaret Saville2 d. c 1452
Last Edited8 Apr 2018
     Sir William Hopton of Swellington married Margaret Wentworth, daughter of Sir Roger Wentworth Knt., of Nettleshead and Margery le Despenser Lady Roos.1
     Sir William Hopton of Swellington was also known as Sir Wittin Hopton of Swillington.3

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Savile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00465320&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

John Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall1

M, #14162, b. circa 1408, d. 10 November 1478
Last Edited8 Apr 2018
     John Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall was born circa 1408.1 He married Margaret Saville, daughter of Sir Thomas Saville and Margaret Pilkington, in 1427; His 1st wife. Per van de Pas; "Date is of contract or similar."2,1
John Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall died on 10 November 1478.1
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. John Hopton: A Fifteenth Century Gentleman, 1981, Richmond, Colin.
     2. Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica 4th series. 3rd series 1900.1 John Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall was also known as Sir John Hopton Knt., of Swillington, Yorkshire.3 John Hopton of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall was also known as Sir John Hopton of Westwood.4

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Hopton, of Yoxford Hall and Cockfield Hall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310835&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Savile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00465320&tree=LEO
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Mauleverer 11: p. 498. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.

Margaret Hopton1,2

F, #14163
FatherSir William Hopton of Swellington1,2
MotherMargaret Wentworth1
Last Edited25 Dec 2002
     Margaret Hopton married Sir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk.1,2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Sir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk1,2

M, #14164
Last Edited25 Dec 2002
     Sir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk married Margaret Hopton, daughter of Sir William Hopton of Swellington and Margaret Wentworth.1,2
     Sir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk lived at Shrubland Hall, co. Suffolk, England.2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Audrey Booth1,2

F, #14165
FatherSir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk1,2
MotherMargaret Hopton1,2
Last Edited8 Apr 2018

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232159&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Rowland Lytton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00117814&tree=LEO

Sir William Lytton of Knebworth1,2

M, #14166
FatherSir Robert Lytton Knt., of Lytton and Knebworth, co. Hertford1,2,3 d. 1505
MotherElizabeth Andrews2 d. 1542
Last Edited8 Apr 2018
     Sir William Lytton of Knebworth married Audrey Booth, daughter of Sir Philip Booth of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk and Margaret Hopton.1,2
     ; WILLIAM de LYTTON, of Knebworth; Govr Castle of Boulogne, Sheriff Herts and Essex; m Audrey, dau and heiress of Sir Philip Booth, of Shrubland Hall, Suffolk, by Margaret, dau of Sir Wittin Hopton, of Swillington, and had, with an er s (Sir Robert, KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall, Sheriff Herts and Essex, m 1st Frances, dau of Anthony Cavalery, m 2nd Elizabeth, dau of Thomas Munden, and widow of Robert Burgoyne, and d c 1551, leaving by his 1st w three daus): ROWLAND LYTTON, of Knebworth.2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232164&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232159&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Rowland Lytton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00117814&tree=LEO

Sir Robert Lytton Knt., of Lytton and Knebworth, co. Hertford1,2,3,4,5

M, #14167, d. 1505
Last Edited4 Jan 2009
     Sir Robert Lytton Knt., of Lytton and Knebworth, co. Hertford married Elizabeth Andrews, daughter of John Andrews Esq., of Baylham, Suffolk and Elizabeth Stratton, after 1485; her 2nd husbandl van de Pas says he married Agnes ANDREWS.4,1,3,5
Sir Robert Lytton Knt., of Lytton and Knebworth, co. Hertford died in 1505; died testate.3
     He was Privy Councillor, Under-Treasurer of England, Keeper of the Great Wardrobe, Treasurer at War, Burgess fo Ludgershall, Knight of the Shire for Hertfordshire.3

; van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 120265.5

; Sir ROBERT de LYTTON, KB, PC, of Lytton; Under-Treasurer Exchequer temp HENRY VII, Keeper Gt Wardrobe; bought 1492 the Knebworth estate, Herts, from Sir Thomas Bourchier; m Elizabeth, dau and coheir of John Andrews, of Weston, Norfolk, and widow of Thomas Windsor, of Hanwell, and had, with a dau (Fides, m Richard Deveneish, of Hellengleigh): WILLIAM de LYTTON.4

Citations

  1. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), LUDLOW 6, p. 229. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  2. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Ludlow 14: p. 476. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232164&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall1,2,3

M, #14168, b. circa 1512, d. 1551
FatherSir William Lytton of Knebworth1,2,3
MotherAudrey Booth1,2,3
Last Edited4 Jan 2009
     Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall married Frances Cavalery, daughter of Sir Anthony Cavalery; his 1st wife.1,2,3 Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall married Elizabeth Munden, daughter of Thomas Munden; his 2nd wife.2 Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall was born circa 1512.3
Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall died in 1551.2
     ; van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: O 30067.3

; Sir Robert, KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall, Sheriff Herts and Essex, m 1st Frances, dau of Anthony Cavalery, m 2nd Elizabeth, dau of Thomas Munden, and widow of Robert Burgoyne, and d c 1551, leaving by his 1st w three daus.2 He was living in 1545.3

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232159&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Frances Cavalery1

F, #14169
FatherSir Anthony Cavalery1
Last Edited4 Jan 2009
     Frances Cavalery married Sir Robert Lytton KB, of Knebworth and Shrubland Hall, son of Sir William Lytton of Knebworth and Audrey Booth; his 1st wife.1,2,3

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lytton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Lytton, of Knebworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00232159&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Sir Anthony Cavalery1

M, #14170
Last Edited15 Aug 2001

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 163. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.

Col. Thomas Randolph1

M, #14171, b. June 1683, d. between 1730 and 1733
FatherCol. William Randolph1 b. b 7 Nov 1651, d. 11 Apr 1711
MotherMary Isham1 b. c 1652, d. 1735
Last Edited15 Aug 2001
     Col. Thomas Randolph married Mary Judith Churchill.2 Col. Thomas Randolph was born in June 1683 at Turkey Island, Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.1
Col. Thomas Randolph died between 1730 and 1733 at Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.1

Family

Mary Judith Churchill b. c 1685, d. a 24 Dec 1733
Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 166. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 167.

Mary Judith Churchill1

F, #14172, b. circa 1685, d. after 24 December 1733
Last Edited15 Aug 2001
     Mary Judith Churchill married Col. Thomas Randolph, son of Col. William Randolph and Mary Isham.1 Mary Judith Churchill was born circa 1685.1
Mary Judith Churchill died after 24 December 1733 at Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.1

Family

Col. Thomas Randolph b. Jun 1683, d. bt 1730 - 1733
Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.

William Randolph1

M, #14173, b. 1712, d. before 3 March 1745
FatherCol. Thomas Randolph1 b. Jun 1683, d. bt 1730 - 1733
MotherMary Judith Churchill1 b. c 1685, d. a 24 Dec 1733
Last Edited10 Sep 2018
     William Randolph was buried at Tuckahoe Plantation Cmetery, Goochland Co., Virginia, USA,

; from Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1712, Henrico County, Virginia, USA
     DEATH     1745 (aged 32–33), Goochland County, Virginia, USA
     06/14/2011 email from FAG contributor: 47131861: Per a plaque pictured on his father's grave he's buried the same place his father is & was born 1712 & died 1745. It also says there's a Mary Page & I'm thinking that's his wife.
     Family Members Parents
      Thomas Randolph 1683–1729
      Judith Fleming Randolph 1685–1743
     Spouse Maria Judith Page Randolph 1714–1746
     Siblings
      Mary Isham Randolph Keith 1716–1772
     Children
      Mary Page Randolph Fleming 1738 – unknown
      Thomas Mann Randolph 1741–1793
     BURIAL     Tuckahoe Plantation Cemetery, Goochland County, Virginia, USA
     PLOT     Buried with his father-wall plaque
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: P Fazzini
     Added: 2 Mar 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 49012294.2 He married Mary Page, daughter of Mann Page and Judith Wormeley.1 William Randolph was born in 1712 at Henrico Co. (now Goochland Co.), Virginia, USA.1,2
William Randolph died before 3 March 1745 at Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.1,2

Family

Mary Page b. 24 Sep 1714, d. b 3 Mar 1745

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 September 2018), memorial page for William Randolph (1712–1745), Find A Grave Memorial no. 49012294, citing Tuckahoe Plantation Cemetery, Goochland County, Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/49012294/william-randolph. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Mary Page1

F, #14174, b. 24 September 1714, d. before 3 March 1745
FatherMann Page2 b. 1691, d. 24 Jan 1730
MotherJudith Wormeley2 b. 1694, d. 12 Dec 1716
Last Edited10 Sep 2018
     Mary Page married William Randolph, son of Col. Thomas Randolph and Mary Judith Churchill.1 Mary Page was born on 24 September 1714 at Gloucester Co., Virginia, USA.2
Mary Page died before 3 March 1745 at Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.1
Mary Page was buried in 1746 at Tuckahoe Plantation Cmetery, Goochland Co., Virginia, USA,

; from Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     24 Sep 1714, Gloucester County, Virginia, USA
     DEATH     1746 (aged 31–32), Goochland County, Virginia, USA
     06/14/2011 email from FAG contributor: 47131861: Per a plaque pictured on his father's grave he's buried the same place his father is & was born 1712 & died 1745. It also says there's a Mary Page & I'm thinking that's his wife.
     8/25/2011 email from FAG contributor: 47516136: William Randolph and Maria Judith Page started their family at Tuckahoe in the 1730's. By 1745 their four children were orphaned at Tuckahoe after the untimely death of both their parents; their mother died less than a year before William was left a widower with four children and a large estate to manage. Before he died, William drew out his will to be sure that his children would be cared for and educated if he should die. In that will, he named his good friend, Peter Jefferson and Jane Randolph Jefferson (cousin to William) guardians of his children. In 1745, after Williams death, Peter and Jane Jefferson honored their friend's wishes and moved to Tuckahoe with their children, including their young toddler,Thomas. Thomas Jefferson spent his youth at Tuckahoe and received his first education in the small one-room schoolhouse that still stands today. From 1745 until 1752, the Jeffersons cared for Tuckahoe and the Randolph children. Mary P., the daughter of Judith &M.Page, was bom the 24 day of February, about 8 o'clock in the morning, 1714.
     Family Members Parents
      Mann Page 1691–1730
      Judith Armstead Wormeley Page 1694–1716
     Spouse
      William Randolph 1712–1745
     Siblings
      Ralph Page 1713 – unknown
     Half Siblings
      Mann Page 1716–1716
      Mann Page 1718–1780
      John Williamson Page 1724–1774
      Carter Page 1724 – unknown
      Matthew Page 1726 – unknown
      Infant Page 1728–1728
     Children
      Mary Page Randolph Fleming 1738 – unknown
      Thomas Mann Randolph 1741–1793
     BURIAL     Tuckahoe Plantation Cemetery, Goochland County, Virginia, USA
     PLOT     Wall plaque
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: P Fazzini
     Added: 2 Mar 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 49012348.2
Mary Page died in 1746 at Goochland Co., Virginia, USA.2

Family

William Randolph b. 1712, d. b 3 Mar 1745

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 September 2018), memorial page for Maria Judith Page Randolph (24 Sep 1714–1746), Find A Grave Memorial no. 49012348, citing Tuckahoe Plantation Cemetery, Goochland County, Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/49012348/maria-judith-randolph. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy1,2,3

M, #14175, b. circa 880, d. 10 April 947
FatherThibaud (?) Comte d'Arles & Vienne1,2,3,4,5,6,7 b. c 854, d. 895
MotherBertha de Lorraine1,8,3,5,9,7 b. c 863, d. 8 Mar 925
Last Edited7 Sep 2020
     Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy married Wandelmodis (?)10,3 Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy was born circa 880.2,3,5 He married Willa I (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Boso V (?) de Provence, in 910; his 1st wife; Genealogy.EU (Boson page) says m. 912; Leo van de Pas says m. 910.2,3,5 Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy married Alda/Hilda (?) on 22 July 927; his 2nd wife; Genealogy.EU (Boson page) says m. 924; Leo van de Pas says m. 22 Jul 927.2,3,11,5 Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy married Marozia (?), daughter of Theophylactus I (?) Count of Tuscany and Teodora (?), in 932; his 3rd wife; her 3rd husband.2,12,5 Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy married Berthe (?) of Swabia, daughter of Burkhard II (?) Duke of Swabia and Reginlinde (?) of Nellenburg, on 12 December 937;
Her 2nd husband; his 4th wife.2,3,13,14,5
Hugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy died on 10 April 947 at Arles, France (now).1,2,3,5
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Hugo was born about 880, the son of Theobald, count of Arles, and Bertha de Lorraine. By inheritance he was count of Arles and Vienne, which made him one of the most important and influential nobles in the kingdom of Provence. After Louis III, king of Lower-Burgundy and Italy, who was also king of Provence, was captured, blinded, and exiled from Italy in 905. Hugo became his chief adviser and regent. By 911 most of the royal prerogatives were exercised by Hugo and Louis ceded him the titles _dux_ of Provence and _marchio_ of the Viennois. He moved the capital to his family's chief seat of Arles and married Louis' half-sister Guille de Provence, widow of Rudolf I, king of Upper Bourgogne, and daughter of Boso, count of Vienne, king of Lower-Burgundy. The marriage did not result in progeny.
     "At an unknown date a Provençal army led by Hugo, his brother Boso and Hugues Taillefer, invaded Lombardy with the support of Hugo's mother. On the basis of the account of Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos, emperor of Byzantium (905-959), this has been dated as late as 923-924, but the account of Bishop Liudprand of Cremona, the Lombard chronicler and author (922-972) dates the event much earlier, between 917 and 920.
     "About 920 a sizable faction of Italian nobles revolted against Emperor Berengar I, and elected Rudolf II, king of Burgundy, as king of Italy. This started a civil war which resulted in Berengar's assassination in 924. Rather than accept Rudolf, Berengar's partisans now elected Hugo as king in 925. Rudolf was ejected from Italy in 926 and Hugo crossed the Alps to be crowned. In his absence, Louis III, as king of Provence, transferred his county of Vienne to his son Charles. Louis died on 5 June 928 and Hugo returned to Provence to sort out the succession.
     "For whatever reason, neither Charles nor Hugo was elected king of Provence, but Hugo annexed the kingdom to Italy de facto, issuing _diplomata_ concerning Provence from his Italian chancery in a royal style. He also took control of the right to grant fiefs in Provence.
     "Hugo's reign started successfully enough. He somewhat improved the central administration of the kingdom, achieving rather more (though not total) success against the Magyar raids that had been plaguing Italy for several decades.
     "Before 22 July 927 Hugo married his second wife Hilda; their daughter Alda and son Lothar would have progeny. Hilda died in 932.
     "In September 928 Hugo met with Raoul, king of France, and Heribert II, comte de Meaux, Soissons et Vermandois, in Burgundy. Hugo granted Vienne to Heribert's son Eudes, in opposition to Charles. He was still in conflict with Rudolf II of Burgundy, and hoped to ally with the king of France against the Burgundian monarch. By 930, however, Charles was in complete control of Vienne and by 931 Raoul of France was claiming suzerainty over the Viennois and Lyonnais. In light of these reverses in his transalpine policy, Hugo turned his attention towards securing his rule in Italy and receiving the imperial crown. He induced the Italian nobility to recognise his son Lothar as their next king and crowned him in April 931. That same year he accused his half-brother Lambert of Tuscany of conspiring for the crown - perhaps with the support of a faction of nobles - and deposed him, bestowing the march of Tuscany on his brother Boso.
     "Hugo, however had other reasons for deposing Lambert, who presented an obstacle to his third marriage to Marozia, widow of Lambert's brother Guido, margrave of Tuscany. Lambert's supporters called in Rudolf II of Burgundy, whom Hugo bribed with the gift of the Viennois and Lyonnais, which Rudolf successfully occupied. In 933 Rudolf relinquished all his rights to Italy.
     "In 936 Hugo replaced his brother Boso of Tuscany with his own son Hubert. He granted Octavion in the Viennois to Hugues Taillefer and patched up his relations with Charles, the former count of Vienne, in a final effort to save influence in Provence.
     "However, Hugo's attempt to strengthen his power further by a third marriage failed disastrously. His bride Marozia was senatrix and effective ruler of Rome and widow first of Alberico I, duca di Spoleto, marchese di Camerino, and then of Hugo's own half-brother Guido of Tuscany. This last fact meant that the marriage was illegal under canon law, on grounds of consanguinity - a matter that Hugo had tried to circumvent by disowning and eliminating the descendants of his mother's second marriage and giving Tuscany to his brother Boso. This in turn, however, alarmed Alberico II, principe dei Romani, Marozia's teenaged son from her first marriage, who, appealing to Roman distrust of the foreign troops Hugo had brought with him, launched a coup d'état during the wedding festivities. Hugo managed to flee, but Marozia was imprisoned until her death a few years later. Hugo's power in Italy was damaged but not destroyed by these events. To strengthen his hand in the affairs of Milan, he tonsured his younger illegitimate son Tebaldo, to groom him for the position of Archbishop of Milan; unfortunately the ancient cleric Arderic, whom he installed pro tem, lived another twenty-two years. He continued to organise the fight against the Magyars and the Andalusian pirates based at Fraxinet in Provence. His active diplomacy paid off. He concluded a treaty with Rudolf II in 933 by which Rudolf abandoned his claims to Italy in return for being handed Provence over the heads of Louis III's heirs and the marriage of Rudolf's daughter Aelis de Bourgogne to Hugo's son Lothar. Friendly relations were maintained with the Byzantine empire, and in 942 Hugo even came to terms with Alberico II, who married Hugo's daughter Alda.
     "Within the kingdom, Hugo intensified his existing habit of giving any available offices or lands to relations, including his numerous legitimate and illegitimate progeny, and a small circle of old and trusted friends. The effect this had on Italian nobles who saw this as threatening themselves eventually resulted in rebellion. In 941 Hugo expelled Berengar II of Ivrea from Italy and abolished the march of Ivrea. In 945 Berengar returned from exile in Germany and defeated Hugo in battle. In a diet Berengar held at Milan, Hugo was deposed, though he managed to come to terms by which he nominally kept the crown and the title _rex_ (king), but he returned to Provence, leaving his son Lothar as nominal king, but with all real power in Berengar's hands. Hugo retired to Provence, but continued to carry the royal title until his death on 10 April 947.
     "By four wives and at least four mistresses, he left eight children. With Guille de Provence, Hugo had no children. Hugo's only legitimate children were both from his second wife Alda or Hilda, of German origin. Her children were Alda, who married Alberico II, and Lothar, Hugo's successor. By his third wife Marozia, and his fourth, Bertha von Schwaben, daughter of Burchard, Herzog von Schwaben, and widow of Rudolf II, Hugo had no children. His son Hubert, to whom he gave Tuscany, was his eldest bastard son by a noblewoman named Wandelmodis. By another, low-born mistress named Bezola, whom the people called Venerem, Hugo had a daughter Bertha who married the Byzantine emperor Romanos II and took the name Eudokia. She inherited her father's lands in Provence and had a brother Boso, who became bishop of Piacenza and imperial chancellor. Hugo's third mistress was Rotrud, called Iunonem by the people. She gave him a daughter Rotlind or Rolend, who married Bernardo, count of Pavia. Tebald, whom Hugo tried to make Archbishop of Milan, was the product of a liaison with a Roman woman named Stephania, to whom the people gave the nickname Semelen. Hugo's youngest son Geoffrey, abbot of Nonantola, was of an unknown mistress.
     "A young page educated at Hugo's court at the traditional Lombard capital, Pavia, grew up to be Liudprand, bishop of Cremona, the liveliest chronicler of the 10th century; his loyalty to the memory of Hugo may have helped fuel some of his partisan bitterness in chronicling Hugo's heirs."15

