Juan Garcias de Padilla Lord of Villagera

M, #7591, b. circa 1305, d. 1355
FatherGarcia Lopez de Padilla b. 1256, d. 1336
Last Edited8 Oct 2020
     Juan Garcias de Padilla Lord of Villagera married Maria de Henestrosa, daughter of Fernan Gonsalez Sire de Henestrosa and Maria Arias de Asturias.1 Juan Garcias de Padilla Lord of Villagera was born circa 1305.
Juan Garcias de Padilla Lord of Villagera died in 1355.
      Juan Garcias de Padilla Lord of Villagera was also known as Juan Garciez de Padilla Sire de Villagera.

Family

Maria de Henestrosa b. c 1305
Child

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=bferris&id=I28374
  2. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

John (?) of Lancaster1

M, #7592, b. circa 1362
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG1,2,3,4 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster1,2,4,5 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     John (?) of Lancaster died; died young.1 He was born circa 1362.6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Edward (?) of Lancaster1

M, #7593, b. circa 1365
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG1,2,3,4 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster1,2,4,5 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Edward (?) of Lancaster died; died young.1 He was born circa 1365.6,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

John (?) of Lancaster1

M, #7594, b. before 4 May 1366
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG2,3 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster1,3,4 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     John (?) of Lancaster died; died young.1 He was born before 4 May 1366.5,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England

M, #7595, b. 3 April 1367, d. 20 March 1413
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG1,2,3 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster1,3,4 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England was buried at Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, co. Kent, England.5

He was born on 3 April 1367 at Bolingbroke Castle, Old Bolingbroke, East Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England.5,6,7,8 He married Lady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG, daughter of Sir Humphrey IX de Bohun Knt., KG, Lord bohun, 2nd Earl of Northampton, 7th Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex and Lady Joan Fitz Alan, between 30 July 1380 and 10 February 1381 at Arundel Castle, Arundel, co. Sussex, England;
His 1st wife. Faris (1999) pp. 205-206: "...aged eleven at time of marriage."5,1,9,8 Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England married Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre, daughter of Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre and Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre, on 7 February 1403 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England;
His 2nd wife.5,1,10,11,8,12
Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England died on 20 March 1413 at Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England, at age 45.5,8,13
Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England was buried after 21 March 1413 at Trinity Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, co. Kent, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     3 Apr 1367, Old Bolingbroke, East Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England
     DEATH     21 Mar 1413 (aged 45), Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     English Monarch. The son of John of Gaunt and Blanche of Lancaster, Henry, Duke of Lancaster had an on/off relationship with his cousin, King Richard II. He was one of the nobles who persecuted Richard's advisors and favorites, but his excellence as a soldier earned him Richard's favor. However, Richard's increasing suspicions led to Henry's banishment for 10 years. When Richard confiscated John of Gaunt's vast Lancastrian estates in 1399, Henry invaded England while the king was on campaign on Ireland and took the throne for himself, imprisoning Richard. Henry was crowned at Westminster Abbey on October 13. Henry's first wife, Mary Bohun, gave him 7 children before her death in 1394. His second wife and queen, Joan of Navarre, whom he married on February 7, 1403 was a very unpopular choice. The manner in which Henry took the throne set the stage for much of his reign. Incessant rebellions and revolts became very costly to crush, and his support dwindled. In 1405 he executed Archbishop of York Richard Scrope on charges of conspiracy, which alarmed his people and only compounded his unpopularity. The king's last two years were marked by failing health, and his son Prince Henry took over the reigns of government. Henry died in the Abbot of Westminster's house in the Jerusalem chamber, at the age of 46. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
      John of Gaunt 1340–1399
      Blanche of Lancaster 1345–1369
     Spouses
      Mary de Bohun Plantagenet 1369–1394
      Joan of Navarre 1370–1437
     Siblings
      Philippa of Lancaster 1360–1415
      Elizabeth Lancaster 1363–1425
     Half Siblings
      John de Beaufort 1371–1410
      Catherine Plantagenet Of Lancaster 1373–1418 (m. 1388)
      Henry Beaufort 1374–1447
      Joan Beaufort Neville 1375–1440
      Thomas de Beaufort 1377–1426
     Children
      Edward Plantagenet 1382–1382
      Blanche of England 1382–1409
      Henry V 1386–1422
      Thomas Plantagenet 1388–1421
      John of Lancaster 1389–1435
      Humphrey Plantagenet 1390–1447
      Philippa 1394–1430
     BURIAL     Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England
     PLOT     Trinity Chapel
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find A Grave Memorial 1959.13
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . page 202.
     2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 833.8 He was Earl of Hereford & Northamptom (jure uxoris.)5

; Per Genealogics:
     "Henry IV, king of England, was born on 3 April in Bolingbroke Castle, the son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and his first wife Blanche of Lancaster.
     "In 1377 he was styled Earl of Derby and, in 1380, married Mary de Bohun, a co-heiress of the great earldom of Hereford. He was one of the five lords appellant who, in the Merciless Parliament of 1388, forced Richard II to dismiss the favourites associated with his tyrannical rule.
     "Adventurous and enterprising, in 1390 he joined the Teutonic knights fighting in Lithuania and also went to Prussia, Cyprus and on pilgrimage to Jerusalem. To his renown as a fighting man, he added a reputation for generosity, elegance and well-developed literary and musical tastes.
     "Returning to the political turmoil of Richard II's court, he regained Richard II's favour and, in 1397, was created Duke of Hereford. In 1398 he quarrelled with one of the other former lords appellant, Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, and attempted to fight a duel with him. Richard II, increasingly suspicious of Henry, banished him for ten years.
     "In 1399, when Henry's father died and Richard II confiscated his vast Lancastrian estates, the exiled Henry found himself at the head of Richard II's growing band of enemies who had suffered similar wrongs. In 1399, while the king was campaigning in Ireland, Henry invaded England. Richard II was forced to abdicate on his return and was imprisoned at Pontefract Castle where he died in 1400, presumed murdered.
     "Henry, now King Henry IV, had to fight to retain his throne, first against Richard II's supporters; from 1400 to 1408, against the Welsh under Owain Glyndwr; from 1403 to 1408 against the powerful Percy family; and even against Richard Scrope, Archbishop of York.
     "In 1394 Mary de Bohun had died, and, on 7 February 1403 in Winchester Cathedral, Henry IV married Jeanne de Navarre, widow of Jean V, Duke of Brittany. In 1405 he had Richard Scrope, Archbishop of York, executed which was a major political blunder. After 1408 Henry IV fell ill with a mysterious disease, perhaps leprosy. Many believed this was God's vengeance for his misdeed against the Archbishop. He became to rely more and more on his eldest son and heir and by 1410 Prince Henry effectively ruled in his ailing father's place. In 1411 the king, perhaps fearing an impending coup, briefly resumed power. However, in 1413 he took to his sickbed once more and died at Winchester.
     "When told that the chamber in which he was sick was called Jerusalem, he responded: 'Lauds be given to the Father of Heaven, for now I know that I shall die here in this chamber, according to the prophecy of me declared, that I should depart this life in Jerusalem.8'

; Faris (1999) pp. 205-206: [quote] HENRY IV OF ENGLAND [of Bolingbroke], K.G., Earl of Hereford and Northampton jure uxoris, only surviving son and heir, was born at Bolingbroke Castle, co. Lincoln, in April 1366. He was married for the first time at Arundel Castle between 30 July 1380 and 10 Feb. 1381 to MARY DE BOHUN, younger daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th and last Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex and 2nd Earl of Northampton (descendant of King Edward I), by Joan Fitz Alan, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, 9th Earl of Arundel (descendant of King Henry Ill) [see BOHUN 10 for her ancestry]. She was born about 1370 and was aged about eleven at time of marriage. She died at Peterborough Castle aged twenty-four after the birth of her youngest child on 4 July 1394, and was buried in Leicester Cathedral. From 1394 he devoted himself to work in Parliament and Council. He was created Duke of Hereford on 29 Sep. 1397. Very soon afterwards began a quarrel with Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, which was ended in the banishment of both Dukes in September 1398. On his father's death in February 1399, Henry succeeded him as Duke of Lancaster, Earl of Lincoln and Leicester, and the banishment was rescinded. He returned to England at the end of June and deposed his cousin, King Richard II. He was declared King of England by Parliament on 30 Sep. 1399, as Henry IV, and was crowned King of England on 13 Oct. 1399. He was married for the second time at Winchester on 7 Feb. 1403 to JEANNE DE NAVARRE, daughter of Charles II, Roi de Navarre, by Jeanne, daughter of Jean de France, Roi de France. She was born about 1370. HENRY IV, King of England, died at Westminster on 20 Mar. 1413, and was buried in Canterbury Cathedral. His widow died at Havering-at-Bower on 9 July 1437.
CF. 6:477 (1926). C.P. 7:417-418 (1929). Paget (1977), p. 27.
Children & grandchildren of Henry IV of England, by Mary Bohun:
i.     A son, born April 1382, died in infancy.
ii.     HENRY V OF ENGLAND, born 9 Aug. 1387 [see next].
iii.     THOMAS OF LANCASTER, born 29 Sep. 1388, created Duke of Clarence, Earl of Albemarle 9 July 1412, slain at the Battle of Beaugé 22 Mar. 1421 s.p., buried at Canterbury; married MARGARET HOLAND, widow of his uncle of the half-blood, John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset, and daughter of Thomas Holand, 2nd Earl of Kent, by Alice Fits Alan, daughter of Richard, 5th Earl of Arundel.
iv.     JOHN OF LANCASTER, born 20 June 1389, created Earl of Kendal, Duke of Bedford 16 May 1414, Regent of France September 1422, died at Rouen in the night of 14-15 Sep. 1435 s.p., buried there; married, first, ANNE DE BOURGOGNE, daughter of Jean, Duc de Bourgogne, second, at Théroueanne 22 Apr. 1433 JACQUETTE DE LUXEMBOURG, daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg, Comte de St. Pol (descendant of Charlemagne), by Margaret, daughter of Francesco del Bazo, Dues d'Andria. She married second about 1436, with issue, Richard Wydeville, Knt., afterwards 1st Earl Rivers [see YORK 6].
v.     HUMPHREY OF GLOUCESTER [the Good], fourth and youngest son, was born on 3 Oct 1390 while his father was in Prussia, knighted 12 Oct 1399, nom. KG. about 1400, said to have been educated at Balliol College, Oxford, to which university he was a generous benefactor, presented many books to the University from about 1411, which formed the nucleus of the Bodleian Library, created Earl of Pembroke and Duke of Gloucester 16 May 1414, summoned to Parliament from 16 Sep. 1414, received command of siege of Harfleur, wounded at Agincourt on 25 Oct. 1415, and took a very active part in the King's second expedition to France, Protector of the Realm and Church of England, 5 Dec. 1423. His first marriage had disastrous effects on the relations between England and her chief ally in the field, the Duke of Burgundy, went to Hainault with his wife Jacqueline in October 1424 in an attempt to recover her lordships, soon discouraged, leaving her at Moos, returning to England in 1425 with Eleanor Cobham; after Eleanor's conviction of witchcraft and sorcery and indictment for treason as aiming at the King's life (she confessed to having used charms to obtain her husband's love), he gradually withdrew from politics and state affairs; died intestate, probably of natural causes, on 23 Feb. 1447, s.p. legit., but under suspicious circumstances, being under arrest at the time at Bury St. Edmunds, buried St. Albans Abbey; married, first, before 7 Mar. 1422/3 JACQUELINE DE HAINAULT, died at Teilingen 8 Oct 1426, widow, first, John, Dauphin of France, second, John, Duke of Brabant (from whom she fled because of neglect and insult in 1421 to England, and procured a divorce from the Anti-Pope Benedict XIII), daughter and heiress of William VI, Count of Holland (marriage to Humphrey declared void 9 June 1428, and she married, fourth, Floris Borselen, Count of Ostrevant); Humphrey married, second, 1428, ELEANOR COBHAM, daughter of Reginald Cobham, Knt., of Sterborough, Surrey, by his first wife, Eleanor, daughter of Thomas Culpeper, Knt. She was condemned and put to public penance in London, sentenced to perpetual imprisonment, October 1441, died a prisoner at Peel Castle, Isle of Man, in 1454. C.P. 5:730-737 (1926). C.P. 6:138-139 (1926).
a.     ARTHUR OF GLOUCESTER, base-born.
b.     ANTIGONE OF GLOUCESTER, base-born, married HENRY GREY [see LLOYD 7].
vi.     BLANCHE OF LANCASTER, born 1392, married LOUIS III, Elector Palatine.
vii.     PHILIPPE OF LANCASTER, born 4 July 1394, married ERIK IV, King of Denmark, Sweden. [end quote]5 Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England was also known as Henry IV (?) King of England.

; See Wikipedia article for more information.14 He was Knight of the Garter in 1377.8 He was Duke of Hereford on 29 September 1397.5
; He crowned King Henry IV in 1399.15 He was King of England and Aquitaine; declared king by Parliament on 30 Sep. 1399, crowned on 13 Oct. 1399. The reign, in view of Henry's title to the throne, was dependent on Parliament. To retain the support of the Church, Henry opposed the demand (1404) of the Commons that Church property be confiscated and applied to poor relief. between 1399 and 1413.16,17 He was Duke of Lancaster; inherited on death of his father in February 1399.5 He was Earl of Lincoln and Leicester; inherited on death of his father in February 1399.

Family 1

Lady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Children

Family 2

Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre b. c 1370, d. 9 Jul 1437
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S739] David Faris and Souglas Richardson, "The Parents of Agatha, Wife of Edward the Exile", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April 1998, 152:224-235 (n.p.: The New England Historic Genealogical Society
    Boston, April 1998, unknown publish date), p. 114.
  7. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Kent 7.vi: p. 419. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004910&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 October 2019), memorial page for Henry IV (3 Apr 1367–21 Mar 1413), Find A Grave Memorial no. 1959, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1959/henry_iv. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_IV_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for Archbishop Thomas Arundel (1353–20 Feb 1414), Find A Grave Memorial no. 16992293, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/16992293/thomas-arundel
  16. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 114.
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 241-2. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for Thomas Plantagenet (29 Sep 1388–22 Mar 1421), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103666394, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by A. I. Zimmer (contributor 46947938), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103666394/thomas-plantagenet
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005214&tree=LEO

Philippa (?) of Lancaster1,2

F, #7596, b. 31 March 1360, d. 1415
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG3,2,4,5,6 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster3,2,4,6,7 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Philippa (?) of Lancaster was born on 31 March 1360 at Leicester, Leicestershire, England.8,3,2 She married Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal, son of Pedro I 'o Justiceiro' (?) King of Portugal and Theresa Gille Lorenco (?), on 2 February 1387 at Oporto, Portugal; Genealogy.EU (Capet 48 page) says m. 11 Feb. 1387.8,3,9,2,10
Philippa (?) of Lancaster died in 1415 at Odivellas, Portugal; died of the plague.11,3,2

Family

Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal b. 11 Apr 1358, d. 14 Aug 1433
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 57. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  11. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 71.
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39043

Isabel (?) of Lancaster1

F, #7597, b. circa 1368
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG1,2,3 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherBlanche (?) of Lancaster1,2,4 b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Isabel (?) of Lancaster was born circa 1368.5,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Lancaster [Plantagenet]: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004872&tree=LEO
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

John (?) of Lancaster1

M, #7598, b. 1374, d. 1374
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG1,2,3,4 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherDoña Constance (Constanza) (?) Infanta de Castilla y León1,2,4,5 b. Jul 1354, d. 24 Mar 1394
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     John (?) of Lancaster died in 1374; died young.1,6 He was born in 1374.1
     

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004863&tree=LEO
  6. [S1543] Clara Estow, Pedro the Cruel of Castille 1350-1369 (Leiden, New York, Koln: E. J. Brill, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Pedro the Cruel.
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Katherine/Catalina (?) of Lancaster1,2,3

F, #7599, b. between 6 June 1372 and 31 March 1373, d. 2 June 1418
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG4,1,5,2,3,6,7,8 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherDoña Constance (Constanza) (?) Infanta de Castilla y León4,1,5,2,3,6,8,9 b. Jul 1354, d. 24 Mar 1394
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Katherine/Catalina (?) of Lancaster was born between 6 June 1372 and 31 March 1373 at Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.10,4,3,6 She married Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon, son of Juan I (?) King of Castile and Leon and Leonor/Eleanor (?) of Aragon, in December 1393 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).10,11,4,5,2,12,13,3,6
Katherine/Catalina (?) of Lancaster died on 2 June 1418 at Valladolid, Castile, Spain (now).11,4,3

Family

Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon b. 4 Oct 1379, d. c 25 Dec 1406
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1543] Clara Estow, Pedro the Cruel of Castille 1350-1369 (Leiden, New York, Koln: E. J. Brill, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Pedro the Cruel.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  5. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  6. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004863&tree=LEO
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 71.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique III 'the Infirm': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004864&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea8.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004869&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catharina of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004871&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Juan II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004866&tree=LEO

Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #7600, b. 4 October 1379, d. circa 25 December 1406
FatherJuan I (?) King of Castile and Leon3,4,7,8,5,6 b. 20 Aug 1358, d. 9 Oct 1390
MotherLeonor/Eleanor (?) of Aragon4,3,9,5,6 b. 20 Feb 1358, d. 13 Aug 1382
Last Edited16 Jan 2008
     Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon was born on 4 October 1379 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).10,6 He married Katherine/Catalina (?) of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG and Doña Constance (Constanza) (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, in December 1393 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).11,12,10,4,7,5,6,13,14
Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon died circa 25 December 1406 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain (now).1,5,6
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 691.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol II page 48.
3. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: yr 1968.
4. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 200.5

; "His father had cleverly arranged a marriage for him with Catherine of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt and Constance, daughter of Pedro the Cruel, which restored a semblance of legitimacy to the line of Trastamara.

He was the first heir-apparent to receive the title of Prince of the Asturias and, aged eleven, succeeded as King of Castile. The Cortes appointed twelve governors to exercise the royal authority until Enrique III came of age at fourteen. Unfortunatly, he had inherited his father's delicacy of health and has gone down in history as 'the Infirm'.

