Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony1

F, #6661, b. circa 1075, d. 29 December 1126
FatherMagnus Billung Duke of Saxony1,2 b. b 1045, d. 23 Aug 1106
MotherZsofia (?) Princess of Hungary1,2 b. 1044, d. 18 Jun 1095
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony was born circa 1075.1,3,2 She married Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria, son of Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria and Judith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland, circa 1095.4,1,3,5,2
Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony died on 29 December 1126 at Altdorf, Uri, Switzerland.4,3,1,2
Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony was buried after 29 December 1126 at Weingarten Abbey, Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1072, Germany
     DEATH     29 Dec 1126 (aged 53–54), Weingarten, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Family Members
     Parents
          Magnus I Von Sachsen Billung 1045–1106
          Sophia of Hungary 1050–1095
     Spouse
          Henry Duke of Bavaria 1074–1126
     Children
          Judith of Bavaria 1101–1131
          Mathilde von Bayern 1105–1183
          Henry X of Bavaria 1108–1139
     BURIAL     Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 1 Feb 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 142067933.6
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 10.2

; Per Genealogics: "Wulfhild was born about 1075, the daughter of Magnus, Herzog von Sachsen, and Zofia of Hungary. About 1095 she married Heinrich 'the Black', the future Herzog von Bayern, son of Welf I, Herzog von Bayern, and Judith van Vlaanderen. Wulfhild brought land holdings in Saxony to the marriage. They had seven children of whom five would have progeny, including their eldest son Heinrich 'the Proud', and daughter Judith who married Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen, duke of Swabia. Wulfhild died on 29 December 1126, only a fortnight after her husband."2

; Per Med Lands: " WULFHILD ([1075]-Altdorf 29 Dec 1126). The Annalista Saxo names "Wifhildem et Eilicam" as the two daughters of Duke Magnus & his wife, specifying that Wulfhild married "Heinrico duci, filio Welfi ducis senioris de Bawaria"[383]. The Historia Welforum records that Wulfhild died at Altdorf "decimo sexton die post mortem mariti" and was buried "in monasterio sancti Martini"[384]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "29 Dec" of "Wlfhild ducissa"[385]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "IV Kal Jan" of "Wuolfhildis ducissa hic sepulta"[386]. m HEINRICH, son of WELF I Duke of Bavaria & his [second/third] wife Judith de Flandre ([1074]-Ravensburg 13 Dec 1126, bur Weingarten). He succeeded his brother in 1120 as HEINRICH IX "der Schwarze" Duke of Bavaria."
Med Lands cites:
[383] Annalista Saxo 1070. [383] Annalista Saxo 1070.
[384] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463.
[385] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg.
[386] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.7


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Wulfhilde Billung of Saxony (1072 – 29 December 1126 in Weingarten Abbey) was the eldest daughter of Magnus, Duke of Saxony and his wife, Sophia of Hungary.
     "She married Duke Henry IX of Bavaria.[1] As a result of this marriage, part of the Billung possessions came into the hands of the House of Guelph. They had the following children:
** Henry X[1]
** Conrad (died: 17 March 1126 in Bari, buried in Molfetta), a Cistercian monk
** Sophia
** Judith[1]
** Matilda (d. 1138), married Margrave Diephold IV of Vohburg (d. 1130) and Count Gebhard III of Sulzbach (d. 1188)
** Welf VI
** Wulfhilde, married Rudolf I, Count of Bregenz (d. 1160)

     "Wulfhilde died in 1126 and was buried at Weingarten Abbey.
References
1. Luscombe & Riley-Smith 2006, p. 755.
Sources
** Luscombe, David; Riley-Smith, Jonathan, eds. (2006). The New Cambridge Medieval History. Cambridge University Press."8 GAV-25 EDV-25. Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony was also known as Wulfhild (?) von Sachsen.2

Family

Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria b. c 1074, d. 13 Dec 1126
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020370&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-24, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich 'the Black': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020369&tree=LEO
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2019), memorial page for Wulfhild Of Saxony (1072–29 Dec 1126), Find A Grave Memorial no. 142067933, citing Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/142067933/wulfhild-of_saxony. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Wulfhilddied1126. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wulfhilde_of_Saxony. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112667&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036578&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#Wulfhiddied1156
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036580&tree=LEO
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330302&tree=LEO

Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony1

M, #6662, b. before 1045, d. 23 August 1106
FatherOtho Ordulf (?) Duke of Saxony1 b. c 1020, d. 28 Mar 1072
MotherUlfhilde (Wulfhilde) (?) of Norway1 b. c 1023, d. 24 May 1070
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited12 Nov 2019
     Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony was born before 1045 at Saxe, Prussia.2,1 He married Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary, daughter of Bela I (?) King of Hungary and Richeza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary, between 1070 and 1071; her 2nd husband.3,1
Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony died on 23 August 1106.4,2,3,1
     GAV-26 EDV-26. He was Duke of Saxony between 1072 and 1106.1

Family

Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary b. 1044, d. 18 Jun 1095
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11049
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020370&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary1

F, #6663, b. 1044, d. 18 June 1095
FatherBela I (?) King of Hungary1 b. c 1016, d. 11 Sep 1063
MotherRicheza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary1,2 b. 22 Sep 1013, d. 21 May 1075
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited30 Jan 2020
     Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary was born in 1044 at Esztergom, Komarom-Esztergom, Hungary.3,4 She married Ulrich I (?) von Weimar, Mgve of Carniola, Markgraf of Krain & Istrien, son of Poppo I von Weimar Marchese di Carniola e Istria. and Hadamut (?) of Istrien, between 1062 and 1063; her 1st husband.1,5 Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary married Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony, son of Otho Ordulf (?) Duke of Saxony and Ulfhilde (Wulfhilde) (?) of Norway, between 1070 and 1071; her 2nd husband.1,6
Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary died on 18 June 1095.7,1
     GAV-26 EDV-26.

Family 2

Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony b. b 1045, d. 23 Aug 1106
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza|Ryksa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020697&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11048
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ulrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079976&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 243A-23, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richgardis von Krain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080014&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#Richgarddiedbefore1128. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ulrich II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330338&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poppo III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079974&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020370&tree=LEO

Bela I (?) King of Hungary1

M, #6664, b. circa 1016, d. 11 September 1063
FatherVazul/Vasul/Basil (?)1,2 b. bt 976 - 978, d. 1038
MotherKatun Comitopuli of Bulgaria3
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited13 Dec 2020
     Bela I (?) King of Hungary was born circa 1016.1 He married Richeza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary, daughter of Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland and Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland, between 1039 and 1042.4,1,5
Bela I (?) King of Hungary died on 11 September 1063.1
Bela I (?) King of Hungary was buried after 11 September 1063 at Szekszárd, Hungary.1


     GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "King Béla I of Hungary (1060-63) -cr 1060, *ca 1016, +11.9.1063, bur Szekszárd; m.Ryksa of Poland (+after 1052.)1"



; NB: There is disagreement about the mother of Bela I and Andras I. Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1 page) says their father, Vazul/Basil m. "N, from Tátony family /OR/ a woman who may (or may not) have been dau.of Tsar Samuel of the Bulgarians ". GA Vaut.1,6

He was King of Hungary between 1061 and 1063 at Hungary.7

Family

Richeza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary b. 22 Sep 1013, d. 21 May 1075
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vazul 'the Blind' of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020693&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katun Comitopuli or Katalin of Bulgaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00526203&tree=LEO
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza|Ryksa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020697&tree=LEO
  6. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 3 July 2003; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Laszlo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020747&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#LaszloI. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020698&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_I_1074-1077,.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#LankaMRostislavVladimirovichRostov

Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau1,2

M, #6665, b. 955, d. 21 May 1034
FatherHerman 'Pusillus/The Small' (?) Count im Auelgau, Bonngau, und Keldachau, Count Palatine of Lower-Lorraine3,1,2,4 b. c 925, d. 16 Jul 996
MotherHeylwig (?) von Dillingen5,1,2 b. 931, d. bt 959 - 1025
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau was born in 955.6 He married Mathilde (?) von Sachsen, daughter of Otto II (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Theophana Skleraina of Byzantium, Holy Roman Empress, on 15 June 991.2,7,8,9,10
Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau died on 21 May 1034 at Saalfeld, Austria.11,12,2,8
Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau was buried after 21 May 1034 at Brauweiler Abbey, Pulheim, Rhein-Erft-Kreis, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     21 Mar 1034
[Text copied from Wikipedia article]
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Matilda of Germany unknown–1025
     Children
          Hermann II of Lotharingia unknown–1056
          Richeza of Lotharingia unknown–1063
          Otto II of Swabia unknown–1047
          Theophanu von Essen 997–1058
          Liudolf of Lotharingia 1000–1031
     BURIAL     Brauweiler Abbey, Pulheim, Rhein-Erft-Kreis, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 19 Oct 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 60337291.13
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 120; VI 1.2 He was Pfalzgraf von Lothringer (Count Palatine of Lorraine.)2

; Per Med Lands:
     "EZZO [Ehrenfried] (-Saalfeld 21 May 1034, bur Brauweiler). The Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio names "Herenfridus comes palatinus, qui post Ezo nominatus est" as husband of "Mathilde filia Magni Ottonis", and in a later passage as son of "Hermanni comitis palatine…cognomente Pusillus"[345]. Graf in Auelgau: Emperor Heinrich II donated property of "Willihelmus comes et Boppo frater eius in villa Winetre in pago Auelgouue in comitatu Ezzonis comitis" to Kloster St Petrus at Bonn by charter dated 25 Feb 1015[346]. Pfalzgraf. Graf im Bonngau: Emperor Heinrich II donated “curtem Moffendorp...in comitatu Ezzonis palatini comitis in pago...Punnegowe” to Aachen St. Maria by charter dated 24 Jul 1020[347]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" renewed the privileges of Kloster Fulda by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1020, witnessed by "Godifridi ducis, Berinhardi ducis, Thiederici ducis, Welphonis comitis, Cunonis comitis, Kunrati comitis, Ottonis comitis, Adilbrahtis comitis, Bobonis comitis, Friderici comitis, Bezilini comitis, Ezonis comitis palatini"[348], the order of witnesses presumably giving some idea of the relative importance of these nobles at the court of Emperor Heinrich II at the time. Piligrim Archbishop of Köln confirmed the donation of "allodium suum in Brunwilre" to the abbey of St Nicholas made by "Erenfridus comes palatinus […et frater eius comes Hecelinus]…cum coniuge sua domna Mathilde" by charter dated 10 Oct 1028[349]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the possessions of the church of Köln donated by "Erenfridus beate memoriæ comes palatinus [et] coniuge sua domina Mathilde abbatiam in Brunwilare" and "postea defunctis supra dictis principibus filii eorum Herimannus…Coloniensis…archiepiscopus nec non sorores eius domina Richeza Bolemiæ quondam regina ac Theophanu Asnidensis monasterii abbatissa" by charter dated 17 Jul 1051 which also names "Etzo comes palatinus…et frater eius comes Hezelinus"[350]. The Annales Hildesheimenses record that "Hezo Palatinus comes" died after catching pox from his "concubina nomine Tiethburga"[351]. The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1034 of "Erenfridus comes palatinus"[352].
     "m (before 15 Jun 991) MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor OTTO II & his wife Theofano --- (Summer 978-Echtz 4 Dec 1025, bur Brauweiler Abbey). The Vita Godehardi names "Mahtildis domnæ Sophiæ sororis" as wife of "Ezonis palatine comitis"[353]. Thietmar records that "Mathilde the emperor's sister married Ezzo, who was the son of Hermann the count palatine", commenting that "this displeased many"[354]. Piligrim Archbishop of Köln confirmed the donation of "allodium suum in Brunwilre" to the abbey of St Nicholas made by "Erenfridus comes palatinus […et frater eius comes Hecelinus]…cum coniuge sua domna Mathilde" by charter dated 10 Oct 1028[355]. The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1025 of "domna nostra Mathilda"[356]."
Med Lands cites:
[345] Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio 1 and 23, MGH SS XI, pp. 396 and 407.
[346] D H II 333, p. 422.
[347] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 156, p. 96.
[348] MGH Diplomata III, D H II 427, p. 542.
[349] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 164, p. 102.
[350] MGH Diplomata V, D H III 272, p. 362.
[351] Annales Hildesheimenses 1034, MGH SS III, p. 99.
[352] Annales Brunwilarenses 1034, MGH SS I, p. 99.
[353] Wolfherii Vita Godehardi Episcopi Hildenesheimensis, Vita Prior 29, MGH SS XI, p. 188.
[354] Thietmar 4.60, p. 194, footnote 165 referring to "a later source from Brauweiler" asserting that Ezzo won the right to marry Mathilde by beating King Otto III at dice or chess.
[355] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 164, p. 102.
[356] Annales Brunwilarenses 1034, MGH SS I, p. 99.8


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ezzo (c.?955 – 21 March 1034), sometimes called Ehrenfried, a member of the Ezzonid dynasty, was Count Palatine of Lotharingia from 1015 until his death. As brother-in-law of Emperor Otto III, father of Queen Richeza of Poland and several other illustrious children, he was one of the most important figures of the Rhenish history of his time.
Life
     "Ezzo was the son of the Lotharingian count palatine Herman I (died 996) and his wife Heylwig of Dillingen. He was sent as a child to be educated by Bishop Ulrich of Augsburg (episcopate 923–973), a relative of his mother. Nothing is known about his youth.
     "Having married Matilda of Germany (died 1025), a daughter of Emperor Otto II and his consort Theophanu,[1] Ezzo became prominent during the reign of his brother-in-law, Emperor Otto III. The marriage was expressly consented by the Dowager Empress Theophanu, probably to rally the powerful family of Ezzo to the throne. Matilda received as dowry out of Ottonian possessions lands in Thuringia and in the Duchy of Franconia (Orlamünde and the East Franconian territories of Coburg and Salz), while her husband gave her as dowry the family estate of Brauweiler near Cologne.
     "At the death of his father in 996, Herman's rich allodial property was shared between his sons. Ezzo received lands in Cochem on the Mosel river, in Maifeld, the Flamersheimer Wald and estates around Tomburg Castle near Rheinbach, as well as half the usufruct of Villewaldin. About the same time, he must have received the Palatinate and previous countal rights, as he is referred as count in the Auelgau in 1015 and as Count Palatine in the Bonngau in 1020. He also received the county of Ruhrgau with tutelage of Essen Abbey.
     "Unsuccessful candidate to the imperial throne upon the death of Emperor Otto III in 1002, his relation with the new Ottonian king Henry II was immediately very tensed. Henry disputed Ezzo's ownership of territories, that he defended as his wife's inheritance of late Otto III. The conflict dragged on for years and reached its peak in 1011. Facing disturbances in Lotharingia, and in need for Ezzo's military support, Henry was forced to come to terms. Ezzo's victory led the king to make concessions and to a complete transformation of its policy. He reconciled with Ezzo, recognized its rights of inheritance and gave him the royal territories of Kaiserswerth, Duisburg as well as Saalfeld in Thuringia for renouncing to the throne. He also associated the Ezzonid dynasty to his Eastern policies, and mediated the marriage of Ezzo's daughter Richeza with the heir to the Polish throne Mieszko II Lambert.
     "These huge territorial concessions made Ezzo one of the most powerful princes in the Empire. Ezzo's growing power and the increased prestige of his house were reflected in the founding of the family, Brauweiler Abbey, the place where his marriage had been celebrated and whose construction begun after a trip to Rome of the couple in 1024. The Benedictine monastery, which was consecrated in 1028 by Archbishop Pilgrim of Cologne, was to be the grave and spiritual centre of the Ezzonid dynasty. The first member of the family buried there was Ezzo' wife Matilda, who died on 4 November 1025.
     "Very little is known about Ezzo's later life, but we are told that he died at a great age at Saalfeld on 21 March 1034, and was buried in Brauweiler.
     "Ezzo has been quite an impressive personality, even if the reporting on his life and offices, described by the glorifying author of Fundatio monasterii Brunwilarensis may be exaggerated. He was mostly active in political affairs when it came to his own interests and the standing of his house, and where he could increase his territories and authority. His dexterous management of the favours of Empress Theophano, Emperor Otto III and later Henry II, testify of his personal ambition and political dexterity.
Children
     "Ezzo and Mathilda left three sons and seven daughters. The first two sons, Liudolf and Otto were aimed at perpetuating the dynasty while the third Hermann, was raised to enter the clergy. Of the seven daughters only Richeza was conspicuously married, while the others were placed in monasteries of which they all became abbesses.
** Liudolf (c. 1000–10 April 1031),[1] Count of Zütphen.
** Otto I (died 1047), Count Palatine of Lotharingia and later Duke of Swabia as Otto II.[1]
** Herman II (995–1056), Archbishop of Cologne.[1]
** Theophanu (died 1058), Abbess of Essen and Gerresheim.[1]
** Richeza (died 21 March 1063), Queen of Poland, married with King Mieszko II Lambert.[1]
** Adelheid (died c. 1030), Abbess of Nivelles (Nijvel).[1]
** Heilwig, Abbess of Neuss.[1]
** Mathilde, Abbess of Dietkirchen and Vilich.[1]
** Sophie, Abbess of St. Maria, Mainz.[1]
** Ida (died 1060), Abbess of Cologne and Gandersheim Abbey [1](founded in 852 by her ancestor Liudolf, Duke of Saxony).

     "After the death of his wife, Ezzo had another son named Henry (1055–1093), later Abbot of Gorze, with a concubine.
References
1. Bernhardt 2002, p. 310.
Sources
** Bernhardt, John W. (2002). Itinerant Kingshiop & Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936-1075. Cambridge University Press.
** Kimpen, E., ‘Ezzonen und Hezeliniden in der rheinischen Pfalzgrafschaft’, Mitteilungen des Österreichischen Instituts für Geschichtsforschung. XII. Erg.-Band. (Innsbruck 1933) S.1–91.
** Lewald, Ursula, 'Die Ezzonen. Das Schicksal eines rheinischen Fürstengeschlechts', Rheinische Vierteljahrsblätter 43 (1979) S.120–168.
** Steinbach, F., ‘Die Ezzonen. Ein Versuch territorialpolitischen Zusammenschlusses der fränkischen Rheinlande’, Collectanea Franz Steinbach. Aufsätze und Abhandlungen zur Verfassungs-, Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte, geschichtlichen Landeskunde und Kulturraumforschung, ed. F. Petri en G. Droege (Bonn 1967) S.64–81.
** Van Droogenbroeck, F.J., ‘Paltsgraaf Herman II (†1085) en de stichting van de abdij van Affligem (28 juni 1062)’, Jaarboek voor Middeleeuwse Geschiedenis 2 (Hilversum 1999) S.38–95.
** Van Droogenbroeck, F.J., ‘De betekenis van paltsgraaf Herman II (1064–1085) voor het graafschap Brabant’, Eigen Schoon en De Brabander 87 (Brussels 2004) S.1–166.
** Wolter, Heinz, Ezzo Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, http://www.rheinische-geschichte.lvr.de/persoenlichkeiten/E/Seiten/Ezzo.aspx.
External links
** "Ezzo" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.) 1911."14

GAV-27 EDV-29. Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau was also known as Ezzo (?) Pfalzgraf of Lorraine.12

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon Family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ezzo/Ehrenfried: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080071&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann Pusillus: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080192&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Hermanndied996B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heylwig von Dillingen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080193&tree=LEO&PHPSESSID=6a9d2ead2ba415662ed73a07deea6198
  6. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Ezzodied1034
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#MathildeMEzzodied1034.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080072&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-21, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10957
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 February 2020), memorial page for Ezzo of Lotharingia (unknown–21 Mar 1034), Find A Grave Memorial no. 60337291, citing Brauweiler Abbey, Pulheim, Rhein-Erft-Kreis, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60337291/ezzo-of_lotharingia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezzo,_Count_Palatine_of_Lotharingia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Richenzadied1063
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Ludolfdied1031
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00570106&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165038&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Ottodied1047
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00570216&tree=LEO

Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria1,2,3,4

M, #6666, b. circa 1036, d. 9 November 1101
FatherAlberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este2,5,6,7,8,9,4 b. 997, d. 20 Aug 1097
MotherKunigunde (?) von Altdorf2,5,3,8,9,4 b. c 1020, d. b 31 Mar 1055
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria married Unknown (?);
His 1st (?) wife.4 Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria was born circa 1036; Genealogics says b. ca 1036; Wikipedia says b, ca 1030/1040; Med Lands says b. 1035/40.8,10,4 He married Ethelinde (?) von Northeim, daughter of Otto I von Northeim Graf von Northeim, Duke in Bavaria and Richenza (?) von Schwaben;
Her 1st husband; his 1st or 2nd wife.5,11,8,12,4 Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria and Ethelinde (?) von Northeim were divorced in 1070.11,8,12,4 Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria married Judith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland, daughter of Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes and Eleanor (?) of Normandy, in 1071;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd or 3rd wife.13,14,5,7,8,15,4,16,17
Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria died on 9 November 1101 at Paphos, Cyprus; Racines et Histoire says d 9/11/1101; Genealogics says d. 9 Nov 1101; Wikipedia says d 6 Nov 1101; Med Lands says d. 9 Nov 1101.18,2,5,7,8,10,4
Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria was buried after 9 November 1101 at Weingarten Abbey, Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1032
     DEATH     6 Nov 1101 (aged 68–69), Cyprus
     Welf was the son of Azzo II of Este and his wife Chuniza of Altdorf. When Welf's maternal uncle, Welf, Duke of Carinthia (also known as Welf III), died childless, Welf inherited his property. Welf married Ethelinde, daughter of Otto II, Duke of Bavaria.
     When Duke Otto had become an enemy of King Henry IV, Welf divorced Ethelinde, and in 1070 was appointed duke of Bavaria.
     During the Investiture Controversy, Welf sided with Pope Gregory VII, and in March 1077 supported the election of Rudolf of Rheinfelden as anti-king. King Henry, in consequence of these repeated acts of rebellion, deprived him of his newly-acquired sovereignty; but, supported by his faithful Bavarians, and aided by his father in Italy, he was able to maintain his place, and to set the ban of the empire at defiance in May 1077.
     In 1071, Welf married Judith of Flanders, daughter of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, and the widow of Tostig Godwinson, Earl of Northumbria.
Welf had the following children from his marriage with Judith of Flanders:
** Welf, born 1072
** Henry (d. 13 December 1126)
** Kunizza, died 6 March 1120, married Frederick Rocho, Count of Dießen
     In 1089, Welf's son Welf married Matilda of Tuscany, thus strengthening relationships with the pope. After the younger Welf divorced Matilda in 1095, Welf made amends with King Henry IV and was reappointed as duke of Bavaria.
     After the death of his father Azzo in 1097, Welf tried to acquire his father's property south of the Alps, but did not succeed against his younger half-brother Fulco.
     In 1099, Welf joined the Crusade of 1101. He died while returning from the crusade in Cyprus in 1101 and was buried in Weingarten Abbey. He was succeeded as duke of Bavaria by his son Welf.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Albert Azzo II 1009–1097
          Kunigunde von Altdorf 1020–1054
     Spouse
          Judith of Flanders 1033–1094
     Children
          Welf II of Bavaria 1072–1120
          Henry Duke of Bavaria 1074–1126
     BURIAL     Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Maintained by: Mad
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 1 Dec 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 62396919.19
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Judith of Flanders, *ca 1037, +5.3.1094; 1m: X.1058 Tostig of Northumbria (+25.9.1066); 2m: ca 1071 Duke Welf IV of Bavaria (+1101.)20"
; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH de Flandre ([1033]-[5] Mar 1094, bur St Martin Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhita…amita Rodberti comitis de Flandria ex cognatione beati Ethmundi regis" as husband of "Haroldi" (in error for Tostig) but correctly names her second husband "Welphus filius Azzonis marchionis Italorum"[209]. The Genealogia Welforum names "filiam comitis Flandrie, reginam Anglie, Iuditam nomine" as wife of Welf[210]. Florence of Worcester says that Judith was "daughter of Baldwin Count of Flanders" but does not specify which Count Baldwin, nor is this clear from the context[211]. According to the Vita Ædwardi Regis, Judith was the sister of Count Baudouin V[212]. On the other hand, Alberic de Trois Fontaines asserts that Judith was one of the children of Baudouin V Count of Flanders and his wife Adela de France[213], but there are other clear errors in Alberic's listing of this couple's children so the statement should be viewed with caution. Judith is also listed as the daughter of Count Baudouin V (after Mathilde) in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also shows her first marriage[214]. The date of her first marriage is confirmed by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which records that "earl Godwine" fled after the Council of 9 Sep 1051 "with Tostig and his wife who was a kinswoman of Baldwin of Bruges"[215]. Judith moved to Denmark after her first husband was killed. "Dux Gewelfo eiusque…uxor Iudita" donated property to Kloster Weingarten, with the consent of "filiorum suorum Gwelfonis et Heinrici", dated 12 Mar 1094[216]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death "1094 IV Non Mar" of "Iuditha uxor ducis Welfonis Baioariæ" and her burial "apud monasterium…Sancti Martini" built by her husband[217]. The necrology of Raitenbuch records the death "III Non Mar" of "Iudinta regina Anglie, filia marchionis de Este uxor Welfonis nostri fundatoris"[218], exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage and confusing her paternity. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "III Non Mar" of "Judita dux regina Anglie"[219], also exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage.
     "m firstly (before Sep 1051) TOSTIG Godwinson, son of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha of Denmark ([1025/30]-killed in battle Stamford Bridge 25 Sep 1066). He was created Earl of Northumbria in 1055[220].
     "m secondly ([1071]) as his second wife, WELF I Duke of Bavaria [Este], son of ALBERTO AZZO II Marchese d'Este & his first wife Kunigunde von Altdorf [Este] ([1030/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Cyprus, removed to Weingarten, near Lake Constance)."
Med Lands cites:
[209] Annalista Saxo 1066.
[210] Genealogia Welforum 9, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[211] Forester, T. (trans.) (1854) The Chronicles of Florence of Worcester with two continuations (London) (“Florence of Worcester”), 1051, p. 152.
[212] Barlow, F. (1992) The Godwins: the Rise and Fall of a Noble Dynasty (Longman), p. 38.
[213] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.
[214] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 350.
[215] Garmonsway, G. N. (trans) (1972) The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (Dent), D, 1052 [1051].
[216] Wirtembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV (Stuttgart, 1883) ("Württembergisches Urkundenbuch"), Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, I, p. VIII.
[217] Bernoldi Chronicon 1094, MGH SS V, p. 457.
[218] Necrologium Raitenbuchense, Freising Necrologies, p. 105.
[219] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.
[220] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle E, 1055.17

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Judith de Flandres ° ~1033 + 05/03/1094
     ép. 1) avant 09/1051 (ou 10/1058 ?) Tostig Godwinson of Northumbria +X 25/09/1066 (Stamford Bridge) earl of Northumbria (1055-10/1065) (fils de Godwin, earl of Wessex et de Gytha de Danemark)
     ép. 2) ~1071 duc Welf 1er (ou IV) de Bavière-Este + 09/11/1101 (Paphos, Chypre) (fils d’Alberto Azzo II, marchese d’Este et de Kunigunde von Altdorf.)21 "

; This is the same person as ”Welf I, Duke of Bavaria” at Wikipedia and as ”Welf IV.” at Wikipedia (DE).10,22

; Per Genealogics:
     "The Welfs (English Guelf, or Guelph, Italian Guelpho) were a dynasty of nobles and rulers who were the chief rivals of the Hohenstaufen in Italy and central Europe in the Middle Ages and who later included the Hanoverian Welfs. The latter, with the accession of George I to the British throne, became rulers of Great Britain. Welf IV was born about 1036, the son of Alberto Azzo II, Marchese d'Este and Kunizza, the daughter of Welf II, Graf in Lechrain. He inherited the German possessions of his uncle Welf III, duke of Carinthia on the latter's death in 1055.
     "Welf IV began the 'Younger House' of Welf. He first married Ethelinde von Northeim, daughter of Otto I von Northeim, Graf von Northeim, Herzog in Bayern, and Richeza von Schwaben. Welf became duke of Bavaria as Welf I in 1070, following Emperor Heinrich IV's dismissal of his father-in-law as duke. In the same year he divorced Ethelinde and in 1071 he married Judith of Flanders, daughter of Baudouin IV, count of Flanders and Eleanor of Normandy. They had two sons, Welf V and Heinrich, of whom Heinrich would have progeny.
     "After his accession as duke of Bavaria, Welf abandoned his alliance with Emperor Heinrich IV to become an important supporter of the papal party in Italy. In 1089 his 17-year-old son Welf V (later Welf II of Bavaria) married the 43-year-old Countess Matilda of Tuscany, an important military figure in her own right and great ally of Pope Gregory VII and his successors in their prolonged dispute with Heinrich IV; the marriage ended in separation.
     "With his friend, the troubadour knight Duke Guillaume IX of Aquitaine, Welf IV undertook a disastrous crusade in 1101, in which most of the crusaders died or were captured in Asia Minor. The crusader army set out on 1 April 1101. The Bavarian and Aquitaine contingents travelled over Hungary and Greece to the Bosphorus. In Constantinople the crusaders swore their oath to the emperor. Then in September 1101 the army, following the path of the first crusade, was caught in a Turkish ambush at Heraclea and wiped out. Only a few escaped, including Welf IV and Guillaume IX of Aquitaine, who managed to get to Antioch and from there to Jerusalem.
     "Welf IV died in Cyprus on 9 November 1101. His line was continued by his second son Heinrich 'the Black'."8 Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria was also known as Guelph (Welf) IV Duke of Bavaria.23

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 11.8 GAV-26 EDV-26.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 2): "A1. [1m.] Welf IV Herzog von Bayern (1070-77)+(1096-1101), +Paphos, Cyprus 9.11.1101; 1m: (div 1070) Ethelinde, dau.of Otto von Northeim, Herzog von Bayern; 2m: 1071 Judith of Flanders OR Judith of Normandy (*ca 1033 +5.3.1094). By 1m. Welf acquired Bavaria."5

; Per Med Lands:
     "WELF [IV], son of ALBERTO AZZO [II] Conte di Luni [Este] & his first wife Kunigunde von Altdorf [Welf] ([1035/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Cyprus, removed to Weingarten, near Lake Constance). The Annalista Saxo names "Welfum seniorum" son of "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin" (called "Welphus filius Azzonis marchionis Italorum" in an earlier passage[297]) and his wife "Cunizam"[298]. After the death of his maternal uncle Welf III, he was summoned from Italy by his maternal grandmother to inherit the Welf family properties in Swabia and Bavaria[299]. He was installed in 1070 as WELF I Duke of Bavaria by Heinrich IV King of Germany. Duke Welf supported Rudolf von Rheinfelden, anti-king of Germany, and was deposed as Duke of Bavaria in 1077 by Heinrich IV. "Heinricus…rex" granted property of "Welfo dux dum erat dux…in pago Passir…in comitatu Gerungi et in comitatu Friderici" to the church of Brixen by charter dated 1078[300]. "Dux Gewelfo eiusque…uxor Iudita" donated property to Kloster Weingarten, with the consent of "filiorum suorum Gwelfonis et Heinrici", dated 12 Mar 1094[301]. He sought to reassert his position in northern Italy against Emperor Heinrich IV by arranging, through Pope Urban II, the marriage of his son to the powerful landowner Matilda Ctss of Tuscany. In 1095, Welf IV was reconciled with the emperor, who regranted him the duchy of Bavaria[302]. He undertook an expedition to Italy after the death of his father in 1097 to assert his position in the inheritance over his half-brothers[303]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[304]. Albert of Aix records that, after their army was dispersed in Asia Minor by the Turks, Duke Welf eventually reached Jerusalem to complete his pilgrimage but died in Cyprus on the return journey[305]. Ekkehard records the death of Welf Duke of Bavaria and his burial in Cyprus[306]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "V Id Nov" of "Welf dux senior hic sepultus"[307], which suggests that his body was moved after its first burial in Cyprus.
     "[m firstly ---. According to Jordan, the first wife of Duke Welf I was "the descendant of an unknown Italian line" but he cites no primary source in support of the statement[308]. No other reference to this alleged first marriage has been found.]
     "m [firstly/secondly] (divorced 1070) as her first husband, ETHELINDE von Northeim, daughter of OTTO I Graf von Northeim Duke of Bavaria & his wife Richenza of Swabia [Ezzonen]. The Annalista Saxo names "Heinricum Crassum comitem…Sifridum de Boumeneburh et Cononem comitem de Bichlinge et tres filias, ex quibus unam nomine Ethilindam accept Welpho dux Bawarie et postquam eam repudiavit duxit eam Herimannus comes de Calverla" as children of Otto von Northeim & his wife[309]. Her husband repudiated her after the disgrace of her father, whom Heinrich IV King of Germany deprived of the duchy of Bavaria[310]. She married secondly Hermann Graf von Calvelage. The Annales Stadenses refers to the four daughters of Otto, specifying that "tertia fuit uxor Hermanni de Calvela, que genuit Ottonem et Heinricum comites de Ravenesberch" without naming her[311].
     "m [secondly/thirdly] ([1071]) as her second husband, JUDITH de Flandre, widow of TOSTIG Godwinson Earl of Northumbria, daughter of BAUDOUIN IV Count of Flanders & his second wife [Eléonore] de Normandie ([1033]-[5] Mar 1094, bur St Martin Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhita…amita Rodberti comitis de Flandria ex cognatione beati Ethmundi regis" as husband of "Haroldi" (in error for Tostig) but correctly names her second husband "Welphus filius Azzonis marchionis Italorum"[312]. The Genealogia Welforum names "filiam comitis Flandrie, reginam Anglie, Iuditam nomine" as wife of Welf[313]. Florence of Worcester says that Judith was "daughter of Baldwin Count of Flanders" but does not specify which Count Baldwin nor is this clear from the context[314]. According to the Vita Ædwardi Regis, she was the sister of Count Baudouin V[315]. Alberic de Trois Fontaines asserts that Judith was one of the children of Baudouin V Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France[316], but there are other clear errors in his listing of this couple's children so the statement should be viewed with caution. Judith is also listed as the daughter of Count Baudouin V (after Mathilde) in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also shows her first marriage[317]. The date of her first marriage is confirmed by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which records that "earl Godwine" fled after the Council of 9 Sep 1051 "with Tostig and his wife who was a kinswoman of Baldwin of Bruges"[318]. Judith moved to Denmark after her first husband was killed. "Dux Gewelfo eiusque…uxor Iudita" donated property to Kloster Weingarten, with the consent of "filiorum suorum Gwelfonis et Heinrici", dated 12 Mar 1094[319]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death "1094 IV Non Mar" of "Iuditha uxor ducis Welfonis Baioariæ" and her burial "apud monasterium…Sancti Martini" built by her husband[320]. The necrology of Raitenbuch records the death "III Non Mar" of "Iudinta regina Anglie, filia marchionis de Este uxor Welfonis nostri fundatoris"[321], exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage and confusing her paternity. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "III Non Mar" of "Judita dux regina Anglie"[322], also exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage."
Med Lands cites:
[297] Annalista Saxo 1066.
[298] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[299] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[300] D H IV 304, p. 400.
[301] Wirtembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV (Stuttgart, 1883) ("Württembergisches Urkundenbuch"), Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, I, p. VIII.
[302] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 84.
[303] Jordan (1986), p. 6.
[304] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[305] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XLIV, p. 583.
[306] RHC, Historiens occidentaux V (Paris, 1895), Ekkehardi Abbatis Uraugiensis Hierosolymita (“Ekkehard”) XXVI, p. 32.
[307] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.
[308] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[309] Annalista Saxo 1082.
[310] Haverkamp (1988), p. 110.
[311] Annales Stadenses 1105, MGH SS XVI, p. 318.
[312] Annalista Saxo 1066.
[313] Genealogia Welforum 9, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[314] Forester, T. (trans.) (1854) The Chronicles of Florence of Worcester with two continuations (London), 1051, p. 152.
[315] Barlow, F. (ed. and trans.) (1992) Vita Ædwardi Regis: The Life of King Edward who rests at Westminster (Oxford Medieval Texts), p. 38.
[316] Alberic de Trois Fontaines Chronica, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.
[317] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 350.
[318] Garmonsway, G. N. (trans) (1972) The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (Dent), D, 1052 [1051].
[319] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, I, p. VIII.
[320] Bernoldi Chronicon 1094, MGH SS V, p. 457.
[321] Necrologium Raitenbuchense, Freising Necrologies, p. 105.
[322] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "ETHELINDE von Northeim . The Annalista Saxo names "Heinricum Crassum comitem…Sifridum de Boumeneburh et Cononem comitem de Bichlinge et tres filias, ex quibus unam nomine Ethilindam accept Welpho dux Bawarie et postquam eam repudiavit duxit eam Herimannus comes de Calverla" as children of Otto von Northeim & his wife[1536]. The Annales Stadenses refers to the four daughters of Otto, specifying that "tertia fuit uxor Hermanni de Calvela, que genuit Ottonem et Heinricum comites de Ravenesberch" without naming her[1537]. Her first husband repudiated her immediately after the disgrace of her father whom Heinrich IV King of Germany deprived of the dukedom of Bavaria[1538].
     "m firstly (divorced 1070) WELF IV, son of ALBERTO AZZO II Marchese d'Este & his first wife Kunigunde von Altdorf [Este] ([1035/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Cyprus, removed to Weingarten, near Lake Constance). He was installed in 1070 as WELF I Duke of Bavaria.
     "m secondly [as his first wife,] HERMANN Graf von Calvelage, son of --- (-after 1144)."
Med Lands cites:
[1536] Annalista Saxo 1082.
[1537] Annales Stadenses 1105, MGH SS XVI, p. 318.
[1538] Haverkamp (1988), p. 110.12
He was Duke of Bavaria between 1070 and 1077.5,10 He was Crusade - First Crusade between 1095 and 1099.8 He was Duke of Bavaria between 1096 and 1101.5,10

Family 1

Unknown (?)

