Heribert/Arbertus (?)1

M, #6631
FatherRaimond I (?) Comte et Marquis de Toulouse, Comte de Rouergue et Comte de Quercy2,1 d. bt 863 - 865
MotherBerta/Bertheis (?)2 b. c 797
Last Edited23 Mar 2020
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HERIBERT [Arbertus]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated Aug 867 under which "Oddo comes, uxorque mea Garsindis" sold property "in comitatu Lemovicino…villa…Orbaciacus", with the consent of "fratre nostro Airberto" and subscribed by "Garsis comitis, Willelmi comitis…"[222]. "Bertheiz sagaci" donated property to Vabres, for the souls of "genitoris mei Remigii hac genetricis meæ Arsinda" and for "iugale meo Raimundo et filio meo Bernardo qui fuerunt quondam, seu et filio meo Odone et Benedicto", by charter dated 6 Apr 883[223]. The identity of "filio meo…Benedicto" in this document presents an interesting problem. As can be seen above, the monastery of Vabres was founded in 862 after the death of Benedict, son of Berthe, as confirmed by the charter of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks dated 21 Jun 870. However, the wording of Berthe´s charter of 883 suggests that both her sons Odon and "Benedicto" were alive at that date. An answer appears to be provided by the subscriptions of the 883 charter, which include "…Airiberto, qui vocatus fuit Benedictus, qui hoc consensit". This subscription does not state the relationship between the donor and this subscriber. He is the only subscriber (out of sixteen) who is described as having consented to the donation. This suggests a close relationship with the donor, except that his name is listed eighth in the list so appears not to be given any particular precedence. Nevertheless, this subscription raises the possibility that "filio meo…Benedicto" was the same person as Berthe´s son who is named "Airberto" in other documents. "Oddo…comes uxorque mea Garsindis" exchanged property with Frotaire Archbishop of Bourges by charter dated to [886] witnessed by "Airberti fratris eius, Garsiæ scriptoris comitis, Willelmi comitis…"[224]. "Frotarius…Biturigensis ecclesiæ archiepiscopus" confirmed privileges to "villa Orbaciaco" for the souls of "Regimundi filiorumque eius Bernardi et Oddonis atque Arberti" by charter dated Aug 887, although the charter of the same date shows that Oddon and Heribert were alive at that time[225]."
Med Lands cites:
[222] Beaulieu, X, p. 24.
[223] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome II, Preuves, CXI, p. 669, and 3rd Edn., Preuves, 203, p. 405.
[224] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome II, Preuves, 204, p. 407.
[225] Beaulieu, XI, p. 26.1
Heribert/Arbertus (?) was also known as Aribert (?) Abbot of Vabres.2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#RaymondIdied865. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html

Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne1,2

M, #6632, b. circa 901, d. 28 June 963
FatherLouis III "The Blind" (?) King of Provence and Italy, Holy Roman Emperor1,3,2,4 b. b 882, d. 5 Jun 928
MotherAdelaide (?) de Bourgogne4 d. 10 May 943
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne married Teutberge (?) de Sens, daughter of Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes and Teutberga (?) of Arles.5,1,6,7,8,9,2 Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne was born circa 901; Genealogy.EU (Boson page) says b. 901/903; Med Lands says b. 905/10.5,1,2,4
Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne died on 28 June 963; Genealogy.EU says d. "ca 942/28.6.963"; Genealogics and Med Lands say d. aft Jan 962.1,5,2,4
     GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30. He was Cte de Vienne.1

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 155.2

; Per Genealogics: "His mother is not Anna of Byzantium”.2 Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne was also known as Carolus Constantinus (?) Cte de Vienne.

; This is the same person as:
”Charles Constantine of Vienne” at Wikipedia and as
”Charles-Constantin de Vienne” at Wikipédia (Fr.)10,11

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES CONSTANTIN ([905/10]-after Jan 962). Flodoard names "Karlo Constantino, Lucdowici Orbi filio"[53]. "Hludovicus…imperator augustus" gave three serfs to "fideli nostro Bononi" at the request of "filius noster Karolus" by charter dated 3 Jun 924[54]. His birth date range is estimated on the basis of his having been a young adult or adolescent at the time of the 924 charter in which he is named. The absence of proof that Charles Constantin was the grandson of the Byzantine emperor is discussed above in relation to his father's betrothal. "Carolus comes" is named "consanguineus noster" by Conrad I King of Burgundy in two charters of the latter dated 28 Mar 943 and 18 May 943[55], which suggests that he may have been the son of Adelais, assuming that her Burgundian origin is correct and assuming also that the Burgundian origin of Willa, wife of Rudolf I King of Burgundy, is incorrect (see above). He was named Comte de Vienne in 926 by his cousin Raoul King of France, in succession to his cousin Hugues Comte d'Arles, who was then proclaimed king of Italy. King Ugo of Italy removed the county of Vienne from Charles Constantin in 928 and granted it to Héribert [II] Comte de Vermandois. Charles Constantin remained at Vienne. Flodoard provides an insight into the continuing rivalries regarding Vienne when he records in 933 that it was granted to "Rodulfo regi" [Rudolf II King of Upper Burgundy, see the document BURGUNDY KINGS][56]. It is supposed that, from that time, Charles Constantin continued to hold the county under the suzerainty of the kingdom of Burgundy. Mermet records the existence of a peace treaty signed at the time between Ugo King of Italy and Rudolf II King of Burgundy which confirmed the latter’s rights to the Burgundian kingdom and Charles Constantin’s position in the county of Vienne[57]. Charles Constantin swore allegiance to Conrad "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy in 943[58]. The rivalry being the competing factions in France concerning the suzerainty over Vienne persisted, as indicated by Flodoard who recorded in 951 that Louis IV “d’Outremer” King of the West Franks summoned "Karlus Constantinus Viennæ princeps et Stephanus Arvernorum præsul" to swear allegiance[59]. "Karolus comes" sold land "in villa Brociano" by charter dated 19 May 960 which names "Teutbergi comitisse"[60].
     "m TEUTBERGA, daughter of --- (-after 19 May 960). "Teutbergi comitisse" is named in the charter of "Karolus comes" dated 19 May 960 which recorded the sale of land "in villa Brociano"[61]. Her origin is not known. Her name suggests a connection with the family of the Comtes de Troyes and it has been suggested[62] that she was Teutberga [de Troyes, daughter of Warnarius [Garnier] Vicomte de Sens [Comte de Troyes] & his wife Teutberga d'Arles]. Gingins-la-Sarra points out that Teutberga was the name of the third wife and widow of Engelbert, of the family of the vicomtes de Vienne, who could have married Charles Constantin as her second husband[63]. There seems to be no basis for this speculation other than the name."
Med Lands cites:
[53] Flodoard 931, MGH SS III, p. 379.
[54] Recueil Actes Provence 15, p. 29, and Cluny Tome I, 242, p. 233.
[55] Cluny Tome I, 622, p. 579, and 631, p. 588.
[56] Flodoard 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[57] Mermet (1833), Vol. II, p. 292 (no citation reference to the treaty in question).
[58] Settipani (1993), pp. 380-1.
[59] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 400.
[60] Cluny, Tome II, 1094, p. 186.
[61] Cluny, Tome II, 1094, p. 186.
[62] Rösch (1977), p. 133. Settipani (1993), p. 381 footnote 128, highlights the absence of proof.
[63] Gingins-la-Sarra (1851), p. 226.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Bosonides): “D1. [1m.] Charles Constantin, Cte de Vienne, *901-903, +ca 942/28.6.963; m.Theutberge de Sens”.8

; Per Racines et Histoire (Sens): “ Teutberga (Theutberge) de Sens + après 960
     ép. Charles Constantin de Provence, comte de Vienne ° ~901/03 ou 905/10 + après 962 (963 ?) (fils de l’Empereur Louis III, Roi d’Italie et de Provence, et d’Adelaïs) ”.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "[TEUTBERGA (-after 960). The origin of the wife of Charles Constantin is not known. However, her name suggests a connection with the family of the Comtes de Troyes and it has been suggested[34] that she was the daughter of Garnier Vicomte de Sens.
     "m CHARLES CONSTANTIN Comte de Vienne, son of Emperor LOUIS III King of Italy [Provence] & his wife Adelais --- ([905/10][35]-after 962).]"
Med Lands cites:
[34] Rösch (1977), p. 133. Settipani (1993), p. 381 footnote 128, highlights the absence of proof.
[35] Birth date range estimated on the basis of his having been a young adult or adolescent at the time of the 924 charter in which he is named.9

Family

Teutberge (?) de Sens b. c 900, d. a 960
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020445&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020443&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#CharlesConstantindied962. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 30-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga de Troyes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218650&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ers Comtes & Vicomtes de Sens, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Sens.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#TeutbergaTroyesdiedafter960
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Constantine_of_Vienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Charles-Constantin de Vienne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles-Constantin_de_Vienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).

Teutberge (?) de Sens1

F, #6633, b. circa 900, d. after 960
FatherWarner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes2,3,4,5,6,7 b. 880, d. 6 Dec 924
MotherTeutberga (?) of Arles2,4,3,5,8 b. c 890, d. b Sep 948
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Teutberge (?) de Sens married Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne, son of Louis III "The Blind" (?) King of Provence and Italy, Holy Roman Emperor and Adelaide (?) de Bourgogne.9,1,2,3,4,5,10 Teutberge (?) de Sens was born circa 900.11
Teutberge (?) de Sens died after 960.9,2,5
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Bosonides): “D1. [1m.] Charles Constantin, Cte de Vienne, *901-903, +ca 942/28.6.963; m.Theutberge de Sens”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES CONSTANTIN ([905/10]-after Jan 962). Flodoard names "Karlo Constantino, Lucdowici Orbi filio"[53]. "Hludovicus…imperator augustus" gave three serfs to "fideli nostro Bononi" at the request of "filius noster Karolus" by charter dated 3 Jun 924[54]. His birth date range is estimated on the basis of his having been a young adult or adolescent at the time of the 924 charter in which he is named. The absence of proof that Charles Constantin was the grandson of the Byzantine emperor is discussed above in relation to his father's betrothal. "Carolus comes" is named "consanguineus noster" by Conrad I King of Burgundy in two charters of the latter dated 28 Mar 943 and 18 May 943[55], which suggests that he may have been the son of Adelais, assuming that her Burgundian origin is correct and assuming also that the Burgundian origin of Willa, wife of Rudolf I King of Burgundy, is incorrect (see above). He was named Comte de Vienne in 926 by his cousin Raoul King of France, in succession to his cousin Hugues Comte d'Arles, who was then proclaimed king of Italy. King Ugo of Italy removed the county of Vienne from Charles Constantin in 928 and granted it to Héribert [II] Comte de Vermandois. Charles Constantin remained at Vienne. Flodoard provides an insight into the continuing rivalries regarding Vienne when he records in 933 that it was granted to "Rodulfo regi" [Rudolf II King of Upper Burgundy, see the document BURGUNDY KINGS][56]. It is supposed that, from that time, Charles Constantin continued to hold the county under the suzerainty of the kingdom of Burgundy. Mermet records the existence of a peace treaty signed at the time between Ugo King of Italy and Rudolf II King of Burgundy which confirmed the latter’s rights to the Burgundian kingdom and Charles Constantin’s position in the county of Vienne[57]. Charles Constantin swore allegiance to Conrad "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy in 943[58]. The rivalry being the competing factions in France concerning the suzerainty over Vienne persisted, as indicated by Flodoard who recorded in 951 that Louis IV “d’Outremer” King of the West Franks summoned "Karlus Constantinus Viennæ princeps et Stephanus Arvernorum præsul" to swear allegiance[59]. "Karolus comes" sold land "in villa Brociano" by charter dated 19 May 960 which names "Teutbergi comitisse"[60].
     "m TEUTBERGA, daughter of --- (-after 19 May 960). "Teutbergi comitisse" is named in the charter of "Karolus comes" dated 19 May 960 which recorded the sale of land "in villa Brociano"[61]. Her origin is not known. Her name suggests a connection with the family of the Comtes de Troyes and it has been suggested[62] that she was Teutberga [de Troyes, daughter of Warnarius [Garnier] Vicomte de Sens [Comte de Troyes] & his wife Teutberga d'Arles]. Gingins-la-Sarra points out that Teutberga was the name of the third wife and widow of Engelbert, of the family of the vicomtes de Vienne, who could have married Charles Constantin as her second husband[63]. There seems to be no basis for this speculation other than the name."
Med Lands cites:
[53] Flodoard 931, MGH SS III, p. 379.
[54] Recueil Actes Provence 15, p. 29, and Cluny Tome I, 242, p. 233.
[55] Cluny Tome I, 622, p. 579, and 631, p. 588.
[56] Flodoard 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[57] Mermet (1833), Vol. II, p. 292 (no citation reference to the treaty in question).
[58] Settipani (1993), pp. 380-1.
[59] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 400.
[60] Cluny, Tome II, 1094, p. 186.
[61] Cluny, Tome II, 1094, p. 186.
[62] Rösch (1977), p. 133. Settipani (1993), p. 381 footnote 128, highlights the absence of proof.
[63] Gingins-la-Sarra (1851), p. 226.12


Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 155.2 GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30. Teutberge (?) de Sens was also known as Teutberga (?) de Troyes.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "[TEUTBERGA (-after 960). The origin of the wife of Charles Constantin is not known. However, her name suggests a connection with the family of the Comtes de Troyes and it has been suggested[34] that she was the daughter of Garnier Vicomte de Sens.
     "m CHARLES CONSTANTIN Comte de Vienne, son of Emperor LOUIS III King of Italy [Provence] & his wife Adelais --- ([905/10][35]-after 962).]"
Med Lands cites:
[34] Rösch (1977), p. 133. Settipani (1993), p. 381 footnote 128, highlights the absence of proof.
[35] Birth date range estimated on the basis of his having been a young adult or adolescent at the time of the 924 charter in which he is named.5


; Per Racines et Histoire (Sens): “ Teutberga (Theutberge) de Sens + après 960
     ép. Charles Constantin de Provence, comte de Vienne ° ~901/03 ou 905/10 + après 962 (963 ?) (fils de l’Empereur Louis III, Roi d’Italie et de Provence, et d’Adelaïs) ”.3

Family

Charles Constantine (?) Comte de Vienne b. c 901, d. 28 Jun 963
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga de Troyes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218650&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ers Comtes & Vicomtes de Sens, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Sens.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#TeutbergaTroyesdiedafter960. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Warnarius: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218648&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#WarnariusTroyesdied924
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga of Arles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218649&tree=LEO
  9. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 30-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020445&tree=LEO
  11. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#CharlesConstantindied962
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga de Troyes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218650&tree=LEO

Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes1,2

M, #6634, b. 880, d. 6 December 924
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited26 Jun 2020
     Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes was born in 880.3 He married Teutberga (?) of Arles, daughter of Thibaud (?) Comte d'Arles & Vienne and Bertha (?) de Lorraine, circa 908.4,5,2,6,7
Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes died on 6 December 924; in battle against the Vikings; Genealogy.EU (Boson page), Med Lands and Racines et Histoire (Sens) all say d. 6 Dec 924. Genealogics says d. 6 Dec 929.4,5,2,3
     GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-30.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 133.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "WARNER [Garnier], son of --- (-killed in battle 6 Dec 924). Vicomte de Sens. Comte de Troyes 895/96. The Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Warnerius vicecomes Senonum" was killed fighting "Paganos in monte Chalo…8 Id Dec [924]"[14].
     "m TEUTBERGA d'Arles, daughter of THIBAUT Comte d'Arles & his wife Berta of Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([880/90][15]-before Sep 948). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She is named "matris mee Theotberg" in the Sep 948 donation to Cluny of her son "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" made for her soul[16], presumably indicating that she was then deceased."
Med Lands cites:
[14] Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, RHGF IX, p. 34.
[15] Birth date range estimated from the marriage date of her parents.
[16] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681.2
Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes was also known as Garnier Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes.4

; Per Racines et Histoire (Sens): “Warner (Garnier) de Sens ° 880 +X 06/12/924 comte de Troyes (895/96), vicomte de Sens
     ép. ~ 908 Teutberga (Theutberge) d’Arles ° ~880/90+ avant 09/948 (fille de Thibauld, comte d’Arles et de Berta de Lotharingie)”.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "TEUTBERGA ([880/90][145]-before Sep 948). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She is named "matris mee Theotberg" in the Sep 948 donation to Cluny of her son "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" made for her soul[146], presumably indicating that she was then deceased.
     "m WARNER [Garnier] Vicomte de Sens, son of --- (-killed in battle 6 Dec 924). Comte de Troyes 895/96."
Med Lands cites:
[145] Birth date range estimated from the marriage date of her parents.
[146] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681.7

Family

Teutberga (?) of Arles b. c 890, d. b Sep 948
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Warnarius: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#WarnariusTroyesdied924. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ers Comtes & Vicomtes de Sens, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Sens.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Warnarius: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218648&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga of Arles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218649&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#TeutbergaMWarnariusSensdied924
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga de Troyes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218650&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#TeutbergaTroyesdiedafter960
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#FromondISensdied951B

Teutberga (?) of Arles1

F, #6635, b. circa 890, d. before September 948
FatherThibaud (?) Comte d'Arles & Vienne2,3,4,5 b. c 854, d. 895
MotherBertha (?) de Lorraine6,3,4,7,5 b. c 863, d. 8 Mar 925
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited7 Sep 2020
     Teutberga (?) of Arles was born circa 890; Med Lands says b. 880/90.6,4 She married Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes circa 908.6,8,9,3,4
Teutberga (?) of Arles died before September 948.6,3,4
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Sens): “Warner (Garnier) de Sens ° 880 +X 06/12/924 comte de Troyes (895/96), vicomte de Sens
     ép. ~ 908 Teutberga (Theutberge) d’Arles ° ~880/90+ avant 09/948 (fille de Thibauld, comte d’Arles et de Berta de Lotharingie)”.10

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 133.3 Teutberga (?) of Arles was also known as Theutberge (?) d'Arles.6 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; Per Med Lands:
     "TEUTBERGA ([880/90][145]-before Sep 948). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She is named "matris mee Theotberg" in the Sep 948 donation to Cluny of her son "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" made for her soul[146], presumably indicating that she was then deceased.
     "m WARNER [Garnier] Vicomte de Sens, son of --- (-killed in battle 6 Dec 924). Comte de Troyes 895/96."
Med Lands cites:
[145] Birth date range estimated from the marriage date of her parents.
[146] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681.4

Family

Warner/Warinarius (?) Vicomte de Sens, Comte de Troyes b. 880, d. 6 Dec 924
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga of Arles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218649&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theotbald: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020455&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga of Arles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218649&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#TeutbergaMWarnariusSensdied924. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#Theotbalddied887895
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020454&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Warnarius: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218648&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#WarnariusTroyesdied924
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, 1ers Comtes & Vicomtes de Sens, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Sens.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teutberga de Troyes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00218650&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#TeutbergaTroyesdiedafter960
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#FromondISensdied951B

Rudolf II (?) King of Upper Burgundy, King of Italy1,2,3,4

M, #6636, b. 905, d. 11 July 937
FatherRudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne2,5,3,4 b. 880, d. 25 Oct 912
MotherWilla I (?) of Vienne2,3,4 b. Dec 873, d. 14 Jun 929
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited23 Apr 2020
     Rudolf II (?) King of Upper Burgundy, King of Italy was born in 905.6 He married Berthe (?) of Swabia, daughter of Burkhard II (?) Duke of Swabia and Reginlinde (?) of Nellenburg, in 922;
Her 1st husband.7,8,3,2,9,4
Rudolf II (?) King of Upper Burgundy, King of Italy died on 11 July 937.3,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 23.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 736.10


; Per Genealogy.EU: "King Rudolf II of Upper Burgundy (912-937) and Lower Burgundy (931/3-937) and Italy (924-926), +937; m.ca 922 Bertha, dau.of Duke Burchard II of Swabia."2

; Per Med Lands:
     "RUDOLF, son of RUDOLF I King of Upper Burgundy & his wife Willa [de Vienne] (-[end] 937). Herimannus names "Roudolfus filius eius [=Roudolfus rex Burgundiæ]" when recording his accession[126]. He succeeded his father in 912 as RUDOLF II King of Upper Burgundy. He was invited to Italy by the magnates of north-west Italy who opposed King Berengario's use of Hungarian mercenaries, and in 922 was elected as RUDOLF I King of Italy. He defeated King Berengario at Firenzuola in 923 and forced the ex-king´s retreat to Verona. However, the Italians rebelled against Rudolf in 925 and offered the crown to Hugues Comte d'Arles[127]. Ugo King of Italy ceded the kingdom of Lower Burgundy, including Provence, to King Rudolf II in 930, after which Arles became the capital of the united kingdom, which was sometimes referred to in primary sources as the kingdom of Arles[128]. Mermet records the existence of a peace treaty signed around [933] between Ugo King of Italy and Rudolf II King of Burgundy which confirmed the latter’s rights to the Burgundian kingdom[129]. Flodoard records the death of "Rodulfus, Iurensis ac Cisalpinæ Galliæ rex" and the succession of his "filius parvus Chonradus" at the end of his passage for 937[130].
     "m ([922]) as her first husband, BERTA of Swabia, daughter of BURKHARD II Duke of Swabia & his wife Regelinda im Zürichgau [Eberhardinger] (-after 2 Jan 966). Liutprand names "Bertam Suevorum ducis Bruchardi filiam" as wife of "Rodulfus rex Burgundionibus"[131]. "Berta matre nostra" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 8 Apr 962[132]. She married secondly as his fourth wife, Ugo King of Italy[133]. Luitprand records the marriage of "Burgundionum rex Rodulfus…viduam Bertam" to King Ugo[134]."
Med Lands cites:
[126] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 912, MHG SS V, p. 111.
[127] Wickham (1981), p. 177.
[128] Marie-José (1956), p. 28.
[129] Mermet (1833), Vol. II, p. 292 (no citation reference to the treaty in question).
[130] Flodoard 937, MGH SS III, p. 385.
[131] Liudprandi Antapodosis II.60, p. 299.
[132] Cluny, Tome II, 1127, p. 217.
[133] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.12, MGH SS III, p. 318.
[134] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.12, MGH SS III, p. 318.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "Rudolf was the son of Rudolf I, king of Upper Burgundy, and Guille/Wille de Provence. In 922 he married Bertha von Schwaben, daughter of Burchard, Herzog von Schwaben. Their son Conrad I and daughter Aelis (Adelheid) would have progeny.
     "Following his ascension to the throne in 912, Rudolf was asked by several Italian nobles in 922 to intervene in Italy on their behalf against Emperor Berengar. Having entered Italy, he was crowned King of the Lombards at Pavia. In 923 he defeated Berengar at Piacenza; Berengar was murdered the following year, possibly at the instigation of Rudolf. The king then ruled Upper Burgundy and Italy together, residing alternately in both kingdoms.
     "However, in 926 the Italian nobility turned against him and requested Hugo of Arles, the effective ruler of Provence (or Lower Burgundy), to rule them instead. Rudolf returned to Upper Burgundy to protect himself, ensuring Hugo's coronation as King of Italy in the process. The Italians then switched sides again, declaring that they wished for Rudolf to reclaim the throne. To prevent this, Hugo and Rudolf signed a treaty in 933, granting Rudolf the rule over Lower Burgundy in exchange for his renunciation of all claims on the Italian throne. He married his daughter Aelis to Hugo's son Lothar. The two Burgundian kingdoms unified, Rudolf ruled until his death in 937. He was succeeded by his son Conrad."10 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-29. He was King of Upper Burgundy between 912 and 937.2 He was King of Italy between 924 and 926.2 He was King of Lower Burgundy between 931 and 937.2

Family

Berthe (?) of Swabia b. c 895
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120373&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#RudolfIIdied937B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020435&tree=LEO
  6. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120374&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 133-21, p. 118. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Bertadied961
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120373&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120375&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bouchard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120376&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020211&tree=LEO
  15. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Adelaide at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01140c.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis (Adelheid) de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080077&tree=LEO

Rudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne1,2

M, #6637, b. 880, d. 25 October 912
FatherKonrad II 'the Younger' (?) Duke of Burgundy, Cte d'Auxerre, Margrave of Transjurania3,4,2,5 b. c 805, d. b 876
MotherWaldrada/Wiltrud (?)3,2 b. 801
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Rudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne was born in 847.6 He was born in 880.7 He married Willa I (?) of Vienne, daughter of Boson V (?) Ct of Bourges, Cte de Vienne et d'Arles, Duke of Lombardy, Governor of Provence, King of Provence, King of Aquitaine and Unknown (?), in 888.8
Rudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne died on 25 October 912.2,3
     ; Rudolf I, proclaimed as King of (Upper) Burgundy (I.888-912), +912; m. Willa, possibly dau.of King Boso of Burgundy.3

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 107
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 23
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 736.2 Rudolf I (?) King of Upper Bourgogne was also known as Rudolph de Burgundy. GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-30. He was King of (Upper) Burgundy between January 888 and 912.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020435&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020419&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#ConradAuxerreMWaldrada. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I24765
  7. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Willa de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020457&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#WillaMBosoVienne
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120373&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#RudolfIIdied937B

Guedinilde (?)1

F, #6638
ReferenceGAV28
Last Edited16 Aug 2019

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html

Petronille (?)1

F, #6639, d. after 1030
Last Edited25 Jun 2020
     Petronille (?) married Ebles I de Turenne Vicomte de Turenne, Aquitaine, son of Archambaud "Camba-Putrida/Jambe-Pourrie" de Comborn Vicomte de Comborn, Ventadour et Turenne and Sulpicie de Turenne;
His 2nd wife.1,2,3
Petronille (?) died after 1030.3
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (): “F1. Vcte Ebles I de Turenne; 1m: before 1001 Beatrix, dau.of Ct Richard of Normandy; 2m: Petronille N; by the 1m. he had issue, for whom see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul2.html”.1
; Per Racines et Histoire (Turenne): “Ebles 1er de Comborn dit aussi «de Turenne» ou «Le Vieux» ° ~ 953 +X en 02 avant 1038 (1030 ?, blessé au combat par Witard de La Roche) vicomte de Comborn et de Turenne, (témoin d’une vente en 05/989 ; donations en 04/1001, avec sa femme et son fils, à Saint-Pierre d’Uzerche ; témoin de donations en 06/1006, en 1010 ; donation ~1020 & en 1024 à Saint-Martin de Tulle ; donation ~1030, avec sa 2nde femme, de l’église de Beaumont & de ses dépendances à Saint-Martin d’Uzerche)
     ép. 1) dès 1001 / ~975/986 (div., répudiée) Béatrix (Béatrice, alias Badia) de Normandie ° ~980 + 18/01/1035 (Abbesse de Montivilliers, en Normandie, après sa répudiation) (fille de Richard 1er «Sans Peur», duc de Normandie, et de Gonnor de Crepon)
     ép. 2) dès 1020 Péronnelle + après 1030 (Pétronille pour les copistes)”.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul2.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LIMOUSIN.htm#EblesITurenneB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Turenne, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Turenne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia1,2