His first two children were girls. However, in March 1405 the Queen gave birth to a son, Juan, whose arrival caused excessive rejoicing. The delicate king succumbed to his ailments in December of the following year, having by his will appointed Queen Catherine and his brother Ferdinand as co-Regents."5 Enrique III "el Doliente" (?) King of Castile and Leon was also known as Henry III (?) King of Castile and Leon.4,10

; King ENRIQUE III "el Doliente" of Castile and Leon (1390-1406), *Burgos 4.10.1379, +Toledo 25.12.1406; m.Madrid 1393 Catherine of Lancastre (*6.6.1372/31.3.1373, +2.6.1418.)6 He was King of Castile and Leon between 1390 and 1406.15,4,5,6

Family

Katherine/Catalina (?) of Lancaster b. bt 6 Jun 1372 - 31 Mar 1373, d. 2 Jun 1418
Children

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix III: The Plantagenet Dynasties 1216-1485. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 250. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique III 'the Infirm': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004864&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea8.html
  7. [S1543] Clara Estow, Pedro the Cruel of Castille 1350-1369 (Leiden, New York, Koln: E. J. Brill, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Pedro the Cruel.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Juan I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004817&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Aragón: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004818&tree=LEO
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  11. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  12. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 71.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  14. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  15. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 248.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004869&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catharina of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004871&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Juan II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004866&tree=LEO

Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal1,2,3

M, #7601, b. 11 April 1358, d. 14 August 1433
FatherPedro I 'o Justiceiro' (?) King of Portugal2,1,3,4,5 b. 18 Apr 1320, d. 18 Jan 1367
MotherTheresa Gille Lorenco (?)6,5
Last Edited23 May 2020
     Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal was born on 11 April 1358 at Lisbon, Portugal; illegitimate son of Pedro I; Louda & Maclagan (Table 93) says b. 1357.7,1 He married Philippa (?) of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG and Blanche (?) of Lancaster, on 2 February 1387 at Oporto, Portugal; Genealogy.EU (Capet 48 page) says m. 11 Feb. 1387.8,9,1,10,3
Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal died on 14 August 1433 at Lisbon, Portugal, at age 75; died of the plague.11,3,9,1
Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal was buried after 14 August 1433.3


     He was Grand Master of Aviz.1 Joao I "the False" (?) King of Portugal was also known as John I (?) King of Portugal.12 He was King of Portugal, JOHN (JOÃO) I, an illegitimate son of Peter I, established the Avis dynasty after leading a successful revolt and driving the regent out of the country. He was proclaimed king by the cortes of Coimbra, but his position was at once challenged by the Castilians, who twice invaded Portugal and besieged Lisbon. between 1385 and 1433.13,1,3

; The Battle of Aljubarrota, in which the Portuguese defeated the Castilians. A decisive date in the history of the country, this battle established the independence of Portugal. With the Avis dynasty, Portugal entered on the greatest period of her history. The king himself was an able and enlightened ruler, who enjoyed the aid of five outstanding sons, of whom Henry the Navigator (1394-1460) became the greatest figure in the history of the epoch-making discoveries of the 15th century.13

; The Treaty of Windsor, by which England and Portugal became permanently allied. King John married Philippa, the daughter of John of Gaunt. The dynasty thereby became part English.13

; Peace was finally concluded with Castile.13

; The Portuguese took Ceuta from the Moors, thus initiating a policy of expansion on the African continent.13

Family 1

Inez Perez Esteves b. 1432
Children

Family 2

Philippa (?) of Lancaster b. 31 Mar 1360, d. 1415
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 93: Portugal - House of Aviz. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 8: Kings of Portugal, 1211-1521. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 48 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet48.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro I 'o Justiceiro': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020568&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PORTUGAL.htm#PedroIdied1367B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teresa Gille Lourenco: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020569&tree=LEO
  7. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I05923
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 204-205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  11. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix III: The Plantagenet Dynasties 1216-1485. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  12. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 57. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 250-251. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39047
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  16. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Exeter 9: p. 300. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  17. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 11.vi: p. 322.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice (Brites) of Portugal: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00279436&tree=LEO

Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre1,2,3

F, #7602, b. circa 1370, d. 9 July 1437
FatherCharles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre4,5,2,3 b. Oct 1332, d. 1 Jan 1387
MotherJeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre2,3 b. 24 Jun 1343, d. 3 Nov 1373
Last Edited3 Oct 2019
     Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre was born circa 1370 at Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarre, Spain.6,4,7,8,2,3 She married Jean V (?) Duc de Bretagne, son of Jean IV 'le Conquerant' de Dreux Duc de Bretagne, Comte de Montfort and Jeanne (?) de Flandres, Duchess of Brittany, on 2 September 1386 at Saillé-près-Guérande, Brittany, France (now); his 3rd wife, her 1st husband; Genealogy.EU says m. 2 Sep 1386.1,5,8,2,9,10,3 Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre married Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England, son of John of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG and Blanche (?) of Lancaster, on 7 February 1403 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England;
His 2nd wife.6,4,2,10,11,3
Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre died on 9 July 1437 at Havering-atte-Bower, London Borough of Havering, Greater London, England.6,4,1,7,8,2,10,3,12
Jeanne (Joan) (?) de Navarre was buried after 9 July 1437 at Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, co. Kent, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1370, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain
     DEATH     9 Jul 1437 (aged 66–67), Havering-atte-Bower, London Borough of Havering, Greater London, England
     English Monarch. She was the Queen Consort of King Henry IV. Also known as Joanna, she was the daughter of Charles II (Charles the Bad), King of Navarre and his wife Princess Joan, daughter of King John II of France. She married John V, Duke of Brittany, on October 2, 1386. They had nine children, seven of whom survived childhood. The Duke died in 1399, and Joan served as regent for her son John VI until 1401, when a marriage was arranged between her and Henry IV, King of England. They were married by proxy in April of 1402, and in person on February 7, 1403. They had no children, but Joan got along very well with Henry's five children (by his first marriage to Mary de Bohun). She was not, however, popular with the English people. Joan was falsely accused of witchcraft, necromancy, and attempting to poison her husband. Her situation was worsened by the fact that her son, the Duke of Brittany, was a political enemy of England. As a result she was imprisoned for four years at Pevensey Castle in Sussex. She lived quietly afterwards, into the reign of Henry's son, Henry V. She died at Havering-atte-Bower, Essex, aged about 70 years. She was laid to rest beside her husband. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
      Charles II of Navarre 1332–1387
      Jeanne de France 1343–1373
     Spouses
      Jean de Bretagne 1339–1399
      Henry IV 1367–1413
     Children
      Jeanne de Bretagne 1387–1388
      Duc Jean De Bretagne 1389–1442
      Artus de Bretagne 1393–1458
      Gilles de Bretagne 1394–1412
      Richard de Bretagne 1395–1438
     BURIAL     Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 13 Nov 2003
     Find A Grave Memorial 8081845.8,2,10,12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Jeanne was born about 1370 in Pamplona, the youngest child of Charles 'the Bad', king of Navarre, and Jeanne de France. On 2 September 1386 she became the third wife of Jean V, duc de Bretagne, son of Jean IV, duc de Bretagne, and Jeanne of Flanders. They had nine children of whom three sons and three daughters would have progeny. In 1399 the duke died, and as his widow she became regent for their eldest son Jean VI until in 1401, aged twelve, he was declared of age.
     "In 1399 King Henry IV of England had visited Jeanne de Navarre at the Breton court, and they must have come to some agreement regarding their future once her son came of age. She requested the pope's dispensation to marry anyone of her choice within the fourth degree of consanguinity, and on 20 March 1402 this was granted.
     "After a proxy marriage, she and Henry married in person on 7 February 1403 in Winchester Cathedral. She was thirty-five when this second marriage took place, and Henry IV about thirty-seven, and no more children were born. This was one of the reasons why people connected her name with witchcraft. Only ten years later Henry IV died and she was a widow again.
     "She was on good terms with her stepchildren to the point of being made regent for England by her stepson Henry V when he departed for France to continue the war.
     "Pleased though she may have been about the English victory, Jeanne's feelings must have been in turmoil as both her brother Charles, the king of Navarre, and a son-in-law Jean I 'le Sage' d'Alençon, husband of her daughter Marie, had fallen at the Battle of Agincourt, while her son Arthur, who would follow two of his brother Jean's sons as duke of Brittany, was captured at Agincourt, taken to the Tower of London and then to Fotheringay Castle, to be imprisoned for many years.
     "In 1417 Henry V was again in France. His brother John, duke of Bedford, acting as regent, ordered Jeanne's arrest as she was accused of witchcraft directed against the king. She was deprived of all her property and kept imprisoned until July 1422, when she was released without trial and her property restored. From then she lived in peace and died, aged about sixty-seven, on 9 July 1437."3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . page 203.
     2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2; 13
     3. A Medieval Heritage : The Ancestry of Charles II, King of England, in 'The Genealogist', Thompson, Neil D. & Hansen, Charles M. 403.3

Family 1

Jean V (?) Duc de Bretagne b. bt 30 Sep 1340 - 8 Dec 1340, d. 1 Nov 1399
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004910&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html#A1
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004909&tree=LEO
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Kent 7.vi: p. 419. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 October 2019), memorial page for Joan of Navarre (1370–9 Jul 1437), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8081845, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8081845/joan_of_navarre. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/25.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arthur III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005726&tree=LEO

Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre1,2,3,4

M, #7603, b. October 1332, d. 1 January 1387
FatherPhilippe III "le Bon" or "le Sage" (?) King of Navarre, Cte d'Evreux, Angouleme et de Longueville, Cte de Mortain2,1,4,5 b. 27 Mar 1306, d. 16 Sep 1343
MotherJeanne II (Joan) (?) de France, Queen of Navarre2,1,4 b. 28 Jan 1311, d. 6 Oct 1349
Last Edited18 Oct 2019
     Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre was born in October 1332 at Evreux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France (now).1,6,4,7 He married Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre, daughter of Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France and Judith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg, in April 1351 at Vivier-en-Brie; her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Capet 20 page) says m. 1353.1,8,6,4
Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre died on 1 January 1387 at Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain (now), at age 54.2,6,4,7
Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre was buried after 1 January 1387 at Cathedral of Pamplona, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     9 Oct 1332, Evreux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     DEATH     1 Jan 1387 (aged 54), Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain
     King of Navarre. Born Carlos, the son of Philippe III, House of Evreux, King of Navarre and Jeanne II, Queen of Navarre. He succeeded to the title of King Carlos II de Navarre in 1349 and acquired the nick-name of Carlos 'the Bad.' After the capture of the French King by the English during the Battle of Poitiers in September 1356, power in France was grabbed for by both him and the French Dauphin as Carlos angled for power and position in France. He married Jeanne de France in 1353 at Vivier-en-Brie and with her had at least six children, including the future Carlos III. In 1358 during a French peasant revolt he suppressed the uprising, leading French nobles against the insurgents. He invited the peasant leader to truce talks and when the man arrived in the camp, had him seized, tortured and beheaded. The leaderless peasants were then crushed at the Battle of Mello. His blatant grab for power in Paris following, however, cost him the support of French aristocracy. He then meddled in Spanish intrigues before returning to playing the French and English both ends against the middle upon resumption of hostilities between them in 1369, including being involved in at least two attempts to have Charles V poisoned, and a proposal that his daughter marry to the new English King. In 1378 Navarre was invaded and sacked by Castillian forces, he lost his French holdings and although he retained his kingdom it effectively became a tributary state. In 1387 he was said to have fallen ill. Physicians were alleged to have ordered him to be wrapped up in a linen cloth soaked with brandy, which was accidentally set aflame leaving the king to burn to death in his own bed. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philipp of Navarra 1306–1343
          Jeanne de France 1311–1349
     Spouse
          Jeanne de France 1343–1373
     Siblings
          Maria de Navarre 1325–1347
          Blanche de Navarre 1330–1398
     Children
          Joan of Navarre 1370–1437
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Pamplona, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 1 Nov 2003
     Find A Grave Memorial 8048814.4,7
     He was Cte d'Évreux, Cte de Beaumont 1353.4

; King Charles II "le Mauvais" e.i. "The Bad" of Navarre (1349-87), Cte d'Évreux, Cte de Beaumont 1353, *Evreux X.1332, +Pamplona 1.1.1387, bur Pamplona Cathedral; m.Vivier-en-Brie IV.1351 Jeanne of France (*Châteauneuf-sur-Loire 24.6.1343, +Evreux 3.11.1373, bur St.Denis.)4

; See Wikipedia article.9,10,11 He was King of Navarre between 1349 and 1387.1,2

Family 1

Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre b. 24 Jun 1343, d. 3 Nov 1373
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 6: Kings of Navarre, 1194-1512. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 October 2019), memorial page for Charles II of Navarre (9 Oct 1332–1 Jan 1387), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8048814, citing Cathedral of Pamplona, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8048814/charles_ii-of_navarre. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_II_of_Navarre
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles II 'the Bad': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004804&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Noble': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004806&tree=LEO
  14. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004910&tree=LEO

Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre1,2,3,4,5

F, #7604, b. 24 June 1343, d. 3 November 1373
FatherJean II "le Bon" (?) King of France2,3,6 b. 26 Apr 1319, d. 8 Apr 1364
MotherJudith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg2,3,7 b. 20 May 1315, d. 11 Sep 1349
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre was born on 24 June 1343 at Châteauneuf-sur-Loire, Departement du Loiret, Centre-Val de Loire, France.1,2,3,8,5 She married Henry (?) of Brabant, Duke of Limburg in 1347 at Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France; her 1st husband.3 Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre married Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre, son of Philippe III "le Bon" or "le Sage" (?) King of Navarre, Cte d'Evreux, Angouleme et de Longueville, Cte de Mortain and Jeanne II (Joan) (?) de France, Queen of Navarre, in April 1351 at Vivier-en-Brie; her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Capet 20 page) says m. 1353.1,2,3,4
Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre died on 3 November 1373 at Évreux, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Normandy, France, at age 30.1,2,3,5,8
Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre was buried after 3 November 1373 at St. Denis, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     24 Jun 1343, France
     DEATH     3 Nov 1373 (aged 30), France
     Royalty, Queen of Navarra. She was the first of the daughters of King Jean II and Bonne of Luxembourg that survived their childhood. When she was five years old she was betrothed to Henri de Brabant, son of Jean III, but he died in 1349. In 1351 she was married to Charles II of Navarra to strengthen the alliance between the two kingdoms of France and Navarra. She was the mother of Maria, wife of Duke Alfonso I of Gandia, Joan, Pierre de Mortain and Charles III. She often stood in for her husband when he was in France or represented him in France while he was in Navarra.
     Family Members
     Parents
          John II of France 1319–1364
          Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
     Spouse
          Charles II of Navarre 1332–1387
     Siblings
          Charles V 1338–1380
          Louis I d'Anjou 1339–1384
          Jean I de Berry 1340–1416
          Philip II of Burgundy 1342–1404
          Marie Princesse de France de Bar 1344–1404
          Isabelle de France 1348–1373
     Children
          Joan of Navarre 1370–1437
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 21 Aug 2006
     Find A Grave Memorial 15449808.3,9
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 16.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:22.8,10


; Per Genealogics:
     "Jeanne was born at Châteauneuf sur Loire on 24 June 1343, the fifth of nine children of Jean, duke of Normandy, the future Jean II 'the Good', king of France, and his first wife Judith of Bohemia. When she was six years old her mother died of Bubonic plague. Jeanne and her siblings later gained a stepmother in Jeanne, comtesse d'Auvergne et Boulogne.
     "On 3 November 1353 at Vivier-en-Brie, Jeanne married Charles II 'the Bad', king of Navarre, son of Philippe III, king of Navarre, and Jeanne II de France, queen of Navarre. Charles feuded with his father-in-law about Jeanne's dowry for several years. They had seven children, of whom just two, Charles III and Jeanne, would have progeny.
     "Jeanne played a significant role politically in the rule of her husband, particularly regarding his difficult relations with the French crown.
     "She died at Evreux on 3 November 1373."8

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Joan of France, also known as Joan or Joanna of Valois (24 June 1343, Châteauneuf-sur-Loire – 3 November 1373, Évreux), was the daughter of John II of France (called The Good), and his first wife, Bonne of Luxembourg. She married Charles II of Navarre (called The Bad), and became Queen-consort of Navarre.
Marriage
     "She was first betrothed to John of Brabant, son of John III, Duke of Brabant and his wife Marie d'Évreux. The marriage did not, however, take place.[1]
     "Joan instead was married on 12 February 1352 to Charles the Bad, at Chateau du Vivier, close to Fontenay-Trésigny in Brie, Coutevroult. He was the son of Philip III of Navarre and his wife, Joan II of Navarre. Joan and Charles were agnatic third cousins and cognatic second cousins.
     "Joan and Charles had seven children:
1. Marie (1360, Puente la Reina – aft. 1400), married in Tudela on 20 January 1393 Alfonso d'Aragona, Duke of Gandia (d. 1412). Their marriage was childless.
2. Charles III of Navarre (1361–1425), married Eleanor of Castile (d. 1416), by whom he had issue.
3. Bonne (1364 – aft. 1389)
4. Peter of Navarre, Count of Mortain (c. 31 March 1366, Évreux – 29 July 1412, Nevers),[2] married in Alençon on 21 April 1411 Catherine (1380–1462), daughter of Peter II of Alençon. Their marriage was childless.
5. Philip (b. 1368), d. young
6. Joanna of Navarre (1370–1437), first married John IV, Duke of Brittany by whom she had issue; and later Henry IV of England. Her second marriage was childless.
7. Blanca (1372–1385, Olite)
     "Joan's daughter, Joanna of Navarre was the second wife of Henry IV of England.
     "Joan died in 1373, aged thirty, in Évreux. She was buried in the Royal Abbey of Saint Denis.
References
1. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, CAPET
2. "Pierre de Navarre, comte de Mortain". Corpus (École nationale des chartes). Testaments enregistrés au Parlement de Paris sous le règne de Charles VI (in French). Sorbonne. Retrieved 2018-03-09.5

Family 2

Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre b. Oct 1332, d. 1 Jan 1387
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Valois,_Queen_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000225&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004805&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for Jeanne de France (24 Jun 1343–3 Nov 1373), Find A Grave Memorial no. 15449808, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15449808/jeanne-de_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Noble': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004806&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004910&tree=LEO

Leonor/Eleanor (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of Navarre1,2,3,4

F, #7605, b. circa 1363, d. 5 March 1416
FatherEnrique II (?) of Trastamara, King of Castile and Leon1,5,6,7,2,3 b. 13 Jan 1334, d. 29 May 1379
MotherJuana/Joanna Manuel (?) de Castile, sna de Lara y Vizcaya, Lady of Villena, Escalona y Penafiel1,5,8,2,3 b. 1339, d. 27 Mar 1381
Last Edited17 Oct 2019
     Leonor/Eleanor (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of Navarre was born circa 1363; Louda & Maclagan (Tables 44 & 48) say b. 1352; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 8) says b. ca 1363; Leo van de Pas says b. aft 1363.1,5,2,3 She married Charles III (Carlos) "le Noble" (?) King of Navarre, son of Charles II (Carlos) "le Mauvais" (?) d'Evreux, King of Navarre and Jeanne/Joan (?) de Valois, Queen of Navarre, on 27 May 1375 at Leria.1,5,9,2,3,10
Leonor/Eleanor (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of Navarre died on 5 March 1416 at Olite, Navarre, Spain (now); Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 8) says d. 5 March 1415; Leo van de Pas says d. 27 Feb 1415.1,5,9,2,3
Leonor/Eleanor (?) Infta of Castile, Queen of Navarre was buried after 5 March 1416 at Cathedral of Pamplona, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1363
     DEATH     27 Feb 1415 (aged 51–52)
     Royalty, daughter of Enrique II and Juana Manuel de Castilia. She was married to Charles III and bore him seven children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Enrique II of Castile 1334–1379
          Juana Manuel de Villena 1339–1381
     Spouse
          Carlos III de Navarra 1361–1425
     Siblings
          Beatriz of Castile unknown–1409
          Juana Enríquez de Castilla
          Juan I de Castilla 1358–1390
     Children
          Maria of Navarra 1383–1406
          Carlos of Navarra 1397–1402
          Luis of Navarra 1401–1402
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Pamplona, Pamplona, Provincia de Navarra, Navarra, Spain
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 19 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 92177605.9,2
     Reference: Leo van de Pas cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 65
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 667.
3. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 243.
4. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 48.3


; See Wikipedia article.4

; Infta Leonor, *ca 1363, +Olite/Pamplona 5.3.1415, bur Pamplona; m.Soria 1375 King Charles III of Navarre (+1425.)2

Family

Charles III (Carlos) "le Noble" (?) King of Navarre b. 1361, d. 8 Sep 1425
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea8.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004807&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Castile,_Queen_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon.
  6. [S1543] Clara Estow, Pedro the Cruel of Castille 1350-1369 (Leiden, New York, Koln: E. J. Brill, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Pedro the Cruel.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique II de Trastamara: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004815&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Juana Manuel de Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004816&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Noble': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004806&tree=LEO
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Edward (?)1

M, #7606, b. April 1382, d. April 1382
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England1 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG1 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited26 Jun 2003
     Edward (?) died in April 1382.1 He was born in April 1382.1
     ; died in infancy.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Henry V (of Monmouth) (?) King of England1

M, #7607, b. 9 August 1387, d. 31 August 1422
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England1,2 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG3,1 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited20 Oct 2019
     Henry V (of Monmouth) (?) King of England was born on 9 August 1387 at Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales, England (now).4,1 He married Catherine de Valois Princess of France, daughter of Charles VI "le Bien-Aime/le Fol" (?) King of France and Isabeau/Elisabeth (?) Duchess of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, Queen of France, on 2 June 1420 at Troyes Cathedral, Troyes, Aube, France;
Her 1st husband.5,6,1,7,8,9
Henry V (of Monmouth) (?) King of England was buried after August 1422 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.5,1


Henry V (of Monmouth) (?) King of England died on 31 August 1422 at Bois de Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France, at age 35.5,1
     ; Faris (1999) p. 206: [quote] HENRY V OF ENGLAND [of Monmouth], son and heir, by first marriage, was born at Monmouth on 9 Aug. 1387. He was created Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester on 15 Oct. 1399, Duke of Aquitaine on 23 Oct. 1399, and Duke of Lancaster on 10 Nov. 1399. He succeeded his father on 21 Mar. 1412/3, and was crowned King of England on 9 Apr. 1413. He made reparation for his father's usurpation by transferring the remains of King Richard II from King's Langley to Westminster Abbey. Taking advantage of disorder in France, Henry formed an alliance with the Burgundians and renewed war, with the defeat of the French at the Battle of Agincourt in October 1415. In 1417 Henry returned to France and conquered Normandy. By his French conquests leading to the Treaty of Troyes on 21 May 1420 he assumed the title of Heir and Regent of the realm of France. This was the height of the English successes in the Hundred Year's War. He was married at Troyes in France on 2 June 1420 to KATHERINE DE VALOIS, daughter of Charles VI, Roi de France, by Isabel, daughter of Stephen, Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt. They had one son. HENRY V OF ENGLAND, King of England, died at Bois de Vincennes on 31 Aug. 1422, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. His widow is said to have been married for the second time (though no evidence of the marriage has been discovered) to Owen Tudor (beheaded by the Yorkists after the Battle of Mortimer's Crown at Hereford on 4 Feb. 1461), and had issue [see TUDOR She died at Bermondsey Abbey on 3 Jan. 1437.
CF. 7:419 (1929). Paget (1977), pp. 27-28. Viault (1992), pp. 79-80. [end quote] He was Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, Earl of Chester on 15 October 1399.5 He was Duke of Aquitaine on 23 October 1399.5 He was Duke of Lancaster on 10 November 1399.5 He was King of England, HENRY V, whose military achievements brought England to the first rank in Europe. Bent on the revival of the Church, he led a strong attack on Lollardy: Sir John Oldcastle (Lord Cobham), the leading Lollard, was excommunicated by Archbishop Arundel but escaped; a Lollard plot against the king's life was discovered; Henry attacked (1414) and captured a Lollard group, most of whom were hanged; anti-Lollard legislation allowed seizure of their books; Oldcastle, the last influential Lollard, executed (1417). Henceforth Lollardy was a lower-class movement driven underground until the Reformation.