Family 3

Judith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland b. c 1033, d. 5 Mar 1094
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020474&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020475&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MODENA,%20FERRARA.htm#AlbertoAzzoIIdied1097.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ethelinde von Northeim: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00124983&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#EthelindeNortheimM1WelfIV
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-22, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020476&tree=LEO
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Judithdied1094.
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 166-23, p. 144.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 November 2019), memorial page for Welf I of Bavaria (1032–6 Nov 1101), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62396919, citing Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62396919/welf_i-of_bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders p. 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html#JB4
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre (s), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  22. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Welf IV.: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_IV.. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  23. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 271. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.

Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este1,2,3

M, #6667, b. 997, d. 20 August 1097
FatherAlberto Azzo I d'Este Marchese di Liguria4,5 b. c 970, d. 1029
MotherAdela/Adelaida (?)6 d. a 1012
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este was born in 997 at Modena, Provincia di Modena, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (now).2,3,7 He married Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf, daughter of Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf and Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg, in 1035;
His 1st wife.2,8,3,9,10 Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este married Gersende (?) de Maine, daughter of Heribert I "Eveille-Chien" (?) Comte du Maine, before 1055; her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.1,2,3,11,12,13
Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este died on 20 August 1097 at Modena, Provincia di Modena, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (now).2,1,3,7
Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este was buried after 20 August 1097 at Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     10 Jul 1009, Modena, Provincia di Modena, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
     DEATH     20 Aug 1097 (aged 88), Modena, Provincia di Modena, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
[Text copied from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Kunigunde von Altdorf 1020–1054
     Children
          Welf I of Bavaria 1032–1101
     BURIAL     Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy
     Created by: relative
     Added: 14 Sep 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 117071674.7
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Alberto Azzo was the son of Alberto Azzo I d'Este, Marchese in Liguria, and his wife Adelaida. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. His position as margrave of Milan and Liguria, and count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, made him a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.
     "Alberto married twice. His first marriage, to Kunizza, daughter of Welf II, Graf in Lechrain and Irmtrud/Imiza von Luxemburg, produced a son Welf IV who became duke of Bavaria and established the house of Braunschweig in Germany, then later the Hanoverian kings of England. Folco I, a son of Alberto's second marriage to Garsende de Maine, remained in Italy and his descendants flourished there for many centuries.
     "In 1069-1070 Alberto tried to acquire Maine for another son Hugo from his marriage to Garsende, on the grounds that she was the heiress of the previous count of Maine. Hugo was declared count, but could not prevail against the dukes of Normandy.
     "A pope (probably Benedict VIII or his brother John XIX) sent the younger Alberto on a mission to the Hungarians. In the mid- 1070s the much older Alberto attempted to mediate in the Investiture Controversy between the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV and Pope Gregory VII, but he later joined the pope's side. Around 1073 Alberto made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.
     "Alberto died on 20 August 1097 aged 100 years."2 GAV-27 EDV-27.

; This is the same person as:
”Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan” at Wikipedia, as
”Alberto Azzo II. d’Este” at Wikipedia (De.), as
”Alberto Azzo II d'Este” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Alberto Azzo II d'Este” at Wikipedia (It.)14,15,16,17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1-1 31.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.18


; Per Med Lands:
     "ALBERTO AZZO [II], son of ALBERTO Azzo [I] Conte di Luni & his wife --- ([996]-Vangadizza monastery 1097, after 13 Apr). "Oldericus Maginfredus marchio f. quondam…Maginfredi marchionis et Berta comitissa jugales filia q. Obberti marchionis" sold property "in comitatu Parmensi, Placensiensi, Ticinensi, Tortonensi, Vercellensi, Aquensi, Astensi, Eporediensi, Torinensi, Oradiensi, Albensi, Avigenensi, Aberganensi, Vigintimiliensi" to "Sigifredo presbitero filio q. Adelgisi", with "notitia propinquorum parentum suorum, id est Adalberti marchionis germani sui et Alberti infantis nepotis sui", by charter dated 6 Jun 1021[2]. He succeeded his father as Conte di Luni. Marchese. The Annalista Saxo calls him "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[3]. "Albertus qui Azo marchio vocatur…professus…lege Langobardorum" donated property "in comitatu Patavensis" to the monastery of Santa Maria in Vangadizza "in comitato Vicentino adque in comitato Patavino" to "Gaxdia puella…filia et germana nostra" by charter dated 26 Sep 1075[4]. A charter dated 31 May 1079 records an agreement between the church of Verona and "marchionem Azonem et Ugonem et Fulconem germanos filios eiusdem marchionis Azonis"[5]. The Genealogia Welforum calls him "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[6]. "Fulco filius Alberti marchionis qui Azo marchio" swore allegiance to "Ugo germano meo" by charter dated 6 Apr 1095, the text of which refers to their father as still living[7]. "Albertus marchio qui Azo marchio…[et] filius…Ugo" donated property to the monastery of Santa Maria in Vangadizza by charter dated 13 Apr 1097[8]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1097 of "Azzo marchio de Longobardia, pater Welfonis ducis de Baiowaria" commenting that he was "iam maior centenario"[9].
     "m firstly ([1035]) KUNIGUNDE von Altdorf, daughter of WELF [II] Graf von Altdorf & his wife Irmtrud im Moselgau [Wigeriche] ([1020]-31 Mar before 1055, bur Vangadizza monastery). The Genealogia Welforum names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf and his wife Imiza, specifying that she married "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[10]. The Annalista Saxo names "Cunizam" daughter of Welf, and her husband "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[11].
     "m secondly ([1049/51]) as her second husband, GERSENDE du Maine, repudiated wife of THIBAUT [III] Comte de Blois, daughter of HERIBERT [I] "Euigilans Canis/Eveille-chien" Comte du Maine & his wife ---([1025/35]-). The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Atho marchisius" left Maine in the hands of "Gaufridi de Meduana", also naming "uxor eiusdem marchisii Garcendis…filia Herberti Cenomannorum…comitis…Evigila Canem" and specifying that she had married firstly "Theobaldo duci Campanie" and that he had repudiated her[12]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom one married “Azsoni marchiso Liguriæ” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters)[13].
     "Mistress (1): MATILDA, sister of GUGLIELMO Vescovo, from Padua and Vedova.
     "Alberto Azzo [II] & his first wife had one child:
     "1. WELF [IV] ([1035/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Cyprus, removed to Weingarten, near Lake Constance).
     "Alberto Azzo [II] & his second wife had two children:
     "2. UGO d'Este (-1131).
     "3. FOLCO [I] d'Este (-15 Dec 1128).
     "Alberto Azzo [II] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
     "4. ADELASIA ."
Med Lands cites:
[2] Carutti, D. (1889) Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, marchionum in Italia (Turin) ("Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ"), L, p. 17.
[3] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[4] Gloria, A. (ed.) (1877) Codice Diplomatico Padovano al secolo sesto a tutto l´undecimo (Venice) ("Codice Diplomatico Padovano"), 223, p. 252.
[5] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 256, p. 280.
[6] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[7] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 314, p. 338.
[8] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 321, p. 344.
[9] Bernoldi Chronicon 1097, MGH SS V, p. 465.
[10] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[11] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[12] Busson, G. and Ledru, A. (eds.) (1902) Actus Pontificum Cenomannis in urbe degentium (Le Mans) ("Actus pontificum Cenomannis"), 377.
[13] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252.19


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Azzo II, Marchese d'Este, *997, +1097; 1m: ca 1035 Kunigunde Welf (*ca 1020 +ca 1055); 2m: Gersende, dau.of Cte Herbert I du Maine and ex-wife of Cte Thibaut III de Blois."3

; Per Genealogy.EU (House of Welfen): “H2. Kunigunde, *ca 1020, +before 1055; m.ca 1035 Marchese Azzo II d'Este (+1097)”.8

; Per Med Lands:
     "KUNIGUNDE ([1020]-31 Mar before 1055, bur Vangadizza Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf, and her husband "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[1859]. The Genealogia Welforum names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf and Imiza, specifying that she married "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[1860].
     "m ([1035]) as his first wife, ALBERTO AZZO II Conte di Luni [Este], son of ALBERTO AZZO I Conte di Luni & his first wife Valdriada Candriada (-1097, bur Vangadizza Monastery)."
Med Lands cites:
[1859] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[1860] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.10
He was Marchese d'Este between 1029 and 1097.17 He was Conte di Luni, Genova e Tortona between 1029 and 1097.17 He was Comte du Maine (jure uxoris Gersende) between 1069 and 1070.17

Family 1

Matilda Vescovo
Child

Family 2

Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf b. c 1020, d. b 31 Mar 1055
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020474&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020673&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ObertoIILunidiedafter1013B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaida: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020674&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 November 2019), memorial page for Albert Azzo II (10 Jul 1009–20 Aug 1097), Find A Grave Memorial no. 117071674, citing Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy ; Maintained by relative (contributor 47268827), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117071674/albert-azzo_ii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020473&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Kunigundediedbefore1055
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garsende de Maine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020139&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MAINE.htm#GersendeM1ThibautIIIBloisM2AzzoIIEste
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Azzo_II,_Margrave_of_Milan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Alberto Azzo II d'Este: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Azzo_II_d%27Este. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Alberto Azzo II. d’Este: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Azzo_II._d%E2%80%99Este. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  17. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Alberto Azzo II d'Este: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Azzo_II_d%27Este. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020474&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MODENA,%20FERRARA.htm#AlbertoAzzoIIdied1097.
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020475&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101

Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf1

F, #6668, b. circa 1020, d. before 31 March 1055
FatherWelf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf2,3,4,5,6 b. c 972, d. 10 Mar 1030
MotherErmentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg2,3,4,7 b. c 1000, d. a 2 Aug 1055
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf was born circa 1020 at Weingarten, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).2,8,3,4 She married Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este, son of Alberto Azzo I d'Este Marchese di Liguria and Adela/Adelaida (?), in 1035;
His 1st wife.9,2,10,3,4
Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf died before 31 March 1055.11,3,4
Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf was buried circa 31 March 1055 at Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1020, Weingarten, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     31 Aug 1054 (aged 33–34), Italy
     Kunigunde von Altdorf (also known as Cunegonde or Chuniza; c.1020 – 31 August 1054) was the ancestress of the younger House of Guelph, a cadet branch of the House of Este.
     She was the only daughter of Count Welf II von Altdorf (d. 1030) and his wife Ermengarde (d. 1057), daughter of Count Frederick of Luxembourg (d. 1019) and Irmentrud von Gleiberg. Kunigunde was a niece of the Empress Kunigunde (d. 1033). Her brother was Welf III (d. 1055), the last member of the Elder House of Welf.
     Kunigunde married c.1035 to Alberto Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, Luni, and Tortona. He was the only son of Alberto Azzo I and his wife Adelaide.
     They had one son:
** Welf IV, (between 1030 and 1040 – 9 November 1101 in Paphos, was Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077. He was named after his uncle, Welf III.

     Family Members
     Parents
          Welf II Of Altdorf unknown–1030
          Imiza de Luxembourg 1000 – unknown
     Spouse
          Albert Azzo II 1009–1097
     Siblings
          Welf III von Altdorf 1007–1055
     Children
          Welf I of Bavaria 1032–1101
     BURIAL     Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy
     Created by: Marti Utter
     Added: 16 Oct 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 137325323.8,4
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Azzo II, Marchese d'Este, *997, +1097; 1m: ca 1035 Kunigunde Welf (*ca 1020 +ca 1055); 2m: Gersende, dau.of Cte Herbert I du Maine and ex-wife of Cte Thibaut III de Blois."10

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALBERTO AZZO [II], son of ALBERTO Azzo [I] Conte di Luni & his wife --- ([996]-Vangadizza monastery 1097, after 13 Apr). "Oldericus Maginfredus marchio f. quondam…Maginfredi marchionis et Berta comitissa jugales filia q. Obberti marchionis" sold property "in comitatu Parmensi, Placensiensi, Ticinensi, Tortonensi, Vercellensi, Aquensi, Astensi, Eporediensi, Torinensi, Oradiensi, Albensi, Avigenensi, Aberganensi, Vigintimiliensi" to "Sigifredo presbitero filio q. Adelgisi", with "notitia propinquorum parentum suorum, id est Adalberti marchionis germani sui et Alberti infantis nepotis sui", by charter dated 6 Jun 1021[2]. He succeeded his father as Conte di Luni. Marchese. The Annalista Saxo calls him "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[3]. "Albertus qui Azo marchio vocatur…professus…lege Langobardorum" donated property "in comitatu Patavensis" to the monastery of Santa Maria in Vangadizza "in comitato Vicentino adque in comitato Patavino" to "Gaxdia puella…filia et germana nostra" by charter dated 26 Sep 1075[4]. A charter dated 31 May 1079 records an agreement between the church of Verona and "marchionem Azonem et Ugonem et Fulconem germanos filios eiusdem marchionis Azonis"[5]. The Genealogia Welforum calls him "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[6]. "Fulco filius Alberti marchionis qui Azo marchio" swore allegiance to "Ugo germano meo" by charter dated 6 Apr 1095, the text of which refers to their father as still living[7]. "Albertus marchio qui Azo marchio…[et] filius…Ugo" donated property to the monastery of Santa Maria in Vangadizza by charter dated 13 Apr 1097[8]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1097 of "Azzo marchio de Longobardia, pater Welfonis ducis de Baiowaria" commenting that he was "iam maior centenario"[9].
     "m firstly ([1035]) KUNIGUNDE von Altdorf, daughter of WELF [II] Graf von Altdorf & his wife Irmtrud im Moselgau [Wigeriche] ([1020]-31 Mar before 1055, bur Vangadizza monastery). The Genealogia Welforum names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf and his wife Imiza, specifying that she married "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[10]. The Annalista Saxo names "Cunizam" daughter of Welf, and her husband "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[11].
     "m secondly ([1049/51]) as her second husband, GERSENDE du Maine, repudiated wife of THIBAUT [III] Comte de Blois, daughter of HERIBERT [I] "Euigilans Canis/Eveille-chien" Comte du Maine & his wife ---([1025/35]-). The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Atho marchisius" left Maine in the hands of "Gaufridi de Meduana", also naming "uxor eiusdem marchisii Garcendis…filia Herberti Cenomannorum…comitis…Evigila Canem" and specifying that she had married firstly "Theobaldo duci Campanie" and that he had repudiated her[12]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom one married “Azsoni marchiso Liguriæ” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters)[13].
     "Mistress (1): MATILDA, sister of GUGLIELMO Vescovo, from Padua and Vedova.
     "Alberto Azzo [II] & his first wife had one child:
     "1. WELF [IV] ([1035/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Cyprus, removed to Weingarten, near Lake Constance).
     "Alberto Azzo [II] & his second wife had two children:
     "2. UGO d'Este (-1131).
     "3. FOLCO [I] d'Este (-15 Dec 1128).
     "Alberto Azzo [II] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
     "4. ADELASIA ."
Med Lands cites:
[2] Carutti, D. (1889) Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, marchionum in Italia (Turin) ("Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ"), L, p. 17.
[3] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[4] Gloria, A. (ed.) (1877) Codice Diplomatico Padovano al secolo sesto a tutto l´undecimo (Venice) ("Codice Diplomatico Padovano"), 223, p. 252.
[5] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 256, p. 280.
[6] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[7] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 314, p. 338.
[8] Codice Diplomatico Padovano, 321, p. 344.
[9] Bernoldi Chronicon 1097, MGH SS V, p. 465.
[10] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[11] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[12] Busson, G. and Ledru, A. (eds.) (1902) Actus Pontificum Cenomannis in urbe degentium (Le Mans) ("Actus pontificum Cenomannis"), 377.
[13] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252.12
GAV-27 EDV-27.

; This is the same person as:
”Kunigunde of Altdorf” at Wikipedia, as
”Kunigunde von Altdorf” at Wikipedia (De.),
and as ”Cunegonda di Altdorf” at Wikipedia (It.)13,14,15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1-1 31.3
Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf was also known as Kunizza (?)16 Kunigunde (?) von Altdorf was also known as Cunigunde (?) of Bavaria.2,16

; Per Med Lands:
     "KUNIGUNDE ([1020]-31 Mar before 1055, bur Vangadizza Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf, and her husband "Azoni marchioni de Langobardia de castris Calun et Estin"[1859]. The Genealogia Welforum names "Cunizam" as daughter of Welf and Imiza, specifying that she married "marchio Etius cum curte Elisina"[1860].
     "m ([1035]) as his first wife, ALBERTO AZZO II Conte di Luni [Este], son of ALBERTO AZZO I Conte di Luni & his first wife Valdriada Candriada (-1097, bur Vangadizza Monastery)."
Med Lands cites:
[1859] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[1860] Genealogia Welforum 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (House of Welfen): “H2. Kunigunde, *ca 1020, +before 1055; m.ca 1035 Marchese Azzo II d'Este (+1097)”.2

Family

Alberto Azzo II d'Este Marchese d'Este b. 997, d. 20 Aug 1097
Child

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020473&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Kunigundediedbefore1055. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud|Imiza von Luxemburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304873&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 November 2019), memorial page for Kunigunde von Altdorf (1020–31 Aug 1054), Find A Grave Memorial no. 137325323, citing Abbey of Vangadizza, Badia Polesine, Provincia di Rovigo, Veneto, Italy ; Maintained by Marti Utter (contributor 47720777), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/137325323/kunigunde-von_altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alberto Azzo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020474&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MODENA,%20FERRARA.htm#AlbertoAzzoIIdied1097.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunigunde_of_Altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Kunigunde von Altdorf: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunigunde_von_Altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  15. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Cunegonda di Altdorf: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunegonda_di_Altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020473&tree=LEO
  17. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020475&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101

Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf1,2

M, #6669, b. circa 972, d. 10 March 1030
FatherRudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria3,4,2,5,6 b. c 927, d. c 990
MotherIta von Öhningen2,3,6 b. 974, d. a 16 Oct 1000
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf was born circa 972 at Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).7,8 He married Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg, daughter of Friedrich I (?) Graf im Moselgau, sn of Gleiberg and Irmtrud von Lahngau Gräfin von Gleiberg, circa 1015.2,9,5,10,11,3,6
Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf died on 10 March 1030 at Bodman-Ludwigshafen, Landkreis Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).2,9,5,8,3,6
Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf was buried after 10 March 1030 at Weingarten Abbey, Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     10 Mar 1030, Bodman-Ludwigshafen, Landkreis Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     b: 972
     Welf II was a Swabian count and a member of the Elder House of Welf. He was a younger son of Count Rudolf II and Ita of Öhningen, a daughter of Duke Conrad I of Swabia of the Conradine dynasty. Welf opposed the election of the Salian count Conrad II as King of the Romans in 1024 because it did not suit his interests, but he had to eventually relent.[1] The next year he joined a rebellion launched by the Babenberg duke Ernest II of Swabia, but finally submitted in 1027. Welf II was married to Imiza, daughter of Count Frederick of Luxembourg. With Imiza, Welf had at least two children:
1. Welf III, Duke of Carinthia
2. Kunigunde of Altdorf

     Family Members
     Parents
          Rudolf II von Altdorf
     Spouse
          Imiza de Luxembourg 1000 – unknown
     Siblings
          Heinrich von Altdorf
          Richlind von Altdorf unknown–1045
     Children
          Welf III von Altdorf 1007–1055
          Kunigunde von Altdorf 1020–1054
     BURIAL     Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 8 Aug 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 150349118.8
     GAV-28 EDV-28.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.3

; This is the same person as ”Welf II, Count of Swabia” at Wikipedia, as ”Welf II d'Altdorf” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Welf II.” at Wikipedia (DE).12,13,14 Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf was also known as Guelph II (?) of Bavaria.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "WELF [II] (-10 Mar 1030, bur Altdorf). The Genealogia Welforum names "Heinricum, qui apud Lonon in venatione saxo percussis interiit, et Gwelfum huius nominis primum" as sons of Rudolf and Ita, specifying that he was buried at Weingarten[1837]. The Historia Welforum names (in order) "Heinricum et Guelfonem et filiam Richgardam" as the children of "Roudolfus" & his wife[1838]. The Annalista Saxo names "Welphum comitem" as son of Rudolf (brother of Eticho/Welf and Konrad, although this appears difficult to sustain chronologically)[1839]. Graf von Altdorf. Graf im Nori- und Inntal. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" renewed the privileges of Kloster Fulda by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1020, witnessed by "Godifridi ducis, Berinhardi ducis, Thiederici ducis, Welphonis comitis, Cunonis comitis, Kunrati comitis, Ottonis comitis, Adilbrahtis comitis, Bobonis comitis, Friderici comitis, Bezilini comitis, Ezonis comitis palatini"[1840], the order of witnesses presumably giving some idea of the relative importance of these named nobles at the court of Emperor Heinrich II at the time. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[1841]. His county around the Brenner pass was confiscated by Emperor Konrad II as a punishment for Welf having supported Ernst Duke of Swabia in his rebellion in 1030[1842]. He built the castle of Ravensburg on his Swabian lands which became the family's chief residence[1843]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "VI Id Mar" of "Ruodolfus com frater sancti Chuonradi…et Welf filius eius…hic sepulti"[1844].
     "m ([1015]) IRMTRUD [Imiza], daughter of [FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau] [Wigeriche] & his wife --- [von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-21 Aug [1055], bur Altomünster). The Historia Welforum names "de gente Salica de castro Glizberch, Imizam…sororem Heinrici ducis Noricorum et Friderici ducis Lotharingiorum et Adilberonis episcopi Metensis" as wife of "Guelfo…Roudolfi filius"[1845]. The Genealogia Welforum names "Salice --- de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf, specifying that she was buried at Altenmünster and that her dowry was "villam Moringen et Elisinam curtem in Longobardia"[1846]. Irmtrud´s father is shown above in square brackets to indicate doubt: there is some possibility that she was born from an earlier marriage of her mother´s, explained further in the document HESSEN. If that is correct, she was IRMTRUD [Imiza] daughter of --- von Gleiberg & his wife --- [von Hammerstein]. Jordan suggests that the land in Lombardy was probably near Este[1847], which could explain their daughter's marriage as her husband may have been a neighbouring landowner. After the death of her son, she contested his will under which he bequeathed all his property to the convent of Weingarten, and summoned her grandson from Italy to assume the inheritance in Swabia and Bavaria. The nuns of Weingarten were resettled in Altomünster in Bavaria, relocating the monks to Weingarten as part of the settlement of the dispute[1848]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[1849]. Herimannus names "Irmengarda, Welf comitis vidua" when recording the transfer to her of Altdorf by the monks[1850]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "XII Kal Sep" of "Irmindruot com que et Imiza mater Welfonis et Chuonize"[1851]."
Med Lands cites:
[1837] Genealogia Welforum 4, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1838] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 6, MGH SS XXI, p. 460.
[1839] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[1840] D H II 427, p. 542.
[1841] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1842] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1843] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1844] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.
[1845] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 8, MGH SS XXI, p. 460.
[1846] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[1847] Jordan (1986), pp. 3-4.
[1848] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1849] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1850] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1036, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[1851] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "[IRMTRUD [Imiza] (-after 2 Aug 1055, bur Altomünster). The Genealogia Welforum names "Salice---de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf, specifying that her dowry was "villam Moringen et Elisinam curtem in Longobardia"[93]. The possibility that Irmtrud/Imiza was “Gleiberg” not “Luxembourg”, born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her mother, is discussed above. Jordan suggests that the land in Lombardy was probably near Este[94]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[95]. The estimated date of her marriage suggests that Irmtrud was one of her parents´ older children.
     "m ([1015]) WELF [II] Graf von Altdorf, son of RUDOLF Graf von Altdorf & his wife Ita von Öhningen [Konradiner] (-10 Mar 1030, bur Altdorf).]"
Med Lands cites:
[93] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[94] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), pp. 3-4.
[95] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.11


; Per Racines et Histoire (Luxembourg): “Irmtrud (Imiza) de Luxembourg ° ~1000 + après 02/08/1055
     ép. ~1015 Welf II von Altdorf, comte de Lechrain + 10/03/1030 (fils de Rudolf et d’Ita von Öhningen)”.15

; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 3): “B8. Imiza (Ermengarde), *ca 1000, +1057; m. Welf II von Altdorf, Gf im Lechrain (+10.3.1030)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “G2. Welf II Gf von Altdorf, Gf im Lechrain, +10.3.1030; m.ca 1015 Irmtrud of Luxemburg."16,17

Family

Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg b. c 1000, d. a 2 Aug 1055
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020468&tree=LEO
  5. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28526
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 November 2019), memorial page for Welf II Of Altdorf (unknown–10 Mar 1030), Find A Grave Memorial no. 150349118, citing Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/150349118/welf_ii-of_altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud|Imiza von Luxemburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304873&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Imizadied1055MWelfII
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II,_Count_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Welf II d'Altdorf: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II_d%27Altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Welf II.: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II.. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Welfin (welf 1): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html#W2
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020473&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Kunigundediedbefore1055

Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg1,2

F, #6670, b. circa 1000, d. after 2 August 1055
FatherFriedrich I (?) Graf im Moselgau, sn of Gleiberg3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 965, d. 6 Oct 1019
MotherIrmtrud von Lahngau Gräfin von Gleiberg3,9,2,4,5,7,8,10 b. 972
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited4 Aug 2020
     Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg was born circa 1000 at Luxembourg (now).11,3,4 She married Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf, son of Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria and Ita von Öhningen, circa 1015.11,3,2,4,5,12,13
Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg was buried in 1055 at Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1000, Luxembourg
     DEATH     unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Imiza of Luxembourg (born in Luxembourg circa 995-1010-died in Bavaria after 02 August 1055) was the daughter of Frederick of Luxembourg (965–6 October 1019), count of Moselgau, who was a son of count Siegfried of Luxembourg and Hedwig of Nordgau.
     Circa 1015, Imiza married Welf II (died 10 March 1030), a Swabian count and a member of the Elder House of Welf.
     Their daughter, Kunigunde of Altdorf (born circa 1020-died 31 Aug 1054) married Alberto Azzo II (born 997 or 10 July 1009 in Modena, Italy – died 20 August 1097 in Modena), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana. He is considered to be the founder of Casa d'Este (House of Este), having been the first master of Este, a town of Padua, Italy.
     Altomünster Abbey (Kloster Altomünster) was a monastery in the small Bavarian market town of Altomünster. A small monastery was founded here by and named after Saint Alto, a wandering monk, in about 750.
     Sometime before 1000 the Welfs enlarged it and made it into a Benedictine abbey. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria resettled the monks in 1056 to the newly founded Weingarten Abbey in Altdorf (now also called Weingarten), while the nuns formerly resident at Altdorf moved to Altomünster, where they lived until the monastery was dissolved in 1488 by Pope Innocent VIII.
     In 1496 by grant of Duke George the Rich the Bridgettines of Maihingen were permitted to establish a Bridgettine monastery at Altomünster. The monastery was dissolved on 18 March 1803 during the secularisation of Bavaria, but was later revived. Today, along with a settlement in Bremen, it is the last Bridgettine monastery in Germany. Nearby is a museum of the history of the Bridgettine Order. (Wikipedia)
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Welf II Of Altdorf unknown–1030
     Children
          Kunigunde von Altdorf 1020–1054
     BURIAL     Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg
     Created by: Marti Utter
     Added: 16 Oct 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 137325802.14
Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg was buried after 2 August 1055 at Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1000, Luxembourg
     DEATH     unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Imiza of Luxembourg (born in Luxembourg circa 995-1010-died in Bavaria after 02 August 1055) was the daughter of Frederick of Luxembourg (965–6 October 1019), count of Moselgau, who was a son of count Siegfried of Luxembourg and Hedwig of Nordgau.
     Circa 1015, Imiza married Welf II (died 10 March 1030), a Swabian count and a member of the Elder House of Welf.
     Their daughter, Kunigunde of Altdorf (born circa 1020-died 31 Aug 1054) married Alberto Azzo II (born 997 or 10 July 1009 in Modena, Italy – died 20 August 1097 in Modena), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana. He is considered to be the founder of Casa d'Este (House of Este), having been the first master of Este, a town of Padua, Italy.
     Altomünster Abbey (Kloster Altomünster) was a monastery in the small Bavarian market town of Altomünster.
     A small monastery was founded here by and named after Saint Alto, a wandering monk, in about 750.
     Sometime before 1000 the Welfs enlarged it and made it into a Benedictine abbey. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria resettled the monks in 1056 to the newly founded Weingarten Abbey in Altdorf (now also called Weingarten), while the nuns formerly resident at Altdorf moved to Altomünster, where they lived until the monastery was dissolved in 1488 by Pope Innocent VIII.
     In 1496 by grant of Duke George the Rich the Bridgettines of Maihingen were permitted to establish a Bridgettine monastery at Altomünster. The monastery was dissolved on 18 March 1803 during the secularisation of Bavaria, but was later revived. Today, along with a settlement in Bremen, it is the last Bridgettine monastery in Germany. Nearby is a museum of the history of the Bridgettine Order. (Wikipedia)
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Welf II Of Altdorf unknown–1030
     Children
          Kunigunde von Altdorf 1020–1054
     BURIAL     Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg
     Created by: Marti Utter
     Added: 16 Oct 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 137325802.15
Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg died after 2 August 1055; Luxemburg 3 page says d. 1057; Genealogics says d. aft 2 Aug 1055; Ravilious says d. 1055.3,2,4,5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "WELF [II] (-10 Mar 1030, bur Altdorf). The Genealogia Welforum names "Heinricum, qui apud Lonon in venatione saxo percussis interiit, et Gwelfum huius nominis primum" as sons of Rudolf and Ita, specifying that he was buried at Weingarten[1837]. The Historia Welforum names (in order) "Heinricum et Guelfonem et filiam Richgardam" as the children of "Roudolfus" & his wife[1838]. The Annalista Saxo names "Welphum comitem" as son of Rudolf (brother of Eticho/Welf and Konrad, although this appears difficult to sustain chronologically)[1839]. Graf von Altdorf. Graf im Nori- und Inntal. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" renewed the privileges of Kloster Fulda by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1020, witnessed by "Godifridi ducis, Berinhardi ducis, Thiederici ducis, Welphonis comitis, Cunonis comitis, Kunrati comitis, Ottonis comitis, Adilbrahtis comitis, Bobonis comitis, Friderici comitis, Bezilini comitis, Ezonis comitis palatini"[1840], the order of witnesses presumably giving some idea of the relative importance of these named nobles at the court of Emperor Heinrich II at the time. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[1841]. His county around the Brenner pass was confiscated by Emperor Konrad II as a punishment for Welf having supported Ernst Duke of Swabia in his rebellion in 1030[1842]. He built the castle of Ravensburg on his Swabian lands which became the family's chief residence[1843]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "VI Id Mar" of "Ruodolfus com frater sancti Chuonradi…et Welf filius eius…hic sepulti"[1844].
     "m ([1015]) IRMTRUD [Imiza], daughter of [FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau] [Wigeriche] & his wife --- [von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-21 Aug [1055], bur Altomünster). The Historia Welforum names "de gente Salica de castro Glizberch, Imizam…sororem Heinrici ducis Noricorum et Friderici ducis Lotharingiorum et Adilberonis episcopi Metensis" as wife of "Guelfo…Roudolfi filius"[1845]. The Genealogia Welforum names "Salice --- de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf, specifying that she was buried at Altenmünster and that her dowry was "villam Moringen et Elisinam curtem in Longobardia"[1846]. Irmtrud´s father is shown above in square brackets to indicate doubt: there is some possibility that she was born from an earlier marriage of her mother´s, explained further in the document HESSEN. If that is correct, she was IRMTRUD [Imiza] daughter of --- von Gleiberg & his wife --- [von Hammerstein]. Jordan suggests that the land in Lombardy was probably near Este[1847], which could explain their daughter's marriage as her husband may have been a neighbouring landowner. After the death of her son, she contested his will under which he bequeathed all his property to the convent of Weingarten, and summoned her grandson from Italy to assume the inheritance in Swabia and Bavaria. The nuns of Weingarten were resettled in Altomünster in Bavaria, relocating the monks to Weingarten as part of the settlement of the dispute[1848]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[1849]. Herimannus names "Irmengarda, Welf comitis vidua" when recording the transfer to her of Altdorf by the monks[1850]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "XII Kal Sep" of "Irmindruot com que et Imiza mater Welfonis et Chuonize"[1851]."
Med Lands cites:
[1837] Genealogia Welforum 4, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1838] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 6, MGH SS XXI, p. 460.
[1839] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[1840] D H II 427, p. 542.
[1841] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1842] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1843] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1844] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.
[1845] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 8, MGH SS XXI, p. 460.
[1846] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[1847] Jordan (1986), pp. 3-4.
[1848] Jordan (1986), p. 4.
[1849] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1850] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1036, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[1851] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.13


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 128.4


; This is the same person as ”Imiza of Luxembourg” at Wikipedia.16 GAV-28 EDV-28. Ermentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg was also known as Imiza (Ermengarde) (?)3

; Per Med Lands:
     "[IRMTRUD [Imiza] (-after 2 Aug 1055, bur Altomünster). The Genealogia Welforum names "Salice---de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf, specifying that her dowry was "villam Moringen et Elisinam curtem in Longobardia"[93]. The possibility that Irmtrud/Imiza was “Gleiberg” not “Luxembourg”, born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her mother, is discussed above. Jordan suggests that the land in Lombardy was probably near Este[94]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "dux Welfo…cum uxore sua Irmindrude…de Glizberc" transferred Kloster Altorf "super montem"[95]. The estimated date of her marriage suggests that Irmtrud was one of her parents´ older children.
     "m ([1015]) WELF [II] Graf von Altdorf, son of RUDOLF Graf von Altdorf & his wife Ita von Öhningen [Konradiner] (-10 Mar 1030, bur Altdorf).]"
Med Lands cites:
[93] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria.
[94] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), pp. 3-4.
[95] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.5


; Per Racines et Histoire (Luxembourg): “Irmtrud (Imiza) de Luxembourg ° ~1000 + après 02/08/1055
     ép. ~1015 Welf II von Altdorf, comte de Lechrain + 10/03/1030 (fils de Rudolf et d’Ita von Öhningen)”.17

; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 3): “B8. Imiza (Ermengarde), *ca 1000, +1057; m. Welf II von Altdorf, Gf im Lechrain (+10.3.1030)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “G2. Welf II Gf von Altdorf, Gf im Lechrain, +10.3.1030; m.ca 1015 Irmtrud of Luxemburg."18,19

Family

Welf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf b. c 972, d. 10 Mar 1030
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud|Imiza von Luxemburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304873&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud|Imiza von Luxemburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304873&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Imizadied1055MWelfII. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091999&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Fredericdied1019B
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Irmentrud von Gleiberg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00092000&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Irmtrud) von Lahngau: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00092000&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 November 2019), memorial page for Imiza de Luxembourg (1000–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 137325802, citing Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg ; Maintained by Marti Utter (contributor 47720777), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/137325802/imiza-de-luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 25 July 2020), memorial page for Imiza de Luxembourg (1000–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 137325802, citing Altmünster Abbey, Luxembourg, Canton de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg; Maintained by Marti Utter (contributor 47720777), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/137325802
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imiza_of_Luxembourg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Welfin (welf 1): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html#W2
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020473&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Kunigundediedbefore1055

Welf III (?) Duke of Carinthia1

M, #6671, d. 13 November 1055
FatherWelf II (?) Graf in Lechrain, Graf von Altdorf1,2,3 b. c 972, d. 10 Mar 1030
MotherErmentrude/Irmtrud/Imiza (?) von Luxemburg1 b. c 1000, d. a 2 Aug 1055
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Welf III (?) Duke of Carinthia died on 13 November 1055.1
     ; Duke of Carinthia.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Judith (?)1

F, #6672
FatherRudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne1 b. 880, d. 25 Oct 912
MotherWilla I (?) of Vienne1 b. Dec 873, d. 14 Jun 929
Last Edited25 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html

Sir Robert Plumpton of Plumpton1

M, #6673
Last Edited10 Nov 2002
     Sir Robert Plumpton of Plumpton married Isabel le Scrope, daughter of Henry le Scrope Knt., PC, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan/Agnes (?).1

Family

Isabel le Scrope b. 24 Aug 1337, d. 19 Apr 1407
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scrope of Danby Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Ita von Öhningen1

F, #6674, b. 974, d. after 16 October 1000
FatherKonrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen1,2,3,4,5,6 b. 920
MotherRichlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben1,3,5,7 b. 950, d. 999
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Ita von Öhningen was born circa 952 at Saxony, Germany (now).8 She married Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria, son of Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria and Siburgis (?).9,10,3 Ita von Öhningen was born in 974.11
Ita von Öhningen died after 16 October 1000.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: I.1-9.1 GAV-29 EDV-29. Ita von Öhningen was also known as Itha von Ohningen.8 Ita von Öhningen was also known as Itta of Swabia.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ita von Oeningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020469&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  3. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, duke Cuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120359&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Konraddied997B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wetterau Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/wetterau.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28529
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020468&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  11. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis von Altdorf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331139&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Richlinddied1045MAdalberoEbersberg
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020470&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030

Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria1,2,3

M, #6675, b. circa 901, d. after 949
FatherHeinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen'1,2,4,5,6 d. c 975
MotherAtha/Beata von Hohenwart2,5 d. a 975
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria married Siburgis (?)7 Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria was born circa 901.8
Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria died after 949.3
     GAV-30 EDV-30.