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 131.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES, son of THEOTBALD Comte d'Arles & his wife Berta of Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([880]-10 Apr 947). "Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…" in a donation by charter dated 924[684]. "Hugo et Lotharius…reges" name "patris et matris nostræ Teubaldi…et Berte" in their donation to Cluny dated 8 Mar 934[685], although this incorrectly implies that Ugo and Lothar were brothers instead of father and son, which is proved by other sources. Comte de Vienne. He was elected as UGO King of Italy in 926. In 931, he deposed his uterine half-brother Lambert Marchese of Tuscany, acquiring the march of Tuscany which he granted to his brother Boso, whom he replaced in 936 by his own illegitimate son[686]. King Ugo attempted to establish control over Rome by his third marriage, but was driven off by his stepson Alberico[687]. He expelled Berengario d´Ivrea from his territories in 941, and abolished the March of Ivrea, but was defeated by Berengario who returned to Italy from exile in Germany in 945. Ugo was declared deposed by a diet at Milan, but Berengario allowed him to retain the title of king. The primary source which records his date of death has not yet been identified.
     "m firstly (912) as her second husband, WILLA [Guille], widow of RUDOLF I King of Upper Burgundy, daughter of --- (-before 924). "Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…et uxoris quondam meæ Willæ…et præsentis conjugis meæ Hildæ atque fratrum et sororum mearum" in a donation by charter dated 924[688], although the primary source which confirms that she was the widow of King Rudolf has not so far been identified. The origin of Willa is not known. Chaume[689] and Hlawitschka[690] suggest that she was Willa, daughter of Boson King [of Provence], the former considering that she was the daughter of King Boson's second marriage while the latter suggests that his first wife was her mother. If Willa was the daughter of King Boson, it is more likely that she was the daughter of his first marriage as her first husband is recorded as already having children in 888, assuming that Willa was their mother. However, this appears inconsistent with Willa's second marriage in 912, when her second husband would have been about 30 years old, while Willa herself would have been over 50 if her first children had been born in the early 880s. The only indication of her date of death is the charter dated 924 under which her second husband "Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…et uxoris quondam meæ Willæ…et præsentis conjugis meæ Hildæ"[691].
     "m secondly (924 or before) HILDA, daughter of ---. "Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…et uxoris quondam meæ Willæ…et præsentis conjugis meæ Hildæ" in a donation by charter dated 924[692]. "Aldam…ex Francorum genere Teutonicorum" is named as wife of King Ugo by Liutprand[693]. Apart from this indication of Germanic origin, nothing is known about Hilda's parents.
     "m thirdly (Ticino, Castro Sancti Angeli 932[694]) as her third husband, MAROZIA, widow firstly of ALBERICO Marchese di Spoleto and secondly of GUIDO Marchese of Tuscany, daughter of TEOFILACTO Senator of Rome & his wife Theodora --- (-in prison 7 Jan [932/37]). Liudprand names "Marotiam et Theodora" as the two daughters of Theodora[695]. The wife of "Albericus marchio" is referred to as "Theophilacti filia" in the Benedicti Chronicon, although not named[696]. Liudprand names "Maroziam scortum Romanam" as wife of Guido[697], and in a later passage names "Marozia, scortum impudens satis" when recording her marriage to King Ugo after the death of her second husband[698]. The Memorial of "Maroza" states that she died "Jan VII indic IX"[699].
     "m fourthly (12 Dec 937) as her second husband, BERTA of Swabia, widow of RUDOLF II King of Upper Burgundy, daughter of BURKHARD II Duke of Swabia & his wife Regelinda [Eberhardinger] (-after 2 Jan 966). Liutprand names "Bertam Suevorum ducis Bruchardi filiam" as wife of "Rodulfus rex Burgundionibus"[700]. The Annales Sangallenses record the marriage in 922 of "filiam Purchardi ducis" and "Ruodolfus rex"[701]. "Berta matre nostra" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 8 Apr 962[702]. Luitprand records the marriage of "Burgundionum rex Rodulfus…viduam Bertam" to King Ugo[703].
     "Mistress (1): WANDELMODA, daughter of ---. Liudprand names "Wandelmoda…muliere nobilissima" as mother of "Hubertum"[704].
     "Mistress (2): PEZOLA, daughter of ---. 926/30. Liutprand names "Pezolam vilissimorum servorum sanguine cretam" as one of the concubines of King Ugo, specifying that she was given the nickname "Venerem" by the people[705].
     "Mistress (3): ROTRUD [Rosa], [wife/widow] of GISILBERTO Conte Palatino, daughter of WALPERTUS & his wife Cristina --- (-after 29 Mar 945). Liutprand names "Rozam, Walperti…filiam" as one of the concubines of King Ugo, specifying that she was given the nickname "Iunonem" by the people[706]. In an earlier passage, he names "Walperti…Rosam…gnatam suam" as wife of "Gilleberto comiti palatio", specifying that Walpert was one of the leading judges in Pavia[707] and that he was husband of Cristina[708].
     "Mistress (4): STEPHANIA, daughter of ---. Liutprand names "Stephaniam, genere Romanam" the third of King Ugo's concubines, specifying that she was given the nickname "Semelen" by the people [709].
     "Mistress (5): ---. No information has been identified in primary sources about Godofredo abbot of Nonantula and his mother."
Med Lands cites:
[684] Diplomata Hugonis Comitis Provinciæ et Regis Italiæ I, RHGF IX, p. 689.
[685] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris), Tome I, 417, p. 403.
[686] Wickham (1981), p. 179.
[687] Wickham (1981), p. 178.
[688] Diplomata Hugonis Comitis Provinciæ et Regis Italiæ I, RHGF IX, p. 689.
[689] Chaume, M. (1925) Les origines du duché de Bourgogne (Dijon), Vol 1, p. 382 note 3, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 374.
[690] Hlawitschka, E. (1976) 'Die verwandschaftlichen Verbindungen zwischen dem hochburgundischen und dem niederburgundischen Köingshaus. Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Geschichte Burgunds in der 1. Hälfte des 10. Jahrhunderts', Festschrift für Peter Acht (Munich), pp. 28-57.
[691] Diplomata Hugonis Comitis Provinciæ et Regis Italiæ I, RHGF IX, p. 689.
[692] Diplomata Hugonis Comitis Provinciæ et Regis Italiæ I, RHGF IX, p. 689.
[693] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.20, MGH SS III, p. 306.
[694] Benedicti Chronicon 32, MGH SS III, p. 715.
[695] Liudprandi Antapodosis II.48, MGH SS II, p. 297.
[696] Benedicti Chronicon 29, MGH SS III, p. 714.
[697] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.40, MGH SS III, p. 312.
[698] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.41, MGH SS III, p. 312.
[699] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 343.
[700] Liudprandi Antapodosis II.60, p. 299.
[701] Annales Sangallensis 922, MGH SS I, p. 78.
[702] Cluny Tome II, 1127, p. 217.
[703] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.12, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[704] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.20, MGH SS III, p. 306.
[705] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.13, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[706] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.13, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[707] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.39, MGH SS III, p. 311.
[708] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.39, MGH SS III, p. 312.
[709] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.13, MGH SS III, p. 318.5
He was Cte d'Arles et de Vienne circa 898.2 He was King (Margrave?) of Provence between 911 and 933.2 He was King of Italy, abdicate between 926 and 946 at Pavia, Provincia di Pavia, Lombardia, Italy.1,2

Family 3

Willa I (?) de Bourgogne b. Dec 873, d. b 926

Family 4

Wandelmodis (?) d. b 948
Child

Family 5

Pezola (?)
Children

Family 6

Alda/Hilda (?) d. b 28 Feb 932
Children

Family 7

Rotrude (?)
Child

Family 8

Marozia (?) b. c 890, d. 932

Family 9

Berthe (?) of Swabia b. c 895

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo of Arles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020677&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_of_Arles. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#UgoKingItalyB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theotbald: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020455&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#Theotbalddied887895
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020454&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wandelmodis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049949&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hilda/Alda: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295864&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marozia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00312810&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120374&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Bertadied961
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo of Arles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020677&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ère Maison deMercoeur, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Mercoeur.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hubert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020678&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha (Eudokia) de Provence: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00215867&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boso of Arles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295870&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alda/Hilda von Vienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00336787&tree=LEO
  21. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Pope John XII, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08426b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331120&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#LotharKingItalydied950.

Hubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino1,2

M, #14176, b. between 920 and 924, d. between 967 and 970
FatherHugues (?) Cte d'Arles et de Vienne, Margrave of Provence, King of Italy3,1,2,4 b. c 880, d. 10 Apr 947
MotherWandelmodis (?)1,2,5 d. b 948
Last Edited13 Apr 2020
     Hubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino was born between 920 and 924.1 He married Willa de Camerino, daughter of Boniface I (?) Markgrave of Camerino, in 936; her 1st husband.1,6,2
Hubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino died between 967 and 970.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 159.
2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen 1995, Neustadt an der Aisch , Erich Brandenburg, Reference: 8.7


; [illegitimate by Waldelmonde of Ivrea (+before 948)] Hubert, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino (943-946), *920-924, +967-970; m.936 Willa de Camerino.1 Hubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino was also known as Heribert (?) Margrave of Tuscany and Spoleto.3

Family 2

Willa de Camerino d. a 7 Jan 978
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hubert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020678&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo of Arles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020677&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wandelmodis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049949&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willa di Camerino: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020667&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hubert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020678&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Malaspina 1 page (Malaspina family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/malaspina1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00295862&tree=LEO

Bertha (?) of Tuscany1

F, #14177
FatherHubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino1 b. bt 920 - 924, d. bt 967 - 970
Last Edited27 Mar 2004

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.

Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni1,2,3

M, #14178, b. circa 920, d. 15 October 975
FatherAdalberto I (?) Marchese in the Marca di Milano4,2,3,5
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited1 Jun 2020
     Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni married Willa/Guilla di Bonifazio, daughter of (?) di Bonifazio Marquis de Spolète;
His 1st wife.6,2 Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni married NN d'Este Heiress of Este and Montagnana, daughter of Hubert (?) Markgraf of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto, Marquis de Camerino;
His 2nd wife.2 Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni was born circa 920.5
Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni died on 15 October 975; Genealogics says d. 15 Oct 975; Genealogy.EU says d. bef 997.7,2,5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "OBERTO OBIZZO [I] (-before 975). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Marchese in the Eastern March 962. Conte di Luni 951. "Hotberti marchio comes palatii" approved a charter confirming the privileges of the church of Asti, by charter dated 27 Sep 962[317]. "Odbertus marchio et comes palacio" heard a lawsuit recorded in a charter dated 964[318].
     "m ---. The name of Oberto Obizzo's wife is not known.
     "Oberto Obizzo [I] & his wife had six children.
     "i) ADALBERTO [II] .
     "ii) OBERTO [II] (-after 1013).
     "iii) ANSELMO .
     "iv) BERTA .
     "v) OBERTO OBIZZO [II] .
     "vi) ALBERTO (-[1024])."