1415: Henry, in alliance with Burgundy, reasserted his claims to the throne of France. Relying on the anarchy in France and hoping through military successes to unite the English behind the house of Lancaster, he advanced into France.

Oct. 25, 1415: Battle of Agincourt, near Arras in Flanders. Henry V, with 10,000 men, defeated three times that number of French; the duke of Orléans was taken prisoner; Normandy was reconquered by the English, undoing for the time the work of Philip Augustus; the dauphin (later Charles VII) fled to the south of France (1418); the Burgundians returned to power, and there was a massacre of Armagnacs in Paris (1418).

1420: Henry's great victory over vastly superior forces opened the way to the Treaty of Troyes, in which Charles, under Burgundian influence, and supported by his wife, Isabelle, accepted the Treaty of Troyes (which repudiated the dauphin as illegitimate), adopted Henry V of England as his heir and immediate regent (with the approval of the University of Paris and the Estates General, 1421). Charles's daughter, Catherine, was married to Henry V and, also under the treaty, the English were allowed to retain all their conquests as far as the Loire. King Henry V drove the forces of the dauphin across the Loire and began the steady conquest of France that continued uninterrupted until his death (1422). The dauphin remained at Bourges (whence his nickname, the Roi de Bourges). between 21 March 1413 and 31 August 1422.5,10 He Crowned.5

Family

Catherine de Valois Princess of France b. 27 Oct 1401, d. 3 Jan 1437
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 206.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001722&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 October 2019), memorial page for Catherine of Valois (27 Oct 1401–2 Jan 1437), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8344315, citing Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8344315/catherine-of_valois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 241-2. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Thomas (?) of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England1,2

M, #7608, b. 29 September 1388, d. 22 March 1421
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England3,1,2,4 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG3,1,2 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited3 Oct 2019
     Thomas (?) of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England was born on 29 September 1388 at Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England.5,3,1,6,2 He married Margaret de Holand, daughter of Sir Thomas de Holand Knt. KG, Lord Holand, 2nd/5th Earl Kent and Lady Alice Fitz Alan, after 16 August 1410; her 2nd husband; no issue; Genealogy.EU says (Anjou 6 page) m. 1412; date of papal mandate.7,1,6
Thomas (?) of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England died on 22 March 1421 at Battle of Beaugé, Bauge, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Anjou (Pays de la Loire now), France, at age 32.5,3,1,6
Thomas (?) of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England was buried after 22 March 1421 at St. Michael's Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, co. Kent, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     29 Sep 1388, Warwickshire, England
     DEATH     22 Mar 1421 (aged 32), Bauge, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     1st Duke of Clarence, KG, KB, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England
     House of Plantagenet - Son of King Henry IV of England and Mary de Bohun. Paternal grandson of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and Blanche of Lancaster. Maternal grandson of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford, and Lady Joan FitzAlan. He married Margaret de Holland, widow of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset, in 1411. She was the daughter of Thomas de Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Joan Plantagenet, "The Fair Maid of Kent". The marriage did not produce any children, but Thomas had a natural son named Sir John Clarence, who fought with his father in France and is also buried at Canterbury Cathedral. Thomas' titles became extinct on his death without legitimate issue.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Henry IV 1367–1413
      Mary de Bohun Plantagenet 1369–1394
     Spouse
      Margaret de Holland de Beaufort 1380–1439
     Siblings
      Blanche of England 1382–1409
      Edward Plantagenet 1382–1382
      Henry V 1386–1422
      John of Lancaster 1389–1435
      Humphrey Plantagenet 1390–1447
      Philippa 1394–1430
     BURIAL     Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England
     PLOT     St. Michael's Chapel/with wife
     Created by: A. I. Zimmer
     Added: 16 Jan 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 103666394
     SPONSORED BY Ro§e?2

His estate was probated on 23 November 1423.6

     ; Faris (1999) p. 205: "THOMAS OF LANCASTER, born 29 Sep. 1388, created Duke of Clarence, Earl of Albemarle 9 July 1412, slain at the Battle of Beaugé 22 Mar. 1421 s.p., buried at Canterbury; married MARGARET HOLAND, widow of his uncle of the half-blood, John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset, and daughter of Thomas Holand, 2nd Earl of Kent, by Alice Fits Alan, daughter of Richard, 5th Earl of Arundel."8 He was Duke of Clarence, Earl of Albemarle on 9 July 1412.5,1

Thomas (?) of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, 1st Earl of Aumale, Lord High Steward of England left a will on 10 July 1417.6

Family

Margaret de Holand b. c 1380, d. 30 Dec 1439

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for Thomas Plantagenet (29 Sep 1388–22 Mar 1421), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103666394, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by A. I. Zimmer (contributor 46947938), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103666394/thomas-plantagenet. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Somerset 9: pp. 222-224. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 205, 332-333.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-32, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford1,2

M, #7609, b. 20 June 1389, d. 15 September 1435
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England3,1,2,4 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG3,1,2 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited15 Nov 2019
     John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford was born on 20 June 1389.5,1,6,2 He married Anne (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers and Margarete/Mary (?) of Holland and Hainault, Duchess of Bavaria, on 17 April 1423 at Troyes, Aube, France; his 1st wife.5,3,6,2 John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford married Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford, daughter of Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano and Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano, on 22 April 1433 at Therouenne, France; her 1st husband; Leo van de Pas says m. 20 Apr 1433; Genealogy.EU Luxemburg 9 page says m. 22 Apr 1433.5,3,1,7,8,2
John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford was buried after 14 September 1435 at Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     20 Jun 1389
     DEATH     14 Sep 1435 (aged 46), Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Royalty. He was the son of Henry IV and Mary de Bohun, also known as John Plantagenet. He married Anne de Bourgogne in 1423 but left no legitimate children. His original tomb was destroyed in the 16th century.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry IV 1367–1413
          Mary de Bohun Plantagenet 1369–1394
     Spouses
          Anne de Bourgogne 1404–1432 (m. 1423)
          Jacquette De Luxembourg Woodville 1415–1472 (m. 1433)
     Siblings
          Blanche of England 1382–1409
          Edward Plantagenet 1382–1382
          Henry V 1386–1422
          Thomas Plantagenet 1388–1421
          Humphrey Plantagenet 1390–1447
          Philippa 1394–1430
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 14 Jul 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 93572472.9
John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France, at age 46.5,1,6,2
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "While regent of England for Henry V in 1415 during the king's first French campaign John, Duke of Bedford, led a fleet to repel a French raid in 1416. In 1417 he brought Sir John Oldcastle to trial and execution for treason and heresy.
     "In 1422, after the death of Henry V, John became protector of England and regent of France. The royal council gave him active authority in France while his brother Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, exercised immediate authority in England.
     "In 1423 he married Anne of Burgundy, daughter of Jean 'the Fearless', Duke of Burgundy. In 1424 John won a great victory at Verneuil but returned to London in 1426 to settle a dispute between his brother Humphrey and the chancellor, Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester.
     "In 1427 he returned to France where, in 1431, he permitted Jeanne d'Arc to be burned as a witch and arranged to have Henry VI crowned King of France in Notre-Dame. On 14 November 1432 he lost his wife and, on 20 April 1433, married Jacquetta of Luxembourg. However, he was unable to stem the tide of the French recovery in the 1430s and died in 1435 a disappointed man."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 202.2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford KG (20 June 1389 – 14 September 1435) was a medieval English prince, general and statesman who commanded England's armies in France during a critical phase of the Hundred Years' War. Bedford was the third son of King Henry IV of England, brother to Henry V, and acted as regent of France for his nephew Henry VI. Despite his military and administrative talent, the situation in France had severely deteriorated by the time of his death.[1]
     "Bedford was a capable administrator and soldier, and his effective management of the war brought the English to the height of their power in France. However, difficulties mounted after the arrival of Joan of Arc, and his efforts were further thwarted by political divisions at home and the waverings of England's key ally, the duchy of Burgundy. In the last years of Bedford's life, the conflict devolved into a war of attrition, and he became increasingly unable to gather the necessary funds to prosecute the conflict.
     "Bedford died during the congress of Arras in 1435, just as Burgundy was preparing to abandon the English cause and conclude a separate peace with Charles VII of France.
Life
     "After his father's accession to the throne of England as Henry IV in 1399, John of Lancaster began to accumulate lands and lucrative offices. He was knighted on 12 October 1399 at his father's coronation and made a Knight of the Garter by 1402. Between 1403 and 1405 grants of the forfeited lands from the House of Percy and of the alien priory of Ogbourne, Wiltshire, considerably increased his income. He was appointed master of the mews and falcons in 1402, Constable of England in 1403 and Warden of the East March from 1403 to 1414.[2] He was created Earl of Kendal, Earl of Richmond and Duke of Bedford in 1414 by his brother, King Henry V.[3][4]
     "When Henry V died in 1422, Bedford vied with his younger brother, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, for control of the Kingdom. Bedford was declared regent but focused on the ongoing war in France, while during his absence Gloucester acted as Lord Protector of England. Bedford defeated the French several times, most notably at the Battle of Verneuil, until the arrival of Joan of Arc rallied the opposition. Bedford handed Joan to an ecclesiastical court, which had her tried and executed at Rouen in 1431, though Bedford himself took no part in the trial. He then arranged a coronation for the young Henry VI at Paris.
     "Bedford had been Governor in Normandy between 1422–1432 where the University of Caen was founded under his auspices. He was an extremely important commissioner of illuminated manuscripts, both from Paris (from the Bedford Master and his workshop) and England. The three most important surviving manuscripts of his are the Bedford Hours (British Library Ms Add 18850) and the Salisbury Breviary (Paris BnF Ms Lat. 17294), which were both made in Paris, and the Bedford Psalter and Hours of about 1420–23, which is English (BL Ms Add 42131). This last is signed in two places by Herman Scheere. All are lavishly decorated and famous examples of the style of the period.
Marriages
     "John's first marriage was to Anne of Burgundy (d.1432), daughter of John the Fearless on 13 May 1423 in Troyes,[5] at an unknown age The couple were happily married, despite being childless. Anne died of the plague in Paris in 1432.[6]
     "John's second marriage was to Jacquetta of Luxembourg, on 22 April 1433 at Thérouanne in northern France. This marriage was also childless, though Jacquetta went on to have more than a dozen children in her second marriage to Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers.
Succession
     "John died in 1435 during the Congress of Arras at his Castle of Joyeux Repos in Rouen, and was buried at Rouen Cathedral near Henry the Young King, but his grave was destroyed by the Calvinists in 1562. Today a plaque marks the former location of his grave. He had no legitimate surviving issue.
In literature
     "He appears in William Shakespeare's plays Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2 as John of Lancaster, and in Henry V and Henry VI, Part 1 as Duke of Bedford.
     "Georgette Heyer's novel My Lord John deals with his life from when he was four to about twenty.
     "In the 2011 Philippa Gregory novel, The Lady of the Rivers, John features as the first husband of main character, Jacquetta of Luxembourg.
Arms
     "As a son of the sovereign, John bore the Royal arms of his father King Henry IV, differenced by a label of five points per pale ermine and France.[7]
     "In the Bedford Book of Hours[8] these arms are shown supported by an eagle collared with a crown and a sable yale all on a gold field sewn with gold "wood stocks" (cut tree stumps with roots), a heraldic badge of King Edward III, referring to Woodstock Palace. It is possible that the yale was painted in silver which has tarnished black. The shield is surrounded with a pair of banners gules which reverse in argent with the motto repeated four times: A vous entier (To you / yours entire[ly]). This may be a pun on the German Tier, i.e., beast, or on (English) tears —or 'tiers' of meaning, including tierce, referring to himself as third in line to his father's throne and by now rightful king but for the baby Henry VI. The Hours were supposedly produced as a courtship present from John to his wife, Anne, daughter of John the Fearless of Burgundy.[citation needed]
     "There is a Queen's Arms public house sign from Birmingham[9] which uses these supporters reversed and with an argent yale uncollared on a shield showing the English royal arms at left and to the right six divisions representing Lorraine. John's second wife, Jacquetta of Luxembourg, cousin to the Emperor (the King of Hungary), was mother to Elizabeth Woodville who may be this queen. Elizabeth Woodville's right to inherit these armorial supporters would seem dubious if they belong to her mother's first husband or to his first wife. Alternatively, though equally incorrect, the arms may be her mother's used in a flattering conceit.[citation needed]
References
a. Several authoritative sources are cited by the Library of Congress Name Authority File. Chevalier (1877–1903) states the marriage took place on 13 April 1423, but more recent sources agree on 13 May 1423 and one of those states Troyes (Library of Congress staff 2014).
1. "John Plantagenet, duke of Bedford". Encyclopædia Britannica. 27 May 1999.
2. Stratford 2004.
3. Hunt 1892, p. 427.
4. Chisholm 1911, p. 616.
5. Library of Congress staff 2014.
6. Smith 1984.
7. Marks of Cadency in the British Royal Family at the Wayback Machine (archived 17 March 2018)
8. Bedford Book of Hours armorial coat
9. Queen's Arms pubsign from Birmingham at the Wayback Machine (archived 8 December 2007)
** Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Bedford, Earls and Dukes of" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 3 (11th ed.) Cambridge University Press. pp. 616–617.
** Hunt, William (1892). "John of Lancaster" . In Lee, Sidney (ed.) Dictionary of National Biography. 29. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
** Library of Congress staff (16 December 2014) [2011]. "Anne, of Burgundy, Duchess of Bedford, 1404?–1432".
** Smith, J.C. (1984). "The Tomb of Anne of Burgundy, Duchess of Bedford, in the Musée du Louvre". Gesta. 23 (1): 39–50. doi:10.2307/766962. JSTOR 766962.
** Stratford, J. (22 September 2011). "John, duke of Bedford (1389–1435)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14844.
Further reading
** Allmand, C. (1983). Lancastrian Normandy, 1415–1450: The History of a Medieval Occupation. Clarendon Press. ISBN 978-0-19-822642-0.
** Barker, J. (2012). Conquest: The English Kingdom of France 1417–1450 (PDF). Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-06560-4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 12 June 2018.
** Brougham, Henry (1855). History of England and France under the House of Lancaster (2nd ed.) London: John Murray. LCCN 26005961.
** Burne, A. (2014). The Agincourt War. London: Frontline Books. ISBN 978-1-84832-765-8.
** Carpenter, C. (1997). The Wars of the Roses: Politics and the constitution in England, c.1437–1509. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-31874-7.
** Chrimes, S.B. (1929). "John, first duke of Bedford; his work and policy in England, 1389–1435". Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research. 7 (20): 110–113. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2281.1929.tb00551.x.
** Cokayne, G. & Gibbs, V., eds. (1912). The Complete Peerage. 2 (2nd ed.) London: St. Catherine Press. Archived.
** Curry, A. (19 June 2012). "John, duke of Bedford's arrangements for the defence of Normandy in October 1434" (PDF). Annales de Normandie. 62 (2): 235–251 (1–17 in PDF). doi:10.3917/annor.622.0235. ISBN 978-2-902239-28-3.
** Evans, Michael R. (1992). "Brigandage and Resistance in Lancastrian Normandy: A Study of the Remission Evidence" (PDF). Reading Medieval Studies. 18: 103–134. ISSN 0950-3129.
** Griffiths, R.A. (1981). The Reign of King Henry VI. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-04372-5.
** Harriss, G.L. (27 January 2005). Shaping the Nation: England 1360–1461. New Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 978-0-19-822816-5.
** Keen, M. (20 November 2003). England in the Later Middle Ages (2nd ed.) Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-27293-3.
** Lobanov, Aleksandr (1 April 2015). "The Indenture of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, of 12 February 1430 and the Lancastrian Kingdom of France". The English Historical Review. 130 (543): 302–317. doi:10.1093/ehr/cev044.
** Lobanov, Aleksandr (2016). "The Treaty of Amiens (1423): Towards a Reconsideration" (PDF). Proslogion. 14: 244–263. ISSN 2500-0926.
** Moore, Terence R. (1982). The Hundred Years War during the reign of Henry VI: The English defeat—Its causes and impact (PDF) (Thesis). Department of History of McGill University.
** Myers, A. (1960). "A Vous Entier: John of Lancaster, 1389–1435". History Today. Vol. 10 no. 7.
** Neillands, R. (8 November 2001). The Hundred Years War (revised ed.) Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-26131-9.
** Powicke, F.M. (1996). E. B. Pryde; D. E. Greenway; S. Porter; I. Roy (eds.) Handbook of British Chronology. Royal Historical Society Guides and Handbooks (revised 3rd ed.) Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-56350-5.
** Pulling, F.S. (1910). "Bedford, John, Duke of". In Sidney Low & F.S. Pulling (eds.) The Dictionary of English History. London: Cassell.
** Rollason, Lynda (15 December 2015). "Bedford, John of Lancaster, duke of (1389–1435)". In John Cannon; Robert Crowcroft (eds.) The Oxford Companion to British History. Oxford Companions (2nd ed.) Oxford University Press. pp. 88. ISBN 978-0-19-967783-2.
** Seward, D. (27 March 2003). The Hundred Years War: The English in France, 1337–1453. Brief Histories (revised ed.) London: Robinson. ISBN 978-1-84119-678-7.
** Sprey, Ilicia J. (2002). "John, Duke of Bedford (1389–1435)". In R. Fritze; William B. Robison (eds.) Historical Dictionary of Late Medieval England, 1272–1485. Greenwood Press. pp. 291–293. ISBN 978-0-313-29124-1.
** Stratford, Jenny (1993). The Bedford Inventories: The Worldly Goods of John, Duke of Bedford, Regent of France, 1389–1435. Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London. 49. ISBN 978-0-85431-261-0. ISSN 0953-7163. OCLC 29900611.
** Stubbs, W. (1880). The Constitutional History of England. 3. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
** Thompson, J. (1960). Economic and social history of Europe in the later Middle Ages (1300–1530). New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing.
** Williams, E.C. (1963). My Lord of Bedford, 1389–1435. Longmans. OCLC 2376051.
** Wolffe, B. (10 June 2001). Henry VI. Yale English Monarchs series. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-08926-4.
External links
** "Biography of Bedford, duke of". Archontology.
** Lundy, Darryl (ed.) "John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford". The Peerage."10