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.1

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Siburgis (?) b. c 903
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020466&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich von Hohenwart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020463&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Heinrichdied934MAtaHohenwart. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Stammliste der Welfen: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stammliste_der_Welfen#Die_schw%C3%A4bischen_Welfen. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28531
  8. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28530
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eticho: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020467&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020468&tree=LEO

Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen1

M, #6676, b. 920
FatherUdo (?) Count in the Wetterau, Lord of Rheingau, Lahngau1,2 b. c 900, d. 2 Dec 949
MotherCunegonde (?) de Vermandois1,3 b. c 882, d. 2 Dec 949
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited7 Aug 2020
     Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen was born in 920 at Saxony, Germany (now).4,5,1 He married Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben, daughter of Liudolf (?) Duke of Swabia and Ida/Ita (?) von Schwaben, in 968.6,7,1,8,9
Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen died on 20 August 997.10,6,1,8
     ; This is the same person as:
”Conrad I, Duke of Swabia” at Wikipedia, as
”Conrad Ier de Souabe” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Konrad I. (Schwaben)” at Wikipedia (De.)11,12,13

; NB: There is uncertainty concerning the paternity of Konrad. Med Lands offers this summary of the two main theories:
     "Considerable controversy surrounds the paternity of these children. Graf Konrad son of Gebhard (died 982) and Graf Udo son of Gebhard (died 949) have both been proposed as their father, Jackman being the principal proponent of the former theory while Hlavitschka has written extensively in support of the latter. It is unnecessary to repeat the detailed arguments in support of each case, as they are fully set out elsewhere, and particularly because each has appeal and neither is obviously preferable. From a purely chronological point of view, the estimated birth date range of the daughter Judith does suggest more difficulty in sustaining the argument in favour of Graf Konrad being their father. The introduction of the name Heribert into the family suggests a strong family connection between these four siblings and the Vermandois family. As shown above, it is suspected that the wives of Gebhard (died 949) and Udo son of Gebhard (also died 949) were daughters of Héribert I Comte de Vermandois. However, in neither case is it obvious that the four siblings shown below were descended from these sisters. In the case of Gebhard, it appears difficult to identify his known son Konrad with Konrad who succeeded as duke of Swabia in 983, and (as noted above) it is chronologically hard to sustain that the siblings were the children of Gebhard's known son Konrad. In the case of Udo son of Gebhard, his known son Udo was recorded as bishop of Strasbourg so could not be the same person as Udo, one of the four siblings shown below, who was killed in 982. All these reservations suggest that there may be a completely different explanation for the parentage of these four siblings from the two theories of Jackman and Hlavitschka."
     The four individuals covered by this discussion are:
1. JUDITH ([925/30]-16 Oct [973], bur Heslinge). m ([946]) as his first wife, HEINRICH von Stade Graf im Heilangau
2. UDO (-killed in battle Cotrone, in Calabria 14 Jul 982).
3. KONRAD von Öhningen (-20 Aug 997).
4. HERIBERT (-992). m IRMGARD, daughter of GODEFROI Comte de Verdun & his wife Mathilde of Saxony [Billung]

Conclusion: I have chosen to show the lineage as theorized by Hlavitschka and shown in Europäische Stammtafeln (ES):
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 8/9.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 4.

The studies by Jackman and Hlavitschka seem to be (from Wikipedia (De.)):
1. Donald C. Jackman: The Konradiner. A Study in Genealogical Methodology (= Studien zur europäischen Rechtsgeschichte. Veröffentlichungen des Max-Planck-Instituts für Europäische Rechtsgeschichte. Band 47). Klostermann, Frankfurt am Main 1990, ISBN 3-465-02226-2.
2. Eduard Hlawitschka: Konradiner-Genealogie, unstatthafte Verwandtenehen und spätottonisch-frühsalische Thronbesetzungspraxis. Ein Rückblick auf 25 Jahre Forschungsdisput. MGH, Studien und Texte 32, Hannover 2003, ISBN 3-7752-5732-2.
** eine ergebnisoffene Rezension dazu von Caspar Ehlers, Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte, Göttingen, in: Concilium medii aevi 7 (2004) S. 1017–1018 online (als pdf über diese Seite abrufbar)
** eine weitgehend positive Rezension von Franz-Reiner Erkens kann hier nachgelesen werden

GA Vaut.14,15,13

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 8/9.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 4.1
GAV-29 EDV-29.

; Per Genealogics: "Konrad was born about 920. When Duke Otto I of Swabia unexpectedly died during the imperial campaign in Italy of 981-982, he left no heirs. To fill the vacancy, Emperor Otto II appointed Konrad as Duke of Swabia. Konrad is notable for being the first Swabian duke to keep the title in the family; after his death in 997 he was succeeded by his son Hermann II. With his wife Regelint, daughter of Liudolf, duke of Swabia (the son of Emperor Otto I 'the Great'), and Idea/Ita von Schwaben, he had at least seven children, including his successor Hermann II and three daughters who would have progeny. Konrad died on 20 August 997."1 Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen was also known as Conrad Count in the Rheingau.10 Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen was also known as CunoKuno Count of Ohningen. Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen was also known as Conrad I (?) Duke of Swabia.11 Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen was also known as Kuno Graf von Ohningen.4,16

; Per Genealogy.EU (Wetterau): “D2. Konrad I von Wetterau, Duke of Swabia (982-997), Gf von Oenningen, +20.8.997; m.Regelindis von Schwaben (+ca 990)”.17 He was Duke of Swabia & Judith between 983 and 997.10,6,11

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, duke Cuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120359&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, count Udo von der Wetterau: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00726526&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Cunegonde|Kunigunde) de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00726527&tree=LEO
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I965
  5. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-4, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Konraddied997B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 167-20, p. 144.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I,_Duke_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Conrad Ier de Souabe: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_Ier_de_Souabe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Konrad I. (Schwaben): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_I._(Schwaben). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Konraddied997A
  15. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 1 July 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 1 page (Grafen von Diessen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/diessen1.html
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wetterau Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/wetterau.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Oenningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331094&tree=LEO
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 1 page (Grafen von Diessen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen1.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza von Oenningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331098&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Kunigunddied1020
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#JudithdauKonradSwabiaM1Rheinfelden
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120357&tree=LEO
  24. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44919
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ita von Oeningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020469&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  27. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44845

Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben1,2

F, #6677, b. 950, d. 999
FatherLiudolf (?) Duke of Swabia2,1,3 b. c 930, d. 6 Sep 957
MotherIda/Ita (?) von Schwaben1,4,5 d. bt 1042 - 1071
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited30 Nov 2020
     Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben was born in 950.6 She was born circa 952 at Saxony, Germany (now).7 She married Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen, son of Udo (?) Count in the Wetterau, Lord of Rheingau, Lahngau and Cunegonde (?) de Vermandois, in 968.2,8,9,10,1
Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben died in 999.7
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Wetterau): “D2. Konrad I von Wetterau, Duke of Swabia (982-997), Gf von Oenningen, +20.8.997; m.Regelindis von Schwaben (+ca 990)”.11

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.1 9.1 GAV28 EDV-28.

; This is the same person as ”Richlind” at Wikipedia (De.)12 GAV-29. Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben was also known as Reginlint (?)13 Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben was also known as Richilde von Saxony.7

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080197&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida/Ita von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080198&tree=LEO
  5. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ
  6. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10930
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 241-4, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, duke Cuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120359&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Konraddied997B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wetterau Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/wetterau.html
  12. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Richlind: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richlind. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN von Oenningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331094&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 1 page (Grafen von Diessen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen1.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunizza von Oenningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331098&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Kunigunddied1020
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#JudithdauKonradSwabiaM1Rheinfelden
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120357&tree=LEO
  20. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44919
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ita von Oeningen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020469&tree=LEO
  22. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44845

Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire1,2,3

M, #6678, b. 23 November 912, d. 7 May 973
FatherHeinrich I "der Vogelsteller/The Fowler/l'Oiseleur" (?) Emperor of Germany, Duke of Saxony, Brunswick and Zelle1,2,4,5,6,7 b. c 876, d. 2 Jul 936
MotherSaint Mathilde von Ringelheim Countess von Ringelheim, Queen of Germany1,8,2,5,7,9,10 b. c 890, d. 14 Mar 968
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire was born on 23 November 912 at Wallhausen, Landkreis Mansfeld-Südharz, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany (now).1,2,3,11,12,13 He married Eadgyth (Edith) (?) of Wessex, daughter of Edward I "the Elder" (?) King of Wessex and Elfleda|Aelflaed (?), in September 929;
His 1st wife; Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1 and Liudolfer pages) say m. 930; Genealogics says m . 929.14,15,1,3,16,11,13,17,18 Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire married Saint Adélaïde (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Rudolf II (?) King of Upper Burgundy, King of Italy and Berthe (?) of Swabia, in October 951 at Pavia, Provincia di Pavia, Lombardia, Italy (now); her 3rd husband; Weis AR7 147-19 says m. aft. 951; Leo van de Pas says m. Oct 951.19,20,21,1,3,22,23,13
Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire died on 7 May 973 at Memleben, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany (now), at age 60.24,19,1,2,3,11,12,13
Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire was buried after 7 May 973 at Cathedral of Saints Maurice and Katharina, Magdeburg, Stadtkreis Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     23 Nov 912, Wallhausen, Landkreis Mansfeld-Südharz, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
     DEATH     7 May 973 (aged 60), Memleben, Burgenlandkreis, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
     Holy Roman Emperor. Born in 912 in Wallhausen, his parents where Henry I, King of the Romans (The Fowler) and Matilda of Ringelheim. He married Edith, the daughter of Edward I. (the Elder) in 930. They had a happy marriage and had six children. He succeeded his father as King in July 936, and was crowned in Aachen on August 7. He had to defend his kingship mainly against relatives that thought they had better reasons to be Henry’s successor. The fighting stopped in 954 when the Hungarians started to threaten the kingdom. In 951 he went to Italy and rescued Adelheid of Burgundy, the widow of King Lothar of Italy, who was imprisoned by Berengar II of Ivrea. He married Adelheid later that year. In August 955 he defeated the Hungarians near Augsburg. Pope John XII called for Otto's help when Berengar II threatened the papal state. Otto secured his sons succession to the throne and went to Italy. On February 2, 962 he and his wife were crowned Emperor and Empress. He was the first to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor by the hand of a Pope. He returned to Germany but was again called to Italy, this time by Pope John XIII, for help. To settle the conflict with Byzantium he crowned his son co-regent in 967 and upon his return to Germany married him to the Byzantium princess Theophano in 972. He died in 973 in the Palatinate of Memleben. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich I of Germany 876–936
          Mathilde von Ringelheim 895–968
     Spouses
          Edith of Wessex 910–946
          Adelheid of Burgundy 931–999
     Siblings
          Hedwig of Saxony
          Gerberga of Saxony 913–969
          Heinrich I von Bayern 920–955
          Louis de France 920–954
          Bruno 925–965
     Children
          Liudolf von Schwaben 930–957
          Liutgard of Saxony 931–953
          Otto 955–983
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Saints Maurice and Katharina, Magdeburg, Stadtkreis Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 22 Jul 2004
     Find A Grave Memorial 9167602.3,12,13
     ; Per Catholic Enc.:
     "Otto I, the Great - Roman emperor and German king, b. in 912; d. at Memleben, 7 May, 973; son of Henry I and his consort Mathilda. In 929 he married Edith, daughter of King Athelstan of England. He succeeded Henry as king in 936. His coronation at Aachen showed that the Carlovingian traditions of empire were still in force. Otto projected a strong central power, which was opposed by the German spirit of individualism. Otto's brother Henry headed those great insurrectionary movements which Otto was first obliged to suppress. The new Duke of Bavaria, Eberhard, refused to pay homage to the king. Otto subdued Bavaria and bestowed the ducal throne upon Arnulf's brother Berthold. This attitude towards the ducal, by the royal, power, now for the first time openly assumed, roused strong opposition. The Franks, ancient rivals of the Saxons, resented this absorption of power. The Frankish Duke Eberhard formed an alliance with Otto's half-brother, Thankmar, and with other disaffected nobles. Otto's younger brother Henry and the unruly Duke Eiselbert of Lorraine raised the banner of insurrection. Agitation was stirred up on the Rhine and in the royal Palatinate on the Saale. The affair first took a decisive turn when Dukes Eberhard and Giselbert fell in the battle of Andernach. The victory did not, however, result in absolute power. An internecine agitation in Franconia between the lesser nobles and the duchy favoured the king. Henry now became reconciled with his royal brother, but his insincerity was manifest when, shortly after, he conspired with the Archbishop of Mainz and the seditious border nobles to assassinate Otto. The plot was discovered. In 941 there was a final reconciliation. The monarchic principle had triumphed over the particularism of the nobles, and the way was paved for a reorganization of the constitution. Otto made good use of his success. The hereditary duchies were filled by men closely connected with the royal house. Franconia was held by Otto in his own possession; Lorraine fell to Conrad the Red, his son-in-law; his brother Henry received Bavaria, having meanwhile married Judith, daughter of the Bavarian duke; while Swabia was bestowed upon his son Ludolph. The power of these dukes was substantially reduced. Otto was manifestly endeavouring to restore their ancient official character to the duchies. This belittling of their political position suited his design to make his kingdom more and more the sole exponent of the imperial idea. It would have been a significant step in the right direction could he have made it an hereditary monarchy, and he worked energetically towards this object.
     "The apparently united realm now reverted to Charlemagne's policies in the regions where he had paved the way. The Southern races promoted the work of Germanizing and Christianizing in the adjacent Slav states, and by degrees German influence spread to the Oder and throughout Bohemia. The ancient idea of universal empire now possessed Otto's mind. He endeavoured to extend his suzerainty over France, Burgundy, and Italy, and welcomed the quarrel between Hugo of France and Ludwig IV, each of whom had married one of his sisters. King and dukes in France balanced the scales of power which Otto could grasp at any time as supreme arbitrator. With similar intent he turned the private quarrels of the reigning house of Burgundy to account. Conrad of Burgundy now appeared as Otto's protégé. More significant was the attitude he was about to assume towards the complicated situation in Italy. The spiritual and moral debasement in the Italian Peninsula was shocking, even in Rome. The names of Theodora and Marozia recall an unutterably sad chapter of church history. The disorder in the capital of Christendom was only a symptom of the conditions throughout Italy. Upper Italy witnessed the wars of Berengarius of Friuli, crowned emperor by Marozia's son, John X, against Rudolph II of Upper Burgundy. After the assassination of Berengarius in 924, the strife was renewed between this Rudolph and Hugo of Lower Burgundy. Hugo finally became sole ruler in Italy and assumed the imperial throne. But his supremacy was soon overthrown by Berengarius of Ivrea, against whom, also, there appeared a growing opposition in favour of Adelaide, the daughter of Rudolph II of Upper Burgundy, to suppress which Berengarius obtained forcible possession of the princess. All these disorders had been studied by Otto. Convinced of the significance of the ancient ideas of empire, he wished to subject Italy to his authority, basing his right upon his royal rank. In 951 he came to Italy, released Adelaide and married her, whilst Berengarius swore allegiance to him. Under the influence of the Roman Alberich, the son of Marozia, Pope Agapetus refused the imperial crown to the German king. But even without the coronation, the universality of his rule was apparent. He stood de facto at the head of the West. The royal power was now in need of the strongest support. New and dangerous insurrections demonstrated the lack of internal solidarity. Particularism once more raised its head. Otto's son Ludolph was the spirit of the new uprising. He demanded a share in the government and was especially irritated by the influence of Otto's Burgundian consort. The particularist element assembled in Ludolph's camp. It fermented throughout almost the entire duchy and broke out openly in many parts. The danger was more threatening than it had been in the first insurrection. On 954 the Magyars once more thronged into the empire. Owing to this crisis, the necessity for a strong, central power was generally recognized, and the insurrection died out. It was definitively terminated at the Imperial Diet of Auerstadt, where it was announced that Conrad and Ludolph had forfeited their duchies. Meanwhile the Magyar hordes surrounded Augsburg. Bishop Ulrich heroically defended the threatened city. In the great battle on the Lechfelde in 955, the Hungarian army was completely routed by Otto, who had advanced to the defence of the city. By this victory he freed Germany finally from the Hungarian peril. It marked a crisis in the history of the Magyar race, which now became independent and founded an empire with definite boundaries. It also caused Otto to realize that his great object of preventing the participation of power with the duchies was not attainable by force or through the prestige of his kingly rank. He at once endeavoured to obtain a strong support from the German Church throughout the empire.
     "The Ottonian system, a close alliance of the German realm with the Church, was begun. Charlemagne, too, had carried out the great conception of unity of Church and State, but the ecclesiastical idea had given a religious colouring to Frankish statesmanship, whilst Otto planned a State Church, with the spiritual hierarchy a mere branch of the interior government of the realm. In order to solve this problem Otto was first constrained to permeate the Church with new spiritual and moral life and also free himself from the dominion of the lay aristocracy. His own deeply religious nature was his best guarantee. Some part of the spirit of ascetic piety which distinguished his mother, Mathilda, was found also in the son; and his brother Bruno, later Archbishop of Cologne, as the clever representative of ecclesiastical views, also exercised a great influence upon the king's religious dispositions. The close union of Church and State had an equally salutary effect upon both of the powers concerned. By granting the Church such royal domains as were not in use, the State could devote its revenues to military purposes. For the united realms this situation was likewise rich in blessings, since under the protection of bishops, commerce and trade were developed on the great ecclesiastical estates, and the lower classes received from the Church protection against the nobles. The kingdom everywhere retained supremacy over the Church: the king could nominate bishops and abbots; the bishops were subject to the royal tribunals; and synods could only be called with the royal approval. The German court became the centre of religious and spiritual life. In the so-called Ottonian renaissance, however, women were chiefly concerned, led by women of the royal family: Mathilda, Gerberga, Judith, Adelaide, and Theophano. Quedlinburg, founded by Otto in 936, was an influential centre of culture. But this Ottonian system depended upon one premise: if it were to benefit the State, the king must control the Church. As a matter of fact, the supreme authority over the German Church was the pope. Yet Otto's policy of imperialism was rooted in the recognition of the above premise. The conquest of Italy should result in the subjection of the highest ecclesiastical authority to German royalty. Otto was consequently obliged to make this campaign; and the much discussed question of the motive dictating the imperial policy is resolved. The unworthy John XII was at that time reigning in Rome. He was the son of Alberich, the Tyrant of Rome, whose covetous glances were directed towards the Exarchate and the Pentapolis. A rival in these aspirations rose in the person of Berengarius who endeavoured to extend his rule over Rome. Otto complied with the pope's request for aid, which exactly suited his projected church policy. He had previously caused his son, Otto, a minor, to be elected and anointed king at the Diet of Worms in 961. He left his brother Bruno, and his natural son, Wilhelm, regents in Germany, and journeyed over the Brenner and thus to Rome, where he was crowned emperor on 2 Feb., 962. On this occasion the so-called Ottonian privilege was conferred, whose genuineness has been frequently, though unjustly, attacked. In its first part this privilege recalls the Pactum Illudovici of 817. It confirms the grants which the Church received from the Carlovingians and their successors. The second part goes back to the Constitution of Lothair (824), according to which the consecration of kings should not be permitted before swearing allegiance to the German ruler. When Otto marched against Berengarius, Pope John entered into treasonable relations with the emperor's enemies; whereupon Otto returned to Rome and forced the Romans to take an oath never to elect a pope without his own or his son's approval. John was deposed and a layman, Leo VIII, placed upon the papal throne. Then Berengarius was defeated in his turn and carried a prisoner to Bamberg. Once more Rome, always in a state of unrest, rose in arms. ,p>The exiled pope, John, forced his supplanter to flee. But John died in 964, and the Romans elected a new pope, Benedict V. The emperor energetically restored order and Leo was reinstated in his position. It was already apparent that the emperor really controlled the papacy which occupied the position of a mere link in the German constitution. The Ottonian system was of the greatest significance to Germany in her position towards the secular powers. How greatly the German King was strengthened through the close alliance between Church and State and how it enhanced the prestige of the empire, is evident from the progress that Teutonism and Christianity were making in Slav territory. Otto chose Magdeburg, for which he had a special attachment, as the local centre of this new civilization, and raised it to an archbishopric.
     "Recurring disorders now recalled him to Rome. The pope whom he had chosen, John XIII, found antagonists in the Roman nobility. The emperor performed his duties as protector of the Church with stern justice and punished the turbulent nobles. John XIII then crowned his son, Otto, emperor. As a logical consequence of his imperial policy, he now openly avowed his intention of acquiring Lower Italy. His supremacy would be absolutely safeguarded if he succeeded in gaining possession of the southern part of the peninsula. Otto, however, finally abandoned the war in the south. His son's prospect of obtaining a Byzantine princess for his bride turned the scale against it. The old German axiom of legitimacy, which was once more honoured in this marriage, was destined later on to revenge itself bitterly.
     "Otto was buried at Magdeburg. His contemporaries compared his tremendous physical strength to that of a lion. He was a Saxon through and through. In his youth he had learned all the arts of the profession of arms. Though subject to violent fits of temper, and conscious of his power and genius, he prayed devoutly as a child. A shrewd calculator, always convincing and always toiling, he correctly estimated the importance of diplomatic negotiations. He was a keen observer and possessed a fine knowledge of human nature which always enabled him to select the proper persons for important offices in the government.
     "KÖPKE AND DÖNNIGES, Jahrbücher des deutschen Reiches unter Otto dem Grossen (Berlin, 1838); KÖPKE AND DÜMMLER, Kaiser Otto der Grosse (Leipzig, 1876); FICKER, Das deutsche Kaiserreich in seinen universellen und nationalen Beziehungen (Innsbruck, 1861); VON SYBEL, Die deutsche Nation und das Kaiserreich (Düsseldorf, 1862); SACKUR, Die Quellen für den ersten Römerzug Ottos I in Strassburger Festschrift zur 46. Versammlung deutscher Philologen (Strasburg, 1901); SICKEL, Das Privilegium Otto I für die römische Kirche vom Jahre 962 (Innsbruck, 1883); MENKEL, Ottos I Beziehungen zu den deutschen Erzbischofen seiner Zeit und die Leistungen der letzteren für Staat, Kirche und Kultur (Program, Magdeburg, 1900); MITTAG, Erzbischof Friedrich von Mainz und die Politik Ottos des Grossen (Halle, 1895).
     "F. KAMPERS Transcribed by Gerald Rossi
The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XI, Copyright © 1911 by Robert Appleton Companym Online Edition Copyright © 2003 by K. Knightm Nihil Obstat, February 1, 1911. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor, Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York."2 GAV-29 EDV-31.

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "King Otto I (the Great). Otto was crowned and anointed at Aachen, Charlemagne's capital; his coronation banquet revived the Carolingian coronation banquet (of Roman origin), at which the duke of Franconia served ceremonially as steward, the duke of Swabia as cup bearer, the duke of Lorraine as chamberlain, and the duke of Bavaria as marshal.
     "Otto vigorously asserted royal authority (a three-year war reduced the dukes of Bavaria, Franconia, Lorraine, and Saxony). He followed the policy of keeping the great duchies (except Saxony) in his own hands or those of his family.
     "951-52: Otto's first expedition to Italy to keep the passes through the mountains open. Marriage to Adelheid and assumption of the crown of Italy; the pope refused him imperial coronation; Berengar of Ivrea, forced into vassalage, ceded the marks of Verona, Friuli, Istria (the keys to the passes) to Otto's brother Henry, duke of Bavaria.
     "953: Revolt of Otto's son (Ludolf, duke of Swabia), his son-in-law Conrad (duke of Lorraine), and others (suppressed, 955).
     "955: Battle of Lechfeld, a plain near Augsburg in southwest Germany, drained by the Lech River. Otto, with an army recruited from all the duchies, ended the Magyar menance with a great victory. Defeat of the Wends on the Recknitz River. Reestablishment and colonization with Bavarians of Charlemagne's East Mark (Austria). Emperor Otto I decisively defeated the raiding Hungarians. From this time on, the Hungarians began to settle down and establish a frontier.
     "961-964: Otto's second expedition to Italy on the appeal of Pope John XII for protection. Assumption of the crown of Italy at Pavia
     "962: Imperial coronation by the pope: Revival of the Roman Empire in the West. Otto put a temporary end to feudal anarchy in Rome, deposed one pope and nominated another, and compelled the pope to recognize the emperor's right to approve or reject papal elections.
     "Otto's coronation at Pavia as king of Italy and his coronation by the pope as Roman emperor, marked the revival of the Roman Empire. Otto confirmed his predecessors' grants in the Patrimonium Petri (probably with additions), but carefully reserved the imperial right to sanction papal elections and treated the pope like a German bishop (i.e., subject to the state). Otto also exacted a promise from the Romans not to elect a pope without imperial consent. He established a precedent by calling a synod at Rome that deposed (963) Pope John XII for various crimes, and selected a (lay) successor, Leo VIII (963-64). This synod opened a period of about a hundred years when the papacy was dominated by the German emperors and by the counts of Tusculum, vassals of the emperors, who had the title of patricius in Rome. In the same period, the bishops in the west lost the position they had won in the 9th century and became increasingly dependent on the kings and feudal nobility, and increasingly secular in outlook. The homage of Pandolf I for Capua and Benevento (967) and his investiture with the duchy of Spoleto mark the beginning of the long imperial effort to include southern Italy in the empire.
     "Otto I, Roman emperor in the west, claimed suzerainty over the Lombards in southern Italy, initiating a period of friction with Constantinople, which was only temporarily broken by the marriage of Otto II and the Byzantine princess Theophano (972).
     "966-972: Otto's third expedition to Italy: deposition of one pope, restoration of another; nomination of a new pope; punishment of the Romans. Imperial coronation (967) of the future Otto II and assertion of suzerainty over Capua and Benevento (967).
     "Otto, with the able assistance of his brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, began a cultural revival (the so-called Ottonian Renaissance) in the manner of Charlemagne; late in life, he learned to read, but not to speak, Latin; Bruno knew Greek. The cosmopolitan court literary circle included Irish and English monks and learned Greeks and Italians, notably Liutprand of Cremona(History of the Deeds of Otto, a major source on the reign, and Narrative of an Embassy to Constantinople, basic for studying East-West relations). Great literary activity of the monasteries: Widukind of Corvey (Res Gestae Saxonicae); Roswitha, the nun of Gandersheim, author of theCarmen de Gestis Ottonis and of learned Latin comedies in a bowdlerized Terentine style, celebrating saintly virginity; the vernacular Heliand (9th century), a Christian epic; Ekkekard of St. Gall's Waltherius, inspired by German legends."25

; This is the same person as:
”Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor” at Wikipedia, as
”Otton Ier (empereur du Saint-Empire)” at Wikipédia (FR.),
and as ”Otto I. (HRR)” at Wikipedia (DE.)26,27,28

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 3.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.5


; Per Genealogics:
     "Otto was born on 3 November 912, the eldest son of Emperor Elect Heinrich 'the Fowler' and Matilda von Ingelheim. Otto's younger years were disturbed by quarrels between his parents. His mother wanted their second son Heinrich, seven years younger than Otto, acknowledged as the heir. However when Heinrich the Fowler died in 936, Otto succeeded him aged twenty-four.
     "In his younger years he preferred to be away from his mother, and accompanied his father subduing the tribes in Bavaria and Suabia. When he was seventeen he married Eadgyth, a daughter of the English king, Edward 'the Elder'. However, his mother's thoroughly religious education left its mark, as he rarely missed attendance at mass and founded several convents. Otto and Eadgyth had two children, Liudolf and Liudgard, who would have progeny.
     "Otto never learned to read or write, which in later life he resented and tried to remedy. He did learn a little French, but not enough to speak it and he had no knowledge of Latin. However he was very intelligent, had a good memory and was an excellent judge of people. He loved hunting and riding wild horses, yet was reserved, calm and dignified. He was capable of sudden bursts of temper, which he would quickly forget, though the people affected did not. Consequently he was more respected than loved.
     "At his coronation in 936 by Hildebert, archbishop of Mayence, he made it clear that he intended to be an absolute ruler. To emphasise this he made the dukes of Bavaria, Suabia, Franconia and Lorraine wait upon him at the banquet following the coronation.
     "Some of these dukes resented this and revolted. Among the rebels were Otto's half-brother Thankmar and the resentful younger brother Heinrich. Heinrich was joined by Giselbert, duke of Lorraine, and marched towards the Rhine. Although Otto was greatly outnumbered he was a clever strategist and defeated the rebels. Superstition also played a role in his victory as he carried a 'Holy Lance'. Further victories were won with this 'Holy Lance', and his brother Heinrich fled to the court of King Louis IV of France.
     "As Otto wanted peace and not revenge, after a period he sought the friendship of the defeated dukes. His brother was forgiven, made duke of Bavaria, and so became Otto's loyal follower. To pacify the duke of Suabia he arranged the marriage of his son Liudolf to Ida, daughter of Hermann I of Suabia, while Otto's supporter Konrad 'the Red' replaced the duke of Lorraine. With peace now within the empire, he wanted to 'secure' the borders at the eastern front. His first step was the conquest of Bohemia, and he then inflicted devastation on the Slavs living beyond the Elbe and Oder. While establishing himself in the east, trouble was caused by King Louis IV of France who wanted to regain Lorraine. Otto, believing in family ties, was furious with his French brother-in-law and marched into France. The defeated Louis IV withdrew into France, only to be defeated again by Hugues 'the Great', duke of The Franks. Hugues was also Otto's brother-in-law. Sick of family squabbles, Otto defeated him as well.
     "Having secured the western borders, Otto was next invited to intervene in Italy. The Italian ruler Lothar had died and the cruel and unscrupulous Berengar II of Ivrea took his place. Berengar tried to seize the dowry of Lothar's widow, the beautiful Aelis (or Adelaïde). Although she escaped, she was still in danger and asked for Otto's protection. Coming with an army to Lombardy, he forced Berengar to acknowledge him as the overlord of Italy, and assumed the title of king of Italy. As he was a widower, he married Aelis. Among their children, four lived to maturity but only Otto II, later Holy Roman Emperor, would have progeny.
     "Although Otto hoped to remain in Italy to make sure of it as part of the empire, he was forced to return to Germany when his son Liudolf revolted, out of fear for possible sons Otto might father by Aelis. The archbishop of Mayence joined Liudolf, and to add to Otto's troubles the Magyars attacked Bavaria.
     "While Otto reasserted his authority in Germany, the duke of Lorraine, who acted as his representative in Lombardy, joined Berengar against him. In 961 the debauched Pope John XII appealed to Otto to get rid of Berengar; Otto returned to Italy and Berengar was forced to acknowledge Otto's supremacy.
     "On 31 January 962 in Rome's St. Peter's, Otto was then crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope John XII. Otto was now secular master of Europe as well as head of the Church, having forced Pope John XII to swear allegiance to him. By doing so, the pope became Otto's vassal. When Pope John XII indicated that he regretted this action, Otto deposed and replaced him with Pope Leo VIII.
     "Having settled his affairs in Italy, Otto returned to Germany; but in 965 Pope Leo VIII suddenly died and the clergy wanted to elect his successor without Otto's consent. Otto returned to Italy and appointed the bishop of Narni as Pope John XIII. When the Romans drove John XIII into exile, in 966 Otto returned and forced the Romans to accept him. Otto then left Italy for the last time and in his last years peace prevailed in Europe. He died on 6 May 973 and was buried in the Cathedral of Magdeburg which he had built."5 Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire was also known as Otto I "the Great" (?) von Saxony.29 Otto I "the Great" (?) Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire was also known as Otto I (?) King of Germany.

; Per Med Lands:
     "OTTO, son of HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde --- (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg Cathedral). Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[217]. Associate King of Germany, with his father, in 930. He was elected as OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany 7 Aug 936, crowned at Aachen. After his accession, the Bohemians and the Abotrites withheld payment of tribute. A revolt in Bavaria was led by Duke Eberhard, whom King Otto deposed and banished. Otto's half-brother Thankmar rebelled in Saxony with other magnates dissatisfied with the king's distribution of offices. His brother Heinrich rebelled in 939, was joined by Louis IV King of the West Franks and Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia, but was defeated at Birten and Andernach[218]. Thietmar records that he founded the monastery of Magdeburg (later Magdeburg Cathedral), encouraged by his first wife, to which the relics of St Innocent were brought[219]. He sent armed forces which were unsuccessful in taking reprisals against Rouen in 945, after members of the local nobility had arranged the escape of Richard I Comte [de Normandie] from his captivity by Louis IV King of the West Franks, his brother-in-law, a nepos (unidentified) of King Otto being killed in the battle[220]. Thietmar records that he invaded Italy in 951, using the ill-treatment of his future second wife as an excuse, entered Pavia 23 Sep 951 and proclaimed himself king of Italy. His predecessor Berengario di Ivrea proposed himself as Otto's viceroy in Italy, which was accepted by the Council of Augsburg in Aug 952. King Otto's son Liudolf rebelled in 953, but was pardoned in 954. Thietmar records that King Otto defeated the Magyars in battle at Lechfeld near Augsburg in 955[221], which marked the end of their marauding in Europe. Berengario King of Italy abused his position, and Otto sent Liudolf to Italy to restore order. After several further years of Berengario's tyrannical rule in Italy, Otto invaded in Aug 961 in response to requests for intervention from Pope John XII and Hubert [de Provence] Duke of Spoleto, one of Berengario's main vassals. King Otto forced Berengario's retreat to the fortress of San Leo near Montefeltro 962, finally capturing him in 963. Thietmar records that he was crowned Emperor at Rome 2 Feb 962 by Pope John XII[222]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "973 Non Mai" of "Otto imp"[223]. Thietmar records his death at Memleben on 7 May in the thirty-eighth year after his consecration and his burial at Magdeburg[224]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "7 May" of "Otto maior magnus imperator"[225].
     "m firstly (Sep 929) EADGYTH of Wessex, daughter of EDWARD "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda --- (-26 Jan 946[226], bur Magdeburg Cathedral). The Book of Hyde names "Edgitham et Elgimam" as fifth and sixth of the six daughters of King Eadweard by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that they were both sent to "Henrico Alemanorum imperatori" and that the former married "filio sui Othoni"[227]. Thietmar names "Edith…daughter of King Edmund of England" when recording her marriage during the lifetime of Otto's father, in a later passage stating that she urged her husband to begin establishing the city of Magdeburg[228]. The Annalista Saxo records the wife of Otto as "Ediht filiam Ehtmundi regis Anglorum"[229]. Thietmar records her death 26 Jan "in the eleventh year" of the reign of her husband, after 19 years of marriage, and her place of burial[230].
     "m secondly (Pavia [Oct/Nov] 951) as her second husband, ADELAIS of Burgundy, widow of LOTHAR King of Italy, daughter of RUDOLF II King of Upper Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Berta of Swabia ([928/33]-Kloster Selz, Alsace 16 Dec 999, bur Kloster Selz). Luitprand names "Adelegidam" daughter of Rudolf and Berta, when recording her marriage to "regi Lothario"[231]. Her birth date range is estimated from having given birth to one child by her first marriage before the death of her husband in 950. She claimed the kingdom of Italy on the death of her husband, as the daughter of one of the rival claimants for the throne earlier in the century. Willa, wife of Berengario di Ivrea who had been proclaimed king at Pavia 15 Dec 950, ordered Adelais's imprisonment at Como 20 Apr 951 and "afflicted her with imprisonment and hunger" according to Thietmar[232]. Otto I King of Germany used her ill-treatment as an excuse to invade Italy in Sep 951, although Adelais had succeeded in escaping 20 Aug 951 to Reggio[233]. King Otto entered Pavia 23 Sep 951, proclaimed himself king of Italy, and married Adelais as her second husband. The Annalista Saxo records "Adelheidam reginam" as "coniuge rege Lothario" when she married Otto[234]. Flodoard refers to "uxorem quoque Lotharii regis defuncti, filii Hugonis, sororem Chonradi regis" when recording her second marriage[235]. Thietmar records that she was crowned empress at Rome with her husband 2 Feb 962[236]. "Aleidis sororis" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 8 Apr 962[237]. "Adelheidis imperatrix cum filia Athelheidhe abbatissa in Italiam profecta est propter quasdam discordias inter se et filium factas", although it is unclear to whom "filia Athelheidhe" refers unless this is an error for her daughter Mathilde[238]. Thietmar records that she replaced her daughter-in-law as regent for her grandson King Otto III in 991[239]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "999 17 Kal Ian" of "Adalheid imperatrix"[240].
     "Mistress (1): (before 929) --- [of the Hevelli], daughter of [BAÇLABI? [Václav] Fürst der Stodoranen & his wife ---]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[241], she was the daughter of Baçlabi?. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. She was a "captured Slavic noblewoman" according to Thietmar, who gives neither her name nor her parentage[242]."
Med Lands cites:
[217] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430.
[218] Reuter (1991), pp. 150-4.
[219] Thietmar 2.3, p. 91.
[220] Dudo of St Quentin's Gesta Normannorum, Chapters 44-45.
[221] Thietmar 2.9 and 2.10, pp. 97-9.
[222] Thietmar 2.13, p. 101.
[223] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.
[224] Thietmar 2.43, p. 123.
[225] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.
[226] Annales Hildesheimenses 946, MGH SS III, p. 56.
[227] Liber Monasterii de Hyda XIV.4, p. 112.
[228] Thietmar 2.1, p. 90, and 2.3, p. 91.
[229] Annalista Saxo 936.
[230] Thietmar 2.3, p. 92.
[231] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.12, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[232] Thietmar 2.5, p. 93.
[233] Thietmar 2.5, pp. 93-4.
[234] Annalista Saxo 951.
[235] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 401.
[236] Thietmar 2.13, p. 101.
[237] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1878) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris) Tome II, 1127, p. 217.
[238] Annalista Saxo 978.
[239] Thietmar 4.15, p. 162.
[240] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.
[241] ES I.2 175A.
[242] Thietmar 2.35, p. 118.13


