Elizabeth Grey1

F, #23161
FatherThomas Grey KB, KG, Lord Ferrers of Groby, 2nd Marquess of Dorset1,2,3 b. 22 Jun 1477, d. 10 Oct 1530
MotherMargaret Wotton1,2,4 d. a 6 Oct 1535
Last Edited26 Oct 2008
     Elizabeth Grey married Sir Thomas Audley Knt., KG, 1st (last) Baron Audley of Walden, son of George Audley.1

      ; Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas Grey, Marquess of Dorset.1

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, p. 17. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Grey 17: p. 360. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Grey: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060806&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Wotton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060807&tree=LEO

Stefano Visconti Signore di Arone1,2,3,4

M, #23162, b. circa 1282, d. 4 July 1337
FatherMatteo I Visconti Duke of Milan2,3,4,5 b. 15 Jul 1250, d. 24 Jun 1322
MotherBonacosta Borri3,4,6 d. 15 Jan 1321
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited16 Aug 2019
     Stefano Visconti Signore di Arone was born circa 1282.2 He married Valentina Doria, daughter of Barnabo Doria Signore di Sasello e Logudoro e Patrizio di Genova and Eliana Fieschi Patrizia di Genova, in 1318
; her 1st husband.7,3,4,2
Stefano Visconti Signore di Arone died on 4 July 1337 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy (now).2,3,4
     EDV-19.

; Stefano, +Milano 4.7.1337, Signore di Arona 1325; m.1318 Valentina Doria, dau.of Barnabo Signore di Sasello e Logudoro e Patrizio di Genova by Eliana Fieschi (*1290 +Milano 1359.)3

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau Geldrop, 1965, G. F. de Roo van Alderwerelt, Reference: 244
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 131
3. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: 63.2

; Stefano (+ Milano 4-7-1327), Signore di Arona dal 1322, associato nel governo di Milano ai fratelli.
= 1318 Valentina Doria, figlia di Barnabò Patrizio Genovese, Signore di Sasello e del Logudoro e di Eliana Fieschi Patrizia Genovese (* 1290 + Miano 27-8-1359).4

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 260. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefano Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028041&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html
  4. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Visconti: Linea Regnante Di Milano - http://www.sardimpex.com/visconti/viscontiducali.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matteo I Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028038&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonacosta Borri: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028039&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Valentina Doria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028042&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matteo II Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028070&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Galeazzo II Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028060&tree=LEO

Matteo II Visconti Duke of Milan1,2,3,4

M, #23163, b. circa 1319, d. 26 September 1355
FatherStefano Visconti Signore di Arone5,2,3,4 b. c 1282, d. 4 Jul 1337
MotherValentina Doria6,2,3,4 b. 1290, d. 27 Aug 1359
Last Edited14 Mar 2004
     Matteo II Visconti Duke of Milan was born circa 1319.3,2 He married Gigliola Gonzaga in 1341.7,3,2

Matteo II Visconti Duke of Milan died on 26 September 1355 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy (now).3,2,4
     He was Signore di Piacenza, Lodi, Parma, Bologna, Pontremoli, Monza e San Donnino.3

; Matteo II, Signore di Piacenza, Lodi, Parma, Bologna, Pontremoli, Monza e San Donnino 1354, co-Signore di Milano (1349-55) with his brothers, *ca 1319, +Milano 26.9.1355; m.Gigliola Gonzaga (+1354) dei Signori di Mantova.3

; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 131.4

; Matteo II (* 1319 + Milano 26-9-1355), armato Cavaliere dallo zio Luchino nel 1339; Signore di Piacenza, Lodi, Parma, Bologna, Pontremoli, Monza e San Donnino dal 1354, Signore di Milano in condominio con i fratelli e lo zio Giovanni dal 1349; Vicario Imperiale di Milano, Genova, Savona, Ventimiglia, Albenga e Noli con Bolla Imperiale del 20-12-1354 (confermata l'8/5-5-1355).
= 1341 Gigliola, figlia di Filippino Gonzaga dei Signori di Mantova (+ 1354.)2 He was Duke of Milan between 1354 and 1355.