F, #6640, b. 1047, d. between 1093 and 1095
FatherHeinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor3,4,5 b. 28 Oct 1017, d. 5 Oct 1056
MotherAgnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress3,6 b. c 1025, d. 14 Dec 1077
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia was born in 1047; Genealogy.EU (Salian page) says b. 1054; Wikipedia says b. 1054; Med Lands says b. 1054. Genealogics says b. 1047.7,3,2,8 She and Philippe I (?) King of France were engaged between 1055 and 1059.9 Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia married Salamon (?) King of Hungary, son of András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary and Anastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary, in 1063;
Her 1st husband.3,1,10 Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia married Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland, son of Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland and Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland, between 1088 and 1089;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband
Leo van de Pas says m. 1088; Rafal Pinke says m. 1088; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 pages says m. ca 1089; Med Lands says m. 1089; Med Lands says m. 1089.7,11,12,13,14,15,16,8
Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia died between 1093 and 1095; Genealogy.EU (Salian page) says d. 1092/6.3,7
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[292]). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[293]. Orderic Vitalis names "Philippum et Hugonem Magnum Crispeii comitem" as the children of "Henricus…Francorum rex" and his wife "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[294]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[295]. He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims: the Hugonis Floriacensis Actum records the consecration in 1058 of “rex...Henricus...Philippum filium suum duodennum” at “Remis a Gervasio archiepiscopo”, in the presence of “duo Nicholai papæ legati, Hugo...Bisunciensis archiepiscopus et Hermenfredus Sedunensis episcopus”[296]. His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who later became regent until 1066/67. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France. The Bertholdi Annales record in 1060 the death of “Heinricus Galliarum rex” and the succession of “filius eius Philippus adhuc puer regnum cum matre gubernandum suscepit”[297]. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims. Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[298]. King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[299]. In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[300]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[301]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[302].
     "Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[303]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted.
     "m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 15 Oct 1094). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[304]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[305]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[306]. Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[307]. She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[308]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Victor records the death "Id Oct" of "Berta mater Ludovici regis"[309]. Clarius’s Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1094 of “Berta regina, quæ a rege Philippo prius fuerat derelicta”[310].
     "m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines). Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus”[311]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[312]. William of Tyre records this marriage[313]. Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[314]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[315]. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[316]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][317]. "
Med Lands cites:
[292] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[293] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[294] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[295] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.
[296] Hugonis Floriacensis Modernorum Regum Francorum Actus, MGH SS IX, p. 389.
[297] Bertholdi Annales, 1060, MGH SS Tome V, p. 271.
[298] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70.
[299] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1.
[300] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[301] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.
[302] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.
[303] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[304] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[305] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.
[306] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).
[307] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[308] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71.
[309] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Victor, p. 593.
[310] Duru, L. M. (1863) Bibliothèque historique de l’Yonne (Auxerre, Paris), Tome II, Chronicon Sancti-Petri-Vivi Senonensis auctore Clario, p. 512.
[311] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386.
[312] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.
[313] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 606.
[314] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107.
[315] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.
[316] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.
[317] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142.9


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 4.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 82, 104.1


; Per Genealogy.EU: "[2m.] Sophie-Judith, *1054, +14.3.1092/96; 1m: 1063 Salomon of Hungary (*1052 +1087); 2m: ca 1089 Wladislav I Herman, Duke of Poland (*1043 +4.6.1102.)14"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Judith of Swabia (Hungarian: Sváb Judit, Polish: Judyta Szwabska; Summer 1054 – 14 March ca. 1105?), a member of the Salian dynasty, was the youngest daughter of Emperor Henry III from his second marriage with Agnes of Poitou. By her two marriages she was Queen of Hungary from 1063 to 1074 and Duchess of Poland from 1089 to 1102.
Life
     "Born probably at the Imperial Palace of Goslar, Judith (also named Judith Maria or Judith Sophia in some sources) was the youngest of the six children born to Emperor Henry III and Empress Agnes, a daughter of the French duke William V of Aquitaine. Among her older siblings were Adelaide, who became Abbess of Quedlinburg and Gandersheim, Gisela, who died in infancy before Judith's birth, and Matilda, the later wife of the Swabian duke and anti-king Rudolf of Rheinfelden, as well as her brother Henry IV, who succeeded their father as Holy Roman Emperor in 1056, and Conrad II, who also died in infancy. In addition, Judith had an older half-sister, Beatrix, Abbess of Quedlinburg and Gandersheim, born from her father's first marriage with Princess Gunhilda of Denmark.
Queen of Hungary
     "Soon after her birth on 9 April 1054, Judith was betrothed to the Capetian prince Philip, eldest son and heir of King Henry I of France. However, after the death of Emperor Henry III on 5 October 1056, with Empress Agnes acting as regent on behalf of her minor son Henry IV,[1] the engagement was broken in September 1058, when a peace treaty was concluded with King Andrew I of Hungary. The late Emperor Henry III had waged two unsuccessful campaigns against Hungary in 1051 and 1052, whereafter Pope Leo IX arranged an agreement. As a part of the new alliance, Judith was engaged to the Hungarian king's son and heir, Prince Solomon, at the Bavarian court in Regensburg. When King Andrew I died in 1060, his widow and sons had to take refuge in Germany. Nevertheless, with the support of his powerful brother-in-law, Solomon could recover the Hungarian throne after the death of his uncle Béla I in 1063 and soon after married with Judith in Székesfehérvár.
     "Their marriage proved to be unsuccessful, and apparently both the king and queen had love affairs. Although it is generally believed that the union was childless, some sources[2][3][4] state that Solomon and Judith had a daughter, Sophia, who later married Poppo, Count of Berg-Schelklingen. If this parentage is correct, Judith was the great-grandmother of Salomea of Berg, second wife of Boles?aw III Wrymouth (her later stepson).
     "During the 1070s, a struggle for power commenced between King Solomon and his cousins (sons of the late Béla I). On 14 March 1074 at the Battle of Mogyoród, the king's forces were decisively defeated by his cousins and their allies, the Dukes of Poland and Bohemia. Judith fled back to Germany, while Solomon continued his fight for the Hungarian throne; in 1077 he accepted the rule of his cousin King László I, who gave him in exchange extensive landholdings after his formal abdication (1081). Despite this, Solomon never gave up his pretensions and began to plot against King László I; however, his plans were discovered and he was imprisoned by the King in the Tower of Visegrád until 15 August 1083, when on the occasion of the canonization of István I, the first King of Hungary, Solomon was released.
     "In the meantime, Judith remained in Germany and settled in her residence in Regensburg (with short breaks) from May or July 1074 until 1088. After his release, Solomon went to Germany and tried to reunite with his wife, but she refused to receive him. After a long wandering, Solomon made an alliance with Kuteshk, the leader of a Pecheneg tribe settled in the later principality of Moldavia. Between 1084-1085 he married his daughter, committing bigamy with this act.
     "Solomon promised to hand over parts of the kingdom of Hungary in exchange for his new father-in-law's military assistance. In 1085, Solomon led the Pecheneg troops against Hungary, but King László I defeated them. Two years later, in 1087, Solomon took part in the Pechenegs' campaign against the Byzantine Empire and was killed in a battle near Hadrianopolis.
Duchess of Poland
     "In 1089, Judith married W?adys?aw I Herman, Duke of Poland. This union considerably benefited German-Polish relations; on the occasion of the wedding, Emperor Henry IV commissioned to St. Emmeram's Abbey in Regensburg the creation of Gospel Books to the Polish court, now kept in the library of the Wawel Cathedral chapter in Kraków.
     "After her marriage, Judith changed her name to Sophia, perhaps to distinguish herself from W?adys?aw I's first wife, Judith of Bohemia. She bore her husband four daughters: Sophia (by marriage Princess of Vladimir-Volynia), Agnes (later Abbess of Quedlinburg and Gandersheim), Adelaide (by marriage Countess of Vohburg and Margravine of the Northern March),[5] and an unnamed daughter (later wife of a Polish lord).
     "She probably had a big impact on Poland's political life. It is believed that she was the mistress of Sieciech, the Count Palatine and true governor of the country. Judith actively aided Sieciech in his schemes to take over the country;[6][7] the death of Mieszko Boles?awowic under mysterious circumstances was, in all probability, caused by orders of the Count Palatine and Judith. With the help of Sieciech, Judith convinced her husband[8] to send W?adys?aw I's first-born son Zbigniew (who seems to be a strong candidate to the succession despite his illegitimacy) to Quedlinburg Abbey where her sister Adelaide was Abbess; also, they wanted an eventual alliance with the only legitimate son of W?adys?aw I, Boles?aw, born from his first marriage with the Bohemian princess.
     "After discovering the plans of Sieciech and Judith to take over the country, Boles?aw and Zbigniew became allies. Both brothers demanded that the reigns of government should be handed over to them. Eventually, after some attempts to break the alliance between the brothers, Sieciech was defeated, deposed and exiled (ca. 1100–1101). On 4 June 1102 Duke W?adys?aw I died. The country was divided between Boles?aw III and Zbigniew.
     "Judith's date of death was disputed among historians and web sources. Although 14 March is stated as the correct day in almost all the known sources, in the case of the year is more difficult to ascertain. Sources established that she died between 1092–1096, but this seems improbable, because is known that around 1105, Boles?aw III entered into an agreement with her, under which, in exchange for abundant dower lands, Judith guaranteed her neutrality in the Duke's political contest with his half-brother Zbigniew.[9] Thus, she died after that date. Gerard Labuda stated that Judith spent her last years of life in Regensburg with her (supposed) daughter Adelaide, wife of Count Dietpold III of Vohburg and Cham; since the date of the marriage between Adelaide and Count Dietpold III was ranked between 1110–1118, it is assumed that Judith died after the latter year, at a relatively advanced age.[10] Her place of burial, Admont Abbey in Austria, apparently confirm this theory.
Marriage and children
1. 1065-1066: Solomon, King of Hungary (1053 – 1087)
1. (?) Sophia (d. about 1100), married Count Poppo of Berg-Schelklingen. Their son was Henry I of Berg-Schelklingen.

2. 1088: Duke W?adys?aw I Herman (c. 1044 – 4 June 1102)
1. Sophia (b. c. 1089 – d. bef. 12 May 1112), married bef. 1108 to Yaroslav Sviatopolkovich, Prince of Volhynia, son of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.
2. Agnes (b. c. 1090 – d. 29 December 1127), Abbess of Quedlinburg (1110) and Gandersheim (1111).
3. Adelaide (b. c. 1091 – d. 25/26 March 1127), married bef. 1118 to Dietrich III, Count of Vohburg and Margrave of the Northern March.[11]
4. a daughter (b. c. 1092 – d. bef. 1111), married c. 1111 with a Polish lord.

Notes
1. Jackson, Guida M. (1999). Women rulers throughout the ages : an illustrated guide ([2nd rev., expanded and updated ed.]. ed.) Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1576070913.
2. Cawley, Charles, HUNGARY - Sophia wife of Poppo of Berg-Schelklingen, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
3. Marek, Miroslav. "Complete Genealogy of the House of Arpad". genealogy.euweb.cz. Retrieved 15 July 2014.[self-published source][better source needed]
4. Sophia (1) Királyi Hercegnö Magyar * Archived 2014-07-20 at the Wayback Machine in: Genealogical Database by Herbert Stoyan [retrieved 15 July 2014].
5. Adelaide's parentage is disputed among the historians and web sources.
6. R. Grodecki, S. Zachorowski, J. D?browski: Dzieje Polski ?redniowiecznej, vol. I, p. 128.
7. K. Maleczy?ski: Boles?aw III Krzywousty, p. 30.
8. R. Grodecki, S. Zachorowski, J. D?browski: Dzieje Polski ?redniowiecznej, vol. I, p. 129.
9. M. Spórna, P. Wierzbicki: S?ownik w?adców Polski i pretendentów do tronu polskiego, p. 62.
10. (in German) Judith Tochter von Kaiser HEINRICH III. + 1092/96 in: manfred-hiebl.de/genealogie-mittelalter [retrieved 24 October 2014].
11. Adelaide's parentage is disputed among the historians and web sources.
References
** Mechthild Black-Veldtrup: Die Töchter Heinrichs III. und der Kaiserin Agnes. [in:] Vinculum Societatis. Festschrift für Joachim Wollasch, 1991. pp. 36–57.
** Mechthild Black-Veldtrup: Kaiserin Agnes (1043–1077). Quellenkritische Studien, Böhlau Editorial, Köln 1995.
** Egon Boshof: Die Salier, Kohlhammer, Stuttgart [u.a.] 2000.
** Hansmartin Schwarzmaier: Von Speyer nach Rom. Wegstationen und Lebensspuren der Salier, Thorbecke, Sigmaringen 1992."2 Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia was also known as Sophie-Judith/Jutta (?)3,7,13

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96]). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[403]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[404]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[405]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[406]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name "Iudite"[407]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[408]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[409]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[410].
     "[Betrothed ([1055/59]) to PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[411]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.]
     "m firstly (betrothed 1059, early 1063) SALOMON King of Hungary, son of ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-killed in battle 1087).
     "m secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102)."
Med Land cites:
[403] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[404] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[405] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[406] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[407] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[408] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[409] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[410] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 319.
[411] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "SALAMON (1053-killed in battle 1087, bur Pula). The Chronicon Posoniense records the birth in 1053 of "Samson filius Andree regie"[413]. The Gesta Hungarorum names "filium suum Salomonem adhuc puerulum" when recording that his father declared him heir to the throne in the twelfth year of his reign[414]. Salamon and his mother took refuge at the court of his brother-in-law Heinrich IV King of Germany when his paternal uncle Béla usurped the throne in 1060. After King Béla I died in 1063, he was installed as SALAMON King of Hungary with support from King Heinrich IV, whose suzerainty he recognised. Following continuing raids on Hungarian territory by Pechenegs, the Hungarians invaded Byzantine territory along the Danube in [1068], suspecting that the imperial governor of Beograd was sponsoring the Pechenegs. They captured Beograd in [1071/72] but did not retain it. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Salomon rex" invaded "bulgarense regnum" in 1072[415]. The dispute with Byzantium was settled by treaty in 1074[416]. Although King Salamon had made peace with his cousin Géza, relations deteriorated between them and open warfare broke out in 1074. The Chronicon Posoniense records disputes in 1071 between "Salomon rex" and "duce magno Geyza Ungarorum"[417]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King Salomon was defeated at "Munorod [Mogyoród]" and fled across the Danube to "Musunium [Moson]", before moving his household to the monastery of Admont in Styria[418]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Salomon" was deposed in 1074[419]. "Heinricus…rex" donated property to Freising church by charter dated 26 Nov 1074 at the request of "Salomon rex Ungarorum"[420], presumably as part of the arrangements agreed for Salamon's exile in Germany. Ex-King Salamon returned from Germany and conspired against his cousin King László I after the latter's accession in 1077, but he was confined to the Tower of Visegrád. He was released in 1083 and returned to his wife in Regensburg, but she refused to receive him. Salamon invaded Hungary again with Pecheneg forces from Moldavia, but was defeated. He was killed fighting in Byzantine territory. His death is recorded in the Annalista Saxo in 1087[421]. A different version of his final years is recorded in the Gesta Hungarorum which states that ex-King Salomon retired to Pula on the Adriatic where he lived in complete poverty and was buried, never having returned to his wife[422]. The Chronicon Varadiense records that "Salamon rex" died "in Pola civitate Styriæ"[423].
     "m (betrothed 1059, early 1063) as her first husband, JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[424]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[425]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[426]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. She married secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?adys?aw I Herman Prince of Poland ([1043]-4 Jun 1102). Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[427]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name as "Iudite"[428]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[429]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[430]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[431]."
Med Lands cites:
[413] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[414] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131.
[415] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[416] Fine (1991), p. 211.
[417] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[418] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 60 and 61, p. 135.
[419] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[420] D H IV 276, p. 353.
[421] Annalista Saxo 1087.
[422] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 61, p. 137.
[423] Chronicon Varadiense, 7, p. 253.
[424] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[425] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[426] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.
[427] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[428] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[429] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[430] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.17
She was Queen consort of Hungary between 1063 and 1074.2 She was Duchess consort of Poland between 1089 and 1102.2

Family 1

Philippe I (?) King of France b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108

Family 2

Salamon (?) King of Hungary b. bt 1051 - 1053, d. 1087
Child

Family 3

Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland b. c 1043, d. 4 Jun 1102
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027255&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027241&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIIIGermanydied1056B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027255&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#JudithMariaM1SalomonHungaryM2WladyslawI.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salomon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020755&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladyslaw I Herman: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027256&tree=LEO
  12. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226085. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page - The Salian family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#WladislawIHermandied1102
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladyslaw I Herman: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027256&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#SalamonI
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027258&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027257&tree=LEO

Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3

M, #6641, b. 28 October 1017, d. 5 October 1056
FatherKonrad II "the Salic" (?) Holy Roman Emperor3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 990, d. 4 Jun 1039
MotherGisela von Schwaben Queen of Germany, Holy Roman empress, Queen of Burgundy3,9,5,6,10,8 b. 11 Nov 990, d. 14 Feb 1043
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited1 Jul 2020
     Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor was born on 28 October 1017 at Osterbeck, Germany (now).11,3,5,6 He married Gunhilda (?) of England, daughter of Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway and Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England, circa 29 June 1036 at Nijmegen, Nijmegen Municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands;
His 1st wife.12,13,3,5,6,14 Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor married Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress, daughter of Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou and Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy, on 21 November 1043 at Besançon, France (now);
His 2nd wife.11,15,16,17,18,19,5,6
Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor died on 5 October 1056 at Burg Bodfeld, Hartz, Germany, at age 38.11,2,3,4,5,6
Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 5 October 1056 at Cathedral of Speyer (Kaiser Dom), Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     28 Oct 1017
     DEATH     5 Oct 1056 (aged 38)
     Royalty, German king and roman emperor, King of Italy and Burgundy. Born the oldest child of emperor Konrad II and Gisela of Swabia. Since 1026 he was his fathers co-king in Germany and since 1033 also in Burgundy. He was married to Gunhild of Denmark in 1036 who bore him one daughter, Beatrix, and died after two years of marriage. In November 1043 he married Agnes of Poitou who bore him six children and acted as regent for their son after his death. His heart and intestines were buried in Goslar.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Konrad II unknown–1039
          Gisela of Swabia 999–1043
     Spouses
          Gunhild of Denmark 1019–1038
          Agnes Of Poitou 1024–1077
     Siblings
          Mathilde of Franconia 1026–1034
     Half Siblings
          Herman IV of Swabia 1010–1038
     Children
          Adelheid II 1045–1096
          Heinrich IV 1050–1106
          Konrad II von Bayern 1052–1055
          Judith Sophie of Germany 1054–1093
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Jun 2008
     Find a Grave Memorial 27501057.6,20
     GAV-27 EDV-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH, son of KONRAD II King of Germany [Emperor KONRAD I] & his wife Gisela of Swabia (Oosterbecke [Ostrebeck] 28 Oct 1017-Burg Bodfeld im Harz 5 Oct 1056, bur Speyer Cathedral). "Cunradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property to the church of Paderborn by charter dated 7 Apr 1027, naming for the first time "filii nostri Heinrici"[365]. Wipo names "Heinricus rex, filius imperatoris" when recording his first marriage in 1036[366]. He was installed in 1027 as HEINRICH VI Duke of Bavaria, until 1042 when he granted the duchy to Graf Heinrich [Luxembourg]. He was crowned as HEINRICH III King of Germany at Aachen 14 Apr 1028. Duke of Swabia 1038-1045. He was installed as king of Burgundy by his father in Autumn 1038. Regent of the duchy of Carinthia 1039-1047. He resumed possession of the duchy of Bavaria from 1047 to 1049. He deposed the three rival Popes Benedict IX, Sylvester III and Gregory VI in 1046, nominating in their place Suidger Bishop of Bamberg, who succeeded as Pope Clement II and crowned him Emperor HEINRICH II at Rome 25 Dec 1046. At the same time Emperor Heinrich received the rank of patricius as a hereditary title, which carried the right to cast the first vote in a papal election, the power of which was reflected in the election of six German popes during the following decade[367]. Emperor Heinrich faced internal opposition in Germany from several powerful magnates, Godefroi II Duke of Lotharingia, Konrad de Luxembourg Duke of Bavaria, Welf III Duke of Carinthia, and Bernhard Billung Duke in Saxony, all of whom were anxious to prevent the centralisation of power in the hands of the king/emperor[368]. A deeply religious man, Emperor Heinrich renewed the ban on clerics taking oaths in court proceedings, refused to follow the practice of bestowing church offices for payment, and laid great emphasis on the sacral character of kingship[369]. He founded the convent of St Simon and Jude at Goslar before 1050. He died of a fever. The Annales Spirenses record his burial at Speyer[370]. The necrology of St Gall records the death "III Non Oct" of "Heinrici imperatoris"[371].
     "m firstly ([29] Jun 1036) GUNHILD [Æthelfryth] of Denmark, daughter of KNUD I King of Denmark and England & his wife Emma de Normandie ([1020]-in Italy 18 Jul 1038, bur Limburg Klosterkirche). Adam of Bremen records that the daughter of King Knud married "imperator filio suo"[372]. Her parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis, who also refers to her marriage[373]. Wipo names "Chnutonis regis Anglorum filiam, nomine Chunehildem" as wife of "Heinricus rex, filius imperatoris" when recording their marriage in 1036[374]. The Annalista Saxo records that the wife of King Heinrich III was "filiam Cnud regis Danorum", specifying that the marriage was arranged by Unwan Archbishop of Bremen[375], although this seems unlikely as Archbishop Unwan died in 1029[376]. Herimannus names "Chunihildem, Cnutonis Danorum et Anglorum regis filiam" when recording her marriage to "Heinricus rex, filius imperatoris" in 1036[377]. She adopted the name KUNIGUND on her marriage. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "uxor imperatoris Henrici Gunhildis imperatrix de Anglia" was accused of adultery, that she was defended in trial by combat, but that after her champion's victory she disdained the success and became a nun[378]. William of Malmesbury also recounts that she was accused of adultery and retired to a convent[379]. She died during her husband's expedition to Italy[380], the death of "regina Conihild" being recorded in the Annalista Saxo "XV Kal Aug"[381]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Cunehilt regina"[382].
     "m secondly (Ingelheim 20 Nov 1043) AGNES de Poitou, daughter of GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Agnès de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] ([1025]-Rome 14 Dec 1077, bur Rome, St Peter's). Herimannus names her "Agnetam, Willehelmi Pictaviensis filiam" when recording her marriage[383]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[384]. She was crowned empress with her husband at Rome 25 Dec 1046. She was regent during the minority of her son from 1056. Her husband's old adviser, Gerhard von Eichstätt by then Pope Victor II, who was in Germany when her husband died, remained in Germany until Spring 1057 as the chief adviser of Agnes and ensured a smooth transition of power[385]. She also installed herself as AGNES Duchess of Bavaria in 1056, until 1061 when she appointed Otto von Northeim as duke. In 1062, Anno [II] Archbishop of Köln kidnapped her son King Heinrich IV and took him from Kaiserswerth to Köln. Agnes resigned as regent and went to Rome[386]. According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Agnes imperatrix eius [Chunigundis imperatricis] consanguinea, obiit Idus Decembris"[387], although the exact relationship between Agnes and Empress Kunigund (widow of Emperor Heinrich I [Heinrich II King of Germany]) has not been traced. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[388]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[389].
     "Emperor Heinrich & his first wife had one child.
     "Emperor Heinrich & his second wife had six children.
     "Emperor Heinrich had one [possible illegitimate] child by [an unknown mistress]."
Med Lands cites:
[365] D K II 82, p. 110.
[366] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 35, MGH SS XI, p. 272.
[367] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 44-5.
[368] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 41-2.
[369] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 39 and 51.
[370] Annales Spirenses, MGH SS XVII, p. 83.
[371] Libri Anniversariorum et Necrologium Monasterii Sancti Galli, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 462.
[372] Adami, Gesta Hammenburgensis Ecclesiæ Pontificum II.54, MGH SS VII, p. 325.
[373] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Book V, p. 87.
[374] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 35, MGH SS XI, p. 272.
[375] Annalista Saxo 1026.
[376] Grote, H. (1877) Stammtafeln (reprint Leipzig, 1984), p. 506.
[377] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1036, MHG SS V, p. 122.
[378] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1041, MGH SS XXIII, p. 787.
[379] Sharpe, Rev. J. (trans.), revised Stephenson, Rev. J. (1854) William of Malmesbury, The Kings before the Norman Conquest (Seeleys, London, reprint Llanerch, 1989), II, 188, p. 179.
[380] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 40.
[381] Annalista Saxo 1038.
[382] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 322.
[383] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1043, MHG SS V, p. 124.
[384] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris), Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, pp. 135-6.
[385] Norwich, J. J. (1992) The Normans in the South 1016-1130 and The Kingdom in the Sun 1130-1194 (Penguin Books), p, 120.
[386] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 57.
[387] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791.
[388] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[389] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 326.6


; Per Genealogics:
     "Heinrich was born on 27 July 1017, the son of Emperor Konrad II and Gisela von Schwaben. He became king of the Germans (emperor-elect) in 1026, duke of Bavaria in 1027, duke of Swabia in 1038, and emperor in 1039. He resolutely maintained the imperial prerogatives of power and encouraged the efforts of the Cluniac monks to reform the ecclesiastical system of Europe.
     "In June 1036 in Nijmegen, he married Gunhild of Denmark and they had one daughter. After Gunhild died he married Agnès de Poitou in 1043 and they had five children. In 1046 he put an end to the intrigues of the three rival popes by deposing all three and electing Clement II in their stead. In 1042 he compelled the duke of Bohemia to acknowledge himself a vassal of the empire. By repeated campaigns in Hungary, he established the supremacy of the empire in 1044.
     "Heinrich III also stretched his authority over the Norman conquerors of Apulia and Calabria. He promoted learning and the arts, founded numerous monastic schools and built many great churches. He died on 5 October 1056."5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 4.
2. Nachkommen Gorms des Alten, 1978 , Brenner, S. Otto. 37.
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 46.5


; See entries on Wikipedia and Wikipédia (Fr.) for more information.21,22



; Per Genealogy.EU: "D1. Heinrich III "The Black", King of Germany (1027-46), King of Burgundy (1038-39), Duke of Swabia (1038-45), King of Italy (1039-56), Emperor (1046-56), *28.10.1017, +Bodfeld 5.10.1056; 1m: Nimeguen 1036 Gunnhilde of England (*1019 +18.7.1038); 2m: 21.11.1043 Agnes d'Aquitaine (*1024 +14.12.1077.)3"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): "Agnés, *1024, +14.12.1077; m.21.11.1043 King Heinrich III of Germany (*1017 +1056.)23" He was Duke of Bavaria between 1026 and 1041.21 He was King of Germany between 1028 and 1056.3,21 He was Duke of Swabia between 1038 and 1045.3,21 He was King of Burgundy between 1038 and 1056.3,21 He was Duke of Carinthia between 1039 and 1047.