; Per Genealogy.EU (Liudolfing): "C2. Otto I "The Great", Duke of Saxony and Thuringia (936-973), King of Germany (936-962), King of Italy (961-973), Emperor cr 2.2.962, *22.11.912, +Memleben 7.5.973; 1m: 930 Edith of England (+26.1.946); 2m: 951 Adelaide of Bourgogne (+999), dau.of Rudolf II of Lower Burgundy."30
; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS of Burgundy ([928/33]-Kloster Selz, Alsace 16 Dec 999, bur Kloster Selz). Luitprand names "Adelegidam" as daughter of Rudolf and his wife Berta, when recording her marriage to "regi Lothario"[138]. Her birth date range is estimated from her having given birth to one child by her first marriage before the death of her husband in 950. She claimed the kingdom of Italy on the death of her husband, as the daughter of one of the rival claimants for the throne earlier in the century. Willa, wife of Berengario di Ivrea who had been proclaimed king at Pavia 15 Dec 950, ordered Adelais's imprisonment at Como 20 Apr 951 and "afflicted her with imprisonment and hunger" according to Thietmar[139]. Otto I King of Germany used her ill-treatment as an excuse to invade Italy in Sep 951, although Adelais had succeeded in escaping 20 Aug 951 to Reggio[140]. King Otto entered Pavia 23 Sep 951, proclaimed himself King of Italy, and married Adelais as her second husband. The Annalista Saxo records "Adelheidam reginam" as "coniuge rege Lothario" when she married Otto[141]. Flodoard refers to "uxorem quoque Lotharii regis defuncti, filii Hugonis, sororem Chonradi regis" when recording her second marriage[142]. She was crowned empress at Rome with her husband 2 Feb 962[143]. "Aleidis sororis" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 8 Apr 962[144]. "Adelheidis imperatrix cum filia Athelheidhe abbatissa in Italiam profecta est propter quasdam discordias inter se et filium factas", although it is unclear to whom "filia Athelheidhe" refers unless this is an error for her daughter Mathilde[145]. She replaced her daughter-in-law as regent for her grandson King Otto III in 991[146]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "999 XVII Kal Ian" of "Adalheid imperatrix"[147].
     "m firstly (947 before 27 Jun) LOTHAR King of Italy, son of UGO King of Italy & his second wife Hilda --- ([926/28]-Turin 22 Nov 950).
     "m secondly (Pavia [Oct/Nov] 951) as his second wife, OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany, son of HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde --- (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg Cathedral). He was crowned Emperor at Rome 2 Feb 962."
Med Lands cites:
[138] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.12, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[139] Thietmar 2.5, p. 93.
[140] Thietmar 2.5, pp. 93-4.
[141] Annalista Saxo 951.
[142] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 401.
[143] Thietmar 2.13, p. 101.
[144] Cluny, Tome II, 1127, p. 217.
[145] Annalista Saxo 978.
[146] Thietmar 4.15, p. 162.
[147] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.23

;      Per Genealogy.EU (Welf): "E4. Adelaide, *931, +16/17.12.999; 1m: 947 Lothar d'Arles, King of Italy (+950); (?) 2m: 950 Adalbert of Ivrea; 3m: 951 Emperor Otto I (+973)"
     Per Genealogy.EU (Bosonides): "D3. [2m.] Lothar II, King of Italy (946-950), *915, +XI.950; m.947 Adelaide of Burgundy (*ca 931 +999.)31,32"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1): “E11. [2m.] Edith, *ca 910/913, +26.1.946/947, bur Cathedral of St.Maurice, Magdeburg; m.930 King Otto I of Germany (*22.11.912 +7.5.973)”.33

; Per Med Lands:
     "EADGYTH ([908/12][1684]-26 Jan 946, bur Magdeburg Cathedral). The Book of Hyde names "Edgitham et Elgimam" as fifth and sixth of the six daughters of King Eadweard by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that they were both sent to "Henrico Alemanorum imperatori" and that the former married "filio sui Othoni"[1685]. Thietmar names "Edith…daughter of King Edmund of England" when recording her marriage during the lifetime of Otto's father, in a later passage stating that she urged her husband to begin establishing the city of Magdeburg[1686]. The Annalista Saxo records the wife of Otto as "Ediht filiam Ehtmundi regis Anglorum"[1687]. Thietmar records her death 26 Jan "in the eleventh year" of the reign of her husband, after 19 years of marriage, and her place of burial[1688].
     "m (Sep 929) as his first wife, OTTO of Germany, son of HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde --- (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg cathedral). Associate King of Germany, with his father, 930. He was elected OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany 7 Aug 936. Crowned Emperor at Rome 2 Feb 962."
Med Lands cites:
[1684] This estimated birth date range is based on her son being born in 930.
[1685] Liber Monasterii de Hyda XIV.4, p. 112.
[1686] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press) 2.1, p. 90, and 2.3, p. 91.
[1687] Annalista Saxo 936.
[1688] Thietmar 2.3, p. 92.18
He was Duke of Saxony and Thuringia between 936 and 973.1 He was King of Germany between 936 and 973.19,1,11 He was King of Italy between 961 and 973.1,11 He was Holy Roman Emperor - See attached map of the Holy Roman Empire ca 1000 (from Wikipedia: Par © Sémhur / Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44483010 between 962 and 973.19,1,11,34

Family 2

Eadgyth (Edith) (?) of Wessex b. bt 908 - 912, d. 26 Jan 946
Children

Family 3

Saint Adélaïde (?) de Bourgogne b. bt 931 - 932, d. 16 Dec 999
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  2. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Otto I, the Great: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11354a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I 'the Great': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080076&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 November 2019), memorial page for Heinrich I “The Fowler” of Germany (c.876–c.2 Jul 936), Find A Grave Memorial no. 14938819, citing Stiftskirche Saint Servatius, Quedlinburg, Landkreis Harz, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14938819/heinrich_i-of_germany. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080076&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I 'the Fowler': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020483&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIGermanydied936B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Matilda: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10049a.htm
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Ringelheim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020486&tree=LEO
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Mathilde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/mathi003.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/edwar001.htm
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 November 2019), memorial page for Otto I The Great (23 Nov 912–7 May 973), Find A Grave Memorial no. 9167602, citing Cathedral of Saints Maurice and Katharina, Magdeburg, Stadtkreis Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9167602/otto_i_the_great
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#OttoIGermanyEmperordied973.
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-17, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Æthelred Mucil/Mucel: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/aethe003.htm
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eadgyth of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020085&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Eadgythdied946.
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 147-19.
  20. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Adelaide at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01140c.htm
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis (Adelheid) de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080077&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#AdelaisBurgundydied999
  24. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  25. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 177-8. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  26. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Otton Ier (empereur du Saint-Empire): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otton_Ier_(empereur_du_Saint-Empire). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  27. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  28. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Otto I. (HRR): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_I._(HRR). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  29. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10248
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfing: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  31. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  32. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bosonides: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html#L3
  33. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Cerdic: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  34. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otton_Ier_(empereur_du_Saint-Empire)#/media/Fichier:Holy_Roman_Empire_1000_map-fr.svg
  35. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  36. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 178.
  37. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  38. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LiudolfDukeSwabiadied957.
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080197&tree=LEO
  40. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudgard von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080200&tree=LEO
  41. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Liutgarddied953.
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint of (Alamannia): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00726544&tree=LEO
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080202&tree=LEO
  44. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Brun of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080203&tree=LEO
  45. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080073&tree=LEO
  46. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 147-20, p. 142.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  47. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#OttoIIdied983.
  48. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080204&tree=LEO

Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia1,2,3,4

M, #6679, b. circa 1090, d. 6 April 1147
FatherFriedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben5,3,4 b. c 1050, d. c 21 Jul 1105
MotherAgnes (?) von Waiblingen6,3,4 b. bt 1072 - 1074, d. 24 Sep 1143
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited19 Oct 2020
     Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia was born circa 1090 at Hohenstauffen, Swabia, Bavaria, Germany.7,2,3,4,8 He married Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia, daughter of Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria and Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony, circa 1121; his 1st wife.3,2,9,4,10 Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia married Agnes (?) von Saarbrücken, daughter of Friedrich I (?) Graf von Saarbrücken and Gisela (?) de Lorraine, circa 1135; his 2nd wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 1131/35.11,3,4,12,13
Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia died on 6 April 1147 at Alzey; Leo van de Pas says d. 4 Apr 1147.7,2,3,4,8
Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia was buried after 6 April 1147 at Abbaye Sainte-Walburge, Walbourg, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1090
     DEATH     6 Apr 1147 (aged 56–57)
     German Nobility. He was born the eldest son of Friedrich I and Agnes of Waiblingen. In 1105 he succeeded his father as Duke of Swabia. He was first married to Judith of Bavaria in 1119 and secondly to Agnes of Saarbrücken.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Friedrich I of Swabia 1049–1105
          Agnes von Waiblingen 1072–1143
     Spouses
          Judith of Bavaria 1101–1131 (m. 1520)
          Agnes von Saarbrücken (m. 1533)
     Siblings
          Heilika von Staufen Lengenfeld unknown–1110
          Sophia Zu Hohenstaufen Pfitzingen 1091–1115
          Konrad III. von Hohenstaufen 1093–1152
     Half Siblings
          Leopold IV of Austria 1107–1141
          Otto of Freising 1109–1158
          Bertha of Austria 1110–1150
          Heinrich II of Austria 1112–1177
          Agnes von Babenberg 1113–1160
          Konrad of Austria 1115–1168
          Ernst of Austria 1118–1137
     Children
          Friedrich I Barbarossa 1122–1190
          Bertha of Hohenstaufen 1124–1195
          Konrad von Hohenstaufen 1134–1195
          Jutta Claricia von Hohenstaufen 1135–1191
     BURIAL     Abbaye Sainte-Walburge, Walbourg, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 Jul 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 114403716.14
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen was born in 1090, the elder son of Friedrich I, Herzog von Schwaben and Agnes von Franken, the daughter of Emperor Heinrich IV. His younger brother Konrad was chosen in 1138 as German king.
     "After the death of his father in 1105, Friedrich succeeded him as duke of Swabia. Together with Konrad, Friedrich further extended the lands of the house of Hohenstaufen, continuing the policy of their father. While Konrad mainly acquired lands in the former dukedom of Franken (Franconia), Friedrich concentrated on the Mittel Rhein and Alsace where he had numerous castles built.
     "In 1108 Friedrich took part in the campaign against King Kálmán of Hungary. In 1110/1111 he accompanied Emperor Heinrich V to Rome for an audience with Pope Paschal II. As Friedrich had remained loyal to the emperor against the opposition movement in Germany, in 1116 Heinrich declared him and Konrad to be his deputies (imperial administrators) for the duration of his journey to Italy. The brothers used this powerful position to further expand the Hohenstaufen holdings, particularly in the Rheinfranken (middle Rhine) region.
     "In 1120 Friedrich married Judith of Bavaria, the daughter of Heinrich 'the Black', Herzog von Bayern, and Wulfhild von Sachsen. They had two children, Friedrich and Bertha, both of whom would have progeny.
     "After the death of Heinrich V, and with him the extinction of the Salian line of emperors, the great princes of the Holy Roman Empire assembled on 24 August 1125 in Mainz for the election of his successor as German king, and Friedrich was one of the candidates. The earlier view that Heinrich had determined before his death that Friedrich should be his successor is now usually rejected. Rather it is now assumed that Friedrich was only nominated to maintain order in the empire until a successor to Heinrich was found. However, Friedrich and his brother Konrad, through their mother Agnes, were the heirs to the Salian territories. The proceedings of the election in Mainz can now no longer be reconstructed with certainty. However it is known that they were tumultuous, and their outcome was that Lothar von Supplinburg, duke of Saxony, was chosen as Lothar III, the new German king. Friedrich accepted this choice at first and honoured Lothar, but he refused to formally pay him homage. Disputes soon arose over the distinction between the king's estate and that of the Salian house. Friedrich and Konrad had inherited the Salian property of Heinrich V and had divided it along the Rhine: holdings on the left bank to Friedrich, on the right bank to Konrad. Nevertheless, the demarcation of the king's estate (Königsgut) which they had to return to Lothar, was in dispute.
     "Before the court in Regensburg, Lothar called on the Hohenstaufens in November 1125 to separate the Königsgut from the Salian house's estates, and to hand the former over to him. When Friedrich and Konrad did not respond, Lothar in December banned them from the royal grace. In January 1126 several princes decided in Goslar to impose the king's ban against the Hohenstaufens militarily. The king and his allies, to a great extent without fighting, captured Hohenstaufen lands in Upper Lorraine, in Alsace and in Rheinfranken; however he did not venture an attack on Swabia, to which the Hohenstaufens had withdrawn. An attack by the Welfs of Bavaria on the Hohenstaufen heartland failed. In 1127 Lothar had to break off the siege of Nuremberg, which was in Hohenstaufen hands. These defeats of Lothar and his allies led to several rulers in lower Lorraine and Franconia withdrawing their support from him. During a battle in the course of these campaigns Friedrich lost an eye, and so he was no longer eligible as a candidate for the kingship, lacking the physical intactness which was a basic condition.
     "In 1127 his brother Konrad returned from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land and became the driving force on the Hohenstaufen side. In December he had himself proclaimed as king, and took over the leadership from Friedrich. However Friedrich was still active as a military leader and in 1128 he captured Speyer, while Konrad tried to gain influence in Italy, largely unsuccessfully. In 1130 the fortunes of war turned: Lothar reconquered Speyer. Friedrich's wife Judith had died soon after, in late February 1130. In the same year Nuremberg with its environs also fell to Lothar. In 1131 the Hohenstaufens lost the whole of Alsace and were driven back to Swabia and Ostfranken. Lothar decided against further attacks on the Hohenstaufens, and concentrated on the extension of the internal structure of the empire and on policy in relation to Italy.
     "About 1132 Friedrich married Agnes von Saarbrücken, daughter of Friedrich I, Graf von Saarbrücken, and Gisela de Lorraine, creating a connection with another house in opposition to Lothar. After his return from Italy, Lothar in 1134 resumed the offensive against the Hohenstaufens. Friedrich could not withstand the concurrent attacks of Lothar in the north and Heinrich 'the Black', Herzog von Bayern, in the south. In the spring of 1135 he submitted to Lothar in Bamberg, wearing a penitent's robe; Konrad repeated this gesture in the autumn. In return for a pledge of loyalty and their agreement to support an Italian campaign, the Hohenstaufens were again accepted into the royal grace. Konrad married Gertrud von Komburg, a sister-in-law of Heinrich 'the Black'.
     "On 4 April 1147 Friedrich died in Alzey. He found his last resting place in the abbey of Walburg in lower Alsace. His son Friedrich succeeded him as duke of Swabia, and in 1152 he ascended to the German throne as King Friedrich I Barbarossa."15



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Frederick II (1090 – 6 April 1147), called the One-Eyed, was Duke of Swabia from 1105 until his death, the second from the Hohenstaufen dynasty. His younger brother Conrad was elected King of the Romans in 1138.
Life
     "Frederick II was the eldest son of Duke Frederick I of Swabia and his wife Agnes of Waiblingen, a daughter of the Salian emperor Henry IV. He succeeded his father in 1105 and together with his brother Conrad continued the extension and consolidation of the Hohenstaufen estates. Frederick had numerous castles erected along the Rhine river and in the Alsace region.
     "The Hohenstaufen brothers supported King Henry V in the conflict with his father Emperor Henry IV; Frederick also accompanied him on his campaign against King Coloman of Hungary in 1108. In 1110 he and Henry V embarked on an expedition to Italy, where in Rome Henry enforced his coronation by Pope Paschal II. In turn, the emperor appointed Conrad Duke of Franconia and both brothers German regents when he left for his second Italian campaign in 1116. On the other hand, the rise of the Hohenstaufens began to upset rivalling princes like Archbishop Adalbert of Mainz, who loathed the supporters of Henry V.[citation needed]
     "About 1120 Frederick married Judith, a daughter of Duke Henry IX of Bavaria and member of the powerful House of Welf. Their first son Frederick was born in 1122.
     "Upon the death of Emperor Henry V in 1125, the Salian dynasty became extinct. Frederick II, Henry's nephew, stood for election as King of the Romans with the support of his younger brother Conrad and several princely houses. However, he lost in the tumultuous round of elections,[citation needed] led by Archbishop Adalbert of Mainz, to the Saxon duke Lothair II. Frederick at first rendered homage to the new king, however, he refused the feudal oath and insisted on the inheritance of the Salian family estates along the Middle Rhine.
     "At the 1125 Hoftag diet in Regensburg, the king officially requested the surrender of the Salian possessions. After he imposed an Imperial ban on the Hohenstaufens, the conflict erupted between Frederick and his supporters, and Lothair: encouraged by Archbishop Adalbert and several princes, the king occupied Hohenstaufen lands in Upper Lorraine and Alsace. However, an attack by Welf forces on the Swabian core territory failed, like the siege of Nuremberg by Lothair in 1127. Frederick relieved the siege and moreover gained the support from his brother Conrad, who had just returned from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. During the fighting, Frederick lost an eye, whereafter he was no longer eligible as German king.[citation needed]
     "In December 1127 Conrad declared himself King of the Romans, while the next year Duke Frederick II occupied the Salian city of Speyer. The attempt of Duke Henry X of Bavaria to capture his brother-in-law Frederick during the negotiations failed. However, afterwards the supporters of Lothair won a number of victories both in Germany and in Italy. Speyer (1129), Nuremberg (1130) and Ulm (1134) were captured; moreover Frederick's consort Judith of Bavaria died in 1130. His second wife, Agnes of Saarbrücken, was a niece of his old enemy Adalbert of Mainz; Frederick married her about 1132.
     "After Lothair was crowned emperor in 1133, Frederick saw himself stuck between the Saxon and Bavarian forces. He eventually submitted to him in the spring of 1135 at Bamberg. Both were finally reconciled and Emperor Lothair renounced further attacks against the Hohenstaufens. After Lothair's death in 1137 and the following election of Conrad as King of the Romans, Frederick supported his brother in the struggle with the Welfs. According to Otto of Freising, Frederick was "so faithful a knight to his sovereign and so helpful a friend to his uncle that by valor he supported the tottering honor of the realm, fighting manfully against its foes..."
     "Duke Frederick II died in 1147 at Alzey. He was buried at the Benedictine abbey of Walburg in Alsace. His son Frederick succeeded him as Swabian duke and was elected German king (as Frederick Barbarossa) in 1152.
Marriage and children
     "With Judith of Bavaria (1103- 22 February 1131), daughter of Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria:[1]
** Frederick III Barbarossa (1122–1190), duke of Swabia and Holy Roman Emperor as Frederick I[1]
** Bertha of Lorraine (1123–1195), married Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine

     "With Agnes of Saarbrücken (d. c.?1147),[2] daughter of Frederick, Count of Saarbrücken:
** Conrad of Hohenstaufen (also spelled Konrad) (1134/1136-1195), Count Palatine of the Rhine[2]
** Jutta (1135–1191), married Louis II, Landgrave of Thuringia[2]

References
1. Brooke 2014, p. 438.
2. Lyon 2013, p. 244.
Sources
** Brooke, Christopher (2014). Europe in the Central Middle Ages: 962-1154. Routledge.
** Lyon, Jonathan R. (2013). Princely Brothers and Sisters. Cornell University Press."8



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 15.
2. [S00623] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 47.15


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Friedrich II, Duke of Swabia (1105-47), *ca 1090, +Alzey 1147; 1m: ca 1121 Judith Welf (*ca 1100 +ca 1132); 2m: ca 1135 Agnes of Saarbrücken (+after 1147.)3"

GAV24 EDV24.

Reference: Weis [1992:144] Line 166-25.7

; Per Med Lands: "FRIEDRICH von Staufen (1090-Alzey 4 or 6 Apr 1147, bur Walburg Abbey). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "ducem Fridericum", father of "regem Fridericum", as son of "ducem Fridericum, qui Stophen condidit" and "filia regis Heinrici"[276]. He succeeded his father as FRIEDRICH II "der Einäugige" Duke of Swabia in 1105. Regent of Germany 1116. His maternal uncle Emperor Heinrich V considered him as his successor and bequeathed him the Salian dynasty's family properties to increase his personal prestige[277], but on the Emperor's death in 1125 Friedrich was passed over as candidate for the German throne in favour of Lothar von Süpplingenburg Duke of Saxony whom the German nobility saw as less of a dynastic threat. After refusing to hand over his inherited crown lands to the new king, Duke Friedrich was outlawed[278]. Friedrich eventually submitted to Emperor Lothar in 1135 with his brother. He agreed to transfer the crown lands, but was allowed to remain as Duke of Swabia[279]. "Dux Fridericus…" witnessed a charter dated 25 Jul 1139 under which Adalbert [II] Archbishop of Mainz confirmed his predecessor's grants to Kloster Jechaburg[280]. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the death of Duke Friedrich and his burial "in monasterio sanctæ Waltpurge…in terminis Alsatiæ sito"[281]. The Necrology of Zwiefalten records the death "VIII Id Apr" of "Fridericus dux de Stouphin"[282]. m firstly ([1119/21]) JUDITH of Bavaria, daughter of HEINRICH "dem Schwarzen" Duke of Bavaria [Welf] & his wife Wulfhild of Saxony [Billung] (after 1100-22 Feb [1130/31], bur Walburg im Heiligen Forst, Alsace). The Historia Welforum names (in order) "Iuditham, Sophiam, Mahtildem, Wulfildem" as the four daughters of "Heinricus dux ex Wulfilde", specifying that Judith married "Friderico Suevorum duci"[283]. The Annalista Saxo names "Heinricum inclitum ducem Saxonie et Bawarie et Welfonem et quatuor filias" as children of Duke Heinrich and his wife Wulfhild, specifying that one of the daughters (mentioned first in the list of daughters, but not named) married "Fridericus dux Suevorum"[284]. m secondly ([1132/33]) AGNES von Saarbrücken, daughter of FRIEDRICH I von Saarbrücken Graf im Saargau & his wife Gisela --- (-after 1147). The Urspergensium Chronicon refers to the second wife of "Friedrich I pater ipsius" as "de genere comitum…Zwainbrug et de Sarbrug"[285]. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "Fridericus dux, mortua uxore sua Iuditha" and "Friderici comitis de Sarbruch, fratris Alberti episcopi, filiam Agnetem"[286]. Duke Friedrich II & his first wife had two children."
Med Lands cites:
[276] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[277] Haverkamp (1988), p. 137.
[278] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 118.
[279] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 121.
[280] Stumpf, K. F. (ed.) (1863) Urkunden zur Geschichte des Erzbisthums Mainz im zwölften Jahrhundert (Acta Maguntina Seculi XII) (Innsbruck) ("Mainz Urkunden 12th Century"), 21, p. 23.
[281] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.39, MGH SS XX, p. 373.
[282] Necrologium Zwifaltense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 240.
[283] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463.
[284] Annalista Saxo 1106.
[285] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 345.
[286] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.21, MGH SS XX, p. 362.16


; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES (-bur Abtei Walburg). The Urspergensium Chronicon refers to the second wife of "Friedrich I pater ipsius" as "de genere comitum…Zwainbrug et de Sarbrug"[997]. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "Fridericus dux, mortua uxore sua Iuditha" and "Friderici comitis de Sarbruch, fratris Alberti episcopi, filiam Agnetem"[998].
     "m ([1132/33]) as his second wife, FRIEDRICH II “der Einäugige” Duke of Swabia, son of FRIEDRICH I Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his wife Agnes of Germany (1090-Alzey 4 or 6 Apr 1147, bur Walburg Abbey)."
Med Lands cites: [998] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.21, MGH SS XX, p. 362. He was Duke of Swabia between 1105 and 1147.2,3,4,8

Family 1

Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia b. bt 1100 - 1103, d. 1130
Children

Family 2

Agnes (?) von Saarbrücken d. a 1147
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106050&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-25, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_II,_Duke_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036580&tree=LEO
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Saarbrücken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064952&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Leiningen 1 page (The House of Leiningen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/leiningen/leiningen1.html
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2019), memorial page for Friedrich II of Swabia (1090–6 Apr 1147), Find A Grave Memorial no. 114403716, citing Abbaye Sainte-Walburge, Walbourg, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/114403716/friedrich_ii-of_swabia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#FriedrichStaufendied1147A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I Barbarossa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013542&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026287&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#BerthaJudithdied1194
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jutta von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00029953&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Judithdied1191
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027035&tree=LEO

Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben1,2,3,4

M, #6680, b. circa 1050, d. circa 21 July 1105
FatherFrederick von Büren Pfalzgraf von Schwaben5,4,3 b. c 1020, d. a 1068
MotherHildegarde von Egisheim1,4,3,6 b. c 1028
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben was born circa 1050.2,3,4,7 He and Agnes (?) von Waiblingen were engaged on 24 March 1079 at Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).7 Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben married Agnes (?) von Waiblingen, daughter of Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne, in 1089 at Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany;
Her 1st husband.8,9,10,2,3,4,11,7
Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben died circa 21 July 1105; Genealogy.EU (Hohenstaufen page) and Med Lands say d. 21 July 1105; Genealogics says d. bef 21 Jul 1105.2,10,3,4,7
Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben was buried circa 21 July 1105 at Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1049
     DEATH     4 Jun 1105 (aged 55–56)
     Nobility. Duke of Swabia from 1179 until his death. He was the oldest son of Friedrich of Büren and Hildegard of Egisheim-Mousson.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Agnes von Waiblingen 1072–1143
     Children
          Heilika von Staufen Lengenfeld unknown–1110
          Friedrich II of Swabia 1090–1147
          Sophia Zu Hohenstaufen Pfitzingen 1091–1115
          Konrad III. von Hohenstaufen 1093–1152
     BURIAL     Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 6 Apr 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 127524690.12,7,13
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 5.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: I.1 14.12
GAV-25 EDV-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Friedrich was born about 1050, the son of Friedrich von Büren, Graf im Risga, and Hildegard von Schwaben, daughter of Graf Ludwig von Mousson, Castellanus in Mömpelgard, Altkirch und Pfirt, and Sofie of Lorraine, daughter of Friedrich II, duke of Upper-Lorraine.
     "While still a count, Friedrich began the expansion of the power of the house of Hohenstaufen. He had a castle built on the peak of Mount Hohenstaufen, which became the family seat and gave its name to the family. A castle at Lorch (near Gmünd in Swabia) was converted around 1100 into a Benedictine monastery, which served from then as the monastery of the house of Hohenstaufen.
     "The heartland of the family still seems to have been relatively small at this time. It was probably confined to the lands around Mount Hohenstaufen together with the properties inherited from Friedrich's mother Hildegard in Alsace, in and around Schlettstadt with the Hochkönigsburg and Hagenau.
     "The determining event in Friedrich's life was his elevation by Emperor Heinrich IV to the dukedom of Swabia (Schwaben) in Regensburg at Easter 1079. During an uprising of the nobility under Rudolf von Rheinfelden against Heinrich IV, the Hohenstaufen belonged to the royalist minority. At the start of 1079 Rudolf's son Berthold von Rheinfelden had been chosen by Heinrich's opposition to be duke of Swabia. As a countermove Heinrich gave the title to Friedrich, and on 24 March of that year, also in Regensburg, he arranged the betrothal to Friedrich of his not yet seven-year-old daughter Agnes (born between the summer of 1072 and the start of 1073, died 24 September 1143); the marriage took place between 1086 and 1089.
     "Over the following years neither duke could gain supremacy. After Heinrich was reconciled in 1097 with Berthold von Zähringen, the successor to Berthold von Rheinfelden, the split of Swabia continued, and Friedrich was able to rule only in the north of the dukedom.
     "He pursued the expansion of power of the house of Hohenstaufen mainly to the north. In the Palatinate over the last years of his rule he became, through his guardianship over the cloister of Weissenburg and the Hochstift (bishopric) of Speyer, and important power figure in the region. With this the Hohenstaufen territory approached the Salian imperial properties in the Rheinfranken (middle Rhine) region. In the south the only substantial holding under Friedrich's control was around Ulm, and beyond the Danube there were only isolated small estates.
     "During Heinrich IV's Italian campaign (1081-1084), in the emperor's absence Friedrich was the senior imperial military leader in the _Regnum Teutonicum_ (German lands).
     "Friedrich died before 21 July 1105, and was buried at the monastery of Lorch."12



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Frederick I (c. 1050 – 1105 before 21 July) was Duke of Swabia from 1079 to his death, the first ruler from the House of Hohenstaufen (Staufer).
Life
     "He was the son of Frederick of Büren (c.1020–1053), Count in the Riesgau and Swabian Count Palatine, with Hildegard of Egisheim-Dagsburg (d. 1094/95), a niece of Pope Leo IX and founder of the Abbey of Saint Faith in Schlettstadt, Alsace. When Frederick succeeded his father, he had Hohenstaufen Castle erected on the eponymous mountain in the Swabian Jura range, which became the ancestral seat of the dynasty. He also founded a Benedictine abbey at the site of former Lorch Castle about 1100.[1] By his mother he ruled over large Alsatian estates around Schlettstadt and Hagenau.
     "When during the Investiture Controversy the Swabian duke Rudolf of Rheinfelden was elected anti-king to King Henry IV of Germany, Frederick remained a loyal supporter of the ruling Salian dynasty. In turn Henry vested him with the Swabian ducal dignity in 1079 and also gave him the hand of his seven-year-old daughter Agnes of Waiblingen.[2] Contested by Rudolf's son Berthold of Rheinfelden and Berthold of Zähringen, Frederick only ruled over the northern parts of the Swabian duchy down to Ulm and the Danube River.[3] Finally in 1098, he and Berthold of Zähringen reached a compromise, whereby his rival confined himself to the title of a "Duke of Zähringen".[3]
     "In the last years of his reign, Frederick was able to expand the Hohenstaufen territories northwards, when he assumed the office of a Vogt (reeve) of Weissenburg Abbey and the Bishopric of Speyer in Rhenish Franconia.
Marriage and issue
     "About 1086/87, Frederick married Agnes, daughter of Emperor Henry IV.[4] They had several sons and daughters, amongst whom were:
** Frederick II (1090–1147), succeeded as Duke of Swabia in 1105, father of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa[5]
** Conrad III, King of Germany (1093–1152), elected King of the Romans in 1138[5]
** Berta of Boll (d. before 1142), married Adalbert of Ravenstein, Count of Elchingen, their daughter Liutgard married Conrad, Margrave of Meissen
** Heilika, who married Frederick III of Pettendorf-Lengenfeld-Hopfenche, their daughter Heilika of Pettendorf-Lengenfeld married Otto IV, Count of Wittelsbach
** Gertrud, married Hermann III of Stahleck, Count Palatine of the Rhine

     "After Frederick's death, Agnes secondly married the Babenberg margrave Leopold III of Austria in 1106. Both are buried in Klosterneuburg Monastery.
See also
Dukes of Swabia family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dukes_of_Swabia_family_tree
References
1. Hamel 2001, p. 466.
2. Barraclough 1984, p. 138.
3. Weinfurter 1999, p. 162.
4. Brooke 1968, p. 140.
5. Frederick I 2000, p. xii.
Sources
** Barraclough, Geoffrey (1984). The Origins of Modern Germany. W.W. Norton & Company.
** Brooke, Z.N. (1968). "Germany under Henry IV and Henry V". In Tanner, J.R; Previte-Orton, C.W; Brooke, Z.N. (eds.) The Cambridge Medieval History: Contest of Empire and Papacy. Vol. V. Cambridge University Press.
** Frederick I, (Holy Roman Emperor) (2000). The Crusade of Frederick Barbarossa: The History of the Expedition of the. Translated by Loud, G.A. Ashgate Publishing.
** Hamel, Leslie Ann (2001). "Lorch". In Jeep, John M. (ed.) Medieval Germany: An Encyclopedia. Routledge.
** Weinfurter, Stefan (1999). The Salian Century: Main Currents in an Age of Transition. Translated by Bowlus, Barbara M. University of Pennsylvania Press."14



; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH von Büren, son of FRIEDRICH von Büren & his wife Hildegard --- ([1050]-1105 before 21 Jul, bur Lorch Monastery). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "ducem Fridericum, qui Stophen condidit" as son of "Fridericus de Buren"[249]. "Hildegardis…cum filiis meis, Ottone…Argentinenis ecclesie episcopo Suevorumque duce Friderico, Lodewico, Walthario, Cunrado et filia mea Adalheida" made a donation to the monastery of St Fides at Schlettstadt in Alsace dated 1094, presumably just before she died[250]. The De Fundatione Monasterii Sancti Fides Sletstatensis names "Fredericus dux Alemannorum [qui fuit Friderici ducis Swevie], qui Romani imperatoris filiæ coniugo, et duo eius fratres Argentinensis episcopus Otto et Conradus"[251]. "Ottone Argentinensi…episcopo" and "fratres mei dux…Suetiæ Fridericus, Ledeuvicus et Galtharius" donated property in "Scelstat villa, in pago Alsatiæ et in comitatu Beirricheim" to the abbey of Conques by charter dated 23 Jul 1095, naming "matre…nostra fratreque nostro Conrado…defunctis"[252]. He was installed as FRIEDRICH I Duke of Swabia at Easter 1079 by Heinrich IV King of Germany. Jackman[253] speculates that his theory concerning a possible Konradiner origin of Friedrich's mother could have justified Friedrich claiming Swabia for which no other genealogical basis is found, although this begs the question of the extent to which ducal appointments in Germany were based on family relationship in the 11th century. He built the castle of Stauf near Göppingen from which the family eventually took its name[254]. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records his death "in senectate" and burial "in monasterio Laureacensi"[255].
     "m (betrothed Regensburg 24 Mar 1079, 1089) as her first husband, AGNES of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III [HEINRICH IV King of Germany] & his first wife Berthe de Savoie ([Summer 1072/early 1073]-24 Sep 1143, bur Klosterneuburg). The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "filiam unicam" of King Heinrich IV and "Fridericus dux Suevorum", naming her Agnes in a later passage[256]. In a subsequent passage, the Gesta records the second marriage of Agnes to "Leopaldo Orientali marchioni"[257]. She married secondly (1106) Leopold III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the marriage of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that the couple had seven children who died in infancy and eleven who survived into adulthood, six sons and five daughters[258]. The marriage presumably took place early in the year if it is correct, as stated by Haverkamp, that it was arranged by Agnes's brother, the future Emperor Heinrich V, to obtain her future husband's support for his rebellion against their father[259]. The Auctarium Mellicense records that Agnes, wife of "Leopoldus marchio", gave birth to 18 children[260]. The Annales Magdeburgenses record the death in 1143 of "Agnes marchionissa mater Cuonradi regis"[261]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa"[262]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa fundatrix h e"[263]."
Med Lands cites:
[249] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[250] Herrgott, M. (1737) Genealogiæ Diplomaticæ Habsburgicæ (Vienna), Vol. II, Pars 1, CXC, p. 129.
[251] De Fundatione Monasterii Sancti Fides Sletstatensis, MGH SS XV.2, p. 997.
[252] Desjardins, G. (ed.) (1879) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Conques en Rouergue (Paris) ("Conques"), no. 575, pp. 405-6.
[253] Jackman (1997), p. 98.
[254] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 117.
[255] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.9, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
[256] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I. 8 and 9, MGH SS XX, pp. 357 and 358.
[257] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
[258] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
[259] Haverkamp (1988), p. 125.
[260] Auctarium Mellicense 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 536.
[261] Annales Magdeburgenses 1143 6, MGH SS XVI, p. 187.
[262] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.
[263] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.7
Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben was also known as Frederick Duke of Swabia.15,10 Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben was also known as Friedrich I von Büren Duke of Swabia.7 He was Duke of Swabia between 1079 and 1105.14

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 2645. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106050&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich von Büren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106053&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard von Egisheim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106054&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#FriedrichIStaufenSwabiadied1105B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date). Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10268
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106050&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 December 2019), memorial page for Friedrich I of Swabia (1049–4 Jun 1105), Find A Grave Memorial no. 127524690, citing Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/127524690/friedrich_i-of_swabia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I,_Duke_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helika von Staufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00208152&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad III von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313571&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#KonradIIIGermanydied1152.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#RichildeMHuguesRoucy
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richilda von Staufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00570049&tree=LEO

Agnes (?) von Waiblingen1

F, #6681, b. between 1072 and 1074, d. 24 September 1143
FatherHeinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor2,3,4,1,5,6,7 b. 11 Nov 1050, d. 7 Aug 1106
MotherBertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne4,1,5,8,7 b. 21 Sep 1051, d. 27 Dec 1087
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was born between 1072 and 1074 at Klosterneuburg, Niederhosterrich, Austria; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1074; Med Lands says Summer 1072-early 1073.1,4,5 She and Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben were engaged on 24 March 1079 at Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany (now).9 Agnes (?) von Waiblingen married Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben, son of Frederick von Büren Pfalzgraf von Schwaben and Hildegarde von Egisheim, in 1089 at Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany;
Her 1st husband.10,11,3,1,12,13,4,9 Agnes (?) von Waiblingen married Saint Leopold III "der Heilige" von Babenberg Margrave of Austria, son of Leopold II "the Fair" (?) Margrave of Austria and Ida (?) von Ratelberg, in 1106; his 2nd wife.14,2,15,1,4
Agnes (?) von Waiblingen died on 24 September 1143.1,4,5
Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was buried after 24 September 1143 at Klosterneuburg Monastery, Klosterneuburg, Tulln Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1072
     DEATH     24 Sep 1143 (aged 70–71), Klosterneuburg, Wien-Umgebung Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria
     German Nobility. The Duchess of Swabia and Margravine of Austria, she was the daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV from the Salian house and his first wife Bertha of Turin. In 1079 she was given to Friedrich I of Staufen, Duke of Swabia and founded with this marriage the claims of the Staufer family for the german throne. The marriage was executed in 1086. Two of their children were Friedrich II, father of Friedrich Barbarossa and the German King Conrad III. Her husband died in 1105 and she married Margrave Leopold III of Austria, later known as "the Pious" or "the Saint". Until a few years ago it was assumed, that in her first marriage, that lasted 18 years, she only gave birth to 3 children and in her second marriage she had 18 children in 12 years. Now it is assumed that she gave birth to 10 children in her first marriage. 12 of them survived her. Despite these 21 births and she reached the high age of 70. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich IV 1050–1106
          Bertha of Savoy 1051–1087
     Spouses
          Friedrich I of Swabia 1049–1105
          Leopold III, Margrave of Austria 1073–1136
     Siblings
          Heinrich of Germany 1071–1071
          Conrad II King Of Italy 1074–1101
          Heinrich V 1088–1125 (m. 1114)
     Children
          Heilika von Staufen Lengenfeld unknown–1110
          Friedrich II of Swabia 1090–1147
          Sophia Zu Hohenstaufen Pfitzingen 1091–1115
          Konrad III. von Hohenstaufen 1093–1152
          Leopold IV of Austria 1107–1141
          Otto of Freising 1109–1158
          Bertha of Austria 1110–1150
          Heinrich II of Austria 1112–1177
          Agnes von Babenberg 1113–1160
          Konrad of Austria 1115–1168
          Ernst of Austria 1118–1137
     BURIAL     Klosterneuburg Monastery, Klosterneuburg, Tulln Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 4 Jan 2005
     Find A Grave Memorial 10214640.16
     GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 4
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 47.17