Family

Gigliola Gonzaga d. 1354
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 260. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Visconti: Linea Regnante Di Milano - http://www.sardimpex.com/visconti/viscontiducali.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matteo II Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028070&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefano Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028041&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Valentina Doria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028042&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Gonzaga 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/gonzaga/gonzaga1.html

Bernabo I Visconti Duke of Milan, Bergamo, Cremona, Lodi, Bologna and Parma1,2,3

M, #23164, b. 1319, d. 18 December 1385
FatherStefano Visconti Signore di Arone4,5,6,7 b. c 1282, d. 4 Jul 1337
MotherValentina Doria7,6,5 b. 1290, d. 27 Aug 1359
ReferenceEDV18
Last Edited14 Dec 2020
     Bernabo I Visconti Duke of Milan, Bergamo, Cremona, Lodi, Bologna and Parma was born in 1319 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy (now).8,3 He married Beatrice detta Regina della Scala, daughter of Mastino II della Scala Lord of Verona, Vicenzo, Brescia, Parma and Lucca and Taddea da Carrara, on 27 September 1350 at Verona, Italy (now),
; his 1st wife.8,2,3,9,10,11
Bernabo I Visconti Duke of Milan, Bergamo, Cremona, Lodi, Bologna and Parma died on 18 December 1385 at Trezzo, Italy (now); poisoned.3
     EDV-18.

; Bernabo I, Signoredi Bergamo, Brescia, Cremona, Soncino, Lunato e Valcamonica 1354, Signore di Lodi, Bologna, Pontremoli e Parma 1355, co-Signore di Milano (1349-85) with his brothers, *Milano 1323, +poisoned Trezzo 18.12.1385; m.Verona 27.9.1350 Beatrice della Scala (*ca 1331, +18.6.1384.)2

; Leo van de pas cites: 1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau Geldrop, 1965, G. F. de Roo van Alderwerelt, Reference: ancestor 122.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 131
3. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: page 235 nr.6.
4. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: page 62.3

Family 1

Beltameda Cassa
Child

Family 2

Beatrice detta Regina della Scala b. c 1331, d. 18 Jun 1384
Children

Family 3

Regina de Salcalle
Child

Family 4

Montanina de Lazzari
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 260. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html#AB1
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernabo Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005140&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefano Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028041&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html
  6. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Visconti: Linea Regnante Di Milano - http://www.sardimpex.com/visconti/viscontiducali.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Valentina Doria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028042&tree=LEO
  8. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/9-12/20/325.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice della Scala: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005141&tree=LEO
  10. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane, online http://www.sardimpex.com/, della Scala page: http://www.sardimpex.com/files/dellascala.htm
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Scalla 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/scalla2.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isotta Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00197470&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lodovico Visconti: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028059&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MILAN.htm#Lodovicodied1404. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Taddea Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007118&tree=LEO
  16. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 73: Austria - House of the Hapsburgs in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Viridis (Verde) Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005143&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MILAN.htm#Marcodied1382
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Caterina Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020343&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Antonia Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020343&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Valenza Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028031&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnese Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028032&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maddalena Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005174&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anglesia Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028057&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giammastino Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028056&tree=LEO
  26. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Wake Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucy Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008719&tree=LEO
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Kent 9: pp. 421-422. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabetta Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013565&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Carlo Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028019&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Donnina Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00351345&tree=LEO

Matteo I Visconti Duke of Milan1,2,3,4

M, #23165, b. 15 July 1250, d. 24 June 1322
FatherTeobaldo Visconti5,2,3 d. 1274
MotherAnastasia Pirovana6,2,3 d. 1276
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited16 Aug 2019
     Matteo I Visconti Duke of Milan married an unknown person.
He was born on 15 July 1250 at Invorio, Italy (now).2,4,3 He married Bonacosta Borri, daughter of Squarcino Borri, in 1269.2,4,7,3