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "Henry III (the Black). Imperial authority at its height. A period of great town prosperity, due to development of trade. His wife, Agnes of Poitou, was an ardent devotee of Cluny; Henry, an honest reformer, abandoned simony and purified the court along Cluniac lines, but retained a firm hold on the Church. Strongest of the German emperors, he asserted his mastery in parts of Poland, Bohemia, and Hungary; Saxony was the only duchy to keep a trace of its original independence; resumption of the dangerous practice of granting duchies outside the royal house made Germany a feudal volcano; use of the ministeriales in administration, but retention of the bishops as principal advisers and administrators. Henry's reforms alienated the bishops, the magnates, and the nobles.
     "1041: Emperior Henry III, alarmed by the expansion of the Bohemian power, invaded the country and advanced to Prague. Betislav agreed to give up his Polish conquests and pay tribute to the emperor.
     "1043: Henry proclaimed the Day of Indulgence, forgiving all his foes and exhorting his subjects to do likewise; Brtislav of Bohemia forced (1041) to do homage; pagan reaction in Hungary put down (1044); final peace in Hungary (1052), which became a fief of the German crown. Homage of Denmark, repudiated soon after.
     "1046: Synods of Sutri and Rome. Deposition, at Henry's instigation, of three rival popes, and election of his nominee, Clement II, the first of a series (Clement, Leo IX, and Nicholas II) of reforming German popes; reaffirmation of the imperial right of nomination to the papacy.
     "The synods of Sutri and of Rome, under pressure from the reforming emperor Henry III, deposed three rival popes and made Suitgar, bishop of Bamberg, pope as Clement II (1046-47). Henry pacified southern Italy, reaffirmed the imperial right of nomination to the papacy, and left Italy in sound order.
     "1049-1052: The three campaigns of Emperor Henry III against the Hungarians. Andrew managed to hold his own, and in 1058 the emperor recognized Hungary's independence from the empire."24 He was King of Italy between 1039 and 1056.3,21 He was Margrave of Meissen in 1046.21 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 1046 and 1056.2,3,21

Family 1

Gunhilda (?) of England b. 1019, d. 18 Jul 1038
Child

Family 2

Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress b. c 1025, d. 14 Dec 1077
Children

Family 3

Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  4. [S1659] Ian S. R. Mladjov, "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile", The Plantagene Connection (Spring/Winter 2003, pp. 1-85): Stemma 4, p. 71. Hereinafter cited as "Mladjov [2003] Reconsidering Agatha."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027241&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIIIGermanydied1056B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027246&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#KonradIIGermanyEmperorB.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Count Bruno of Brunswick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106626&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027247&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-22, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1 page (Denmark family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Gunhilddied1038.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  17. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Agnesdied1077
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 May 2020), memorial page for Heinrich III (28 Oct 1017–5 Oct 1056), Find a Grave Memorial no. 27501057, citing Cathedral of Speyer, Speyer, Stadtkreis Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27501057/heinrich_iii. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_III,_Holy_Roman_Emperor. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  22. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Henri III (empereur du Saint-Empire): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_III_(empereur_du_Saint-Empire). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Poitou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  24. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 205. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  25. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027260&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#MathildeMRudolfRheinfeldenSwabiadied1080.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027259&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIVGermanydied1106B.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027251&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#AzelaMWolframEnzberg.

Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress1,2,3

F, #6642, b. circa 1025, d. 14 December 1077
FatherGuillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou1,4,5,6,7 b. c 969, d. 31 Jan 1030
MotherAgnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy5,4,8,7 b. c 995, d. 10 Nov 1068
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited20 Jun 2020
     Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress was born circa 1025; Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1 page) says b. 1024.1,2,7 She married Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor, son of Konrad II "the Salic" (?) Holy Roman Emperor and Gisela von Schwaben Queen of Germany, Holy Roman empress, Queen of Burgundy, on 21 November 1043 at Besançon, France (now);
His 2nd wife.9,1,10,11,2,7,12,13
Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress died on 14 December 1077 at Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy (now).14,1,4,7
Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress was buried after 14 December 1077 at Saint Peter's Basilica, Vatican City,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1024
     DEATH     14 Dec 1077 (aged 52–53)
     German queen and empress, between 1056 and 1061 she acted as regent for her son Heinrich IV. She married King Heinrich III in 1043 and bore him the children Adelheid, Gisela, Mathilde, Heinrich IV., Konrad and Sophie-Judith. She was crowned with her husband on 25 December 1046 in Rome. She was buried in the old church of St Peter.
     Family Members
     Parents
          William Aquitaine 969–1030
          Agnes of Burgundy unknown–1068
     Spouse
          Heinrich III 1017–1056
     Siblings
          Eudes de Poitou unknown–1039
          Guillaume IV de Poitou 1004–1038
          Guillaume V Pierre de Poitou 1023–1058
          Guillaume VI de Poitou 1024–1086
     Children
          Adelheid II 1045–1096
          Heinrich IV 1050–1106
          Konrad II von Bayern 1052–1055
          Judith Sophie of Germany 1054–1093
     BURIAL     Saint Peter's Basilica, Vatican City
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 5 Jun 2008
     Find a Grave Memorial 27347323.7,15
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "D1. Heinrich III "The Black", King of Germany (1027-46), King of Burgundy (1038-39), Duke of Swabia (1038-45), King of Italy (1039-56), Emperor (1046-56), *28.10.1017, +Bodfeld 5.10.1056; 1m: Nimeguen 1036 Gunnhilde of England (*1019 +18.7.1038); 2m: 21.11.1043 Agnes d'Aquitaine (*1024 +14.12.1077.)16"

; Per Genealogics:
     "Agnès was born about 1025, the daughter of Guillaume III-V, duke of Aquitaine, and Agnès de Bourgogne. In 1031 Agnès was mentioned as being at the court of her brother, Guillaume 'the Fat'. In 1036 and 1037 she was in a cloister with her brother's wife Eustacia, because Guillaume had lost his position in Aquitaine. In 1042 she was in Bésançon at the court of her uncle Reginald when Bruno, bishop of Würzburg, came to ask her hand in marriage for the widowed Emperor Heinrich III. In October 1043 Agnès and Heinrich III met at the Burgundian border, and travelled together to Mainz for her coronation. A month later they married with great pomp in Ingelheim. In 1046 they went to Italy and were crowned Emperor and Empress by Pope Clemens II.
     "Heinrich III and Agnès had five children. Though Agnès was usually with her husband and is mentioned in many imperial documents, she had no political influence on him. However, she acted as regent for her son Heinrich IV when her husband died in 1056. As regent from 1056 until 1062 she worked to preserve the empire and continued Heinrich III's policies.
     "She travelled extensively throughout the empire, but her regency was troubled by some of the nobles she had trusted. She had placed Rudolf von Rheinfelden in charge of Swabia and betrothed him in 1059 to her eldest daughter Matilda. A year later Matilda died and Rudolf became one of her son's rebellious vassals. In 1060 she sent an army to aid her son-in-law Salomon of Hungary, but the army was defeated and Salomon and his wife were forced to flee.
     "Her regency came to an abrupt end when the bishop of Cologne kidnapped her son Heinrich IV and took over the regency. Without objection she returned to her own lands. In 1063 she went to Rome where she was befriended by Pope Alexander II who used her several times as an ambassador to the imperial court. She was also associated with Hildebrand, the future Pope Gregory VII. Agnes sided with the papal party and tried to conciliate between Pope Gregory VII and her son, by then Emperor Heinrich IV.
     "Agnes died on 14 December 1077."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 28.2

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Agnès de Poitou (ou de Poitiers, d'Aquitaine), est née entre 1020 et 1030 et morte le 14 décembre 1077 à Rome.
     "En 10431, elle épouse Henri III dit le Noir, empereur germanique2. Devenue veuve en 1056, l'impératrice Agnès assume la régence du Saint-Empire romain germanique jusqu'à la majorité de son fils Henri IV le Grand, en 1062.
     "Cette période est marquée par la rivalité entre le pouvoir impérial et le pouvoir pontifical.
     "En 1057, le prince Frédéric de Lorraine, abbé du Mont-Cassin et frère de Godefroi II, duc de Toscane, est élu pape à l'insu du pouvoir impérial sous le nom d'Étienne IX. Farouche défenseur de l'indépendance de l'Église face au pouvoir impérial, il est assassiné huit mois après son élection.
     "En 1061, après la mort du pape Nicolas II et contrairement à la coutume, le Sacré Collège ne fait pas confirmer l'élection d'Alexandre II par le Saint-Empire. L'aristocratie de Rome conteste l'élection et fait appel à Agnès, qui fait élire à Bâle l'antipape Honorius II. Le schisme dure peu, puisque Honorius est désavoué par tous en 1064, mais encourage la papauté dans sa réforme, ce qui conduira à la querelle des Investitures.
     "Pendant la régence, les grands féodaux et les grands évêques du royaume d'Allemagne se révoltent et vont jusqu'à enlever en 1062 son fils Henri, roi des Romains. Après un voyage en France, elle se retire dans un couvent en Italie, d'où on l'appelle en 1072 pour réconcilier le duc de Souabe Rodolphe de Rheinfelden avec son fils. Après avoir évité la guerre civile, elle se retire à nouveau et meurt à Rome.
     "Femme érudite, elle fit traduire les ouvrages de Constantin l'Africain, moine médecin de l'abbaye du Mont-Cassin. Saint Pierre Damien, cardinal d'Ostie, est une des principales sources sur sa vie.
État des recherches sur le personnage d'Agnès
     "Agnès du Poitou est un personnage historique très controversé. Bien que femme, elle a dirigé l'un des plus grands empires européens, pendant presque dix ans, mais sa régence a été une période de réformes ecclésiastiques et l'occasion pour le trône de Saint-Pierre de commencer à s'émanciper de la monarchie germanique, émancipation dans laquelle elle joue un rôle. Mais Agnès était-elle vraiment la régente faible, confite en dévotion, complètement dépassée par les charges que son mari lui avait laissées en mourant de conduire les affaires du gouvernement et de parfaire l'éducation de leur fils, l'héritier du trône Henri IV ? C'est ainsi que l'historiographie la présentait.
     "Pendant longtemps il n'y eut aucun doute : Agnès avait été une régente trop faible. Ainsi, en 1923, Marie-Louise Buhlst-Thiele estime que « le fait d'entrer dans les ordres à la fin de sa vie, [est considéré] pour l'impératrice, comme une faiblesse ». Wilhelm von Giesebrecht va jusqu'à décrire Agnès comme étant d'une nature indécise et d'un caractère craintif. Dans son « Histoire de l'Empire allemand » (1890) il ne voit en elle qu'une régente faible, épouse du puissant empereur Henri III.
     "Pourtant dans les vingt dernières années l'opinion des chercheurs sur Agnès du Poitou a fortement changé. Cette évolution est surtout l'œuvre de deux historiens qui ont étudié le sujet en profondeur.
     "Tilmann Struve, en 1995, démontre entre autres que l'entrée au couvent de l'impératrice ne doit pas être considérée comme une conséquence directe du coup d'État de Kaiserswerth, mais date du voyage d'Agnès à Rome en 1065. Cela donne à penser que l'impératrice n'a ni abdiqué ni fui ses responsabilités, mais au contraire qu'elle a tenu sa place légitime de régente aussi longtemps que cela lui a été possible.
     "Mechthild Black-Veldtrup a rédigé une critique historique des sources à propos d'Agnès du Poitou, dans laquelle elle résume les nombreuses nouvelles connaissances sur l'impératrice, modifiant profondément son image (2006).
     "Tilmann Struve et Mechthild Black-Veldtrup ont réussi, avec de nouvelles méthodes de datation et un travail critique sur les sources, à remettre en question les opinions des chercheurs et à les corriger sur des points qui ne sont nullement secondaires. Cependant les recherches sur Agnès du Poitou sont loin d'être épuisées, il reste à éclaircir bien des points de sa vie, comme ce coup de force de Kaiserswerth, près de Düsseldorf, toujours obscur…
Le mariage d'Agnès avec Henri III
Une famille puissante
     "Agnès est la fille de Guillaume V, duc d'Aquitaine et comte de Poitiers et de sa troisième épouse, Agnès de Bourgogne.
Mariage politique
     "Agnès, fille de Guillaume duc d'Aquitaine et comte de Poitou, fut couronnée reine à Mayence en 1043 par Bardo de Mayence3 et, en novembre de la même année, elle épousa Henri III à Ingelheim.
     "Agnès, à cette date, avait tout au plus 18 ans, et elle devait être une jeune fille tendre, instruite et pleine d'une profonde piété. C'est ainsi que l'abbaye de Cluny était une fondation de sa famille et Hugo, son abbé, devait être plus tard le parrain de l'héritier du trône, le futur Henri IV, et devenir le confident intime de la famille impériale.
     "Henri avait choisi Agnès comme épouse après que sa première femme, Gunhild, fut morte du paludisme. Ce mariage présentait surtout pour lui des avantages politiques en affermissant son pouvoir. Une alliance avec la dynastie française qui était peut-être la plus puissante renforçait la pression sur la royauté française et était de nature à améliorer la position d'Henri en Bourgogne, puisque là aussi la famille d'Agnès avait de riches possessions.
     "Tous deux furent couronnés empereur et impératrice le 25 décembre 1046 à Rome4.
Vie d'impératrice
     "La vie de cour joyeuse et les festins ne plaisaient guère au couple royal qui avait une notion très claire de ses devoirs religieux. C'est ainsi que ménestrels et jongleurs, qui normalement ne manquaient à aucune fête du Moyen Âge, n'eurent pas l'autorisation de venir au mariage pour montrer leurs talents5. Tout ce qui entourait les souverains devait être empreint de sérieux et de dignité.
     "Henri s'enthousiasma pour l'idée de la Trêve de Dieu (Treuga Dei) qui était apparue en France et il s'efforça de mettre fin au droit du plus fort et aux vengeances privées6. Il se heurta à des résistances mais il était trop puissant pour que ses adversaires pussent agir efficacement contre lui. Cependant sa veuve devait rencontrer plus tard les mêmes problèmes.
     "En 1047 elle assiste à la première canonisation d'une femme. Sainte Wiborada par le pape Clément II7.
     "On peut croire qu'Agnès encouragea Henri dans sa conception religieuse de l'autorité, qu'elle soutint et même inspira son action dans sa politique de réforme religieuse ; du vivant de son mari, malgré tout, elle n'eut aucune occasion d'intervenir activement dans la politique. Ses fonctions étaient surtout représentatives : l'épouse et la mère occupaient le premier rang.
Mort d'Henri III et maintien au pouvoir
     "Après la mort de son mari, dont elle avait été très proche (ce qui ne caractérisait peut-être pas le comportement médiéval), ce fut à Agnès que revint le soin d'assurer la régence que le roi défunt lui avait confiée sur son lit de mort au nom de leur fils Henri IV, qui était encore mineur. Elle essaya bien au début de continuer la politique de son mari, mais se heurta à des résistances considérables dans l'Empire, particulièrement en Saxe ; la situation ayant changé, on ne pouvait plus suivre les mêmes principes, il fallait s'adapter, trouver un moyen pour garder l'héritage d'Henri III à leur fils et à la dynastie salienne.
     "Après la mort d'Henri III le 5 octobre 10568, Agnès prit la régence au nom d'Henri IV, mineur, mais déjà couronné. Au début, elle continua la politique de son mari en s'appuyant surtout sur Hugues de Cluny et le pape Victor II. Ce dernier, en tant qu'évêque d'Eichstätt et administrateur de l'Empire, faisait tout ce qu'il pouvait pour maintenir le pouvoir des Franconiens, issu de Conrad le Salique. L'impératrice, comme son époux Henri III, était du côté des réformateurs de l'église clunisienne, tandis que Hugues de Cluny, le parrain de son fils, qui était l'abbé de Cluny, centre de la réforme, menait une politique d'équilibre et de paix. Le pape Victor II9, qui devait la tiare à Henri III, jouait les bons offices entre la couronne, la noblesse et l'épiscopat. De cette façon la régence de l'impératrice, femme sans expérience politique, était acceptée, même si une loyauté complète était loin d'être garantie du côté des grands de l'Empire. La régence semblait n'avoir rien à craindre.
     "Pourtant, le pouvoir dans l'Empire échappait de plus en plus aux mains de la maison salienne, puisqu'Agnès n'avait pas encore réussi à s'imposer politiquement. Dans l'Empire, biens et droits passaient des mains de la noblesse dans celles de l'Église impériale, ce qui affaiblissait le pouvoir des Brunonen et des Billunger et créait de sérieux problèmes en Saxe. « Au vrai, on ne parle pas après 1057 de graves désordres ou de révoltes, mais sur les questions politiques essentielles, la régence se contentait de réagir au lieu de diriger les événements. Le danger croissait que les grands de l'Empire s'habituassent à se passer d'un roi. »
     "L'impératrice était bien forcée d'agir. Comme son autorité n'était pas aussi grande que celle d'Henri III, elle commença bientôt à s'attacher les nobles en leur concédant en fiefs des duchés, ce qui n'était pas possible sans leur accorder des droits seigneuriaux directs. Dès Noël 1056 elle attribuait déjà à l'Ezzon Konrad le duché de Carinthie, qui pendant un an était resté vacant10. En 1057 Rudolf von Rheinfelden fut pourvu de la Souabe et devait aussi régir la Bourgogne. Berthold von Zähringen, qui avait rappelé son droit sur le prochain duché vacant, se sentit lésé et reçut en 1061 la Carinthie, après la mort du duc Konrad. Frutolf von Michelsberg, un chroniqueur de l'époque, nous apprend dans sa Chronique du Monde que Rudolf von Rheinfelden avait extorqué l'attribution de la Souabe en enlevant Mathilde, la fille de l'empereur qui n'avait que 12 ans, et en se mariant deux ans plus tard avec elle. Mathilde était un gage qui pesait plus que promesse de la Souabe faite par Henri III, puisque Berthold von Zähringen pouvait maintenant l'appuyer sur une alliance avec l'empereur.
     "En 1061 les difficultés de la politique extérieure, entre autres le différend avec la Hongrie, contraignirent l'impératrice à se dessaisir aussi de la Bavière, qui était le dernier duché relevant encore directement de la maison royale et le plus important de l'Allemagne du Sud. Elle nomma duc le comte saxon Otto von Northeim, chef de guerre expérimenté. C'est à lui qu'incomberait désormais la défense du sud-est de l'Empire.
     "Évidemment les ducs ainsi créés étaient destinés à devenir les pires ennemis d'Henri IV, mais comment le reprocher à Agnès ? Il lui fallait bien faire quelque chose pour apaiser l'opposition de la noblesse à sa personne. Les historiens continuent cependant à lui reprocher qu'en diminuant la puissance des Saliens et en distribuant à tout de bras les duchés elle ait fortement diminué les pouvoirs de la royauté.
     "Pour le moment Otto von Northeim agissait exactement comme l'avait voulu la maison salienne. Comme l'avait souhaité Agnès, il protégeait efficacement l'empire contre les menaces extérieures, et faisait jeu égal avec la Hongrie, ce que n'avait pas réussi Henri III pendant sa vie. Les historiens le décrivent comme un homme d'action.
     "L'exemple de la Bavière confirme que, quand elle distribuait les duchés, Agnès n'avait pas le choix. Les voisins orientaux, en tout premier lieu la Hongrie, représentaient pour l'empire un danger qu'on ne pouvait sous-estimer, et pour Agnès, la régente de fait, il ne lui était pas légalement possible de conduire des expéditions. Elle avait besoin à ses côtés de ducs puissants, comme c'était le cas en Bavière avec Otto von Northeim. Sûrement, Agnès aurait pu empêcher les Zähringer, les Rheinfelder et les Northeimer de donner à leur pouvoir une base aussi forte, mais l'élévation de ces trois hommes jeunes, appartenant à de jeunes dynasties, était peut-être à cette date un moindre mal, un risque calculé.
Le début des années 1060 : la situation politique s'aggrave
     "Dans un empire garanti pour l'instant au-dedans comme au dehors, Agnès semblait respectée. Les concessions qu'elle avait faites avaient beau être énormes, on lui assura par serment que, si le trône devenait vacant, c'est-à-dire en cas de mort prématurée d'Henri IV dont le frère, Konrad, était déjà décédé en 1055, elle aurait le droit de désigner elle-même son successeur, c'est-à-dire que les Électeurs seraient obligés d'accepter le nom qu'elle proposerait.
     "Une telle obligation par serment (le principal engagement entre personnes au Moyen Âge) montre qu'Agnès était désormais considérée par tous les partis dans l'Empire comme la souveraine légitime. Sans son consentement, aucun nouveau roi ne pourrait être proclamé par les princes. Le sérieux d'un tel serment fut mis en évidence par les scrupules des princes lors de l'élection d'un antiroi contre Henri IV, en 1076.
     "La mort du pape Victor II, son conseiller et son ami, en 1057, fut un tournant pour la régente. Agnès perdait le contact avec ceux qui voulaient réformer l'Église. Ses intérêts et les leurs commençaient à n'être plus les mêmes. L'ère des Empereurs fidèles au Pape prenait fin.
     "Beatrix, la belle-fille d'Agnès, qui patronnait la riche abbaye de Gandersheim en Saxe se vit reprocher par le chapitre des dames nobles, qui se recrutait principalement dans la noblesse saxonne, d'abandonner aux ministériels les biens de la fondation et de compromettre ainsi la subsistance des chanoinesses. Victor II avait encore tranché en faveur de Beatrix. Le légat du nouveau pape Étienne IX réétudia l'affaire et décida en faveur du chapitre. C'était un coup pour le prestige et le pouvoir des Saliens en Saxe. Étienne IX avait déjà été élu en 1057 sans que la régente fût consultée et elle avait mis du temps à le reconnaître ; après la mort du pape, le 29 mars 1058, l'aristocratie romaine sentit qu'elle avait une chance d'influencer l'élection du nouveau pape et, dès le 5 avril 1058, fit élire Benoît X. Ce n'est qu'après le retour du légat du pape, Hildebrandt, qui à ce moment ne se trouvait pas en Italie, qu'avec le consentement de l'impératrice l'évêque Gérard de Florence fut élu pape à Sienne sous le nom de Nicolas II.
     "C'était bel et bien le schisme et Nicolas II fut contraint de s'ouvrir par les armes la route de Rome ; mais la lutte tourna en sa faveur.
     "Les grandes décisions politiques hors de l'Empire, comme l'élection du pape Étienne IX, se firent de plus en plus sans que les Saliens eussent rien à dire. C'est ainsi qu'en 1059 le pape Nicolas II promulgua le décret concernant l'élection des papes sans avoir consulté l'impératrice. Par ce décret, l'élection du pape était confiée aux cardinaux. Mesure dirigée autant contre l'empire que contre l'aristocratie romaine. Dans l'Empire même les intrigues politiques et les luttes pour le pouvoir étaient toujours à l'ordre du jour. « Chacun voulait s'élever encore plus haut ou au moins y songeait. » Agnès était littéralement écartelée entre les contraintes politiques et ses propres intérêts.
     "Certains conseillers de l'impératrice commençaient à penser d'abord à leurs propres intérêts, ce qui l'incitait à se fier toujours davantage aux personnes appartenant aux services royaux, c'est-à-dire aux ministériels. Ainsi, elle chargea le ministériel Kuno de l'éducation de son fils en même temps qu'Otnand, déjà partisan fidèle d'Henri III, s'élevait au premier plan de la politique.
     "Et c'est précisément leur zèle à servir les intérêts de la couronne qui provoqua une opposition contre l'impératrice qui donnait sa confiance à « des gens issus de rien ». On alla jusqu'à insulter Otnand en l'appelant « Orcus ille », chien d'enfer.
     "Que le jeune Henri IV fût élevé par des personnages d'aussi basse condition paraissait au plus haut point scandaleux à la noblesse et au clergé. Plongée dans un dilemme, Agnès prit l'évêque Heinrich d'Augsbourg comme son conseiller personnel.
     "Un nouveau problème se présenta quand l'impératrice fut soupçonnée d'amour illicite avec Heinrich d'Augsbourg, car on pensa généralement qu'elle ne pouvait pas mettre en lui une telle confiance sans qu'il y eût quelque chose entre eux. Les chercheurs nous peignent l'atmosphère de la cour au début des années soixante du xie siècle comme particulièrement agitée et bouillonnante d'intrigues, d'hostilités, de jalousies et de coups bas. Mais les processus qui devaient finalement plonger l'empire dans une crise et conduire Agnès à vouloir se retirer de la politique n'étaient pas encore enclenchés.
Conflit pour l'élection du pape
     "En 1060 Agnès demanda le pallium (insigne de la dignité archiépiscopale) pour l'évêque, Siegfried Ier de Mayence. Nicolas II refusa. Alors, réunis dans un synode, les évêques de l'Empire déclarèrent invalides toutes les dispositions de Nicolas II pour montrer leur mécontentement.
     "Après la mort de Nicolas II le 19 juillet 1061, les cardinaux usèrent de leur nouvelle prérogative et le 30 septembre 1061 ils choisirent comme pape l'évêque réformateur Anselme de Lucca, qui prit le nom d'Alexandre II11. Agnès refusa alors de le reconnaître, et lui opposa son propre candidat, l'évêque de Parme Cadalus. C'était un nouvel échelon dans le conflit qui couvait déjà sous Nicolas II entre la cour et la papauté réformatrice.
     "L'élection de Cadalus, devenu l'antipape Honorius II le 28 octobre 1061 à Bâle, n'était donc que « la continuation logique de la politique romaine d'Henri III. »
     "Dès l'élection cependant, le petit nombre de ceux qui y avaient participé avait clairement montré à l'impératrice qu'elle ne pouvait pas compter dans l'Empire sur un soutien inconditionnel pour faire triompher son candidat. Elle pouvait bien tenter d'imposer Honorius envers et contre tout, elle se rendait bien compte que s'accrocher à la décision qu'elle avait prise non seulement porterait un coup mortel à la politique de réforme commencée par Henri III, mais encore qu'on allait au schisme, un schisme qui devait durer deux ans et demi.
     "La cour germanique se retrouvait donc adversaire de la papauté réformatrice et l'impératrice portait la responsabilité dans la division de l'Église. L'affaire prenait un tour qui n'était absolument pas dans les desseins d'Agnès.
     "Cette élection de Bâle marque une cassure dans la régence de l'impératrice. Dans le gouvernement de l'Empire la barre semblait lui échapper des mains. En particulier le fait qu'Honorius II n'avait pas su s'imposer à Rome et avait dû au bout du compte revenir dans son évêché de Parme était pour Agnès un grave échec politique. Pour la première fois, un pape nommé par la cour impériale n'avait pas été capable de s'imposer.
     "Elle jouissait bien sûr du soutien des adversaires de la réforme, mais c'était là ce qui devait durant toute sa vie la remplir d'un sentiment de culpabilité et la mettre mal à l'aise. Pourtant on ne saurait lui reprocher d'avoir, par faiblesse personnelle, adopté une politique ecclésiastique contraire à celle de son mari. C'est que les temps avaient changé. Par ses réformes la papauté s'était émancipée du pouvoir impérial contre les intérêts de laquelle elle agissait désormais. Mise au pied du mur, Agnès se décida contre sa conviction personnelle, elle agit comme devait le faire une régente : elle prit le parti de l'Empire et de ses dignitaires. Il semble qu'elle ne voyait aucun autre choix pour elle que de se retirer de la politique pour laisser à d'autres la possibilité de reprendre à zéro la question de la papauté sans tenir compte de ses propres décisions. C'est directement en relation avec le conflit sur le choix du pape que, selon M. Black-Veldtrup, doit être considérée la prise de voile d'Agnès à Spire, ce qui comme conséquence logique conduisit à l'installation comme vice-régent de l'évêque Heinrich d'Augsbourg en qui elle avait confiance. Par conséquent non seulement la retraite d'Agnès peut s'expliquer parce qu'elle était fatiguée de gouverner ou trop faible, mais on doit la placer dans son contexte : c'était la conséquence de ses erreurs d'appréciation dans sa politique vis-à-vis de Rome.
Le coup d'État de Kaiserswerth
     "La décision d'Agnès de se retirer de la politique est, de façon très probable, une prise de conscience de sa responsabilité personnelle dans cette crise au sujet de l'élection du pape. L'impératrice voulait laisser la voie libre pour un règlement définitif de la question avec la participation de la Cour12.
     "Mais rien de cela ne se produisit du fait qu'Henri d'Augsbourg, le vice-régent mis en place par Agnès, n'était pas accepté par la majorité des princes. Sa nomination à un tel poste constituait peut-être la deuxième grave erreur d'appréciation de l'impératrice, surtout en raison de la liaison qu'on leur avait imputée (voir plus haut).
     "Cette tentative d'Agnès de limiter les dégâts précipitait définitivement au bout du compte l'empire dans la crise. Au début d'avril 1062, un groupe de seigneurs spirituels et temporels, sous la direction de Anno II, l'archevêque de Cologne, réussit à enlever le jeune roi Henri IV à Kaiserswerth : cet événement devait rester dans les livres d'histoire comme le coup d'État de Kaiserswerth.
     "Les motifs de cette action sont encore débattus, du fait surtout que les sources se contredisent beaucoup là-dessus. L'opinion des chroniqueurs de l'époque est divisée. Ainsi, la chronique de Lambert semble encore relativement objective quand il écrit que les ravisseurs, et avant tout Anno, aspiraient « à soustraire le fils à l'influence de sa mère, et à prendre en mains l'administration de l'empire13. » Lambert ne hasarde aucune spéculation sur les motifs qui ont fait agir les conspirateurs. Il indique seulement la possibilité qu'ils auraient pu être poussés par « la rancune politique », mais il est aussi possible qu'ils aient pu croire agir pour le bien de l'Empire.
     "Bruno fait plus ou moins retomber sur Henri la responsabilité de son propre enlèvement : infatué de l'orgueil d'être roi, l'adolescent n'aurait plus écouté que d'une oreille les mises en garde de sa mère. Le « respectable » Anno après l'enlèvement le fait éduquer avec le plus grand soin. Selon Bruno, Agnès n'aurait absolument pas eu l'autorité nécessaire, et elle se serait montrée trop faible pour éduquer correctement le jeune roi et assurer la régence, tandis que Bruno félicite Anno pour sa politique. Cette critique envers Henri IV s'explique par le fait que Bruno ne devait pas approuver par la suite la politique personnelle de son souverain, si bien qu'il s'attache à lui trouver des traits de caractère négatifs dès sa jeunesse14. Il est manifeste que, politiquement, il ne se trouvait pas non plus du côté d'Agnès.
     "Bien que les sources ne nous donnent rien de sûr quant aux motifs qui ont fait agir les ravisseurs, la recherche actuelle part du fait que la lutte pour le pouvoir (en particulier chez Anno de Cologne) mais aussi le souci de l'éducation d'Henri IV qu'on jugeait abandonné étaient des éléments décisifs. Agnès se voyait privée du pouvoir de gouverner, en fait elle ne pouvait plus rien. L'archevêque Anno de Cologne et l'archevêque Adalbert de Brême se partageaient la responsabilité des affaires. Bien que le jeune roi fût assis sur le trône, c'est à eux qu'appartenait désormais le destin de l'Empire.
     "Anno et Adalbert devinrent bien vite des adversaires irréconciliables, mais l'archevêque de Brême s'était hâté d'établir des rapports de confiance avec le jeune roi, tandis qu'Anno se sentait avant tout politiquement lié au parti de la réforme religieuse et réussissait rapidement à s'entendre avec Rome puisqu'il était capable de faire reconnaître par l'Empire le pape réformateur Alexandre II.
     "Au fond, Anno était ainsi arrivé à ce règlement de la question pontificale qu'Agnès avait espéré. On suppose en général qu'Agnès, libérée à présent de la responsabilité des affaires, n'a pas tardé à renoncer complètement à la vie mondaine pour se consacrer au salut de son âme.
     "Cette opinion provient de recherches déjà anciennes de Meier-Kronau, Giesebrecht et Buhlst-Thiele. Cependant, Tilmann Struve s'appuie sur le fait que ce n'est que trois ans après Kaiserswerth qu'elle a entrepris son voyage à Rome et s'est retirée du monde. Il y aurait donc eu des raisons politiques. Ce qui réfuterait cette vision de l'impératrice se retirant timidement du monde torturée par ses scrupules.
Agnès après Kaiserswerth
     "Longtemps les chercheurs ont accepté l'idée qu'Agnès se fût retirée du monde immédiatement après Kaiserswerth ; il n'y a pas là de quoi s'étonner puisque c'est ce que nous ont transmis beaucoup de chroniqueurs contemporains. C'est ce que raconte entre autres dès 1056 Frutolf de Michelsberg dans sa Chronique du monde, en résumant ainsi les événements : l'impératrice se serait rendue directement à Fruttuaria après qu'on lui eut pris son fils et serait morte plus tard à Rome.
     "Il semble cependant qu'une telle opinion ait été révisée entre-temps. Tilmann Struve a établi de façon claire et scientifiquement correcte qu'Agnès a entrepris son voyage à Rome, qui signifiait qu'elle se retirait du monde, non en 1062/63, mais seulement en 1065, c'est-à-dire 3 ans après le coup d'État de Kaiserswerth. Pour cette chronologie Struve utilise surtout les rapports de Petrus Damiani, un fidèle d'Agnès qui dans ses écrits a parlé entre autres de son arrivée à Rome.
     "Comme Damiani, lui non plus, ne fournit aucune datation exacte, Struve compare toutes les sources connues, ce qui lui permet d'établir à quelle date aussi bien Petrus Damiani que l'impératrice Agnès se sont arrêtés à Rome. Par la suite Struve compare les éclipses de lune que rapporte Damiani, qui les met en relation avec l'empereur Henri III et le pape Victor II, et une éclipse totale qui, toujours selon Damiani, aurait correspondu au schisme de Cadalus, les dates de toutes ces éclipses étant scientifiquement vérifiables. Struve en vient alors à la conclusion que le voyage à Rome de l'impératrice ne peut avoir eu lieu qu'en mai ou en novembre 1065. Il est vrai Agnès, tout de suite après Kaiserswerth, a écrit à l'abbé du monastère de Fruttuaria pour lui demander d'être accueillie dans la communauté monastique, mais Lampert d'Hersfeld nous apprend, de façon concordante, qu'Agnès a été convaincue par ses conseillers de rester pour l'instant dans l'Empire.
     "D'un point de vue politique, le fait Agnès restât dans l'Empire était nécessaire bien qu'elle eût perdu la régence : jusqu'à la majorité d'Henri IV, c'était elle le chef de la maison salienne. Ce n'est qu'en restant sur place qu'elle pouvait la maintenir pour son fils et ainsi lui assurer l'Empire. Si la situation était telle, la relation de Lampert apparaît dans son contexte légal et gagne en authenticité : Agnès aurait donc, poussée par ses conseillers, abandonné son idée de se retirer dans un cloître. Dès qu'Henri IV fut devenu majeur le 29 mars 1065, par la cérémonie où on lui fit ceindre l'épée, Agnès put obéir à son long désir de finir sa vie dans la piété. Après s'être acquittée de ses devoirs politiques jusqu'à la majorité de son fils et lui avoir garanti de succéder à son père, elle prit la décision de servir la réforme de la papauté à laquelle elle avait nui en faisant élire un antipape contre ses propres convictions religieuses.
Bilan
     "Même si la fin de la régence d'Agnès a été regardée pendant des siècles comme une faillite (et elle l'est encore), un tel jugement n'est peut-être pas absolument sûr. À juger l'ensemble, la politique de l'impératrice doit être considérée en gros comme réussie, et sa retraite a été mûrement choisie en fonction de la situation politique de l'Empire. C'est ainsi que même des contemporains reconnaissent qu'elle s'est toujours efforcée d'obtenir un équilibre politique. Elle a réussi à assurer la stabilité de l'Empire et surtout à jeter les bases du pouvoir d'Henri IV.
     "Les querelles d'Henri III contre les Saxons n'ont pas été reprises par Agnès. Elle a plutôt cherché à s'arranger avec eux, ce que confirme le fait que de 1057 jusqu'à la fin de la régence d'Agnès on ne relève pas de troubles en Saxe. De même elle a évité une confrontation avec la Hongrie. L'attribution de duchés pris au domaine royal lui a procuré à l'intérieur une stabilité politique, ce qui a permis par contrecoup le renforcement de l'Empire à l'extérieur. Ainsi, c'est seulement à partir des années 1960 que l'on connaît des exemples concrets de mécontentement contre son gouvernement ; jusque-là elle avait donc quand même pu, au début avec l'aide du pape Victor II, gouverner de façon presque incontestée. On lui reproche une longue querelle pour des raisons personnelles avec l'évêque Gunther de Bamberg, la préférence qu'elle donnait à l'évêque Henri d'Augsbourg, ses insuffisances dans l'éducation de son fils et sa trop grande retenue dans la conduite des affaires, mais tout cela s'explique par la conscience qu'elle avait d'être responsable du schisme provoqué par le choix de l'antipape Cadalus. Reconnaissant ses responsabilités pour avoir mal estimé la situation politique et créé des dissensions entre les partisans de la réforme de l'Église et l'Empire elle avait décidé de prendre le voile. Le coup d'État de Kaiserswerth suivit peu après.
     "L'élévation de Henri d'Augsbourg au poste de vice-régent n'avait que peu affecté la position d'Agnès. Anno de Cologne n'avait pris en fin de compte que la place de son collègue d'Augsbourg en tant que régent et éducateur effectif du jeune roi. Pendant son administration, celle d'Anno de Cologne et celle d'Adalbert de Brême, Agnès a pu se consacrer à la restitution des biens aliénés et à la nomination des évêques. Son départ d'Allemagne en mai ou en novembre 1065 n'est pas dû à Kaiserswerth, mais en fin de compte seulement à ce conflit de 1061 sur l'élection du pape, qui est à l'origine de tous les autres événements.
     "Agnès d'Aquitaine était une femme remarquable, qui a exercé avec habileté la tâche que lui avait laissée son mari d'administrer et de maintenir l'Empire pour leur fils Henri. En tant que femme elle ne pouvait être ni un chef d'armée ni un juge, ce qu'aurait été un homme dans sa situation, elle n'en a pas moins agi en sachant ce qu'elle voulait, avec énergie et habileté. Alors qu'elle n'avait pas d'expérience politique, elle a conservé les assises du pouvoir pour son fils et a essayé d'adapter la politique de la dynastie salienne à ces conditions qui n'étaient plus les mêmes dans un temps ou tout changeait, surtout en ce qui concerne la politique ecclésiastique. Agnès a dû remplir sa tâche sans y avoir été préparée et sous la pression des circonstances. Elle devait tenir compte d'un grand nombre de facteurs et il était inévitable qu'elle consentît bien des compromis. Toutes ses décisions n'ont pas été heureuses, qu'on pense aux problèmes qu'Henri IV rencontrera par la suite, mais elle agissait probablement en toute conscience pour le bien de l'Empire. Elle a rempli la tâche qui lui était assignée, ni plus ni moins. La fermeté qu'elle y a montrée est toutefois remarquable.
Notes et références
1. Patrick Corbet, Autour de Burchard de Worms : l'Église allemande et les interdits de parenté, Vittorio Klostermann, 2001, p. 137
2. Francis Rapp, Le Saint Empire romain germanique, Tallandier, 2000, p. 86
3. Patrick Corbet, p. 142
4. Francis Rapp, p. 92
5. Francis Rapp, p. 87
6. Francis Rapp, p. 89
7. Gian Franco Schubiger, Saints, martyrs et bienheureux en Suisse, Editions Saint-Augustin, 1999 (ISBN 9782880111588, lire en ligne [archive])
8. Francis Rapp, p. 93
9. Francis Rapp, p. 130
10. Frutolf von Michelsberg, Chronik, S. 75f
11. Francis Rapp, p. 131
12. Mechthild Black-Veldtrup, Kaiserin Agnes, p. 360
13. Lambert d'Hersfeld, Annales, p. 73
14. Lambert d'Hersfeld, Annales, p. 75
Bibliographie
** Francis Rapp, Le Saint-Empire romain germanique, d'Othon le Grand à Charles Quint, Point Histoire, Seuil, 2003, (ISBN 978-2-02-055527-2) Document utilisé pour la rédaction de l’article
** Joseph Rovan, Histoire de l'Allemagne, Paris, Éd. du Seuil, 1999 (ISBN 9782020351362, OCLC 409490203)Document utilisé pour la rédaction de l’article
** Patrick Corbet, Autour de Burchard de Worms: l'Église allemande et les interdits de parenté, Vittorio Klostermann, 2001, (ISBN 978-3-465-03138-3), p. 137 et suivantes disponible sur Google livres [archive]
** (de) Mechthild Black-Veldtrup, Kaiserin Agnes (1043-1077). Quellenkritische Studien. Böhlau Verlag, Cologne 1995, (ISBN 978-3-412-02695-0)
** (de) Tilman Struve, Salierzeit im Wandel, Böhlau Verlag, Cologne, 2006, (ISBN 978-3-412-08206-2)
** (de) Marie-Luise Buhlst-Thiele, Kaiserin Agnes. Gerstenberg, Hildesheim 1972 (Reprint de Leipzig 1933), (ISBN 978-3-8067-0149-4).
** (de) Wilhelm von Giesebrecht, Geschichte des Deutschen Kaiserzeit, Band 2. Hobbing, Berlin 1923 (Reprint de Leipzig 1890).
Liens externes
** Jean-Marie Sansterre « Mère du roi, épouse du Christ, et fille de Saint Pierre: les dernières années de l'impératrice Agnès de Poitou. Entre image et réalité » [archive], dans S. Lebecq, A. Dierkens, R. Le Jan, J.-M. Sansterre (dir.), Femmes et pouvoirs des femmes à Byzance et en Occident (VIe-XIe siècle), Lille, 1999, p. 163-174"