Med Lands cites:
[317] Gabotto, F. (ed.) ´Le più antiche carte dello archivio capitulare di Asti, Vol. I´, Biblioteca della società storica subalpina, Vol. XXVIII (Pinerolo, 1904) ("Asti Capitolare (antiche carte)"), LXXXVI, p. 166.
[318] Muratori (Este), Parte I, p. 139.
[319] Muratori, L. A. (1773) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome I, p. 632.3


; Per Genealogics:
     "Oberto Obizzo I was an Italian count palatine and margrave and the oldest member of the Obertenghi family about whom some facts are known. He was hereditary count of Milan from 951. Oberto's father was Margrave Adalberto, about whom nothing is known other than his name and title.
     "Soon after assuming the Italian throne, Berengar II reorganised his territories south of the Po River, dividing them into three new marches (frontier districts) named after their respective margraves: the _marca Alermica_ of Aleramo of Monferrato, the _marca Arduinica_ of Ardoino, count of Susa and Torino, and the _marca Obertenga_ of Oberto. This last division consisted of eastern Liguria and was also known as the _marca Januensis_ or March of Genoa. It consisted of Tuscany with the cities of Genoa, Luni, Tortona, Parma and Piacenza.
     "In 960 Oberto had to take refuge in Germany. The next year, Pope John XII asked Otto I of Germany to intervene in Italy to protect him from Berengar. When Otto took control of Italy, Oberto was able to return to his lands, with the title of Count Palatine confirmed by Otto.
     "He was succeeded as count of Milan by his sons Adalberto II and Oberto II. His great-grandson Alberto Azzo II, margrave of Milan, founded the house of Este; this makes Oberto the top most documented ancestor of the house of Este as well as of its branches, the house of Welf and the house of Hanover.
     "Oberto died on 15 October 975."5



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Oberto I Obizzo (also known as Otbert) (died 15 October 975) was an Italian count palatine and margrave and the oldest known member of the Obertenghi family.[1]
Biography
     "Oberto I inherited the countship of Milan in 951 from his father Adalberto the Margrave.[2]
     "Soon after assuming the Italian throne, Berengar II reorganised his territories south of the Po River, dividing them into three new marches (frontier districts) named after their respective margraves: the marca Aleramica of Aleram of Montferrat, the marca Arduinica of Arduin Glaber, and the marca Obertenga of Oberto. This last division consisted of eastern Liguria and was also known as the marca Januensis or March of Genoa. It consisted of Tuscany with the cities of Genoa, Luni, Tortona, Parma, and Piacenza.[3]
     "In 960, he had to take refuge in Germany. The next year, Pope John XII asked Otto I of Germany to intervene in Italy to protect him from Berengar. When Otto took control of Italy, Oberto was able to return to his lands, with the title of count palatine confirmed by Otto.
     "He was succeeded as Count of Milan by his sons Adalberto II of Milan who at a later time was succeeded by Oberto II. His great-grandson Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan founded the House of Este.[4]
External links
** History of Obertenga[permanent dead link] (in Italian)
References
1. Pompeo Litta, Famiglie celebri d'Italia. D'Este, Torino, 1835.
2. Giorgio fiori, i malaspina, tipleco, piacenza 1995.
3. Giorgio fiori, i malaspina, tipleco, piacenza 1995.
4. Luciano Chiappini, Gli Estensi, Varese, 1988."8



; Per Shamà:
     "Oberto I († ante 15.X.975), per alcuni figlio di Alberto Azzo Conte di Milano; citato in un placito a Pavia del Conte Palatino Lanfranco (13.IV.945) nel quale il capostipite Oberto, discendente forse da Suppone, Duca di Spoleto e Conte Palatino nel IX secolo, viene nominato a sua volta Conte del Sacro Palazzo, poi Conte di Luni e nel 951 Signore della Marca della Liguria orientale (comprendente i comitati di Genova, Tortona, Bobbio e Luni), carica che ricopriva già dal 23.I.951 per volere di Berengario II Re d’Italia che aveva aiutato a diventare Re nel 950 insieme ai conti poi marchesi Arduino e Aleramo; fu uno dei più grandi e potenti feudatari; a seguito di rottura con Berengario II si rifugiò presso l’Imperatore Ottone I di Sassonia (960); fu sostituito da Ildebrando III Conte di Roselle nel marchesato e dal fratello di questi Gherardo I come Conte Sacro Palazzo e, dopo la vittoria di Ottone I, grazie al suo aiuto, riottenne Marca e Comitato palatino da cui era stato esautorato da Berengario II, trasmettendola ai suoi due figli; risiedeva in Pavia; nominato nel 931, 945, 948 e 961 Marchese e Conte (953 – 972.)9"

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Oberto Ier est le fondateur de la dynastie nobiliaire italienne des Obertenghi, actif dans la péninsule entre 940 et 972.
Comte
     "On ignore la filiation d'Oberto, mais les archives gardent trace de son activité à quatre reprises : en 945, en 951, en 953 et en 975.
     "Le 13 avril 945, il porte le titre de comte et assiste à une audience au palais royal de Pavie. Il côtoie à cette occasion le comte palatin Lanfranco, le comte Adalberto (dont les descendants seront les Canossa), le comte de Parme Manfredo, le comte de Vérone Milone (futur marquis de Frioul) et deux comtes piémontais, Aleramo (racine de la dynastie nobiliaire des Aleramici) et Arduino (à l'origine de la dynastie nobiliaire des Arduini). La signature a lieu devant le roi d'Italie Lothaire II, et l'acte concerne celui qui lui succédera sous le nom de Bérenger II. À cette époque, Oberto est donc déjà un personnage de tout premier plan, associé au plus haut niveau aux affaires du royaume.
Marquis et comte palatin
     "En 951 et, à nouveau, en 953 (entre le règne de Lothaire II et celui de Bérenger II), il se porte témoin au bas d'un document royal, signant la première fois comme marquis, la seconde comme comte palatin.
     "Dans cette dernière fonction, la plus élevée du palais, il assume des responsabilités qui s'étendent à l'ensemble du royaume d'Italie. Cette ascension, qui prend place dans un contexte politique tourmenté, démontre la capacité d'adaptation de l'aristocratie de l'époque. Titulaires de titres de comtes et de marquis, mais surtout grands propriétaires fonciers, ces fonctionnaires royaux imposent alors à leur suzerain un rapport de force basé sur la permanence et la continuité de leurs lignages face à une royauté plus instable et plus intermittente.
     "En 960, Oberto fait partie de la délégation qui quitte l'Italie et gagne la Germanie pour demander à son souverain, Otton Ier, de descendre dans la péninsule pour y assumer la royauté. Une fois Otton couronné, Oberto sera récompensé de ses peines, recevant des terres prélevées sur le patrimoine de l'abbaye de Bobbio.
     "Il est alors, très probablement, titulaire de droits sur le district de Luni, entre la Ligurie et la Toscane. En tant que marquis, il domine la « marca obertenga » (la marche des Obertenghi) entre Ligurie, Piémont et Lombardie, incluant les comtés de Gênes, Luni, Tortone et Milan. En tant que comte palatin, il est le bras droit du roi sur l'ensemble du royaume.
Patrimoine et influence
     "Le patrimoine qu'il léguera à ses descendants s'étend très au-delà des confins de ses juridictions comtales. Une partie se trouve dans la plaine du Pô, entre Pavie, Crémone, Plaisance et Parme. Une autre dans ce qui deviendra le berceau de la famille d'Este, à savoir un triangle Padoue, Ferrare, Rovigo. La troisième partie se trouve en Toscane (marca di Tuscia).
     "La dispersion de ces biens semble indiquer que le patrimoine d'Oberto se constitue pendant qu'il exerce ses fonctions palatines, qui lui donnent accès à des domaines contestés, à des héritages en déshérence et à des biens générateurs de revenus fiscaux qu'il lui est possible de s'approprier moyennant finances. Ses fonctions lui permettent d'accéder à des terres qui l'autorisent à leur tour d'amplifier sa clientèle, pour devenir ainsi, au sein de l'administration du Royaume, sinon un candidat au trône, au moins un des faiseurs de roi. Oberto pose ainsi les bases d'une lignée dynastique d'envergure régionale, disposant d'un vaste patrimoine réparti dans tout le nord de la péninsule, avec une attention particulière pour les zones clés des Apennins et pour les périphéries fragiles des domaines en voie de dissolution.
     "Ni Oberto, ni ses successeurs ne sont à l'origine de la fondation d'un monastère « familial ». À part l'abbaye de San Colombano de Bobbio, avec laquelle il entretient un rapport particulier1, il disperse ses donations entre plusieurs établissements religieux2
Mort et postérité
     "On ne connaît pas la date de la mort d'Oberto. Un acte de 975, rédigé par l'évêque de Pise en faveur de ses fils, indique qu'il est mort entre 953 et cette date.3
     "Un texte de 1124 (la Paix de Luni), qui règle un différend concernant un puits situé à Sarzana, a permis aux historiens de reconstituer, à rebours, une partie de l'arbre généalogique d'Oberto. Cette reconstitution indique qu'il est à l'origine des familles Malaspina, Pallavicini, D'Este, de Massa-Carrara, ainsi que de la famille Parodi.
Adalberto I, comte (vers 900).
     |--Oberto I († avant le 15 octobre 975, comte palatin et margrave x Guilla di Bonifazio, fille du marquis de Spolète.
      |--Oberto II († après 1014/1021), comte palatin, margrave de Milan, Tortone et Gênes x Railenda, fille du comte Riprando.
      |--Ugo († après le 26 janvier 1037), margarve de Milan, comte de Gênes x Gisèle de Bergame, fille du comte Gisalberto II.
      |--Alberto Azzo I (970- † avant 1018) margrave de Milan x Adèle.
      |--Adèle x Aledramo II, margrave de Saluces († avant 1055).
      |--Alberto Azzo II d'Este (997-1096/97), margrave de Milan (Maison d'Este).
      |--x Cunizza de Altdorf, fille du comte Welf II de Bavière (branche des Welf).
      |--x Gersende du Maine, fille du comte Herbert Ier du Maine (branche des Hugonides).
      |--x Mathilde, sœur de Guillaume, évêque de Pavie (Aleramici).
      |--Berta († 1037)
      |--x Arduin d'Ivrée, roi d'Italie († 1015)
      |--x Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate († 1034/35), margrave de Turin, (Arduinici).
Adalberto IV († 1034) x Adélaïde, fille du comte Boso.
      |--Adalberto V
      |--Anselmo († 1047)
      |--Adalberto II († avant mars 1000), comte x Adélaïde4 fille de Boson I, comte de Sabbioneta ancêtre des familles de Massa-Carrara, Parodi et Pallavicino.
      |--Oberto III
      |--Adalberto VI
      |--Berthe x Lanfranco, comte de Plaisance.
      |--Gisèle (peut-être fille d'Adalberto III) x Anselmo I del Monferrato (Aleramici).
      |--Adalberto III († 1002/11) comte x Inconnue
      |--Gisèle (peut-être fille d'Adalberto III) x Anselmo I del Monferrato (Aleramici).
Oberto Obizzo x Ermengarda - souche de la famille Malaspina.
      |--Alberto
Notes et références
1. Il a en effet redistribué à ses vassaux une partie des terres de Bobbio, que lui a concédées l'Empereur.
2. San Maiolo à Pavie et Santa Fiora à Arezzo, par exemple.
3. Luigi Provero. Oberto I [archive]. Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani. Treccani. Volume 79, 2013.
4. A. Conti, Gli ascendenti dei Casaloldo. I conti di Sabbioneta e gli ultimi conti di Parma tra il Garda e il Po (secc. XI-XIII), in M. Vignoli, Casaloldo e la battaglia del 10 maggio 1509, Mantova, 2009
Liens internes
** Histoire de l'Italie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histoire_de_l%27Italie
** Italie médiévale: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italie_m%C3%A9di%C3%A9vale
** Royaume d'Italie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royaume_d%27Italie_(888-1024)
** Maison d'Este: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maison_d%27Este.6 "

Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni was also known as Oberto I (?) Count of Milano.7,10 Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni was also known as Oberto I (?) Count of Lucca. GAV-29.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Oberto Obizzo I, +before 997, Marques in the Oriental Mark 962, Count of Luni 951; 1m: Willa or Guilla, dau.of Bonifacio II Duke of Spoleto by Vaudré of Bourgogne; 2m: N, a sister of Ugo Marques of Toscana, heiress of Este and Montagnana."2

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Malaspina 1 page (Malaspina: Linee Antiche): http://www.sardimpex.com/malaspina/malaspina1.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Malaspina 1 page (Malaspina family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/malaspina1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adalberto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00626059&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto Obizzo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00626060&tree=LEO
  6. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Oberto Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberto_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  7. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberto_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, http://www.sardimpex.com/Estensi/Obertenghi.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020666&tree=LEO
  11. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Adalberto I di Milano: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adalberto_I_di_Milano. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ObertoIILunidiedafter1013B
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%201100-1400.htm#AlbertoObertenghidied1024B
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#BertaLuniMGuibertoParma
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto Obizzo II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO

Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano1,2,3,4

M, #14179, b. circa 950, d. circa 1017
FatherOberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni1,5,6,7 b. c 920, d. 15 Oct 975
MotherWilla/Guilla di Bonifazio8,6,2,9
ReferenceGAV28
Last Edited1 Jun 2020
     Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano married Railinda (?) of Cuomo, daughter of Ripando (?) Count.1,5,10 Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano was born circa 950.5
Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano died circa 1017; Genealogics says d. ca 1017; Shamà says d. bef 19/12/1028.1,5,11
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "OBERTO [II], son of OBERTO OBIZZO [I] Conte di Luni & his wife --- (-after 1013). His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 975 under which "Adalbertus et Obertus germani Marchioni, filii bone memorie Oberti Marchionis et Comitis Palatio" granted rights to the bishop of Pisa[324]. Conte di Luni. Marchese. "Otbertus marchio filius quondam item Otberti itemque marchio" donated property to the Bishop of Luni by charter dated 998[325].
     "m ---. The name of Oberto´s wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[324] Muratori, L. A. (1773) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome I, p. 632.
[325] Muratori (Este), Parte I, p. 132.12


Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 41.13

; Per Genealogics:
     "Oberto was margrave of Milan. A member of the Obertenghi family, he succeeded his father Oberto Obizzo I as margrave after his father's death in 975, together with his brother Adalberto II. He was also count of Milan, Genoa and Bobbio. In 1002 he joined the revolt of Ardoino, count of Susa and Torino, against Emperor Heinrich II 'der Heilige'.
     "With his wife Railende of Como, Oberto had seven children, of whom his successor Alberto Azzo I and daughter Berte would have progeny. She married Olderich Manfred II, count of Susa.
     "Oberto died after 1014, possibly about 1017."5



; Per Shamà: "A2. Oberto II († ante 19.XII.1028), Marchese e Conte (985–1014); governa insieme al fratello sui comitati di Luni, Genova e Tortona con diritti anche su Parma e Piacenza, nonchè sui territori di Bobbio, Lavagna e Borgotaro; da lui discendono i marchesi Malaspina, gli Estensi e la Casa di Brunswick.
     a) = ……
     b) = 999 Railenda, figlia di Riprando Conte di Piacenza."11

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Oberto II d'Este (947-1014), est un noble italien de la lignée des Obertenghi, actif dans le nord de l'Italie entre 947 et 1014, à l'origine de la Maison d'Este.
Biographie
     "Issu d'une lignée de marquis et de comtes palatins, fils d'Oberto I, il hérite de son père, vers 975, d'importants domaines répartis dans le nord de la péninsule, ainsi que de titres et de charges liées à la maison royale.
     "Lors de la rébellion d’Arduin d’Ivrée, roi de Lombardie et usurpateur du trône d‘Italie, il s'engage à ses côtés avec ses deux fils Alberto Azzo et Hugues, encourant ainsi la disgrâce de la part de l'Empereur.
     "Un temps prisonnière d'Henri II du Saint-Empire et dépouillée de ses fiefs, la famille rentre en grâce vers l’an 1014.
     "Son fils, Alberto Azzo, sera à l'origine de la Maison d'Este.
liens internes
Maison d'Este: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maison_d%27Este."4

GAV-28. Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano was also known as Oberto II Marchese in Liguria. Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano was also known as Oberto Obizzo II Margrave of Milan.5 He was Marchese e conte between 985 and 1014.11

Family

Railinda (?) of Cuomo
Children

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ObertoIILunidiedafter1013B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Oberto II d'Este: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberto_II_d%27Este. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto Obizzo II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020666&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willa di Camerino: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020667&tree=LEO
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Oberto Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberto_Ier
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Railinda of Como: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00532945&tree=LEO
  11. [S4758] Genealogies delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane, online <http://www.sardimpex.com/>, http://www.sardimpex.com/Estensi/Obertenghi.asp. Hereinafter cited as Shamà: Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italiane.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ObertoIILunidiedafter1013B
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020673&tree=LEO
  15. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 182.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#Bertadied1037MManfredo

Railinda (?) of Cuomo1,2

F, #14180
FatherRipando (?) Count1,3,4
ReferenceGAV28
Last Edited14 Apr 2020
     Railinda (?) of Cuomo married Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano, son of Oberto Obizzo I (?) Marchese in the Eastern March, Conte di Luni and Willa/Guilla di Bonifazio.1,5,2
     GAV-28. Railinda (?) of Cuomo was also known as Railende (?)3

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Railinda of Como: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00532945&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Railende: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020671&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Riprandi: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020672&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto Obizzo II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ObertoIILunidiedafter1013B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020673&tree=LEO
  8. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 182.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#Bertadied1037MManfredo

Ripando (?) Count1

M, #14181
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited13 Jan 2004
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 41.2 GAV-30 EDV-30. Ripando (?) Count was also known as Riprandi (?)2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Riprandi: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020672&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Railende: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020671&tree=LEO

Bertha d'Este1,2

F, #14182, b. 997, d. between 29 December 1037 and 1040
FatherMarchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano1,2,3,4 b. c 950, d. c 1017
MotherRailinda (?) of Cuomo1,2,5,4
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Bertha d'Este was born in 997.4 She married Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa, son of Manfredo I (?) Count of Susa and Prangarda (?) of Reggio, between 1010 and 1014; Genealogis says m. 1010; Med Lands says m. 1014.6,7,2,4,8
Bertha d'Este died between 29 December 1037 and 1040; Genealogics says d. 1029; Med Lands says d. "29 Dec 1037/1040."9,4
     GAV-27 EDV-27.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 41,60.2 Bertha d'Este was also known as Bertha degli Obertenghi.8