Matteo I Visconti Duke of Milan died on 24 June 1322 at Crescenzago, Italy (now), at age 71.2,4,3
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Kwartieren van Hendrik III en Willem de Rijke van Nassau Geldrop, 1965, G. F. de Roo van Alderwerelt, Reference: 488
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 131
3. Les Ancetres d'Albert Schweitzer, Strasbourg. , Reference: 64.4 EDV-20.

; Matteo I, Signore di Milano (1295-1308)+(1317-22), *Invorio 15.7.1250, +Crescenzago 24.6.1322; m.1269 Bonacosa, dau.of Squarcino Borri (+Milano 15.1.1321); they had issue.2

; Matteo I (* Invorio 15-7-1250 + Crescenzago 24-6-1322), Capitano del Popolo di Milano dal 12-1287 (associato allo zio Ottone e poi di fatto governatore dello stato in suo nome), Podestà di Milano dal 1288 (la carica era incompatibile con il capitanato ma si faceva rieleggere ogni anno), Signore di Milano dal 1295 al 12-7-1302 e dal 2-1311, Vicario Imperiale della Lombardia 5-1294/12-7-1302 e 13-7-1311/31-3-1317 (nel 1317 rinuncia per assumere il titolo di Signore Generale), Rettore del Comune dal 20-9-1313, Capitano del Popolo di Novara e Vercelli 1292/1297 e di Como nel 1292.
= 1269 Bonacosa, figlia di Squarcino Borri, Patrizio Milanese (+ Milano 15-1-1321).3


; 1277-1477: Rule of the VISCONTI. Established by Archbishop Otto Visconti. Establishment (1312) of the Visconti supremacy (Matteo designated imperial vicar). Ruthless Visconti rule and expansion over northern Italy (including Genoa). Stefano's sons Bernabò, Galeazzo, Matteo divided the domains but ruled jointly until Matteo was assassinated (1355) by his brothers. Intolerably harsh joint rule of Bernabò (1354-85) at Milan and Galeazzo (1354-78) at Pavia; ostentatious patronage of learning and art.1 He was Duke of Milan between 1310 and 1322.1

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 258, 260. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html
  3. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, Visconti: Linea Regnante Di Milano - http://www.sardimpex.com/visconti/viscontiducali.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matteo I Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028038&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teobaldo Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028036&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia Pirovana: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028037&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonacosta Borri: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028039&tree=LEO
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 260.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catharina Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028071&tree=LEO
  10. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane, online http://www.sardimpex.com/, della Scala page: http://www.sardimpex.com/files/dellascala.htm
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Scalla 1 page - Della Scala (Scalighieri) Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/scalla1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Galeazzo I Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028062&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefano Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028041&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giovanni Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028072&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucchino Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00417842&tree=LEO

Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons1,2,3,4,5

M, #23166, b. 13 March 1372, d. 13 November 1407
FatherCharles V "le Sage" (?) King of France2,1,6,7 b. bt 21 Jan 1337 - 1338, d. 16 Sep 1380
MotherJeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France2,1,7 b. 3 Feb 1339, d. 6 Feb 1378
Last Edited29 Jun 2020
     Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons was born on 13 March 1372 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France; Louda & Maclagan (Table 62) says b. 1371.2,1,4,8,9 He and Catherine (?) were engaged between 1374 and 1378; Betrothal ended with her death.5 Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons and Marie (?) were engaged between 1384 and 1385; A proxy mariage was held in April 1385, but not recognized.5 Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons married Valentina Visconti Cts d'Asti, Duchess of Orléans, daughter of Gian Galeazzo I Visconti Duke of Milan, Count of Pavia, Count of Vertus and Isabelle de Valois de France, Countess of Vertus, on 17 August 1389.1,2,3,4

Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons died on 13 November 1407 at age 35; murdered; buried there. Genealogy.EU says d. 13 Dec 1407. Genealogics, Wikipedia and Find A Grave says d. 23 Nov. 1407.2,1,4,9,8,5
Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons was buried after 23 November 1407 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     13 Mar 1372, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     23 Nov 1407 (aged 35), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     French Royalty. Son of Charles V. Grandfather of King Louis XII. Originally buried in Abbaye des Célestins, Paris, Île-de-France, France. After the Revolution, he was reburied in Saint-Denis Basilique. Bio by: Mike Reed
     Family Members
     Parents
          Charles V 1338–1380
          Jeanne de Bourbon 1338–1378
     Spouse
          Valentina Visconti 1370–1408
     Siblings
          Jeanne de Valois 1366–1366
          Charles VI 1368–1422
          Isabelle de Valois 1373–1378
          Catherine de France 1378–1388
     Children
          Louis d'Orléans 1391–1395
          Jean d'Orleans 1393–1393
          Charles d'Orléans 1394–1465
          Philippe d'Orléans 1396–1420
          Jean de Angouleme 1400–1467
          Marguerite d'Orléans 1406–1466
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21095.9
      ; Per Genealogy.EU: "Duc Louis d'Orleans, etc, *Paris 13.3.1372, +murdered Paris 13.12.1407, bur there; m.Melun 17.8.1389 Valentina Visconti, Cts d'Asti (*1366 +4.12.1408.)1"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Louis of France, comte de Valois (1392-1406), Duc de Valois (1406), Duc de Touraine (1386-92), Duc d'Orleans (1392-1407), comte de Blois, comte de Dunois 1391, Comte de Angoulemême (1394-1407), comte de Périgord 1400, comte de Dreux 1401, comte de Soissons 1404, *Paris 13.3.1372, +murdered Paris 23.11.1407, bur there; m.Melun 17.8.1389 Valentina Visconti, Cts d'Asti (*1366 +4.12.1408.)4"

; Per Genealogics:
     "Son of Charles V, king of France, and Jeanne de Bourbon, Louis was born on 13 March 1372 in Paris. He was at first titled comte de Valois; in 1386 Charles granted him Touraine, which he exchanged in 1392 for the duchy of Orléans. On 17 August 1389 he married his cousin Valentina Visconti, daughter of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, duke of Milan, and Isabelle de France, the daughter of Jean II, king of France. Louis and Valentina had eight children of whom two sons, Charles and Jean, and a daughter Marguerite would have progeny. Valentina brought as part of her dowry lands in northern Italy, which awakened Orléans ambitions for founding a kingdom there. Her hereditary right to Milan furnished her descendants, the kings Louis XII and François I, with a pretext for the wars they undertook in Italy.
     "Louis had an important political role during the Hundred Years' War. With the increasing insanity of his elder brother Charles VI 'the Mad' (who suffered from bipolar disorder), Louis disputed the regency and guardianship of the royal children with his cousin Jean 'the Fearless', duke of Burgundy. The enmity between the two was public and a source of political unrest in the already troubled France. Louis had the initial advantage, being the king's brother, but his character and rumour of an affaire with the consort queen Isabeau von Bayern made him extremely unpopular. For the following years, the children of Charles VI were successively kidnapped and recovered by both parties, until Jean 'the Fearless', duke of Burgundy managed to be appointed by royal decree guardian of the dauphin and regent of France.
     "Louis did not give up and took every opportunity to sabotage Jean's rule, including squandering the money raised for the relief of Calais, then occupied by the English. After this episode, Jean and Louis broke into open threats and only the intervention of Jean I, duc de Berry, uncle of both men, avoided a civil war. On 20 November 1407 a solemn reconciliation was vowed in front of the court of France, but only three days later Louis was assassinated in the streets of Paris, under orders of Jean 'the Fearless'."8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 150.
2. Gens Nostra. 1991 495
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:24
4. A Medieval Heritage : The Ancestry of Charles II, King of England, in 'The Genealogist', Thompson, Neil D. & Hansen, Charles M. 216
5. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia .8