Per Wikipedia:
     "Agnes of Poitou, also called Agnes of Aquitaine or Empress Agnes (c.?1025 – 14 December 1077), a member of the House of Poitiers, was German queen from 1043 and Holy Roman Empress from 1046 until 1056. From 1056 to 1061 she acted as Regent of the Holy Roman Empire during the minority of her son Henry IV.
Family
     "She was the daughter of the Ramnulfid duke William V of Aquitaine (d. 1030)[1] and Agnes of Burgundy. She thereby was the sister of Duke William VI of Aquitaine, Duke Odo of Gascony, Duke William VII, and Duke William VIII of Aquitaine. Her maternal grandparents were Count Otto-William of Burgundy and Ermentrude of Rheims, daughter of Renaud of Roucy.
Marriage and children
     "Agnes married King Henry III of Germany in November 1043[Note 1] at the Imperial Palace Ingelheim.[2] She was his second wife[1] after Gunhilda of Denmark, who had died, possibly from malaria, in 1038.[3] This marriage helped to solidify the Empire's relationships with the princely houses in the west.[1] King Henry was able to improve his position versus the French royal dynasty and to exert his influence in the Duchy of Burgundy. Agnes, like her husband, was of profound piety, her family had founded Cluny Abbey and Abbot Hugh the Great was godfather of her son Henry IV.
     "Their children were:
** Adelaide II (1045, Goslar – 11 January 1096), abbess of Gandersheim from 1061 and Quedlinburg from 1063
** Gisela (1047, Ravenna – 6 May 1053)
** Matilda (October 1048 – 12 May 1060, Pöhlde), married 1059 Rudolf of Rheinfelden, duke of Swabia and antiking (1077)
** Henry, his successor[1]
** Conrad II (1052, Regensburg – 10 April 1055), Duke of Bavaria (from 1054)
** Judith (1054, Goslar – 14 March 1092 or 1096), married firstly 1063 Solomon of Hungary and secondly 1089 Ladislaus I Herman, Duke of Poland

Role as regent
     "After her husband's death on 5 October 1056, Agnes served as regent on behalf of her young son, Henry IV.[4] Henry III had secured the election of his son as King of the Romans on his deathbed. Agnes, aided by Hugh of Cluny and Pope Victor II, also Bishop of Eichstätt, tried to continue her husband's politics and to reinforce the rule of the Salian dynasty. However, despite being related to kings of Italy and Burgundy, she was a controversial leader.[5]
     "In order to forge alliances, she would give away three German duchies:[1] already on Christmas 1056, the Ezzonid scion Conrad III, a nephew of Count palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia, received the princeless Duchy of Carinthia.
     "The next year she enfeoffed Rudolf of Rheinfelden with Swabia, appointed him administrator of Burgundy and offered him the hand of her daughter Matilda. According to the medieval chronicler Frutolf of Michelsberg, Rudolf had possibly abducted her and extorted the betrothment. However, the late Henry III had promised the Swabian duchy to Berthold of Zähringen, who in turn had to be compensated with Carinthia upon Conrad's death in 1061.
     "At the same time, while German forces interfered in the fratricidal struggle of King Andrew I and Béla I of Hungary, Agnes ceded the Duchy of Bavaria to Count Otto of Nordheim. He reached a settlement with Hungary by enforcing the coronation of Andrew's son Solomon but later became a bitter rival of her son Henry IV.
     "Though initially a follower of the Cluniac Reforms, Agnes opposed the contemporary papal reform movement, and took the side of Italian dissidents who did as well.[1] Things had worsened after the death of Pope Victor II in 1057: his successor Stephen IX, who was unable to take actual possession of Rome due to the Roman aristocracy's election of an antipope, Benedict X, sent Hildebrand of Sovana and Anselm of Lucca (respectively, the future Popes Gregory VII and Alexander II) to Germany to obtain recognition from dowager empress Agnes in her role as regent.
     "Though Stephen died before being able to return to Rome, Agnes' help was instrumental in letting Hildebrand depose the Antipope [6] and with Agnes' support replace him by the Bishop of Florence, Nicholas II. However, on Easter 1059 Nicholas issued the papal bull In nomine Domini establishing the cardinals as the sole electors of the pope, detrimental to the interests of the emperor and the temporal empire.
     "When Pope Alexander II was elected on 30 September 1061, Agnes refused to acknowledge him and had Antipope Honorius II elected; a schism that did not end until Pentecost 1064. The empress' candidate could not prevail against the Roman Curia; in consequence, Agnes retired from politics, leaving the regency to her confidant Bishop Henry II of Augsburg.
Legacy
     "Agnes is a featured figure on Judy Chicago's installation piece The Dinner Party, being represented as one of the 999 names on the Heritage Floor.[7][8]
Notes
1. Munster cites November 21, Jackson-Laufer cites November 1
References
1. Guida Myrl Jackson-Laufer (1999). Women rulers throughout the ages: an illustrated guide. ABC-CLIO. pp. 12–13. ISBN 978-1-57607-091-8. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
2. Sebastian Münster, Cosmographia, 1550, Book III, 333.
3. Fuhrmann, H. (1995). Germany in the high middle ages c.1050–1200. Translated by Reuter, T. Cambridge University Press. p. 40.
4. Jackson, Guida M. (1999). Women rulers throughout the ages : an illustrated guide ([2nd rev., expanded and updated ed.]. ed.) Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1576070913.
5. "Agnes of Poitiers, empress | Epistolae". epistolae.ctl.columbia.edu. Retrieved 2019-04-02.
6. According to the sources, feeling his was nearing his end, Stephen had his cardinal swear that they would wait for Hildebrand's return to Rome before electing his successor.Paravicini Bagliani, Agostino (December 2008). "Una carriera dieotr le quinte". Medioevo (143): 70.
7. "Agnes of Poitou". Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Heritage Floor: Agnes of Poitou. Brooklyn Museum. 2007. Retrieved 17 December 2011.
8. Chicago, 121.
Sources
** Chicago, Judy. The Dinner Party: From Creation to Preservation. London: Merrell (2007). ISBN 1-85894-370-1
** Robinson, I. S. Henry IV of Germany 1056-1106, 2000
** Women and Power in the Middle Ages: Political Aspects of Medieval Queenship PDF of an article from an unknown book, lacks footnote information: https://web.archive.org/web/20061019204549/http://www.stm.unipi.it/Clioh/tabs/libri/2/02-Averkorn_11-30.pdf."3,17

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES de Poitou ([1025]-Rome 14 Dec 1077, bur Rome, St Peter's). Herimannus names her "Agnetam, Willehelmi Pictaviensis filiam" when recording her marriage[493]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[494]. She was crowned empress with her husband at Rome 25 Dec 1046. She was regent during the minority of her son from 1056. Her husband's old adviser, Gerhard von Eichstätt by then Pope Victor II, who was in Germany when her husband died, remained in Germany until spring 1057 as the chief adviser of Agnès and ensured a smooth transition of power[495]. She also installed herself as AGNES Duchess of Bavaria in 1056, until 1061 when she appointed Otto von Northeim as duke. In 1062, Anno II Archbishop of Köln kidnapped her son King Heinrich IV and took him from Kaiserswerth to Köln. Agnès resigned as regent and went to Rome[496]. According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Agnes imperatrix eius [Chunigundis imperatricis] consanguinea, obiit Idus Decembris"[497], although the exact relationship between Agnes and Empress Kunigund (widow of Emperor Heinrich II) has not been traced. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[498]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[499].
     "m (Ingelheim 20 Nov 1043) as his second wife, HEINRICH III King of Germany, son of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia (Ostrebeck 28 Oct 1017-Burg Bodfeld im Harz 5 Oct 1056, bur Speyer Cathedral)."
Med Lands cites:
[493] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1043, MHG SS V, p. 124.
[494] Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 135-6.
[495] Norwich, J. J. (1992) The Normans in the South 1016-1130 and The Kingdom in the Sun 1130-1194 (Penguin Books), p, 120.
[496] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 57.
[497] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791.
[498] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[499] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 326.7
Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress was also known as Agnes of Poitou.18 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): "Agnés, *1024, +14.12.1077; m.21.11.1043 King Heinrich III of Germany (*1017 +1056.)19" She was Queen consort of Germany between 1043 and 1054.3 She was Queen consort of Italy between 1043 and 1056.3 She was Queen consort of Burgundy between 1043 and 1056.3 She was Holy Roman Empress between 1046 and 1056.3 She was Regent of the Holy Roman Empire between 1056 and 1061.11 She was Duchess of Bavaria between 1056 and 1091.7

Family

Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor b. 28 Oct 1017, d. 5 Oct 1056
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Poitou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III-V 'Le Grand': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020504&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Agnesdied1077
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-22, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  11. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027241&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIIIGermanydied1056B.
  14. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 May 2020), memorial page for Agnes Of Poitou (1024–14 Dec 1077), Find a Grave Memorial no. 27347323, citing Saint Peter's Basilica, Vatican City ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/27347323/agnes-of_poitou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Agnès de Poitiers (impératrice du Saint-Empire): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agn%C3%A8s_de_Poitiers_(imp%C3%A9ratrice_du_Saint-Empire). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Poitou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027260&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#MathildeMRudolfRheinfeldenSwabiadied1080.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027259&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027236&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIVGermanydied1106B.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027251&tree=LEO

Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia1,2,3

M, #6643, b. 950, d. before 4 May 1003
FatherKonrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen3,4,5,6,7 b. 920
MotherRichlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben3,5,8,7 b. 950, d. 999
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited7 Aug 2020
     Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia was born in 950.9,7
Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia died before 982.10,11 He married Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy and Matilda (?) de France, Queen consort of Burgundy, between 986 and 988;
Her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Welf 1 page) says m. 998; Med Lands says m. 986.12,13,10,14,3,15
Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia died before 4 May 1003.16,3,7
     GAV-28 EDV-28.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 23.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.3 334.10


; Per Genealogics:
     "Hermann I is the first member of the house of Werl for whom some reliable data are available. It remains unclear whether the Hermann mentioned in connection with the convent of Meschede about 913 was his grandfather, or whether a Heinrich mentioned in 947 and in 955 was his father. Possibly a Bernhard, who held countship rights over the Hellweg and in North Rhine Westphalia, was his brother.
     "The sources for Hermann are sparse. Even in his time the counts of Werl were probably already stewards of the abbey of Werden. He also had his seat in Werl. There is only one document in which Otto granted, at the request of his wife Theophano (Skleraina), to the abbess Thiezswid of Meschede the court of Völlinghausen and its related possessions in the district of Engern in Hermann's county. Hermann was a supporter of the emperor. The emperor's agreement to the donation of the court in Völlinghausen to the house of Werl's convent of Meschede could have been a reward for Hermann's assistance in the victory over Otto's cousin Heinrich II 'der Zanker', Herzog von Bayern.
     "He was probably present at the court in Dortmund in 978, when conflict broke out between Otto II and his mother Aelis (Adelheid) de Bourgogne, who had sided with Lothar I, king of France, when he invaded Lorraine and occupied Aachen, forcing Otto to leave. Adelheid left the imperial court for the court of her brother Konrad I, king of Burgundy. Around this time Hermann also came into contact with the Burgundian court. He may have accompanied the emperor's mother there.
     "This relationship led to his marriage about 978 or 979 with Gerberge de Bourgogne, Konrad's daughter with Mahaut de France. The marriage is only confirmed a little later by indirect sources, especially the Quedlinburg Annals. The slightly later _Annalista Saxo_ text gave the reference somewhat distorted, casting some doubt on the marriage. However today's research reveals no doubt over the marriage of Hermann and Gerberge.
     "Through his marriage, Hermann became a brother-in-law of Heinrich II 'der Zanker', Herzog von Bayern, married to Gerberge's half-sister Gisela de Bourgogne, and entered into a family connection with the imperial house (Heinrich's father Heinrich I was a brother of Otto II's father Emperor Otto I 'the Great'). Hermann and Gerberge had three sons, Hermann II, Bernhard and Rudolf or Ludolf, and a daughter Ida or Hitda who later became abbess of Meschede. It may have been she who made precious gifts to the abbey, including the Hitda Codex, when she took office. Hermann II and Rudolf are recorded as having progeny.
     "Hermann is believed to have been the Count Hermann who travelled with Emperor Otto II to Italy in 983. After Otto's death in Rome that year this Hermann was working as a go-between who succeeded in settling the dispute within the royal family with Heinrich II 'der Zanker'. The likelihood that Hermann was the count of the same name is strengthened, inter alia, by the fact that the imperial court was in Soest in August 985, close to Werl. From there, the court moved to Wiedenbrück where Emperor Otto III, at the instigation of his mother the Dowager Empress Theophano, confirmed the previous privileges of the convent of Meschede. This can be seen as thanks for Hermann's efforts in imperial service.
     "Because Hermann was not specifically named as steward of Meschede, it is assumed that he had died shortly beforehand. About 988 Hermann's widow Gerberge married Hermann II, Herzog von Schwaben, with whom she had progeny."17 He was Count in the Rheingau.18