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Bertha of Milan or Bertha of Luni (c. 997-c. 1040),[1] was a duchess of Turin by marriage to Ulric Manfred II of Turin, and regent for her daughter Adelaide of Susa in 1033.
     "She is sometimes identified with the Bertha who was married to Arduin of Ivrea.[2]
Life
     "Although it is known that Bertha was a member of the Obertenghi dynasty, there is some debate about who her parents were. Her father is often said to be Oberto II,[3] but others argue that Bertha's father was in fact Otbert III of Milan.[4]
     "By 1014 at the latest, Bertha had married Ulric Manfred (that year, Emperor Henry II confirmed their joint donation to the abbey of Fruttuaria).[5] Her dowry included lands in the counties of Tortona, Parma and Piacenza.[6]
     "In May 1028 with her husband, Ulric Manfred, Bertha founded the convent of Santa Maria at Caramagna.[7] The following year, in July 1029, along with her husband and his brother, Bishop Alric of Asti, Bertha founded the Benedictine abbey in of S. Giusto in Susa, which housed the relics of Saint Just (San Giusto), presumed to be a martyred monk from the abbey of Novalesa.[8] The church of the Abbey of San Giusto is now Susa Cathedral.
     "After Ulric Manfred's death (in December 1033 or 1034), Bertha briefly acted as regent for their daughter, Adelaide of Susa.
     "In 1037 Bertha captured envoys who wished to cross the Alps from Piedmont to Champagne, thus foiling a conspiracy against Emperor Conrad II. Conrad II rewarded Bertha for her part in suppressing the rebellion against him by issuing an imperial diploma which confirmed her donations to the abbey of S. Giusto in Susa.[9]
Issue
     "With Ulric Manfred, Bertha had three daughters:[10]
** Adelaide
** Immilla
** Bertha

References
** H. Bresslau, Jahrbücher des Deutschen Reichs unter Konrad II., 2 vols. (1884), accessible online at: archive.org
** C.W. Previté-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy (1000-1233) (Cambridge, 1912), accessible online at: archive.org
** G. Sergi, ‘Una grande circoscrizione del regno italico: la marca arduinica di Torino,’ in Studi Medievali XII (1971), 637-712
** C. Violante, ‘Quelques caractéristiques des structures familiales en Lombardie, Emilie, et Toscane aux Xle et XII siècles,’ in G. Duby and J. le Goff, eds., Famille et parenté dans l’Occident médiéval (Paris, 1977), pp. 87–148.
** M. Nobili, ‘Formarsi e definirsi dei nomi di famiglia nelle stirpi marchionali dell’Italia centro-settentrionale: il caso degli Obertenghi,’ in Nobiltà e chiese nel medioevo e altri saggi, ed. C. Violante (Rome, 1993), pp. 77–95.
** G.C. Alessio, Cronaca di Novalesa (Turin 1982).
External links
** Medieval Lands Project: Northern Italy, 900–1100.
** Epistolae: Medieval Women’s Latin Letters: Bertha of the Obertenghi (brief biography of Bertha and translations of some legal documents issued by her)
** Bertha von Luni (c.980-1037) (in German)
Notes
1. Bresslau, Jahrbücher, I, p. 377
2. A. Thiele, Erzählende genealogische Stammtafeln zur europäischen Geschichte Band II, Teilband 2, table 395
3. e.g. Bresslau, Jahrbücher, I, esp. p. 416; Medieval Lands Project; Epistolae: Medieval Women's Latin Letters
4. Nobili, ‘Formarsi’; Violante, ‘Caractéristiques,’ esp. pp. 89, 95, 104ff., and 132ff.
5. Sergi, ‘Una grande circoscrizione,’ p. 661; Previté-Orton, Early History, p. 166
6. Previté-Orton, Early History, p. 164
7. The document which records this is available online in the Latin original and in an English translation, at: Epistolae: Medieval Women's Latin Letters
8. The document which records the foundation of San Giusto is available online in the Latin original and in an English translation, at: Epistolae: Medieval Women's Latin Letters. On the relics of Saint Just: Alessio, Cronaca, pp. 14-5.
9. Previté-Orton, Early History, pp. 207, 219f.
10. Bresslau, Jahrbücher, I, p. 378."10

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oberto Obizzo II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020670&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#Bertadied1037MManfredo. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Railende: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020671&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Olderich Manfred II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027350&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ManfredUdalricodied1034
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Milan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Susa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106729&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0002856&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00440275&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page - Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#AdelaidaSusadied1091
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080003&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#AemiliaSusaMOttoSchweinfurt

Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia1,2,3

F, #14183, b. after 1052, d. 1079
FatherOddon de Maurienne Marchese di Susa, Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais4,5,1,6,7,8 b. c 1020, d. 1 Mar 1060
MotherAdelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino4,5,1,6,9 b. c 1015, d. 19 Dec 1091
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia was born after 1052; Wikipedia says b. c 1050; Med Lands says b. 1052/53; Genealogics says b. aft 1052.5,1,2,6 She married Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect, son of Kuno (?) Count of Rheinfelden, in 1067;
His 2nd wifeGenealogics says m. 1067; med Lands says m. 1061/62.4,5,10,1,6
Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia died in 1079.4,5,1,2,6
Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia was buried in 1079 at Dom zu St. Blasien, Landkreis Waldshut, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1052
     DEATH     1079 (aged 26–27)
     Adelaide of Savoy was the daughter of Otto of Savoy and Adelaide of Susa. Around 1066 Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfelden, duke of Swabia. In 1069 Rudolf attempted to repudiate Adelaide for unfaithfulness. In 1071 Adelaide cleared herself of the accusation of adultery in the presence of Pope Alexander II. Rudolf was required to reconcile with Adelaide. In 1077, Rudolf was elected antiking of Germany, with Adelaide as his consort. With Rudolf, Adelaide had four children:
** Adelaide of Rheinfelden
** Bertha
** Otto (died young)
** Agnes
     Adelaide died in 1079 and was buried in the monastery of St. Blasien.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Othon of Savoy 1020–1060
          Adelaide di Susa 1014–1091
     Spouse
          Rudolf von Rheinfelden 1025–1080
     Siblings
          Pierre I of Savoy 1048–1078
          Amedee II of Savoy 1050–1080
          Bertha of Savoy 1051–1087
     Children
          Agnes von Rheinfelden 1070–1111
     BURIAL     Dom zu St. Blasien, Landkreis Waldshut, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 9 Apr 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 127715832.6,11
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide of Savoy (German: Adelheid von Turin; c.1050/2 – 1079),[1] a member of the Burgundian House of Savoy, was Duchess of Swabia from about 1062 until 1079 by her marriage with Rudolf of Rheinfelden, who also was elected German anti-king in 1077.
Biography
     "Adelaide's parents were Count Otto of Savoy and his wife Adelaide of Susa from the Arduinici noble family. Her maternal grandparents were Margrave Ulric Manfred II of Turin and Bertha of Milan. Adelaide was the younger sister of Bertha of Savoy, who was betrothed to the future king Henry IV of Germany in 1055.
     "According to the Europäische Stammtafeln genealogy, she first was married to Count Guigues I of Albon, though this assumption seems highly unlikely. Actually Adelaide, around 1060/62 and aged about ten, married the Swabian duke Rudolf of Rheinfelden.
     "In 1069 Rudolf attempted to repudiate Adelaide for an alleged affair with Count Werner of Habsburg.[2] In 1071 Adelaide cleared herself of the accusation of adultery in the presence of Pope Alexander II. Rudolf was required to reconcile with Adelaide.[3] At the same time, Henry IV attempted to repudiate her sister Bertha, also without success.
     "In 1077, an assembly of revolting German princes elected Rudolf anti-king. He was crowned by Archbishop Siegfried I of Mainz on March 26, with Adelaide as his consort. When the Great Saxon Revolt broke out, Adelaide remained in Swabia, defending her husband's lands, whilst Rudolf campaigned against Henry IV in Saxony.[4]
     "Adelaide died during the Easter period of 1079, apart from her husband at Hohentwiel Castle. She was buried in the monastery of St. Blasien.
Issue
     "With Rudolf, Adelaide had at least four children:
1. Agnes of Rheinfelden, married Berthold II of Zähringen
2. Adelaide of Rheinfelden, married King Ladislaus I of Hungary
3. Bertha of Rheinfelden, Countess of Kellmünz, married Ulrich X, Count of Bregenz
4. Otto (died young)
5. Berthold of Rheinfelden (disputed)
Notes
1. Hlawitschka, ‘Zur Herkunft,' pp. 180, 189; Previté-Orton, Early History, p. 205
2. Hlawitschka, ‘Zur Herkunft,’ pp. 191ff; Creber, Alison (2019-04-22). "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do: Dissolving Royal and Noble Marriages in Eleventh-Century Germany". German History. 37 (2): 149–171. doi:10.1093/gerhis/ghy108. ISSN 0266-3554..
3. Previté-Orton, Early History, p. 232
4. Bernold, Chronicon, a.1077, 289; Meyer von Knonau, Jahrbücher, III, pp. 38f.
References
** E. Hlawitschka, ‘Zur Herkunft und zu den Seitenverwandten des Gegenkönigs Rudolf,’ in Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp. 175–220
** H. Bresslau, Jahrbücher des Deutschen Reichs unter Konrad II., 2 vols. (1884), accessible online at: archive.org
** C.W. Previté-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy (1000-1233) (Cambridge, 1912), accessible online at: archive.org
** Bernold of Constance, Chronicon, in Die Chroniken Bertholds von Reichenau und Bernolds von Konstanz 1054-1100, ed. I.S. Robinson, MGH SS rer Germ NS 14 (Hannover, 2003), pp. 383-540.
** G. Meyer von Knonau, Jahrbücher des Deutschen Reiches unter Heinrich IV und Heinrich V, 7 vols (Leipzig, 1890-1909).
External links
** Medieval Lands Project: Northern Italy, 900–1100.: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Adelaidedied1079
** Adelheid von Turin, deutsche Königin (in German): http://www.manfred-hiebl.de/genealogie-mittelalter/deutschland_koenige_2/adelheid_deutsche_koenigin_1079_savoyen_rheinfelden/adelheid_von_turin_deutsche_koenigin_+_1079.html."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:190.1 EDV-27.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adélaïde de Savoie ou Adélaïde de Maurienne, née avant ou vers 1052 et morte vers 1079, est une aristocrate issue de la dynastie des Humbertiens, fille du comte Othon Ier (v. 1023-1060) et de sa femme Adélaïde de Suse (1016-1091). Elle épouse Rodolphe de Rheinfelden, duc de Souabe de 1057 à 1079 et antiroi des Romains de 1077 à 1080.
Origine
     "Adélaïde de Maurienne, dite de Savoie, est née à une date inconnue, la tradition donne cependant 1052. Elle est la fille du comte en Maurienne et marquis de Suse et d'Italie Othon Ier, issu de la dynastie des Humbertiens, et de Adélaïde de Suse, de la lignée des marquis arduinides1,2. Elle relève le prénom de sa mère2.
     "Elle est la sœur de Pierre, qui succède à son père à la tête de la principauté, et d'Amédée qui relève son frère, de Othon ou Odon, évêque d’Asti et de Berthe de Turin, qui épouse en 1066 Henri de Franconie, futur empereur1. Cette dernière est parfois appelée Adélaïde de Turin.
Mariage avec Rodolphe de Rheinfelden
     "Adélaïde de Savoie épouse vers 1061/62 (site de généalogie Foundation for Medieval Genealogy)3 ou 1067 (le site sabaudia.org)1, Rodolphe de Rheinfelden, duc de Souabe1. Il s'agit du second mariage pour Rodolphe de Rheinfelden, qui avait épousé à la suite de son Mathilde de Franconie, fille de Henri III du Saint-Empire, décédée en 10601.
     "On attribue parfois à Adélaïde un mariage avec Guigues II d'Albon, nommé Guigues IV sur les sites sabaudia.org1 ou celui de la Foundation for Medieval Genealogy3.
     "Le couple a six enfants1,4 :
** Adélaïde (1063/1065 † 3 mai 1090), mariée en 1077 à Ladislas Ier, roi de Hongrie ;
** Berthold († 18 mai 1090), duc de Souabe ;
** Agnès († 19 décembre 1119), mariée à Berthold II de Zähringen, duc de Souabe ;
** Berthe, mariée à Ulrich X, comte de Bregenz ;
** Otton ;
** Bruno, moine à Hirsau, puis abbé d'Ussenhofen.

     "De 1077 à 1080, son époux, le duc Rodolphe de Rheinfelden, appuyé par le pape Grégoire VII, revendiqua la couronne impériale contre Henri IV, époux de sa sœur Berthe.
Voir aussi
Articles connexes
** Maison de Savoie
** Femmes de la Maison de Savoie
** Histoire de la Savoie au Moyen Âge
** Maison de Hohenstaufen
** Duché de Souabe
Notes et références
1. André Palluel-Guillard, « La Maison de Savoie » [archive], sur le site des Archives départementales de la Savoie et de la Haute-Savoie - Sabaudia.org (consulté le 29 avril 2015), dont la fiche « Othon (Odo, Oddon) » page 6.
2. Laurent Ripart, « La tradition d'Adélaïde dans la maison de Savoie », dans Patrick Corbet, Monique Goullet, Dominique Iogna-Prat, Adélaïde de Bourgogne. Genèse et représentations d'une sainteté impériale, Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques / Éditions universitaires de Dijon, coll. « CTHS Histoire », 2002, 230 p. (ISBN 2-7355-0497-2, lire en ligne [archive]), p. 61.
3. (en) Charles Cawley, « Adelaide » [archive], sur sur fmg.ac/MedLands (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy) (consulté en avril 2020).
4. (en) Charles Cawley, « Rudolf von Rheinfelden » [archive], sur sur fmg.ac/MedLands (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy) (consulté en avril 2020)."3

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIDE ([1052/53]-[Schloß Twiel] early 1079, bur St Blasius). The Annales of Berthold, which record the death in 1079 of "uxor…regis Roudolfi…Adelheit, filia Adelheidæ marchionissæ, soror Berhtæ reginæ uxoris Heinrici", confirm that Adelaide was the daughter of Adelaida di Susa[139]. Adelaide's daughter Adelheid is named with "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" in a charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086][140]. It is assumed that she was the daughter of her mother's third marriage but this is not certain. Europäische Stammtafeln[141] shows Adelaide's birth date as "after 1052", presumably based on the likelihood that she was born after her sister Berthe, as Heinrich IV King of Germany would presumably have married the older daughter. Concerning her marriage date, it is likely that the marriage took place after the marriage of her sister, assuming that Oddon was her father. She is named "Adalheid coniux Ruodulfi ducis" in the Annales Weissemburgenses, which record that she was accused of being unchaste, was repudiated by her husband two years later, but that Pope Alexander arranged a reconciliation, dated to [1069/71][142]. A continuation of the Annales of St Gallen records that “uxor Rudolphi ducis” was accused of adultery with “Werinhario commite suo cognato”[143]. The Annales of Berthold record that "rex…Roudolfus…uxor" was "in partes Burgundiæ a Turego divertens", suffering "iniurias" in "quodam castello suo"[144]. The wife of "Rudolfus rex de Arle" is named "Adelheidis" in a list of founders of the monastery of St Peter in Schwarzwald[145]. The Annales Sancti Blasii record the death in 1079 of "Adelheit uxor Roudolfi regis" and her burial "apud Sanctum Blasium"[146]. The Annales of Berthold record the death in 1079 of "uxor…regis Roudolfi…Adelheit, filia Adelheidæ marchionissæ, soror Berhtæ reginæ uxoris Heinrici" and her burial "ad monasterium Sancti Blasii"[147].
     "[m firstly (divorced) as his first wife, GUIGUES [IV] "Pinguis" Comte d'Albon, son of GUIGUES [III] "Vetus" [d'Albon] & his wife Adelais --- ([1025/30]-[1075]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[148], Adelaide married firstly Guigues Comte d'Albon. Another table in Europäische Stammtafeln shows the first wife of Guigues Comte d'Albon as "Adelais (von Turin)" and their son Guigues II Comte d'Albon as co-heir of Adelaida Marchese di Susa in 1091[149]. The basis for this alleged first marriage has not been found, but it is unlikely to be correct considering the estimated birth date of Adelaide.]
     "m ([1061/62]) as his second wife, RUDOLF von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia, son of KUNO Graf & his wife --- (before 1027-killed in battle near Hohenmölsen, Merseburg [15/16] Oct 1080, bur Merseburg Cathedral). He was elected King of Germany in 1077. "
Med Lands cites:
[139] Bertholdi Annales 1079, MGH SS V, p. 319.
[140] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[141] ES II 190.
[142] Annales Weissemburgenses 1069 and 1071, MGH SS III, p. 71.
[143] St. Galler Annalen 1054-1102, Staat- und Stadtbibliothek Augsburg Hs 2° Cod. 254, fol. 17r, lines 9-15, consulted at (12 Sep 2016), passage transcribed at Hlawitschka ‘Rheinfelden’ (1991), p. 192. I am grateful to Matthias Zimmermann for locating the digital copy of this source.
[144] Bertholdi Annales 1077, MGH SS V, p. 298.
[145] Nomina Fundatorum huius loci Monasterii Sancti Petri in Nigri Silva, which follows Genealogia Zaringorum, MHG SS XIII, p. 736.
[146] Annales Sancti Blasii 1079, MGH SS XVII, p. 277.
[147] Bertholdi Annales 1079, MGH SS V, p. 319.
[148] ES II 190 and ES XII 95A (Die Grafen von Rheinfelden).
[149] ES III 738 (Les Comtes d'Albon).6
Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia was also known as Adélaïde de Maurienne.4,5,3