; Per Genealogics:
     "Agnes was born at the end of 1072, the second daughter of Emperor Heinrich IV and Berta de Savoie.
     "On 24 March 1079, when Agnes was seven, she was betrothed to Friedrich I, Herzog von Schwaben, son of Friedrich von Büren, Graf im Risgau, and Hildegard von Schwaben. Their marriage between 1086 and 1089 would give rise to the later claim of the house of Schwaben to the German throne. They had eleven children, of whom Friedrich II, Konrad III and Heilika would have progeny.
     "Friedrich died in 1105 and in 1106 Agnes became the second wife of Leopold III von Österreich, Markgraf von der Ostmark. The marriage was a reward for Leopold's backing of her brother, the future emperor Heinrich V against his father Emperor Heinrich IV. Agnes and Leopold had numerous children of whom Heinrich II, Agnes, Judith and Gertrud would have progeny.
     "Agnes was said to have used her strong religious faith and belief in the afterlife to sustain the loss of more than half of her children in her lifetime. She died in Klosterneuburg on 24 September 1143, almost seven years after her husband. The strong bonds between the Hohenstaufen and the Babenbergs were established through Agnes. Like her husband she was buried in the Augustinian monastery at Klosterneuburg."17



; Per Med Lands: "AGNES ([Summer 1072/early 1073]-24 Sep 1143, bur Klosterneuburg). The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "filiam unicam" of King Heinrich III and "Fridericus dux Suevorum", naming her Agnes in a later passage[449]. In a subsequent passage, the Gesta records the second marriage of Agnes to "Leopaldo Orientali marchioni"[450]. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the marriage of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that the couple had seven children who died in infancy and eleven who survived into adulthood, six sons and five daughters[451]. The marriage presumably took place early in the year if it is correct, as stated by Haverkamp, that it was arranged by Agnes's brother, the future Emperor Heinrich IV, to obtain her future husband's support for his rebellion against their father[452]. The Auctarium Mellicense records that Agnes, wife of "Leopoldus marchio", gave birth to 18 children[453]. The Annales Magdeburgenses record the death in 1143 of "Agnes marchionissa mater Cuonradi regis"[454]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa"[455]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa fundatrix h e"[456]. m firstly (betrothed Regensburg 24 Mar 1079) FRIEDRICH I Duke of Swabia, son of FRIEDRICH von Büren & his wife Hildegard ([1050]-1105 before 21 Jul, bur Lorch). m secondly ([early] 1106) as his second wife, LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria, son of LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria & his wife Ida [von Ratelberg] ([1075]-killed while hunting 15 Nov 1136, bur Stift Klosterneuburg (-15 Sep 1136, bur Klosterneuburg)."
Med Lands cites:
[449] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I. 8 and 9, MGH SS XX, pp. 357 and 358.
[450] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
[451] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
[452] Haverkamp (1988), p. 125.
[453] Auctarium Mellicense 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 536.
[454] Annales Magdeburgenses 1143 6, MGH SS XVI, p. 187.
[455] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.
[456] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.5
Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was also known as Agnes (?) von Klosterneuburg.11 Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was also known as Agnes (?) von Franconia.18,2,3,4,1 Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was also known as Agnes (?) of Germany.5 Agnes (?) von Waiblingen was also known as Agnes (?) von Franken.19

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Agnesdied1143. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIVGermanydied1106B.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027237&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#FriedrichIStaufenSwabiadied1105B
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date). Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10268
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106050&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 45-24, p. 47.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 December 2019), memorial page for Agnes von Waiblingen (1072–24 Sep 1143), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10214640, citing Klosterneuburg Monastery, Klosterneuburg, Tulln Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10214640/agnes-von-waiblingen. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  18. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 2645. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franken: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Helika von Staufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00208152&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad III von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313571&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#KonradIIIGermanydied1152.
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#RichildeMHuguesRoucy
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richilda von Staufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00570049&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027263&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Agnesdied11601163
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027272&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#HeinrichIIdied1177B
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00310307&tree=LEO

Frederick von Büren Pfalzgraf von Schwaben1,2,3

M, #6682, b. circa 1020, d. after 1068
FatherFrederick (?) Gf von Sundergau4,1,2 d. a Apr 1027
MotherAdelheit von Filsgau5
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Frederick von Büren Pfalzgraf von Schwaben was born circa 1020.2 He married Hildegarde von Egisheim circa 1047.6,2,1,3,7
Frederick von Büren Pfalzgraf von Schwaben died after 1068.2,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 5.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Friedrich was born around 1020, the son of Friedrich, Graf im Riesgau and Adelheit von Filsgau, heiress of Walter. He is generally seen as the ancestor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, also called the Staufer dynasty, which ruled the Holy Roman Empire from 1138 to 1208 and from 1212 to 1254. The older Friedrich, who outlived his son by more than fifteen years and died as a monk, was said to have belonged to the fifth generation of a family of count Palatines, and to have become Graf im Riesgau through his marriage.
     "In 1042 Friedrich married Hildegard, recently established as Hildegard von Egisheim, probably the daughter of Graf Gerhard III von Egisheim-Dagsburg, brother of Bishop Bruno of Toul, the later Pope Leo IX. Friedrich and Hildegard probably had more than six children; their fourth son was Friedrich I (born around 1050), first duke of Swabia and builder of castle Hohenstaufen.
     "Little is known about the life of Friedrich von Büren, like his father Graf im Riesgau, and the origin of 'Büren' cannot be established with certainty. It probably goes back to the name of his preferred residence, the Wascherschloss near Wäschenbeuren, where he spent the twelve or so years of his marriage.
     "It is not known when Friedrich died, but it was after 1068."2

; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH von Büren, son of FRIEDRICH Graf im Sundergau & his wife --- (-[1068]). The Tabula consanguinitatis Friderici I regis et Adelæ reginæ (which provided the basis for their divorce) names "Fridericum de Buren" as son of "Fridericus", brother of "Berta"[1536]. Pfalzgraf von Schwaben 1053. He founded the convent of Lorch.
     "m ([1047]) HILDEGARD, daughter of --- (-[1094/23 Jul 1095]). "Hildegardis…cum filiis meis, Ottone…Argentinenis ecclesie episcopo Suevorumque duce Friderico, Lodewico, Walthario, Cunrado et filia mea Adalheida" made a donation to the monastery of St Fides at Schlettstadt in Alsace dated 1094, presumably just before she died[1537]. She may have been the heiress of the land on which her son later built the castle of Stauf. Jackman suggests[1538] that she was Hildegard, daughter of Graf Otto & his wife ---, emphasising that it could provide an explanation based on heredity for the appointment of Hildegard's son, Friedrich von Büren, as Duke of Swabia in 1079. This assumes the need for such a hereditary basis, whereas it appears that the duchy of Swabia was awarded on the basis of the political or economic power of the nominee. In addition, if heredity had been the basis for the nomination, there would clearly have been other candidates with a senior claim. Decker-Hauff suggested[1539] that Hildegard was the daughter of Louis de Mousson (who would have been Hildegard's sister if Jackman's theory is correct). Jackman says that this should be rejected on chronological grounds as Sophie de Lorraine, the wife of Louis de Mousson, must have been born in [1020] and could not therefore have been the grandmother of Friedrich I Duke of Swabia, born in [1050]. The wife of Friedrich von Büren is not named in Europäische Stammtafeln[1540]. "
Med Lands cites:
[1536] Wibaldi Epistolæ 408, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 547.
[1537] Herrgott (1737), Vol. II, Pars 1, CXC, p. 129.
[1538] Jackman (1997), p. 97.
[1539] Decker-Hauff, H. 'Das Staufische Haus', Die Zeit der Staufer. Geschichte - Kunst - Kultur. Katalog der Ausstelluung Stuttgart 1977, Vol. 3 (Stuttgart, 1977), 339-74, at 344, cited in Jackman (1997), p. 96.
[1540] ES I.1 14.3
GAV-26 EDV-26.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich von Büren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106053&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#FriedrichIStaufenSwabiadied1105A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106051&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheit von Filsgau: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106052&tree=LEO
  6. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 2645. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard von Egisheim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106054&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106057&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106058&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106059&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106050&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106055&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106056&tree=LEO

Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4

M, #6683, b. 11 November 1050, d. 7 August 1106
FatherHeinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor5,4,6,7,8,9 b. 28 Oct 1017, d. 5 Oct 1056
MotherAgnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress4,10,8,9 b. c 1025, d. 14 Dec 1077
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited20 Jun 2020
     Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor was born on 11 November 1050 at Goslar, Landkreis Goslar, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany (now).11,3,12,4,13,8,9 He married Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne, daughter of Oddon de Maurienne Marchese di Susa, Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais and Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino, on 13 July 1066 at Trebur, Darmstadt, Hesse (Cassel), Germany (now);
His 1st wife. Per Med Lands: "betrothal Zürich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur 13 Jul 1066."11,4,13,14,15,8,9 Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor married Eupraxia/Adelheid Vsevolodovna (?) of Kiev, Holy Roman Empress, daughter of Vsevolod I Yaroslavich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Pr of Pereyaslavl, Pr of Chernigov and Anna (?), on 17 August 1089 at Köln, Germany (now);
His 2nd wife.16,12,4,8,9,17,18 Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Eupraxia/Adelheid Vsevolodovna (?) of Kiev, Holy Roman Empress were divorced in 1093; Med Lands says div. 1095.16,8,9,17,18
Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor died on 7 August 1106 at Liège, Arrondissement de Liège, Liège, Belgium, at age 55.11,5,12,4,13,8,9
Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 7 August 1106 at Cathedral of Speyer (Kaiser Dom), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     11 Nov 1050, Goslar, Landkreis Goslar, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     DEATH     7 Aug 1106 (aged 55), Liège, Arrondissement de Liège, Liège, Belgium
     Royalty, german king and roman emperor, only surviving son of Heinrich III and his wife Agnes of Poitou. He was his fathers co-king in Germany since 1054 and succeeded him two years later. His mother and later archbishop Anno II of Cologne acted as his regents until 1066. From first wife Bertha of Savoy he had five children. He was first buried in the Cathedral of Liége but because he had died banned by the Pope he was reburied in unconsecrated earth outside the city. His sarcophagus was later moved to Speyer and placed in the unfinished St Afra chapel. Only after the repeal of the bann in 1111 he was buried beside his father.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich III 1017–1056
          Agnes Of Poitou 1024–1077
     Spouse
          Bertha of Savoy 1051–1087 (m. 1066)
     Siblings
          Adelheid II 1045–1096
          Konrad II von Bayern 1052–1055
          Judith Sophie of Germany 1054–1093
     Children
          Heinrich of Germany 1071–1071
          Agnes von Waiblingen 1072–1143
          Conrad II King Of Italy 1074–1101
          Heinrich V 1088–1125
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Jun 2008
     Find a Grave Memorial 27501102.3,9,19
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Heinrich IV was born at Goslar on 11 November 1050, the son of Emperor Heinrich III and Agnès de Poitou. He was elected king of the Germans (emperor-elect) in 1054, having succeeded his father in 1056, his mother acting as regent. On 13 July 1066 he married Berta de Savoie, daughter of Otto, comte de Savoie, and Adelaide de Susa, Markgräfin von Susa, Herrin von Torrino. Heinrich and Berta had five children, of whom Heinrich and Agnes would have progeny.
     “About 1070 Heinrich IV began to act for himself. His first task was to break the power of the nobles. However his measures provoked a rising of the Saxons who in 1074 forced humiliating terms upon him. In 1075 he defeated them at Hohenburg and then proceeded to take vengeance upon the princes, secular and ecclesiastical, who had opposed him.
     “Their case gave Pope Gregory VII a pretext to interfere in the affairs of Germany. This was the beginning of the great duel between pope and emperor. In 1076 Heinrich declared the pontiff deposed. Gregory VII retaliated by excommunicating the emperor. Heinrich IV, seeing his vassals and princes falling away from him, hastened to Italy to make submission at Canossa as a humble penitent, and, in January 1077 the ban of excommunication was removed.
     “Having found adherents among the Lombards, Heinrich IV renewed the conflict, but was again excommunicated. He thereupon appointed a new pope, Clement III, then hastened over the Alps to besiege Rome. There in 1084 he caused himself to be crowned emperor by the antipope. In Germany during his absence, three rival kings of the Germans successively found support, but Heinrich IV managed to triumph over them all.
     “Heinrich's first wife Berta died in 1087, and in 1089 he married Eupraxia of Kiev, but this marriage did not result in progeny, and he divorced her in 1093.
     “He had crossed the Alps for the third time in 1090 to support Clement III, when he learned that his son Konrad had joined his enemies and been crowned king at Monza. Disheartened, he retired to Lombardy, but at length returned in 1097 to Germany. His elder son Heinrich was elected king of the Germans and heir to the empire. This prince, however, was induced to rebel by Pope Pascal II; he took his father prisoner and compelled him to abdicate. The emperor escaped, however, to find safety at Liège where he died on 7 August 1106.”.8 GAV-26 EDV-26.

; This is the same person as:
”Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor” at Wikipedia, as
”Henri IV (empereur du Saint-Empire)” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Heinrich IV. (HRR)” at Wikipedia (De.)20,21,22

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 4.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 46.8
Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor was also known as Henry IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Salian): “[2m.] Heinrich IV, King of Germany and Italy (1056-1106), Emperor (1085-1106), *11.11.1050, +7.8.1106; 1m: 1066 Berthe (*ca 1051 +1087), dau.of Otone of Savoy; 2m: 1089 Praxedis of Kiev (+1109)”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH, son of HEINRICH III King of Germany [Emperor HEINRICH II] & his second wife Agnes de Poitou ([Goslar] 11 Nov 1050-Liège 7 Aug 1106, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Annalista Saxo records the birth of "Heinrico inperatori filius quartus Heinricus"[416]. He was installed as HEINRICH VIII Duke of Bavaria 1053-1054. His father crowned him associate king of Germany at Aachen 17 Jul 1054. He succeeded his father in 1056 as HEINRICH IV King of Germany, under the regency of his mother until 1062 when she resigned after Heinrich was kidnapped by Anno [II] Archbishop of Köln, who continued as regent until the king was declared of age 29 Mar 1065[417]. King Heinrich faced many difficulties with his nobility. He deprived Otto von Northeim of the duchy of Bavaria in 1070 after accusing him of an assassination plot. He imprisoned Magnus Billung Duke in Saxony, who had supported Otto von Northeim. He also lost the support of Rudolf von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia, Berthold Duke of Carinthia and Welf IV Duke of Bavaria, who were said to have considered deposing him. King Heinrich was eventually forced to leave his fortress of Harzburg and seek protection in Worms, for which he rewarded the town with special privileges in 1074[418]. Under the peace of Gerstungen in early Feb 1074, he was obliged to demolish his castles, except Harzburg although the latter was stormed by Saxon peasantry and destroyed[419]. Difficulties with the papacy centred around the dispute about lay investiture in Germany. After King Heinrich's accession, the right of patricius to cast the first vote in papal elections was largely ignored, resulting in declining German influence in the selection of new Popes. Matters came to a head when the king sent Pope Gregory VII an accusatory letter, issued by the assembly at Worms held 21 Jan 1076. The Pope, in response, deposed and excommunicated the king, who was forced into obedience. King Heinrich crossed the Alps into Italy with his family and appeared in Jan 1077 as a penitent before the castle of Canossa, in which the Pope had taken refuge, and forced a reconciliation. The German princes, affronted by the withdrawal of the excommunication, elected Rudolf von Rheinfelden as rival king of Germany at Forcheim in Feb 1077[420]. The Pope repeated his excommunication order in 1080, and declared support for the anti-king[421]. King Heinrich responded by having Archbishop Wibert of Ravenna elected as Pope Clement III in Brixen in Jun 1080, and eventually bringing the rival pope to Rome for his enthronement at Easter 1084, after which Heinrich was crowned Emperor HEINRICH III 31 Mar 1084[422]. In the deepening dispute between Church and empire, Emperor Heinrich enjoyed temporary success against Matilda Ctss of Tuscany, one of the Pope's most ardent supporters, and defeated her troops at Tresenta in 1091[423]. However, the emperor was left without political support and was obliged to remain confined in a castle near Verona to avoid capture[424]. He returned to Germany in 1097 after six years campaigning in Italy, and recovered some of his political power after reconciling himself with the Welf and Zähringen families. He held an assembly at Mainz in 1098 to regulate the succession, declaring his older son deposed and nominating his younger son as his successor[425]. In 1102, Pope Paschal II renewed the excommunication against the emperor who largely ignored the move. At a general assembly in Mainz in 1103, the emperor proclaimed a four year peace for the empire, but in 1105 his son Heinrich rebelled against him, captured his father, forced him to hand over the royal insignia, and held him semi-prisoner at Ingelheim. The younger Heinrich declared himself sole king of Germany at an assembly in Mainz in early 1106. His father, however, escaped and rallied his forces around Liège, where he defeated his son's army[426]. The victory was short-lived as Emperor Heinrich III died soon after. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records his death at Liège and burial at Speyer[427]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "1106 7 Id Aug" of "Heinricus imperator filius Heinrici imperator"[428]. The Annales Spirenses record his burial at Speyer[429].
     "m firstly (betrothal Zürich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur[430] 13 Jul 1066) BERTHE de Savoie, daughter of ODDON Comte de Chablais, Marchese di Susa & his wife Adelaida Marchese di Susa (21 Sep 1051-Mainz 27 Dec 1087, bur Speyer Cathedral[431]). The Annalista Saxo names "Bertam filiam Ottonis marchionis de Italia et Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of King Heinrich[432]. Her husband proposed to repudiate her in 1069, but withdrew his demand[433]. The dispute was not finally settled until 1077 when Empress Bertha's mother intervened to prevent any repudiation in return for mediating between the emperor and Pope Gregory VII in Canossa[434]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi record the death in 1087 of "Bertha imperatrix" and her burial "apud Moguntiam"[435]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Berhta imperatrix"[436]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Bertha imperatrix"[437].
     "m secondly (14 Aug 1089, divorced 1095) as her second husband, IEVPRAXIA Vsevolodovna of Kiev, widow of HEINRICH III Graf von Stade Markgraf der Nordmark, daughter of VSEVOLOD Iaroslavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Anna of the Kumans ([1071]-1 Aug or 11 Nov 1109). The Annalista Saxo names "Eupracciam filiam regis Ruscie qui in nostra lingua vocobatur Adelheid, quam postea duxit Heinricus imperator" as wife of "Heinricus marchio"[438]. She was known as ADELHEID in Germany. Contemporary chroniclers were scandalised by the alleged sexual abuses inflicted on his second wife by Emperor Heinrich III. According to Helmold of Bossau Chronica Slavorum, King Heinrich "had made a public prostitute of his wife, subjecting her by force to the lust of other men". The emperor imprisoned his wife at Verona, from where she was released in 1094 by Matilda Ctss of Tuscany. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "Praxedis reginæ" made complaints about her treatment "inauditas fornicationum spurcicias" to the synod of Konstanz in 1094 and that her separation was agreed in 1095 at the same synod[439]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi gives lengthy details concerning her divorce[440]. The divorce is recorded in Annalista Saxo under 1094[441]. The empress publicly denounced her husband at the council of Piacenza, presided over by Pope Urban II from 1 Mar 1095[442]. She became a nun at Kiev in 1095. The Primary Chronicle records that Ievpraxia daughter of Vsevolod took the veil 6 Dec 1106[443], and the death 10 Jul 1109 of Ievpraxia daughter of Vsevolod and her burial place[444]."
Med Lands cites:
[416] Annalista Saxo 1048.
[417] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 57.
[418] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 78.
[419] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 62-3, and Haverkamp, A. (1988) Medieval Germany 1056-1273 (Oxford University Press), p. 111.
[420] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 63-6.
[421] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 67.
[422] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 68.
[423] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 101.
[424] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 69.
[425] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 85.
[426] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 86.
[427] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
[428] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.
[429] Annales Spirenses, MGH SS XVII, p. 83.
[430] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[431] Annalista Saxo 1088.
[432] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[433] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 61.
[434] Marie José (1956), p. 33.
[435] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[436] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[437] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 327.
[438] Annalista Saxo 1082.
[439] Bernoldi Chronicon 1094 and 1095, MGH SS V, pp. 458 and 462.
[440] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 14.
[441] Annalista Saxo 1894.
[442] Poull (1994), pp. 57-8.
[443] Cross, S. H. and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, O. P. (trans. & eds.) (1973) The Russian Primary Chronicle, Laurentian Text (Cambridge, Massachusetts) (“PC”), 1106, p. 203.
[444] Russian Primary Chronicle 1108, p. 204.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1): “B4. Berta, *1051, +27.12.1087; m.13.7.1066 Emperor Heinrich IV (*11.11.1050 +Liege 7.8.1106)”.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHE de Savoie (21 Sep 1051-Mainz 27 Dec 1087, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Annalista Saxo names "Bertam filiam Ottonis marchionis de Italia et Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of King Heinrich[132]. Her husband proposed to repudiate her in 1069, but withdrew his demand[133]. The dispute was finally settled in 1077 when Empress Bertha's mother intervened to prevent any repudiation in return for mediating between the emperor and Pope Gregory VII in Canossa[134]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi record the death in 1087 of "Bertha imperatrix" and her burial "apud Moguntiam"[135]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Berhta imperatrix"[136]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Bertha imperatrix"[137].
     "m (betrothed Zurich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur[138] 13 Jul 1066) as his first wife, HEINRICH IV King of Germany, son of Emperor HEINRICH III & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([Goslar] 11 Nov 1050-Liège 7 Aug 1106, bur Speyer Cathedral). He was crowned Emperor at Rome 31 Mar 1084."
Med Lands cites:
[132] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[133] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 61.
[134] Marie José (1956), p. 33.
[135] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[136] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[137] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 327.
[138] Annalista Saxo 1067.15

; Per Med Lands:
     "IEVPRAXIA Vsevolodovna ([1071]-10 Jul 1109, bur Kiev, Crypt Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Eupracciam filiam regis Ruscie qui in nostra lingua vocobatur Adelheid, quam postea duxit Heinricus imperator" as wife of "Heinricus marchio"[366]. She was known as ADELHEID in Germany. Contemporary chroniclers were scandalised by the alleged sexual abuses inflicted on his second wife by Heinrich IV[367] who imprisoned her at Verona, from where she was released in 1094 by Matilda Ctss of Tuscany. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "Praxedis reginæ" made complaints about her treatment "inauditas fornicationum spurcicias" to the synod of Konstanz in 1094 and that her separation was agreed in 1095 at the same synod[368]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi gives lengthy details concerning her divorce[369]. The empress publicly denounced her husband at the council of Piacenza, presided over by Pope Urban II from 1 Mar 1095[370]. She became a nun at Kiev in 1095. The Primary Chronicle records that Eupraxia daughter of Vsevolod took the veil 6 Dec 1106[371]. The Primary Chronicle records the death 10 Jul 1109 of Eupraxia daughter of Vsevolod and her burial place[372].
     "m firstly HEINRICH I "der Lange" Graf von Stade Markgraf der Nordmark, son of LOTHAR UDO II Graf von Stade, Markgraf der Nordmark & his wife Oda von Werl ([1065]-27 Jun 1087).
     "m secondly (14 Aug 1089, divorced 1095) as his second wife, Emperor HEINRICH IV King of Germany, son of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([Goslar] 11 Nov 1050-Liège 7 Aug 1106, bur Speyer cathedral)."
Med Lands cites:
[366] Annalista Saxo 1082.
[367] According to Helmold of Bossau Chronica Slavorum, King Heinrich "had made a public prostitute of his wife, subjecting her by force to the lust of other men".
[368] Bernoldi Chronicon 1094 and 1095, MGH SS V, pp. 458 and 462.
[369] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 14.
[370] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Presses Universitaires de Nancy), pp. 57-8.
[371] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1106, p. 203.
[372] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1108, p. 204.18

; Per Genealogy.EU (Rurik 8): “A4. [2m.] Eupraxia (Adelheid), *ca 1071, +Pereyaslav 9.7.1109; 1m: 1085/86 Heinrich I von Stade, Mkgf von Nordmark (+28.6.1087); 2m: Köln 14.8.1089 (div 1093) Emperor Heinrich IV of Germany (*11.11.1050 +7.8.1106)”.23 He was King of Germany between 1056 and 1084.11

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "Age six at his accession; nine-year regency of his pious mother, Agnes. During the regency, lay and clerical magnates appropriated royal resources and sovereign rights with impunity, and dealt a serious blow to the monarchy.
     "1062: Anno, archbishop of Cologne, kidnaped the young king and, with Adalbert, archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen, governed in his name; they divided the monasteries (one of the chief resources of the crown) between themselves.
     "1066: The Diet of Tribur, thanks to the reaction of the clergy and nobles against Adalbert, freed Henry from Adalbert, and his personal government began.
     "Henry was a remarkable but undisciplined man, intelligent, resolute, headstrong, with the odds against him from the start; under papal pressure he was reconciled (1069) with his wife, Bertha, reformed his personal life, and began a vigorous rule. His policy was a return to the Ottonian habit of using the Church as a major source of revenue; simony was open, and the reforming party appealed to Rome against Henry. Henry began the recapture, reorganization, and consolidation of royal lands and revenues, especially in Saxony, and probably planned to consolidate the monarchy in the Capetian manner, around a compact core of royal domain in the Harz-Goslar region.
     "1073: A great conspiracy of the leading princes led to a rising of virtually all of Saxony. Henry came to terms with the pope, played one faction off against the other, won the South German baronage, and finally defeated the rebels (1075).
     "1075-1122: The struggle over lay investiture. The German bishops, alarmed at Gregory VII's reform policy [>], opposed his confirmation as pope, but Henry, in the midst of the Saxon revolt, sanctioned it, and apparently promised reforms in Germany. The sudden abolition of lay investiture would have reduced the emperor's power in Germany and would have made government impossible. With the end of the Saxon revolt, Henry's interest in reform vanished.
     "Civil war ensued, but Henry, loyally supported by the towns, gained strength steadily; Rudolf of Swabia was defeated and killed (1080); Gregory excommunicated and deposed Henry, but a synod of German and North Italian prelates then deposed Gregory, naming as his successor Guibert of Ravenna, a reforming bishop and former friend of Gregory (1080).
     "1083: Henry, at the end of a series of expeditions to Italy (1081-82), besieged Rome; after futile efforts at reconciliation, he gained entrance to the city, and Gregory called in his Norman allies. Henry, crowned at Rome by his antipope, invaded Apulia; Robert Guiscard expelled him from Rome and sacked (1084) the city. The horrors of the Norman sacking made it impossible for Gregory to remain in Rome, and he departed with his allies, dying as their “guest” in Salerno (1085).
     "Henry's second deposition (1080) was without serious effect. After a series of invasions (1081-84), Henry entered Rome and was crowned by his antipope, only to be expelled by Gregory's Norman ally, Robert Guiscard, with a motley army that included Saracens; the atrocity of the Norman sacking made it impossible for Gregory to remain, and he died a virtual exile, almost a prisoner of his allies at Salerno, leaving Henry and his antipope master of Rome for the time."24 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 1084 and 1106.11,4

Family 1

Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne b. 21 Sep 1051, d. 27 Dec 1087
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027241&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIIIGermanydied1056B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIVGermanydied1106B.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-23, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027237&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Berthedied1087
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eupraxia of Kiev: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027242&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eupraxia of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027242&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IevpraxiaVsevolodovnadied1109.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 20 June 2020), memorial page for Heinrich IV (11 Nov 1050–7 Aug 1106), Find a Grave Memorial no. 27501102, citing Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27501102. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_IV,_Holy_Roman_Emperor. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Henri IV (empereur du Saint-Empire): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_IV_(empereur_du_Saint-Empire). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  22. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Heinrich IV. (HRR): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_IV._(HRR). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html#YVX
  24. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 205-206.
  25. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Agnesdied1143.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027243&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Konraddied1101.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027240&tree=LEO

Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne1,2,3,4

F, #6684, b. 21 September 1051, d. 27 December 1087
FatherOddon de Maurienne Marchese di Susa, Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais3,4,5,6,7 b. c 1020, d. 1 Mar 1060
MotherAdelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino8,5,6,9 b. c 1015, d. 19 Dec 1091
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne was born on 21 September 1051.4,3,5,6 She married Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor, son of Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress, on 13 July 1066 at Trebur, Darmstadt, Hesse (Cassel), Germany (now);
His 1st wife. Per Med Lands: "betrothal Zürich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur 13 Jul 1066."10,3,4,5,6,11,12
Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne died on 27 December 1087 at age 36; Charlemagne Desc. says d. 1079; Salian page says d. 1087; Savoy 1 page says d. 27.12.1087; Genealogics says d. 27 Dec. 1087.13,3,4,5,6
Bertha (?) di Savoia, Countess of Maurienne was buried after 27 December 1087 at Cathedral of Speyer (Kaiser Dom), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     21 Sep 1051
     DEATH     27 Dec 1087 (aged 36), Mainz, Stadtkreis Mainz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     German Royalty. She was the daughter of Oddon de Savoie and Adélaïde Comtesse de Torino. She was betrothed to the son of emperor Heinrich III in 1055. Due to their age they were married 11 years later. In 1069 tried to have the marriage annulled but the pope denied him. A year later, the first of their five children was born. In January 1077 she accompanied him on his travel to Italy in order to meet with Pope Gregory VII to have Heinrichs excommunication lifted. In 1081 and 1082 Heinrich besieged Rome, but left after a few weeks. He returned in 1084 after Gregory VII had lost the support of the people of Rome and several of his cardinals. He was deposed and excommunicated. The antipope Cement III crowned Heinrich and Bertha emperor and empress on Easter Sunday 1084.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Othon of Savoy 1020–1060
          Adelaide di Susa 1014–1091
     Spouse
          Heinrich IV 1050–1106 (m. 1066)
     Siblings
          Pierre I of Savoy 1048–1078
          Amedee II of Savoy 1050–1080
          Adelaide of Savoy 1052–1079
     Children
          Heinrich of Germany 1071–1071
          Agnes von Waiblingen 1072–1143
          Conrad II King Of Italy 1074–1101
          Heinrich V 1088–1125
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 May 2008
     Find a Grave Memorial 27095498.14
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Salian): “[2m.] Heinrich IV, King of Germany and Italy (1056-1106), Emperor (1085-1106), *11.11.1050, +7.8.1106; 1m: 1066 Berthe (*ca 1051 +1087), dau.of Otone of Savoy; 2m: 1089 Praxedis of Kiev (+1109)”.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH, son of HEINRICH III King of Germany [Emperor HEINRICH II] & his second wife Agnes de Poitou ([Goslar] 11 Nov 1050-Liège 7 Aug 1106, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Annalista Saxo records the birth of "Heinrico inperatori filius quartus Heinricus"[416]. He was installed as HEINRICH VIII Duke of Bavaria 1053-1054. His father crowned him associate king of Germany at Aachen 17 Jul 1054. He succeeded his father in 1056 as HEINRICH IV King of Germany, under the regency of his mother until 1062 when she resigned after Heinrich was kidnapped by Anno [II] Archbishop of Köln, who continued as regent until the king was declared of age 29 Mar 1065[417]. King Heinrich faced many difficulties with his nobility. He deprived Otto von Northeim of the duchy of Bavaria in 1070 after accusing him of an assassination plot. He imprisoned Magnus Billung Duke in Saxony, who had supported Otto von Northeim. He also lost the support of Rudolf von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia, Berthold Duke of Carinthia and Welf IV Duke of Bavaria, who were said to have considered deposing him. King Heinrich was eventually forced to leave his fortress of Harzburg and seek protection in Worms, for which he rewarded the town with special privileges in 1074[418]. Under the peace of Gerstungen in early Feb 1074, he was obliged to demolish his castles, except Harzburg although the latter was stormed by Saxon peasantry and destroyed[419]. Difficulties with the papacy centred around the dispute about lay investiture in Germany. After King Heinrich's accession, the right of patricius to cast the first vote in papal elections was largely ignored, resulting in declining German influence in the selection of new Popes. Matters came to a head when the king sent Pope Gregory VII an accusatory letter, issued by the assembly at Worms held 21 Jan 1076. The Pope, in response, deposed and excommunicated the king, who was forced into obedience. King Heinrich crossed the Alps into Italy with his family and appeared in Jan 1077 as a penitent before the castle of Canossa, in which the Pope had taken refuge, and forced a reconciliation. The German princes, affronted by the withdrawal of the excommunication, elected Rudolf von Rheinfelden as rival king of Germany at Forcheim in Feb 1077[420]. The Pope repeated his excommunication order in 1080, and declared support for the anti-king[421]. King Heinrich responded by having Archbishop Wibert of Ravenna elected as Pope Clement III in Brixen in Jun 1080, and eventually bringing the rival pope to Rome for his enthronement at Easter 1084, after which Heinrich was crowned Emperor HEINRICH III 31 Mar 1084[422]. In the deepening dispute between Church and empire, Emperor Heinrich enjoyed temporary success against Matilda Ctss of Tuscany, one of the Pope's most ardent supporters, and defeated her troops at Tresenta in 1091[423]. However, the emperor was left without political support and was obliged to remain confined in a castle near Verona to avoid capture[424]. He returned to Germany in 1097 after six years campaigning in Italy, and recovered some of his political power after reconciling himself with the Welf and Zähringen families. He held an assembly at Mainz in 1098 to regulate the succession, declaring his older son deposed and nominating his younger son as his successor[425]. In 1102, Pope Paschal II renewed the excommunication against the emperor who largely ignored the move. At a general assembly in Mainz in 1103, the emperor proclaimed a four year peace for the empire, but in 1105 his son Heinrich rebelled against him, captured his father, forced him to hand over the royal insignia, and held him semi-prisoner at Ingelheim. The younger Heinrich declared himself sole king of Germany at an assembly in Mainz in early 1106. His father, however, escaped and rallied his forces around Liège, where he defeated his son's army[426]. The victory was short-lived as Emperor Heinrich III died soon after. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records his death at Liège and burial at Speyer[427]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "1106 7 Id Aug" of "Heinricus imperator filius Heinrici imperator"[428]. The Annales Spirenses record his burial at Speyer[429].
     "m firstly (betrothal Zürich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur[430] 13 Jul 1066) BERTHE de Savoie, daughter of ODDON Comte de Chablais, Marchese di Susa & his wife Adelaida Marchese di Susa (21 Sep 1051-Mainz 27 Dec 1087, bur Speyer Cathedral[431]). The Annalista Saxo names "Bertam filiam Ottonis marchionis de Italia et Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of King Heinrich[432]. Her husband proposed to repudiate her in 1069, but withdrew his demand[433]. The dispute was not finally settled until 1077 when Empress Bertha's mother intervened to prevent any repudiation in return for mediating between the emperor and Pope Gregory VII in Canossa[434]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi record the death in 1087 of "Bertha imperatrix" and her burial "apud Moguntiam"[435]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Berhta imperatrix"[436]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Bertha imperatrix"[437].
     "m secondly (14 Aug 1089, divorced 1095) as her second husband, IEVPRAXIA Vsevolodovna of Kiev, widow of HEINRICH III Graf von Stade Markgraf der Nordmark, daughter of VSEVOLOD Iaroslavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Anna of the Kumans ([1071]-1 Aug or 11 Nov 1109). The Annalista Saxo names "Eupracciam filiam regis Ruscie qui in nostra lingua vocobatur Adelheid, quam postea duxit Heinricus imperator" as wife of "Heinricus marchio"[438]. She was known as ADELHEID in Germany. Contemporary chroniclers were scandalised by the alleged sexual abuses inflicted on his second wife by Emperor Heinrich III. According to Helmold of Bossau Chronica Slavorum, King Heinrich "had made a public prostitute of his wife, subjecting her by force to the lust of other men". The emperor imprisoned his wife at Verona, from where she was released in 1094 by Matilda Ctss of Tuscany. The Chronicon of Bernold records that "Praxedis reginæ" made complaints about her treatment "inauditas fornicationum spurcicias" to the synod of Konstanz in 1094 and that her separation was agreed in 1095 at the same synod[439]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi gives lengthy details concerning her divorce[440]. The divorce is recorded in Annalista Saxo under 1094[441]. The empress publicly denounced her husband at the council of Piacenza, presided over by Pope Urban II from 1 Mar 1095[442]. She became a nun at Kiev in 1095. The Primary Chronicle records that Ievpraxia daughter of Vsevolod took the veil 6 Dec 1106[443], and the death 10 Jul 1109 of Ievpraxia daughter of Vsevolod and her burial place[444]."
Med Lands cites:
[416] Annalista Saxo 1048.
[417] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 57.
[418] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 78.
[419] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 62-3, and Haverkamp, A. (1988) Medieval Germany 1056-1273 (Oxford University Press), p. 111.
[420] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 63-6.
[421] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 67.
[422] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 68.
[423] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 101.
[424] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 69.
[425] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 85.
[426] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 86.
[427] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
[428] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.
[429] Annales Spirenses, MGH SS XVII, p. 83.
[430] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[431] Annalista Saxo 1088.
[432] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[433] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 61.
[434] Marie José (1956), p. 33.
[435] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[436] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[437] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 327.
[438] Annalista Saxo 1082.
[439] Bernoldi Chronicon 1094 and 1095, MGH SS V, pp. 458 and 462.
[440] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 14.
[441] Annalista Saxo 1894.
[442] Poull (1994), pp. 57-8.
[443] Cross, S. H. and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, O. P. (trans. & eds.) (1973) The Russian Primary Chronicle, Laurentian Text (Cambridge, Massachusetts) (“PC”), 1106, p. 203.
[444] Russian Primary Chronicle 1108, p. 204.12