; Per Ravilious:
1.1.1.3.1 Hermann II of Swabia
     Death: bef 4 May 1003[7],[1]
     Occ: Duke of Swabia 997-1003
     '..Herimannus dux Alamanniae..' father of Gisela (empress and wife
of Conrad II). Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris, Capitulum IV[8] cf. ES I Tafel 9[1]
     Spouse: Gerberga of Burgundy
     Birth: 0965[7]
     Death: 7 Jul 1019[7],[1]
     Father: Conrad III 'the Pacific', king of Burgundy (ca0930-0993)
     Mother: Matilda of France (0943-<0992)
     Marr: ca 0986[1]
     Children: Matilda (ca0988-1031), m. (2) Frederick II of Upper
      Lorraine
      Gisela (0990-1043), m. (1) Emperor Conrad II
      Berchtold (0992-0993)
      Beatrix (->1025)
      Hermann III (<0995-1012), duke of Swabia
Ravilious cites:
1. Detlev Schewennicke, "Europäische Stammtafeln: Neue Folge," [ " European Family Trees: Family Trees for the History of European States, New Series " ], Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998 [4th series], Band I.1 [Tafel 3 - Die Arnulfinger -751-771 Konige der Franken ], First series by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, continued second series by Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven.
7. Frederick L. Weis (add/corr, Walter L Sheppard Jr.), "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists," Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., connection of Isabel de Condet and Hugh Bardolf, as cited by E. Mann, Line 132D-27,-28 in AR7, also, Descendants of Henry I of Germany (10/30/98), Line 157 (Gerberga of Burgundy to Emperor Henry III).
8. "Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris," Wiponis Gesta Chuonradi II ceteraque quae supersunt opera, ed. H. Bresslau, Hannover 1878/1915, Bibliotheca Augustana site : http://www.fh-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chronologia/Lspost11/Wipo/wip_vit0.html.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "HERMANN [I] (-[985/86]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[2961], Hermann [I] was the possible son of Graf Heinrich but the basis for this speculation is not known. "Otto…rex" confirmed the foundation by "matrone Helmburhe" of Kloster Fischbeck for the soul of "Ricperhti domini sui et Richarddi et Aelfdehe filii sui", including property "in pago Tilithi in comitatu Hirimanni…iterum in pago Merstem in comitatu eiusdem comitis…et in pago Laginga…in comitatu Dodicon et in pago Vuestfala in comitatu Henrici comitis…et in comitatu Hroduuerkes…et in comitatu Vuirinhardi", by charter dated 10 Jan 955[2962]. Graf von Werl.
     "m as her first husband, GERBERGA of Burgundy, daughter of CONRAD I "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy [Welf] & his second wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] (-7 Jul 1018). No direct record of this first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000[2963], and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016[2964]. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers[2965]. She founded Kloster Oedingen in 1000. She married secondly ([986]) Hermann [von Schwaben], who was installed in 997 as Hermann II Duke of Swabia. "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse"[2966]."
Med Lands cites:
[2961] ES I.3 334.
[2962] D O I 174, p. 255.
[2963] D O III 363, p. 792.
[2964] Thietmar 7.49, p. 342.
[2965] Annalista Saxo 1026.19

; Per Richardson:
     "Douglas Richardson Mar 26, 2006, 11:58:40 AM
     "Duke Heinrich of Bavaria & Saxony (nicknamed the Lion), died 1195, referred in a charter dated before ?1190 to his late kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, founder of Marienthal monastery ["... quam pie memorie Frithericus palatinus, fundator ipsius coenobii, cognatus noster") [Reference: Die Urkunden Heinrichs des Löwen Herzogs von Sachsen und Bayern (Monumenta Germaniae Historica, 500-1500) (1941): 181-182].
     "Charting their respective ancestries, I find that three of Count Friedrich II's great-grandparents are unknown, which makes it difficult at best to be certain how the two men were related. Regardless, I find that one of Count Friedrich's great-grandparents, Bernard II, Count of Hövel, was in fact uncle to the ancestral line of Duke Heinrich. If this is the kinship intended, the two men were related in the 4th and 7th degrees of kindred, or if you prefer third cousins thrice removed, by virtue of common descent from Gerbege (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, but by different husbands, as charted below.
1. Gerberga (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (2nd) Herman II, Duke of Swabia.
2. Gisele of Swabia, married Bruno II, Count of Brunswick.
3. Liudolf, Count of Brunswick, died 1038.
4. Egbert, Count of Brunswick, died 1067/68.
5. Gertrud of Brunswick, married Heinrich, Count Northeim, Duke of Saxony.
6. Richensa of Northeim, Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor.
7. Gertrud of Lotharinia, married Henry X, Duke of Bavaria & Saxony.
8. Heinrich "the Lion," Duke of Bavaria and Saxony, died 1195.

1. Gerberge (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (1st) Bernard I, Count of Werl.
2. Bernard II, Count of Hövel, died after 1030.
3. Ida von Werl-Hövel, married Heinrich II, Count of Lauffen.
4. Adelheid of Lauffen, married (2nd) Friedrich I, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg.
5. Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, died 1162.

     "For additional information on Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg (died 1162), see the following website:
http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/sommerschenburger_pfalzgrafen_von_sachsen/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_1162/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_+_1162.html
     "This post is part of a systematic, exhaustive study into the nature of kinship among high born medieval European families.
     "Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
     "Website: www.royalancestry.net“.20
; Per Med Lands:
     "GERBERGA (-7 Jul 1018). Herimannus names "filiam Counradi regis Burgundiæ, Gerbirgam" as wife of "Herimannus dux"[195]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rodulfum II et sororem suam Gepam matrem imperatricis Gisile" as children of "Conradus rex Burgundie" and his wife Mathilde[196]. Wipo names "Herimannus dux Alamanniæ [et] Kerbirga filia Chuonradi regis de Burgundia" as the parents of "regis coniunx Gisela"[197]. "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse"[198]. The necrology of Marchtalen records the death "Non Jul" of "Gerbirc ducissa"[199]. No direct record of her first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000[200], and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016[201]. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers[202].
     "m firstly HERMANN [I] Graf von Werl, son of [HEINRICH Graf im Lerigau & his wife ---] (-[985/86]).
     "m secondly ([986]) HERMANN [von Schwaben], son of KONRAD Duke of Swabia & his wife Richlint of Germany (-2/3 May 1003). He was installed in 997 as HERMANN II Duke of Swabia."
Med Lands cites:
[195] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 998, MHG SS V, p. 118.
[196] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 986, MGH SS XXIII, p. 773.
[197] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 4, MGH SS XI, p. 261.
[198] D O III 254, p. 670.
[199] Fragmenta Necrologii Marchtalensis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 201.
[200] D O III 363, p. 792.
[201] Thietmar 7.49, p. 342.
[202] Annalista Saxo 1026.15
He was Duke of Swabia between 997 and 1003.13,3

Family

Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne b. 965, d. 7 Jul 1019
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  3. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, duke Cuno: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120359&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Konraddied997B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wetterau Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/wetterau.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120357&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginlint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120360&tree=LEO
  9. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120358&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lippe 1 page (The House of Lippe): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lippe/lippe1.html
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 157-20, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120357&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#GerbergaM1HermannWerleM2HermannIISwabi
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 167-20, p. 144; line 157-20, p. 128.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139613&tree=LEO
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 167-20, p. 144.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#HermannIWerle985
  20. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 27 Mar 2006: "Ducal Kinsfolk: Duke Henry of Bavaria & Saxony's kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ) to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006."
  21. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32695
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Schwaben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027247&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331029&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 1 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg1.html
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Mathildedied1031

Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne1,2,3,4

F, #6644, b. 965, d. 7 July 1019
FatherConrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy2,3,5,6,7,8 b. c 925, d. 19 Oct 993
MotherMatilda (?) de France, Queen consort of Burgundy2,3,6,9,8 b. c 943, d. bt 981 - 982
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited20 Aug 2020
     Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne was born in 965; Genealogy.EU (Welf 1 page) says b. bef 971.10,3,6 She married Hermann I von Werl between 978 and 979;
Her 1st husband.11,3,4,12,13,8,14 Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne married Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia, son of Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen and Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben, between 986 and 988;
Her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Welf 1 page) says m. 998; Med Lands says m. 986.10,15,2,3,6,8
Gerberge/Guepa (?) de Bourgogne died on 7 July 1019; Genealogy.EU (Lippe 1 and Welf 1 pages) say d. after 1016; Med Lands says d. 7 Jul 1018.10,11,3,6,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HERMANN [I] (-[985/86]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[2961], Hermann [I] was the possible son of Graf Heinrich but the basis for this speculation is not known. "Otto…rex" confirmed the foundation by "matrone Helmburhe" of Kloster Fischbeck for the soul of "Ricperhti domini sui et Richarddi et Aelfdehe filii sui", including property "in pago Tilithi in comitatu Hirimanni…iterum in pago Merstem in comitatu eiusdem comitis…et in pago Laginga…in comitatu Dodicon et in pago Vuestfala in comitatu Henrici comitis…et in comitatu Hroduuerkes…et in comitatu Vuirinhardi", by charter dated 10 Jan 955[2962]. Graf von Werl.
     "m as her first husband, GERBERGA of Burgundy, daughter of CONRAD I "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy [Welf] & his second wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] (-7 Jul 1018). No direct record of this first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000[2963], and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016[2964]. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers[2965]. She founded Kloster Oedingen in 1000. She married secondly ([986]) Hermann [von Schwaben], who was installed in 997 as Hermann II Duke of Swabia. "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse"[2966]."
Med Lands cites:
[2961] ES I.3 334.
[2962] D O I 174, p. 255.
[2963] D O III 363, p. 792.
[2964] Thietmar 7.49, p. 342.
[2965] Annalista Saxo 1026.13


; Per Ravilious:
1.1.1.3.1 Hermann II of Swabia
     Death: bef 4 May 1003[7],[1]
     Occ: Duke of Swabia 997-1003
     '..Herimannus dux Alamanniae..' father of Gisela (empress and wife
of Conrad II). Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris, Capitulum IV[8] cf. ES I Tafel 9[1]
     Spouse: Gerberga of Burgundy
     Birth: 0965[7]
     Death: 7 Jul 1019[7],[1]
     Father: Conrad III 'the Pacific', king of Burgundy (ca0930-0993)
     Mother: Matilda of France (0943-<0992)
     Marr: ca 0986[1]
     Children: Matilda (ca0988-1031), m. (2) Frederick II of Upper
      Lorraine
      Gisela (0990-1043), m. (1) Emperor Conrad II
      Berchtold (0992-0993)
      Beatrix (->1025)
      Hermann III (<0995-1012), duke of Swabia
Ravilious cites:
1. Detlev Schewennicke, "Europäische Stammtafeln: Neue Folge," [ " European Family Trees: Family Trees for the History of European States, New Series " ], Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998 [4th series], Band I.1 [Tafel 3 - Die Arnulfinger -751-771 Konige der Franken ], First series by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, continued second series by Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven.
7. Frederick L. Weis (add/corr, Walter L Sheppard Jr.), "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists," Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., connection of Isabel de Condet and Hugh Bardolf, as cited by E. Mann, Line 132D-27,-28 in AR7, also, Descendants of Henry I of Germany (10/30/98), Line 157 (Gerberga of Burgundy to Emperor Henry III).
8. "Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris," Wiponis Gesta Chuonradi II ceteraque quae supersunt opera, ed. H. Bresslau, Hannover 1878/1915, Bibliotheca Augustana site : http://www.fh-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chronologia/Lspost11/Wipo/wip_vit0.html.6

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Gerberga, *before 971, +after 1016; 1m: Gf Bernhard I von Werl (+ca 982) OR his son Hermann von Werl; 2m: ca 998 Duke Hermann II of Swabia (+4.5.1003.)3"



; Per Genealogics:
     "Gerberge was born about 965, the daughter of Konrad I, king of Burgundy, and his second wife Mahaut de France. About 978 she married Hermann I, Graf von Werl, with whom she had several children including three sons, Hermann II, Bernhard and Rudolf or Ludolf, and a daughter Ida or Hitda who later became abbess of Meschede. Hermann II, his father's successor, and Rudolf would have progeny.
     "At her request, Emperor Otto III gave the estate of Stockhausen, that had been possessed by a deceased imperial outlaw, to the Werl convent of Meschede. She was the founder of the convent of Oedingen, located in the county of her son Hermann II in its district of Lochtrop.
     "Hermann died about 985, and about 988 she married Hermann II, Herzog von Schwaben, son of Konrad, Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen, by his wife Reginlint, They had five children, of whom Mathilde and Gisela would have progeny. Gerberge died on 7 July 1019."12


; Per Richardson:
     "Douglas Richardson Mar 26, 2006, 11:58:40 AM
     "Duke Heinrich of Bavaria & Saxony (nicknamed the Lion), died 1195, referred in a charter dated before ?1190 to his late kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, founder of Marienthal monastery ["... quam pie memorie Frithericus palatinus, fundator ipsius coenobii, cognatus noster") [Reference: Die Urkunden Heinrichs des Löwen Herzogs von Sachsen und Bayern (Monumenta Germaniae Historica, 500-1500) (1941): 181-182].
     "Charting their respective ancestries, I find that three of Count Friedrich II's great-grandparents are unknown, which makes it difficult at best to be certain how the two men were related. Regardless, I find that one of Count Friedrich's great-grandparents, Bernard II, Count of Hövel, was in fact uncle to the ancestral line of Duke Heinrich. If this is the kinship intended, the two men were related in the 4th and 7th degrees of kindred, or if you prefer third cousins thrice removed, by virtue of common descent from Gerbege (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, but by different husbands, as charted below.
1. Gerberga (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (2nd) Herman II, Duke of Swabia.
2. Gisele of Swabia, married Bruno II, Count of Brunswick.
3. Liudolf, Count of Brunswick, died 1038.
4. Egbert, Count of Brunswick, died 1067/68.
5. Gertrud of Brunswick, married Heinrich, Count Northeim, Duke of Saxony.
6. Richensa of Northeim, Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor.
7. Gertrud of Lotharinia, married Henry X, Duke of Bavaria & Saxony.
8. Heinrich "the Lion," Duke of Bavaria and Saxony, died 1195.

1. Gerberge (or Guepa) of Burgundy, died 1018/9, married (1st) Bernard I, Count of Werl.
2. Bernard II, Count of Hövel, died after 1030.
3. Ida von Werl-Hövel, married Heinrich II, Count of Lauffen.
4. Adelheid of Lauffen, married (2nd) Friedrich I, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg.
5. Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg, died 1162.

     "For additional information on Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony, Count of Sommerschenburg (died 1162), see the following website:
http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/sommerschenburger_pfalzgrafen_von_sachsen/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_1162/friedrich_2_pfalzgraf_von_sachsen_+_1162.html
     "This post is part of a systematic, exhaustive study into the nature of kinship among high born medieval European families.
     "Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
     "Website: www.royalancestry.net“.16 GAV-28 EDV-28.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 4.
2. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 177.12


; Per Med Lands:
     "GERBERGA (-7 Jul 1018). Herimannus names "filiam Counradi regis Burgundiæ, Gerbirgam" as wife of "Herimannus dux"[195]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rodulfum II et sororem suam Gepam matrem imperatricis Gisile" as children of "Conradus rex Burgundie" and his wife Mathilde[196]. Wipo names "Herimannus dux Alamanniæ [et] Kerbirga filia Chuonradi regis de Burgundia" as the parents of "regis coniunx Gisela"[197]. "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse"[198]. The necrology of Marchtalen records the death "Non Jul" of "Gerbirc ducissa"[199]. No direct record of her first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000[200], and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016[201]. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers[202].
     "m firstly HERMANN [I] Graf von Werl, son of [HEINRICH Graf im Lerigau & his wife ---] (-[985/86]).
     "m secondly ([986]) HERMANN [von Schwaben], son of KONRAD Duke of Swabia & his wife Richlint of Germany (-2/3 May 1003). He was installed in 997 as HERMANN II Duke of Swabia."
Med Lands cites:
[195] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 998, MHG SS V, p. 118.
[196] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 986, MGH SS XXIII, p. 773.
[197] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 4, MGH SS XI, p. 261.
[198] D O III 254, p. 670.
[199] Fragmenta Necrologii Marchtalensis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 201.
[200] D O III 363, p. 792.
[201] Thietmar 7.49, p. 342.
[202] Annalista Saxo 1026.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "HERMANN [I] (-[985/86]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[2963], Hermann [I] was the possible son of Graf Heinrich but the basis for this speculation is not known. "Otto…rex" confirmed the foundation by "matrone Helmburhe" of Kloster Fischbeck for the soul of "Ricperhti domini sui et Richarddi et Aelfdehe filii sui", including property "in pago Tilithi in comitatu Hirimanni…iterum in pago Merstem in comitatu eiusdem comitis…et in pago Laginga…in comitatu Dodicon et in pago Vuestfala in comitatu Henrici comitis…et in comitatu Hroduuerkes…et in comitatu Vuirinhardi", by charter dated 10 Jan 955[2964]. Graf von Werl.
     "m as her first husband, GERBERGA of Burgundy, daughter of CONRAD I "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy [Welf] & his second wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] (-7 Jul 1018). No direct record of this first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000[2965], and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016[2966]. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers[2967]. She founded Kloster Oedingen in 1000. She married secondly ([986]) Hermann [von Schwaben], who was installed in 997 as Hermann II Duke of Swabia. "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse"[2968]."
Med Lands cites:
[2963] ES I.3 334.
[2964] D O I 174, p. 255.
[2965] D O III 363, p. 792.
[2966] Thietmar 7.49, p. 342.
[2967] Annalista Saxo 1026.
[2968] D O III 254, p. 670.13

Family 2

Hermann II (?) Duke of Swabia b. 950, d. b 4 May 1003
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120358&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 27 Mar 2006: "Ducal Kinsfolk: Duke Henry of Bavaria & Saxony's kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ) to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020211&tree=LEO
  6. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020211&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#GerbergaM1HermannWerleM2HermannIISwabi. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020130&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 157-20, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lippe 1 page (The House of Lippe): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lippe/lippe1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120358&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#HermannIWerle985
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139613&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120357&tree=LEO
  16. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hermann II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00615984&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#HermannIIWerledied1029
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#HermannIIIWerldiedbefore1050
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf von Werl: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00615987&tree=LEO
  21. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32695
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027247&tree=LEO
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wetterau family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/wetterau.html
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331029&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#Mathildedied1031

Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy1,2,3

M, #6645, b. circa 925, d. 19 October 993
FatherRudolf II (?) King of Upper Burgundy, King of Italy2,3,4,5 b. 905, d. 11 Jul 937
MotherBerthe (?) of Swabia2,3,6 b. c 895
ReferenceGAV29 EDV27
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy married Adelaide de Bellay; Wikipedia says yhay Adelaide was Conrad's 1st wife.7,8 Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy married Adelania (?); Med Lands says that "Aldiud" was Contrad's mistress, not his wife.3,2,9,10 Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy was born circa 925.11 He married Matilda (?) de France, Queen consort of Burgundy, daughter of Louis IV "d'Outre-Mer" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor and Gerberga (?) von Sachsen, after 964; his 2nd wife.12,13,14,15,2,3
Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy died on 19 October 993 at Vienna, Austria; Genealogy.EU (Welf 1 page) says d. 10 Oct 993.13,12,2
Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy was buried after 19 October 993 at Saint-André-de-Bas, Vienne, Departement de l'Isere, Rhône-Alpes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     925
     DEATH     993 (aged 67–68)
     Born in 925 as the eldest son of Rudolf II and Berta of Swabia. He was raised together with the later emperor Otto who was his lifelong friend. Died in 993. He was buried at the Abbaye Saint-André-de-Bas, which he had founded.
     Hermannus Contractus says he was buried in Saint Maurice, but this is apparently wrong.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Rodolphe II de Bourgone unknown–937
          Bertha of Swabia
     Spouse
          Mathilde de France 943–992
     Siblings
          Adelheid of Burgundy 931–999
     Children
          Gisela of Burgundy unknown–1007
          Bertha Of Burgundy
          Gerberga of Burgundy
          Rudolf III of Burgundy unknown–1032
     BURIAL     Saint-André-de-Bas, Vienne, Departement de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 14 Mar 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 66946524.16
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ANSELM [II] (-before [1019]). "Otto…imperator augustus" donated property "in pago Bibligouue in comitatu Anshelmi in villa Chupinga" to the bishopric of Chur in exchange for property "predii…Adalberto filio Liutuuardi…in pago Suerzza in comitatu Gotefridi in villa Alemuntinga" by charter dated 22 Apr 966[260]. "…Anselmus episcopus Augustensis…Anselmus pater Anselmi episcopi, Rotbertus frater eius…" witnessed the charter dated [1001/02] under which Rudolf III King of Burgundy confirmed a donation to Romainmotier[261]. A charter dated Jan 1006 records that "Vuillelmus de monte Ioveto" donated property to "S. Egidio" of which one was "in valle Mugnana", in which "Anselmus" held three parts and "Uldricus comes" held the fourth, and the other "in loco Intola" in which "Uldiricus comes" held two parts[262].
     "m ALDIUD, daughter of ---. Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 19 Aug [1019] of "Burchardus sancta Viennensis archiepiscopus et Udolricus frater meus et advocatus meus" granted property "in pago Genevensi…in villa Marischa…a circio Lemani lacus" made "pro remedio animarum…genitore nostro Anselmo sive pro genetrice nostra Aaldui"[263]. A series of documents, including this charter, shows that Aldiud had been the mistress of Conrad I King of Burgundy, probably before her marriage to Anselm, and that she gave birth to Burchard Archbishop of Lyon by the king. This is established as follows. Firstly, the Chronicon Hugonis names the king’s son, the archbishop of Lyon, as "Burchardus, Rodulfi regis frater, Conradi ex concubina filius"[264]. Secondly, Burchard’s mother’s name is confirmed as Aldiud by a charter dated 14 Feb 1005, which records that "Burchardum Lugdunensem archiepiscopum" donated property "in loco Oponlongis infra comitatum Ottingen" which he had "ex patre matris suæ Aldiud quod rex Chuonradus ei præbuit" to Anselm bishop of Aosta[265]. Thirdly, the name of the father of Anselm Bishop of Aosta is confirmed as Anselm in the charter of Rudolf III King of Burgundy for Romainmotier dated [1001/02], which was witnessed by "…Anselmus episcopus Augustensis…Anselmus pater Anselmi episcopi…"[266]. Fourthly, a charter dated 1 Nov 1002, noted by Rivaz in his compiled index of Burgundian charters, confirms that Anselm Bishop of Aosta and Burchard Archbishop of Lyon were brothers: "Burchard archévêque de Lyon et abbé de Saint-Maurice" [Aldiud’s illegitimate son] granted property "dans les comtés de Valais et de Vaud" to "Gauslin", with the consent of "Anselme son frère évêque d'Aoste et prévôt de ladite abbaye"[267]. Fifthly, Anselm and Aldiud were also parents of Burchard Archbishop of Vienne and Udalrich his avocatus, as shown by the charter dated 19 Aug [1019] referred to above[268]. The conclusion therefore is that the only way in which Burchard Archbishop of Lyon could have been the brother of the three brothers Anselm, Burchard and Odalric is if they shared the same mother, who gave birth to them by different fathers. Aldiud’s relationship with the earliest counts of Savoy is indicated by Rodolfus Glauber who describes Burchard, son of Count Humbert "aux Blanches Mains", as nepos of Aldiud's illegitimate son[269]. This relationship is explained by Count Humbert's wife being the legitimate daughter of Anselm and Aldiud, as shown below. The Chronicon Hugonis specifies that the king’s son Burchard was appointed archbishop (dated to 978) when still a child[270]. This presumably dates Aldiud’s relationship to the King Conrad to [965/70], which is probably before she married Anselm."
Med Lands cites:
[260] D O I 326, p. 440.
[261] Cibrario & Promis (1833), Documenti, p. 7.
[262] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, XXVII, p. 9.
[263] Chartarium Viennensium 47, in Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, p. 256.
[264] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 972, MGH SS VIII, p. 367.
[265] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, XXVI, p. 9.
[266] Cibrario & Promis (1833), Documenti, p. 7.
[267] Rivaz I, p. 24, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. II, p. 84.
[268] Chartarium Viennensium 47, in Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, p. 256.
[269] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.26, p. 213.
[270] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 972, MGH SS VIII, p. 367.17


; Per Genealogy.EU: "King Konrad "the Peaceful" of Burgundy (937-993), *ca 925, +10.10.993; 1m: Adelana N; 2m: ca 964 Matilda of France (+981/2.)11"



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 177.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.9


; Per Genealogics: "Conrad was born about 925, the son of Rudolf II, king of Bourgogne, and Bertha von Schwaben. He was the king of Burgundy from his father's death in 937 until his own death. He is sometimes numbered as Conrad I as king of Burgundy and as Conrad III of Provence, since he inherited Provence in 948. There is no record of progeny with his first wife Adelania. In 964 he married Mahaut de France, daughter of Louis IV 'd'Outremer', king of France, and Gerberga von Sachsen. They had at least five children of whom Bertha and Gerberge would have progeny. With his third wife Adelaide de Bellay he had a daughter Gisela who would have progeny, marrying Heinrich II 'der Zanker', duke of Bavaria. Conrad's reign was peaceful and he was popular with his subjects. The only war in which he became involved was a simultaneous invasion by Saracens and Magyars in which he played them off against each other, then routed them in combat. He died on 19 October 993."9