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Adelaide, *after 1052, +1079; 1m: Cte Guigues IV d'Albon; 2m: 1067 Rudolf von Rheinfelden, Duke of Swabia, German King (*by 1027 +15.10.1080.)5"

Family

Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect b. bt 1020 - 1025, d. 15 Oct 1080
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00496755&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Savoy,_Duchess_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Adélaïde de Savoie (1052-1079): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_de_Savoie_(1052-1079). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  4. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Adelaidedied1079. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Oddondied1060A
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027351&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027261&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 April 2020), memorial page for Adelaide of Savoy (1052–1079), Find a Grave Memorial no. 127715832, citing Dom zu St. Blasien, Landkreis Waldshut, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/127715832/adelaide-of_savoy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BerthaRheinfeldenMUlrichBregenz
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RudolfRheinfeldendied1080
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Rheinfelden
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied1079

Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect1,2

M, #14184, b. between 1020 and 1025, d. 15 October 1080
FatherKuno (?) Count of Rheinfelden3,4,5,6 b. bt 990 - 1000, d. 1026
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect was born between 1020 and 1025; Savoy 1 page says b. bef 1027; Genealogy.EU says b. 1020; Genealogics says b. c 1025.7,8,2 He married Mathilde (?) of Germany, daughter of Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress, in 1059;
His 1st wife.9,7,2,5,10 Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect married Adelheid/Adélaïde (?) de Savoie, Duchess of Swabia, daughter of Oddon de Maurienne Marchese di Susa, Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais and Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino, in 1067;
His 2nd wifeGenealogics says m. 1067; med Lands says m. 1061/62.1,8,2,11,12
Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect died in 1080; killed in battle.6
Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect died on 15 October 1080 at Merseburg, Saalekreis, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany (now); Per Genealogics: "Emboldened, his forces met Heinrich's at the Elster River. The battle, which took place on 14 October 1080, would have been a huge victory for the anti-royalists. However, in the battle Rudolf lost his right hand and was mortally wounded in the abdomen. He withdrew to nearby Merseburg, where he died the next day and was buried.1,7,8,2
Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect was buried after 15 October 1080 at Cathedral of Merseburg, Merseburg, Saalekreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1025
     DEATH     16 Oct 1080 (aged 54–55)
     Royalty, Duke of Swabia and Count of Rheinfelden, from 1077 until his death German antiking.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Adelaide of Savoy 1052–1079
     Children
          Agnes von Rheinfelden 1070–1111
     Children
          Agnes von Rheinfelden 1070–1111
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Merseburg, Merseburg, Saalekreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Dec 2009
     Find a Grave Memorial 46107569.13
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Adelaide, *after 1052, +1079; 1m: Cte Guigues IV d'Albon; 2m: 1067 Rudolf von Rheinfelden, Duke of Swabia, German King (*by 1027 +15.10.1080.)8"

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 4.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Rudolf was born about 1025, the son of Kuno, Graf von Rheinfelden. In 1057 Rudolf allegedly took advantage of the minority of German King Heinrich IV by kidnapping Mathilde, the king's sister. Rudolf demanded, and received, Mathilde's hand in marriage (in 1059), as well as the duchy of Swabia and administration of the kingdom of Burgundy. In 1060 Mathilde died, after giving birth to a daughter Agnes. In 1066 Rudolf married Adelheid, daughter of Otto, comte de Savoie, and Adelaide de Susa, Markgräfin von Susa, Herrin von Torino.
     "Rudolf was a two-time brother-in-law to Heinrich IV, and he at first supported the king's campaigns. He aided him in Thuringia and Saxony and was a primary force in the First Battle of Langensalza against the rebels. However, when the Investiture Controversy broke out and Heinrich was excommunicated, Rudolf met with several other nobles to decide on a course of action. Despite the lifting of Heinrich's excommunication in 1077, the rebels continued with their plans. At Forchheim, Rudolf was elected anti-king in March. He promised to respect the electoral concept of the monarchy and declared his willingness to be subservient to the pope.
     "In May 1077 Rudolf was crowned at Mainz, but the people of the city revolted and he was forced to flee to Saxony. This presented a problem, since Saxony was cut off from his duchy of Swabia by the king's lands. He then gave Swabia to his son Berthold and attempted to rectify this situation by besieging Würzburg, but to little effect. Meanwhile he was deprived of Swabia by the Diet at Ulm in May, and Heinrich IV gave the duchy to Friedrich von Büren, the first Hohenstaufen ruler.
     "The battle of Mellrichstadt (7 August 1078) proved indecisive. Rudolf found it difficult to convince the Saxons to fight beyond their borders; they viewed Rudolf as a southerner and distrusted him. He was also frustrated by the apparent reluctance of the pope to recognise his cause. In order to gain and maintain supporters, he was forced to grant large parts of the crown lands, as well as those of the Church, to his followers. Nevertheless, things seemed to be improving in 1080. The battle of Flarchheim (27 January 1080) went in his favour. On 7 March the pope finally excommunicated Heinrich again and recognised Rudolf as king.
     "Emboldened, his forces met Heinrich's at the Elster River. The battle, which took place on 14 October 1080, would have been a huge victory for the anti-royalists. However, in the battle Rudolf lost his right hand and was mortally wounded in the abdomen. He withdrew to nearby Merseburg, where he died the next day and was buried. The rebellion against King Heinrich soon evaporated."2 GAV-26.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Rudolf of Rheinfelden (c.?1025 – 15 October 1080) was Duke of Swabia from 1057 to 1079. Initially a follower of his brother-in-law, the Salian emperor Henry IV, his election as German anti-king in 1077 marked the outbreak of the Great Saxon Revolt and the first phase of open conflict in the Investiture Controversy between Emperor and Papacy. After a series of armed conflicts, Rudolf succumbed to his injuries after his forces defeated Henry's in the Battle on the Elster.
Life
     "Rudolf was the son of the Swabian count (Graf) Kuno of Rheinfelden. He was first mentioned in a 1048 deed issued by the Salian emperor Henry III as a count in the Swabian Sisgau on the High Rhine (in present-day Northwestern Switzerland), an estate then held by the Prince-Bishopric of Basel.[1] Rudolf's family had large possessions up to Sankt Blasien Abbey in the Black Forest and down to the Aargau beyond the border with the Kingdom of Burgundy. He probably was related to King Rudolph II of Burgundy (d. 937), the Dukes of Lorraine and the Ottonian dynasty.
Duke of Swabia
     "When Duke Otto III of Swabia died without male heirs in 1057, Empress Agnes, consort of late Henry III, appointed him Swabian duke and administrator of Burgundy.[2] Rivalling with the Zähringen count Berthold, Rudolf according to Frutolf of Michelsberg had taken advantage of the minority of Agnes' son Henry IV, elected King of the Romans, by kidnapping his sister Matilda of Swabia.[3] Rudolf demanded, and received, Matilda's hand in marriage (1059).[4] In 1061 Berthold received the Duchy of Carinthia instead. When Matilda died in 1060, Rudolf subsequently, in 1066, married Adelaide of Savoy (d. 1079), a daughter of Count Otto of Savoy and Adelaide of Susa.[5] When Adelaide's sister Bertha of Savoy married Henry IV in 1066, Rudolf became brother-in-law to the king twice over.
     "During Agnes' regency, the Princes of the Holy Roman Empire could further strengthen their position against the Imperial authority. In the 1062 Coup of Kaiserswerth, several princes led by Archbishop Anno II of Cologne even abducted the minor king to enforce the surrender of the Imperial Regalia. When Henry came of age in 1065, he continued the policies of his father against the reluctant Saxon nobility, sparking the Saxon Rebellion in 1073. While other princes like the Carinthian duke Berthold of Zähringen or Duke Welf of Bavaria distanced themselves, Rudolf supported Henry's campaigns in Thuringia, when he was a primary force in the 1075 Battle of Langensalza against the insurgents. However, after the joint victory, Rudolf became estranged to the king and rumours occurred that he was involved in adversarial conspiracies. Empress Agnes repeatedly had to arbitrate between the parties.[6]
     "Finally when the Investiture Controversy broke out and King Henry was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII in February 1076, Duke Rudolf met with Berthold, Welf and several other princes in Trebur in order to decide on a course of action and to arrange a new election. Henry, observing the proceedings from his camp in Oppenheim on the other side of the Rhine, had to face a massive loss of support among the German nobles and realized that he had to achieve the lifting of his ban. Pope Gregory agreed to meet with the princes at Augsburg in February 1077.
Anti-king
     "Already in January, Henry hastened to see the pope on his way to the Empire from Rome. Duke Rudolf attempted to have the Alpine passes closed, nevertheless the king through wintry weather made his Walk to Canossa, where Gregory, fearing an armed attack by Henry's forces, had found refuge with Matilda of Tuscany. By doing penance, Henry managed to achieve absolution, buying time at the price of his reputation and secular authority. The rebels continued with their plans. Rudolf was elected anti-king on 15 March 1077 at the Kaiserpfalz in Forchheim, where already Louis the Child and Conrad I of Germany had been crowned. The first anti-king in the history of the Empire, he promised to respect the investiture solely according to canon law, as well as the concept of the elective monarchy. Further claims raised by the princes were rejected as simony by the attendant papal legates.
     "Rudolf was supported by the Archbishops of Mainz, Salzburg and Magdeburg as well as by the Dukes of Carinthia and Bavaria, the Saxon rebel Otto of Nordheim and possibly also by Duke Magnus of Saxony. He proceeded to Mainz, where on 25 May he was crowned by Archbishop Siegfried I, but soon after was forced to flee to Saxony, when the Mainz citizens revolted. This presented a problem, since the Saxon duchy was cut off from his Swabian homelands by the king's Salian territory. Moreover, the pope avoided taking sides and adopted a waiting attitude. Rudolf was accused of greed, treason and usurpation by Henry's liensmen, while his own support crumbled.[7]
Later life
     "Rudolf gave Swabia to his son Berthold and attempted to rectify his situation by stalking Henry's forces near Würzburg, but to little effect. Meanwhile, he was deprived of Swabia by the Hoftag diet at Ulm in May, and the king gave the duchy to Frederick of Büren, the first Hohenstaufen ruler.
     "The next year Henry waged a successful campaign to Bavaria, while Pope Gregory rejected to excommunicate Rudolf. The Battle of Mellrichstadt on 7 August 1078 proved indecisive: though the opposition forces under Otto of Nordheim were victorious, the troops of Berthold and Welf were stuck in a peasants' revolt. Rudolf found it difficult to convince the Saxons to fight beyond their borders; they viewed him as a southerner and distrusted him. He was also frustrated by the apparent reluctance of the pope to recognize his cause. In order to gain and maintain supporters, he was forced to grant large parts of the crown lands, as well as those of the church, to his followers. Nevertheless, things seemed to be improving in 1080. The battle of Flarchheim (27 January 1080) went well in his favor. On 7 March, the pope excommunicated Henry again and recognized Rudolf as king.
     "Emboldened, Rudolf's forces met Henry's at the White Elster river in the Battle of Elster. The battle, which took place on 14 October 1080, would have been a huge victory for the anti-royalists. However, Rudolf lost his right hand in the battle and was mortally wounded in the abdomen. He withdrew to nearby Merseburg, where he died the next day and was buried. The majority of the support for the rebellion against Henry IV soon evaporated, but the struggle continued on in effect into 1085, with a final flare up in 1088 under Rudolph's successor, the second anti-king, Herman of Luxembourg.
Issue
     "With his second wife, Adelaide, Rudolf had at least four (and perhaps five) children:
** Agnes of Rheinfelden, married Berthold II of Zähringen
** Adelaide of Rheinfelden, married King Ladislaus I of Hungary
** Bertha of Rheinfelden, Countess of Kellmünz, married Ulrich X, Count of Bregenz
** Otto (died young)
** Berthold of Rheinfelden (the identity of Berthold's mother is disputed)

Notes
1. Bresslau and Kehr, Die Urkunden Heinrichs III, no. 219 (1 June 1048), p. 292
2. Black-Veldtrupp, Kaiserin Agnes, p. 109.
3. Ekkehardi Uraugiensis chronica. In: Georg Heinrich Pertz et al. (ed.): Scriptores (in Folio) 6: Chronica et annales aevi Salici. Hanover, 1844, pp. 198 (Monumenta Germaniae Historica, 198 digitalised)
4. Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln, table 12.
5. Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln, table 95A; Creber, Alison (22 April 2019). "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do: Dissolving Royal and Noble Marriages in Eleventh-Century Germany". German History. 37 (2): 149–171. doi:10.1093/gerhis/ghy108. ISSN 0266-3554..
6. Black-Veldtrupp, Kaiserin Agnes, p. 304.
7. Vita Heinrici IV. imperatoris, ch. 4, p. 17; Liber de unitate ecclesiae, I 13.
References
** M. Black-Veldtrupp, Kaiserin Agnes (1043-1077). Quellenkritische Studien (Cologne, 1995).
** D. Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten. Neue Folge Band XII, Schwaben
** E. Hlawitschka, ‘Zur Herkunft und zu den Seitenverwandten des Gegenkönigs Rudolf,’ in Die Salier und das Reich, vol. 1: Salier, Adel und Reichsverfassung, ed. S. Weinfurter with H. Kluger (Sigmaringen, 1991), pp. 175-220.
** T. Struve, ‘Das Bild des Gegenkönigs Rudolf von Schwaben in der zeitgenössischen Historiographie,’ in Ex ipsis rerum documentis. Festschrift für Harald Zimmermann zum 65. Geburtstag, ed. K. Herbers, H. H. Kortüm, C. Servatius (Sigmaringen, 1991), pp. 459-475.
Sources
** Robinson, Ian Stuart (2002). Bertholds und Bernolds Chroniken. Lateinisch und deutsch (in German). Darmstadt: Wiss. Buchgesellschaft. pp. 35–277. ISBN 3-534-01428-6.
** H. Bresslau and P. Kehr, eds., Die Urkunden Heinrichs III, MGH Diplomata 5 (Berlin, 1931).
** Vita Heinrici IV. imperatoris, ed., W. Eberhard, MGH Script. rer. Germ. 58 (Hannover and Leipzig, 1899).
** Liber de unitate ecclesiae conservanda in W. Schwenenbecher, ed., MGH Libelli, 2 (Hannover, 1892), pp. 184-284."14