; Per Genealogics:
     “Berta was born on 21 September 1051, the daughter of Otto, comte de Savoie, and Adelaide de Susa, Markgräfin von Susa, Herrin von Torino. During the lifetime of Emperor Heinrich III, Berta and Heinrich IV were betrothed as young children on 25 December 1055 in Zürich. The wedding took place on 13 July 1066 in Trebur.
     “While Berta was said to have fallen in love with Heinrich from the outset, Heinrich initially viewed his wife with aversion. Although she was apparently a pretty young woman, the Saxon chronicler Bruno, an avowed opponent of Heinrich IV, reported on the emperor's continual unfaithfulness: 'He had two or three Kebsweiber (concubines) at the same time, in addition (to his wife), yet he was not content. If he heard that someone had a young and pretty daughter or wife, he instructed that she be supplied to him by force. (...) His beautiful and noble wife Berta (...) was in such a manner hated by him that he never saw her after the wedding any more than necessary, since he had not celebrated the wedding out of free will.'
     “In 1069 Heinrich began procedures for a divorce, supplying what was for the time an unusually honest reason for the divorce: 'The king explained publicly (before the princes), that his relationship with his wife was not good; for a long time he had deceived others, but now he did not want to do so any longer. He could not accuse her of anything that justified a divorce, but he was not capable of carrying out conjugal relations with her any longer. He asked them for the sake of God to remove him from the bonds of a marriage closed under bad signs....so that the way to a luckier marriage might be opened. And nobody knowing any objection to raise, and his wife being an obstacle to a second marriage ceremony, he then swore that she was as he received her, unstained and her virginity intact.' (Bruno of Merseburg)
     “The German episcopacy dared not submit to the king's demands, and called on Pope Alexander II for assistance. He sent Petrus Damiani as his legate to the Synod in Frankfurt, and rejected the divorce. Heinrich then apparently submitted to his fate, his first daughter by Berta being born in the year after the divorce attempt. They had two sons and three daughters, of whom Heinrich (the future Emperor Heinrich V) and Agnes would have progeny.
     “Berta also accompanied her husband on his dangerous journey to Canossa, carrying her three-year-old son Konrad. She remained with her husband between 25 and 28 January 1077 in freezing weather beyond the walls of the castle, in order to reach a solution of Heinrich's dispute with the pope. Together with Heinrich, Berta later also journeyed to Rome, and on 31 March 1084 she was crowned Empress.
     “Berta died in Mainz on 27 December 1087. She was buried in the cathedral of Speyer.”.5

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 110.5

; This is the same person as:
”Bertha of Savoy” at Wikipedia, as
”Berthe de Turin” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Berta di Savoia” at Wikipedia (It.)15,16,17 GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTHE de Savoie (21 Sep 1051-Mainz 27 Dec 1087, bur Speyer Cathedral). The Annalista Saxo names "Bertam filiam Ottonis marchionis de Italia et Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of King Heinrich[132]. Her husband proposed to repudiate her in 1069, but withdrew his demand[133]. The dispute was finally settled in 1077 when Empress Bertha's mother intervened to prevent any repudiation in return for mediating between the emperor and Pope Gregory VII in Canossa[134]. The Annales Sancti Diibodi record the death in 1087 of "Bertha imperatrix" and her burial "apud Moguntiam"[135]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Berhta imperatrix"[136]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Bertha imperatrix"[137].
     "m (betrothed Zurich 25 Dec 1055, Tribur[138] 13 Jul 1066) as his first wife, HEINRICH IV King of Germany, son of Emperor HEINRICH III & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([Goslar] 11 Nov 1050-Liège 7 Aug 1106, bur Speyer Cathedral). He was crowned Emperor at Rome 31 Mar 1084."
Med Lands cites:
[132] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[133] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 61.
[134] Marie José (1956), p. 33.
[135] Annales Diibodi 1087, MGH SS XVI, p. 9.
[136] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[137] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 327.
[138] Annalista Saxo 1067.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1): “B4. Berta, *1051, +27.12.1087; m.13.7.1066 Emperor Heinrich IV (*11.11.1050 +Liege 7.8.1106)”.4

Family

Heinrich IV (?) Holy Roman Emperor b. 11 Nov 1050, d. 7 Aug 1106
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027237&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Berthedied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027351&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-23, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIVGermanydied1106B.
  13. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 20 June 2020), memorial page for Bertha of Savoy (21 Sep 1051–27 Dec 1087), Find a Grave Memorial no. 27095498, citing Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27095498. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Savoy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Berthe de Turin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berthe_de_Turin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Berta di Savoia: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berta_di_Savoia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Franconia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027239&tree=LEO
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Agnesdied1143.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027243&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Konraddied1101.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027240&tree=LEO

Jeanne (?) Comtesse de Réthel1,2,3

F, #6685, b. before 1277, d. after 12 March 1328
FatherHugues IV (?) Comte de Réthel, chevalier, vicomte de4,1,2,3,5 b. b 1244, d. b 1277
MotherIsabelle de Grandpré6,1,2,3,5 b. a 1237, d. b 4 Apr 1292
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jeanne (?) Comtesse de Réthel was born before 1277.2 She married Louis I (?) of Flanders, Cte de Nevers et de Rethel, son of Robert III "de Bethune" (?) Ct of Flanders and Nevers, sn de Bethune et de Dendermonde and Yolande (?) de Bourgogne, Cts de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, on 16 December 1290.1,7,8,2,3
Jeanne (?) Comtesse de Réthel died after 12 March 1328; Racines et Histoire says d aft 1325.1,2,3
     ; [3m.] Cts Jeanne de Rethel, *before 1277, +after 12.3.1328; m.16.12.1290 Louis of Flanders, Cte de Nevers et de Rethel (+24.7.1322.)2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Joan of Rethel (died 1328) was Countess of Rethel between 1285 and 1328.
     "She was the daughter of Hugh IV, Count of Rethel and his third wife Isabelle of Grandpré. She succeeded her father as Countess of Rethel in 1285. Joan married in 1290 with Louis I, Count of Nevers, son of Robert III, Count of Flanders.
     "They had two children:
** Joan (1295–1375), married John of Montfort
** Louis (1304–1346), Count of Flanders, Nevers and Rethel.5


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 8 ;III 626.1 She was Countess of Rethel between 1285 and 1328.5

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026399&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rethel 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel2.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 16. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139459&tree=LEO
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Countess_of_Rethel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Grandpré: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139461&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026398&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders5.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004908&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013577&tree=LEO

Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino1,2

F, #6686, b. circa 1015, d. 19 December 1091
FatherManfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa3,2,4,5,6,7 b. 992, d. 29 Oct 1034
MotherBertha d'Este3,8,9,2,5,6,7 b. 997, d. bt 29 Dec 1037 - 1040
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited15 Aug 2020
     Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino was born circa 1015 at Turin (Torino), Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy (now); Genealogy.EU (Montfer) says b. ca 1020; Savoy 1 page says v. ca 1015; Genealogics says b. ca 1015; Med Lands says b. 1020.10,3,9,2,6,7 She married Hermann IV (?) Herzog von Schwaben, son of Ernst I von Babenberg Herzog von Schwaben and Gisela von Schwaben Queen of Germany, Holy Roman empress, Queen of Burgundy, between 1035 and 1036;
Her 1st husband.11,6,7,12 Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino married Enrico I di Monferrato, Marchese di Monferrato,, son of Guglielmo III del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrato and Waza/Uvazza (?), before 19 January 1042;
Her 2nd husband.9,6,7,13,14 Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino married Oddon de Maurienne Marchese di Susa, Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais, son of Umberto I "Biancomanno" (?) Comte de Savoie and Ancilia/Auxilia (?), in 1046;
Her 3rd husband.10,2,6,7,15,16
Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino died on 19 December 1091 at Canischio, Italy (now); Genealogics and Genealogy.EU (Babenberg) say d. 19 Dec 1091; Med Lands says d. 27 Dec 1091; Genealogy.EU (Montferrato) says d. 16 Dec 1091; vGenealogy.EU (Savoy 1) says d. 19 Oct 1091.10,3,9,2,6,7
Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino was buried after 19 December 1091 at Parrocchia di Canischio, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1014, Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
     DEATH     19 Dec 1091 (aged 76–77), Italy
     Adelaide of Susa was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. She was the daughter of Ulric Manfred II and Bertha, daughter of Oberto II around 1014/20, Adelaide's early life is not well-known. Her only brother predeceased her father in 1034, though she had two younger sisters, Immilla and Bertha. Thus, on Ulric's death, the great margraviate was divided between his three daughters, though the greatest part by far went to Adelaide. Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, arranged a marriage between Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia, to serve as margrave of Turin after Ulric's death. The two were married in January 1037, but Herman died of the plague while fighting at Naples in July 1038.
     Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march to Henry of Montferrat, but he died in 1045 and left her a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy. With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. She also had two daughters, Bertha and Adelaide. Bertha, the countess of Maurienne, married the Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, while Adelaide married Rudolf of Rheinfeld, who opposed Henry as King of Germany.
     After 1060, Adelaide acted as regent for her sons. In 1068, Henry tried to divorce Bertha and consequently drove Adelaide to an intense hatred of him and his family. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. Adelaide and Amadeus accompanied the humiliated emperor to Canossa. In gratitude for her mediation, Henry donated Bugey to Adelaide and her family and took back Bertha as his wife, returning to Germany.
     Adelaide later played the mediator between her two royal sons-in-law, Henry and the aforementioned Rudolf during the wars of the 1080s in Germany. She was an opponent of the Gregorian reform, though she honoured the papacy, and defender of the autonomy of abbacies.
     In 1091, Adelaide died, to the general mourning of her people, and was buried in the parochial church of Canischio (Canisculum), a small village on the Cuorgnè in the Valle dell'Orco, to which she had retired in her later years. In the Cathedral of San Giusto in Susa, in a niche in the wall, there is a statue of walnut wood, beneath a bronze veneer, representing Adelaide, genuflecting in prayer. Above it can be read the inscription: Questa è Adelaide, cui l'istessa Roma Cole, e primo d'Ausonia onor la noma.
     Adelaide had passed her childhood amongst the retainers of her father and had even learned the martial arts when young, bearing her own arms and armour. She was reputed to be beautiful and virtuous. She was pious, putting eternal things ahead of temporal. Strong in temperament, she did not hesitate to punish even the bishops and grandees of her realm. She patronised the minstrels and always received them at her court, urging them to compose songs emphasising religious values. She was a founder of cloisters and monasteries that transmitted the history of the region. The only failure of Adelaide's career was the loss of the County of Albon. Greatly admired in her own time, she was compared to Deborah of Biblical fame and was known affectionately as the "marchioness of the Italians." Peter Damian summed up her life and career in the admiring words:
" Tu, senza l'aiuto di un re, sostieni il peso del regno, ed a te ricorrono quelli che alle loro decisioni desiderano aggiungere il peso di una sentenza legale. Dio onnipotente benedica te ed i tuoi figlioli d'indole regia.
You, without the help of a king, sustain the weight of a kingdom, and to you return those who wish to add to their decisions the weight of legal pronouncement. Omnipotent God bless you and your regal children.

     Adelaide and Herman IV, Duke of Swabia had at least three children:
** Gebhard I, Count of Sulzbach
** Adalbert I, Count of Windberg
** Adelaide, married Hermann von Peugen

     Adelaide and Otto of Savoy had five children:
** Peter I of Savoy
** Amedeus II of Savoy
** Otto, Bishop of Asti
** Bertha of Savoy, married Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor
** Adelaide (died 1079), married Rudolf von Rheinfeld

     Family Members
     Parents
          Ulric Manfred of Turin 992–1034
          Bertha of Milan 997–1040
     Spouses
          Herman IV of Swabia 1010–1038
          Othon of Savoy 1020–1060
     Children
          Amedee II of Savoy 1050–1080
          Bertha of Savoy 1051–1087
          Adelaide of Savoy 1052–1079
     BURIAL     Parrocchia di Canischio, Canischio, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 4 Nov 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 100149290.17
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1): "A4. Oddone, Marchese di Susa e Moriana 1046, Ct of Chablais, Ct of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana (1051-60), *ca 1020, +1.3.1060; m.ca 1046 Adelaide Marchesa di Torino e Susa (*ca 1015, +19.10.1091), dau.and heiress of Marchese."2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ODDON de Maurienne, son of HUMBERT Comte de Maurienne & his wife Auxilia --- ([1017]-1 Mar 1060, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[66]. Marchese di Susa [1046], by right of his wife, her territories extending between the Alps and the River Po (including Auriate, Turino, Ivrea and Aosta) and to the Mediterranean between Ventimiglia and Albenga, and including control of the Alpine passes of Mont-Cenis and Saint-Bernard[67]. "Odo marchio" subscribed the charter of his presumed nephew dated [1046][68]. He succeeded his brother in [1051] as ODDON Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais. "Odo marchio" donated property to the church of Tarantasia, for the soul of "patris mei Humbertus comes", by charter dated 1051[69]. "Oddo et uxor mea Adalaicis…et filii mei Petrus Admedeus et filie mee" donated churches to Oulx by charter dated May 1057[70]. The importance of the family's role in contemporary European politics is demonstrated by the marriage of Comte Oddon's daughter to the future king of Germany. The necrology of San Andreo di Torino records the death "XIV Kal Feb" of "Dnis Oddonis Marchionis"[71].
     "m ([1046]) as her third husband, ADELAIDA di Susa, Marchesa di Susa, widow firstly of HERMANN IV Duke of Swabia and secondly of ENRICO Marchese di Monferrato, daughter of MANFREDO UDALRICO Marchese di Susa & his wife Berta degli Obertenghi (Turin 1020-Canischio in Canavese 27 Dec 1091, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). Her first marriage is confirmed by Herimannus who records that "Hermannus quoque dux Alamanniæ" was granted "marcham soceri sui Maginfredi in Italia" by the emperor in 1034[72]. Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1043 under which "Henricus marchio filius quondam Wilielmi similiter marchioni et Adalena comitissa jugales filia quondam bo. me. Oldrici…Maginfredi…marchioni" donated property to San Antonino[73]. Her third marriage is confirmed by the Annalista Saxo which names "Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of "Ottonis marchionis de Italia"[74]. "Oddo et uxor mea Adalaicis…et filii mei Petrus Admedeus et filie mee" donated churches to Oulx by charter dated May 1057[75]. She was regent for her son in 1060 after the death of her husband, playing a significant role in support of Heinrich IV King of Germany, her son-in-law, in his disputes with the papacy. "Dominus Petrus Marchio filius quond. bonæ memoriæ Oddonis marchionis…cum domina Adheleida comitissa matre sua" signed a charter dated 31 Jul 1064[76]. "Adelegida…comitissa" donated property to Pinerolo, for the souls of "domni Manfredi marchionis genitoris mei et Adalrici episcopi Barbani mei et Bertæ genetricis meæ et…domni Odonis marchionis viri mei", by charter dated 8 Sep 1064, signed by "Petri, Amedei, Vitelmi qui Bruno vicecomes vocatur…Henrici qui vocatur Marchio…"[77]. "Adalaxia cometissa filia quondam Maginfredus marchio" donated property to Pinerolo by charter dated 23 Jul 1075[78]. Adelaida mediated with Pope Gregory VII when King Heinrich submitted to him at Canossa in 1077, and received in return the town of Bugey for the house of Savoy[79]. "Domna Adelaida comitissa filia…cum filiis suis Petro et Amedeo" donated property to Novalesa, for the soul of "mariti sui Oddonis", by charter dated 16 Jul 1078[80]. "Adalegida cometissa filia Maginfredi marchionis et relicta quond. Oddonis idemque marchionis" donated property to the monastery at Taurini, in the presence of "domne Agnetis comitissæ, filiæ Wilelmi comitis et relictæ quondam Petri marchionis", for the souls of "Maginfredi patris, Adalrici Astensis episcopi patrui, Berthæ matris et Petri marchionis filii predictæ comitissæ Adalegidæ", by charter dated 4 Jul 1079[81]. "Adalasia comitissa cum nuru sua Agneta et filia eius Agnete" donated property to "ecclesiæ S. Mariæ…Astensis episcopatus" by charter dated 18 Jun 1089[82]. The necrology of Schaffhausen records the death "XIV Kal Jan" of "Adelheida Taurinensis comitissa"[83]."
Med Lands cites:
[66] Carutti (1888), Documenti del libro primi, XXVII, p. 196.
[67] Marie José (1956), pp. 32-3.
[68] Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, 212, p. 155.
[69] Carutti (1888), Documenti del libro primi, XXXV, p. 203.
[70] Collino, G. (ed.) (1908) Le carte della prevostura d´Oulx (Pinerolo) ("Oulx"), VII, p. 7.
[71] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, CLV, p. 54.
[72] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1034, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[73] Carutti, D. (1888) Il conte Umberto I e il re Ardoino (Rome), p. 142, no citation reference.
[74] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[75] Oulx, VII, p. 7.
[76] Wurstenberger, L. (1858) Peter der Zweite Graf von Savoyen, Markgraf in Italien, sein Haus und seine Lande (Bern, Zurich), Vol. IV, 16, p. 5.
[77] Cipolla, C. (ed.) ´Il gruppo dei diplomi Adelaidini in favore dell´abbazia di Pinerolo´, Biblioteca della società storica subalpina, Vol. II (Pinerolo, 1899) ("Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini)"), II, p. 318.
[78] Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini), IV, p. 334.
[79] Marie José (1956), p. 33.
[80] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[81] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 18, p. 5.
[82] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, CCXV, p. 76.
[83] Necrologium Scafhusenses, Bernoldi Chronicon Introduction, MGH SS V, p. 393.16


; This is the same person as ”Adelaide of Susa” at Wikipedia, as ”Adélaïde de Suse” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Adelaide di Susa” at Wikipédia:ITAL] (IT).18,19,20 GAV-26.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Adelaide was born about 1015, daughter of Olderich Manfred II, margrave of Turin and Susa, and Berte d'Este. Olderich died in 1034 while Adelaide was still a young unmarried woman, and she inherited most of his vast domains in northern Italy.
     “As a girl she had learned the martial arts and bore her own arms and armour. She had courage and energy and knew how to rule her inheritance. More than once she waged war on rebels in her own territories, burning Asti, Lodi, and other towns that had risen against her.
     “About 1036 Adelaide married Hermann, Herzog von Schwaben, son of Ernst, Herzog von Schwaben, and Gisela von Schwaben whose third husband was the Holy Roman Emperor Konrad II. They became the parents of three children, Hermann, Richwara and Gebhard, who all would have progeny. Her husband died of the plague on 28 July 1038 near Milan. About 1042 she married Enrico de Monferrato who died about 9 June 1044. This marriage did not produce progeny.
     “In 1046 Adelaide married Otto, comte de Savoie, son of Umberto I, comte de Savoie, and Ancilia (von Lenzburg). Of their children Amadeo II, Peter, Berta and Adelheid would have progeny while the youngest, Eudes, became bishop of Asti. Otto died about twelve years later.
     “Adelaide's involvement in politics did not stop at her own borders. In the struggle between the German emperors and the papacy, she strongly supported the imperial side. In the quarrel between her son-in-law Emperor Heinrich IV and Pope Gregory VII, her advice to Heinrich saved his crown for him. When Heinrich went to Canossa to seek forgiveness from the Pope, Adelaide went with him.
     “In her old age she did works of charity, and she began to give generously to religious institutions. She died on 10 December 1091 at Canischio.”.6 Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino was also known as Adelheid of Susa.3 Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino was also known as Adelaide of Turin.21,22 Adelaide de Susa Markgrafin of Susa, Herrin of Torino was also known as Adaline of Turin.22

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 60.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 110.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 2:190; 3/3:593.23,6


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIDA di Susa (Turin 1020-Canischio in Canavese 27 Dec 1091, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). She succeeded her father in 1034 as Marchesa di Susa, heiress of Auriate, Turin, Ivrea and Aosta. Her first marriage is confirmed by Herimannus who records that "Hermannus quoque dux Alamanniæ" was granted "marcham soceri sui Maginfredi in Italia" by the emperor in 1034[614]. "Adaleida f. quondam Maginfredi marchionis et coniux Ermanni ducis et marchionis" donated property "in loco Porciana" to the monastery of San Stefano at Genoa by charter dated 4 Jul [1038], signed by "Bertæ comitissæ…"[615]. "Heynricus marchio filius quondam Uuilielmi similique marchioni et Adalagide cometisse jugales filia bone memorie Odolrici qui et Maginfredi similique marchionis" donated churches to the church of Torino by charter dated 29 Jan 1042[616]. Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1043 under which "Henricus marchio filius quondam Wilielmi similiter marchioni et Adalena comitissa jugales filia quondam bo. me. Oldrici…Maginfredi…marchioni" donated property to San Antonino[617]. "Adalania comitissa filia quondam Odolricus…Magenfridi et conjux Enricus" donated property to Santa Maria di Cavorre by charter dated 1043[618]. Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1043 under which "Henri marquis de Monferrat et Adelaide de Susa son épouse" donated the church of Santa Agata, Susa to the monastery of Saint-Antonin[619]. "Domnus Henricus marchio filius quondam Vuilielmi…marchio et domna Adeleita cometissa iugales, filia quondam Odelrici qui et Magnifredi…marchionis" donated property to Pinerolo by charter dated 14 Mar [1044][620]. Her third marriage is confirmed by the Annalista Saxo which names "Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of "Ottonis marchionis de Italia"[621]. She was regent for her son in 1060 after the death of her husband, playing a significant role in support of Heinrich IV King of Germany, her son-in-law, in his disputes with the Papacy. "Dominus Petrus Marchio filius quond. bonæ memoriæ Oddonis marchionis…cum domina Adheleida comitissa matre sua" signed a charter dated 31 Jul 1064[622]. "Adelegida…comitissa" donated property to Pinerolo, for the souls of "domni Manfredi marchionis genitoris mei et Adalrici episcopi Barbani mei et Bertæ genetricis meæ et…domni Odonis marchionis viri mei", by charter dated 8 Sep 1064, signed by "Petri, Amedei, Vitelmi qui Bruno vicecomes vocatur…Henrici qui vocatur Marchio…"[623]. "Adalaxia cometissa filia quondam Maginfredus marchio" donated property to Pinerolo by charter dated 23 Jul 1075[624]. She mediated with Pope Gregory VII when King Heinrich submitted to him at Canossa in 1077, and received in return the town of Bugey for the house of Savoy[625]. "Domna Adelaida comitissa filia…cum filiis suis Petro et Amedeo" donated property to Novalesa, for the soul of "mariti sui Oddonis", by charter dated 16 Jul 1078[626]. "Adalegida cometissa filia Maginfredi marchionis et relicta quond. Oddonis idemque marchionis" donated property to the monastery at Taurini, in the presence of "domne Agnetis comitissæ, filiæ Wilelmi comitis et relictæ quondam Petri marchionis", for the souls of "Maginfredi patris, Adalrici Astensis episcopi patrui, Berthæ matris et Petri marchionis filii predictæ comitissæ Adalegidæ", by charter dated 4 Jul 1079[627]. The necrology of Schaffhausen records the death "XIV Kal Jan" of "Adelheida Taurinensis comitissa"[628]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the possessions of the church at Asti by undated charter placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1093, which notes among others property in "comitatum [Astensi]…habuit et tenuit Adheledis comitissa"[629].
     "m firstly (1035) HERMANN IV Duke of Swabia, son of ERNST I Duke of Swabia [Babenberg] & his wife Gisela of Swabia ([1015]-28 Jul 1038). He was the stepson of Emperor Konrad II who arranged his marriage with Adelaida who was a powerful heiress in Northern Italy[630].
     "m secondly (Jan 1042) ENRICO Marchese di Monferrato, son of Marchese GUGLIELMO & his wife Waza --- (-[14 Mar 1044/1045]).
     "m thirdly ([1046]) ODDON de Maurienne, son of HUMBERT Comte de Maurienne & his second wife Auxilia --- ([1017]-1 Mar 1060, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). Marchese di Susa [1046], in right of his wife. Comte de Chablais."
Med Lands cites:
[614] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1034, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[615] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, CXVII, p. 41.
[616] Collino, G. (ed.) (1908) Le carte della prevostura d´Oulx (Pinerolo) ("Oulx"), I, p. 1.
[617] Carutti, D. (1888) Il conte Umberto I e il re Ardoino (Rome), p. 142, no citation reference.
[618] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[619] Chevalier, U. (ed.) (1875) Diplomatique de Bourgogne par Pierre de Rivaz (Paris) ("Rivaz") LXXIX, p. 37, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. I, p. 550.
[620] Cipolla, C. (ed.) ´Il gruppo dei diplomi Adelaidini in favore dell´abbazia di Pinerolo´, Biblioteca della società storica subalpina, Vol. II (Pinerolo, 1899) ("Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini)"), I, p. 315.
[621] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[622] Wurstenberger, L. (1858) Peter der Zweite Graf von Savoyen, Markgraf in Italien, sein Haus und seine Lande (Bern, Zurich), Vol. IV, 16, p. 5.
[623] Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini), II, p. 318.
[624] Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini), IV, p. 334.
[625] Marie José (1956) La Maison de Savoie, Les Origines, Le Comte Vert, Le Comte Rouge (Paris, Albin Michel), (1956), p. 33.
[626] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[627] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 18, p. 5.
[628] Necrologium Scafhusenses, Bernoldi Chronicon Introduction, MGH SS V, p. 393.
[629] D H IV 427, p. 572.
[630] Trillmich, pp. 350-9.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Babenbergs): “B2. Duke Hermann IV of Swabia (1030-38), *1015, +28.7.1038; m.Adelheid of Susa (*1015 +19.12.1091) dau.of Mgve Odelrico Menfredo II of Susa, Mkgf of Turin by Berthe von Este”.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "HERMANN ([1015]-28 Jul 1038). The Chronicle of Otto of Freising names "geminosque ex ea [Ernusto duci Suevorum] filios Ernustum et Herimannum"[207], although it is not certain that this should be taken as meaning that the two brothers were twins, reference to which has not yet been identified in other sources. Herimannus names "frater eius [=Ernust dux] iunior Herimannus" when recording his succession as Duke of Swabia in 1030 when his brother was deprived of the title[208]. He succeeded his brother in 1030 as HERMANN IV Duke of Swabia. He succeeded his father-in-law as Marchese di Susa in 1036. Wipo records the death "V Kal Aug" of "filius imperatricis Herimannus dux Alemannorum"[209]. The necrology of Fulda records the death in 1038 of "Herimannnus dux"[210]. The necrology of St Gall records the death "V Kal Aug" of "Heremanni ducis Alamannnorum"[211].
     "m (1035) as her first husband, ADELAIDA Marchesa di Susa, daughter of MANFREDO UDALRICO Marchese di Susa Conte di Turino & his wife Berta degli Obertenghi (Turin 1020-Canischio in Canavese 27 Dec 1091, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). Her first marriage is confirmed by Herimannus who records that "Hermannus quoque dux Alamanniæ" was granted "marcham soceri sui Maginfredi in Italia" by the emperor in 1034[212]. "Adaleida f. quondam Maginfredi marchionis et coniux Ermanni ducis et marchionis" donated property "in loco Porciana" to the monastery of San Stefano at Genoa by charter dated 4 Jul [1038], signed by "Bertæ comitissæ…"[213]. She married secondly (Jan 1042) Enrico Marchese di Monferrato. Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1043 under which "Henricus marchio filius quondam Wilielmi similiter marchioni et Adalena comitissa jugales filia quondam bo. me. Oldrici…Maginfredi…marchioni" donated property to San Antonino[214]. "Adalania comitissa filia quondam Odolricus…Magenfridi et conjux Enricus" donated property to Santa Maria di Cavorre by charter dated 1043[215]. Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1043 under which "Henri marquis de Monferrat et Adelaide de Susa son épouse" donated the church of Santa Agata, Susa to the monastery of Saint-Antonin[216]. She married thirdly ([1046]) Oddon de Maurienne Comte de Chablais [Savoie]. The Annalista Saxo names "Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of "Ottonis marchionis de Italia"[217]. She succeeded her father in 1034 as Marchesa di Susa, heiress of Auriate, Turin, Ivrea and Aosta. She was regent for her son in 1060 after the death of her husband, playing a significant role in support of Heinrich IV King of Germany, her son-in-law, in his disputes with the Papacy. She mediated with Pope Gregory VII when King Heinrich submitted to him at Canossa in 1077, and received in return the town of Bugey for the house of Savoy[218]. The necrology of Schaffhausen records the death "XIV Kal Jan" of "Adelheida Taurinensis comitissa"[219]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the possessions of the church at Asti by undated charter placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1093, which notes among others property in "comitatum [Astensi]…habuit et tenuit Adheledis comitissa"[220]."
Med Lands cites:
[207] Chronicon Ottonis Frisingensis VI. 28, MGH SS XX, p. 241.
[208] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1030, MHG SS V, p. 121.
[209] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 37, MGH SS XI, p. 273.
[210] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.
[211] Libri Anniversariorum et Necrologium Monasterii Sancti Galli, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 462.
[212] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1034, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[213] Carutti, D. (1889) Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, marchionum in Italia (Turin) ("Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ"), CXVII, p. 41.
[214] Carutti, D. (1888) Il conte Umberto I e il re Ardoino (Rome), p. 142, no citation reference.
[215] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[216] Chevalier, U. (ed.) (1875) Diplomatique de Bourgogne par Pierre de Rivaz (Paris) ("Rivaz") LXXIX, p. 37, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. I, p. 550.
[217] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[218] Marie José (1956) La Maison de Savoie, Les Origines, Le Comte Vert, Le Comte Rouge (Paris, Albin Michel), p. 33.
[219] Necrologium Scafhusenses, Bernoldi Chronicon Introduction, MGH SS V, p. 393.
[220] D H IV 427, p. 572.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Babenbergs): “B2. Duke Hermann IV of Swabia (1030-38), *1015, +Trento 28.7.1038; m.Adelheid of Susa (*1015 +19.12.1091) dau.of Mgve Odelrico Menfredo II of Susa, Mkgf of Turin by Berthe von Este”.24

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “Enrico (Henri) 1er di Monferrato + ~1044/45 marquis de Montferrat
ép. 1) Marie ?
ép. 2) ~1042 Adélaïde 1ère marquise de Turin et de Suze (1034-1091) ° ~1020 + 16/12/1091 (fille du marquis Olderico Manfredi II et de Berta dei Marchesi d’Este)”.25

; Per Genealogy.EU (Montferrato): “C1. Enrico I, Marquis, +ca 1044; m.ca 1042 Adelaide I Marchesa di Torino e Susa (1034-91) (*ca 1020, +16.12.1091), dau.of Marchese Olderico Manfredi II and Berta dei Marchesi d’Este”.26

; Per Med Lands:
     "ENRICO (-[14 Mar 1044/1045]). Lord of the March of Monferrato [Marchio Monferratensis]. "Heynricus marchio filius quondam Uuilielmi similique marchioni et Adalagide cometisse jugales filia bone memorie Odolrici qui et Maginfredi similique marchionis" donated churches to the church of Torino by charter dated 29 Jan 1042[30]. "Henricus marchio filius quondam Wilielmi similiter marchioni et Adalena comitissa jugales filia quondam bo. me. Oldrici…Maginfredi…marchioni" donated property to San Antonino by charter dated 1043[31]. "Adalania comitissa filia quondam Odolricus…Magenfridi et conjux Enricus" donated property to Santa Maria di Cavorre by charter dated 1043[32]. Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1043 under which "Henri marquis de Monferrat et Adelaide de Susa son épouse" donated the church of Santa Agata, Susa to the monastery of Saint-Antonin[33]. "Domnus Henricus marchio filius quondam Vuilielmi…marchio et domna Adeleita cometissa iugales, filia quondam Odelrici qui et Magnifredi…marchionis" donated property to Pinerolo by charter dated 14 Mar [1044][34].
     "m (before 19 Jan 1042) as her second husband, ADELAIDA Marchesa di Susa, widow of HERMANN IV Duke of Swabia, daughter of MANFREDO UDALRICO Marchese di Susa Conte di Turino & his wife Berta degli Obertenghi (Turin 1020-Canischio in Canavese 27 Dec 1091, bur Turin, cathedral of San Giovanni). Her first marriage is confirmed by Herimannus who records that "Hermannus quoque dux Alamanniæ" was granted "marcham soceri sui Maginfredi in Italia" by the emperor in 1034[35]. "Heynricus marchio filius quondam Uuilielmi similique marchioni et Adalagide cometisse jugales filia bone memorie Odolrici qui et Maginfredi similique marchionis" donated churches to the church of Torino by charter dated 29 Jan 1042[36]. "Henricus marchio filius quondam Wilielmi similiter marchioni et Adalena comitissa jugales filia quondam bo. me. Oldrici…Maginfredi…marchioni" donated property to San Antonino by charter dated 1043[37]. "Adalania comitissa filia quondam Odolricus…Magenfridi et conjux Enricus" donated property to Santa Maria di Cavorre by charter dated 1043[38]. Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1043 under which "Henri marquis de Monferrat et Adelaide de Susa son épouse" donated the church of Santa Agata, Susa to the monastery of Saint-Antonin[39]. "Domnus Henricus marchio filius quondam Vuilielmi…marchio et domna Adeleita cometissa iugales, filia quondam Odelrici qui et Magnifredi…marchionis" donated property to Pinerolo by charter dated 14 Mar [1044][40]. She married thirdly ([1046]) Oddon de Maurienne Comte de Chablais [Savoie]. The Annalista Saxo names "Adelheidis que soror erat comitis qui agnominatus est de Monte Bardonis in Italia et Immule seu Irmingardis" as wife of "Ottonis marchionis de Italia"[41]. She was regent for her son in 1060 after the death of her husband, playing a significant role in support of Heinrich IV King of Germany, her son-in-law, in his disputes with the Papacy. She mediated with Pope Gregory VII when King Heinrich submitted to him at Canossa in 1077, and received in return the town of Bugey for the house of Savoy[42]. The necrology of Schaffhausen records the death "XIV Kal Jan" of "Adelheida Taurinensis comitissa"[43]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the possessions of the church at Asti by undated charter placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1093, which notes among others property in "comitatum [Astensi]…habuit et tenuit Adheledis comitissa"[44]."
Med Lands cites:
[30] Collino, G. (ed.) (1908) Le carte della prevostura d´Oulx (Pinerolo) ("Oulx"), I, p. 1.
[31] Carutti, D. (1888) Il conte Umberto I e il re Ardoino (Rome), p. 142, no citation reference.
[32] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[33] Chevalier, U. (ed.) (1875) Diplomatique de Bourgogne par Pierre de Rivaz (Paris) ("Rivaz") LXXIX, p. 37, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. I, p. 550.
[34] Cipolla, C. (ed.) ´Il gruppo dei diplomi Adelaidini in favore dell´abbazia di Pinerolo´, Biblioteca della società storica subalpina, Vol. II (Pinerolo, 1899) ("Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini)"), I, p. 315.
[35] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1034, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[36] Oulx, I, p. 1.
[37] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[38] Carutti (1888), p. 142, no citation reference.
[39] Rivaz LXXIX, p. 37, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. I, p. 550.
[40] Pinerolo (Diplomi Adelaidini), I, p. 315.
[41] Annalista Saxo 1067.
[42] Marie José (1956) La Maison de Savoie, Les Origines, Le Comte Vert, Le Comte Rouge (Paris, Albin Michel), p. 33.
[43] Necrologium Scafhusenses, Bernoldi Chronicon Introduction, MGH SS V, p. 393.
[44] D H IV 427, p. 572.14
She was Marchesa di Torino e Susa between 1034 and 1091.9

Family 1

Hermann IV (?) Herzog von Schwaben b. c 1015, d. 28 Jul 1038
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Olderich Manfred II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027350&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ManfredUdalricodied1034. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#AdelaidaSusadied1091
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page - Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  10. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106624&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#HermannIVSwabiadied1038
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrico de Monferrato: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00440274&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MONFERRATO,%20SALUZZO,%20SAVONA.htm#EnricoMAdelaidaSusa.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027351&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Oddondied1060B
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 August 2020), memorial page for Adelaide di Susa (1014–19 Dec 1091), Find a Grave Memorial no. 100149290, citing Parrocchia di Canischio, Canischio, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/100149290/adelaide-di_susa. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Susa. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Adélaïde de Suse: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A9la%C3%AFde_de_Suse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  20. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Adelaide di Susa: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_di_Susa. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  21. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10265
  22. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  23. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The Babenbergs: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Aleramici (di Montferrato) family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gebhard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106617&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amadeo II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027364&tree=LEO
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html#P1
  31. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027237&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Berthedied1087
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00496755&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Adelaidedied1079

Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa1,2

M, #6687, b. 992, d. 29 October 1034
FatherManfredo I (?) Count of Susa3,4
MotherPrangarda (?) of Reggio5,4 b. c 955
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa was born in 992 at Turin (Torino), Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy (now).4,6 He married Bertha d'Este, daughter of Marchese Oberto II d'Este Conte di Luni, Tortona, Genova and Milano and Railinda (?) of Cuomo, between 1010 and 1014; Genealogis says m. 1010; Med Lands says m. 1014.2,1,7,8,4
Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa died on 29 October 1034 at Turin (Torino), Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy (now).9,10,4,6
Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa was buried after 29 October 1034 at Cattedrale di San Giovanni Battista, Turin (Torino), Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     992, Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
     DEATH     29 Oct 1034 (aged 41–42), Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
     Ulric was the son of Manfred I and Prangarda (daughter of Adalbert Atto of Canossa). Ulric Manfred inherited a vast march centred on Turin (1000), which had been created from the lands of his ancestor Arduin Glaber. An imperial diploma, dated 31 July 1001, records that, for his faithful service, Emperor Otto III confirmed Ulric Manfred's possessions and granted him several privileges.
     Ulric married Bertha of Milan by 1014. They had 3 daughters:
1. Adelaide, his heir
2. Immilla
3. Bertha

     Ulric Manfred had a palace in Turin, but like many other medieval lords, he lived an itinerant life. He moved from castle to castle in order to maintain his control and to effect the administration of his dominions.
     Around 1028, Ulric, along with his brother, Bishop Alric of Asti, Archbishop Aribert of Milan and Bishop Landulf of Turin acted to suppress a heretical movement which had developed at Monforte.
     Ulric restored the old church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Susa and Novalesa Abbey. In May 1028 with his wife Bertha, founded the convent of Santa Maria at Caramagna. The following year, in July 1029, along with his wife, Bertha, and his brother, Bishop Alric of Asti, founded the Benedictine abbey in of S. Giusto in Susa, which housed the relics of Saint Justus of Novalesa. The church of the Abbey of San Giusto is now Susa Cathedral.
     Ulric Manfred fortified the villages of Exilles and Bardonecchia.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Manfred I Of Turin unknown–1000
          Prangarda Of Canossa 955–992
     Spouse
          Bertha of Milan 997–1040
     Children
          Adelaide di Susa 1014–1091
     BURIAL     
Cattedrale di San Giovanni Battista
Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
Created by: Angie Swann
Added: 19 May 2015
Find a Grave Memorial 146724789.4,10,6
     Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 60.10 GAV-27.