; Per Med Lands:
     "CONRAD, son of RUDOLF II King of Upper Burgundy & his wife Berta of Swabia ([922/25]-Vienne 19 Oct 993, bur Vienne, cathédrale Saint-Maurice). He is named "Chuonradus rex filio Rodulfi" in his charter dated 23 Apr 943[155]. He succeeded his father in 937 as CONRAD I "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy. The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records the death "XIV Kal Nov" of "regis Conradi" and his burial at Vienne[156].
     "m firstly ADELANE, daughter of --- ([935/40]-[23 Mar 963/[964]). "Adelane regine" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 23 Mar 963[157] but is not mentioned in his charter dated 8 Apr 962[158]. This suggests that she married after the latter date, but this would leave insufficient time for the birth of her supposed two children. Her birth date range is estimated based on the estimated birth date range of her daughter Gisela. Her origin is not known but Jackman suggests[159] that Adela was sister of "Konrad Duke of Alsace".
     "m secondly ([964]) MATHILDE de France, daughter of LOUIS IV "d'Outremer" King of the Franks & his wife Gerberga of Germany (end-943-26/27 Jan [981/992], bur Vienne, cathédrale Saint-Maurice). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage of "rex Francorum Lotharius…sororem suam Mathildem" and "Conradus rex Burgundie"[160]. "Mathilde et Alberada" are named as daughters of "Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Mathilde was mother of "Rodulfus rex et Mathildis soror eius"[161]. Her brother, Lothaire King of the West Franks, arranged this marriage to strengthen his position in south-eastern France. Her dowry consisted of the counties of Lyon and Vienne[162]. The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records the death "VI Kal Dec" of "Mathildis uxor regis Conradi" and her burial at Vienne[163].
     "Mistress (1): ([965/70]) ALDIUD, wife of ANSELM, daughter of ---. The identity of King Conrad´s mistress is ascertained as follows. Firstly, as noted below, the Chronicon Hugonis names the king´s illegitimate son, archbishop of Lyon, as "Burchardus, Rodulfi regis frater, Conradi ex concubina filius"[164]. Secondly, Burchard´s mother´s name is confirmed as Aldiud by a charter dated 14 Feb 1005, which records that her son "Burchardum Lugdunensem archiepiscopum" donated property "in loco Oponlongis infra comitatum Ottingen" which he had "ex patre matris suæ Aldiud quod rex Chuonradus ei præbuit" to Anselm Bishop of Aosta[165]. Thirdly, the name of the father of Anselm Bishop of Aosta is confirmed as Anselm in the charter of Rudolf III King of Burgundy for Romainmotier dated [1001/02], which was witnessed by "…Anselmus episcopus Augustensis…Anselmus pater Anselmi episcopi…"[166]. Fourthly, a charter dated 1 Nov 1002, noted by Rivaz in his compiled index of Burgundian charters, confirms that Anselm Bishop of Aosta and Burchard Archbishop of Lyon were brothers: "Burchard archévêque de Lyon et abbé de Saint-Maurice" granted property "dans les comtés de Valais et de Vaud" to "Gauslin", with the consent of "Anselme son frère évêque d'Aoste et prévôt de ladite abbaye"[167]. Fifthly, Anselm and Aldiud were also parents of Burchard Archbishop of Vienne and Udalrich his advocatus, as shown by a charter dated 19 Aug [1019] of "Burchardus sancta Viennensis archiepiscopus et Udolricus frater meus et advocatus meus" which granted property "in pago Genevensi…in villa Marischa…a circio Lemani lacus" made "pro remedio animarum…genitore nostro Anselmo sive pro genetrice nostra Aaldui"[168]. The conclusion therefore is that the only way in which Burchard Archbishop of Lyon could have been the brother of the three brothers Anselm, Burchard and Odalric is if they shared the same mother, who gave birth to them by different fathers. Aldiud´s relationship with the early counts of Savoy is indicated by Rodolfus Glauber who describes Burchard, son of Count Humbert "aux Blanches Mains", as nepos of Aldiud's illegitimate son[169]. This relationship is explained by Count Humbert's wife being the legitimate daughter of Anselm and Aldiud. The Chronicon Hugonis specifies that Burchard was appointed archbishop (dated to 978) when still a child[170]. This presumably dates Aldiud´s relationship to the King Conrad to [965/70], which was probably before she married Anselm.
Med Lands cites:
[155] Cluny, Tome I, 627, p. 584.
[156] De Allobrogibus VI, p. 382.
[157] Cluny, Tome II, 1152, p. 242.
[158] Cluny, Tome II, 1127, p. 217.
[159] Jackman (1997), p. 46.
[160] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 986, MGH SS XXIII, p. 773.
[161] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[162] McKitterick (1983), p. 322.
[163] De Allobrogibus VI, p. 382.
[164] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 972, MGH SS VIII, p. 367.
[165] Regesta comitum Sabaudiæ, XXVI, p. 9.
[166] Cibrario & Promis (1833), Documenti, p. 7.
[167] Rivaz I, p. 24, citing Hist. Patriæ Monum., Ch. t. II, p. 84.
[168] Chartarium Viennensium 47, in Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, p. 256.
[169] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum, IV.26, p. 213.
[170] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 972, MGH SS VIII, p. 367.10


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Conrad I, called the Peaceful (French: Conrad le Pacifique; c.? 925 – 19 October 993), a member of the Elder House of Welf, was King of Burgundy (Kingdom of Arles) from 937 until his death.
Life
     "He was the son of King Rudolph II, the first ruler over the united territories of Upper and Lower Burgundy since 933, and his consort Bertha, a daughter of Duke Burchard II of Swabia.[1] Some sources call him Conrad III, since he was the third Conrad in his family: his great-grandfather was Duke Conrad II, whose father was Count Conrad I.
     "According to the chronicler Ekkehard IV, in a story that is probably apocryphal, when Conrad learned that both the Magyars and the Saracens of Fraxinetum were marching against him, he sent envoys to both armies warning them of the other. The envoys offered Burgundian aid to each invader against the other and then informed them of the other's whereabouts. When the Magyars and Saracens met, the Burgundians held back and only attacked when the opposing forces were spent. In this way, both invading armies were destroyed and the captives sold into slavery.[2][3]
     "He married firstly, Adelaide of Bellay. They were parents to at least one daughter:[4]
** Gisela (– 21 July 1006), married Henry II, Duke of Bavaria[5]

     "He married Matilda by 966,[4] daughter of Louis IV of France and Gerberga of Saxony.[5] They had at least four children:
** Bertha (964 – 16 January 1016), married Odo I, Count of Blois, and then Robert II of France[5]
** Matilda (born 969), possibly married Robert, Count of Geneva
** Rudolph (971 – 6 September 1032)[5]
** Gerberga (born 965), married Herman II, Duke of Swabia[5]

     "By his concubine, Aldiud, he had a son:
** Burchard, Archbishop of Lyons[6]

References
1. Reuter & McKitterick 1999, p. 699.
2. Fichtenau 1991, p. 407.
3. Cope 1987, p. 67.
4. Poole 1911, p. 314-315.
5. Bourchard 1999, p. 342.
6. Previté-Orton 1911, p. 10.
Sources
** Bourchard, Constance Brittain (1999). "Burgundy and Provence, 879–1032". In Reuter, Timothy; McKitterick, Rosamond (eds.) The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 3, c.900-c.1024. Cambridge University Press.
** Cope, Christopher (1987). Phoenix Frustrated: The Lost Kingdom of Burgundy. Constable.
** Fichtenau, Heinrich (1991). Living in the Tenth Century: Mentalities and Social Orders. Translated by Geary, Patrick J. University of Chicago Press.
** Poole, Reginald L. (1911). "Burgundian Notes". The English Historical Review. 26 (102).
** Previté-Orton, C. W. (1912). Early History of the House of Savoy. Cambridge University Press.
** Reuter, Timothy; McKitterick, Rosamond, eds. (1999). "Appendix". The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 3, c.900-c.1024. Cambridge University Press."8

GAV-29 EDV-27 GKJ-29. Conrad I "The Peaceful" (?) King of Burgundy was also known as Conrad III (?) Roi de Bourgogne. He was King of Bourgogne between 937 and 993.3,11,8

Family 1

Adelania (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020211&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120373&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#RudolfIIdied937B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120374&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide de Bellay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00550380&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conrad I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020211&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#AdelaideMRichardBurgundy
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 157-19, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 133-21, p. 118.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020130&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 November 2019), memorial page for Conrad of Burgundy (925–993), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66946524, citing Saint-André-de-Bas, Vienne, Departement de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66946524/conrad-of_burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkgenev.htm#AnselmMAldiud
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisela de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080212&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#Giseladied1007
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331133&tree=LEO
  23. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020105&tree=LEO
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#BertheM1EudesIBloisM2RobertIIFrance
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120358&tree=LEO
  28. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#GerbergaM1HermannWerleM2HermannIISwabi
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331135&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331134&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#MathildeBurgundyMGeneva

Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer1,2,3

M, #6646, b. circa 970, d. 995
FatherOtto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau4,2,3,5 b. c 949, d. 4 Nov 1004
MotherJudith (?) de Bayern2,3,5 b. c 950, d. 991
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited1 Jul 2020
     Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer married Adelheid (?) of Alsace, daughter of Gerhard (?) Graf von Metz; Her 1st husband.3,6,7 Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer married unknown (?); his 2nd wife.3 Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer was born circa 970.3
Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer was buried between 28 September 989 and 1000 at Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     28 Sep
     970-990. Nobility, eldest son of Otto of Carinthia and Judith of Bavaria and thus grandson of Emperor Otto. He married around 985 Adelheid of Metz. There is not much known about him, even the year of his death is uncertain. The last mention of him is from September 28th, 989 where he was witness of a contract with the Lorsch monastery. His wife bore him two children, Konrad and Judith and married after his death Hermann of Bretachgau.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Judith of Bavaria
     Spouse
          Adelheid von Metz unknown–1039
     Siblings
          Konrad I of Carinthia unknown–1011
     Children
          Konrad II unknown–1039
          Judith von Speyer
     BURIAL     Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Dec 2009
     Find a Grave Memorial 46089035.8
Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer died in 995; Genealogy.EU says d. 995; Med Lands says d. "28 Sep [989/1000]."3,5
     GAV-29 EDV-29.

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH (-28 Sep [989/1000], bur Worms cathedral). Wipo names "Hezil et Chuono…Brunone et Willihelmo" as sons of "Ottone duce Francorum"[381].
     "m as her first husband, ADELHEID, daughter of [RICHARD Graf von Metz or GERHARD Graf von Metz] [Matfride] & his wife --- (-19 May [1039/46], bur Öhningen Stiftskirche). Wipo names "Adalheida ex nobilissima gente Litharingorum oriunda…soror…comitem Gerhardi et Adalberti" as mother of "maioris Chuononis"[382]. She married secondly ---, as suggested by the Vita Meinwerci which names "Gebehardus iuvenis, frater imperatoris" when recording his tonsure at the synod in 1028[383], Gerhard not being named elsewhere as full brother of Emperor Konrad I. "Heinricus…rex" donated property "Lohwilare in pago Bietgowe in comitatu Bezelini comitis…ex avia nostra domina Adelheit iure hereditario suscepimus" to the cathedral of Speyer by charter dated 7 Sep 1046[384].
     "Graf Heinrich & his wife had two children:
a) KONRAD ([990]-Utrecht 4 Jun 1039, bur Speyer cathedral).
b) JUDITH (-[998], before 30 Jan 1034, bur Worms Cathedral)."

Med Lands cites:
[381] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 2, MGH SS XI, p. 258.
[382] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 2, MGH SS XI, p. 258.
[383] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 200, MGH SS XI, p. 154, the date "1025" is inserted in the margin.5


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Henry of Speyer (German: Heinrich von Speyer, also Heinrich von Worms; c.?970 – 989/992), a member of the Salian dynasty, was count in the Rhenish Franconian Wormsgau. He was the father of Emperor Conrad II.
     "According to the 977 donation deed of Lambrecht Abbey, Henry was the eldest son of Count Otto von Worms (d. 1004), Duke of Carinthia from 978 to 983 and again from 995, and his wife Judith.[1] He married Adelaide of Metz (d. 1039/46),[1] a sister of the Lorraine counts Gerhard III and Adalbert II. The marriage produced a son, Conrad (c.?990 – 1039),[2] who was elected King of the Romans in 1024 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor three years later, and a daughter, Judith. Henry's younger brother Bruno was elected Pope Gregory V in 996, his brother Conrad I succeeded their father as Duke of Carinthia in 1004.
     "Little is known of Henry's life, since he died at around the age of 20, even predeceasing his father Otto. He is buried in Worms Cathedral along with his daughter Judith. Adelaide outlived her husband by many years; she secondly married another Franconian count, possibly from the Elder House of Babenberg (Popponids), and died in 1046.
References
1. Walter 2016, p. l.
2. Wolfram 2006, p. 18.
Sources
** Wilson, Peter H. (2016). Heart of Europe: A History of the Holy Roman Empire. Harvard University Press.
** Wolfram, Herwig (2006). Conrad II, 990-1039: Emperor of Three Kingdoms. Translated by Kaiser, Denise A. The Pennsylvania State University Press."9 Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer was also known as Heinrich (?) Graf im Wormsgau.7,5 Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer was also known as Heinrich (?) Graf im Speyergau.6

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B1. Heinrich, Gf von Speyer, *ca 970, +995; 1m: Adele of Metz (*ca 970 +19.5.1046), dau.of Gf Gerard von Nordgau und Alsace; 2m: NN."10

Family 1

Adelheid (?) of Alsace b. 975, d. bt 19 May 1039 - 1046
Children

Family 2

unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 264. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1659] Ian S. R. Mladjov, "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile", The Plantagene Connection (Spring/Winter 2003, pp. 1-85): Stemma 4, p. 71. Hereinafter cited as "Mladjov [2003] Reconsidering Agatha."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120366&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#HeinrichWormsdied989. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 1 page (The House of Lorraine): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine1.html
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied10391046
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 April 2020), memorial page for Heinrich of Speyer (unknown–28 Sep), Find a Grave Memorial no. 46089035, citing Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46089035/heinrich-of_speyer. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_of_Speyer. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027246&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#KonradIIGermanyEmperorB.

Adelheid (?) of Alsace1

F, #6647, b. 975, d. between 19 May 1039 and 1046
FatherGerhard (?) Graf von Metz2
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited1 Jul 2020
     Adelheid (?) of Alsace married Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer, son of Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau and Judith (?) de Bayern; Her 1st husband.3,2,4 Adelheid (?) of Alsace married Unknown (?)4 Adelheid (?) of Alsace was born in 975.4
Adelheid (?) of Alsace died between 19 May 1039 and 1046; Genealogy.
EU (Lorraine) says d. 1040; Med Lands says d. 19 May 1939/1046; Find A Grave says d. 1039.4,2,5
Adelheid (?) of Alsace was buried between 19 May 1039 and 1046 at Stiftskirche St. Peter und Paul in Öhringen, Heilbronn, Stadtkreis Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     1039
     Countess. Principal founder of the convent in Öhringen. Her remains were re-interred inside a sarcophagus in the old crypt in 1241, about 200 years after her death. The image on the right is an illustration from the Obleybuch of Öhringen, showing the founding of the Öhringen convent of canons in 1037. Lower left: the founder, countess Adelheid of Metz, lower right: Petrus, upper left: bishop Gebhard of Regensburg, upper right: count Burchard of Comburg.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Heinrich of Speyer
     Children
          Konrad II unknown–1039
          Judith von Speyer
          Gebhard III von Hohenlohe 1002–1060
     BURIAL     Stiftskirche St. Peter und Paul in Öhringen, Heilbronn, Stadtkreis Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     PLOT     crypt underneath the church
     Created by: Frank K.
     Added: 15 Sep 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 97164368.4
Adelheid (?) of Alsace died in 1040 at Germany (now).2
     GAV-29 EDV-29.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELHEID ([975][888]-19 May [1039/46], bur Öhningen Stiftskirche). Wipo names "Adalheida ex nobilissima gente Litharingorum oriunda…soror…comitem Gerhardi et Adalberti" and mother of "maioris Chuononis"[889]. Her second marriage is suggested by the Vita Meinwerci which names "Gebehardus iuvenis, frater imperatoris" when recording his tonsure at the synod in 1028[890], Gerhard not being named elsewhere as the full brother of Emperor Konrad I.
     "m firstly HEINRICH Graf im Wormsgau, son of OTTO Duke of Carinthia, Graf im Nahe-, Speier-, und Wormsgau [Salier] & his wife Judith --- (-[20 Sep 989/1000]).
     "m secondly ---. The name of Adelheid's second husband is not known.
Adelheid & her second husband had [three] children:
a) GEBHARD ([after 1000]-1060).
b) [ROTHILD ([after 1000]-2 Dec ----).
c) [---. m ---.]
i) LIETARD ."

Med Lands cites:
[888] Birth date estimated from the birth of her oldest son Emperor Konrad I in 992, but bearing in mind the likely birth dates of her father and paternal grandfather.
[889] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 2, MGH SS XI, p. 258.
[890] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 200, MGH SS XI, p. 154, the date "1025" is inserted in the margin.4


; Per Med Lands, Adelheid is the child "either of RICHARD Graf von Metz (-after 982), or his brother GERHARD."4 Adelheid (?) of Alsace was also known as Adelheid von Metz.5 Adelheid (?) of Alsace was also known as Adelaide (?) of Alsace.2

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B1. Heinrich, Gf von Speyer, *ca 970, +995; 1m: Adele of Metz (*ca 970 +19.5.1046), dau.of Gf Gerard von Nordgau und Alsace; 2m: NN."6

Family 1

Heinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer b. c 970, d. 995
Children

Family 2

Unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1659] Ian S. R. Mladjov, "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile", The Plantagene Connection (Spring/Winter 2003, pp. 1-85): Stemma 4, p. 71. Hereinafter cited as "Mladjov [2003] Reconsidering Agatha."
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 1 page (The House of Lorraine): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelheiddied10391046. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 April 2020), memorial page for Adelheid von Metz (unknown–1039), Find a Grave Memorial no. 97164368, citing Stiftskirche St. Peter und Paul in Öhringen, Heilbronn, Stadtkreis Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Frank K. (contributor 46941322), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/97164368/adelheid-von_metz. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027246&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#KonradIIGermanyEmperorB.

Judith (?)1

F, #6648, d. 998
FatherHeinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer1,2 b. c 970, d. 995
MotherAdelheid (?) of Alsace1 b. 975, d. bt 19 May 1039 - 1046
Last Edited23 Apr 2020
     Judith (?) died in 998.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#HeinrichWormsdied989. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Gebhard (?) Bishop of Regensburg1

M, #6649, b. circa 1002, d. 2 December 1060
FatherHeinrich (?) Duke of Franconia, Graf von Speyer1 b. c 970, d. 995
Motherunknown (?)1
Last Edited12 Sep 2004
     Gebhard (?) Bishop of Regensburg was born circa 1002.1
Gebhard (?) Bishop of Regensburg died on 2 December 1060.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html

Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau1,2

M, #6650, b. circa 949, d. 4 November 1004
FatherKonrad "der Rote" (?) Duke of Lotharingia, Graf im Nahegau, Graf im Niddagau1,2,3,4 b. c 922, d. 10 Aug 955
MotherLuitgarde (?) von Sachsen1,2,5,4 b. c 931, d. 18 Nov 953
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited11 Aug 2020
     Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau was born circa 949.2 He married Judith (?) de Bayern, daughter of Henry (?) von Bayern.1,2,6
Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau died on 4 November 1004.7,1,2
     He was Duke of Carinthia.7 GAV-30 EDV-30.

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 4
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 46.2 Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau was also known as Otto II of Germany.

Family 1

Judith (?) de Bayern b. c 950, d. 991
Children

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120366&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad 'the Red': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080201&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#KonradderRotedied955. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudgard von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080200&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120367&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 45-19, p. 46. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25006
  9. [S1659] Ian S. R. Mladjov, "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile", The Plantagene Connection (Spring/Winter 2003, pp. 1-85): Stemma 4, p. 71. Hereinafter cited as "Mladjov [2003] Reconsidering Agatha."
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#HeinrichWormsdied989
  11. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: Pope Gregory V at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06790a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331028&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#KonradKartenCarinthiadied1011

Judith (?) de Bayern1

F, #6651, b. circa 950, d. 991
FatherHenry (?) von Bayern b. c 920, d. c 953
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited11 Aug 2020
     Judith (?) de Bayern was born circa 950.2 She married Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau, son of Konrad "der Rote" (?) Duke of Lotharingia, Graf im Nahegau, Graf im Niddagau and Luitgarde (?) von Sachsen.3,2,4
Judith (?) de Bayern was buried in 991 at Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
     950 - 991. German nobility. It is not much known about her. She married around 978 Otto of Worms, Duke of Carinthia and bore him four children: Heinrich of Speyer, Brun who later became Pope Gregory V., Konrad I, Duke of Carinthia and Wilhelm Bishop of Straßburg.
     Family Members
     Children
          Konrad I of Carinthia unknown–1011
          Heinrich of Speyer
     BURIAL     Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Dec 2009
     Find a Grave Memorial 46089026.5
Judith (?) de Bayern died in 991.2
     GAV-30 EDV-30.

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 4.4

Family

Otto (?) Duke of Carinthia; Graf im Wormsgau b. c 949, d. 4 Nov 1004
Children

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10253
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Salian page (Salian Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120366&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120367&tree=LEO
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 April 2020), memorial page for Judith of Bavaria (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 46089026, citing Cathedral of St Peter, Worms, Stadtkreis Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46089026/judith-of_bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25006
  7. [S1659] Ian S. R. Mladjov, "Reconsidering Agatha, Wife of Eadward the Exile", The Plantagene Connection (Spring/Winter 2003, pp. 1-85): Stemma 4, p. 71. Hereinafter cited as "Mladjov [2003] Reconsidering Agatha."
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#HeinrichWormsdied989. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: Pope Gregory V at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06790a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331028&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#KonradKartenCarinthiadied1011

Renaud (Reinald) III (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon1,2,3

M, #6652, b. circa 1093, d. 22 January 1148
FatherEtienne I "Tete-Hardi" (?) Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Count de Vienne et de Macon4,5,3,6 b. c 1065, d. 27 May 1102
MotherBeatrix (?) de Lorraine7,5,3,6 b. c 1058, d. a 1117
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Renaud (Reinald) III (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon was born circa 1093 at Haute Bourgogne, France.2 He married Agatha (?) de Lorraine, daughter of Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine and Adelheid (?) de Louvain, in 1130.3,8,9,10,2,6
Renaud (Reinald) III (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon died on 22 January 1148; Leo van de Pas says d. 22 Jan 1148 or 20 Jan 1149; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says d. 22 Jan 1148.3,2
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Renaud was born about 1093, the eldest son of Etienne I 'Tete-Hardi' de Bourgogne, comte de Mâcon, and Beatrix de Lorraine. He was count of Burgundy between 1127 and 1148. Previously he had been the count of Mâcon from his father's death in 1102, with his brother Guillaume IV.
     "About 1130 Renaud married Agathe de Lorraine, daughter of Simon I, duke of Lorraine, and Adelheid de Louvain. Their only child Beatrice would have progeny, marrying Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa. Her uncle Guillaume IV had attempted to abduct her, but was prevented by Friedrich, who then married her.
     "Renaud proclaimed independence from the Holy Roman Emperor Lothar von Supplinburg, but was defeated by Konrad III von Schwaben, emperor-elect, Herzog von Franken, and forced to relinquish all his lands east of the Jura. The name of the region Franche-Comté is derived from his title, franc-compte, meaning 'free count'.
     "Renaud died in January 1148 or 1149."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 59.2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Reginald III or Renaud III (c. 1087 – 1148), son of Stephen I (Tête-hardi) and Beatrix of Lorraine,[1] was the count of Burgundy between 1127 and 1148. Previously, he had been the count of Mâcon since his father's death in 1102, with his brother, William of Vienne.
     "He proclaimed independence from the Holy Roman Emperor Lothair III,[2] but was defeated by King Conrad III of Germany and forced to relinquish all his lands east of the Jura. The name of the region Franche-Comté is derived from his title, franc-compte, meaning "free count".
     "In 1148, Reginald was traveling in France when he fell ill with multiple illnesses. He died so suddenly that he could not even appoint a regent for his young daughter.
Family
     "About 1130, he married the young Agatha (c. 1120- April 1147), daughter of Simon I, Duke of Lorraine. at an unknown age [3] They had one daughter:
** Beatrice (c. 1145 – 15 November 1184) married the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa in 1156[4]

     "Beatrice became countess of Burgundy on her father's death, although she was too young to actually govern the county.
Notes
a. Parisse states Reginald's wife was Agatha, daughter of the duke of Lorraine.[3]
References
1. Bouchard 1987, p. 276.
2. McKitterick & Abulafia 1999, p. 364.
3. Bouchard 1987, p. 277.
4. Gislebertus (of Mons) 2005, p. 55.
Sources
** Gislebertus (of Mons) (2005). Chronicle of Hainaut. Translated by Napran, Laura. The Boydell Press.
** Bouchard, Constance Brittain (1987). Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980-1198. Cornell University Press.
** McKitterick, Rosamond; Abulafia, David, eds. (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 5, C.1198-c.1300. Cambridge University Press.
External links
** History of Franche-Comté, (in French): http://gilles.maillet.free.fr/index.html."11

; Per Med Lands:
     "RENAUD de Mâcon (-22 Jan 1148 or 20 Jan 1149). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Elizabeth sororem comitis Raynaldi de Burgundia" as wife of "Hugo comes Campanie"[78], but the primary source which confirms their parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded his father in 1102 as Comte de Mâcon, under the guardianship of his uncle Guy, who was then Archbishop of Vienne[79]. He succeeded his second cousin in 1127 as RENAUD III Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne. He defeated Konrad I Herzog von Zähringen, who claimed Bourgogne-Comté after the death of his nephew Comte Palatin Guillaume II. However, after refusing to swear allegiance to Emperor Lothar for his imperial lands, Renaud was captured and brought by Herzog Konrad before the emperor who confiscated these territories. Renaud was known as "le franc-comte", the origin of the name of the area later known as Franche-Comté. “Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[80]. The necrology of the Priory of Saint-Martin-des-Champs records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Rainaldus comes"[81]. The necrology of Macon Saint-Pierre records the death “XVIII Kal Feb” of “comes Raynaldus” and his donation of “unum censualem modium vini in villa Liviniaci”[82].
     "m ([1130]) AGATHE de Lorraine, daughter of SIMON II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Adélaïde de Hainaut. The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the wife of Comte Renaud as "Simonis Lotharingiorum ducis filiam"[83]. “Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[84]. She was first cousin once removed of her husband but no mention of a Papal dispensation for the marriage has so far been found. “Matheus...Lotharingorum Dux et marchio” donated property to Tart abbey, with the consent of “uxoris mee Berthe...fratris mei Balduini et Agathe sororis mee”, by charter dated 1142[85]."
Med Lands cites:
[78] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1125, MGH SS XXIII, p. 826.
[79] Bouchard (1987), p. 275.
[80] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 122.
[81] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, p. 422.
[82] Macon Saint-Pierre Necrology, p. 4.
[83] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis 2.29, MGH SS XX, p. 413.
[84] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 122.
[85] Plancher (1739), Tome I, Preuves, LXII, p.xlii.6
GAV-24 EDV-25. Renaud (Reinald) III (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon was also known as Renaud III de Macon.12 He was Count of Brgundy between 1127 and 1148.11 He was Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon between 1127 and 1148.3

Family

Agatha (?) de Lorraine b. c 1119, d. 1147
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120313&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne I 'Tete-Hardi' de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026533&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120313&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RenaudIIIdied1149. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027403&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120314&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#AgatheMRenaudIIIBourgogne
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_III,_Count_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10280
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013543&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#Beatrixdied1184A

Agatha (?) de Lorraine1,2

F, #6653, b. circa 1119, d. 1147
FatherSimon I (?) Duke of Lorraine1,3,4,5,6 b. c 1076, d. 13 Jan 1138
MotherAdelheid (?) de Louvain1,7,4,5,6 b. 1074, d. a 4 Nov 1158
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Agatha (?) de Lorraine was born circa 1119.1 She married Renaud (Reinald) III (?) Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon, son of Etienne I "Tete-Hardi" (?) Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Count de Vienne et de Macon and Beatrix (?) de Lorraine, in 1130.8,1,5,6,9,10
Agatha (?) de Lorraine died in 1147.11
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 59.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGATHE de Lorraine . The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the wife of Comte Renaud as "Simonis Lotharingiorum ducis filiam"[69]. “Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[70]. She was first cousin once removed of her husband but no mention of a Papal dispensation for the marriage has so far been identified. “Matheus...Lotharingorum Dux et marchio” donated property to Tart abbey, with the consent of “uxoris mee Berthe...fratris mei Balduini et Agathe sororis mee”, by charter dated 1142[71].
     "m ([1130]) RENAUD [III] Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne, son of ETIENNE [I] Comte de Mâcon & his wife Beatrix de Lorraine (-22 Jan 1148 or 20 Jan 1149)."
Med Lands cites:
[69] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis 2.29, MGH SS XX, p. 413.
[70] Chifflet, P. F. (1656) Lettre touchant Beatrix comtesse de Chalon (Dijon) (“Chifflet Beatrix (1656)”), Preuves, p. 122.
[71] Plancher, U. (ed.) (1739) Histoire générale et particulière de Bourgogne (Dijon), Tome I, Preuves, LXII, p.xlii.6