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Louis I of Orléans (13 March 1372 – 23 November 1407) was Duke of Orléans from 1392 to his death. He was also, Duke of Touraine (1386–1392), Count of Valois (1386?–1406) Blois (1397–1407), Angoulême (1404–1407), Périgord (1400–1407) and Soissons (1404–07).
     "Louis was the second son of King Charles V of France and Joanna of Bourbon and was the younger brother of Charles VI.[1] In 1498, his legitimate agnatic progeny inherited the French throne (which in turn died out in 1589) after the extinction of the Valois main line.
Succession in Hungary, Poland and Naples
     "In 1374, Louis was betrothed to Catherine, heiress presumptive to the throne of Hungary.
     "Louis and Catherine were expected to reign either over Hungary or over Poland, as Catherine's father, Louis I of Hungary, had no sons. Catherine's father also planned to leave them his claim to the Crown of Naples and the County of Provence, which were then held by his ailing and childless cousin Joanna I.[2] However, Catherine's death in 1378 ended the marriage negotiations. In 1384, Elizabeth of Bosnia started negotiating with Louis' father about the possibility of Louis marrying her daughter Mary, notwithstanding Mary's engagement to Sigismund of Luxembourg. If Elizabeth had made this proposal in 1378, after Catherine's death, the fact that the French king and the Hungarian king did not recognise the same pope would have presented a problem. However, Elizabeth was desperate in 1384 and was not willing to let the schism stand in the way of the negotiations. Antipope Clement VII issued a dispensation which annulled Mary's betrothal to Sigismund[citation needed] and a proxy marriage between Louis and Mary was celebrated in April 1385.[3] Nonetheless, the marriage was not recognised by the Hungarian noblemen who adhered to Pope Urban VI. Four months after the proxy marriage, Sigismund invaded Hungary and married Mary, which ultimately destroyed Louis' chances to reign as King of Hungary.[4]
Hundred Years' War
     "Louis had an important political role during the Hundred Years' War. With the increasing insanity of his elder brother Charles the Mad (who suffered from either schizophrenia, porphyria or bipolar disorder), Louis disputed the regency and guardianship of the royal children with John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy. The enmity between the two was public and a source of political unrest in the already troubled France. Louis had the initial advantage, being the brother rather than the first cousin of the king, but his reputation as a womaniser and the rumour of an affair with the queen consort Isabeau of Bavaria made him extremely unpopular. For the following years, the children of Charles VI were successively kidnapped and recovered by both parties, until the Duke of Burgundy managed to be appointed by royal decree to be the guardian of Louis, the Dauphin and regent of France.
     "Louis did not give up and took every effort to sabotage John's rule, including squandering the money raised for the relief of Calais, then occupied by the English. After this episode, John and Louis broke into open threats and only the intervention of John of Valois, Duke of Berry and uncle of both men, avoided a civil war.
Murder
On Sunday 20 November 1407, the contending Dukes exchanged solemn vows of reconciliation before the court of France. But only three days later, Louis was brutally assassinated in the streets of Paris, by the orders of the Duke of Burgundy John the Fearless. Louis was stabbed while mounting his horse by fifteen masked criminals led by Raoulet d'Anquetonville, a servant of the Duke of Burgundy.[5] An attendant was severely wounded.