; Per Wikipédia:
     "Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate, né à une date inconnue dans la seconde moitié du xe siècle probablement à Turin et mort vers 1034-351 dans cette même ville, est un seigneur italien du Moyen Âge, qui fut seigneur de la marche de Turin et marquis de Suse.
     "Il est mentionné sous la forme Manfred II Odelrich, dans les annales allemandes, ou encore Ulric-Manfred chez les historiens Charles William Previté-Orton2 ou Paul Guichonnet3.
Biographie
     "Apparenté à la famille Ardouin, Oldéric-Manfred II est le fils d'Oldéric-Manfred Ier et de Prangarda la fille d'Attone de Canossa, comte de Modène et Reggio4.
     "Oldéric-Manfred hérite de la marche de Turin. Selon la charte de fondation de l'Abbaye de Saint-Just de Suse de 1029, la généalogie de la famille du marquis révèle qu'il aurait eu cinq frères : Alric (mentionné également sous les formes Aldéric ou Abdéric ou encore Alrico) évêque d'Asti en 1017, Oddon, Alton, Hugues et Guy1,5. Devenu marquis au xie siècle, Oldéric-Manfred II sait consolider le pouvoir des Arduin s'entremettant dans la lutte entre Arduin d’Ivrée et l'Empire. Dans un diplôme impérial daté 31 juillet 1001, en récompense de ses loyaux services l'empereur Othon III confirme les possessions d'Oldéric-Manfred — dans les comtés de Bredule, d'Albe et d'Auriate, et en outre du tiers de la vallée de Suse, du tiers d’Oulx, d'Exilles, de Bardonnèche, etc., du tiers de Turin, etc.5 — et lui concède plusieurs privilèges6.
     "Oldéric-Manfred, immédiatement après avoir assumé la succession de son père, consolide son pouvoir vis-à-vis d'Arduin, marquis d'Ivrée, et de l'empereur Henri II. Lors de leur conflit pour le contrôle du royaume d'Italie (regnum Italicum), il obtient vers 1015, de vastes territoires aux dépens de la marche d'Ivrée7.
     "Ses domaines deviennent très vastes. Dans deux chartes, cosignées avec son épouse Berthe, relatives à une vente à un prêtre nommé Sigifried, fils d'Adalgis vers 1021 et à une donation au monastère de Saint-Soluture de Turin en 1031, on peut lire la liste des territoires qu'il contrôle dont les villes et environs de Parme, Plaisance, Pavie, Tortone, Vercelli , Acqui Terme, Asti, Ivrée, Turin, Alba, Albenga et Vintimille8. Pour éviter les conflits avec l'Empire, il ne se préoccupe pas trop d'étendre ses territoires par les armes, mais il gère plutôt au mieux ses terres afin d'accroitre son contrôle et sa puissance9.
     "La capitale de la marche se trouve à Turin, bien qu'elle soit un bourg et ceci en raison de sa position stratégique au centre de ses territoires. Oldéric-Manfred ne réside pas souvent dans la ville et il se déplace régulièrement pour gérer au mieux ses domaines.
     "Oldéric-Manfred fait restaurer l'antique église de Santa Maria Maggiore de Suse et l'abbaye de la Novalaise, il fait fortifier les bourgs d'Exilles et de Bardonèche. Il fait construire un important monastère à Suse en 1027, qui, au cours de années suivantes, atteint une certaine importance ainsi que celle de Caramagna.
Union et postérité
     "Oldéric épouse Berthe d'Ivrée, dit aussi de Toscane ou encore de Milan, (vers 976 - après 1029), margrave de Suse et comtesse de Turin. Selon Samuel Guichenon, dans son Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie, Berthe d'Ivrée [est] fille d'Albert Marquis d'Ivrée & cousine d'Ardoin Roi d'Italie10. Berthe, fille du marquis Obert II, est issue la branche adalbertienne des Obertenguides1.
Ils ont 11,12 :
** N. N., comte de Mombardone12 (Mombaldone ?) ;
** Adélaïde de Suse, marquise de Suze, comtesse de Turin (1020 - 1091)2. Elle déplacera sa résidence à Suse, quittant Turin et affaiblissant ainsi les possessions paternelles. Elle se marie par trois fois, notamment avec le comte Othon Ier de Savoie12, et devient régente de Savoie pour ses fils à la mort de ce troisième époux ;
** Immilla-Ermengarde1, dite de Suse, ou Irmgarde ou encore Aemilia/Immula (1015 - 1078) qui épouse en 1030 Otton III, comte de Schweinfurt dont Gisèle de Schweinfurt qui épouse Berthold III d' Andechs, puis en secondes noces, Egbert Ier, margrave de Misnie12 ;
** Berthe de Turin (1010 - ) épouse Otto (ou Tetone), margrave de Savone12.

Notes et références
1. Laurent Ripart, « La tradition d'Adélaïde dans la maison de Savoie », dans Patrick Corbet, Monique Goullet, Dominique Iogna-Prat, Adélaïde de Bourgogne. Genèse et représentations d'une sainteté impériale, Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques / Éditions universitaires de Dijon, coll. « CTHS Histoire », 2002, 230 p. (ISBN 2-7355-0497-2, lire en ligne [archive]).
2. Previté-Orton, 1912, p. 166 (Lire en ligne [archive]).
3. Paul Guichonnet, Nouvelle histoire de la Savoie, Édition Privat, 1996, 366 p. (ISBN 978-2-7089-8315-1), p. 119.
4. Stokvis, Anthony Marinus Hendrik Johan, préface de H. F. Wijnman, Manuel d'histoire, de généalogie et de chronologie de tous les États du globe, depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'à nos jours, éditions Brill à Leyde, 1890-1893 ; Généalogie des rois d'Italie et des Margraves de Toscane Frioul, Auriate: Volume III, « Chapitre XII, Tableau Généalogique n°12 »
5. Léon Menabrea, Des origines féodales dans les Alpes occidentales, Imprimerie royale, 1865, 596 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 123.
6. Urkunden Otto des III, no. 408, p. 842. Il est nommé « Margrave Ulric nommé Manfred » (Odelrico marchioni qui Mainfredus nominatur) dans ce document.
7. Previté-Orton, 1912, p. 165 (Lire en ligne [archive]).
8. (it) Domenico Carutti (en), Il conte Umberto I (Biancamano) e il re Ardoino: ricerche e documenti, E. Loescher, 1884, 408 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 333.
9. Previté-Orton, 1912, p. 173 (Lire en ligne [archive]).
10. Samuel Guichenon, Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie, p.200 (Lire en ligne [archive]).
11. Bresslau, Jahrbücher, I, p. 378.
12. Previté-Orton, 1912, p. 212 (Lire en ligne [archive]).
Voir aussi
Sources
** (it) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en italien intitulé « Olderico Manfredi II » (voir la liste des auteurs).
** (en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en anglais intitulé « Ulric Manfred II of Turin » (voir la liste des auteurs).
Bibliographie
** (en) Charles William Previté-Orton, The Early History of the House of Savoy: 1000-1233, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press (réimpr. 2013) (1re éd. 1912), 512 p. (lire en ligne [archive]). .
Liens internes
** Histoire du Piémont: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histoire_du_Pi%C3%A9mont."11



; Per Genealogics:
     "Olderich Manfred II was born in 992, the son of Manfredo I, count of Susa and Prangorda of Reggio. He was the count of Turin and margrave of Susa in the early eleventh century, one of the most powerful Italian barons of his time.
     "Olderich inherited a vast march centred on Turin, which had been created from the lands of Arduino Glabrio (died 977). By a charter dated 31 July 1001, Holy Roman Emperor Otto III confirmed his possessions and granted him several privileges. This grant was requested by _Hugonis marchionis,_ probably Hugo, margrave of Tuscany.
     "In 1014 Olderich married Berte d'Este of the Obertenghi, daughter of Margrave Oberto Obizzo II. That year Emperor Heinrich II confirmed their joint donation to the abbey of Fruttuaria. Olderich and Berte had three daughters who would all have progeny: Adelaide with Hermann, Herzog von Schwaben; Irmingard with Otto, Herzog von Schwaben, Markgraf von Schweinfurt; and Berta with Teotone/Oddone, margrave of Vasto.
     "Olderich, immediately upon his succession, began to consolidate his power in relation to Arduin of the March of Ivrea on the one hand and the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich II on the other. In the fight over the _regnum Italcum,_ he gained a great deal of territory at the expense of the Eporedian march. By the preserved notarial deeds of a priest named Sigifred (1021 and 1031), a precise catalogue of the cities under his control can be known: Turin, Ivrea, Albenga, Ventimiglia, Auriate, Tortona, and Vercelli. In all the wars between Arduin and Heinrich, Olderich prudently avoided any confrontation with the two leaders and gradually extended his territories by arms (he was at war with Boniface I, marquis of Tuscany, in 1016) and by increasing his authority within his proper domains. In 1024, following the death of Heinrich, he opposed the election of Konrad II and instead invited Guillaume V 'le Grand', duc d'Aquitaine to take the Italian throne, but to no avail.
     "Though his capital was Turin, Olderich rarely resided in that strategic but small city. He lived an itinerant life typical for an early eleventh century feudal lord, moving from castle to castle in order to maintain his control and to administer his dominions. His daughter Adelaide abandoned Turin as a capital and the itinerant lifestyle, and set up house in Susa.
     "Olderich restored the old church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Susa and the monastery of Novalesa. He constructed a new monastery in Susa and the cathedral of San Giusto (in 1029). He fortified the villages of Exilles and Bardonecchia. He died at Turin on 29 October 1034, and was buried there in the cathedral of San Giovanni."10

Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa was also known as Ulric Manfred II Count of Susa, Marquis of Turin.12 Manfredo Udalrico II (?) Marchese di Torino, Count of Susa was also known as Oderico-Manfredo II Count of Turin, Margrave of Susa.13 He was Marquis de Turin between 1010 and 1041.11

Family

Bertha d'Este b. 997, d. bt 29 Dec 1037 - 1040
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Olderich Manfred II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027350&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Manfredo I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121010&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#ManfredUdalricodied1034. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Prangorda of Reggio: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121011&tree=LEO
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 April 2020), memorial page for Ulric Manfred of Turin, II (992–29 Oct 1034), Find a Grave Memorial no. 146724789, citing Cattedrale di San Giovanni Battista, Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/146724789/ulric-manfred_of_turin. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berte d'Este: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020856&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#Bertadied1037MManfredo
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-23, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Olderich Manfred II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027350&tree=LEO
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Oldéric-Manfred II d'Oriate: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old%C3%A9ric-Manfred_II_d%27Oriate. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  13. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berta de Susa: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106729&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00440275&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page - The House of Savoy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027352&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#AdelaidaSusadied1091
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard de Susa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080003&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#AemiliaSusaMOttoSchweinfurt

Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland1

M, #6688, b. 990, d. 10 May 1034
FatherBoleslaw I "Chrobry" (?) King of Poland2,3 b. 967, d. 17 Jun 1025
MotherEmnilde (?) Princess of the Western Slavs, Duchess of the Polans1,4 b. bt 970 - 975, d. bt 1013 - 1017
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited12 May 2020
     Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland was born in 990 at Poznan, Miasto Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland (now).1,5 He married Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland, daughter of Edzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau and Mathilde (?) von Sachsen, circa 1013 at Merseburg.6,7,8,1,5
Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland died on 10 May 1034; murdered.9,1,5
Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland was buried after 10 May 1034 at Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Poznan, Miasto Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     May 1034
     Family Members
     Parents
          Boleslaw I King Of Poland unknown–1025
          Emnilda S?owia?ska unknown–1017
     Spouse
          Richeza of Lotharingia unknown–1063
     Siblings
          Regelinda unknown–1014
          Otto Boles?awowic 1000–1033
     Half Siblings
          Bezprym unknown–1032
     Children
          Gertrude of Poland unknown–1108
          Richeza Of Poland 1013–1075
          Casimir I King Of Poland 1016–1058
     BURIAL     Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Pozna?, Miasto Pozna?, Wielkopolskie, Poland
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 4 Mar 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 66461899.10
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Mieszko II was born in Posen about 990, the son of Boleslaw I Chrobry 'the Brave', king of Poland, and Enmilde, daughter of Dobromir, duke of Lusatia. About 1013 Mieszko II was married to Richeza de Lorraine, daughter of Ezzo/Ehrenfried, Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, and Mathilde of Saxony. Through her mother, Richeza was the granddaughter of Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor. Mieszko and Richeza had a son Kazimierz I Karol, who would succeed his father, and two daughters: Richeza/Ryksa married to Béla I, king of Hungary, and Gertruda married to Isjaslaw I, grand duke of Kiev. All three would have progeny.
     "Mieszko II was very well educated for the period. He was able to read and write, and knew both Greek and Latin. He is unjustly known as Mieszko Gnusny (the 'Lazy', 'Stagnant' or 'Slothful'). He received that epithet due to the unfortunate way his reign ended; but at the beginning he acted as a skilful and talented ruler. Before he became king in 1025, he probably served as his father's governor in Cracow, most likely from 1013, and reputedly built many churches.
     "Beginning in 1028, he successfully waged war against Germany; he was able to repel the German army, and later even invaded Saxony. He allied Poland with Hungary, resulting in a temporary Hungarian occupation of Vienna. This war was probably prompted by family connections of Mieszko in Germany who opposed Emperor Konrad II.
     "An understanding of what happened later requires an understanding of Mieszko's family. His older half-brother Bezprym was the son of Judith of Hungary, wife of Boleslaw and was later expelled by Mieszko. He also had a younger brother Otto. By Slavic custom, a father should divide his legacy among all his sons. However, since a kingdom cannot be divided, Mieszko's brothers received nothing from their father's legacy.
     "As Bezprym was the eldest son, many probably felt that he should have succeeded his father as king. Bezprym had, however, always been disliked by his father, as indicated by his name (the Piasts tended to give names such as Boleslaw, Mieszko and later Kazimierz, Wladyslaw and emperors' names such as Otto, Konrad and Heinrich; Bezprym was a commoner's name, which implied that Boleslaw did not wish Bezprym to succeed him). He was packed off to a monastery.
     "Mieszko's two brothers escaped abroad: Otto to Germany, Bezprym to Kievan Rus. Soon after, the Holy Roman Emperor and Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch 'the Wise', grand duke of Kiev, made alliance and simultaneously invaded Poland.
     "Facing two enemies, Germany on the west and Rus on the east, Mieszko escaped to Bohemia, where he is said to have been castrated. Bezprym began his reign by sending his crown and regalia to Germany. Mieszko soon returned, but was forced to pledge fealty to the German Emperor, and Poland was divided between him, his brothers Otto and Bezprym, and a certain Thiedric (probably a nephew or cousin). Otto was killed by one of his own men, and Mieszko was able to reunite Poland.
     "What happened next is a mystery. Historians now think that Mieszko was killed (in 1034) in a plot hatched by the aristocracy. After Mieszko's death, Poland's peasants revolted in a 'pagan reaction'. The exact reasons and date are unknown. Mieszko's son, Kazimierz I Karol, was either expelled by this insurrection, or the insurrection was caused by the aristocracy's expulsion of him.
     "Modern historians argue that the insurrection was less likely caused by religious than by economic factors (including huge new taxes for the Church, and the militarisation of the early Polish dukedom/kingdom - almost all the male population were drafted into the army). Priests, monks and knights were killed; and cities, churches and monasteries were burned.
     "The chaos became still greater when unexpectedly the Czechs invaded from the south. The land became divided among local rulers, one of whom is known by name: Maslaw, ruler of Masovia. Greater Poland was so devastated that it ceased to be the core of the Polish kingdom. The capital was moved to Cracow in Lesser Poland."5

; Per Genealogy.EU: "[3m.] King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland (1025-34), *990, +murdered 10.5.1034; m.Merseburg ca 1013 Richeza of Lorraine (*before 1000 +21.3.1063.)1"

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:120 ; Posen Peter de Loriol.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "MIESZKO LAMBERT of Poland, son of BO?ESLAW I "Chrobry" Prince [King in 1025] of Poland & his [third/fourth] wife Emnilda --- (990-10 May 1034). Thietmar refers to the two sons of Boleslaw as his wife Emnilde as "Miesco and another…named after his beloved lord [Otto]"[116]. The Chronicæ Polanorum names "secundus Mescho" as son of "magnus Bolezlavum"[117]. The Annales Kamenzenses record the birth in 990 of "Mesco filius Bolezlai"[118]. The Annales Silesiaci Compilati record the birth in 990 of "Boleslau filius Meczko"[119]. The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Boleslaus" had "filium Meziconem secundum" in 990[120]. He succeeded his father in 1025 as MIESZKO II King of Poland. He launched raids on the territory of the Ostmark in 1030, devastating hundreds of villages[121]. A German-Russian coalition defeated King Mieszko in 1030, conquered territory, divided what remained of Poland between members of the Piast dynasty and forced the king to send his crown to Germany. The country descended into civil war[122]. The Annales Cracovienses Vetusti record the death in 1034 of "Mysko rex Poloniorum"[123]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "10 May" of "Lanpertus sive Misico dux poloniorum"[124].
     "m ([1013], [divorced]) RICHEZA, daughter of EZZO Pfalzgraf of Lotharingia & his wife Mathilde of Germany (-21 Mar 1063, bur Köln St Maria ad gradus). The Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio names the seven daughters (in order) "Richza, Adelheit, Ida, Mathild, Theophanu, Heylewig, Sophia" as children of "Herenfridus comes palatinus, qui post Ezo nominatus est" and his wife "Mathilde filia Magni Ottonis", specifying in a later passage that "Richza" was divorced from her husband and was mother of "Gazimerum"[125]. The Annales Kamenzenses record the marriage in 1013 of "Mesco filius Bolezlai primi" and "sororem Ottonis tercii imperatoris"[126]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of Kloster Brauweiler by charter dated 18 Jul 1051 which names "Richeza regina quondam Poleniæ…pro remedio anime sue fratrisque sui beate memorie Ottonis ducis aliorumque parentum suorum in monasterio Brunwilarensi sepultorum…per manum Heinrici palatini comitis filii patrui sui" and witnessed by "Heinricus comes palatinus, Sicco comes, Starchri comes…"[127]. She fled for shelter to a western monastery when Poland descended into civil war[128]. The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XII Kal Mai” of “Rigza regina soror Herimanni archiepiscopi”[129].
Med Lands cites:
[116] Thietmar 4.58, p. 193.
[117] Chronicæ Polanorum I.17, MGH SS IX, p. 436.
[118] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 7.
[119] Annales Silesiaci Compilati 990, MGH SS XIX, p. 538.
[120] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 53.
[121] Annalista Saxo 1030.
[122] Dzi?cio? (1963), pp 199 and 228
[123] Annales Cracovienses Vetusti, p. 2.
[124] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.
[125] Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio 5 and 16, MGH SS XI, pp. 398 and 403.
[126] Annales Kamenzenses, p. 8.
[127] D H III 273, p. 370.
[128] Dzi?cio? (1963), p. 200.
[129] Lacomblet, T. J. (1857) Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins (Düsseldorf), Band II, p. 12.11


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Mieszko II Lambert (About this soundPolish (help·info); c. 990 – 10/11 May 1034) was King of Poland from 1025–1031, and Duke from 1032 until his death.
     "He was the second son of Boles?aw I the Brave but the eldest born from his third wife Emnilda of Lusatia. He was probably named after his paternal grandfather, Mieszko I. His second name, Lambert, sometimes erroneously considered to be a nickname, was given to him as a reference to Saint Lambert. Also, it is probable that this name Lambert was chosen after Boles?aw's half-brother Lambert. It is thought that the choice of this name for his son was an expression of warming relations between Boles?aw I and his stepmother Oda.[1]
     "He organized two devastating invasions to Saxony in 1028 and 1030. Then Mieszko II ran a defensive war against Germany, Bohemia and the Kievan princes. Mieszko II was forced to escape from the country in 1031 after an attack of Yaroslav I the Wise, who installed Mieszko's older half-brother Bezprym onto the Polish throne. Mieszko took refuge in Bohemia, where he was imprisoned by the Duke Oldrich. In 1032 he regained power in one of the three districts, then united the country, making good use of the remaining power structures. At this time, several Polish territorial acquisitions of his father were lost: Upper Lusatia (also known as Milsko), part of Lower Lusatia, Red Ruthenia, western and central part of Upper Hungary (now Slovakia) and probably Moravia.
     "Mieszko II was very well educated for the period. He was able to read and write, and knew both Greek and Latin. He is unjustly known as Mieszko II Gnu?ny (the "Lazy," "Stagnant" or "Slothful"). He received that epithet due to the unfortunate way his reign ended; but at the beginning he acted as a skillful and talented ruler.
Life
Early years
     "Since Mieszko II was politically active before his father's death, Boles?aw I appointed him as his successor. He participated mainly in German politics, both as a representative of his father and the commander of the Polish troops.
     "In 1013 Mieszko II went to Magdeburg, where he paid homage to the Emperor Henry II. A few months later Boles?aw I paid homage in person. The real purpose of Mieszko's visit is unclear, especially since soon after his father paid homage to the Holy Roman Empire. Presumably, the young prince paid homage for Milsko or Moravia and Lusatia. The relevant treaty stipulated that it was only a personal tribute, not entailing any legal obligations. Another hypothesis assumes that the territories were transferred by Boles?aw to him, and as a result made Mieszko a vassal of the Empire.
     "The position of the young prince, at the both Polish and Imperial courts, became stronger in 1013 when he married Richeza[2] daughter of Count Palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia and niece of Emperor Otto III. Ezzo was a prince of a considerable influence as a great leader of the opposition against Henry II. Through the marriage with his daughter Mieszko, he entered into the circle of the Imperial family and became a person equal to, if not higher than the Emperor himself. Probably after the wedding, and in accordance with prevailing custom, Boles?aw I the Brave gave a separate district to Mieszko II to rule: Kraków. One of his towns, Wawel (now part of the city), was chosen by the prince as his residence.
     "In the year 1014 Mieszko II was sent by his father to Bohemia as an emissary. He had to persuade Duke Old?ich to make an alliance against the Emperor Henry II. The mission failed as Old?ich imprisoned Mieszko. He was released only after the intervention of the Emperor, who, despite the planned betrayal of Boles?aw I, loyally acted on behalf of his vassal. As a result, Mieszko was sent to the Imperial court in Merseburg as a hostage. Henry II probably wanted to force the presence of Boles?aw I in Merseburg and make him explain his actions. The plan failed however, because, under pressure from his relatives, the Emperor soon agreed to release Mieszko.
     "A year later, Mieszko II stood at the head of Polish troops in the next war against the Emperor. The campaign wasn't favorable to Henry. His army needed over a month to reach the line of the Oder River, and once there, his troops encountered strong resistance led by Mieszko and his father. Henry II sent a delegation to the Polish rulers, in an effort to induce them to conclude a peace settlement. Mieszko II refused, and after the Emperor's failure to defeat his troops in battle, Henry decided to begin retreating to Dziadoszyce. The Polish prince went on pursuit, and inflicted heavy losses on the German army. When the Polish army advanced to Meissen, Mieszko II unsuccessfully tried to besiege the castle of his brother-in-law, Margrave Herman I (husband of his sister Regelinda). The fighting stopped in autumn and was resumed only in 1017 after the failure of peace talks. Imperial forces bypassed the main defensive site near Krosno Odrza?skie and besieged Niemcza. At the same time, at the head of ten legions, Mieszko went to Moravia and planned an allied attack together with Bohemia against the Emperor. This action forced the Emperor to give up on a plan of any frontal attack. A year later, the Peace of Bautzen (30 January 1018) was concluded, with terms extremely favorable to the Polish side.
     "Beginning in 1028, he successfully waged war against the Holy Roman Empire. He was able to repel its invading army, and later even invaded Saxony. He allied Poland with Hungary, resulting in a temporary Hungarian occupation of Vienna. This war was probably prompted by family connections of Mieszko's in Germany who opposed Emperor Conrad II.
     "Due to the death of Thietmar of Merseburg, the principal chronicler of that period, there is little information about Mieszko II's life from 1018 until 1025, when he finally took over the government of Poland. Only Gallus Anonymus mentions the then Prince on occasion of the description of his father's trip to Rus in 1018: "due to the fact that his son (...) Mieszko wasn't considered yet capable of taking the government by himself, he established a regent among his family during his trip to Rus". This statement was probably the result of the complete ignorance of the chronicler, since 1018 Mieszko II was 28 years old and was already fully able to exercise the power by himself.
King of Poland
Coronation and Inheritance
     "King Boles?aw died on 17 June 1025. Six months later, on Christmas Day, Mieszko II Lambert was crowned King of Poland by the Archbishop of Gniezno, Hipolit, in the Gniezno Cathedral. Contemporary German chroniclers considered this to be an abuse of power on the part of the Archbishop, which was made necessary by the existing political situation. After his father's death, Mieszko inherited a vast territory, which in addition to Greater Poland, Lesser Poland, Silesia and Gdansk Pomerania also included Western Pomerania, as well as Lusatia, Red Ruthenia and territory of present-day Slovakia. Whether Moravia was still under his reign or was lost earlier is disputed.[3] Once his solo reign had begun, as an important Central European ruler, he was now very important to the Holy Roman Empire.
     "Later developments during his reign had their source in dynastic and familial issues. His older half-brother Bezprym was the son of the Hungarian princess Judith, Boles?aw's second wife. Mieszko also had a younger full-brother, Otto. According to Slavonic custom, a father was expected to divide his legacy among all his sons. However, since Boles?aw I did not wish to break up the kingdom, Mieszko's brothers received nothing from their father's legacy.
     "As Bezprym was the oldest son, there were some who felt that he should have succeeded his father as king. Bezprym had, however, always been disliked by his father, as indicated by his name (the Piasts tended to give names such as Boles?aw, Mieszko and later Kazimierz, W?adys?aw and emperors' names, such as Otto, Konrad (Conrad), and Henryk (Heinrich). Bezprym was rather a commoner's name, which implied that Boles?aw did not wish Bezprym to succeed him). For that reason, Bezprym was sent to a monastery.
     "According to some chroniclers, Mieszko II expelled his two brothers from the country. Otto took refuge in Germany and Bezprym escaped to the Kievan Rus.
Support to German opposition
     "In 1026 the German King Conrad II, went to Italy for his Imperial coronation. His absence increased the activity of the opposition centered around the Dukes Ernest II of Swabia and Frederick II of Upper Lorraine. Conrad II's opponents conspired to acquire the favor of the King of Poland. Historical evidence of these efforts is in the Prayer Book sent to Mieszko II by the Duchess Matilda of Swabia around 1027. The volume is entitled: 'officiorum Liber quem ordinem Romanum apellant. In it, a miniature showed the Duchess presenting the Book to Mieszko II while sitting on a throne. The gift was accompanied by a letter, wherein Matilda named him a distinguished King and a father of the model for the spread of Christianity. Also written was praise of the merits of Mieszko II in the building of new churches, as well his knowledge of Latin, very unusual in those times when Greek was more widely used. In this book were found the earliest records of the Kingdom of Poland: neume at the margins of the sequence Ad célèbres rex celica. The gift caused the expected effect, and Mieszko II promised to take military action. The preparations for the war began in the autumn of 1027. In the middle of that year, Conrad II returned to the Germany and began to fight the rebels. Soon he defeated Duke Ernest II, depriving him of his lands. Only when the rebel fight was nearly lost did Mieszko II arrive to their aid. In 1028 Polish troops invaded Saxony and took a number of prisoners. The devastation was so great that, according to Saxon sources where Mieszko II's troops put their feet grass never thence grew. The Emperor accused the Polish ruler of an illegal coronation as King and declared him a usurper. This invasion involved the lands of the Lutici tribe. In October 1028, the Emperor's opportunity came as the Lutici district of Pöhlde asked the Emperor to defend against the attacks of Mieszko II, promising support in the fight against the Polish ruler.
Retaliatory expeditions
     "Despite the treaty which secured peace between Poland and Germany, the Emperor soon armed a retaliatory expedition against Mieszko II. Conrad II's army arrived to Lusatia in the autumn of 1029 and began the siege of Bautzen; but the German troops did not receive the promised support of the Lutici tribe and the expedition failed. Threatened by the Hungarians, the Emperor was forced to retreat.
     "Probably in this same year the son of Old?ich, Bretislaus I, attacked and took Moravia.[4]
     "In 1030 Mieszko II secured an alliance with Hungary and once again invaded Saxony. In the meanwhile, his southern ally attacked Bavaria and temporarily occupied Vienna.
     "In response, the Emperor organized another expedition against the Polish King, this time by organizing a coalition against Mieszko II. Already in 1030 Yaroslav I the Wise began the offensive and conquered Red Ruthenia and some Be?z castles.
     "The Emperor in 1031 concluded a peace with the Kingdom of Hungary. Probably in exchange for his support, Conrad II give to the King Stephen I the territories between the Leitha and Fischa Rivers, ceding them to Hungary. Now that the Emperor was less concerned about an attack from the south, in the autumn of 1031 he went on the offensive against Poland and besieged Milsko. The offensive ended with a complete success, and Mieszko II was forced to surrender some lands. As a result, the Polish King lost portions of the lands taken by his father, who warred often against the Emperor Henry II.
The situation in Poland
     "Historians estimate that the reason for the rapid capitulation of Mieszko II was the bad internal situation in the country. Boles?aw left to his son an unstable Kingdom, who had to defend his autonomy and position amongst neighboring rulers. Also, the cost of Mieszko II's extensive war against Emperor Conrad II caused his popularity to decline among his subjects, despite the fact that on the invasion of Saxony the King only defended their territory. Furthermore, the final loss of the war against the Holy Roman Empire weakened the position of the King, who had to face several rebellions among the opposition, who claimed that the previous war didn't produce the expected benefits. An additional problem was a dynastic crisis: Mieszko II's brothers continued their attempts to regain power with the help of foreign forces.
Attack of Yaroslav I the Wise. Deposition
     "Probably the brother who caused the first problems to Mieszko II was Bezprym, who allegedly with the support of Otto won the alliance of Kiev in order to take power. When Mieszko II was busy defending Lusatia from the troops of Conrad II, the Kievan expedition started from the east with Yaroslav I the Wise as the leader. In 1031 Poland was invaded and then Bezprym was settled on the throne. Mieszko II and his family were forced to flee the country. Queen Richeza and her children found refuge in Germany. The King couldn't escape to Hungary because during his travel he was stopped by Rus' troops. King Stephen I of Hungary wasn't favorable to accepting him in his country. Without alternatives, Mieszko II went to Bohemia. Duke Old?ich once again imprisoned him. This time the King wasn't counting with the Imperial support. Mieszko II was not only imprisoned but also castrated, which was to be a punishment to Boles?aw I the Brave, who blinded Duke Boleslaus III the Red (Old?ich's brother) thirty years before. Mieszko II and his wife never reunited again; according to some sources they were either officially divorced or only separated.
Restoration to the Throne
     "The new Duke Bezprym probably made bloody persecutions against the followers of Mieszko II. At the time the power was exercised to the mutiny and the people known as the "Pagan Reaction". Have degraded the structure of power, the Duke's authority collapsed, and he was forced to send the Royal crown and regalia to the Emperor. After only one year of reign, Bezprym was murdered (1032), probably thanks to the instigations of his brothers.
     "After the death of Bezprym, the Polish throne remained vacant. Mieszko II was still imprisoned in Bohemia and Otto probably in Germany. German sources report that the Emperor has organized an expedition in order to invade Poland. It is unknown what happened after this, but certainly Mieszko II was released by Duke Old?ich and he could return to the country. After his recent opponent could regain the power, the Emperor immediately reacted and began the preparations for the expedition against Poland. Mieszko II wasn't prepared for the confrontation, so he used his influence in the German court in order to resolve the conflict.
     "On 7 July 1032, in Merseburg a meeting took place between Conrad II and the surviving heirs of the Piast dynasty. Without alternatives, Mieszko II was forced to surrender the Royal crown and agreed to the division of Poland between him and the other two competitors: his brother Otto and certain Dytryk (German: Thiedric) —cousin, grandson of Duke Mieszko I and his third wife Oda—.
     "Mieszko II probably received Lesser Poland and Masovia, Otto obtained Silesia, and Dytryk took Greater Poland.[5] Another proposal involves that Mieszko II received Greater Poland, and other neighborhoods were given to Otto and Dytryk.[6]
     "Although the distribution was uncertain, this division was short-lived: in 1033 Otto was killed by one of his own men, and Mieszko II took his domains. Shortly after, he could have expelled Dytryk and thus was able to reunite the whole country in his hands.
     "Mieszko II regained the full power, but he still had to fight against the nobility and his own subjects. In Poland his renunciation to the Royal crown wasn't counted, and after 1032, in the chronicles, he was still called King.
Death
     "Mieszko II died suddenly between 10 and 11 May 1034, probably in Pozna?. The Polish chronicles clearly stated that he died of natural causes; the information that he was murdered by the sword-bearer (Miecznik), given by the chronicles of Gottfried of Viterbo, refers to Bezprym. However, the historians now think that he was killed in a plot hatched by the aristocracy.[7]
     "He was buried in the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul.
     "After Mieszko II's death, Poland's peasants revolted in a "pagan reaction." The exact reasons and date are unknown. Mieszko II's only son and heir, Casimir I, was either expelled by this insurrection, or the insurrection was caused by the aristocracy's expulsion of him.
     "Some modern historians argue that the insurrection was caused more by economic than by religious issues, such as new taxes for the Church and the militarization of the early Polish polity. Priests, monks and knights were killed; cities, churches and monasteries were burned.
     "The chaos became still greater when unexpectedly the Czechs invaded Silesia and Greater Poland from the south (1039). The land became divided among local rulers, one of whom is known by name: Miec?aw, ruler of Masovia. Greater Poland was so devastated that it ceased to be the core of Polish Kingdom. The capital was moved to Kraków in Lesser Poland.
Marriage and issue
     "In Merseburg ca. 1013, Mieszko II married with Richeza (b. bef. 1000 – d. Saalfeld, 21 March 1063), daughter of Count Palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia. They had at least three children, and possibly four:
1. Ryksa (b. 22 September 1013 – d. 21 May 1075), married by 1039/42 to King Béla I of Hungary.
2. Casimir I the Restorer (b. 25 July 1016 – d. 19 March 1058).
3. Gertruda (b. 1025 – d. Kiev, 4 January 1108), married by 1043 to Grand Prince Iziaslav I of Kiev.
4. possibly Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile, whose origins are unknown. One theory that has been put forward is that she was daughter of Mieszko II and Richeza.[8]

Notes
1. Jasi?ski K. Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, p. 114
2. The Catholic Church in Poland: Saints. Quote: "Blessed Rycheza (Ryksa) (+1063), Queen, wife of [the] King Mieszko II [21.5]"
3. See note No. 4
4. In the literature appears different dates of this conquest: 1017 (Norman Davies, Bo?e igrzysko, t. I, Wydawnictwo ZNAK, Kraków 1987, ISBN 83-7006-052-8), 1019 (this date is supported virtually all Czech historiography; as partes pro toto can be named: Krzemie?ska, Barbara (1999). "II. Dobytí Moravy" [II. Conquering of Moravia]. B?etislav I.: ?echy a st?ední Evropa v prvé polovin? XI. století [Bretislaus I: Bohemia and Central Europe in 1st Half of the 11th Century] (in Czech) (2nd. ed.) Praha: Garamond. ISBN 80-901760-7-0. or Wihoda, Martin (2010). Morava v dob? knížecí (906–1197) [Moravia in the Ducal Era (906–1197)] (in Czech). Praha: NLN. ISBN 978-80-7106-563-0.), 1020 (Tadeusz Manteuffel, Trudno?ci wzrostu w Zarys historii Polski pod redakcj? Janusza Tazbira, Polski Instytut Wydawniczy, Warszaw 1980, p. 24), 1021, 1029 (G. Labuda, Korona i infu?a, Krajowa Agencja Wydawnicza, Kraków 1996, ISBN 83-03-03659-9, p.1) and 1030.
5. Szczur S. "Historia Polski ?redniowiecze", p. 80
6. Labuda G. Pierwsze pa?stwo piastowskie, p. 54
7. Gerard Labuda (1992). Mieszko II król Polski: 1025-1034 : czasy prze?omu w dziejach pa?stwa polskiego. Secesja. p. 102. ISBN 978-83-85483-46-5. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
8. MichaelAnne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret of Scotland: A study of Agatha's ancestry", Foundations, vol. 4(2012), pp. 81-121."12 GAV-26 EDV-28. Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland was also known as Miescyslaw II (?) King of Poland.13 He was Per Enc. of World History: King of Poland: MIESZKO II, whose reign marked the culmination of feudal separatism. The Poles, like the other Slavs, divided their domain among the various sons of a deceased king, thus creating endless dynastic conflict and ample opportunity for intervention by neighboring rulers. During Mieszko's reign, most of the territorial gains of Boleslav were lost: St. Stephen of Hungary conquered Slovakia (1027); Betislav of Bohemia took Moravia (1031); Yaroslav of Russia acquired Ruthenia (1031); Canute of Denmark took Pomerania (1031). In 1032 the Emperor Conrad actually divided Poland between between 1025 and 1031.14,12 He was Duke of Poland between 1032 and 1034.12