; Faris (1999) pp. 205-206: "JOHN OF LANCASTER, born 20 June 1389, created Earl of Kendal, Duke of Bedford 16 May 1414, Regent of France September 1422, died at Rouen in the night of 14-15 Sep. 1435 s.p., buried there; married, first, ANNE DE BOURGOGNE, daughter of Jean, Duc de Bourgogne, second, at Théroueanne 22 Apr. 1433 JACQUETTE DE LUXEMBOURG, daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg, Comte de St. Pol (descendant of Charlemagne), by Margaret, daughter of Francesco del Bazo, Dues d'Andria. She married second about 1436, with issue, Richard Wydeville, Knt., afterwards 1st Earl Rivers [see YORK 6]. He was Earl of Kendal, Duke of Bedford on 16 May 1414.1 He was Regent of France in September 1422.5

Family 1

Anne (?) de Bourgogne b. 1404, d. 14 Nov 1432

Family 2

Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford b. bt 1415 - 1416, d. 30 May 1472
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005214&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 25 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet25.html
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacquetta de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000015403&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for John of Lancaster (20 Jun 1389–14 Sep 1435), Find A Grave Memorial no. 93572472, citing Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93572472/john-of_lancaster. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Lancaster,_1st_Duke_of_Bedford. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG1,2

M, #7610, b. 3 October 1390, d. 23 February 1447
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England3,1,4 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG3,1 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited3 Oct 2019
     Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG was born on 3 October 1390.5,3,6 He married Jakobaa/Jacobea (?) of Bavaria, Css of Hainault, Holland and Seeland, daughter of Wilhelm II/VI (?) Duke of Bavaria, Ct of Hainault, Holland and Seeland and Marguerite (?) de Bourgogne, Cts de Mortagne, before 7 March 1422/23; Genealogy.EU says (Anjou 6 page) m. 1422.7,3,1 Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG married Eleanor Cobham, daughter of Reginald/Reynold de Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham of Sterborough and Eleanor Colepepper, in 1428.7,3,1,8
Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG died on 23 February 1447 at Bury St. Edmunds, co. Suffolk, England, at age 56; s.p.l.7,3,1,6
Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG was buried after 23 February 1447 at St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.7,6


     ; Staley cites: CP III: 354 (d), VI: 138-9, VII: 417-8.6 He was Duke of Gloucester.1

; Farris (1999) p. 206: [quote] HUMPHREY OF GLOUCESTER [the Good], fourth and youngest son, was born on 3 Oct 1390 while his father was in Prussia, knighted 12 Oct 1399, nom. KG. about 1400, said to have been educated at Balliol College, Oxford, to which university he was a generous benefactor, presented many books to the University from about 1411, which formed the nucleus of the Bodleian Library, created Earl of Pembroke and Duke of Gloucester 16 May 1414, summoned to Parliament from 16 Sep. 1414, received command of siege of Harfleur, wounded at Agincourt on 25 Oct. 1415, and took a very active part in the King's second expedition to France, Protector of the Realm and Church of England, 5 Dec. 1423. His first marriage had disastrous effects on the relations between England and her chief ally in the field, the Duke of Burgundy, went to Hainault with his wife Jacqueline in October 1424 in an attempt to recover her lordships, soon discouraged, leaving her at Moos, returning to England in 1425 with Eleanor Cobham; after Eleanor's conviction of witchcraft and sorcery and indictment for treason as aiming at the King's life (she confessed to having used charms to obtain her husband's love), he gradually withdrew from politics and state affairs; died intestate, probably of natural causes, on 23 Feb. 1447, s.p. legit., but under suspicious circumstances, being under arrest at the time at Bury St. Edmunds, buried St. Albans Abbey; married, first, before 7 Mar. 1422/3 JACQUELINE DE HAINAULT, died at Teilingen 8 Oct 1426, widow, first, John, Dauphin of France, second, John, Duke of Brabant (from whom she fled because of neglect and insult in 1421 to England, and procured a divorce from the Anti-Pope Benedict XIII), daughter and heiress of William VI, Count of Holland (marriage to Humphrey declared void 9 June 1428, and she married, fourth, Floris Borselen, Count of Ostrevant); Humphrey married, second, 1428, ELEANOR COBHAM, daughter of Reginald Cobham, Knt., of Sterborough, Surrey, by his first wife, Eleanor, daughter of Thomas Culpeper, Knt. She was condemned and put to public penance in London, sentenced to perpetual imprisonment, October 1441, died a prisoner at Peel Castle, Isle of Man, in 1454. C.P. 5:730-737 (1926). C.P. 6:138-139 (1926).
a.     ARTHUR OF GLOUCESTER, base-born.
b.     ANTIGONE OF GLOUCESTER, base-born, married HENRY GREY [see LLOYD 7]. [end quote] The marriage of Humphrey "The Good" (?) Duke of Gloucester, Knt., KG and Jakobaa/Jacobea (?) of Bavaria, Css of Hainault, Holland and Seeland was annulled on 9 June 1428.9

Family 2

Children

Family 3

Eleanor Cobham d. 1454

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Lloyd 12: p. 454. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S1806] Louise Staley, "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005 "EDWARD III to Roger CORBET of Albright Hussey 11 Ways (1)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005."
  7. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 206.
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Cobham 11: p. 223.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 206: "marriage to Humphrey declared void..."
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Earl Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Blanche (?) of Lancaster1

F, #7611, b. 1392, d. 21 May 1409
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England1,2 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG1 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited3 Oct 2019
     Blanche (?) of Lancaster was born in 1392 at Peterborough Castle.3,1 She married Ludwig III "der Bärtige" (?) Kfst von der Pfalz, son of Rupert/Ruprecht III gennant Clem (?) Pfgf bei Rhein, Duke of Bavaria, Emperor of Germany and Elisabeth (?) Burggräfin von Nürnberg, on 6 July 1402.4,1,5
Blanche (?) of Lancaster died on 21 May 1409 at Hagenau, Pfalz, Germany (now).
     ; Blanche, *Peterborough Castle 1392, +Hagenau 21.5.1409; m.Heidelberg 1402 Kfst Ludwig III von der Pfalz (*1378 +1436.)1

Family

Ludwig III "der Bärtige" (?) Kfst von der Pfalz b. 23 Jan 1378, d. 30 Dec 1436
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  4. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 206.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012496&tree=LEO
  6. [S2250] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 8 Mar 2008: "Fw: Birthdate of Ruprecht, son of Blanche of England"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 8 Mar 2008. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 8 Mar 2008."

Philippa (?) of Lancaster1

F, #7612, b. 4 July 1394, d. 6 January 1430
FatherHenry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England1,2 b. 3 Apr 1367, d. 20 Mar 1413
MotherLady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG1 b. c 1370, d. 4 Jul 1394
Last Edited3 Oct 2019
     Philippa (?) of Lancaster was born on 4 July 1394.3,1 She married Erik VII (?) King of Denmark, Sweden, Norway, son of Wartislaw VII (?) Duke of Pomerania-Stolp and Maria (?) Duchess zu Mecklenburg-Schwerin, on 26 October 1406 at Lund.4,1,5
Philippa (?) of Lancaster died on 6 January 1430 at Convent of Wadstena, Lund, at age 35.6,1
     ; Philippa, *4.7.1394, +convent of Wadstena, Lund 6.1.1430; m.Lund 1406 King Eric I of Denmark and Norway (+3.5.1459.)1

Family

Erik VII (?) King of Denmark, Sweden, Norway b. c 1382, d. 3 May 1459

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004903&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  4. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 206.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Pomer 2 page (Pomerania): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/pomer/pomer2
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 17. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.

Sir John Beaufort KG, 1st Earl of Somerset, Marquess of Dorset1,2,3,4,5

M, #7613, b. circa 1371, d. between 16 March 1409 and 5 April 1410
FatherJohn of Gaunt (?) Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, KG6,2,3,4,7,5,8,9,10 b. 24 Jun 1340, d. 3 Feb 1398/99
MotherKatherine de Roet Duchess of Lancaster b. 25 Nov 1340, d. 10 May 1403; Burke's Peerage says that John was "...the eldest of John of Gaunt's bastards by Catherine Swynford"11,6,12,3,4,7,5,8,13,10
ReferenceGAV16 EDV16
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Sir John Beaufort KG, 1st Earl of Somerset, Marquess of Dorset was born circa 1371 at Beaufort Castle, Meuse-et-Loire, France; Staley says b. ca 1373, Richardson says "aged 21 in 1392."14,4,7,5,15 He married Margaret de Holand, daughter of Sir Thomas de Holand Knt. KG, Lord Holand, 2nd/5th Earl Kent and Lady Alice Fitz Alan, before 28 September 1397; her 1st husband.16,14,2,3,4,5
Sir John Beaufort KG, 1st Earl of Somerset, Marquess of Dorset died between 16 March 1409 and 5 April 1410 at St. Catherine-by-the-Tower, London, City of London, Greater London, England.14,17,3,4,5

His estate was probated on 5 April 1410.5

Sir John Beaufort KG, 1st Earl of Somerset, Marquess of Dorset was buried after 16 March 1410 at St. Michael's Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, co. Kent, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1371, Lincolnshire, England
     DEATH     16 Mar 1410 (aged 38–39), London, City of London, Greater London, England
     Husband of Lady Margaret de Holand and father of: Lady Joan de Beaufort, Lady Margaret de Beaufort, Henry de Beaufort, John de Beaufort, Thomas de Beaufort, and Edmund de Beaufort. He was invested as a knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) circa 1397, and his illegitimate birth was legitimized by Parliament and Papal decree February, 1397. He became the 1st Earl of Somerset on 10 February, 1397, and the 1st Marquess of Somerset on 29 September, 1397. He was deposed as Marquess of Dorset and Somerset on 3 November 1399.
     Family Members
     Parents
      John of Gaunt 1340–1399
      Katherine de Roet Swynford 1350–1403
     Spouse
      Margaret de Holland de Beaufort 1380–1439
     Siblings
      Henry Beaufort 1374–1447
      Joan Beaufort Neville 1375–1440
      Thomas de Beaufort 1377–1426
     Half Siblings
      Philippa of Lancaster 1360–1415
      Elizabeth Lancaster 1363–1425
      Henry IV 1367–1413
      Thomas Swynford 1368–1432
      Catherine Plantagenet Of Lancaster 1373–1418 (m. 1388)
     Children
      Margaret Beaufort Courtenay unknown–1449
      John Beaufort 1404–1444
      Joan Beaufort 1404–1445
      Thomas Beaufort 1405–1431
      Edmund Beaufort 1406–1455
     BURIAL     Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England
     PLOT     St. Michael's Chapel
     Created by: Carolyn Gray-Yeaw
     Added: 3 Jan 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 46305389
     SPONSORED BY Audrey DeCamp Hoffman.3,4,8
     ; Sir JOHN BEAUFORT (Beaufort being the name of a castle in Champagne belonging to his f), KG (c 1397); b c 1371; cr: 10 Feb 1396/7 EARL OF SOMERSET and 29 Sept 1397 MARQUESS OF DORSET and MARQUESS OF SOMERSET (all E; he was degraded from both marquessates 1399 following accession of HENRY IV), Constable of England 1404; m by 28 Sept 1397 Lady Margaret de Holand, dau of Thomas, Earl of Kent, by Alice, dau of Richard FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel (see NORFOLK, D), and d 16 March 1409/10. He was Earl and Marquess of Somerset.18 GAV-16 EDV-16.

; RICHARD II created the eldest of John of Gaunt's bastards by Catherine Swynford John Beaufort Earl of Somerset. He was later promoted Marquess of Somerset, though degraded from the rank in the early part of HENRY IV's reign. Both before and after the deposition of RICHARD he was a prominent military figure, chiefly in France during the Hundred Years War. The latter conflict continued to provide the Beaufort Earls of Somerset with opportunities: the 3rd Earl, one of John's younger sons, was promoted Duke of Somerset in 1443 following various military operations in Normandy, Anjou and Maine, though these were competently executed rather than conspicuously triumphant. Probably his close kinship with HENRY VI was chief cause of his leap in the peerage, for his mother Margaret was daughter of Thomas Earl of Kent, a descendant of EDWARD I. It is this Duke of Somerset's daughter who was mother of HENRY VII.11

; Faris (1999, pp. 332-333): [quote] JOHN BEAUFORT, Knt., K.G., eldest base-born son, was born about 1371 (aged twenty-one in 1392). He was created Earl of Somerset on 10 Feb. 1396/7, and Marquess of Dorset on 29 Sep. 1397. He was summoned to Parliament on 17 Sep. 1397. He was married before 28 Sep. 1397 to MARGARET HOLAND, daughter of Thomas de Holand [of Woodstock], 2nd Earl of Kent (descendant of King Edward I), by Alice (descendant of King Henry III), daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, 5th Earl of Arundel. She was sister and co-heiress of Edmund Holand, Earl of Kent [see HOLAND 8 for her ancestry]. JOHN BEAUFORT, Earl of Somerset, died testate in the hospital of St. Katherine-by-the-Tower on 16 Mar. 1409/10, and was buried in St. Michael's chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. His widow was married for the second time (with papal mandate dated 16 Aug. 1410) to THOMAS, Duke of Clarence, second son of King Henry IV (died 22 Mar. 1420/1 s.p.legit., being slain at the Battle of Bauge in Anjou). She died in the Monastery of St. Saviour's, Bermondsey, Surrey, on 30 Dec. 1429, and was buried with her two husbands in Canterbury Cathedral. SOMERSET (cont.)
C.P. 4:64 note e (1416). C.P. 4:416 (1916). TAG 19:198 (Apr. 1943). C.P. 12(1):39-45 (1953), 40, note a (John Beaufort was born about 1371, being "in doublte advoutrow goten" according to King Richard III).
Children of John Beaufort, by Margaret de Holand:
i.     HENRY BEAUFORT, son and heir, born Oct. 1401, 2nd Earl of Somerset, died 25 Nov. 1418, unmarried, s.p.
ii.     JOHN BEAUFORT, married MARGARET BEAUCHAMP [see TUDOR 6].1
iii.     THOMAS BEAÜFORT, born 1405, styled Earl of Perche, died unmarried 1432.
iv.     EDMUND BEAUFORT [see next].
v.     JOAN BEAUFORT, died at Dunbar 15 July 1445, married, first, at St. Mary Overy's, Southwark 2 or 13 Feb. 1423/4 JAMES I OF SCOTLAND, King of Scotland, born Dumferline December 1394, crowned 21 May 1424 at Scone, murdered 21 Feb. 1436/7 at Perth, buried there in the Carthusian Church; second, 1439 JAMES STEWART, Knt. [the Black Knight of Lorne].
vi.     MARGARET BEAUFORT, married THOMAS COURTENAY, 5th Earl of Devon.
[end quote]16

; Staley cites: CP VII: 410-16, XIV: 421, XII:/1: 39-45.4

; legitimated with the assent of Parliament by letters patent dated 9 Feb. 1396/7.5 He was Constable of Wallingford Castle in 1397 at Wallingford Castle, Wallingford, Berkshire, England.5 He was Lieutenant of the Duchy of Aquitaine between 1397 and 1401 at Aquitaine, France (now).5 He was 1st on 10 February 1396/97.17,8 He was M.P. on 17 September 1397.17 He was 1st Marquess of Dorset on 29 September 1397.19,8 He was Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports between 1398 and 1399 at Dover Castle, Dover, co. Kent, England.5 He was Deposed as Marquess of Dorset and Somerset on 3 November 1399. on 3 November 1399.8

Sir John Beaufort KG, 1st Earl of Somerset, Marquess of Dorset left a will between 16 March 1409 and 1410.5

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Margaret de Holand b. c 1380, d. 30 Dec 1439
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 35. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  4. [S1807] Louise Staley, "Staley email #5 3 Aug 2005 "EDWARD III to Roger CORBET of Albright Hussey 11 Ways (1)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Staley email #5 3 Aug 2005."
  5. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Somerset 9: pp. 222-224. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 4: England - Last Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S2201] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for Sir John de Beaufort (1371–16 Mar 1410), Find A Grave Memorial no. 46305389, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by Carolyn Gray-Yeaw (contributor 47062093), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46305389/john-de_beaufort. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John 'of Gaunt': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000812&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#JohnGauntdied1399B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Somerset Family Page.
  12. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 34.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine Roet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001976&tree=LEO
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-32, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for John “Earl of Somerset” Beaufort (1371–16 Mar 1410), Find A Grave Memorial no. 202398899, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by AradiaB (contributor 47631932), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/202398899/john-beaufort
  16. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  17. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 332-333.
  18. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 90-9, p. 111. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  19. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 137, pp. 332-333.
  20. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.i: p. 227.
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Gurdon 12: p. 367. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  22. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.vi: pp. 224-5.
  23. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.i: p. 224.
  24. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 13: Scotland: Houses of Bruce and Stuart.
  25. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.v: p. 224.
  26. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.ii: p. 224.
  27. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 9.iii: p. 224.
  28. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry, Vol III: Somerset 10: pp. 227-8.