     "John was supported by the population of Paris and the University. He could even publicly admit the killing. Rather than deny it, John had the scholar Jean Petit of the Sorbonne deliver a peroration justifying the killing of tyrants.
     "Louis' murder sparked a bloody feud and civil war between Burgundy and the French royal family which divided France for the next twenty-eight years, ending with the Treaty of Arras in 1435.
Marriage and issue
     "In 1389, Louis married Valentina Visconti,[6] daughter of Gian Galeazzo, Duke of Milan. The union produced eight children:
-- A son (born and died Paris, 25 March 1390), buried in Paris église Saint-Paul.
-- Louis (Paris, Hôtel de Saint-Pol, 26 May 1391 - September 1395), buried Paris église des Célestins.
-- John (September 1393 - Château de Vincennes, bef. 31 October 1393), buried Paris église des Célestins.
-- Charles, Duke of Orléans (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris, 24 November 1394 - Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire, 4 January 1465),[6] father of Louis XII, King of France.
-- Philip, Count of Vertus (Asnières-sur-Oise, Val d'Oise, 21/24 July 1396 - Beaugency, Loiret, 1 September 1420).[6] Left a natural son Philip Anthony, called the Bastard of Vertus who died about 1445; no issue.
-- John, Count of Angoulême (24 June 1399 – Château de Cognac, Charente, 30 April 1467),[6]
-- Marie (Château de Coucy, Aisne, April 1401 - died shortly after birth).
-- Margaret (4 December 1406 - Abbaye de Laguiche, near Blois, 24 April 1466), married Richard of Brittany, Count of Étampes. She received the County of Vertus as a dowry. Ancestors of the Dukes of Brittany and Lords of Chalon-Arlay and Prince of Orange.
     "By Mariette d'Enghien,[7] his mistress, Louis had an illegitimate son:
-- John of Dunois (1402–1468), ancestor of the Dukes of Longueville[7]
Honours
-- Kingdom of France - Duchy of Orléans: 1st Grand Master and Knight of the Order of the Porcupine he founded at the occasion of the baptism of his son Charles
References
1. Keane 2016, p. 17.
2. Engel, Ayton & Pálosfalvi 1999, p. 169.
3. Warnicke 2000, p. 106.
4. Parsons 1997, p. ?.
5. Theis 1992, p. 326-327.
6. Adams 2010, p. 255.
7. Potter 1995, p. 373.
Sources
-- Adams, Tracy (2010). The Life and Afterlife of Isabeau of Bavaria. Johns Hopkins University Press.
-- Engel, Pal; Ayton, Andrew; Pálosfalvi, Tamás (1999). The Realm of St. Stephen: A History of Medieval Hungary, 895-1526. Vol. 19. Penn State Press.
-- Keane, Marguerite (2016). Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-century France: The Testament of Blanche of Navarre (1331-1398). Brill.
-- Parsons, John Carmi (1997). Medieval Queenship. Palgrave Macmillan.
-- Potter, David (1995). A History of France, 1460-1560: The Emergence of a Nation State. St. Martin's Press.
-- Theis, Laurent (1992). Histoire du Moyen Âge Français. Perrin.
-- Warnicke, Retha M. (2000). The Marrying of Anne of Cleves: Royal Protocol in Early Modern England. Cambridge University Press.
Further reading
-- Darwin, F. D. S. (1936) Louis d'Orléans (1372-1407): a necessary prologue to the tragedy of La Pucelle d'Orleans. London: John Murray
-- Jager, Eric. (2014). Blood Royal: a true tale of crime and detection in Medieval Paris. Little, Brown, and Co."5 He was Duke of Touraine between 1386 and 1392.5 He was Cte de Valois between 1386 and 1406.4,5 He was Cte de Dunois in 1391.4 He was Duc d'Orléans between 1392 and 1407.2,4,5 He was Cte de Angouleme between 1394 and 1407.4 He was Count of Blois between 1397 and 1407.5 He was Count of Périgord between 1400 and 1407.5 He was Cte de Dreux in 1401.4 He was Cte de Soissons between 1404 and 1407.4,5 He was Count of Angoulême between 1404 and 1407.5