; Per Med Lands:
     "RUDOLF von Rheinfelden, son of KUNO Graf von Rheinfelden & his wife --- (-killed in battle near Hohenmölsen near Merseburg [15/16] Oct 1080, bur Merseburg cathedral). A Habsburg genealogy records that "Chono comes de Rinfelden" was father of "Rudolfum regem"[465]. [Graf im Sisgau: Emperor Heinrich III confirmed various properties to Basel cathedral, including property “in pago Sysgowe in villis Melin et Gurbulun [Möhlin, Görbelhof] in comitatu Rudolfi comitis”, by charter dated 1 Jun 1048[466]. Hlawitschka suggests that the proximity of Sisgau to Rheinfelden may indicate that “Rudolfi comitis” was Rudolf Graf von Rheinfelden[467].] He was installed as Duke of Swabia in 1057 by Agnes de Poitou, widow of Emperor Heinrich III[468]. Frutolf von Michelsberg’s Chronicon Wirziburgense records in 1057 the death of “Otto de Svinfurte dux Suevorum IV Kal Oct“ and the appointment of “Ruodolfus de Rinveldon qui postea rex esse contendit”[469]. He became rector of Burgundy, entrusted with the administration of the kingdom, in 1060[470]. He introduced the stricter monastic rules from Fruttuaria[471] into the monastery of St Blasien in 1072. He was one of the nobles opposed to his brother-in-law King Heinrich IV. He was elected as RUDOLF King of Germany at Forcheim in Feb 1077 by the German nobility who were affronted by Pope Gregory VI's withdrawal of the order of excommunication against King Heinrich[472]. The Pope remained neutral, but after the king's defeat near Flarcheim on the Unstrut 27 Jan 1080, he renewed the excommunication of the king and impliedly declared support for Rudolf as anti-king by granting remission to the sins of Rudolf's supporters[473]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death "1080 Id Oct" of "Roudolfus rex", and his burial "apud Merseburc"[474]. The necrology of St Peter im Schwarzwald records the death "XVII Kal Nov" of "Ruodolfus rex"[475]. The identification of this entry with Rudolf von Rheinfelden is rendered more probable by another entry referring to his daughter Agnes as "filia Ruodolfi regis de Arle".
     "m firstly (1059) MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou (1045-12 May 1060). The Annales of Berthold record the marriage in 1059 of "Roudolfus Alemmanorum dux" and "Mahthildam, Heinrici regis sororem" and the death in 1060 of "Mahthilt soror regis"[476]. The Annales Sancti Blasii record the marriage in 1059 of "Roudolfus dux" and "Mahtildam regis sororem", and the death of "Mahtilt uxor Roudolfi ducis" in 1060[477].
     "m secondly ([1061/62]) ADELAIDE de Savoie, daughter of ODDON Comte de Chablais, Marchese di Susa & his wife Adelaida Marchesa di Susa ([1052/53]-[Schloß Twiel] early 1079, bur St Blasius). The Annales of Berthold, which record the death in 1079 of "uxor…regis Roudolfi…Adelheit, filia Adelheidæ marchionissæ, soror Berhtæ reginæ uxoris Heinrici", prove that she was the daughter of Adelaida di Susa[478]. Her daughter Adelheid is named with "progenitoribus Rodolfo…rege et Adelheida…regina matertera Heinrici quarti inperatoris" in a charter dated [1079/10 Oct 1086][479]. Europäische Stammtafeln[480] shows Adelaide's birth date as "after 1052", presumably based on the likelihood that she was born after her sister Berthe as Heinrich IV King of Germany would no doubt have married the older daughter. Concerning her marriage date, it is likely that the marriage took place after the marriage of her older sister. She is named "Adalheid coniux Ruodulfi ducis" in the Annales Weissemburgenses, which records that she was accused of being unchaste, was repudiated by her husband two years later, but that Pope Alexander arranged a reconciliation, dated to [1069/71][481]. A continuation of the Annales of St Gallen records that “uxor Rudolphi ducis” was accused of adultery with “Werinhario commite [presumably Werner Graf von Habsburg] suo cognato”[482]. The Annales of Berthold record that "rex…Roudolfus…uxor" was "in partes Burgundiæ a Turego divertens", suffering "iniurias" in "quodam castello suo"[483]. The wife of "Rudolfus rex de Arle" is named "Adelheidis" in a list of founders of the monastery of St Peter in Schwarzwald[484]. The Annales Sancti Blasii record the death in 1079 of "Adelheit uxor Roudolfi regis" and her burial "apud Sanctum Blasium"[485]. The Annales of Berthold record the death in 1079 of "uxor…regis Roudolfi…Adelheit, filia Adelheidæ marchionissæ, soror Berhtæ reginæ uxoris Heinrici" and her burial "ad monasterium Sancti Blasii"[486]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[487], Adelaide married firstly Guigues Comte d'Albon. Another table in Europäische Stammtafeln[488] shows the first wife of Guigues Comte d'Albon as "Adelais (von Turin)" and their son Guigues II Comte d'Albon as co-heir of Adelaida Marchese di Susa in 1091. The basis for this alleged first marriage has not been found but it is unlikely to be correct considering Adelaide's likely birth date."
Med Lands cites:
[465] Schaffhausen, Rheinau und Muri: Acta Murensia, I. p. 3.
[466] MGH DD H III, 219, p. 291.
[467] Hlawitschka ‘Rheinfelden’ (1991), p. 182.
[468] Haverkamp (1988), p. 107.
[469] Hlawitschka ‘Rheinfelden’ (1991), p. 180, quoting Schmale, F. J. & Schmale-Ott, I. (1972) Frutolfs und Ekkehards Chroniken und die anonyme Kaiserchronik (Darmstadt), p. 74. The Ekkehardi Chronicon Wirziburgense, MGH SS VI, p. 17, records only the death of “Ottho dux Suevorum”.
[470] Jackman, D. C. (1997) Criticism and Critique, sidelights on the Konradiner (Oxford Unit for Prosopographical Research), p. 109. According to Haverkamp (1988), p. 107, this appointment coincided with Rudolf's installation as Duke of Swabia in 1057.
[471] Haverkamp (1988), p. 187.
[472] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 67.
[473] Haverkamp (1988), p. 117.
[474] Bernoldi Chronicon 1080, MGH SS V, p. 436.
[475] Necrologium minus monasterii S Petri Nigræ Silvæ, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 334.
[476] Bertholdi Annales 1059 and 1060, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[477] Annales Sancti Blasii 1059 and 1060, MGH SS XVII, p. 277.
[478] Bertholdi Annales 1079, MGH SS V, p. 319.
[479] Braun, J. W. (ed.) (2003) Urkundenbuch des Klosters Sankt Blasien im Schwarzwald, Teil I ("Sankt-Blasien"), 33, p. 47.
[480] ES II 190.
[481] Annales Weissemburgenses 1069 and 1071, MGH SS III, p. 71.
[482] St. Galler Annalen 1054-1102, Staat- und Stadtbibliothek Augsburg Hs 2° Cod. 254, fol. 17r, lines 9-15, consulted at (12 Sep 2016), passage transcribed at Hlawitschka ‘Rheinfelden’ (1991), p. 192. I am grateful to Matthias Zimmermann for locating the digital copy of this source.
[483] Bertholdi Annales 1077, MGH SS V, p. 298.
[484] Nomina Fundatorum huius loci Monasterii Sancti Petri in Nigri Silva, which follows Genealogia Zaringorum, MGH SS XIII, p. 736.
[485] Annales Sancti Blasii 1079, MGH SS XVII, p. 277.
[486] Bertholdi Annales 1079, MGH SS V, p. 319.
[487] ES II 190 and ES XII 95A (Die Grafen von Rheinfelden).
[488] ES III 738 (Les Comtes d'Albon).5


; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Rodolphe de Rheinfelden (né vers 1025, et mort le 15 octobre 1080 à Hohenmölsen), fut duc de Souabe de 1057 à 1077. Du parti de son beau-frère le roi Henri IV, à l'origine, il est devenu un opposant notoire au cours de la querelle des Investitures et fut élu antiroi le 15 mars 1077. Après trois ans de conflit armé entre les deux partis, la campagne de Rodolphe pris fin avec la bataille de Hohenmölsen où il perdit la vie.
Biographie
     "Le nom de Rodolphe, fils du comte Cunon de Rheinfelden, apparaît pour la première fois dans un document émis par l'empereur Henri III en 1048. Ses ancêtres étaient à la tête du landgraviat de Sisgau (dans l'actuelle Suisse du Nord-Ouest) à la limite du duché de Souabe et du royaume d'Arles. La noble famille vient de la Haute-Bourgogne et est apparentée au roi Rodolphe II († 937). Rodolphe de Rheinfelden dispose désormais de tous les atouts pour une fonction royale.
Duc de Souabe
     "À la mort du duc Otton III de Souabe en 1057, Rodolphe profitant de la minorité d’Henri IV, alors roi des Romains, a été nommé duc de Souabe et également administrateur du royaume d'Arles par l'impératrice Agnès. Tous deux ont des liens particuliers avec l'abbaye Saint-Blaise dans la Forêt-Noire et des réformes grégoriennes. Toutefois, l'attribution de Souabe provoqua la résistance de Berthold de Zähringen qui reçoit en compensation le duché de Carinthie.
     "Pour consolider les liens entre Rodolphe et la dynastie franconienne, le nouveau duc se fiance avec Mathilde, la sœur du roi Henri IV. Selon la chronique de Frutolf de Michelsberg, il enleva la jeune fille, âgé de onze ans, confiée à l'évêque de Constance. Deux ans plus tard, il la demande en mariage, avec succès. Mathilde meurt en 1060, et Rodolphe épouse vers 1061/1062 Adélaïde, fille du comte Othon Ier de Savoie. Sa sœur Berthe de Savoie épouse Henri IV en 1066.
     "Deux fois beau-frère d’Henri IV, Rodolphe l’aide dans ses campagnes militaires en Thuringe et en Saxe. La régence de l'impératrice Agnès a conduit à une situation dans laquelle les princes ont joué un rôle déterminant dans la politique impériale. Rodolphe se livra au renversement des archevêques Annon II de Cologne et Adalbert de Brême, et contribue notamment à la lutte contre les forces de l'opposition saxonne culminant dans la révolte des Saxons à partir de 1073. Le 9 juin 1075, il mena les forces souabes à la victoire de Langensalza. À cette époque-là déjà, toutefois, il aurait conspiré avec les ducs Berthold de Carinthie et Welf de Bavière.
Antiroi
     "Le vent ne tourna qu'à la suite de la querelle des Investitures et de l’excommunication d’Henri IV par le pape Grégoire VII le 2 février 1076. Lors d'une réunion à Trebur en octobre, Rodolphe se met à comploter avec d’autres nobles dont Werner Ier de Habsbourg. Un délai a été fixé au roi jusqu'à février 1077 qui obligea Henri à faire la pénitence de Canossa. Rodolphe a cherché en vain à couper le passage du roi et la levée de l’excommunication ne lui fit pas abandonner son plan. Le 15 mars 1077 à Forchheim en Franconie, il est élu le premier antiroi de l'histoire allemande. Rodolphe a reçu le soutien des chefs ecclésiastiques de Mayence, de Salzbourg et de Magdebourg, ainsi que de Worms, de Passau, d'Halberstadt et de Wurtzbourg, à côté des princes séculiers Otton de Nordheim, Berthold de Carinthie et Welf de Bavière. Il s’engage à respecter le caractère électoral de la monarchie et à rester soumis au pape afin de conforter sa position.
     "Son couronnement a lieu au mois le 26 mars à Mayence par son partisan l'archévêque Sigefroi Ier, mais la population de la ville se soulève, et Rodolphe doit fuir en Saxe. La Saxe étant isolée de son duché de Souabe par les terres du roi, il laisse le duché de Souabe à son fils Berthold de Rheinfelden et met le siège devant Wurtzbourg, mais sans succès. Dans le même temps, la diète d’Ulm lui retire le duché de Souabe, qu’Henri IV confie à Frédéric de Hohenstaufen.
     "Le 7 août 1078, l’issue de la bataille de Mellrichstadt est indécise. Rodolphe peine à convaincre les Saxons de combattre au-delà de leurs frontières ; ils le considèrent comme un homme du sud et n’ont pas confiance en lui. Autre problème important, le pape refusa de reconnaître sa cause. Pour conserver le soutien des autres nobles, il doit leur accorder de larges portions du territoire royal ainsi que des biens d’Église. Cependant, les choses tournèrent en sa faveur en 1080 : il remporte la victoire de Flarchheim le 27 janvier 1080, et le 7 mars, le pape excommunie de nouveau Henri IV et reconnait Rodolphe comme roi des Romains et vassal du Saint-Siège.
     "Près de l’Elster, ses troupes affrontent de nouveau celles d’Henri IV le 14 octobre. Il remporte la victoire, mais perd la main droite dans la bataille et fut mortellement blessé à l’abdomen. Il se retire dans la ville voisine de Mersebourg, où il meurt le lendemain et est inhumé dans la cathédrale. La rébellion contre Henri IV s’éteint presque immédiatement.
Unions et postérité
     "Rodolphe de Rheinfelden épouse d'abord en 1059 Mathilde de Franconie (née en 1045 † 12 mai 1060). Puis en 1061/1062 Adélaïde de Savoie dont six enfants1:
** Adelaïde de Rheinfelden épouse en 1077 Ladislas Ier de Hongrie ;
** Berthold de Rheinfelden († 1090), duc de Souabe en 1077 puis en opposition de 1079 à 1090 ;
** Agnès († 1111), épouse de Berthold II de Zähringen, duc de Souabe en opposition de 1092 à 1098 ;
** Berthe († après 1128) épouse Ulrich (X) comte de Bregenz ;
** Othon († jeune) ;
** Bruno moine à l'abbaye de Hirsau.

     "Une autre source lui attribue une fille supplémentaire2: Qui vu les dates serait plutôt sa sœur (comme l'indique Medieval Lands).
** Tetberge épouse de Louis Ier de Faucigny († 1060), puis de Gérold II de Genève.

Notes et références
1. (en) Rudolf von Rheinfelden sur le site Medieval Lands [archive] .
2. Anthony Stokvis Manuel d'histoire, de généalogie et de chronologie de tous les états du monde, depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'à nos jours éditions Brill, Leyde 1890-93, préf. H. F. Wijnman, réédition 1966. Volume 3 chapitre VIII tableau généalogique n°86 « Généalogie des ducs de Souabe » p. 218
Voir aussi
Article connexe
** Adalbéron de Wurtzbourg
Bibliographie
** Joseph Calmette Le Reich allemand au Moyen-Âge Payot, Paris 1951."15 He was Duke of Swabia.6 Rudolf von Rheinfelden Herzog von Schwaben, Emperor Elect was also known as Rudolph (?) Duke of Swabia.6 He was King of Germany.7

; Per Genealogy.EU: "[2m.] Mathilde, *1048, +12.5.1060; m.1059 Rudolf of Swabia, King of Germany (*1020 +16.10.1080.)7" He was Herzog von Schwaben between 1057 and 1079.14

Family 1

Mathilde (?) of Germany b. 1045, d. 12 May 1060
Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf von Rheinfelden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027261&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00303368&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#dauKunoRheinfeldenMGeroldGeneve. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RudolfRheinfeldendied1080
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#MathildeMRudolfRheinfeldenSwabiadied1080.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00496755&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Adelaidedied1079
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 April 2020), memorial page for Rudolf von Rheinfelden (1025–16 Oct 1080), Find a Grave Memorial no. 46107569, citing Cathedral of Merseburg, Merseburg, Saalekreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46107569/rudolf-von_rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_of_Rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Rodolphe de Rheinfelden: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodolphe_de_Rheinfelden. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164901&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027261&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesRheinfeldendied1111
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BerthaRheinfeldenMUlrichBregenz
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Rheinfelden
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela von Rheinfelden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020748&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied1079

Luitgard (?) Gräfin von Nassau1

F, #14185, d. before 1222
FatherRuprecht III 'der Streitbare' (?) Graf von Nassau3 b. c 1130, d. bt 1190 - 1191
MotherElizabeth von Leiningen Gräfin von Schaumburg2 d. bt 1235 - 1238
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Luitgard (?) Gräfin von Nassau married Gebhard IV (?) Burggraf von Magdeburg between 1197 and 1202;
Her 1st husband.4 Luitgard (?) Gräfin von Nassau married Hermann III (?) Graf von Virneburg, son of Gottfried (?) Graf von Virneburg, in 1214;
Her 2nd husband.5
Luitgard (?) Gräfin von Nassau died before 1222.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 107.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band III, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1976, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 38.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Luitgard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105665&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Leiningen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105674&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruprecht III 'der Streitbare': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105673&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gebhard IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105664&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00107739&tree=LEO

Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor1,2,3

M, #14186, b. 1115, d. 1174
FatherIoannes/John II Dukas Comnenus Basileus of the East, Emperor or Byzantium1 b. 13 Sep 1087, d. 8 Apr 1143
MotherSaint Prisca/Piroska/Irene/Eirene (?) of Hungary1,3,4 b. 1078, d. 13 Aug 1134
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited4 Nov 2020
     Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor was born in 1115.2 He married Theodora Kamaterina in 1134; his 1st wife.2,3 Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor married Eirene Diplosynadene in 1146; his 2nd wife.2
Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor died in 1174; Genealogy EU says d. 1154-1174; Rudt-Collenberg says d. 1174.1,2,3
     EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Isaakios Komnenos, *1115, +1154/74; 1m: 1134 Theodora Kamaterina (+1144); 2m: 1146 Eirene Diplosynadene.2 Isaakios/Isaac Comnenus Sebastokartor was also known as Isaakios Komnenos Sebastokrator.2

Family 2

Eirene Diplosynadene
Children
  • Theodora Kalusine Comnena+3,8 b. bt 1145 - 1146, d. c 1182
  • Eudoxia Comnena+ b. 1167, d. c 1202; Byzant 1 page shows this Eudoxia to have been the dau. of Alexios Comnenus, Protostrator, Protosebastos (lover of Empress Maria) and his wife Maria Dukaina. Other (incl. Stewart) have argued that she is the dau. of Isaakios Komnenos, Sebastokrator and his 2nd wife, Eirene Diplosynadene5,9

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 1 page ("The Komnenos family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html#TKK
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eirene (Piroska) of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#MariaKdied1190. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Komnena: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330270&tree=LEO
  8. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  9. [S1699] Doug McDonald, "McDonald email 2 Jan 2005 email "Re: Alexios Komnenos, Protostrator 1136-1183"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "McDonald email 2 Jan 2005."