Anne (?) de Bourgogne1,2

F, #7614, b. 1404, d. 14 November 1432
FatherJean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers1,2,3 b. 28 May 1371, d. 10 Sep 1419
MotherMargarete/Mary (?) of Holland and Hainault, Duchess of Bavaria2,4 b. 1363, d. 23 Jan 1423
Last Edited24 Oct 2019
     Anne (?) de Bourgogne was born in 1404.5 She married John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford, son of Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England and Lady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG, on 17 April 1423 at Troyes, Aube, France; his 1st wife.6,1,2,7
Anne (?) de Bourgogne died on 14 November 1432; buried there.1,5,2

Family

John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford b. 20 Jun 1389, d. 15 Sep 1435

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 25 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet25.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean 'the Fearless': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002123&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002124&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005214&tree=LEO

Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford1,2,3,4,5

F, #7615, b. between 1415 and 1416, d. 30 May 1472
FatherPierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano6,7,2,3,4,5,8 b. 1390, d. 31 Aug 1433
MotherMarguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano9,2,3 b. 1394, d. 15 Nov 1469
ReferenceEDV15
Last Edited13 Jul 2020
     Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford was born between 1415 and 1416 at Luxembourg; Genealogy.EU says (Anjou 6 page) b. ca 1416.10,6,1,2,3,11 She married John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford, son of Henry IV (of Bolingbroke) (?) K.G., Earl of Bolingbroke, King of England and Lady Mary de Bohun Queen Consort of England, LG, on 22 April 1433 at Therouenne, France; her 1st husband; Leo van de Pas says m. 20 Apr 1433; Genealogy.EU Luxemburg 9 page says m. 22 Apr 1433.12,6,1,2,3,13 Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford married Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers, son of Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., of Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire and Joan Bittlesgate, on 23 March 1436; her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU Luxemburg 9 page says m. ca 6.2.1435/36.12,6,14,2,3,4,5
Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford died on 30 May 1472 at Grafton Regis, South Northamptonshire Borough, Northamptonshire, England; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1415, Luxembourg
     DEATH     30 May 1472 (aged 56–57), Grafton Regis, South Northamptonshire Borough, Northamptonshire, England
     Duchess of Bedford, Lady Rivers.Lady at Court to Henry VI. In charge of examining Joan of Arc in prison to determine if she had been raped. Her brother Jean had arrested Joan of Arc. Married first,at age 17, to Prince John of Lancaster, son of King Henry IV. They had no children AFter his death married second Earl Rivers Richard Woodville. She bore Richard 16 children. Her daughter Elizabeth married King Edward IV. Husband Richard was illegally beheaded in 1469. He was the love of her life. Jacquette mourned his death and died just 3 years later in obscurity. her burial place is unknown.
     Jacquetta of Luxembourg was born in 1415 in St Pol, Artois, France. She was the daughter of Peter I of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Conversano and Brienne (1390-1433) and Margaret of Baux (1394-1469).
     On 22 April 1433 at age 17, Jacquetta married John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford at Therouenne. The Duke was the third son of King Henry IV of England and Mary de Bohun, and thus the grandson of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, himself the third son of Edward III.
     Jacquetta was a fourth cousin, twice removed of Sigismund of Luxembourg, the reigning Holy Roman Emperor, and King of Bohemia and Hungary.
     The marriage was childless and the Duke died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen. In Philippa Gregory's novel The White Queen Jacquetta is referred to as 'Jaquetta Rivers' but in fact and as was customary at the time, after her second marriage Jacquetta retained the title of her first husband and was always known as the Duchess of Bedford, this being a higher title to that of countess.
     Sir Richard Woodville, son of Sir Richard Wydevill who had served as the late Duke's chamberlain, was commissioned by Henry VI of England to bring the young widow to England. During the journey, the couple fell in love and married in secret (before 23 March 1437), without seeking the king's permission. The marriage was long and very fruitful: Jacquetta and Richard had fourteen children, including the future Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville. She lost her first-born son Lewis to a fever when he was 12 years old.
     Sir Richard and Jacquetta Woodville were the parents of the following known children: Elizabeth Woodville, Queen of England, Lewis Woodville, Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier, Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers, Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke, Jacquetta Woodville, Lady Strange, Sir John Woodville, Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers, Martha Woodville, Lady Bromley, Eleanor Woodville, Lady Grey, Lionel Woodville, Bishop of Salisbury, Margaret Woodville, Countess of Arundel, Sir Edward Woodville and Catherine Woodv     
Through her daughter, Queen Elizabeth, Jacquetta was the maternal grandmother of Elizabeth of York, Queen and wife of Henry VII. As such, she is an ancestress of all subsequent English and British monarchs, including Elizabeth II, and seven other present-day European monarchs.
     Jacquetta died on 30 May 1472 in Grafton, Northamptonshire, England. She was 57 years old.
     More information at this Wikipedia article about Jacquetta and many links to many in her family: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacquetta_of_Luxembourg
     Family Members
     Parents
      Pierre de Luxembourg-Saint Pol 1390–1433
      Margherita del Balzo 1394–1469
     Spouses
      John of Lancaster 1389–1435 (m. 1433)
      Richard Woodville 1410–1469
     Siblings
      Thibaut de Luxemburg 1418–1477
      Jacques de Luxembourg-Ligny 1420–1487
     Children
      Jacquette Wydeville L'Estrange
      Anne Wydville Grey unknown–1489
      Elizabeth Woodville 1437–1492
      Anthony Woodville 1440–1483
      Catherine Woodville 1458–1497
     BURIAL     Body lost or destroyed, Specifically: no burial records have been found
     Created by: Carolyn Gray-Yeaw
     Added: 25 May 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 111143241.10,6,1,2,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol III page 109.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: page 90.
3. The Royal House of Stuart London, 1969,1971,1976. , A. C. Addington, Reference: vol III page 106.
4. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 202.
5. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: page 3.
6. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.2:231.3


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Jacquette, *1415/6, +30.5.1472; 1m: 1433 John of England, Duke of Bedford (+1435); 2m: ca 6.2.1435/36 Richard Wydeville, Earl Rivers (their dau.was wife of King Edward IV of England.)2"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers (1415/16 – 30 May 1472) was the eldest daughter of Peter I of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Conversano and Brienne, and his wife Margaret of Baux (Margherita del Balzo of Andria).[1] She was a prominent, though often overlooked, figure in the Wars of the Roses. Through her short-lived first marriage to the Duke of Bedford, brother of King Henry V, she was firmly allied to the House of Lancaster. However, following the emphatic Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, she and her second husband Richard Woodville sided closely with the House of York. Three years after the battle and the accession of Edward IV of England, Jacquetta's eldest daughter Elizabeth Woodville married him and became Queen consort of England. Jacquetta bore Woodville 14 children and stood trial on charges of witchcraft, for which she was exonerated.
Family and ancestry
     "Her father Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, was also the hereditary Count of Brienne from 1397 until his death in 1433. Peter had succeeded his father John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir and mother Marguerite of Enghien, who had been Count and Countess of Brienne from 1394 to her death in 1397. John had been a fourth-generation descendant of Waleran I of Luxembourg, Lord of Ligny, second son of Henry V of Luxembourg and Margaret of Bar. This cadet line of the House of Luxembourg held Ligny-en-Barrois.
     "Jacquetta's paternal great-grandmother, Mahaut of Châtillon, was descended from Beatrice of England, daughter of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.[2] Jacquetta's mother, Margherita del Balzo, was a daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1st Duke of Andria, and Sueva Orsini.[3] Sueva descended from Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England, the youngest child of King John of England and Isabella of Angoulême.[3]
     "The Luxembourgs claimed legendary descent from the water deity Melusine through their ancestor Siegfried of Luxembourg (c. 922 – 998).[4] Jacquetta was a fourth cousin twice removed of Sigismund of Luxembourg, the reigning Holy Roman Emperor and king of Bohemia and Hungary.
Early life
     "Most of Jacquetta's early life is a mystery. She was born as the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years War began. Her uncle, John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny, was the head of the military company that captured Joan of Arc. John held Joan prisoner at Beauvoir and later sold her to the English.
First marriage
     "On 22 April 1433 at age 17, Jacquetta married John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, at Thérouanne. The Duke was the third son of King Henry IV of England and Mary de Bohun, and thus the grandson of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, himself the third son of King Edward III. The marriage was childless and the Duke died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen. As was customary at the time, after her second marriage Jacquetta retained the title of her first husband and was always known as the Duchess of Bedford, this being a higher title than that of countess. Jacquetta inherited one-third of the Duke's main estates as her widow's share.[5]
Second marriage
     "Sir Richard Woodville, son of Sir Richard Woodville who had served as the late Duke's chamberlain, was commissioned by Henry VI of England to bring Bedford's young widow to England. During the journey, the couple fell in love and married in secret (before 23 March 1437), without seeking the king's permission. Jacquetta had been granted dower lands following her first husband's death on condition that she did not remarry without a royal licence. On learning of the marriage, Henry VI refused to see them, but was mollified by the payment of a fine of £1000. The marriage was long and very fruitful: Jacquetta and Richard had fourteen children, including the future Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville. She lost her first-born son Lewis to a fever when he was 12 years old.
     "By the mid-1440s, the Woodvilles were in a powerful position. Jacquetta was related to both King Henry and Queen Margaret by marriage. Her sister, Isabelle de Saint Pol, married Margaret's uncle Charles du Maine while Jacquetta was the widow of Henry VI's uncle. She outranked all ladies at court with the exception of the queen. As a personal favourite, she also enjoyed special privileges and influence at court. Margaret influenced Henry to create her husband Baron Rivers in 1448, and he was a prominent partisan of the House of Lancaster as the Wars of the Roses began.[4]
Wars of the Roses
     "The Yorkists crushed the Lancastrians at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and Edward IV, the first king from the House of York, took the throne. The husband of Jacquetta's oldest daughter Elizabeth, Sir John Grey, had been killed a month before at the Second Battle of St. Albans, a Lancastrian victory under the command of Margaret of Anjou. At Towton, however, the tables turned in favour of the Yorkists.
     "Edward IV met and soon married the widowed Elizabeth Woodville in secret; though the date is not accepted as exactly accurate, it is traditionally said to have taken place (with only Jacquetta and two ladies in attendance) at the Woodville family home in Northamptonshire on 1 May 1464.[6] Elizabeth was crowned queen on 26 May 1465. The marriage, once revealed, ruined the plans of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, Edward's cousin, who had been negotiating a much-needed alliance with France via a political marriage for Edward.
     "With Elizabeth now Queen of England, the Woodvilles rose to great prominence and power. Jacquetta's husband Richard was created Earl Rivers and appointed Lord High Treasurer in March 1466. Jacquetta found rich and influential spouses for her children and helped her grandchildren achieve high posts.[7] She arranged for her 20-year-old son, John, to marry the widowed and very rich Katherine Neville, Duchess of Norfolk, who was at least 45 years older than John. The rise of the Woodvilles created widespread hostility among the Yorkists, including Warwick and the king's brothers George and Richard, who were being displaced in the king's favour by the former Lancastrians.
     "In 1469, Warwick openly broke with Edward IV and temporarily deposed him. Earl Rivers and his son John were captured and executed by Warwick on 12 August at Kenilworth. Jacquetta survived her husband by three years and died in 1472, at about 56 years of age.
Witchcraft accusations
     "Shortly after her husband's execution by Warwick, Thomas Wake, a follower of Warwick's, accused Jacquetta of witchcraft. Wake brought to Warwick Castle a lead image "made like a man-of-arms . . . broken in the middle and made fast with a wire," and alleged that Jacquetta had fashioned it to use for witchcraft and sorcery. He claimed that John Daunger, a parish clerk in Northampton, could attest that Jacquetta had made two other images, one for the king and one for the queen. The case fell apart when Warwick released Edward IV from custody, and Jacquetta was cleared by the king's great council of the charges on 21 February 1470.[8] In 1484 Richard III in the act known as Titulus Regius[9] revived the allegations of witchcraft against the dead Jacquetta when he claimed that she and Elizabeth had procured Elizabeth's marriage to Edward IV through witchcraft; however, Richard never offered any proof to support his assertions.
Heritage
     "Through her daughter Elizabeth, Jacquetta was the maternal grandmother of Elizabeth of York, wife and queen of Henry VII, and therefore an ancestor of all subsequent English monarchs.
Children
1. Elizabeth Woodville, Queen consort of England (c. 1437 – 8 June 1492), married first Sir John Grey, second Edward IV of England.
2. Lewis Woodville (c. 1438), died in childhood.
3. Anne Woodville (1438/9 – 30 July 1489), married first William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, second George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
4. Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers (c. 1440 – 25 June 1483), married first Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales, second Mary Fitzlewis; not married to Gwenllian Stradling, the mother of Margaret.
5. John Woodville (c. 1444 – 12 August 1469), married Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk.
6. Jacquetta Woodville (1445–1509), married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange of Knockin.
7. Lionel Woodville, Bishop of Salisbury (c. 1446 – June 1484).
8. Eleanor Woodville (d. c. 1512), married Sir Anthony Grey, son of Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent.
9. Margaret Woodville (c. 1450 – 1490/1), married Thomas Fitzalan, 17th Earl of Arundel.
10. Martha Woodville (d. c. 1500), married Sir John Bromley of Baddington.
11. Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (1453 – March 1491).
12. Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (1454/8 – 28 July 1488).
1.. Mary Woodville (c. 1456 – 1481), married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.
14. Catherine Woodville (c. 1458 – 18 May 1497), married first Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, second Jasper Tudor, Duke of Bedford, and third Sir Richard Wingfield.[10]

     "The Visitation of Buckinghamshire of 1566 mentions the marriage of William Dormer of Wycombe (only later of Ascott House) to "Agnes, da. of Sir Richard Woodvyle, Erle Ryvers" but does not say whether the father was the first or the third earl, who the mother was or whether Agnes was legitimate.
In fiction
     "Jacquetta is a main character in Philippa Gregory's 2009 novel The White Queen, a fictionalized account of the life of her eldest daughter Elizabeth.[11] In the novel, Jacquetta is portrayed as having indeed dabbled quite a bit in witchcraft, displaying what would seem to be actual power. She is also the main protagonist in Gregory's 2011 prequel novel The Lady of the Rivers.[12] Gregory's works explore the historical claim by Jacquetta's family that they were descended from the water deity Melusine. Gregory uses Jacquetta's tenuous ties to Melusine and Joan of Arc to further her potential ties to witchcraft. In the 2013 BBC One/Starz television series adaptation The White Queen, Jacquetta is portrayed by actress Janet McTeer.[13]
     "Jacquetta is also an important character in Margaret Frazer's fifth "Player Joliffe" novel, A Play of Treachery (2009). The story is set in 1435–6, after the death of her first husband, John, Duke of Bedford. This historical novel tells a tale regarding her marriage to Sir Richard Woodville. There is no mention of witchcraft in this novel.
     "Jacquetta is also a prominent character in The Last of the Barons (1843), a novel by Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803–1873). The book's title is a reference to Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick.
References
1. David Baldwin, Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower, (The History Press, 2010), Genealogical table 4.
2. Douglas Richardson. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. pg 533-542.
3. Douglas Richardson. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. pg 395-402, 538.
4. Philippa Gregory; David Baldwin; Michael Jones (2011). The Women of the Cousins' War. London: Simon & Schuster.
5. Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office, Volume 3 p. 53 Web. 17 November 2014.
6. Robert Fabian, The New Chronicles of England and France, ed. Henry Ellis (London: Rivington, 1811), 654; "Hearne's Fragment of an Old Chronicle, from 1460–1470," The Chronicles of the White Rose of York. (London: James Bohn, 1845), 15–16.
7. Ralph A. Griffiths, "The Court during the Wars of the Roses". In Princes Patronage and the Nobility: The Court at the Beginning of the Modern Age, cc. 1450–1650. Edited by Ronald G. Asch and Adolf M. Birke. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. ISBN 0-19-920502-7. 59–61.
8. Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1467-77, p. 190
9. "The Richard III and Yorkist History Server". r3.org. Archived from the original on 31 August 2008.
10. Richard Marius, Thomas More: A Biography, (Harvard University Press, 1984), 119.
11. "The White Queen (Official site)". PhilippaGregory.com. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
12. "The Lady of the Rivers (Official site)". PhilippaGregory.com. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
13. "BBC – Media Centre: The White Queen, a new ten-part drama for BBC One". BBC.co.uk. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2014.
Further reading
** Philippa Gregory; David Baldwin; Michael Jones (2011). The Women of the Cousins' War. London: Simon & Schuster."15

; Per Genealogics:
     "Jacquetta de Luxembourg was born about 1415-16, daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg, comte de St. Pol, Brienne et Conversano, and Margherita del Balzo. John, duke of Bedford and regent of occupied France, was married to Anne de Bourgogne, sister of Duke Philippe 'the Good'. Anne _'bonne, belle et jeune'_ died in Paris on 14 November 1432. This marriage had been the basis of the strong relationship of Bedford and Duke Philippe; this unhappy event caused the relationship to 'grow somewhat cold'. No doubt wishing to ally himself with another powerful Burgundian family, Bedford married Jacquetta, on 20 April 1433 at Thérouanne. Duke Philippe was angered by this marriage to the daughter of one of his richest nobles which took place without his consent.
     "In June 1433 Bedford returned to England, to deny before Parliament rumours that he was incompetent and neglectful. He did so to such effect that in November the Commons complimented him on his management of affairs in France. Bedford remained in England until he received a letter from the Provost of Paris, saying that unless he came back soon the capital was lost. When he returned to France in July 1434 he was greeted with news of a general rising by the Norman peasants against English garrisons; they had been provoked by Richard Venables who had massacred the entire village of Vicques near Falaise.
     "In December Bedford returned to Paris where another terrible winter had set in - 'day and night the snow never stopped falling'. In February 1435 Bedford left Paris for the last time. When the congress at Arras began in August, Bedford was seriously ill at Rouen. On 14 September 1435, John, duke of Bedford, died at Rouen.
     "Richard Widville had been steward to John, duke of Bedford. About 23 March 1436 Jacquetta married Richard Widville in secret. When it became known it caused a major scandal and she was fined 1,000 pounds for marrying beneath her. Her first marriage been childless, but with Richard Widville she became the mother of sixteen children. Her husband was, on 9 May 1448, created Baron Rivers and, in 1466, Earl Rivers.
     "After their daughter Elizabeth had married King Edward IV, her family became very powerful, which was very much resented. After Edward's defeat at the Battle of Edgecote Moor on 26 July 1469, Richard and their second son John were taken prisoners at Chepstow. Following a hasty show trial, they were beheaded at Kenilworth on 12 August 1469.
     "Jacquetta died on 30 May 1472, having seen all her daughters making great marriages."3 EDV-15 GKJ-15.

Family 1

John (?) of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford b. 20 Jun 1389, d. 15 Sep 1435
Child

Family 2

Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers b. b 1408, d. 12 Aug 1469
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 6 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou6.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacquetta de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000015403&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Grey 15: p. 359. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Herbert 15: p. 396.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007731&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_I,_Count_of_Saint-Pol. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita del Balzo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007732&tree=LEO
  10. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 273. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Jacquette De Luxembourg Woodville (1415–30 May 1472), Find A Grave Memorial no. 111143241, ; Maintained by Carolyn Gray-Yeaw (contributor 47062093) Body lost or destroyed, who reports a no burial records have been found, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/111143241/jacquette-woodville. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005214&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015402&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacquetta_of_Luxembourg
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Woodville,_1st_Earl_Rivers.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Woodville,_Lord_Scales.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Widville: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001713&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#ElizabethWydevilledied1492. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  20. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I34000
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anthony Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00236627&tree=LEO
  22. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I6902
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108613&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Mary Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00041629&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00263388&tree=LEO
  26. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Woodville,_3rd_Earl_Rivers.
  27. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I47420
  28. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 2 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel2.html
  29. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 43.
  30. [S1806] Louise Staley, "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005 "EDWARD III to Roger CORBET of Albright Hussey 11 Ways (1)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005."
  31. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Stafford 13: pp. 257-261. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.

Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #7616, b. 28 May 1371, d. 10 September 1419
FatherPhilip II "the Bold" (?) Duc de Bourgogne et de Touraine2,3,7,8 b. 17 Jan 1342, d. 27 Apr 1404
MotherMarguerite III (?) Css of Flanders, Cts d'Artois, Nevers and Rethel, Css Palatine of Burgundy, Margravine of Antwerp, Lady of Malines, Duchess of Brabant and Limburg8,9 b. 13 Apr 1350, d. 16 Mar 1405
ReferenceGAV19
Last Edited22 Feb 2020
     Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers was born on 28 May 1371 at Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France.2,3,10,8 He married Margarete/Mary (?) of Holland and Hainault, Duchess of Bavaria, daughter of Albrecht I (?) Count of Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing and Margarethe von Brieg Duchess of Silesia, on 12 April 1385.2,10,11,8,12
Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers died on 10 September 1419 at Montereau-Fault-Yonne, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France, at age 48; murdered.2,3,10,8
Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers was buried after 10 September 1419 at Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     28 May 1371, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     DEATH     10 Sep 1419 (aged 48), Montereau-Fault-Yonne, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     French Royalty. Also known as The Fearless, Jean de Valois and Jean de Bourgogne. Second Duke of Burgundy, he is one of the most dramatic characters among medieval rulers. He inherited the Duchy from his father Philip II the Bold and mother Margaret III, Countess of Flanders. By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters: Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, Earl of Richmond and afterwards Duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, Count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, Duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., Duke of Bourbon, in 1425. Murdered at a meeting with the Dauphin, (later King Charles VII of France) his body was first buried at Montereau, eventually removed to the Chartreuse of Dijon, and afterwards transferred to the Musee des Beaux Arts (Fine Arts Museum). Bio by: MC
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philip II of Burgundy 1342–1404
          Marguerite Of Dampierre 1350–1405
     Spouse
          Margarete von Bayern 1363–1423
     Siblings
          John of Burgundy 1371–1419
          Louis de Bourgogne 1377–1378
          Catherine of Burgundy 1378–1425
          Antoine of Burgundy 1384–1415
          Marie de Bourgogne 1386–1422
          Philip II, Count of Nevers 1389–1415
          Philippe de Bourgogne 1389–1415
     Children
          Marie de Bourgogne von Kleve unknown–1463
          Marguerite de Bourgogne 1393–1442
          Philipp of Burgundy III 1396–1467
          Anne de Bourgogne 1404–1432
     BURIAL     Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: MC
     Added: 11 Jan 2006
     Find A Grave Memorial 12949357.10,13
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "John the Fearless (French: Jean sans Peur?; Dutch: Jan zonder Vrees; 28 May 1371 – 10 September 1419) was Duke of Burgundy (the second of the Valois dynasty) as John I from 1404 until his death. A scion of the royal house of France, he played an important role in French affairs during the early 15th century,[1] in particular the struggles to rule the country for the mentally ill King Charles VI (his first cousin) and the Hundred Years' War with England. His rash, unscrupulous, and violent political dealings[1] contributed to the eruption of the Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War in France, and culminated in his assassination in 1419.
     "The involvement of Charles, the heir to the French throne, in his assassination, prompted John's son and successor Philip to seek an alliance with the English, thereby bringing the Hundred Years' War to its final phase.
Biography
Early life
     "John was born in Dijon on 28 May 1371 to Philip II "the Bold," Duke of Burgundy, and Margaret III, Countess of Flanders. On the death of his maternal grandfather Louis II, Count of Flanders, in 1384, he received the title Count of Nevers, which he bore until his father’s death in 1404,[2] when he ceded it to his brother Philip.[citation needed]
     "In 1385,[2] a double wedding for the Burgundian family took place in Cambrai.[citation needed] John married Margaret of Bavaria, daughter of Albrecht of Bavaria, Count of Holland and Hainaut,[2] while at the same time his sister Margaret of Burgundy married Albrecht's son William in order to consolidate John's position in the Low Countries. The marriage took place after John cancelled his engagement to his first cousin, Catherine of France, a daughter of King Charles V of France, who was only a child at the time.[citation needed]
     "Before his accession to the Duchy of Burgundy, John was one of the principal leaders of the French forces sent to aid King Sigismund of Hungary in his war against Sultan Bayezid I. John fought in the Battle of Nicopolis of 25 September 1396 with such enthusiasm and bravery that he was given the cognomen Fearless (Sans-Peur). Despite his personal bravery, his impetuous leadership ended in disaster for the European expedition.[3] He was captured and did not recover his liberty until the next year after an enormous ransom was paid.[2]
Conflict with Louis of Orléans
     "John was invested as Duke of Burgundy in 1404 upon the death of his father Philip the Bold and almost immediately entered into open conflict with Louis, Duke of Orléans, the younger brother of the increasingly disturbed King Charles VI of France. Both men attempted to fill the power vacuum left by the demented king.[2]
     "John played a game of marriages by exchanging his daughter Margaret of Burgundy for Michelle of Valois, who would marry his heir, Philip the Good. For her part, Margaret was married to Louis, Duke of Guyenne, the heir to the French throne from 1401 until his death in 1415. For all his concentration on aristocratic politics, John nonetheless did not overlook the importance of the middle class of merchants and tradesmen or the University of Paris.[2]
     "Louis tried to gain the favour of the wife of Charles VI, Queen Isabeau of France, and may have become her lover. After his son-in-law, the Dauphin Louis, was successively kidnapped and recovered by both parties, the Duke of Burgundy managed to gain appointment by royal decree — during one of the King's "absent" periods when mental illness manifested itself — as guardian of the Dauphin and the King's children. This did not improve relations between John and the Duke of Orléans. Soon the two rivals descended into making open threats.[citation needed] Their uncle, John, Duke of Berry, secured a vow of solemn reconciliation on 20 November 1407, but only three days later, on 23 November 1407, Louis was brutally assassinated in the streets of Paris.[2] The order, no one doubted, had come from the Duke of Burgundy, who shortly admitted to the deed and declared it to be a justifiable act of "tyrannicide". According to Thomas Walsingham, Orléans had simply received his just deserts as he had been "taking his pleasure with whores, harlots, incest" and had committed adultery with the wife of an unnamed knight who had taken his revenge by killing him under the protection of the Duke of Burgundy.[citation needed] After an escape from Paris and a few skirmishes against the Orléans party, John managed to recover the King's favour. In the treaty of Chartres, signed on 9 March 1409, the King absolved the Duke of Burgundy of the crime, and he and Louis' son Charles pledged a reconciliation. A later edict renewed John's guardianship of the Dauphin.[2]
     "Even with the Orléans dispute resolved in his favour, John did not lead a tranquil life. Charles, the son and heir of the murdered Duke of Orleans, was only 14 at the time of his father's death and was forced to depend heavily on allies to support his claims for the property that had been confiscated from him by the Duke of Burgundy. Chief among these allies was his father-in-law Bernard VII, Count of Armagnac. Because of this alliance, their faction became known as the Armagnacs in opposition to the Burgundians. With peace between the factions solemnly sworn in 1410, John returned to Burgundy and Bernard remained in Paris, where he reportedly shared the Queen's bed. The Armagnac party was not content with its level of political power, and after a series of riots and attacks against the citizens, John was recalled to the capital, then sent back to Burgundy in 1413. At this time, King Henry V of England invaded French territory and threatened to attack Paris. During the peace negotiations with the Armagnacs, Henry was also in contact with John, who was keen to wrest control of France away from King Charles VI. Despite this, he continued to be wary of forming an alliance with the English for fear of destroying his immense popularity with the common people of France. When Henry demanded Burgundy's support for his claim to be the rightful King of France, John backed away and decided to ally himself with the Armagnacs.[citation needed] Although he talked of helping his sovereign, his troops took no part in the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, although two of his brothers, Antoine, Duke of Brabant, and Philip II, Count of Nevers, died fighting for France during the battle.[2]
Conflict with the Dauphin
     "Two years later, with the rivalry between Burgundians and Armagnacs at an all-time high because of the shattering defeat at Agincourt, John's troops set about the task of capturing Paris.[citation needed] On 30 May 1418, he did capture the city, but not before the new Dauphin, the future Charles VII of France, had escaped. John then installed himself in Paris and made himself protector of the King. Although not an open ally of the English, John did nothing to prevent the surrender of Rouen in 1419. With the whole of northern France in English hands and Paris occupied by Burgundy, the Dauphin tried to bring about a reconciliation with John. They met in July and swore peace on the bridge of Pouilly, near Melun. On the grounds that peace was not sufficiently assured by the meeting at Pouilly, a fresh interview was proposed by the Dauphin to take place on 10 September 1419 on the bridge at Montereau. John of Burgundy was present with his escort for what he considered a diplomatic meeting. He was, however, assassinated by the Dauphin's companions. He was later buried in Dijon. His successor Philip the Good formed an alliance with the English.
Family
     "John and his wife Margaret, who married in 1385, had one son, who succeeded him, and seven daughters:[2]
** Catherine (1391–1414, Ghent), promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou;[2]
** Marie (1393 – 30 October 1463, Monterberg bei Kalkar). She married Adolph I, Duke of Cleves;[2]
** Margaret (December 1393 – February 1442, Paris), married on 30 August 1404 Louis of Valois the Dauphin (heir of king Charles VI of France), then in 1423 Arthur de Richemont, the future Duke of Brittany;[2]
** Philip ??? (1396–1467) son and heir;[2]
** Isabelle[2] (d. 18 September 1412, Rouvres), married at Arras on 22 July 1406 to[citation needed] Olivier de Châtillon-Blois, Count of Penthièvre and Périgord;[2]
** Joanna[2] (b. 1399, Bouvres), died young;[citation needed]
** Anne (1404 – 14 November 1432, Paris), married John, Duke of Bedford;[6]
** Agnes (1407 – 1 December 1476, Château de Moulins), married Charles I, Duke of Bourbon.[2]
     "John and his mistress Agnes de Croy, daughter of Jean I de Croÿ, had the following child:[7]
** John of Burgundy, Bishop of Cambrai
     "John and his mistress Marguerite de Borsele had the following children:[8][9]
** Guy of Burgundy, Lord of Kruybeke (killed at the siege of Calais in 1436), married Johanna, illegitimate daughter of Albert I, Duke of Bavaria.[10][9]
** Antoine of Burgundy.[11]
** Philipotte of Burgundy, Lady of Joncy, married Antoine of Rochebaron, Baron of Berze-le-Chatel.[8][10]
Titles
1384–1404: Count of Nevers as John I
27 April 1404 – 10 September 1419: Duke of Burgundy as John I
21 March 1405 – 10 September 1419: Count Palatine of Burgundy as John I
21 March 1405 – 10 September 1419: Count of Artois as John I
21 March 1405 – 10 September 1419: Count of Flanders as John I
27 April 1404 – 28 January 1405: Count of Charolais as John I
Notes
1. Vaughan 1998.
2. Poupardin 1911, p. 445.
3. Smith & DeVries 2005, pp. 71–73.
4. de Sousa, Antonio Caetano (1735). Historia genealogica da casa real portugueza (in Portuguese). Lisbon: Lisboa Occidental. p. 147.
5. Suckale, Robert; Crossley, Paul (2005). Prague: The Crown of Bohemia, 1347-1437. Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 16. ISBN 9781588391612. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
6. Library of Congress staff 2014.
7. Vaughan 2005, p. 236.
8. Sommé 1998, p. 69.
9. Kasten 2008, p. 478.
10. Vaughan 2005, p. 134.
11. Kerrebrouck 1990, p. 157.
References
** Poupardin, R. (1911). "John (1371–1419), called the Fearless" . In Hugh Chisholm (ed.) Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed. 15. Cambridge University Press. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |encyclopedia= (help) This publication, now in the public domain, has text incorporated into this article.
** Smith, Robert Douglas & DeVries, K. (2005). The Artillery of the Dukes of Burgundy, 1363–1477. Armour and Weapons. Woodbridge: Boydell Press. ISBN 978-1-84383-162-4.
** Vaughan, R. (1998-07-20). "John, duke of Burgundy". Encyclopædia Britannica.
** Vaughan, Richard (2005). John the Fearless. The Dukes of Burgundy. 2 (reprinted new ed.) Boydell Press. ISBN 978-0-85115-916-4.
Secondary
** Kasten, Brigitte (2008). Herrscher- und Fürstentestamente im westeuropäischen Mittelalter. Böhlau Verlag Köln Weimar. p. 478.
** Kerrebrouck, Patrick van (1990). Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France. Les Valois. 3. Villeneuve-d'Arcy. p. 517.
** Library of Congress staff (16 December 2014) [2011]. "Library of Congress Name Authority File: Anne, of Burgundy, Duchess of Bedford, 1404?-1432".
** Sommé, Monique (1998). Isabelle de Portugal, duchesse de Bourgogne: une femme au pouvoir au XVe siècle. Presses universitaires du Septentrion. p. 69.14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Jean 'the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, was born on 28 May 1371 in the ducal castle at Rouvres, Dijon, where he spent the greater part of his childhood, son of Philippe 'the Bold', duke of Burgundy, and Margaretha of Flanders and Brabant.
     "On 12 April 1385 at Cambrai he married Margaretha of Bavaria, daughter of Albrecht, count of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault, and Margarethe von Schlesien-Brieg. They had eight children of whom their son Philippe and daughters Marie and Anne would have progeny. By Margarethe van Borselen he fathered three children of whom a son Philippe would have progeny, and by Agnes de Croÿ he fathered a son Jean who would become bishop of Kamerijk, and later archbishop of Trier.
     "In the decade following his marriage, Jean's father initiated him into the arts of government and warfare, though he was not given any post of responsibility. Even in 1396, at 24 when he became leader of the Burgundian crusade against the Ottoman Turks in defence of Hungary, his leadership was only nominal. The actual conduct of the expedition, which ended in the disastrous defeat of the crusaders on the battlefield of Nicopolis on 25 September 1396 and the capture of Jean by the Turks (an adventure that earned him the epithet 'the Fearless'), was entrusted to a group of councillors and military advisers appointed by Philippe 'the Bold'. Jean evidently benefited from the blunders of these commanders, for his subsequent career showed that he was the only one of the Valois rulers of Burgundy who knew how to handle an army.
     "When Jean at last succeeded his father in 1404 as duke of Burgundy and count of Burgundy, Flanders and Artois, he was 33 years old. Jean 'the Fearless' spent most of his time and his considerable political and military energies in France, Paris being his normal place of residence and seat of government. His only significant personal participation as duke of Burgundy in major events outside France took place in 1408, when he led a Burgundian army to aid his beleaguered brother-in-law, the bishop of Liège, Jean of Bavaria, against the citizens of Liège, who were in open revolt. On the field of Othée, on 23 September 1408, the men of Liège were decisively defeated, and Burgundian influence was extended over the city and over the bishopric of Liège.
     "From the start, Jean found himself involved in French affairs, and he was in part responsible for provoking a civil war in France with a rival house, headed by his first cousin, the King's younger brother Louis, duc d'Orléans. Each man sought control of the mad king Charles VI and his queen and of the capital Paris. While the notorious murder by Jean of his cousin using hired assassins in 1407 enabled him to subdue Paris and the crown, the opposition to the Burgundians by Louis' followers and heirs continued. Their faction was named after its main supporter, Bernard VII, comte d'Armagnac.
     "During the five years between 1413 and 1418, in which the Armagnacs succeeded in driving the Burgundians out of Paris, the internal situation in France was further complicated by a new English invasion led by the ambitious king, Henry V. Jean was one of those French princes who, while pretending to do his best to reach the battlefield of Agincourt to give battle to the English in 1415, was unaccountably delayed on the way.
     "His intermittent negotiations with King Henry V did not, however, lead to a firm Anglo-Burgundian alliance, and in the autumn of 1419 Jean turned instead to the Armagnacs, in the hopes of arranging a truce or even making a firm peace settlement with their youthful leader, the dauphin Charles (the future Charles VII), in an alliance against the English. The two princes, each with 10 companions, met on the bridge of Montereau, some 50 miles south east of Paris. As the diplomatic parley began, Jean 'the Fearless' was struck down and killed during a dispute started by the Armagnacs, a political assassination that contemporary evidence shows was almost certain carefully premeditated.
     "Jean pursued aims similar to those of the other rulers of his day: the consolidation and extension of his own and his family's power. In spite of his lapses into violence, his love of intrigue, his hypocrisy, and his rashness, he was a successful diplomat and military leader; he was more dynamic and more of a reformer than his son Philippe 'the Good' and more cunning, though less scrupulous, than his father. Yet he has received less attention from historians than either of them. In the eye of history, especially French history, he has long been regarded as a traitor and assassin. There was, perhaps, a dark and sinister element in his character, but he lived in an age when vice, tyranny, and murder were the common properties of every ruler. If he wrought destruction in France, he also brought peace and prosperity to his own Burgundian lands."8

; Jean "Sans Peur", Duc de Bourgogne (1404-19), Ct of Flanders, etc, *Dijon 28.5.1371, +murdered at Pont-de-Yonne 10.9.1419, bur Dijon; m.Cambrai 12.4.1385 Margareta of Bavaria-Straubing, Css of Holland (*1363 +23.1.1423.)10

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 89.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 173.
3. Biography of Jean the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy , Vaughan, Richard.
4. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
5. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2; 27.15,8
Jean/John "the Fearless" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Ct of Flanders, Count of Nevers was also known as John (?) Duke of Burgundy.6 GAV-19. He was Duke of Burgundy between 1404 and 1419.3,6,10

Family 2

Margarete/Mary (?) of Holland and Hainault, Duchess of Bavaria b. 1363, d. 23 Jan 1423
Children

Family 3

Agnès de Croÿ
Child

Citations

  1. Eldest son.
  2. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 57. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  5. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/27.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe 'the Bold': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002121&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean 'the Fearless': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002123&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe of Flanders and Brabant: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002122&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 25 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet25.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wittel 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wittel/wittel9.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002124&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for John of Burgundy (28 May 1371–10 Sep 1419), Find A Grave Memorial no. 12949357, citing Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12949357/john_of_burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_the_Fearless. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  16. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#Mariedied1463. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005740&tree=LEO
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002082&tree=LEO
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Croÿ.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano1,2,3

M, #7617, b. 1390, d. 31 August 1433
FatherJean (?) de Luxemburg, Comte de Brienne, Seigneur de Beaurevoir et de Richebourg1,4,2 b. 1370, d. 2 Jul 1397
MotherMarguerite d'Enghien comtesse de Brienne, contesa di Conversano, heiress of Brienne and Enghien1,5,2 b. c 1365, d. a 19 Sep 1393
ReferenceEDV16
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano was born in 1390 at Naples, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy (now).6,1 He married Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano, daughter of Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria and Sueva/Sveva Orsini, on 8 May 1405.7,8,9,1,2,10,11
Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano died on 31 August 1433 at Rambures, Somme, France (now); died of the plague.8,1,2
Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano was buried after 31 August 1433 at Abbey of Cercamp, Artois, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1390, Luxembourg
     DEATH     31 Aug 1433 (aged 42–43), Rambures, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France
     Nobility, Count of Brienne, Conversano and Saint Pol, Lord of Enghien, Richebourg and Arkinghem. Born the eldest son of Jean II de Beauvoir and Marguerite d'Enghien, Countess of Conversano and Brienne and brother of Cardinal Louis of Luxembourg (Ely Cathedral).
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Margherita del Balzo 1394–1469
     Children
          Jacquette De Luxembourg Woodville 1415–1472
          Thibaut de Luxemburg 1418–1477
          Jacques de Luxembourg-Ligny 1420–1487
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 7 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 86369125.2,12
     Reference: Genealogcs cites:
     1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol III page 109.
     2. The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, wife of Reverend John Owsley 3rd Edition, 1999., Ronny O.Bodine & Thomas W. Spalding Jr., Reference: 266
     3. Cahiers de Saint Louis Magazine. , Jacques Dupont, Jacques Saillot, Reference: 775
     4. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.)
1.2:231
     5. Les Chevaliers de l'Ordre de la Toison d'or au XVe siècle. 2nd ed., 2000 , Smedt, Raphaël de (ed).
22-4.13,7