Family 1

Catherine (?) b. Jul 1366, d. 1377

Family 2

Marie (?) b. 1365, d. 1366

Family 3

Valentina Visconti Cts d'Asti, Duchess of Orléans b. 1366, d. 4 Dec 1408
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Visconti 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/visconti2.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 23 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet23.html
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_I,_Duke_of_Orl%C3%A9ans. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000224&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVdied1380B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis, Duc d'Orléans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000223&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Louis of Orleans (13 Mar 1372–23 Nov 1407), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21095, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21095/louis-of_orleans. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html

Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans1,2

M, #23167, b. 26 May 1391, d. 4 January 1465
FatherLouis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons1,2 b. 13 Mar 1372, d. 13 Nov 1407
MotherValentina Visconti Cts d'Asti, Duchess of Orléans1,3 b. 1366, d. 4 Dec 1408
Last Edited26 Jan 2020
     Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans was born on 26 May 1391 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now).2,1,4 He married Isabeau/Isabelle (?) of France, daughter of Charles VI "le Bien-Aime/le Fol" (?) King of France and Isabeau/Elisabeth (?) Duchess of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, Queen of France, on 29 June 1406 at Compiègne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France,
;
His 1st wife, her 2nd husband; Med Lands says: "m firstly (contract 5 Jun 1406, Compiègne, Oise 6 Jun 1407) as her second husband."5,1,6,4,7 Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans married Bonne/Bona (?) d'Armagnac, daughter of Bernhard VII (?) Cte d'Armagnac, Comte de Charolais et de Rodez and Bonne/Bona de Berry, between 18 April 1410 and 15 August 1410
;
His 2nd wife; Med Lands says: "m secondly contract Gien, Loiret 18 Apr 1410, Riom, Puy-de-Dôme 15 Aug 1410."2,1,4,7 Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans married Marie von Kleve, daughter of Adolf I-II (?) Herzog von Kleve, Graf von la Marck und Ravenstein and Marie (?) Duchess of Burgundy. Duchess of Cleves, on 6 November 1440 at St. Omer, France (now),
;
Her 1st husband; his 3rd wife. Per Med Lands she: "m firstly contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440". Med Lands says he: "m thirdly contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440."1,2,8,4,9,7
Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans was buried after 1465 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; Per Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1394, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     4 Jan 1465 (aged 70–71), Amboise, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     French Royalty. Duc d'Orléans. Born in Paris, France, the eldest son of Louis de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, the second son of King Charles VI of France, and Valentine Visconti. In June 1406 he married his cousin Isabella, widow of Richard II of England. They had one daughter before Isabella's death three years later. He inherited his father's titles after the Duke's murder by Burgundian agents in 1407. During the English invasion of France and the battle of Agincourt, Charles served as co-commander and was wounded in action and taken prisoner. He was held in England, taking apartments in Windsor, Pontefract, Ampthill, Wingfield, and the Tower during the course of his prolonged stay and was allowed to indulge in pastimes befitting his rank, such as riding and hawking. During his enforced exile he also indulged in writing, and is credited as author of several hundred short French poems, the majority which were ballads or rondels. A ransom of 80,000 livres and a promise to pay 140,000 crowns in future was agreed upon in July 1440, and he was released the following November, having spent over twenty years a well kept prisoner. Upon his release he married Maria von Kleve daughter of Adolf I Herzog von Kleve, and with her had one son. He died at Amboise at the age of 70. His son would succeed to the French throne as Louis XII. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis of Orleans 1372–1407
          Valentina Visconti 1370–1408
     Spouse
          Isabel of Valois 1389–1409
     Siblings
          Louis d'Orléans 1391–1395
          Jean d'Orleans 1393–1393