Eirene/Irene Tornikaina1

F, #14187, d. between 18 November 1183 and 1185
FatherDemetrios Tornikes2 d. bt 1201 - 1202
MotherNN Malakissa2
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Eirene/Irene Tornikaina married Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium, son of Andronikos Dukas Angelos and Euphrosyne Kastamonnitissa, before 1181; Genealogy.EU (Byzantium 4 page) says that Isaakios' first wife was unknown. Genealogics calls her "Herina (Eirene)" with no father identified. Med Lands names her as "[EIRENE] Tornikaina, daughter of DEMETRIOS Tornikes & his wife --- Malakissa."3,4,5,1
Eirene/Irene Tornikaina died between 18 November 1183 and 1185.3,2
     GAV-23 EDV-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "[EIRENE] (-[18 Nov] [1183/85]). The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[891]. This entry is discussed by Hiestand[892]. Bearing in mind the estimated date of death of Emperor Isaakios (see above), it is possible that 18 Nov commemorates the death of [Eirene], although it is also possible that the date commemorates some other family event. There remains some doubt about whether "Eirene" can have been the name of Isaakios's first wife as the original baptismal name of her daughter, "Maria regina", is also recorded as Eirene, the Byzantine naming practice not normally being to name children after their parents. One possibility is that [Eirene] died while giving birth to Eirene/Maria, as naming a child after a parent appears to have been acceptable practice in those circumstances. If that is correct, it is unlikely that [Eirene] died later than [1184] considering her daughter´s first marriage in 1192. Her family relationship with the Tornikes family is indicated by a document at Patmos which names Konstantinos Tornikes as uncle ("?????") of Emperor Alexios IV, dated to Dec 1203[893]. While the passage would not exclude Konstantinos being the husband either of a maternal or paternal aunt of the emperor, or indeed a more remote relation as the word "?????" could indicate a family relationship which is more distant than "uncle". Don Stone and Charles Owens, in their detailed analysis of all the relevant sources, argue convincingly that the most likely interpretation is that Konstantinos Tornikes was Emperor Alexios´s maternal uncle[894].
     "m (before 1181) as his first wife, ISAAKIOS Angelos, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204). He succeeded in 1185 as Emperor ISAAKIOS II.]"
Med Lands cites:
[891] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[892] Hiestand, R. Jarhbuch für österreichischen Byzantinistik 47 (1997), pp. 199-208.
[893] "Konstantinos 216" in PBW (2006.2), citing Branouse, E. and Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou, M. (1980) ????????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? 1. ?????????????, 2. ???????? ?????????? (Athens) Vol. 2, p. 131.14.
[894] Stone, D. C. & Owens, C. R. ´[Eirene?], First Wife of Emperor Isaakios II Angelos, is a Probable Tornikina and Gateway to Antiquity´, Foundations, Vol. 3, No. 5 (Jan 2011), p. 382, citing Darrouzès, J. (1970) Georges et Demetrios Tornikès, Lettres et discours, Introduction, texte, analyses, traduction et notes (Paris), pp. 349-69.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "ISAAKIOS Angelos ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204). Niketas Choniates names "Isaacius et Alexius" as sons of "Andronicus Angelus"[798]. As leader of the aristocrats against whom Emperor Andronikos I had struggled, he succeeded in 1185 on the latter's downfall as Emperor ISAAKIOS II. He immediately attacked the Normans, his general Alexios Branas defeating them at Mosynopolis and Dimitritsa 7 Nov 1185, which resulted in their expulsion from Thessaloniki, Durazzo and Corfu[799]. Isaakios also made peace with Béla III King of Hungary, sealed by the emperor's second marriage with the king's daughter. In 1186, he was faced with the rebellion of Alexios Branas, who had been sent to quell the Bulgarian rebellion of the brothers Ivan Asen and Teodor but, having penetrated rebel territory, used the army for his own interests and led it to Adrianople where he was proclaimed emperor. Branas marched on Constantinople, but was put to flight and killed by loyal forces[800]. Emperor Isaakios led his army personally against Bulgarian rebels, successfully driving them across the Danube. This was followed by further campaigns in Sep 1187 and 1188, but the emperor was forced to recognise Bulgarian independence under a peace treaty signed in 1188[801]. Tensions developed with Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa", leader of the Third Crusade, who had received a warm welcome in Serbia and had crossed into Byzantine territory at Brani?evo. Anxious to protect his interests, Isaakios signed a treaty of alliance with Saladin, which worsened the situation. After taking Philippopolis [Plovdiv] and Adrianople, as well as threatening Constantinople, Emperor Friedrich forced Emperor Isaakios to give him provisions and ships to cross into Asia Minor[802]. In Sep 1190, Byzantine troops defeated the Serbs at the Morava River, but although the Byzantines regained Niš, Beograd and northern Macedonia including Skopje, under the ensuing peace treaty, they were obliged to recognise Serb independence and Nemanja's right to rule Zeta, southern Dalmatia, Trebinje and Hum[803]. In retaliation for Bulgarian raids on Philippopolis, Sardika [Sofija] and Adrianople, Emperor Isaakios attacked Bulgaria but was heavily defeated in [1194] near Arcadiopolis[804]. The reign of Emperor Isaakios saw a major weakening of Byzantium and was marked by a rapid revival of corruption and administrative abuses, especially increased taxes to establish his luxurious court[805]. He was deposed 8 Apr 1195 by his older brother Alexios while preparing a further campaign against Bulgaria, and blinded. He was restored as emperor 17 Jul 1203 when the crusading army captured Constantinople and his brother Alexios III had fled, his son being named as co-emperor. Isaakios was deposed end-Jan 1204 in an anti-Latin revolt which broke out in Constantinople, and imprisoned once more. The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[806].
     "m firstly (before [1181]) [EIRENE] Tornikaina, daughter of DEMETRIOS Tornikes & his wife --- Malakissa (-[18 Nov] [1183/85]). The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[807]. Bearing in mind the estimated date of death of Emperor Isaakios (see above), it is possible that 18 Nov commemorates the death of [Eirene], although it is also possible that the date commemorates some other family event. There remains some doubt about whether "Eirene" can have been the name of Isaakios's first wife as the original baptismal name of her daughter, "Maria regina", is also recorded as Eirene, the Byzantine naming practice not normally being to name children after their parents. One possibility is that [Eirene] died while giving birth to Eirene/Maria, as naming a child after a parent appears to have been acceptable practice in those circumstances. If that is correct, it is unlikely that [Eirene] died later than [1184] considering her daughter’s first marriage in 1192. Her relationship with the Tornikes family is indicated by a document at Patmos which names Konstantinos Tornikes as uncle ("?????") of Emperor Alexios IV, dated to Dec 1203[808]. While the passage would not exclude Konstantinos being the husband either of a maternal or paternal aunt of the emperor, or indeed a more remote relation as the word "?????" could indicate a family relationship which is more distant than "uncle". Don Stone and Charles Owens, in their detailed analysis of all the relevant sources, argue convincingly that the most likely interpretation is that Konstantinos Tornikes was Emperor Alexios’s maternal uncle[809].
     "m secondly (1185) as her first husband, MARGIT of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[810]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry[811]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[812]. The special wedding tax levied to finance her elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[813]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[814]. She married secondly (May 1204) as his second wife, Bonifazio I Marchese di Monferrato, who wished thereby to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[815]. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[816]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[817]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[818]. She married thirdly (after Sep 1207) Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes. She was regent of Thessaloniki in 1207. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[819]."
Med Lands cites:
[798] Niketas Choniates, Imperium Alexii Comneni Porphyrogeniti Manuelis filii, 9, p. 319.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 9.
[800] Fine (1994), p. 14.
[801] Fine (1994), p. 15.
[802] Fine (1994), p. 24-25.
[803] Fine (1994), pp. 25-26.
[804] Fine (1994), p. 27.
[805] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[806] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[807] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[808] "Konstantinos 216" in PBW (2006.2), citing Branouse, E. and Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou, M. (1980) ????????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? 1. ?????????????, 2. ???????? ?????????? (Athens) Vol. 2, p. 131.14.
[809] Stone & Owens ‘[Eirene?]’, pp. 349-69.
[810] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[811] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[812] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[813] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[814] Villehardouin, 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[815] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[816] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[817] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[818] Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[819] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.1


; Per Genealogy.EU (Byzant 4): “C2. ISAAKIOS II Angelos, Emperor of Byzantium (1185-95)+(1203-04), *1155, +Constantinople 12.4.1204 in prison; 1m: NN; 2m: 1185 Margaret of Hungary (*1175 +after 1223)”.6

Family

Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium b. Sep 1156, d. Jan 1204
Children

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IsaakiosIIdied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EireneTornikainadied1184
  3. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isaakios II Angelos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027070&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html#I2
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AnnaMRomanGaliciadied1205
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AlexiosAdied1204

Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium1,2,3

M, #14188, b. September 1156, d. January 1204
FatherAndronikos Dukas Angelos2,4,5 b. c 1122, d. a 1185
MotherEuphrosyne Kastamonnitissa2,4,5 b. c 1125, d. a 1195
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium was born in September 1156.1,2,6,4,5 He married Eirene/Irene Tornikaina, daughter of Demetrios Tornikes and NN Malakissa, before 1181; Genealogy.EU (Byzantium 4 page) says that Isaakios' first wife was unknown. Genealogics calls her "Herina (Eirene)" with no father identified. Med Lands names her as "[EIRENE] Tornikaina, daughter of DEMETRIOS Tornikes & his wife --- Malakissa."1,7,4,5 Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium married Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary, daughter of Béla III (?) King of Hungary and Agnes/Anna de Châtillon of Antiochia, Queen of Hungary, in 1185;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.8,9,2,3,10,11,4,5
Isaac/Isaakios II Angelos Emperor of Byzantium died in January 1204 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now), at age 47;
Died in prison. Genealogics says d. Jan 1204; Med Lands says d. 28 Jan/12 Apr 1204.1,6,4,5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "[EIRENE] (-[18 Nov] [1183/85]). The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[891]. This entry is discussed by Hiestand[892]. Bearing in mind the estimated date of death of Emperor Isaakios (see above), it is possible that 18 Nov commemorates the death of [Eirene], although it is also possible that the date commemorates some other family event. There remains some doubt about whether "Eirene" can have been the name of Isaakios's first wife as the original baptismal name of her daughter, "Maria regina", is also recorded as Eirene, the Byzantine naming practice not normally being to name children after their parents. One possibility is that [Eirene] died while giving birth to Eirene/Maria, as naming a child after a parent appears to have been acceptable practice in those circumstances. If that is correct, it is unlikely that [Eirene] died later than [1184] considering her daughter´s first marriage in 1192. Her family relationship with the Tornikes family is indicated by a document at Patmos which names Konstantinos Tornikes as uncle ("?????") of Emperor Alexios IV, dated to Dec 1203[893]. While the passage would not exclude Konstantinos being the husband either of a maternal or paternal aunt of the emperor, or indeed a more remote relation as the word "?????" could indicate a family relationship which is more distant than "uncle". Don Stone and Charles Owens, in their detailed analysis of all the relevant sources, argue convincingly that the most likely interpretation is that Konstantinos Tornikes was Emperor Alexios´s maternal uncle[894].
     "m (before 1181) as his first wife, ISAAKIOS Angelos, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204). He succeeded in 1185 as Emperor ISAAKIOS II.]"
Med Lands cites:
[891] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[892] Hiestand, R. Jarhbuch für österreichischen Byzantinistik 47 (1997), pp. 199-208.
[893] "Konstantinos 216" in PBW (2006.2), citing Branouse, E. and Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou, M. (1980) ????????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? 1. ?????????????, 2. ???????? ?????????? (Athens) Vol. 2, p. 131.14.
[894] Stone, D. C. & Owens, C. R. ´[Eirene?], First Wife of Emperor Isaakios II Angelos, is a Probable Tornikina and Gateway to Antiquity´, Foundations, Vol. 3, No. 5 (Jan 2011), p. 382, citing Darrouzès, J. (1970) Georges et Demetrios Tornikès, Lettres et discours, Introduction, texte, analyses, traduction et notes (Paris), pp. 349-69.12
GAV-23 EDV-24.

; This is the same person as:
”Isaac II Angelos” at Wikipedia, as
”Isaac II Ange” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Isacco II Angelo” at Wikipedia (It.)13,14,15