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Agatha of Lorraine (c. 1120 – April 1147) was the wife of Renaud III, Count of Burgundy.[1][2] She was the daughter of Simon I, Duke of Lorraine and his wife Adelaide of Leuven.[3]
     "Agatha's children with her husband included:
** Beatrice I, Countess of Burgundy[4]
** Two other sons and three other daughters who died in childhood
     "She fell sick in March 1147 and died two weeks later.
External links
1. Gesta Friderici
2. Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium
3. Agathe de Lorraine
4. Continuatio Admuntensis"


Per Wikipédia (Fr.)
     "Agathe de Lorraine, née vers 1120 et morte en avril 1147, est la femme de Renaud III, Comte de Bourgogne1,2. C'est la fille de Simon Ier, Duc de Lorraine et de son épouse Adélaïde de Louvain (morte en 1158) (en)3.
     "Les enfants de Agathe et de son époux sont :
** Béatrice Ire, Comtesse de Bourgogne4 ;
** Cinq autres enfants — trois garçons et deux filles — morts en bas-âge.
     "Elle tombe malade en mars 1147 avant de mourir deux semaines plus tard.
Notes et références
1. (en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en anglais intitulé « Agatha of Lorraine » (voir la liste des auteurs).
2. Gesta Friderici
3. Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium
4. Agathe de Lorraine [archive]
5. Continuatio Admuntensis."12,13 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120314&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026284&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#SimonIdied1139B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120314&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#AgatheMRenaudIIIBourgogne
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Louvain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026285&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120313&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RenaudIIIdied1149
  11. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agatha_of_Lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Agathe de Lorraine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agathe_de_Lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013543&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#Beatrixdied1184A

Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine1,2,3

M, #6654, b. circa 1076, d. 13 January 1138
FatherThierry II (Dirk, Didrik, Dietrich) (?) Duke of Upper Lorraine1,2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1055, d. 23 Jan 1115
MotherHedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach b. 1050, d. 1088; Racines et Histoire Flandres says Simon I is son of Thierry's 1st wife, Gertrude de Flandres. Racines et Histoire Brabant says he sthe son of Thierry's 2nd wife, Hewig von Formbach1,2,3,7,6,8,4
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine was born circa 1076.9 He married Adelheid (?) de Louvain, daughter of Henri III (?) comte de Louvain, graf en vogt van Brabant and Gertrude (?) de Flandres, between 1112 and 1113.10,9,2,11,12,13,14,4
Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine died on 13 January 1138; Racines et Histoire says d. 13-14/01/1139.9,2,3,7
Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine was buried after 13 January 1139 at Cistercian Abbey, Sturzelbronn, Departement de la Moselle, Lorraine, France,

; Per Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1076
     DEATH     13 Jan 1139 (aged 62–63)
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Adelaide Of Leuven
     Children
          Mathieu I de Lorraine 1110–1176
     BURIAL     Cistercian Abbey, Sturzelbronn, Departement de la Moselle, Lorraine, France
     Created by: Jerry D. Ferren
     Added: 7 Aug 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 115056996.15
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "SIMON de Lorraine, son of THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine & his first wife Hedwig von Formbach (-[13/15] Jan 1139, bur Stulzbron). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Symonem ducem" as son of "Theodericum ducem"[49]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[50], Duke Simon was the son of his father's first marriage. This appears to be confirmed by the charter dated 10 Oct 1091 under which Pibon Bishop of Toul granted privileges to the monastery of Toul Saint-Léon and named "dux Theodericus et Simon puer eius filius, et frater ducis Gerardus comes et Renardus comes Tillensis"[51]. Poull[52] refers to several sources which apparently indicate that he was the son of Duke Thierry II's second marriage, including Duke Simon's own act dated 11 Apr 1126 which refers to his deceased "mother Gertrude". However, Duke Simon married "his stepmother's daughter whom she had by her first husband Graf Heinrich"[53], which is best interpreted as meaning that he married the daughter of Gertrude de Flandre, second wife of Duke Thierry II, by her first husband. The alternative interpretation, that Duke Simon (assumed for the purposes of this argument to be the son of Gertrude de Flandre) married the daughter of Hedwig von Formbach by an otherwise unknown first husband "Graf Heinrich" presents major chronological difficulties. Such a daughter could not have been born later than 1072 at the latest. Considering that Hedwig gave birth to two children by her husband Gerhard von Süpplingenburg who died in 1075, such a birth date appears incompatible with Duke Simon's wife having given birth to at least seven children, even if their marriage took place as early as [1112/13] as suggested by Poull. Two further sources confirm that Duke Simon was born from his father's first marriage. Firstly, the Gesta Alberonis Archiepiscopi names "Lotharingiæ ducem Symonem, fratrem regis [=Lothar von Süpplingenburg]" when recording his excommunication 10 Apr 1132[54], Emperor Lothar being Simon's uterine half-brother assuming that Hedwig von Formbach was his mother. Secondly, "Teodericus dux Lotharingie" donated the church at Nancy to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "filio suo Simone" by charter dated to [1080/90][55] which, assuming this dating is correct, was before the date of Duke Thierry's second marriage. “Theodoricus...Lotharingorum princeps, dux et marchio” donated “quidquid continetur a rivo de Grimommont usque ad nemus de Granviller et usque ad nemus de Stivay” to Saint-Dié, at the request of “Hugonis de Distorchio”, in the presence of “suorum filiorum...Simonis, Theodorici, Gerardi, Henrici”, by charter dated 19 Mar 1114[56]. He succeeded his father in 1115 as SIMON I Duke of Lorraine. “Duci Simoni, comiti Odvino, Alberto de Darney et Simoni advocato” granted rights to Saint-Dié by charter dated to [1123/25][57]. "Simon...dux Lotharingiæ et marchio" donated “ecclesiam...de Pixerecourt...partem decimarum villæ...de Margeville et Augecourt” to the abbey of Bouxières-aux-Dames, in the presence of “soror mea domina Hara abbatissæ”, by charter dated 30 Mar 1130[58]. “Simon...Lotharingorum dux” renounced claims over property of “ecclesia de Sancti-Remigii-Monte”, brought by “patris mei beatæ memoriæ ducis Theodorici”, with the support of “uxore mea...ducissa Adelide...cum Matthæo...unico nostro filio”, by undated charter[59]. He founded the Cistercian monastery of Sainte-Marue-au-Bois at Stulzbron. The necrology of Notre-Dame aux Nonnains records the death "15 Jan" of "Symon dux Lotaringeris"[60]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIX Kal Feb" of "Simon Lotaringorum dux"[61]. The necrology of Gorze records the death "XIX Kal Feb" of "Simon dux Lotharingiæ"[62]. The Obituaire de Saint-Mansuy-lès-Toul records the death "14 Jan" of "Sigismundus dux"[63].
     "m ([1112/13]) ADELAIDE de Louvain, daughter of HENRI III Comte de Louvain & his wife Gertrude de Flandre (before 1095-4 Nov after 1158). Simon Duke of Lorraine married "his stepmother's daughter whom she had by her first husband Graf Heinrich"[64]. In light of the chronological difficulties of this having been a daughter of Duke Thierry II's first wife, it is likely that Duke Simon's wife was the daughter of the comte de Louvain, whose wife married Duke Thierry as his second wife. “Simon...Lotharingorum dux” renounced claims over property of “ecclesia de Sancti-Remigii-Monte”, brought by “patris mei beatæ memoriæ ducis Theodorici”, with the support of “uxore mea...ducissa Adelide...cum Matthæo...unico nostro filio”, by undated charter[65]. Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1155, after 1 Sep, under which "Judit Romaricensis ecclesie abbatissa" donated property at the request of "Aledis mater ducis Mathei"[66]. After the death of her husband, Adelaide retired to the Cistercian abbey of Notre-Dame du Tart, near Dijon[67]."
Med lands cites:
[49] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 4, MGH SS XXV, p. 383.
[50] ES I.2 204.
[51] Calmet (1748), Tome III, Preuves, col. xx.
[52] Poull (1991), p. 28.
[53] Sächsische Weltchronik, MSH SS, II, p. 277, quoted in Poull (1991), p. 28.
[54] Gesta Alberonis Archiepiscopi Trevirorum 13, MGH SS VIII, p. 251.
[55] Molesme II, 64, p. 73.
[56] Sommier (1726), L, p. 370.
[57] Calmet (1728), Tome II, Preuves, col. cclx.
[58] Calmet (1757), Tome V, Preuves, col. clxxii.
[59] Sommier (1726), N, p. 376.
[60] Troyes Necrologies, 5 Obituaire de Notre-Dame aux Nonnains, p. 417.
[61] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.
[62] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 267.
[63] Mavot, P. 'L'obituaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Mansuy-lès-Toul', Revue Mabillon XVIII 1928, p. 97.
[64] Sächsische Weltchronik, MSH Deutsche Chroniken, II, p. 277, quoted in Poull (1991), p. 28.
[65] Sommier (1726), N, p. 376.
[66] Bridot, J. (ed.) Chartes de l'abbaye de Remiremont des origins à 1231 (Brepols) ("Remiremont") 75, p. 166.4


Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 13.16

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Simon I (1076 – 13 or 14 January 1139) was the duke of Lorraine from 1115 to his death, the eldest son and successor of Theodoric II and Hedwig of Formbach.[1]
     "Continuing the policy of friendship with the Holy Roman Emperor, he accompanied the Emperor Henry V to the Diet of Worms of 1122, where the Investiture Controversy was resolved.
     "He had stormy relations with the episcopates of his realm: fighting with Stephen of Bar, bishop of Metz, and Adalberon, archbishop of Trier, both allies of the count of Bar, whose claim to Lorraine against Simon's father had been quashed by Henry V's father Henry IV. Though Adalberon excommunicated him, Pope Innocent II lifted it. He was a friend of Bernard of Clairvaux and he built many abbeys in his duchy, including that of Sturzelbronn in 1135. There was he interred after his original burial in Saint-Dié.
Children of Simon and Adelaide
     "Simon I of Lorraine married Adelaide,[2] daughter of Henry III of Leuven. Their children were:
** Matthias, his successor in Lorraine[3]
** Robert, lord of Floranges (near Thionville)
** Agatha of Lorraine, married Reginald III, Count of Burgundy (Renaud III), the first Free Count
** Hedwige, married Frederick III, count of Toul
** Bertha, married Margrave Hermann III of Baden
** Mathilde, married Gottfried I, Count of Sponheim
** Baldwin
** John

References
1. Bogdan 2007, p. 34.
2. Bogdan 2007, p. 35.
3. Bogdan 2007, p. 36.
Sources
** Bogdan, Henry (2007). La Lorraine des ducs (in French). Perrin.
See also
** Dukes of Lorraine family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Lorraine
** Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Line 45-26
External links
** (in German) genealogie-mittelalter.de: https://web.archive.org/web/20070312184007/http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/lothringen/simon_1_herzog_von_ober_lothringen_1139_chatenois/simon_1_herzog_von_oberlothringen_+_1139.html"

Per Wikipédia (Fr.)"
     "Simon Ier de Lorraine1, dit le grois, né vers 1096, mort le 13 ou 14 janvier 1139, duc de Lorraine de 1115 à 1139 et marchis2. Il est le fils du Thierry II, duc de Lorraine, et d'Edwige de Formbach ou de Gertrude de Flandre.
Filiation
     "Il y a eu un doute sur la mère de Simon ; longtemps considéré comme le fils d'Hedwige de Formbach, certains généalogistes[Qui ?] l'ont plutôt considéré comme le fils de Gertrude de Flandre. Mais l'analyse des parentés montre bien qu'il est fils d'Hedwige de Formbach.
     "Les raisons qui ont conduit à douter qu'il soit fils d'Hedwige :
** Galbert de Bruges, dans son ouvrage Meurtre de Charles le Bon, signale que Gertrude est devenue duchesse d'Alsace et a eu pour fils Simon et Gérard,
** Simon le 11 avril 1126 demande aux chanoines de la cathédrale de Toul de prier pour le repos de son âme et pour ses prédécesseurs, notamment son père Thierry et sa mère Gertrude.

     "La confusion viendrait du fait qu'à cette époque on nommait frère indifféremment son frère et son beau-frère ; Simon dans une charte destinée aux chanoines de Saint-Dié signale son frère Lothaire, roi des Romains, indication reprise par Henri évêque de Toul dans un acte de 1134 (Cartulaire de Belval)3, mais cette confusion existe également entre mère et belle-mère. D'autre part, les auteurs flamands sont mal renseignés sur la maison de Lorraine et plusieurs attribuent le comté d'Alsace à Thierry II, alors qu'il n'en a jamais été comte ou duc.
     "En fait, tout tient sur la filiation de l'épouse de Simon Ier. Au xiie siècle, la Sächsische Weltchronik (de) précise que Simon, duc de Lorraine, épousa la fille de sa belle-mère qu'elle avait eu de son premier mari le comte Henri4. Le premier mari d'Hedwige de Formach était le comte Gebhard de Supplinbourg, tandis que celui de Gertrude de Flandre était le comte Henri III de Louvain. Gertrude est donc la belle-mère de Simon Ier, lequel ne peut être que fils de Thierry II et d'Hedwige de Formach :
[See original article for chart embedded here.]
Biographie
     "Il succède à son père en 1115 et accompagne l'empereur Henri V en 1122 à la Diète de Worms, qui met fin à la Querelle des Investitures.
     "À l'intérieur du duché, il entre en conflit avec Étienne de Bar, évêque de Metz et Adalbéron de Montreuil, archevêque de Trèves, tous deux alliés du comte de Bar. L'archevêque l'excommunie une première fois à la suite d'une querelle avec les chanoines de la collégiale de Saint-Dié. Il est accusé de percevoir des taxes trop importantes sur les terres et en particulier sur celle de Coincourt ; l'intervention du pape ne fait pas changer l'attitude de Simon. Il est donc excommunié par l'archevêque de Trèves mais le pape Innocent II lève l'excommunication.
     "dont il est l'ami intervient par courrier auprès de l'épouse de Simon. Il détruit la forteresse mais usurpe des terres appartenant à l'abbaye. Le pape demande aux évêques de Toul et de Metz de défendre l'abbaye ; il excommunie Simon et jette l'interdit sur le duché.
     "En guerre contre l'archevêque de Trèves, et aidé par le duc de Bavière et le comte de Salm, il s'empare de plusieurs forteresses de l'archevêque. Lothaire lui vient secondairement en aide et il ravage les terres de l'archevêque. Adalberon l'excommunie et jette l'interdit sur ses états.
     "Il fonde plusieurs abbayes dont celle de Sturzelbronn en 1135 où il sera inhumé une seconde fois, après l'avoir été à Saint-Dié. En effet lors de son décès, son entourage ignore que Simon a été excommunié par le pape le 17 décembre 1138, et son corps est déposé dans l'église de la collégiale de Saint-Dié, mais celle-ci est frappée d'interdit. On le transporte donc à Sturzelbronn où la cérémonie se déroule le 19 avril 1139. L'interdit ne sera levé que 4 ans plus tard par le pape Luce II (bulle du 22 mars 1143). Il épouse en 1112 ou 1113 Adélaïde de Louvain, fille d'Henri III de Louvain et de Gertrude de Flandre, laquelle est la belle-mère de Simon4.
     "Adélaïde est inhumée dans l'ancienne église de l'abbaye Notre-Dame de L'Étanche qui fut détruite lors de la guerre de Trente Ans.
Ils ont comme enfants :
** Mathieu Ier (v. 1119 † 1176), duc de Lorraine
** Robert, seigneur de Floranges (près de Thionville)
** Agathe, épouse vers 1130 Renaud III, comte de Bourgogne († 1148/1149).
** Hedwige, épouse de Frédéric III, comte de Toul.
** Baudouin de Lorraine, moine ; il passe son existence en Flandre.
** Bertha,(1116 - † 1162) mariée à Herman III († 1160), margrave de Bade.
** (selon Wiki en5 : Mathilde, épouse de Gottfried Ier comte de Sponheim)
** Jean de Lorraine, une seule fois cité dans les documents ; cité comme témoin dans la charte de fondation de l'abbaye de l'Étanche ([...] Johannes frater Ducis [...]).

     "Selon certains auteurs, il serait aussi le père de :
** Pétronille, mariée à Arnould III de Berghes-Saint-Winocq, châtelain d'Ardres. Pétronille est dite fille de Marguerite de Hennin-Liétard6… ce qui simplifie guère la question matrimoniale de Simon 1er…
** Matthias
** Baudouin Ier, seigneur de Hénin-Liétard, marié à Isabeau de Hainaut, auteurs de la Maison d'Alsace-Hénin-Liétard. Baudouin, comme Pétronille sa sœur, est dit fils de Marguerite de Hennin-Liétard6.
** Vauthier de Haute Lorraine, Seigneur de Gerbéviller7

Sources
** Simon I. Herzog von Lothringen (1115-1139) [archive]: https://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/
** Henry Bogdan, La Lorraine des ducs, sept siècles d'histoire, Perrin, 2005 [détail des éditions] (ISBN 2-262-02113-9)
Liens externes
https://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/Notices d'autorité : Fichier d’autorité international virtuelGemeinsame Normdatei
https://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/Article sur le Château Fort de Frouard [archive]
Notes et références
1. Généalogie de Simon sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
2. La lorraine est une marche entre les royaumes de France, d'Allemagne et de Bourgogne.
3. Georges Poull, La Maison ducale de Lorraine, Nancy, Presses Universitaires de Nancy, 1991, 575 p. [détail de l’édition] (ISBN 2-86480-517-0), p. 28.
4. Généalogie d'Adélaïde de Louvain sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
5. Simon I duc de Lorraine, page Wikipédia en anglais.
6. François-Alexandre de La Chenaye-Aubert, Dictionnaire de la Noblesse, contenant les généalogies, l'histoire & la Chronologie des familles nobles de France, l'explication de leurs armes, & l'état des grandes Terres du Royaume aujourd'hui possédées à titre de Principautés, Duchés, Marquisats, Comtés, Vicomtés, Baronnies, &c, soit par création, par héritages, alliances, donations, substitutions, mutations, achats ou autrement., t. 1, Paris, La veuve Duchesne, 1770, 2e éd., 834 p., p. 202
7. Histoire [archive] de la Lorraine selon Dom Calmet, tome 2, pages xxxiii et xxxiv.17,18 "

; Per Genealogics:
     "Simon was born about 1076, the eldest son of Thierry II, duke of Lorraine, and his first wife Hedwig, Gräfin von Formbach. He was the duke of Lorraine from 1115 to his death.
     "Continuing his father's policy of support for the emperor, he accompanied Emperor Heinrich V to the Diet of Worms in 1122, where the Investiture Controversy was resolved.
     "He had stormy relations with the episcopates of his realm, fighting with Etienne de Bar, bishop of Metz, and Albero de Montreuil, archbishop of Trier, both allies of Thierry I (Dietrich), comte de Bar-le-Duc, whose claim to Lorraine against Simon's father had been quashed by Heinrich V's father Heinrich IV. Though Albero excommunicated him, Pope Innocent II lifted the excommunication.
     "With his wife Adelheid de Louvain, daughter of Henri III, comte de Louvain, and Gertrud van Vlaanderen, Simon had seven children of whom Mathieu I, Bertha and Agathe would have progeny.
     "Simon was a friend of Bernard of Clairvaux and he built many abbeys in his duchy, including that of Sturzelbronn in 1135. He died on 14 January 1138, and was buried at Sturzelbronn after his original burial in Saint-Dié."16

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Duke Simon I of Lorraine (1115-38), *ca 1076, +13.1.1138; m.Adelaide (+ca 1158), dau.of Ct Baldwin of Hainault /OR/ Adelaide, dau.of Gebhard von Supplembourg and Hedwige von Forbach."9 GAV-25.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Frlandres): "Simon 1er de Lorraine + 01/09/1139 duc de Haute-Lorraine (1115)
     ép. 1112/13 Adélaïde + après 1158 (soeur de l’empereur Lothaire)"

Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): "? Adélaïde (Adelheid) de Louvain + un 04/11 peu après 1158 (citée charte de donation après 01/09 en 1155 ; veuve, se retire à l’Abbaye cicstercienne de NotreDame-du-Tart près Dijon)
     ép. avant 05/08/1122 Simon 1er, duc de Lorraine «Le Grois» + 13-14/01/1139 (fils de Thierri II et d’Hedwig von Formbach) postérité."12 He was Duc de Lorraine between 1115 and 1138.9,7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html#PTL
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026284&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#SimonIdied1139B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thierry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026281&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#ThierryIIdied1115
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 8.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026282&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026285&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#AdelaideLouvaindiedafter1158.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 May 2020), memorial page for Simon Duke of Lorraine, I (1076–13 Jan 1139), Find a Grave Memorial no. 115056996, citing Cistercian Abbey, Sturzelbronn, Departement de la Moselle, Lorraine, France ; Maintained by Jerry D. Ferren (contributor 48024221), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/115056996/simon-duke_of_lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026284&tree=LEO
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_I,_Duke_of_Lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Simon Ier de Lorraine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Ier_de_Lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page (The House of Zähringen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120314&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#AgatheMRenaudIIIBourgogne
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathieu I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026286&tree=LEO

Adelheid (?) de Louvain1,2,3

F, #6655, b. 1074, d. after 4 November 1158
FatherHenri III (?) comte de Louvain, graf en vogt van Brabant4,5,6,7,8,9 b. c 1048, d. 5 Feb 1095
MotherGertrude (?) de Flandres10,3,4,5,11,9 b. 1070, d. 1117
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Adelheid (?) de Louvain was born in 1074.12 She married Simon I (?) Duke of Lorraine, son of Thierry II (Dirk, Didrik, Dietrich) (?) Duke of Upper Lorraine and Hedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach, between 1112 and 1113.10,13,14,15,16,4,5,17
Adelheid (?) de Louvain died after 4 November 1158.3,4,5
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Frlandres): "Simon 1er de Lorraine + 01/09/1139 duc de Haute-Lorraine (1115)
     ép. 1112/13 Adélaïde + après 1158 (soeur de l’empereur Lothaire)"

Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): "? Adélaïde (Adelheid) de Louvain + un 04/11 peu après 1158 (citée charte de donation après 01/09 en 1155 ; veuve, se retire à l’Abbaye cicstercienne de NotreDame-du-Tart près Dijon)
     ép. avant 05/08/1122 Simon 1er, duc de Lorraine «Le Grois» + 13-14/01/1139 (fils de Thierri II et d’Hedwig von Formbach) postérité."16

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 13.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: I.2 236.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIDE de Louvain (-4 Nov shortly after 1158). Simon Duke of Lorraine married "his stepmother's daughter whom she had by her first husband Graf Heinrich"[75]. In light of the chronological difficulties of this having been a daughter of Duke Thierry II's first wife, it is likely that Duke Simon's wife was the daughter of the comte de Louvain, whose wife married Duke Thierry as his second wife. “Simon...Lotharingorum dux” renounced claims over property of “ecclesia de Sancti-Remigii-Monte”, brought by “patris mei beatæ memoriæ ducis Theodorici”, with the support of “uxore mea...ducissa Adelide...cum Matthæo...unico nostro filio”, by undated charter[76]. Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1155, after 1 Sep, under which "Judit Romaricensis ecclesie abbatissa" donated property at the request of "Aledis mater ducis Mathei"[77]. After the death of her husband, Adelaide retired to the Cistercian abbey of Notre-Dame du Tart, near Dijon[78].
     "m (before 5 Aug 1122) SIMON I Duke of Lorraine, son of THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine & his first wife Hedwig von Formbach (-13/14 Jan 1139, bur Stürzelbronn)."
Med lands cites:
[75] Sächsische Weltchronik, MSH Deutsche Chroniken, II, p. 277, quoted in Poull, G. (1991) La Maison ducale de Lorraine (Presses universitaires de Nancy), p. 28.
[76] Sommier, J. C. (1726) Histoire de l’église de Saint-Diez, N, p. 376.
[77] Bridot, J. (ed.) Chartes de l'abbaye de Remiremont des origins à 1231 (Brepols) (“Remiremont”) 75, p. 166.
[78] Poull (1991), p. 31.5
GAV-25.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page (The House of Zähringen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Louvain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026285&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026285&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#AdelaideLouvaindiedafter1158. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#H3
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319752&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIIILouvaindied1095.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026283&tree=LEO
  12. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026284&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#SimonIdied1139B
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120314&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#AgatheMRenaudIIIBourgogne
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathieu I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026286&tree=LEO

Gertrud (?) de Louvain1,2

F, #6656
FatherHenri III (?) comte de Louvain, graf en vogt van Brabant3,4,5,6 b. c 1048, d. 5 Feb 1095
MotherGertrude (?) de Flandres1,2,7,6 b. 1070, d. 1117
Last Edited29 Oct 2020

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319752&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#H3
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIIILouvaindied1095. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026283&tree=LEO

Hedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach1,2

F, #6657, b. 1050, d. 1088
FatherFriedrich (?) Graf von Formbach3,2,4,5 b. c 1020, d. c 1060
MotherGertrude (?) von Haldensleben2,4,6 d. 21 Feb 1116
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Hedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach was born in 1050.7,8 She married Gerhard (?) Graf von Süpplinburg, Graf im Harzgau before 1075;
Her 1st husband.4,8,9 Hedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach married Thierry II (Dirk, Didrik, Dietrich) (?) Duke of Upper Lorraine, son of Gerard IV (?) Graf von Metz, Count of Alsace, Duke of Upper Lotharingia, Count of Chatenois and Hedwige (Hadwide) (?) de Namur, in 1079;
Her 2nd husband; his 1st wife. Genealogy.EU (Lorraine 11 page) says m. ca 1075; Genealogics says m. 1079.1,10,4,8,11
Hedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach died in 1088; Genealogy EU (Lorraine 11 page) says d. 1085/90; Med Lands says d. 1090/93; Genealogics says d. 1085-90.3,4,8
     ; Genealogy.EU (Lorraine 11): "A1. Duke Thierry II of Lorraine (1070-1115), +23.1./30.12.1115; 1m: ca 1075 Hedwig (+1085/90), dau.of Ct Friedrich von Formbach; 2m: 1095/96 Gertrude of Flanders (*ca 1080 +1117.)12"

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEDWIG (-[1090/93]). The Vita Wirntonis names "Fridericus" as father of "Hedwigis, mater Lotharii regis"[238]. According to the 14th century Genealogia comitum Neuburgensium sive Formbacensium, "Hadewic mater Lotharii regis et Ite comitisse de Purchausen" was the only daughter of "Fridericus senioris Tiemonis filius" & his wife[239]. Her alleged first marriage to "Graf Heinrich" is based on a misinterpretation of the report that Simon Duke of Lorraine married "his stepmother's daughter whom she had by her first husband Graf Heinrich"[240], assuming that Duke Simon was therefore the son of Hedwig's second husband, Thierry II Duke of Lorraine, by his second wife Gertrud de Flandre. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[241], Duke Simon was the son of his father's first wife Hedwig. Poull[242] refers to several sources which apparently indicate that he was the son of Duke Thierry II's second marriage, including Duke Simon's own act dated 11 Apr 1126 referring to his deceased "mother Gertrude". However, the chronology is highly unfavourable for this possibility. If Duke Simon's wife had been the daughter of Hedwig von Formbach, by an otherwise unknown first husband, she must have been born before 1072, considering that Hedwig gave birth to two children by her husband Gerhard von Süpplingenburg who died in 1075. This would be incompatible with Duke Simon's wife having given birth to at least seven children, even if their marriage took place as early as [1112/13] as suggested by Poull.
     "m firstly GERHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau, son of Graf im Harz- und Derlingau und in Nordthüringen & his wife Ida von Querfurt (-killed in battle Homburg 9 Jun 1075).
     "m secondly ([1080]) as his first wife, THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine, son of GERARD Duke of Upper Lotharingia [Matfriede] & his wife Hadwide --- (-30 Dec 1115)."
Med Lands cites:
[238] Vita Wirntonis Abbatis Formbacensis 9, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1128.
[239] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ II, MGH SS XXIV, p. 77.
[240] Sächsische Weltchronik, MSH SS, II, p. 277, quoted in Poull, G. (1991) La Maison ducale de Lorraine (Presses universitaires de Nancy), p. 28.
[241] ES I.2 204.
[242] Poull (1991), p. 28.4


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VI 129 ; VIII 131b.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 10.8


; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Edwige de Formbach (ou Hedwig van Formbach), née vers 1057 et morte entre 1085 et 10931, est la fille de Frédéric, comte de Formbach, et de Gertrude d'Haldensleben. Elle épouse en premières noces Gebhard de Supplinburg2 (mort le 9 juin 1075), comte de l'Harzgau. Après la mort de celui-ci, elle épouse vers 1075 ou 10801 Thierry II de Lorraine (mort en 1115), dont elle est la première épouse.
Descendance
     "Elle eut de son mariage avec Gebhard de Supplinbourg :
** Ida (morte en 1138)2, qui épousera Sighard X, comte de Tengling, Schala et Burghausen3 ;
** Lothaire de Supplinbourg (1075-1137), qui deviendra duc de Saxe à partir de 1106, roi des romains (c'est-à-dire candidat au trône impérial) en 1125, puis empereur du Saint-Empire romain germanique en 1133.