Family

Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland b. c 995, d. 21 Mar 1063
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw I Chrobry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049956&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emnilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049957&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko II Lambert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049959&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-22, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049960&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon Family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 241-6, p. 205; line 147-22, p. 129.
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 December 2019), memorial page for Mieszko II Lambert (unknown–May 1034), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66461899, citing Archcathedral Basilica Of Saint Peter And Saint Pa, Pozna?, Miasto Pozna?, Wielkopolskie, Poland ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66461899/mieszko_ii-lambert. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIdied1034. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mieszko_II_Lambert. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10935
  14. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  15. [S4750] Michael Anne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret of Scotland: A study of Agatha's ancestry", Foundations IV:81-121 (Vol. IV, 2012): pp. 84-87, 116. Hereinafter cited as "From Theophanu to St. Margaret."
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#dauMieszkoMImreHungary
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/agath000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  18. [S4750] Michael Anne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret."
  19. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231034. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kazimierz I Karol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027277&tree=LEO
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_of_Poland
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertruda of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027059&tree=LEO

Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland1,2,3,4

F, #6689, b. circa 995, d. 21 March 1063
FatherEdzo/Ezzo/Ehrenfried (?) Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, Graf im Auel- und im Bonngau2,1,5,6 b. 955, d. 21 May 1034
MotherMathilde (?) von Sachsen5,7 b. 979, d. 4 Dec 1025
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited12 May 2020
     Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland was born circa 995; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says b. bef 1000; Genealogics says b. 995/1000.8,3,9 She married Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland, son of Boleslaw I "Chrobry" (?) King of Poland and Emnilde (?) Princess of the Western Slavs, Duchess of the Polans, circa 1013 at Merseburg.10,8,1,3,11
Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland died on 21 March 1063 at Saalfeld, Austria; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 page says d. 21.3.1063.1,3,9
Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland was buried after 21 March 1063 at Kölner Dom, Cologne (Köln), Stadtkreis Köln, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     21 Mar 1063
     Royalty. Born around 995 as one of eleven children of count palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia and his wife Mathilde, a daughter of Emperor Otto II. She married Mieszko II. Lambert King of Poland in 1013 and bore him three children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Ezzo of Lotharingia unknown–1034
          Matilda of Germany unknown–1025
     Spouse
          Mieszko II Lambert unknown–1034
     Siblings
          Hermann II of Lotharingia unknown–1056
          Otto II of Swabia unknown–1047
          Theophanu von Essen 997–1058
          Liudolf of Lotharingia 1000–1031
     Children
          Gertrude of Poland unknown–1108
          Richeza Of Poland 1013–1075
          Casimir I King Of Poland 1016–1058
     BURIAL     Kölner Dom, Cologne, Stadtkreis Köln, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     PLOT     St. Johns chapel
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 19 Jun 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial 27696568.1,8,12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Richeza was born between 995 and 1000, the daughter of Ezzo/Ehrenfried, Pfalzgraf von Lothringen, and Mathilde von Sachsen, the daughter of Emperor Otto II and sister of Emperor Otto III. About 1013 Richeza married Mieszko II Lambert, king of Poland. They had a son Kazimierz I Karol who would succeed his father as king of Poland, and two daughters: Richeza/Ryksa married Béla I, king of Hungary; and Gertruda married Isjaslaw I, grand duke of Kiev. All three would have progeny.
     "Mieszko II died in suspicious circumstances in 1034, after his forced abdication and a brief restoration. After the death of her husband, Richeza probably tried to seize power in the country and secure the crown for her son. However, she failed and Kazimierz had to flee to the kingdom of Hungary while the central parts of Poland were controlled by his uncle Bezprym.
     "After 7 September 1047 Richeza became a nun. She died on 21 March 1063 in Saalfeld. Her tomb is in the chapel of St. Johannes in the Cologne cathedral, alongside that of the cathedral's founder Archbishop Konrad von Hochstaden.
     "In Poland and Germany Richeza is venerated as a saint; her feast day is 21 March."9 GAV-26 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 120;VI 1.
2. Królewska Krew Poznan, 1997. , Rafal Prinke, Andrzej Sikorski, Reference: 234.9


; Per Med Lands: " RICHENZA (-Saalfeld 21 Mar 1063, bur Köln St Maria ad gradus). The Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio names the seven daughters (in order) "Richza, Adelheit, Ida, Mathild, Theophanu, Heylewig, Sophia" as children of "Herenfridus comes palatinus, qui post Ezo nominatus est" and his wife "Mathilde filia Magni Ottonis", specifying in a later passage that "Richza" was divorced from her husband and was mother of "Gazimerum"[357]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of Kloster Brauweiler by charter dated 18 Jul 1051 which names "Richeza regina quondam Poleniæ…pro remedio anime sue fratrisque sui beate memorie Ottonis ducis aliorumque parentum suorum in monasterio Brunwilarensi sepultorum…per manum Heinrici palatini comitis filii patrui sui" and witnessed by "Heinricus comes palatinus, Sicco comes, Starchri comes…"[358]. She fled for shelter to a western monastery when Poland descended into civil war[359]. The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XII Kal Mai” of “Rigza regina soror Herimanni archiepiscopi”[360]. m ([1013], [divorced]) MIESZKO LAMBERT of Poland, son of BOLES?AW I "Chrobry/the Brave" Prince [later King] of Poland & his third wife Emnilde --- (989-10 May 1034). He succeeded in 1025 as MIESZKO II King of Poland."
Med Lands cites:
[357] Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio 5 and 16, MGH SS XI, pp. 398 and 403.
[358] MGH Diplomata V, D H III 273, p. 370.
[359] Dzi?cio?, Witold (1963) The Origins of Poland (Veritas, London), p. 200.5
Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland was also known as Richenza (?)5 Rixa (Richeza) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine, Queen of Poland was also known as Richeza (Rixa) (?) Countess of Pfalz-Lorraine.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Richeza of Lotharingia (also called Richenza, Rixa, Ryksa; born about 995/1000 – 21 March 1063) was a German noblewoman by birth, a member of the Ezzonen dynasty. She married Duke Mieszko II Lambert, later King of Poland, becoming Queen of Poland. She returned to Germany following the deposition of her husband in 1031, later becoming a nun, and today is revered as Blessed Richeza of Lotharingia.
     "Richeza had three known children: Casimir I the Restorer, Ryksa, Queen of Hungary, and Gertruda, Grand Princess of Kiev. She was also noted in 2009 as the putative mother of Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile and mother of Margaret of Wessex. From her descended the eastern rulers of the Piast, Rurikid, and Árpád dynasties. Four of her Árpád descendants were canonized: Elizabeth, Landgravine of Thuringia, Kinga, Duchess of Kraków, and Margaret and Irene of Hungary. She was beatified with another one of her descendants, Yolanda, Duchess of Greater Poland.
Life
Family
     "She was the eldest daughter of Ezzo (also called Ehrenfried), Count Palatine of Lotharingia by his wife, Matilda, daughter of Emperor Otto II and Theophanu.[1][2] She could be even the eldest child of Ezzo and Matilda.[2] Through her mother, Richeza was a niece of Emperor Otto III (who was instrumental to her betrothal), Adelheid I, Abbess of Quedlinburg and Sophia I, Abbess of Gandersheim.
     "Richeza's parents were married in 993, so she could be born no earlier than in 993.[2] Polish historian Kazimierz Jasi?ski supposed that she was few years younger than her husband Mieszko II Lambert.[2]
Queen of Poland
     "In 1000 during the Congress of Gniezno, an agreement was apparently made between Boles?aw I the Brave and Emperor Otto III. Among the usual political talks, they decided to strengthen ties through marriage. Otto's childlessness meant that the seven daughters of his sister Mathilde (the only of Otto II's daughters who married and produced children) were the potential brides for Mieszko, Boles?aw I's son and heir; the oldest of Otto III's nieces, Richeza, was chosen. However, Otto's unexpected death in 1002 and the reorientation of the Holy Roman Empire politics by his successor Henry II and wars between Henry and Boles?aw led to the delay of the wedding. The Emperor took the opportunity of a settlement with the Ezzonen family and in Merseburg negotiated a temporary peace with Poland. The marriage between Mieszko and Richeza took place[1][3] in Merseburg, probably during the Pentecost festivities.
     "After the final peace agreement between the Holy Roman Empire and Poland, which was signed in 1018 in Bautzen, Richeza and Mieszko maintained close contacts with the German court. In 1021 they participated in the consecration of part of the Bamberg Cathedral.
     "Boles?aw I the Brave died on 17 June 1025. Six months later, on Christmas Day, Mieszko II Lambert and Richeza were crowned King and Queen of Poland by the Archbishop of Gniezno, Hipolit, in the Gniezno Cathedral.
     "Mieszko's reign was short-lived: in 1031, the invasion of both German and Kievan troops forced him to escape to Bohemia, where he was imprisoned and castrated by orders of Duke Oldrich. Mieszko II's half-brother Bezprym took the government of Poland and began a cruel persecution of the followers of the former King.
     "The Brauweiler Chronicle indicated that soon after the escape of her husband, Richeza and her children fled to Germany[3] with the Polish royal crown and regalia, which were given to Emperor Conrad II. She subsequently played an important role in mediating a peace settlement between Poland and the Holy Roman Empire. However, modern historians discount this account.
     "Richeza and Mieszko II never reunited; according to some sources, they were either officially divorced or separated. After Bezprym was murdered in 1032, Mieszko II was released from captivity and returned to Poland, but was forced to divide the country between himself, his brother Otto and their cousin Dytryk. One year later (1033), after Otto was killed and Dytryk expelled from the country, Mieszko II reunited Poland under his domain. However, his rule lasted only one year: on 10 or 11 July 1034, Mieszko II died suddenly, probably killed as a result of a conspiracy.
     "Richeza's son Casimir was at that time at the court of his maternal uncle Hermann II, Archbishop of Cologne. In 1037 the young prince returned to Poland in order to recover his throne; apparently Richeza also returned with him, although this is disputed. Soon after, a barons' rebellion — coupled with the so-called "Pagan Reaction" of the commoners — forced both Casimir and Richeza to flee to Germany again. She never returned.
After returning to the Holy Roman Empire
     "The return of Richeza to Germany forced a redistribution of her father's inheritance, because at the previous arrangement it wasn't contemplated that Richeza would need a place to live. She received Saalfeld, a possession that did not belong to the Lower Rhine area in which the Ezzonen dynasty tried to build a coherent dominion. Richeza still called herself Queen of Poland, a privilege that was given to her by the Emperor. In Saalfeld she led the Polish opposition that supported her son Casimir, who in 1039, with the help of Conrad II, finally obtained the Polish throne. During the years 1040–1047 Richeza lived in Klotten in the Moselle region.
     "On 7 September 1047 Richeza's brother Otto, the last male representative of the Ezzonen dynasty, died, and with him the territorial and political objectives of his family. Richeza now inherited large parts of the Ezzonen possessions.
     "Otto's death seems to have touched Richeza; apparently, they were very close (Otto named his only daughter after her). At his funeral in Brauweiler, according to Bruno of Toul (later Pope Leo IX), she put her fine jewelry on the altar and declared that she would spend the rest of her life as a nun[3] to preserve the memory of the Ezzonen dynasty. Another goal was probably to secure the remaining Ezzonen rights.
     "A charter dated 17 July 1051 noted that Richeza participated in the reorganization of the Ezzonen properties. Her sister Theophanu, Abbess of Essen, and her brother, Hermann II, Archbishop of Cologne and Richeza transferred the Abbey of Brauweiler to the Archdiocese of Cologne. This created a dispute with the Emperor, as this transfer had already occurred under the reign of Ezzo. This was successfully challenged by Ezzo's surviving children. The reason for the transfer was likely that the future wasn't secured to the descendants of the Ezzonen: From Ezzo's ten children only Richeza and Otto had children. None of these children was in a position of real power over the Ezzonen inheritance. The transfer to the diocese, headed by Hermann II with one of the younger Ezzonen, ensured the cohesion of the property. In 1054 in connection with some donations to the Abbey of Brauweiler, Richeza expressed her desire to be buried there beside her mother. This reorganization, which apparently emanated from the hope that Hermann II would survive his siblings, failed, because he died in 1056. The Archbishop of Cologne, Anno II, trying to increase the power of his diocese at the expense of the Ezzonen.
     "Richeza responded to Anno II's ambitions with the formal renunciation of her possessions in Brauweiler to the monastery of Moselle, while reserving the lifelong use of the lands. Brauweiler was the center of Ezzonen memory and she wanted it protected regardless of the economic position of the family. Then Richeza went to Saalfeld, where she found similar arrangements in favor of the Diocese of Würzburg. Anno II protested against these regulations unsuccessfully. At the end Richeza only maintained direct rule over the towns of Saalfeld and Coburg, but retained the right to use until her death seven other locations in the Rhineland with their additional incomes, and 100 silver pounds per year by the Archdiocese of Cologne. Richeza died on 21 March 1063 in Saalfeld.[4]
Controversy over Richeza's heritage
     "Richeza was buried in Cologne's church of St. Maria ad Gradus and not, as she had wished, in Brauweiler. This was prompted by Archbishop Anno II, who appealed to an oral agreement with Richeza. The Klotten estate donated her funeral arrangements to St. Maria ad Gradus, whose relationship with Richeza, Hermann II and Anno II is unclear. Possibly St. Maria ad Gradus was an unfinished work of Richeza's brother and completed by Anno II, who wanted to secure part of the Ezzonen patrimony in this way. The Brauweiler Abbey claimed the validity of the 1051 charter and demanded the remains of the Polish Queen.
     "The dispute ended in 1090 when the then-current Archbishop of Cologne, Hermann III, ruled in favor of the monastery of Brauweiler. However, Richeza's grave remained in St. Maria ad Gradus until 1816, when it was transferred to Cologne Cathedral. Her grave was placed in the chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist in a classic wooden sarcophagus. Beside the coffin hang two medieval portraits of Richeza and Anno II that originate from the medieval grave in St. Maria ad Gradus.
     "Her grave was opened multiple times after the transfer to Cologne Cathedral. The last opening was in 1959 and revealed her bones. According to witnesses, Richeza had a small and graceful stature. Her collarbone showed traces of a fracture. Richeza's relics were located in St. Nicholas church in Brauweiler and were moved to the Klotter parish church in 2002.
Activities
Brauweiler Abbey
     "The most important of Richeza's projects was the re-building of the Abbey of Brauweiler. Her parents had founded Brauweiler, but the original church was modestly furnished, which was incompatible with the dynasty's territorial objectives. After Otto's death, Richeza decided to make Brauweiler the center of Ezzonen memory. Since the original building didn't suit this purpose, Richeza built a new Abbey, which remains in good condition. When the construction began a three-aisled pillared basilica was planned with projecting transept to the east apse across a crypt. The aisles were groined vaults with flat ceilings in the central nave. Inside, the nave had five Pfeilerjoche, each of which was half as large as the square crossing. Throughout the Abbey the cross-vaulted ceiling could be seen (for example in the aisles, pillars or the crypt), which can be found in many Ezzonen buildings. The crypt was consecrated on 11 December 1051. The consecration of the rest of the construction was on 30 October 1063, seven months after Richeza's death.
     "The building has distinct references to the Church of St. Maria im Kapitol in Cologne, founded by Richeza's sister Ida. Both crypts are laid out identically, the two bays in Brauweiler, however, were shorter. In the upper church, there are clear references. Brauweiler is seen as a copy of the Cologne Cathedral, probably thanks to the influence of Richeza's brother Hermann II, who in 1040 consecrated Stavelot Abbey.
     "Richeza planned to make Brauweiler the Ezzonen family crypt, in 1051 interring the remains of her sister Adelaide, Abbess of Nivelles. In 1054 she transferred the remains of her father from Augsburg to be buried next to her sister.
Richeza's Gospel Book
     "The Gospel Book of Queen Richeza (today in possession of the Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Darmstadt), comes from St. Maria ad Gradus, where Richeza had a space reserved in the central nave, normally occupied by the Donors. It is not clear whether this was done at the behest of Anno II, or by Richeza. An indication of the latter thesis, however, is the Gospel Book. The manuscript is made of 153 pages in the pergamin style in an 18 x 13.5 cm format. In 150 of the pages of the book a prayer is recorded, which suggests a high-born owner. The following pages contain entries about the Ezzonen memorial. In these, in addition to Richeza, Anno II and her parents were named. The entries can be counted among drawings in the Codex style recognized around 1100. The Codex itself was built around 1040, probably in Maasland, with incomplete ornamentation: the Mark and Luke are drawn completely, but only in a preliminary sketch. Matthew wasn't drawn. Another possible indication is the Codex date: After 1047, when Richeza took her clerical vows and had no need for a personal representative signature. It is unknown whether it remained in her possession and was used together with other relics of Anno II from her estate of St. Maria ad Gradus, or had already been donated to her brother before her death.
Further reading
** Kazimierz Jasi?ski, Rycheza, ?ona króla polskiego Mieszka II
** Klaus Gereon Beuckers: Die Ezzonen und ihre Stiftungen. Münster: LIT Verlag, 1993, ISBN 3-89473-953-3.
** Franz Xaver von Wegele (1889), "Richeza", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 28, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 439–442
** Amalie Fößel (2003), "Richeza, Königin von Polen († 1063)", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 21, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 516–517; (full text online)
References
1. Bernhardt 2002, p. 310.
2. Jasi?ski, Kazimierz (1992). Rodowód pierwszych Piastów (in Polish). Warszawa - Wroc?aw. p. 115.
3. "Wall tomb and shrine to the Blessed Richeza of Lotharingia", Kölner Dom
4. Jasi?ski, Kazimierz (1992). Rodowód pierwszych Piastów (in Polish). Warszawa - Wroc?aw. p. 116.
Sources
** Bernhardt, John W. (2002). Itinerant Kingshiop & Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936-1075. Cambridge University Press.
External links
** Richeza of Lotharingia in the German National Library catalogue: https://portal.dnb.de/opac.htm?method=simpleSearch&cqlMode=true&query=idn%3D118928872
** Ekkart Sauser (2002). "Richeza, Königin von Polen". In Bautz, Traugott (ed.) Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) (in German). 20. Nordhausen: Bautz. cols. 1220–1221. ISBN 3-88309-091-3."4 She was Queen consort of Poland between 1025 and 1034.4

Family

Mieszko II Lambert (?) King of Poland b. 990, d. 10 May 1034
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon Family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ezzo/Ehrenfried: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080071&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richeza_of_Lotharingia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Richenzadied1063. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#Ezzodied1034
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080072&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049960&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049960&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-22, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mieszko II Lambert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049959&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 December 2019), memorial page for Richeza of Lotharingia (unknown–21 Mar 1063), Find A Grave Memorial no. 27696568, citing Kölner Dom, Cologne, Stadtkreis Köln, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27696568/richeza-of_lotharingia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S4750] Michael Anne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret of Scotland: A study of Agatha's ancestry", Foundations IV:81-121 (Vol. IV, 2012): pp. 84-87, 116. Hereinafter cited as "From Theophanu to St. Margaret."
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#dauMieszkoMImreHungary
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/agath000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  17. [S4750] Michael Anne Guido and John P. Ravilious, "From Theophanu to St. Margaret."
  18. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231034. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kazimierz I Karol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027277&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertruda of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027059&tree=LEO
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_of_Poland

Geza I (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4

M, #6690, b. between 1044 and 1045, d. 25 April 1077
FatherBela I (?) King of Hungary1,3,4 b. c 1016, d. 11 Sep 1063
MotherRicheza (Rixa) (?) of Poland, Queen Consort of Hungary1,5,3,4 b. 22 Sep 1013, d. 21 May 1075
ReferenceEDV27
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Geza I (?) King of Hungary was born between 1044 and 1045 at Poland; Genealogics says b. 1039; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1 and 2) says b. 1044/45; Med Lands says b. 1044/45.1,3,4 He married Sophia von Looz Queen of Hungary, daughter of Emmo von Looz Graf von Looz and Suanehildis (?), circa 1062;
His 1st wife.6,3,4,7 Geza I (?) King of Hungary married NN Synadene of Byzantium, Queen Consort of Hungary, daughter of Theodulus Synadenos of Byzantium and NN Botaneiatissa, between 1065 and 1075;
His 2nd wife.8,1,3,4,9,10
Geza I (?) King of Hungary died on 25 April 1077.1,3,4
Geza I (?) King of Hungary was buried after 25 April 1077 at Vac, Hungary.1,4


     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 104.3 EDV-27.

; This is the same person as ”Géza I of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as ”Géza Ier de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”I. Géza magyar király” at ]Wikipédia (HU).11,12,13

; Per Genealogics:
     “Geisa was born about 1039, the eldest son of Béla I, king of Hungary, and Richeza of Poland. Baptised as Magnus, Geisa (Géza) was his pagan given name. About 1062 he married Sophie of Looz, daughter of Giselbert, Graf von Looz and Erlende de Jodoigne. Geisa and Sophie had two sons, of whom Kálmán would become king of Hungary. After Sophie's death in 1065, Geisa married Synadene, daughter of Theodul Synadenos and niece of Emperor Nikephoros III Botaneiates. Their son Almos would be the father of Béla II 'the Blind', king of Hungary.
     “For his coronation in 1074, Geisa received a crown from Byzantine Emperor Michael VII Doukas that was incorporated with the ancient crown of King Stephan I. Geisa's short rule was characterised by general disorder in the kingdom. He did, however, capture Croatia from his brother-in-law Dmitar Zvonimir. Geisa died on 24 April 1077, and was succeeded by his brother Laszlo I. Geisa is buried at Vác.”.3 Geza I (?) King of Hungary was also known as Gevitza I (?) King of Hungary.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "GÉZA, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland ([in Poland] [1044/45]-25 Apr 1077, bur Vac). The Gesta Hungarorum names "Geichæ et Ladislai" as sons of "fratris sui Belæ" when recording that King András obtained their agreement to the future succession of his son Salomon[519]. The Kronika W?giersko-Polska names "Geyzam et Ladislaum" as the two older sons of "Bela" and his wife "rex Polonie filiam", adding that they were both born in Poland[520]. He was sent as a hostage to the imperial court in [1062/63][521], at which time he must have been unmarried in line with the custom of not sending married men as hostages to foreign courts. He sought refuge in Poland after his father's death in 1063, but later returned to Hungary, made peace with King Salamon, and was appointed Duke between March and Gran[522]. This must have occurred in [1064/67] if it is correct that Géza's second marriage took place before 1067, as suggested below. The Chronicon Posoniense records disputes in 1071 between "Salomon rex" and "duce magno Geyza Ungarorum"[523]. Relations deteriorated and Géza, possibly with at least financial support from Emperor Mikhael VII[524], defeated King Salamon at Mogyorod, forcing the king to withdraw to the western border and from there to Germany. Géza succeeded his cousin in 1074 as GÉZA I King of Hungary. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Salomon" was deposed in 1074 and "Magnus rex" crowned in 1075[525]. "Magnus qui et Geysa supremus Hungarorium Dux postea…rex consecratus, Belæ regis filius" founded the monastery of St Benedict, Gron, in the presence of "Ladislao Duce germano meo…Iula Comite Palatino", by charter dated 1075[526]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that Géza succeeded King Salomon but died after a reign of three years and was buried at "Waciæ [Vác]"[527]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "VIII Kal Mai" in 1077 of "Geysa primogenitus Belæ regis" and his burial "in ecclesia Vaciensi quam ipse construxit"[528].
     "m firstly ([1062]) [SOPHIE de Looz], daughter of [EMMO Comte de Looz] & his wife [Suanehildis of Holland] ([1044/46]-[1065]). She is named as the first wife of King Géza in Europäische Stammtafeln[529]. The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. Kerbl, in his analysis concerning Géza I's [second] Byzantine marriage, does not mention this supposed first marriage[530]. If it is correct, the marriage presumably took place while Géza was a hostage at the imperial court, which Kerbl dates to [1062/63][531]. This is consistent with Sophie having been born in [1044/46]. The Vita Arnulfi names "Arnulfum comitem de Lo et Sophiam ducissam de Hungaria…et ducissam de Hui" as the children of Emmo Comte de Looz, adding that Sophie was the mother of "regem de Hungaria"[532]. This manuscript, written at Oudenbourg abbey, is dated to 1220[533]. This is late to be reliable. In addition, the document represents the ancestors of Comte Emmo in a way which is inconsistent with earlier primary sources. As the county of Looz was among the temporal possessions of the Bishop of Liège and, as such, part of the duchy of Lower Lotharingia under the suzerainty of the German emperor, it would not be improbable for a daughter of the comte de Looz to have been staying at the imperial court and for her marriage to have been arranged with another noble visitor. The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "Sophia de Los, Hungariæ regina, comitis Arnoldi Lossensis soror" sent letters to her brother after hearing that he intended to found Averboden abbey[534]. This report is clearly anachronistic as the abbey in question was founded in 1135, when Sophie de Looz could not possibly have been queen of Hungary. The question remains whether Sophie´s supposed marriage to King Géza I is based on speculation, suggested by an as yet unidentified secondary source which was trying to make sense of the passages in the Vita Arnulfi and the Vita Andreæ by identifying the most likely Hungarian king who could have been her husband. Until further sources come to light, it has been decided to show Sophie de Looz in square brackets. Whatever the truth of the matter, the chronology of the births of King Géza´s older children suggests that their mother could not have been the Byzantine wife whom he married in [1066/75].
     "m secondly ([1066/75]) --- Synadene, daughter of THEODULOS Synadenos & his wife --- Botaneiatissa. Skylitzes records that Emperor Nikephoros Botaneiates married "sororis suæ filiam Synadenen, Theodulo Synadeno genitam" ("??? ?????? ????? ? ????????") the daughter of Theodoulos Synadenos ("??? ?????????, ???????? ????? ????????? ??? ?????????") to "crali Ungariæ" ("?? ????? ???????? ??? ???????") and that she returned to Byzantium after her husband died[535]. The passage does not name the Hungarian king in question. Kerbl says that Horvát suggested that her husband was Lambert, son of Béla I King of Hungary[536], although it is unclear how Lambert could have been described as "krali" of Hungary as no other record has been identified indicating that he ever reigned as king. Kerbl also cites Wertner as the first source which proposed that her husband was Géza of Hungary[537]. The narrative of Skylitzes Continuatus ends during the reign of Emperor Nikephoros (who reigned from 1078 until his forced abdication in 1081). This suggests that the husband of --- Synadene must have died before that date, which supports his identification as King Géza. However, it is not impossible that the text was written some years later, and that her return to Constantinople was mentioned because it was of recent date at the time of writing. Nevertheless, it is unlikely that her husband was King László I (who appears to be the only other realistic candidate) as his marriage to Adelheid von Rheinfelden appears to be certain as discussed above. The remaining potential difficulty is with the date of the marriage. Wertner suggested that the marriage took place in [Oct 1073/Oct 1074][538]. Nikephoros Botaneiates (later Emperor Nikephoros III) was Byzantine military commander along the Danube, adjacent to Hungarian territory, from 1064 to before 1067 when he was reassigned as governor of Antioch[539]. Kerbl therefore assesses this as the more likely period during which the marriage took place[540]. However, if it is correct, as stated by Skylitzes, that --- Synadene returned to Byzantium after her husband's death, it is probable that she had no surviving children. If she had had children, it is reasonable to expect that she would have remained with them to protect their interests, especially as the chronology suggests that King Géza's son Kálmán could not in any case have been her son and would therefore have had a superior claim to the throne than any half-brothers. If this is correct, all of King Géza's children must have been born from his first marriage, which would date his second marriage to --- Synadene to the early 1070s at the earliest. "
Med Lands cites:
[519] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131.
[520] Kronika W?giersko-Polska, De sancto rege Ladislao, p. 489.
[521] Homan, Geschichte, p. 270, cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 8.
[522] Kerbl (1979), p. 14.
[523] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[524] Kerbl (1979), p. 50.
[525] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[526] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 428.
[527] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 62, p. 139.
[528] Chronicon Varadiense, 9, p. 254.
[529] ES II 154.
[530] Kerbl (1979), pp. 1-57.
[531] Kerbl (1979), p. 8.
[532] Vita Arnulfi Episcopi Suessioniensis I.3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 879.
[533] Butkens, C. (1724) Trophées tant sacrés que profanes du duché de Brabant (The Hague), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 6.
[534] Wouters, M. J. (1849) Notice historique sur l´ancienne abbaye d´Averboden (Gand), Annexes, Vita B. Andreæ primi abbatis Averbodiensis monasterii, XIII, p. 147.
[535] Migne, J. P. (1889) Georgius Cedrenus, Ioannes Scylitzes, Michael Psellus, Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Græca Tomus CXXII (Paris) Excerpta ex breviario historico Joannis Scylitzæ curopalatæ ("Skylitzes"), col. 475. The Greek text is quoted in full in Kerbl (1979), pp. 2-3, from Tsolakes, E.T. Tsolakes ? ???????? ??? ???????????? ??? ??????? ???????? (Ioannes Skylitzes Continuatus), ???????? ??????????? ???????, ?????? ??????? ?????????? ??? ????? 105, Thessalonike (1968), pp. 103-186, 185.
[536] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Horvát, I. (1834) Tudományos Gyüjtemény (Budapest), p. 95.
[537] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Wertner, M. (1892) Az Árpádok családi története (Nagy Becskerek), p. 186.
[538] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Wertner, M. (1892) Az Árpádok családi története (Nagy Becskerek), p. 186.
[539] Laurent, V. Chronologie, p. 246 (28), cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 18.
[540] Kerbl (1979), pp. 15-16 and 18-19.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad 2): “Géza I King of Hungary (1074-77); *1044/5, +25.4.1077; 1m: ca 1062 Sophie von Looz (+ca 1065); 2m: 1065-74 Synadena (+after 1077), dau.of Theodulus Synadenos and niece of Emperor Nikophorus III of Byzantium.”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "--- Synadene. Skylitzes records that Emperor Nikeforos Botaneiates married "sororis suæ filiam Synadenen, Theodulo Synadeno genitam" ("??? ?????? ????? ? ????????") the daughter of Theodoulos Synadenos ("??? ?????????, ???????? ????? ????????? ??? ?????????") to "crali Ungariæ" ("?? ????? ???????? ??? ???????") and that she returned to Byzantium after her husband died[656]. The passage does not name the Hungarian king in question. Kerbl says that Horvát suggested that her husband was Lambert, son of Béla I King of Hungary[657], although it is unclear how Lambert could have been described as "krali" of Hungary as no other record has been identified that he ever reigned as king. Kerbl also cites Wertner as the first source which proposed that her husband was Géza of Hungary[658]. The narrative of Skylitzes Continuatus ends during the reign of Emperor Nikeforos (who reigned from 1078 until his forced abdication in 1081). This suggests that the husband of --- Synadene must have died before that date, which supports his identification as King Géza. However, it is not impossible that the text was written some years later, and that her return to Constantinople was mentioned because it was of recent date at the time of writing. Nevertheless, it is unlikely that her husband was King László I (who appears to be the only other realistic candidate) whose marriage to Adelheid von Rheinfelden appears to be certain (as discussed in the document HUNGARY KINGS). The remaining potential difficulty is with the date of the marriage. Wertner suggested that the marriage took place in [Oct 1073/Oct 1074][659]. Nikeforos Botaneiates (later Emperor Nikeforos III) was Byzantine military commander along the Danube, adjacent to Hungarian territory, from 1064 to before 1067 when he was reassigned as governor of Antioch[660]. Kerbl therefore assesses this as the more likely period during which the marriage took place[661]. However, if it is correct, as stated by Skylitzes, that --- Synadene returned to Byzantium after her husband's death, it is probable that she had no surviving children. If she had had children, it is reasonable to expect that she would have remained with them to protect their interests, especially as the chronology suggests that King Géza's son Kálmán could not in any case have been her son and would therefore have had a superior claim to the throne than any half-brothers. If this is correct, all of King Géza's children must have been born from his first marriage, which would date his second marriage to --- Synadene to the early 1070s at the earliest.
     "m ([1066/75]) as his second wife, GÉZA of Hungary, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife Ryksa of Poland ([1044/45]-25 Apr 1077). He succeeded his cousin in 1074 as GÉZA I King of Hungary."
Med Lands cites:
[656] Skylitzes, col. 475. The Greek text is quoted in full in Kerbl (1979), pp. 2-3, from Tsolakes, E.T. Tsolakes ? ???????? ??? ???????????? ??? ??????? ???????? (Ioannes Skylitzes Continuatus), ???????? ??????????? ???????, ?????? ??????? ?????????? ??? ????? 105, Thessalonike (1968), pp. 103-186, 185.
[657] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Horvát, I. (1834) Tudományos Gyüjtemény (Budapest), p. 95.
[658] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Wertner, M. (1892) Az Árpádok családi története (Nagy Becskerek), p. 186.
[659] Kerbl (1979), p. 1, citing Wertner, M. (1892) Az Árpádok családi története (Nagy Becskerek), p. 186.
[660] Laurent, V. Chronologie, p. 246 (28), cited in Kerbl (1979), p. 18.
[661] Kerbl (1979), pp. 15-16 and 18-19.10


; Per Genealogy.EU (Looz 1): "C3. Sophia; m.ca 1062 Géza I of Hungary (+1077.)6"

; Per Med Lands:
     "[SOPHIE ([1044/46]-[1065]). The Vita Arnulfi names "Arnulfum comitem de Lo et Sophiam ducissam de Hungaria…et ducissam de Hui" as the children of Emmo Comte de Looz, adding that Sophie was the mother of "regem de Hungaria"[802]. This manuscript, written at Oudenbourg abbey, is dated to 1220[803]. This is late to be reliable. In addition, the document represents the ancestors of Comte Emmo in a way which is inconsistent with earlier primary sources. "Ducissam de Huy" has not yet been identified. Sophie is identified as the first wife of King Géza in Europäische Stammtafeln[804]. Kerbl, in his analysis concerning Géza I's [second] Byzantine marriage, does not mention this supposed first marriage[805]. If it is correct, the marriage presumably took place while Géza was a hostage at the imperial court, which Kerbl dates to [1062/63][806]. This is consistent with Sophie having been born in [1044/46], which is somewhat earlier than the expected birth dates of Emmo´s other children. As the county of Looz was among the temporal possessions of the Bishop of Liège and, as such, part of the duchy of Lower Lotharingia under the suzerainty of the German emperor, it would not be improbable for a daughter of the comte de Looz to have been staying at the imperial court and for her marriage to have been arranged with another noble visitor. The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "Sophia de Los, Hungariæ regina, comitis Arnoldi Lossensis soror" sent letters to her brother after hearing that he intended to found Averboden abbey[807]. This report is clearly anachronistic as the abbey in question was founded in 1135, when Sophie de Looz could not possibly have been queen of Hungary. The question remains whether Sophie´s supposed marriage to King Géza I is based on speculation, suggested by an as yet unidentified secondary source which was trying to make some sense of the passages in the Vita Arnulfi and the Vita Andreæ by identifying the most likely Hungarian king who could have been Sophie´s husband. Until further sources come to light, it has been decided to show Sophie de Looz in square brackets. Whatever the truth of the matter, the chronology of the births of King Géza´s older children suggests that their mother could not have been the Byzantine wife whom he married in [1066/75].
     "m ([1062]) as his first wife, GÉZA I King of Hungary, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland ([in Poland] [1044/45]-25 Apr 1077, bur Vac).]"
Med Lands cites:
[802] Vita Arnulfi Episcopi Suessioniensis I.3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 879.
[803] Butkens, C. (1724) Trophées tant sacrés que profanes du duché de Brabant (The Hague), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 6.
[804] ES II 154.
[805] Kerbl, R. (1979) Byzantinische Prinzessinnen in Ungarn zwischen 1050-1200 und ihr Einfluß auf das Arpadenkönigreich (VWGÖ, Vienna), pp. 1-57.
[806] Kerbl (1979), p. 8.
[807] Wouters, M. J. (1849) Notice historique sur l´ancienne abbaye d´Averboden (Gand), Annexes, Vita B. Andreæ primi abbatis Averbodiensis monasterii, XIII, p. 147.15
He was King of Hungary
See attached map of the Kingdom of Hungary in the 11th century (from Wikipedia: By Original uploader and author was Fz22 at en.wikipedia - Originally from en.wikipedia; description page is/was here (based on CART56 map/taneszkozok.hu), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2657022) between 1074 and 1077 at Hungary.16,17

Family 1

Sophia von Looz Queen of Hungary b. bt 1044 - 1046, d. c 1065
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020698&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_I_1074-1077,. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richeza|Ryksa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020697&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Looz 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/looz1.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sophie of Looz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139747&tree=LEO
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25128
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Synadene: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020699&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#SynadeneMGezaIHungary
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A9za_I_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Géza Ier de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A9za_Ier_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, I. Géza magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/I._G%C3%A9za_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#EmmoLoozdied1078A
  16. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A9za_I_of_Hungary#/media/File:Hungary_11th_cent.png
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kálmán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020725&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330284&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almos of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020701&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Almosdied1129
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.