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 143.4

; Per Genealogics:
     “Isaakios was born in September 1156, the son of Andronikos Doukas Angelos and Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa. His father was a son of Theodora Komnene, the youngest daughter of Emperor Alexios I Komnenos and Eirene Doukaina. Thus Isaac was a member of the extended imperial clan.
     “The identity of Isaakios II's first wife is unknown, but a name for her, Herina (Eirene), is found on the necrology in Speyer Cathedral; their daughter Eirene Angelina, who married Philipp von Hohenstaufen, Emperor-Elect, is buried nearby in the Staufen Mausoleum in the Monastery of Lorch. (It is worth noting, however, that it would have been extremely unusual for a mother and daughter to bear the same name, unless the mother's name was monastic.) Isaakios' wife may have been a member of the Palaiologos family. Their third child was born in 1182 or 1183 and she was dead or divorced by 1185, when Isaakios remarried. Their second child Euphrosyne Angelina became a nun, and their son Alexios IV Angelos, a later emperor of Byzantium, did not leave progeny.
     “During the brief reign of Andronikos I Komnenos, Isaakios was involved (alongside his father and brothers) in the revolt of Nicaea and Prousa. Unusually, the emperor did not punish him for this disloyalty, and Isaakios remained at Constantinople.
     “On 11 September 1185, during Andronikos' absence from the capital, his lieutenant Stephanos Hagiochristophorites moved to arrest Isaakios. Isaakios killed Hagiochristophorites and took refuge in the church of Hagia Sophia. Andronikos, in some ways a capable ruler, was hated for his cruelty and his efforts to keep the aristocracy obedient. Isaakios appealed to the populace, and a tumult arose which spread rapidly over the whole city. When Andronikos arrived he found that his authority was overthrown, and that Isaakios had been proclaimed emperor. Andronikos attempted to flee by boat but he was apprehended. Isaakios handed him over to the people of the city, and he was killed on 12 September 1185.
     “Isaakios II Angelos strengthened his position as emperor with dynastic marriages in 1185 and 1186. His niece Eudokia Angelina was married to Stefan Prvovencani, king of Serbia, son of Stefan Nemanja of Serbia. Isaakios' sister Theodora was married to Conrad, Marchese de Monferrato. In January 1186 Isaac himself married Margarete of Hungary (who was renamed Maria), daughter of King Béla III. Hungary was one of the empire's largest and most powerful neighbours, and Margarete also had the benefit of high aristocratic descent, being related to the royal families of Kiev, the Holy Roman Empire, Italy, Provence, and earlier Byzantine dynasties. Isaakios and Margarete had two sons, Johannes Angelos, born no earlier than January 1193, and Manuel Angelos, born after 1195. Neither of them would have progeny.
     “Isaakios inaugurated his reign with a decisive victory over the Norman king of Sicily Guglielmo II on the banks of the Strymon, on 7 September 1185. Guglielmo had invaded the Balkans towards the end of Andronikos I's reign. Elsewhere Isaakios' policy was less successful. In late 1185 he sent a fleet of 80 ships to liberate his brother Alexios Angelos from Acre, but it was destroyed by the Normans of Sicily. He then sent a fleet of 70 ships, but it failed in its attempt to recover Cyprus from the rebellious noble Isaakios Komnenos, thanks to Norman interference. The oppressiveness of his taxes, increased to pay his armies and finance his marriage, resulted in the Vlach-Bulgarian rebellion late in 1185. The rebellion led to the establishment of the Second Bulgarian Empire under the Asen dynasty. In 1187 Alexios Branas, the victor over the Normans, was sent against the rebels, but he turned his arms against his master, and attempted to seize Constantinople, only to be defeated and slain by Isaakios' brother-in-law Conrad de Monferrato.
     “Isaakios' attention was next demanded in the east, where several claimants to the throne successively rose and fell. In 1189 the Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa sought and obtained permission to lead his troops on the Third Crusade through the Byzantine Empire; but he had no sooner crossed the border than Isaakios, who had meanwhile sought an alliance with Saladin, threw every impediment in his way, and was only compelled by force of arms to fulfil his commitments in 1190.
     “The next five years were disturbed by continued warfare with Bulgaria, against which Isaac led several expeditions in person. In spite of a promising start, these ventures had little effect, and on one occasion in 1190 Isaakios barely escaped with his life. In the preparations for yet another offensive against Bulgaria in 1195, Alexios Angelos, Isaakios' older brother, taking advantage of his absence from camp on a hunting expedition, proclaimed himself emperor, and was readily recognised by the soldiers as Emperor Alexios III. Isaakios was blinded and imprisoned in Constantinople.
     “After eight years of captivity, he was raised from his dungeon to his throne once more after the arrival of the Fourth Crusade and the flight of Alexios III from the capital. But both mind and body had been enfeebled by confinement, and his son Alexios IV Angelos was associated on the throne as the effective monarch.
     “Heavily beholden to the Crusaders, Alexios IV was unable to meet his obligations, and his vacillation caused him to lose the support of both his Crusader allies and his subjects. At the end of January 1204, the influential court official Alexios Doukas Mourtzouphlos, married to Eudokia Komnene Angelina, the daughter of Alexios III, took advantage of riots in the capital to imprison Alexios IV and seize the throne as Emperor Alexios V. At this point Isaakios II died, allegedly of shock, while Alexios IV was strangled on 28 or 29 January.
     “Isaakios has the reputation of one of the most unsuccessful princes to occupy the Byzantine throne. Surrounded by a crowd of slaves, mistresses and flatterers, he permitted his empire to be administered by unworthy favourites, while he squandered the money wrung from his provinces on costly buildings and expensive gifts to the churches of his metropolis. During his reign the empire lost Bulgaria, Cilicia and Cyprus.”.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Byzant 4): “C2. ISAAKIOS II Angelos, Emperor of Byzantium (1185-95)+(1203-04), *1155, +Constantinople 12.4.1204 in prison; 1m: NN; 2m: 1185 Margaret of Hungary (*1175 +after 1223)”.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISAAKIOS Angelos ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204). Niketas Choniates names "Isaacius et Alexius" as sons of "Andronicus Angelus"[798]. As leader of the aristocrats against whom Emperor Andronikos I had struggled, he succeeded in 1185 on the latter's downfall as Emperor ISAAKIOS II. He immediately attacked the Normans, his general Alexios Branas defeating them at Mosynopolis and Dimitritsa 7 Nov 1185, which resulted in their expulsion from Thessaloniki, Durazzo and Corfu[799]. Isaakios also made peace with Béla III King of Hungary, sealed by the emperor's second marriage with the king's daughter. In 1186, he was faced with the rebellion of Alexios Branas, who had been sent to quell the Bulgarian rebellion of the brothers Ivan Asen and Teodor but, having penetrated rebel territory, used the army for his own interests and led it to Adrianople where he was proclaimed emperor. Branas marched on Constantinople, but was put to flight and killed by loyal forces[800]. Emperor Isaakios led his army personally against Bulgarian rebels, successfully driving them across the Danube. This was followed by further campaigns in Sep 1187 and 1188, but the emperor was forced to recognise Bulgarian independence under a peace treaty signed in 1188[801]. Tensions developed with Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa", leader of the Third Crusade, who had received a warm welcome in Serbia and had crossed into Byzantine territory at Brani?evo. Anxious to protect his interests, Isaakios signed a treaty of alliance with Saladin, which worsened the situation. After taking Philippopolis [Plovdiv] and Adrianople, as well as threatening Constantinople, Emperor Friedrich forced Emperor Isaakios to give him provisions and ships to cross into Asia Minor[802]. In Sep 1190, Byzantine troops defeated the Serbs at the Morava River, but although the Byzantines regained Niš, Beograd and northern Macedonia including Skopje, under the ensuing peace treaty, they were obliged to recognise Serb independence and Nemanja's right to rule Zeta, southern Dalmatia, Trebinje and Hum[803]. In retaliation for Bulgarian raids on Philippopolis, Sardika [Sofija] and Adrianople, Emperor Isaakios attacked Bulgaria but was heavily defeated in [1194] near Arcadiopolis[804]. The reign of Emperor Isaakios saw a major weakening of Byzantium and was marked by a rapid revival of corruption and administrative abuses, especially increased taxes to establish his luxurious court[805]. He was deposed 8 Apr 1195 by his older brother Alexios while preparing a further campaign against Bulgaria, and blinded. He was restored as emperor 17 Jul 1203 when the crusading army captured Constantinople and his brother Alexios III had fled, his son being named as co-emperor. Isaakios was deposed end-Jan 1204 in an anti-Latin revolt which broke out in Constantinople, and imprisoned once more. The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[806].
     "m firstly (before [1181]) [EIRENE] Tornikaina, daughter of DEMETRIOS Tornikes & his wife --- Malakissa (-[18 Nov] [1183/85]). The necrology of Speyer cathedral records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Maria regina Philippi regis contectalis, nata de Grecia" and the donations which she made to found the anniversaries "in octava Martini [18 Nov]…patris eius et matris eius…Ysaac et matre Herina" and "fratris…eius et sororis eius tercia die post festum Michahelis [1 Oct]…Manuel fratre, Effrosina sorore"[807]. Bearing in mind the estimated date of death of Emperor Isaakios (see above), it is possible that 18 Nov commemorates the death of [Eirene], although it is also possible that the date commemorates some other family event. There remains some doubt about whether "Eirene" can have been the name of Isaakios's first wife as the original baptismal name of her daughter, "Maria regina", is also recorded as Eirene, the Byzantine naming practice not normally being to name children after their parents. One possibility is that [Eirene] died while giving birth to Eirene/Maria, as naming a child after a parent appears to have been acceptable practice in those circumstances. If that is correct, it is unlikely that [Eirene] died later than [1184] considering her daughter’s first marriage in 1192. Her relationship with the Tornikes family is indicated by a document at Patmos which names Konstantinos Tornikes as uncle ("?????") of Emperor Alexios IV, dated to Dec 1203[808]. While the passage would not exclude Konstantinos being the husband either of a maternal or paternal aunt of the emperor, or indeed a more remote relation as the word "?????" could indicate a family relationship which is more distant than "uncle". Don Stone and Charles Owens, in their detailed analysis of all the relevant sources, argue convincingly that the most likely interpretation is that Konstantinos Tornikes was Emperor Alexios’s maternal uncle[809].
     "m secondly (1185) as her first husband, MARGIT of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[810]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo and probably Niš as part of her dowry[811]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[812]. The special wedding tax levied to finance her elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[813]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[814]. She married secondly (May 1204) as his second wife, Bonifazio I Marchese di Monferrato, who wished thereby to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[815]. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[816]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[817]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[818]. She married thirdly (after Sep 1207) Nicolas de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes. She was regent of Thessaloniki in 1207. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[819]."
Med Lands cites:
[798] Niketas Choniates, Imperium Alexii Comneni Porphyrogeniti Manuelis filii, 9, p. 319.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 9.
[800] Fine (1994), p. 14.
[801] Fine (1994), p. 15.
[802] Fine (1994), p. 24-25.
[803] Fine (1994), pp. 25-26.
[804] Fine (1994), p. 27.
[805] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[806] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[807] Boehmer, F. (1868) Fontes rerum Germanicarum, Vol. IV, p. 323.
[808] "Konstantinos 216" in PBW (2006.2), citing Branouse, E. and Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou, M. (1980) ????????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? 1. ?????????????, 2. ???????? ?????????? (Athens) Vol. 2, p. 131.14.
[809] Stone & Owens ‘[Eirene?]’, pp. 349-69.
[810] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[811] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[812] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[813] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[814] Villehardouin, 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[815] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[816] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[817] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[818] Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[819] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGIT (1175-after 3 Mar 1229). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Haymericum et Andream…et duas reginas Constantiam de Boemia et Margaretam de Grecia" as children of "rex Bela de Hungaria" & his wife Agnes[789]. Niketas Choniates records the marriage of Emperor Isaakios and "Belæ Hungariæ regis filiam", commenting that she was only ten years old at the time[790]. She brought Beograd, Brani?evo/Barancs and probably Niš as part of her dowry for her first marriage[791]. The special wedding tax levied by Emperor Isaakios II to finance their elaborate nuptial ceremonies may have contributed to attracting support for the rebellion in Bulgaria by the brothers Ivan Asen and Tedor[792]. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. The Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam records the marriage of "Bonifacius marchio" and "Margaritam imperatricem condam Ysachii, sororem Aimerici regis Ungari"[793]. Villehardouin records that the wife of Emperor Isaakios, and stepmother of his son, was "the king of Hungary's sister", in a later passage naming her "the Empress Marie"[794]. Georgius Akropolites records that "rex Thessalonicæ" married "Mariam Ungaram", widow of "imperatori Isaacio"[795]. Villehardouin records the marriage of "the Marquis Boniface de Montferrat" and "the lady who had been the Emperor Isaac's wife…the king of Hungary's sister"[796]. Her second marriage was arranged by Bonifazio to advance his claim to be installed as emperor of the new Latin Empire of Constantinople[797], but he was outmanoeuvred by Enrico Dandolo Doge of Venice who secured the appointment of Baudouin Count of Flanders who was considered a less powerful candidate. Her second husband installed her as regent of Thessaloniki while he was on campaign to conquer Thessaly[798]. She was also regent for her infant son after the death of her husband, but in the face of opposition from local nobles was replaced by Uberto di Biandrate. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. She was restored as regent by Henri Latin Emperor of Constantinople to whom Uberto refused to swear allegiance, after the latter was captured in Euboea by the emperor in 1209[799]. Pope Gregory IX confirmed that "[Margaretha] soror…regis Ungarie" acquired "terram…ulterior Sirmia" by bull dated 3 Mar 1229[800].
     "m firstly (1185) as his second wife, Emperor ISAAKIOS II, son of ANDRONIKOS Dukas Angelos & his wife Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa ([1155]-Constantinople in prison [28 Jan/12 Apr] 1204).
     "m secondly (1204) as his third wife, BONIFAZIO I Marchese di Monferrato King of Thessaloniki, son of GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Judith of Austria [Babenberg] (1150-killed in battle 4 Sep 1207). King of Thessaloniki 1204.
     "m thirdly (after Sep 1207) NICOLAS de Saint-Omer Lord of Thebes, son of GUILLAUME IV Châtelain de Saint-Omer, Seigneur de Fauquembergues & his first wife Ida d'Avesnes (-[1217/19])."
Med Lands cites:
[789] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 849-50.
[790] Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Isaacii Angeli, Liber 1, 4, p. 481.
[791] Fine (1994), p. 10.
[792] Fine (1994), p. 11.
[793] Cronica Fratris Salimbene de Adam, Ordinis Minorem 1204, MGH SS XXXII, p. 25.
[794] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 11, p. 82, and 12, p. 92.
[795] Bekkerus, I. (ed.) (1836) Constantinus Manasses, Ioel, Georgius Acropolita, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) Georgius Akropolites 8, p. 15.
[796] Villehardouin, 13, p. 96.
[797] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[798] Fine (1994), p. 63.
[799] Fine (1994), p. 87.
[800] Smi?iklas, T. (ed.) (1905) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiæ, Dalamatiæ et Slavoniæ, Diplomati?ki Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb), Vol. III, p. 305.11


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “E2. Margit, *1175, +after 1223; 1m: 1185 Emperor Isaac II Angelos of Byzantium (*ca 1155 +12.4.1204); 2m: 1204 Mgve Boniface I of Montferrat, King of Thessalonica (*1150 +4.9.1207); 3m: ca 1210 Nicolas de Saint-Omer (+1217/19)”.9 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 1185 and 1195 at Constantinople, Byzantium.2 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 1203 and 1204 at Constantinople, Byzantium.2

Family 1

Eirene/Irene Tornikaina d. bt 18 Nov 1183 - 1185
Children

Family 2

Margarete/Marie (?) of Hungary b. 1175, d. a 1223
Children

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4 page (The Angelos Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isaakios II Angelos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027070&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#IsaakiosIIdied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_II_Angelos. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 4 page (The Angelos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227, 232. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarete of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020752&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#MargitM1IsaakiosIIByzM2BonifMonferrato
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EireneTornikainadied1184
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_II_Angelos
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Isaac II Ange: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_II_Ange. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Isacco II Angelo: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isacco_II_Angelo. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant4.html#I2
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AnnaMRomanGaliciadied1205
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM%2010571204.htm#AlexiosAdied1204
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  20. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs.

Edith (Elizabeth) Windsor1,2,3

F, #14189, b. circa 1515
FatherSir Andrews Windsor KB, PC, 1st Lord Windsor of Stanwell1,4,5,6,3,2 b. 1 May 1467, d. 30 May 1543
MotherElizabeth Blount1,4,5,7,2,3 b. b 1471, d. b 1543
Last Edited4 Jan 2009
     Edith (Elizabeth) Windsor was born circa 1515.8,4,3 She married George Ludlow Esq., Lord of Hill Deverill, son of William Ludlow Esq., of Hill Deverill, Wiltshire and Jane Moore, before 26 March 1543.1,4,2,9,3
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. Pedigrees of some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Volume I West Somerville, Mass.,1942., Redlich, Marcellus D. R. von, Reference: 197
2. Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists 1996, Baltimore, 1st Edition, Faris, David, Reference: 175.3

Family

George Ludlow Esq., Lord of Hill Deverill b. 1522, d. a 25 May 1580
Child

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 183. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Ludlow 16: pp. 476-477. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edith Windsor: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105257&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), LUDLOW 5, p. 229. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Ludlow 15: p. 476.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Andrews Windsor: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00119061&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Blount: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00119062&tree=LEO
  8. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 187.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, George Ludlow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105256&tree=LEO
  10. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 184.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Ludlow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00279062&tree=LEO

George Ludlow Esq., Lord of Hill Deverill1,2

M, #14190, b. 1522, d. after 25 May 1580
FatherWilliam Ludlow Esq., of Hill Deverill, Wiltshire3,4
MotherJane Moore3,4
Last Edited4 Jan 2009
     George Ludlow Esq., Lord of Hill Deverill was born in 1522 at Hill Deverill, Dinton, Wiltshire, England.5,2 He married Edith (Elizabeth) Windsor, daughter of Sir Andrews Windsor KB, PC, 1st Lord Windsor of Stanwell and Elizabeth Blount, before 26 March 1543.1,6,4,2,7

His estate was probated between 4 February 1580 and 1581
; P.C.C. 4 Darcy.2,4
George Ludlow Esq., Lord of Hill Deverill died after 25 May 1580.5,4,2
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. Pedigrees of some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Volume I West Somerville, Mass.,1942., Redlich, Marcellus D. R. von, Reference: 197
2. Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists 1996, Baltimore, 1st Edition, Faris, David, Reference: 175.2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 183. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, George Ludlow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105256&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 184.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Ludlow 16: pp. 476-477. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II, p. 187.
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), LUDLOW 5, p. 229. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edith Windsor: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105257&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Ludlow: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00279062&tree=LEO