; Per Genealogcs:
     "Pierre was born in Naples in 1390, the son and heir of Jean de Luxembourg, sire de Beauvoir et de Richebourg, and Marguerite d'Enghien, comtesse héritière de Brienne et de Conversano, dame d'Enghien et de Gouy-lez-Piéton, duchesse en titre d'Athènes. He was the third of four children, but the only one to have offspring. His elder brother Louis became cardinal archbishop of Rouen.
     "On 8 May 1405 Pierre married Margherita del Balzo, daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1.duca d'Andria, and his third wife Sueva Orsini. They had seven children of whom three sons and two daughters would have progeny. His eldest daughter Jacquetta in 1433 married John, duke of Bedford (son of King Henry IV of England), the English regent of France. Their marriage was childless and he died in 1435. In 1436 she married Sir Richard Widville, who was the son of her dead husband's chamberlain. He was later created the first earl Rivers. They had sixteen children, among them Elizabeth Widville who was to become the wife of King Edward IV of England, and mother of Elizabeth of York (in her turn mother of King Henry VIII) and of King Edward V. Pierre's eldest son Louis became constable of France in 1465, but was beheaded in 1475 after a conspiracy between Louis XI and the duke of Burgundy, themselves at war but both deeply distrusting the constable. Pierre's youngest son Jacques, seigneur de Richebourg, became a knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece like his father.
     "Pierre spent his early years in the kingdom of Naples and was married there. In October 1407 he came to Enghien for the first time. He then entered the service of Willem of Bavaria, then count of Hainaut, Holland and Zeeland. At the side of Johann of Bavaria, prince-bishop of Liège, he fought at the Battle of Othée (23 September 1408).
     "In the conflict between England and France in 1420 he sided with England. He was with Philippe 'the Good', duke of Burgundy at the marriage of Henry V of England and Catherine of France at Troyes (on 2 June 1420). He took part in the siege of Melun, but was captured in the summer of 1420 between Melun and Brienne, and imprisoned in Meaux. At the end of 1421 he was ransomed by the king of England.
     "He returned to Enghien and soon after he became a member of the ducal council of Brabant. From the end of 1421 to 1430 he played a major role in the council under the dukes Jean IV and Philippe de Saint-Pol, to whom he was related. Under the rule of Philippe de Saint-Pol, he was one of five barons to whom Philippe had to assign the rule of the duchy following the revolt of 1428. When Philippe 'the Good', duke of Burgundy, in 1430 became duke of Brabant and Limburg, Pierre continued to occupy an influential position as a member of the regency council, made up of seven members of the high nobility of Brabant and Limburg.
     "He also had a degree of authority in the county of Hainault as governor for Jean IV de Bourgogne, duke of Brabant and Limburg, after the latter's victory over the troops of Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, husband of Jean's former wife Jacoba of Bavaria, countess of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault. In 1425 he was one of two captains-general of Brabant.
     "Like his brothers he supported Philippe 'the Good' in his coalition with the English against the French. With his elder brother Jean, comte de Ligny and seigneur de Beaurevoir, he was among the first members to be appointed to the Order of the Golden Fleece at its foundation by Philippe 'the Good' in 1430, although he did not personally swear his oath until the second chapter at Bruges on 2 December 1432.
     "From 1431 until his death he was count of St. Pol in Artois, of Brienne in Champagne, and of Conversano in Apulia as well as lord of Enghien in Hainault.
     "On 31 August 1433 at Rambures Pierre died of the plague; he was buried at the abbey of Cercamp in Artois.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "PIERRE de Luxembourg, son of JEAN de Luxembourg Seigneur de Beauvoir et de Richebourg & his wife Marguerite d’Enghien Ctss di Conversano et de Brienne, dame d'Enghien (1390-Rambures 31 Aug 1433, bur Cercamp). He succeeded in 1430 as Comte de Saint-Pol. He died from the plague. m (May 1405) MARGHERITA del Balzo, daughter of FRANCESCO del Balzo Duca d'Andria Conte di Montescaglioso e Squillace & his third wife Sveva Orsini (1394-1469, bur Cercamp).
     "Pierre & his wife had nine children:
     "1. JACQUETTE de Luxembourg ([1416/17]-30 May 1472). The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage “die Sancti Botulphi...in villa de Tyrwene” 22 Apr 1433 of “dux Bedfordiæ” and “filiam domini de Seynt Pole”[481]. The testament of John Duke of Bedford, Governor and Regent of France, dated 10 Sep 1435, bequeathed property to “the ...princess Lady Jacobe his wife...Richard the bastard of Bedford his natural son”, and appointed “Louis Bishop of Terouenne Chancellor of France his uncle” among his executors[482]. m firstly (Thérouanne 20 Apr 1433) JOHN Duke of Bedford, son of HENRY IV King of England & his first wife Mary de Bohun (20 Jun 1389-Rouen 15 Sep 1435, bur Rouen Cathedral). m secondly ([6 Feb 1436/23 Mar 1437]) RICHARD Wydeville, son of RICHARD Wydeville & his wife Joan Bedlisgate ([1405]-beheaded 12 Aug 1469). He was created Lord de Ryvers 9 May 1448 and Earl Rivers 24 May 1466.
     "2. LOUIS de Luxembourg (1418-beheaded Paris 19 Dec 1475). Comte de Saint-Pol, de Brienne et di Conversano.
- see below.
     "3. CATHERINE de Luxembourg (-1492, bur Chartreuse de Nantes). m (2 Jul 1445) as his third wife, ARTHUR de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, Comte de Dreux, son of JEAN V "le Vaillant" Duke of Brittany & his third wife Infanta doña Juana de Navarra (Château Succinio near Vannes 24 Aug 1393-Château Nantes 26 Dec 1458). He succeeded in 1457 as ARTHUR III Duke of Brittany.
     "4. PHILIPPA de Luxembourg . Abbess of Saint-Maixent.
     "5. ISABELLE de Luxembourg (-1472[483] or after). m (contract 9 Jan 1444, Angers May 1444) as his second wife, CHARLES d'Anjou Comte de Gien, son of LOUIS II Duc d'Anjou Titular King of Sicily and Jerusalem & his wife Infanta doña Violante de Aragón (Château de Montils-lès-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 14 Oct 1414-Neufvy-le-Roi en Touraine, Indre-et-Loire 10 Apr 1473, bur Le Mans Cathédrale Saint-Julien). Comte de Guise, in right of his wife, registered 4 Jul 1444. He adopted the title Comte du Maine 7 Apr 1445, entering in possession 1448 when his brother ceased to use the title and the English left the county.
     "6. THIBAUT de Luxembourg (-1 Sep 1477, bur Le Mans Cathedral). Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII names “...Thiébaud Monseigneur frère au conte de Saint Pol...” among the ambassadors of the duke of Burgundy at the treaty of Arras in 1435[484]. Seigneur de Fiennes, Comte de Brienne. Bishop of Le Mans 1465.
- SEIGNEURS de FIENNES, COMTES de GAVRE, VICOMTES de MARTIGUES, COMTES de PENTHIEVRE.
     "7. JACQUES de Luxembourg (-Mantes 20 Aug 1487, bur Cercamp). Seigneur de Richebourg. A letter of King Louis XI dated 30 Jun 1475 names “messire Jacques de Saint Pol, le seigneur de Contey, le seigneur de Crisancy, de Myremmont et ce seigneur de Romont” among those involved in a skirmish at Arras, during which “messire Jacques de Saint Pol” was injured in the head, “le seigneur de Contey est prins, le seigneur de Crisancy de Bourbon, ledit Jacques de Saint Pol, Romont, n’est point trouvé encore”[485]. Presumably this passage was intended to indicate that Pierre and Jacques were captured in addition to “le seigneur de Contey”, “Romont” being the only one not found. m (contract 7 Jun 1464) ISABELLE de Roubaix, daughter of PIERRE Seigneur de Roubaix & his wife Marguerite van Gistel ([1433/34]-25 May 1502, bur Roubaix). Jacques & his wife had five children:
     "     "a) FRANÇOIS de Luxembourg (bur Roubaix). 18 Sep 1472.
     "     "b) CHARLES de Luxembourg (-young, bur Roubaix).
     "     "c) ISABELLE de Luxembourg . Dame de Richebourg-en-Artois. m (18 Mar 1495) JEAN [VI] de Melun Seigneur d’Antoing et d’Epinoy, son of JEAN [V] Vicomte de Melun, Burggraaf van Gent, Seigneur d’Antoing et d’Epinoy & his wife Marie de Commercy (-29 Jul 1502, bur Antoing).
     "     "d) YOLANDE de Luxembourg (-Jeumont 7 May 1534, bur Roubaix). Dame de Roubaix. m (contract 8 Jun 1494) NICOLAS de Werchin Baron de Werchin et de Cysoing, son of --- (-Biez 10 Jul 1513, bur Rouhaix).
     "     "e) LOUISE de Luxembourg (-18 May 1518, bur Le Quesnoy). m firstly JAN van Gistel Seigneur de Duzelles/Heer van Dudzele, son of --- (-1506). m secondly (25 Dec 1507) as his first wife, ANTOINE de Croÿ Seigneur de Sempy, son of PHILIPPE de Croÿ Comte de Chimay & his wife Walpurga von Mörs (-1545, bur Le Quesnoy)
     "8. VALERAN de Luxembourg (-young).
     "9. JEAN de Luxembourg (-in Africa).

     "Pierre had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:
     
"10. JACQUES de Luxembourg bâtard de Saint-Pol (-21 Jun 1528, bur Lille, église des Franciscains). Seigneur de la Boutillerie. m CATHERINE de Werquigneul Dame de Quinquempoix, daughter of --- (-2 Dec 1522, bur Lille, église des Franciscains)."14


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Peter of Luxembourg (1390 – 31 August 1433) was a son of John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir, and his wife Marguerite of Enghien. His inheritance included the counties of Brienne, Conversano and Saint-Pol.
Family
     "Peter had succeeded his father, John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir, and mother, Marguerite of Enghien. They had co-reigned as Count and Countess of Brienne from 1394 to her death in 1397.
Life
     "Peter succeeded his aunt Jeanne of Luxembourg, Countess of Saint-Pol and Ligny, as Count of Saint-Pol in 1430. On 8 May 1405, Peter married Margaret de Baux (a descendant of the Baron of Lisarea Gilbert d'Escors[3][4][5]), daughter of Francesco del Balzo's third wife Sueva Orsini, a relation of Clarice Orsini (wife of Lorenzo de' Medici). Peter and Margaret had:
* Louis of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, de Brienne, de Ligny, and Conversano, Constable of France (1418 – 19 December 1475), married firstly, in 1435, Jeanne de Bar, Countess of Marle and Soissons (1415 – 14 May 1462), by whom he had issue, and from whom descended King Henry IV of France and Mary, Queen of Scots. He married secondly, Marie of Savoy (20 March 1448 – 1475), by whom he had further issue. He was beheaded in Paris in 1475 for treason against King Louis XI.
* Jacquetta of Luxembourg (1415/1416 – 30 May 1472), married firstly in 1433, John, Duke of Bedford, and secondly, in secret, c.1436, Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, by whom she had sixteen children, including Elizabeth Woodville, Queen consort of King Edward IV of England. Every English monarch after 1509 descended from her.
* Thibaud of Luxembourg, Seigneur de Fiennes, Count of Brienne, Bishop of Le Mans, (died 1 September 1477), married Philippa de Melun, by whom he had issue.
* Jacques of Luxembourg, Seigneur de Richebourg (1426-1487), married Isabelle de Roubaix, by whom he had issue.
* Valeran of Luxembourg, died young.
* Jean of Luxembourg, died in Africa.
* Catherine of Luxembourg (died 1492), married Arthur III, Duke of Brittany (24 August 1393 – 26 December 1438).
* Isabelle of Luxembourg, Countess of Guise (died 1472), married in 1443, Charles, Count of Maine (1414–1472), by whom she had a daughter, Louise (1445–1477), who in her own turn married Jacques d'Armagnac, Duke of Nemours, by whom she had six children.
Death
     "The Black Death had hit Luxembourg, France, England and Spain in the 1340s when it caused the deaths of millions of people; and it continued to re-appear at intervals over the succeeding centuries. Peter was among its victims. He died at Rambures on 31 August 1433, aged 43 years, and was buried in the abbey at Cercamp, near Frévent.[6] His wife died 36 years later.
References
1. Richardson, D. (2011). Kimball G. Everingham (ed.) Plantagenet Ancestry. 3 (2nd ed.) p. 538.
2. Richardson, D. (2013). Kimball G. Everingham (ed.) Royal Ancestry. 5. p. 422–423.
3. L'Achaïe féodale: étude sur le moyen âge en Grèce (1205-1456). Diane de Guldencrone, Diane Gabrielle Victoire Marie Clémence 4.Gobineau Guldencrone. Published in 1886 by E. Leroux. Book Collection from the University of Michigan. Free download: https://archive.org/details/lachaefodaletud00guldgoog/
5. Libro de los fechos et conquistas del principado de la Morea. 1885. Juan Fernández de Heredia, Alfred Morel -Fatio. Imprimerie Jules -Guillaume Fick.
6. The Chronicle of Morea. A History in political verse, relating the establishment of feudalism in Greece by the Franks in the thirteenth century. 1904. John Schmitt, PhD. Methuen & CO. 36 Essex Street, W.C. London.
7. Anselme de Sainte-Marie, Honoré Caille du Fourny, Ange de Sainte-Rosalie, Simplicien (1728), Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de France, 3rd ed. Vol. 3, p. 726 (in French.)15"

; Per Genealogcs:
     "Pierre was born in Naples in 1390, the son and heir of Jean de Luxembourg, sire de Beauvoir et de Richebourg, and Marguerite d'Enghien, comtesse héritière de Brienne et de Conversano, dame d'Enghien et de Gouy-lez-Piéton, duchesse en titre d'Athènes. He was the third of four children, but the only one to have offspring. His elder brother Louis became cardinal archbishop of Rouen.
     "On 8 May 1405 Pierre married Margherita del Balzo, daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1.duca d'Andria, and his third wife Sueva Orsini. They had seven children of whom three sons and two daughters would have progeny. His eldest daughter Jacquetta in 1433 married John, duke of Bedford (son of King Henry IV of England), the English regent of France. Their marriage was childless and he died in 1435. In 1436 she married Sir Richard Widville, who was the son of her dead husband's chamberlain. He was later created the first earl Rivers. They had sixteen children, among them Elizabeth Widville who was to become the wife of King Edward IV of England, and mother of Elizabeth of York (in her turn mother of King Henry VIII) and of King Edward V. Pierre's eldest son Louis became constable of France in 1465, but was beheaded in 1475 after a conspiracy between Louis XI and the duke of Burgundy, themselves at war but both deeply distrusting the constable. Pierre's youngest son Jacques, seigneur de Richebourg, became a knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece like his father.
     "Pierre spent his early years in the kingdom of Naples and was married there. In October 1407 he came to Enghien for the first time. He then entered the service of Willem of Bavaria, then count of Hainaut, Holland and Zeeland. At the side of Johann of Bavaria, prince-bishop of Liège, he fought at the Battle of Othée (23 September 1408).
     "In the conflict between England and France in 1420 he sided with England. He was with Philippe 'the Good', duke of Burgundy at the marriage of Henry V of England and Catherine of France at Troyes (on 2 June 1420). He took part in the siege of Melun, but was captured in the summer of 1420 between Melun and Brienne, and imprisoned in Meaux. At the end of 1421 he was ransomed by the king of England.
     "He returned to Enghien and soon after he became a member of the ducal council of Brabant. From the end of 1421 to 1430 he played a major role in the council under the dukes Jean IV and Philippe de Saint-Pol, to whom he was related. Under the rule of Philippe de Saint-Pol, he was one of five barons to whom Philippe had to assign the rule of the duchy following the revolt of 1428. When Philippe 'the Good', duke of Burgundy, in 1430 became duke of Brabant and Limburg, Pierre continued to occupy an influential position as a member of the regency council, made up of seven members of the high nobility of Brabant and Limburg.
     "He also had a degree of authority in the county of Hainault as governor for Jean IV de Bourgogne, duke of Brabant and Limburg, after the latter's victory over the troops of Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, husband of Jean's former wife Jacoba of Bavaria, countess of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault. In 1425 he was one of two captains-general of Brabant.
     "Like his brothers he supported Philippe 'the Good' in his coalition with the English against the French. With his elder brother Jean, comte de Ligny and seigneur de Beaurevoir, he was among the first members to be appointed to the Order of the Golden Fleece at its foundation by Philippe 'the Good' in 1430, although he did not personally swear his oath until the second chapter at Bruges on 2 December 1432.
     "From 1431 until his death he was count of St. Pol in Artois, of Brienne in Champagne, and of Conversano in Apulia as well as lord of Enghien in Hainault.
     "On 31 August 1433 at Rambures Pierre died of the plague; he was buried at the abbey of Cercamp in Artois.1 EDV-16 GKJ-16. He was Comte de St. Pol between 1390 and 1433.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007731&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Pierre de Luxembourg-Saint Pol (1390–31 Aug 1433), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86369125, citing Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86369125/pierre-de_luxembourg_saint_pol. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007727&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite d'Enghien: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007728&tree=LEO
  6. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/24.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  8. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 273. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Baux 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/baux/baux3.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita del Balzo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007732&tree=LEO
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Leicester 9.i: p. 447. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for Pierre de Luxembourg-Saint Pol (1390–31 Aug 1433), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86369125, citing Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86369125/pierre-de_luxembourg_saint_pol
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007731&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Bar: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAR.htm#Louisdied1475B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_I,_Count_of_Saint-Pol. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013401&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Luxembourg-St.Pol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007654&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00055238&tree=LEO
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacquetta de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000015403&tree=LEO
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Grey 15: p. 359.
  22. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Herbert 15: p. 396.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007733&tree=LEO
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaud de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000025662&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacques de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000055239&tree=LEO
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg-Saint-Pol.pdf, p. 7.

Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano1,2,3,4

F, #7618, b. 1394, d. 15 November 1469
FatherFrancesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria1,2,5 b. c 1330, d. 1422
MotherSueva/Sveva Orsini6,1,2,5 d. a 1404
ReferenceEDV16
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano was born in 1394.7,1,2,8,4,9 She married Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano, son of Jean (?) de Luxemburg, Comte de Brienne, Seigneur de Beaurevoir et de Richebourg and Marguerite d'Enghien comtesse de Brienne, contesa di Conversano, heiress of Brienne and Enghien, on 8 May 1405.10,6,1,11,12,2,3
Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano died on 15 November 1469.7,1,2,8,4
Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano was buried after 15 November 1469 at Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1394, Città Metropolitana di Bari, Puglia, Italy
     DEATH     15 Nov 1469 (aged 74–75), France
     Nobility. Born the daughter of Francesco del Balzo and his third wife Sveva Orsini. She married Pierre de Luxembourg in 1405 and bore him nine children.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Francesco del Balzo 1330–1422
      Sueva Orsini del Balzo 1360–1430
     Spouse
      Pierre de Luxembourg-Saint Pol 1390–1433
     Children
      Jacquette De Luxembourg Woodville 1415–1472
      Thibaut de Luxemburg 1418–1477
      Jacques de Luxembourg-Ligny
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 7 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 86369032.2,8
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Margaret of Baux (French: Marguerite des Baux, Italian: Margherita del Balzo; 1394 – 15 November 1469) was a Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano. She was a member of the noble House of Baux of the Kingdom of Naples, which had its origins in Provence dating back to the 11th century. Her husband was Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano (1390 – 31 August 1433). Margaret's descendants include English Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville, King Henry IV of France, Mary, Queen of Scots, and all English monarchs after 1509.
Family
     "Margaret was born in 1394, the daughter of Francis of Baux (1330 – 23 April 1422) by his third wife Sueva Orsini (1360 – c.1430).[1] a descendant of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England (daughter of King John of England).[2]
     "Her paternal grandparents were Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria and Squillace, and Marguerite d'Aulnay, and her maternal grandparents were Nicola Orsini, Count of Nola, Senator of Rome (27 August 1331 – 14 February 1399), and Jeanne de Sabran.
Marriage and issue
     "On 8 May 1405, Margaret married Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol,[3] of Brienne, and of Conversano (1390 – 31 August 1433), the eldest son of John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir and Marguerite of Enghien, Countess of Brienne and of Conversano, Heiress of Enghien. Peter inherited his mother's fiefs, which included the counties of Brienne and Conversano. He succeeded his aunt Jeanne of Luxembourg, Countess of Saint-Pol and Ligny, as Count of Saint-Pol in 1430. His younger brother John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny, an ally of the English during the Hundred Years War, received Joan of Arc as his prisoner, and subsequently sold her to the English, for 10,000 livres.
     "Peter and Margaret had:
** Louis of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, de Brienne, de Ligny, and Conversano, Constable of France (1418 – 19 December 1475), married firstly, in 1435, Jeanne de Bar, Countess of Marle and Soissons (1415 – 14 May 1462), by whom he had issue, and from whom descended King Henry IV of France and Mary, Queen of Scots. He married secondly, Marie of Savoy (20 March 1448 – 1475), by whom he had further issue. He was beheaded in Paris in 1475 for treason against King Louis XI.
** Jacquetta of Luxembourg (1415/1416 – 30 May 1472), married firstly in 1433, John, Duke of Bedford, and secondly, in secret, c.1436, Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, by whom she had 16 children,[citation needed] including Elizabeth Woodville, queen consort of King Edward IV of England. Every English monarch after King Henry VII of England descends from Jacquetta's granddaughter, Elizabeth of York, queen consort of England.
** Thibaud of Luxembourg, Seigneur de Fiennes, Count of Brienne, Bishop of Le Mans, (died 1 September 1477), married Philippa de Melun, by whom he had issue.
** Jacques of Luxembourg, Seigneur de Richebourg (died 1487), married Isabelle de Roubaix, by whom he had issue.
** Valeran of Luxembourg, died young.
** Jean of Luxembourg, died in Africa.
** Catherine of Luxembourg (died 1492), married Arthur III, Duke of Brittany (24 August 1393 – 26 December 1438).
** Isabelle of Luxembourg, Countess of Guise (died 1472), married in 1443, Charles, Count of Maine (1414–1472), by whom she had a daughter, Louise
(1445–1477), who in turn married Jacques d'Armagnac, Duke of Nemours, by whom she had six children.
     "Margaret died on 15 November 1469 at the age of 75 and was buried in Cercamp Abbey, Frévent, Pas-de-Calais.[2] Her husband Peter had died of plague in 1433.
References
1. Baldwin 2010, p. Table 4.
2. Richardson 2011, p. 538.
3. Russell 1995, p. 191.
Sources
** Baldwin, David (2010). Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower. The History Press.
** Richardson, Douglas (2011). Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families (2nd ed.)
** Russell, Peter Edward (1995). Portugal, Spain, and the African Atlantic, 1343-1490: Chivalry and Crusade from John of Gaunt to Henry the Navigator. Variorum."4

; Per Med Lands: "MARGHERITA del Balzo (1394-1469, bur Cercamp). m (May 1405) PIERRE de Luxembourg, son of JEAN de Luxembourg Seigneur de Beauvoir et de Richebourg & his wife Marguerite d´Enghien Ctss di Conversano et de Brienne, dame d'Enghien (1390-Rambures 31 Aug 1433, bur Cercamp). He succeeded in 1430 as Comte de Saint-Pol."9

; Per Genealogics:
     "Margherita was a member of the noble del Balzo (de Baux) family of the kingdom of Naples, which had its origins in Provence in the 11th century. She was born in 1394, the daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1.duca d'Andria, and his third wife Sueva Orsini, a descendant of Simon de Montfort, 6th earl of Leicester, and Eleanor of England a daughter of King John.
     "On 8 May 1405 Margherita married Pierre de Luxembourg, comte de Saint-Pol, Brienne et Conversano, the eldest son of Jean de Luxembourg, comte de Brienne, sire de Beauvoir, and Marguerite d'Enghien, comtesse heritière de Brienne et de Conversano. Pierre inherited his mother's fiefs, which included the counties of Brienne and Conversano. He succeeded his aunt Jeanne de Luxembourg, comtesse de Saint-Pol et Ligny, as comte de Saint-Pol in 1430. His younger brother Jean II de Luxembourg, comte de Ligny, an ally of the English during the Hundred Years War, received Jeanne d'Arc as his prisoner, and subsequently sold her to the English for 10,000 livres.
     "Margherita and Pierre had seven children of whom three sons and two daughters would have progeny. She died on 15 November 1469 at the age of seventy-five and was buried in Cercamp Abbey, Frévent, Pas-de-Calais. Her husband Pierre had died on the plague in 1433."13

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol III page 109.
2. The Ancestry of Elizabeth of York 1999. , Marlyn Lewis, Reference: 15.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:750.13
Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano was also known as Margherita de Baux.7,11 EDV-16 GKJ-16.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Baux 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/baux/baux3.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita del Balzo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007732&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Leicester 9.i: p. 447. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Baux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Leicester 9: p. 447.
  6. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 273. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  7. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/24.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Margherita del Balzo (1394–15 Nov 1469), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86369032, citing Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86369032/margherita-del_balzo. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Southen Italy: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#MargueriteBauxdied1469. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007731&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita del Balzo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007732&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013401&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Luxembourg-St.Pol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007654&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00055238&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacquetta de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000015403&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007733&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaud de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000025662&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacques de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000055239&tree=LEO
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg-Saint-Pol.pdf, p. 7.

Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria1,2,3,4

M, #7619, b. circa 1330, d. 1422
FatherBertrand III del Bazo sn de Berre, Vcte de Misson, Cte d'Andria e di Montescaglioso, Captain-General of Tuscnay, Grand-Justiciar of Naples-Sicily, Senator of Rome1,5,4 d. 1351
MotherMarguerite d'Alneto Dame Teano6,1,7,4 d. a 1334
ReferenceEDV17
Last Edited15 Aug 2019
     Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria was born circa 1330.2,1,4 He married Luisa Sanseverino, daughter of Tommaso III Sanseverino 5th Conte di Marsico, Barone di Sanseverino, Cilento e Lauria and Margherita de Clignet, in 1350; his 1st wife; Richardson says m. 1337.1,4 Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria married Margareta (?) of Tarento, Empress of Constantinople, daughter of Philippe I (?) d'Anjou, Prince of Tarento, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, Pr of Achaia, titular Emperor of Constantinople and Catherine II (?) de Valois, titular Empress of Constantinople, Pss of Achaia, in 1352; his 2nd wife; Richardson says m. in 1348.1,8,4,9 Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria married Sueva/Sveva Orsini, daughter of Niccolo Orsini 3rd Conte di Nola e Soleto, Senator of Rome and Giovanna/Jeanne de Sabran, in 1381; his 3rd wife.10,2,1,11,4
Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria died in 1422.2,1,4
     ; Francesco I del Balzo, Duca d'Andria, etc, *1330, +1422; 1m: 1350 Luisa Sanseverino; 2m: 1352 Pss Margareta of Naples (+Naples 1380); 3m: 1381 Sueva Orsini, dau.of Nicolas Ct Nola, Senator of Rome, and Jeanne de Sabran.1 EDV-17 GKJ-17. Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria was also known as Francois des Baux 1st Duca d'Andria.4



Francesco I del Balzo 1st Duca d'Andria left a will on 23 April 1422.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Baux 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/baux/baux3.html
  2. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/24.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  3. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Sanseverino page: http://www.sardimpex.com/sanseverino/SANSEVERINO1.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Leicester 9: p. 447. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrand III del Balzo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079808&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32936
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita d'Alneto: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079809&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 19 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet19.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079812&tree=LEO
  10. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 273. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  11. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane, online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Orsini page: http://www.sardimpex.com/ORSINIantichi.htm
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margherita del Balzo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007732&tree=LEO

Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers1

M, #7620, b. before 1408, d. 12 August 1469
FatherSir Richard Wydeville Knt., of Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire2,1 d. c Dec 1441
MotherJoan Bittlesgate3,1 d. a 17 Jul 1448
ReferenceEDV15
Last Edited13 Jul 2020
     Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers was born before 1408 at Maidstone, co. Kent, England.1 He married Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford, daughter of Pierre I (?) de Luxembourg, Comte de Brienne, St. Pol, Brienne and Conversano and Marguerite del Balzo Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano, on 23 March 1436; her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU Luxemburg 9 page says m. ca 6.2.1435/36.4,5,1,6,7,8,9
Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers died on 12 August 1469 at Northampton, England; beheaded at Northampton, England.10,1
Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers was buried after 12 August 1469 at All Saints Curchyar, Pontefract, Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     ORIGINAL NAME     Richard Wydeville
     BIRTH     1410, Maidstone, Maidstone Borough, Kent, England
     DEATH     12 Aug 1469 (aged 58–59), Kenilworth, Warwick District, Warwickshire, England
     Knight of the Garter, of Grafton Regis, Pattishall and Wicken, Northamptonshire and London. King's Knight, Privy Councillor, Lieutenant of Calais, Constable and Treasurer of England, 1st Earl of Rivers.
     Son and heir to Sir Richard Wydeville, Constable of the tower of London and Joan Bittlesgate, daughter of Thomas.
     Husband of Jacquette de Luxembourg, daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg and Maud de Balzo (Baux) daughter of the Duke of Ardria. She was the widow of John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, married in 1433, John died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen.
     They were married in secret as she had been granted dower lands following her first husband's death on condition that she did not re-marry without a royal licence. Richard was fined £1000 when the marriage came out in the open. They were married before 23 March 1437 and had at least seven sons and seven daughters:
** Elizabeth 1437–1492 married Edward IV of England
** Lewis 1438-1450
** Anne 1439–1489 wife of William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, Edward Wingfield & Sir George Grey 2nd Earl of Kent
** Anthony 2nd Earl Rivers 1442–1483 married Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales
** Mary 1443–148, married William Herbert 2nd Earl of Pembroke
** Jacquetta 1444–1509 married John le Strang 8th Baron Strange of Knockin
** John 1445–1469 married Catherine Nevill, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk
** Lionel 1447–1484, Bishop of Salisbury
** Martha 1450–1500 married Sir John Bromle
** Eleanor 1452–1512 married Sir Anthony Grey
** Richard 3rd Earl Rivers c. 1453–1491
** Margaret 1454–1490 married Thomas Fitzalan 17th Earl of Arundel
** Henry c. 1455–1489
** Catherine c.1458-149, married Henry Stafford 2nd Duke of Buckingham & second Jasper Tudor, 1st Duke of Bedford
** Agnes d.1506 married William Dormer
** Thomas married Anne Holland

     Richard fought in the French wars under King Henry V and John, the Duke of Bedford. He was knighted in 1426 at Leicester by King Henry VI, and in 1435 he was a knight bachelor in the Regent's court and is said to have been captured by the French at Gerberoy. He was his wife helped to escort Margaret of Anjou to England for her wedding to King Henry VI. He was created Lord Rivers on 09 May 1448 in tail male (only sons can inherit) and he was taken prisoner at the Battle of Towton, but received a pardon form Edward and created Lord Rivers 24 May 1466. After the Edward's defeat at the Battle of Edgecote, Richard and his second son, John, were taken prisoner, held at Chepstow, and executed without trial at Kenilworth on 12 August 1469 and buried at Pontrefract. His son, Anthony was the next Earl Rivers. Jacquette, Duchess of Bedford, died 30 May 1472.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Richard Woodville de Woodville 1385–1442
          Joan Bedlisgate Wydeville
     Spouse
          Jacquette De Luxembourg Woodville 1415–1472
     Siblings
          Joan Wydeville Hawte
     Children
          Jacquette Wydeville L'Estrange
          Anne Wydville Grey unknown–1489
          Elizabeth Woodville 1437–1492
          Anthony Woodville 1440–1483
          Margaret Wydeville Arundel / FitzAlan 1454–1491
          Catherine Woodville 1458–1497
     BURIAL     All Saints Churchyard, Pontefract, Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 26 Feb 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 105850048.11
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Royal House of Stuart, London, 1969, 1971, 1976 , Addington, A. C. vol III page 106.
2. The Ancestry of Elizabeth of York, 1999 , Lewis, Marlyn. 6.
3. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 3.
4. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. 953.
5. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard. 583.
6. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band III, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1976, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 109.
7. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 11:19-22.12,13
EDV-15.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Richard Woodville (or Wydeville), 1st Earl Rivers KG (1405 – 12 August 1469) was an English nobleman, best remembered as the father of Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville and the maternal grandfather of Edward V and the maternal great-grandfather of Henry VIII.
Early life
     "Born at Maidstone in Kent, Richard Woodville was the son of Richard Wydeville (Woodville), chamberlain to the Duke of Bedford, and Joan Bittlesgate (or Bedlisgate), the daughter of Thomas Bittlesgate of Knightstone[1][2][3] in the parish of Ottery St Mary in Devon. He was also grandson of John Wydeville who was Sheriff of Northamptonshire (in 1380, 1385, 1390).[3]
Marriage and courtly career
     "Woodville followed his father into service with the Duke of Bedford. In 1433 the Duke had married the 17-year-old Jacquetta of Luxembourg; she was the Duke's second wife and he was significantly older and in ill health. When the Duke died in 1435, Jacquetta was left a childless and wealthy widow. She was required to seek permission from King Henry VI before she could remarry, but in March 1437 it was revealed that she had secretly married Richard Woodville who was far below her in rank and not considered a suitable husband for the lady still honoured as the king's aunt. The couple were fined £1000, but this was remitted in October of the same year.
     "Despite this inauspicious start, the married couple soon prospered, thanks mainly to Jacquetta's continuing prominence within the royal family. She retained her rank and dower as Duchess of Bedford, which initially provided an income of between £7000 and £8000 per year, though over the years this diminished as a result of territorial losses in France and collapsing royal finances in England. Richard Woodville was honoured with military ranks, in which he proved himself a capable soldier.
     "Further honours for both came when Henry VI married Margaret of Anjou, whose uncle was Jacquetta's brother-in-law (Jacquetta's sister Isabelle married Margaret of Anjou's paternal uncle Charles du Maine). The Woodvilles were among those chosen to escort the bride to England, and the family benefited further through this double connection to the royal family. Sir Richard was raised to the rank of Baron Rivers in 1448. Their children therefore would grow up enjoying considerable privilege and material comfort.
Military career
     "Woodville was a captain in 1429, served in France in 1433 and was a knight of the regent Duke of Bedford in 1435. He was at Gerberoy in 1435 and served under William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1435–36. He then fought under Somerset and Shrewsbury in 1439 and the Duke of York in 1441–42, when he was made captain of Alençon and knight banneret. He was appointed seneschal of Gascony in 1450 (but failed to reach it before its fall), lieutenant of Calais in 1454–55, and to defend Kent against invasion by the Yorkist earls in 1459–60 (but was captured at Sandwich). He was created Baron Rivers by Henry VI on 9 May 1448. Two years later, as Sir Richard, he was invested as a Knight of the Garter in 1450. He was appointed Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1459.
     "In the Wars of the Roses, he was initially a Lancastrian, but he became a Yorkist when he thought that the Lancastrian cause was lost. He reconciled himself to the victorious Edward IV, his future son-in-law. On 1 May 1464, Edward married his daughter Elizabeth, widow of Sir John Grey of Groby. Richard was created Earl Rivers in 1466, appointed Lord Treasurer in March 1466 and Constable of England on 24 August 1467.
Later career
     "The power of this new family was very distasteful to the old baronial party, and especially so to the Earl of Warwick. Rivers was regarded as a social upstart, and in an ironical episode, his future son-in-law in 1459, while accepting his submission, had rebuked him for daring, given his lowly birth, to fight against the House of York. The Privy Council, in its horrified response to the King's marriage, said bluntly that Richard Woodville's low social standing in itself meant that the King must surely know "that Elizabeth was not the wife for him". Early in 1468, the Rivers estates were plundered by Warwick's partisans, and the open war of the following year was aimed at destroying the Woodvilles. After the Yorkist defeat at the Battle of Edgecote Moor on 26 July 1469, Rivers and his second son John were taken prisoners at Chepstow. Following a hasty show trial, they were beheaded at Kenilworth on 12 August 1469.
     "Richard Woodville's eldest son Anthony succeeded him in the earldom.
     "Lord Rivers had a large family. His third son, Lionel (d. 1484) became the Bishop of Salisbury. All his daughters made great marriages: Catherine Woodville, his eighth daughter, was the wife of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham.
     ""Woodville" is the modern spelling of the name: in their own time "Wydeville", "Wydville" and other variants were used.
Children of Richard Woodville and Jacquetta of Luxembourg
     "They had at least 14 children:[4]
** Elizabeth Woodville (c. 1437 – 1492), married first Sir John Grey of Groby, and second Edward IV of England.
** Lewis Woodwille (c. 1438?), died in childhood.
** Anne Woodville (1439–1489), married first William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, and second George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
** Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers (1442–1483), married Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales.
** Mary Woodville (1443–1481), married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.
** Jacquetta Woodville (1444–1509), married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange of Knockin.
** John Woodville (1445–1469), married Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk.
** Lionel Woodville (1447–1484), Bishop of Salisbury.
** Martha Woodville (d. c. 1500), married Sir John Bromley of Baddington.
** Eleanor Woodville (1452–1512), married Sir Anthony Grey, son of Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent.
** Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (1453–1491).
** Margaret Woodville (1454–1490), married Thomas FitzAlan, 17th Earl of Arundel.
** Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (d. 1488), soldier and courtier.
** Catherine Woodville (c. 1458[5] – 1497[6]), married first Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, second Jasper Tudor, Duke of Bedford, she married third Sir Richard Wingfield.

     "Robert Glover, Somerset Herald, noted another 'Richard' who would seem to have been born before Richard the 3rd Earl.[7] A 'Richard Woodville, esquire for the body' was present at the christening of Prince Arthur (son of Elizabeth and Henry VII) on 24 September 1486 in Winchester Cathedral; Arthur's grandmother, Elizabeth Woodville, served as his Godmother, and her younger brother Edward was also present at the ceremony.
     "The Visitation of Buckinghamshire of 1566 mentions the marriage of William Dormer of Wycombe (only later of Ascott House) to "Agnes, da. of Sir Richard Woodvyle, Erle Ryvers" but does not say whether the father was the first or the third earl, who the mother was or whether Agnes was legitimate.
In fiction
     "Woodville is a primary character in Philippa Gregory's 2011 novel about Jacquetta of Luxembourg, The Lady of the Rivers. In The White Queen television series, he is portrayed by Robert Pugh.
Notes
1. "Knighteston" in the hundred of Ottery St Mary: Pole, Sir William (d.1635), Collections Towards a Description of the County of Devon, Sir John-William de la Pole (ed.), London, 1791, p.148; Modern "Knightstone", per Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, pp.528-9
2. The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV. St Catherine's Press. p. 549.
3. "Woodville Family", http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/WOODVILLE.htm. Accessed on 10-4-2015.
4. Michael Hicks, 'Woodville , Richard, first Earl Rivers (d. 1469)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, édition en ligne, septembre 2011.
5. Her brother Richard's 1492 postmortem inquisition names her as being "34 or more". Calendar of Inquisitions Post-Mortem, Henry VII, vol. I, No. 681 (Richard, Earl of Ryvers)
6. Pugh, T.B, ed., 1963, The Marcher Lordships of South Wales, 1415–1536. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, p. 241
7. Blair, C. H. Hunter, ed. Visitation of the North, Part III: A Visitation of the North of England Circa 1480-1500, p. 58.
8. Neil D. Thompson and Charles M. Hansen, The Ancestry of Charles II, King of England (American Society of Genealogists, 2012).
References
** Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Rivers, Richard Woodville, Earl" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 23 (11th ed.) Cambridge University Press. p. 386.
** Cokayn, George E. (1887). Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant. London: G. Bell & Sons. p. 207.
** Hicks, Michael. "Woodville, Richard". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.) Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29939.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
** Lenman, Bruce (ed.) Chambers Dictionary of World History. ISBN 0-550-13000-4.
** Jenkins, Elizabeth. The Princes in the Tower.[full citation needed]"14

; Per Genealogics: "Richard Widville was born before 1408, son of Richard Wydeville, of the Mote, and Joan Bittlesgate. On 19 May 1426 at Leicester, Richard was knighted by King Henry VI. Before 23 March 1437 he married Jacquetta de Luxembourg the childless widow of the duke of Bedford, the king's uncle and regent of France. On 4 August 1450 he became a Knight of the Garter. His eldest daughter, Elizabeth (whose Lancastrian husband, Sir John Grey, was killed on 17 February 1460 at St. Albans) had married King Edward IV on 1 May 1464. As a result, on 4 March 1466, Richard Widville was appointed Treasurer of England, which position he held to his death. On 24 May 1466 he was created Earl Rivers, and on 24 August 1467he was appointed Constable of England. Following the Lancastrian invasion and the Yorkist defeat at Edgecote, he was given over to the earl of Warwick and after a hasty show trial he was beheaded at Kenilworth on 12 August 1469."13

Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers lived at Grafton, Northamptonshire, England.15 Sir Richard Wydeville Knt., KG, 1st Earl Rivers was also known as Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers.14 He was 169 Knight of the Garter in 1450.13 He was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports between 1459 and 1460.14 He was Lord High Treasurer between 1466 and 1469.14 He was created 1st Earl Rivers between 24 May 1466 and 12 August 1469.16,13,14 He was Lord High Constable between 1467 and 1469.14

Family

Jacquette (?) de Luxembourg, Dutchess of Bedford b. bt 1415 - 1416, d. 30 May 1472
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015402&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Wydeville, of the Mote: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125570&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Bittlesgate: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125571&tree=LEO
  4. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacquetta de Luxembourg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I000015403&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Grey 15: p. 359. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Herbert 15: p. 396.
  10. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I6404
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for Sir Richard Woodville (1410–12 Aug 1469), Find A Grave Memorial no. 105850048, citing All Saints Churchyard, Pontefract, Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/105850048/richard-woodville. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 361.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Wydville (or Woodville): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015402&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Woodville,_1st_Earl_Rivers. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 159-160.
  16. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 340.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Woodville,_Lord_Scales.
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 4: England - Last Plantagenets.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Widville: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001713&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#ElizabethWydevilledied1492. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anthony Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00236627&tree=LEO
  22. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Saint Davids Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108613&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Mary Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00041629&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Widville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00263388&tree=LEO
  26. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Woodville,_3rd_Earl_Rivers.
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 2 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel2.html
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 43.
  29. [S1806] Louise Staley, "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005 "EDWARD III to Roger CORBET of Albright Hussey 11 Ways (1)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Staley email #4 3 Aug 2005."
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Burnell 16: pp. 174-175.
  31. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Hastings 14: pp. 387.
  32. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Stafford 13: pp. 257-261. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.