     "Elle eut de son mariage avec Thierry II de Lorraine 1 :
** Simon de Lorraine (mort en 11391), qui deviendra Simon Ier duc de Lorraine ;
** Gertrude de Lorraine (morte en 11441), qui changea son nom en Pétronille (dérivé du prénom Pierre) pour montrer sa fidélité envers le Saint-Siège. Elle épousa Florent II, comte de Hollande ;
** Frounica1 ;
** Hara (morte après 1156)1, qui deviendra abbesse de Bouxières-aux-Dames1.

Notes et références
1. « BAVARIAN NOBILITY » [archive], sur fmg.ac (consulté le 23 février 2017): http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HedwigFormbachdied10901093
2. « SAXONY NOBILITY » [archive], sur fmg.ac (consulté le 23 février 2017): http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#Gerharddied1075
3. « BAVARIAN NOBILITY » [archive], sur fmg.ac (consulté le 23 février 2017): http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#SieghardIXTenglingBurghausendied1104B."13



; This is the same person as ”Hedwig of Formbach” at Wikipedia, as ”Edwige de Formbach” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Hedwig van Formbach” at Wikipedia (DE).14,15,16 GAV-30 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERHARD von Süpplingenburg, son of BERNHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau & his wife Ida von Querfurt (-killed in battle Unstrutt near Homburg 9 Jun 1075). He is named as son of Ida in the Annalista Saxo[319]. Graf im Harzgau 1052. A supporter of the nobles who opposed Heinrich IV King of Germany, he incited the rebellion of Saxony and was killed in battle fighting the king's forces[320]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "9 Jun" of "Geuehardus com"[321]. The Chronicon Garstense records that "Ernust marchio Austrie et Gebehardus pater Lotharii postea imperatoris" were killed in the Saxon wars in 1075 "iuxta fluvium…(Unstrutt)"[322].
     "m as her first husband, HEDWIG von Formbach, daughter of FRIEDRICH Graf von Formbach & his wife Gertrud von Haldensleben. The Vita Wirntonis names "Fridericus" as father of "Hedwigis, mater Lotharii regis"[323]. According to the 14th century Genealogia comitum Neuburgensium sive Formbacensium, "Hadewic mater Lotharii regis et Ite comitisse de Purchausen" was the only daughter of "Fridericus senioris Tiemonis filius" & his wife[324]. She married secondly ([1080]) as his first wife, Thierry II Duke of Lorraine. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[319] Annalista Saxo 1009 and 1106.
[320] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 99.
[321] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg.
[322] Rauch, A. (ed.) (1793) Rerum Austriacum Scriptores Vol. I (Vienna), Chronicon Garstense, p. 13.
[323] Vita Wirntonis Abbatis Formbacensis 9, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1128.
[324] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ II, MGH SS XXIV, p. 77.9

Family 2

Thierry II (Dirk, Didrik, Dietrich) (?) Duke of Upper Lorraine b. c 1055, d. 23 Jan 1115
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Hedwig von Formbach: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026282&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html#PTL
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HedwigFormbachdied10901093. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120311&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Haldensleben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201833&tree=LEO
  7. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026282&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#Gerharddied1075
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#ThierryIIdied1115
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thierry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026281&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html#D2
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Edwige de Formbach: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwige_de_Formbach. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwig_of_Formbach. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Edwige de Formbach: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwige_de_Formbach. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  16. [S4777] Wikipedia - De vrije encyclopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Hedwig van Formbach: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwig_van_Formbach. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NL).
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#Idadied1138
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar von Supplinburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060070&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026284&tree=LEO
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 8.
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#SimonIdied1139B
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geertruid/Petronella de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018666&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#GertrudePetronilladied1144

Friedrich (?) Graf von Formbach1,2

M, #6658, b. circa 1020, d. circa 1060
FatherThiemo I (?) Graf im Schweinachgau, Graf in Reichenhall, Graf im Salzburggau3,4,5 d. c 7 Mar 1050
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited6 Aug 2020
     Friedrich (?) Graf von Formbach married Gertrude (?) von Haldensleben, daughter of Konrad von Haldensleben Graf von Haldensleben;
Her 1st husband.4,5,6,7 Friedrich (?) Graf von Formbach was born circa 1020.4
Friedrich (?) Graf von Formbach died circa 1060; killed in battle.4
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Friedrich was born about 1020, the son of Tiemo, Graf im Schweinachgau, Graf in Reichenhall, from a Bavarian family. About 1049 Friedrich secretly married the great Saxon heiress, Gertrud von Haldensleben, daughter of Konrad, Graf von Haldensleben and granddaughter of St. Vladimir I 'the Great', grand duke of Kiev and Novgorod.
     “About 1050 they had a daughter Hedwig. However their marriage greatly angered Emperor Heinrich III, and Friedrich was forced to flee the court. He was later forgiven and invited back to court. However on his journey back in 1059 or 1060 he was waylaid and murdered by the emperor's retainers, wishing to punish the disgrace of a marriage between a Saxon heiress and a non-Saxon.
     “Friedrich's daughter Hedwig married twice. With her first husband Gebhard, Graf von Supplinburg, she had a son who would become the Holy Roman Emperor Lothar von Supplinburg. She also had progeny with her second husband Thierry II, duke of Lorraine.
     “Friedrich's widow became the second wife of Ordulf, duke of Saxony, but did not have children. She died on 21 February 1116.”.4

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XVI 37; VI 129.4 GAV-27 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "FRIEDRICH (-killed [1060], bur Vornbach). According to the 14th century Genealogia comitum Neuburgensium sive Formbacensium, "Tiemo senior genuit iuniorem Tiemonem, Hermannum Bambergensem prepositum, Dietricum clericum, Fridericum, Heinricum"[235].
     "m as her first husband, GERTRUD von Haldensleben, daughter of KONRAD Graf von Haldensleben [Nordmark] & his wife --- [von Friesland] (-21 Feb 1116). According to the 14th century Genealogia comitum Neuburgensium sive Formbacensium, "Fridericus senioris Tiemonis filius" married "neptem ipsius regis Gertrudem", the king referred to being Heinrich IV King of Germany, and was buried at Formbach[236]. The primary source which confirms her precise parentage has not yet been identified. She married secondly as his second wife, Ordulf Duke in Saxony [Billung]. The Annalista Saxo records the death in 1116 of "Gertrudis ductrix, avia Liuderi ducis"[237]."
Med Lands cites:
[235] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ II, MGH SS XXIV, pp. 76-7, the introduction to this edition confirming that the Genealogia includes many errors.
[236] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ II, MGH SS XXIV, p. 77.
[237] Annalista Saxo 1116.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "GERTRUD (-21 Feb 1116). According to the 14th century Genealogia comitum Neuburgensium sive Formbacensium, "Fridericus senioris Tiemonis filius" married "neptem ipsius regis Gertrudem", the king referred to being Heinrich IV King of Germany, and was buried[ at Formbach[401]. The primary source which confirms her precise parentage has not been identified. She was imprisoned at Mainz in 1076. The Annalista Saxo records the death in 1116 of "Gertrudis ductrix, avia Liuderi ducis"[402].
     "m firstly FRIEDRICH [von Formbach], son of TIEMO I Graf von Schweinachgau, in Reichenhall und im Salzburggau & his wife --- (-killed in battle [1060]).
     "m secondly (1071 after May) as his second wife, ORDULF Duke in Saxony, son of BERNHARD II Herzog in Sachsen [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (-28 Mar 1072, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis).]"
Med Lands cites:
[401] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ II, MGH SS XXIV, p. 77.
[402] Annalista Saxo 1116.7

Family

Gertrude (?) von Haldensleben d. 21 Feb 1116
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120311&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 11 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html#PTL
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#TiemoSchweinachgaudied1050B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120311&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#FriedrichFormbachdied1060
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Haldensleben: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00201833&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRANDENBURG,%20PRUSSIA.htm#GertrudHaldenslebendied1116.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gräfin Hedwig von Formbach: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026282&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HedwigFormbachdied10901093

Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia1,2,3

F, #6659, b. between 1100 and 1103, d. 1130
FatherHeinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria1,4,2 b. c 1074, d. 13 Dec 1126
MotherWulfhilda (?) of Saxony1,5,2 b. c 1075, d. 29 Dec 1126
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited3 Aug 2020
     Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia was born between 1100 and 1103; Wikipedia says b. 19 May 1100.6,1,7,2,3 She married Friedrich II (?) von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia, son of Friedrich I (?) von Hohenstauffen, Duke of Alsace and Schwaben and Agnes (?) von Waiblingen, circa 1121; his 1st wife.7,8,1,9,10
Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia was buried in 1130 at Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1101
     DEATH     20 Feb 1131 (aged 29–30)
     Nobility. Daughter of Heinrich 'the Black' of Bavaria and Wulfhild of Saxony. She married Friedrich II of Swabia around 1120 as his first wife. She bore him two children; Friedrich, who will later be German King and Bertha.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry Duke of Bavaria 1074–1126
          Wulfhild Of Saxony 1072–1126
     Spouse
          Friedrich II of Swabia 1090–1147 (m. 1520)
     Siblings
          Mathilde von Bayern 1105–1183
          Henry X of Bavaria 1108–1139
     Children
          Friedrich I Barbarossa 1122–1190
          Bertha of Hohenstaufen 1124–1195
     BURIAL     Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 2 Dec 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 139502719.11
Judith (?) von Bayern, Duchess of Swabia died in 1130; Genealogy.EU (Welf 2 and Hohenstaufen pages) say d. 1132; Genealogics says d. after 22 Feb 1130; Wikipeida says d. 27 Aug 1130.6,1,7,2,3
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Judith was born about 1103, the eldest daughter of Heinrich 'the Black', Herzog von Bayern, and Wulfhild von Sachsen. Sometime between 1119 and 1121 she married Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen, Herzog von Schwaben, elder son of Friedrich I, Herzog von Schwaben, and Agnes von Franken. This dynastic marriage united the house of Welf and the house of Hohenstaufen, the two most powerful and influential families in Germany. They had two children, Friedrich and Bertha, who would both have progeny. Friedrich would become Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa.
     "In 1125 Judith's father initially supported the candidacy of her husband to succeed Emperor Heinrich V as King of the Germans (emperor-elect), but he eventually switched his support to Lothar von Supplinburg, duke of Saxony, who became emperor. The defection of Judith's father created an enmity between the Welfs and the Swabians that would have far-reaching consequences in Germany which would last throughout the 12th century. It is not known how this affected relations between Judith and her husband.
     "Judith died after 22 February 1130, and was buried at Waldburg in Heiligen Forst, Alsace. Shortly after Judith's death Friedrich married as his second wife Agnes von Saarbrücken."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.2

; Per Med Lands: " JUDITH (after 1100-22 Feb [1130/31], bur Walburg im Heiligen Forst, Alsace). The Historia Welforum names (in order) "Iuditham, Sophiam, Mahtildem, Wulfildem" as the four daughters of "Heinricus dux ex Wulfilde", specifying that Judith married "Friderico Suevorum duci"[359]. The Annalista Saxo names "Heinricum inclitum ducem Saxonie et Bawarie et Welfonem et quatuor filias" as children of Duke Heinrich & his wife Wulfhild, specifying that one of the daughters (mentioned first in the list of daughters, but not named) married "Fridericus dux Suevorum"[360]. m ([1119/21]) as his first wife, FRIEDRICH II “der Einäugige” Duke of Swabia, son of FRIEDRICH I Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his wife Agnes of Germany (1090-Alzey 4 or 6 Apr 1147, bur Walburg Abbey). "
Med Lands cites:
[359] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463.
[360] Annalista Saxo 1106.12


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Judith of Bavaria, Duchess of Swabia (19 May 1100 – 27 Aug 1130[1]) was a Duchess of Swabia by marriage to Frederick II, Duke of Swabia. She was the mother of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor, known to history as "Barbarossa".
Life
     "Judith was born 19 May 1100, the eldest daughter of Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria and Wulfhilde of Saxony, daughter of Magnus, Duke of Saxony and Sophia of Hungary, and thereby a member of the powerful German House of Welf. She had three brothers Henry X, Duke of Bavaria, Conrad, and Welf; and three sisters, Sophia, Matilda, and Wulfhild. The Historia Welforum names in order Iuditham, Mahtildem, Sophium, and Wulfildem as the four daughters of Henricus dux ex Wulfilde.[2] This is evidence that Judith was the eldest daughter. She had in addition to her seven legitimate siblings, one half-brother, Adalbert, born of her father's relationship with an unnamed mistress.
Duchess of Swabia
     "On an unknown date between 1119 and 1121, she married as his first wife, Frederick II, Duke of Swabia (1090 – 6 April 1147); this dynastic marriage united the House of Welf and the House of Hohenstaufen, the two most powerful and influential families in Germany. The Historia Welforum specified that Judith married Friderico Suevorum duci,[3] but did not mention the date.
     "In 1125, her father initially supported the candidacy of her husband to succeed Emperor Henry V as King of Germany, however he eventually switched his support to Lothar III, Holy Roman Emperor. The defection of Judith's father created an enmity between the Welfs and the Swabians that would have far-reaching consequences in Germany which would last throughout the 12th century.[4] It is not known how this affected relations between Judith and her husband. It is curious to note that no further children were born to the couple after the birth of their daughter Bertha in 1123.
     "She died on 27 Aug 1130 and was buried at Waldburg in Heiligen Forst, Alsace.[5] Shortly after Judith's death Frederick married as his second wife, Agnes of Saarbrücken.
Issue
     "She had two children:[6]
** Frederick I Barbarossa, Holy Roman Emperor (1122 – 10 June 1190), married on 9 June 1156 Beatrice I, Countess of Burgundy, by whom he had 12 children.
** Bertha (also called Judith) of Swabia (1123 – 18 October 1194/25 March 1195), married in 1138[7] Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine, by whom she had seven children.

References
1. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Bavaria, Dukes
2. Cawley
3. Cawley
4. Cawley
5. Cawley
6. Cawley
7. http://www.thePeerage.com
Sources
** Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Bavaria, Dukes: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101."3

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Judith, *after 1100, +ca 1130/31; m.1119/21 Duke Friedrich II of Swabia (*ca 1090 +1147.)1" GAV-24 EDV-24.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036580&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Bavaria,_Duchess_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich 'the Black': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020369&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020370&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-25, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  8. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - House of Hohenstaufen. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064951&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036580&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2019), memorial page for Judith of Bavaria (1101–20 Feb 1131), Find A Grave Memorial no. 139502719, citing Kloster Lorch, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Ostalbkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/139502719/judith-of_bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Friedrich I Barbarossa: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013542&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIGermanydied1190B.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha von Schwaben: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026287&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIA.htm#BerthaJudithdied1194

Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria1,2

M, #6660, b. circa 1074, d. 13 December 1126
FatherWelf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria3,2,4,5 b. c 1036, d. 9 Nov 1101
MotherJudith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland2,5,6,7 b. c 1033, d. 5 Mar 1094
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria was born circa 1074.8,9 He married Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony, daughter of Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony and Zsofia (?) Princess of Hungary, circa 1095.8,10,2,9,11
Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria died on 13 December 1126 at Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).8,3,2,9,12
Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria was buried after 13 December 1126 at Weingarten Abbey, Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1074
     DEATH     13 Dec 1126 (aged 51–52), Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Family Members
     Parents
          Welf I of Bavaria 1032–1101
          Judith of Flanders 1033–1094
     Spouse
          Wulfhild Of Saxony 1072–1126
     Siblings
          Welf II of Bavaria 1072–1120
     Children
          Judith of Bavaria 1101–1131
          Mathilde von Bayern 1105–1183
          Henry X of Bavaria 1108–1139
     BURIAL     Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Jerry D. Ferren
     Added: 7 Aug 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 115057770.12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Heinrich 'the Black' was born in 1074, the son of Welf I, duke of Bavaria and Judith of Flanders. He was the younger brother of Welf II, duke of Bavaria. Heinrich married Wulfhild of Saxony, the daughter of Magnus, duke of Saxony and Zofia of Hungary. He added to the family holdings in Swabia and Upper Italy additional holdings in Saxony through his marriage. He and Wulfhild had seven children of whom five would have progeny, including his eldest son Heinrich 'the Proud', and his daughter Judith who married Friedrich II von Hohenstaufen, duke of Swabia.
     "Heinrich succeeded his brother Welf II to the duchy of Bavaria in 1120. In 1125 he supported Lothar von Supplinburg, duke of Saxony in the election for German king, and not his own son-in-law Friedrich von Hohenstaufen, father of the future Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa. Heinrich had strong ties to Lothar, as his son Heinrich 'the Proud' married Lothar's daughter Gertrud von Supplinburg.
     "Heinrich 'the Black' died aged 52 on 13 December 1126 in Ravensburg bei Weingarten, and was buried in the foundations at Weingarten. He was succeeded as duke of Bavaria by Heinrich 'the Proud'."9


; Per Genealogy.EU: "[2m.] Heinrich "der Schwarze", Duke of Bavaria (1120-26) as Heinrich IX, *ca 1074, +Ravensburg 13.12.1126; m.Wulfhild of Saxony (*1075 +Altdorf 29.12.1126.)2"


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 11.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH, son of WELF I Duke of Bavaria & his [second/third] wife Judith de Flandre ([1074]-Ravensburg 13 Dec 1126, bur Weingarten). The Annalista Saxo records the death in 1126 of "Heinricus dux Bawarie…filius Welphonis ducis…[et] Iudhitam"[335]. "Dux Gewelfo eiusque…uxor Iudita" donated property to Kloster Weingarten, with the consent of "filiorum suorum Gwelfonis et Heinrici", dated 12 Mar 1094[336]. On the death of his father-in-law in 1106, he inherited extensive territories in Saxony around Lüneburg and in the Bardengau[337]. He was appointed to succeed his brother in 1120 as HEINRICH IX "der Schwarze" Duke of Bavaria. He initially supported the candidacy of his son-in-law Friedrich Duke of Swabia to succeed Emperor Heinrich V as King of Germany in 1125, but eventually supported the election of Lothar von Süpplingenberg, presumably on the understanding of his son's marriage to Lothar's only daughter, which took place in 1127[338]. The enmity of the Staufen family which this created was to have far-reaching consequences in Germany for the rest of the century. Duke Heinrich became a monk at Weingarten shortly before his death[339]. The Historia Welforum records that Duke Heinrich became a monk shortly before he died "in castro Ravenspurch"[340]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "12 Dec" of "Henricus dux"[341]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "Id Dec" of "Heinricus dux et m n c …pater Welfonis, hic sepultus"[342].
     "m WULFHILD of Saxony, daughter of MAGNUS Duke of Saxony [Billung] & his wife Zsófia of Hungary (-Altdorf 29 Dec 1126, bur Weingarten). The Annalista Saxo names "Wifhildem et Eilicam" as the two daughters of Duke Magnus & his wife, specifying that Wulfhild married "Heinrico duci, filio Welfi ducis senioris de Bawaria"[343]. The Historia Welforum records that Wulfhild died at Altdorf "decimo sexton die post mortem mariti" and was buried "in monasterio sancti Martini"[344]. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "29 Dec" of "Wlfhild ducissa"[345]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "IV Kal Jan" of "Wuolfhildis ducissa hic sepulta"[346].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Duke Heinrich's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[335] Annalista Saxo 1126.
[336] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, I, p. VIII.
[337] Jordan (1986), p. 6.
[338] Jordan (1986), p. 7.
[339] Jordan (1986), p. 7.
[340] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463.
[341] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg.
[342] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.
[343] Annalista Saxo 1070.
[344] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463.
[345] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg.
[346] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221.13


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Henry IX (1075 – 13 December 1126), called the Black, a member of the House of Welf, was Duke of Bavaria from 1120 to 1126.
Life and reign
     "Henry was the second son of Duke Welf I of Bavaria (d. 1101) from his marriage with Judith,[1] daughter of Count Baldwin IV of Flanders. As a young man, he administered the family's Este property south of the Alps.
     "Through his marriage to Wulfhilde, daughter of Duke Magnus of Saxony,[1] about 1095, he acquired part of the Billung estates around Lüneburg (the nucleus of the later Welf duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg). He aspired to succeed his father-in-law as Saxon duke when Magnus died without male heirs in 1106, but was denied as the new king Henry V enfeoffed his follower Count Lothair of Supplinburg.
     "Duke Henry nevertheless upheld close relations with the ruling Salian dynasty. In 1116, he joined Emperor Henry V's second Italian campaign to seize the estates of late Margravine Matilda of Tuscany. He succeeded his elder brother Welf II as Bavarian duke, when the latter died childless in 1120. Henry was also instrumental in bringing about the 1122 Concordat of Worms, ending the long-lasting Investiture Controversy between Pope and Emperor.
     "Upon the emperor's death, Duke Henry played a vital role in the royal election of 1125: first supporting his son-in-law, the Hohenstaufen duke Frederick II of Swabia, he switched his allegiance to his old rival Duke Lothair of Saxony —probably after Lothair promised that Gertrude, his only daughter and heir, would marry Henry's son Henry the Proud. The marriage was concluded in May 1127. The estrangement between the Welf and Hohenstaufen dynasties ("Guelphs and Ghibellines") lasted until the 13th century.
     "After Lothair won the tumultuous election, he imposed an Imperial ban on Frederick II, however, the king's forces were not able to conquer the Hohenstaufen territories in Swabia. In 1126 Henry abdicated as Bavarian duke in favour of his second son Henry the Proud and retired to the family foundation of Weingarten Abbey in Upper Swabia, possibly to not be obliged to participate in the prosecution of his son-in-law.
     "Henry died shortly thereafter and was buried in Weingarten. His wife Wulfhilde outlived him by only 16 days. Henry's epithet "the Black" has not been recorded before the 13th century. Both Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and his bitter rival Henry the Lion were his grandsons.
Issue
     "Henry and Wulfhilde had the following children:
** Judith, married Frederick II, Duke of Swabia[2]
** Conrad (died 17 March 1126)
** Henry X the Proud, married Gertrude of Süpplingenburg,[3] succeeded his father as Duke of Bavaria
** Welf VI (died 1191)[1]
** Sophia, married Berthold III, Duke of Zähringen and secondly Margrave Leopold of Styria[1]
** Wulfhild, married Rudolf I, Count of Bregenz[1]
** Mathilde, married Diepold IV, Margrave of Vohburg and Count Gebhard III of Sulzbach[1]
** Adalbert, Abbot of Corvey

References
1. Lyon 2013, p. 245.
2. Barber 2004, p. 193.
3. Luscombe & Riley-Smith 2006, p. 755.
Sources
** Barber, Malcolm (2004). The Two Cities: Medieval Europe 1050–1320. Routledge.
** Lyon, Jonathan R. (2013). Princely Brothers and Sisters. Cornell University Press.
** Luscombe, David; Riley-Smith, Jonathan, eds. (2006). The New Cambridge Medieval History. Cambridge University Press.
Literature
** Bernd Schneidmüller: Die Welfen. Herrschaft und Erinnerung (819–1252) (= Urban-Taschenbücher 465). Kohlhammer, Stuttgart etc., 2000, ISBN 3-17-014999-7, pp. 149 ff.
** Sigmund Ritter von Riezler (1880), "Heinrich IX", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 11, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 461–462
** Kurt Reindel (1969), "Heinrich IX. der Schwarze", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 8, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 343–343; (full text online)
External links
** Deed of Henry IX for Ranshofen Abbey, 30 July 1125, "digitalised image". Photograph Archive of Old Original Documents (Lichtbildarchiv älterer Originalurkunden). University of Marburg.: http://lba.hist.uni-marburg.de/lba-cgi/kleioc/0010KlLBA/exec/showrecord/zugangsnummer/%229149%22.14 "
Heinrich I "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria was also known as Henry IX "the Black" (?) Duke of Bavaria.3,2 GAV-25 EDV-25. He was Duke of Bavaria between 1120 and 1126.2,14

Family

Wulfhilda (?) of Saxony b. c 1075, d. 29 Dec 1126
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020475&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020476&tree=LEO
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-24, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich 'the Black': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020369&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Billung page (Billung family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/small/billung.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020370&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 November 2019), memorial page for Henry Duke of Bavaria (1074–13 Dec 1126), Find A Grave Memorial no. 115057770, citing Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Jerry D. Ferren (contributor 48024221) , at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/115057770/henry-duke_of_bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://lba.hist.uni-marburg.de/lba-cgi/kleioc/0010KlLBA/exec/showrecord/zugangsnummer/%229149%22
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_IX,_Duke_of_Bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00112667&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wulfhild of Bavaria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036578&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#Wulfhiddied1156
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036580&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330302&tree=LEO