          Philippe d'Orléans 1396–1420
          Jean de Angouleme 1400–1467
          Marguerite d'Orléans 1406–1466
     Children
          Louis XII 1462–1515
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21055.10
Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans died on 4 January 1465 at Amboise, France, at age 73; Genealogy.EU (Capet 20 page) says d. 1466.2,1,4
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Charles was born on 26 May 1391 in Paris, the son of Louis, duc d'Orléans and Valentina Visconti, the only child of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, duke of Milan, and Isabelle de France. Louis d'Orléans was assassinated in Paris on 23 November 1407 at the orders of his cousin Jean 'the Fearless', duke of Burgundy, who was himself assassinated at Montereau on 10 September 1419 by Armagnac supporters of the dauphin of France.
     "In 1406 Charles married Isabelle de Valois, daughter of Charles VI, king of France, and Isabeau von Bayern, and widow of Richard II, king of England. They had a daughter Jeanne who married but did not have progeny. In 1407 after his father's murder Charles became duke of Orléans and led the Armagnacs against the duke of Burgundy. In 1410 he married Bonne d'Armagnac, daughter of Bernard VII de Armagnac, comte de Charolais, comte de Rodez, and Bonne de Berry, but this marriage remained childless.
     "At the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 Charles was captured and imprisoned for twenty-five years in England. His long imprisonment had at least one virtue in awakening his poetic muse; Charles became the greatest poet of the 15th century in the French language, alongside François Villon. Following the active intervention of Philippe 'the Good' and especially of his wife Isabella of Portugal, in 1440 Charles was released after a ransom of 120,000 marks had been paid as part of Henry VI of England's peace overtures. Thereby the houses of Orléans and Burgundy became reconciled, much to the anger of Charles VII. Charles d'Orléans swore his adherence to the Treaty of Arras, and on 6 November 1440 at Saint Omer married Marie von Kleef, daughter of Adolf I, Herzog von Kleef, and Marie de Bourgogne. They had three children of whom Marie and Louis, the future Louis XII of France, would have progeny. Anne would become abbess of Fontevrault and Poitiers.
     "On 30 November 1440 at Saint-Omer Charles agreed to receive the chain of a knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece, while Philippe 'the Good' agreed to receive the chain of the Order of the Camail (Porcupine) founded in 1394 by Charles' father Louis, duc d'Orléans.
     "Having returned to active life, he participated with Philippe 'the Good' in the conferences of Nevers in 1442, in the course of which a large number of French princes expressed their grievances towards Charles VII. In 1444 he took part in conferences at Tours which resulted in the truce between France and England. In parallel, he worked to gain the freedom of his brother Jean, comte d'Angoulême, a prisoner in England since 1412, Jean's freedom came in 1445.
     "In 1447 Charles crossed the Alps to his county of Asti, in the hope of gaining, with the help of Charles VII, the duchy of Milan which he claimed in the name of his mother. This attempt failed after Francesco Sforza's victory in the same year over the French. Charles returned to France, and thereafter he spent most of his last years in retirement at Blois, writing and befriending other literary men. Charles died at Amboise on 4 January 1465."4

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Charles, Duc d'Orleans, some-time Duke of Milan, *Paris 1391, +Amboise 1466, bur Paris; 1m: Compiegne 1406 Isabeau of France (*1389 +1409); 2m: 1410 Bonne (*1392, living 1415) dau.of Cte Bernard VII d'Armagnac; 3m: St.Omer 1440 Maria of Cleves (*1426 +1487.)1"

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 17.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 147.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:24.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES d'Orléans, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Nov 1394-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 4 Jan 1465, bur Paris église des Célestins). The Chronique de Saint-Denis records that the duchess of Orléans gave birth, 1394 from the context, “vers le milieu de novembre...en l’hôtel royal de Saint-Paul” to “un fils...Charles”[1245]. Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande names “l’aisné...Charles...après la mort de son pere...duc d’Orleenz et de Valloys, comte de Blays et de Beaumont et seigneur de Coucy” as one of the three sons of “la ducesse d’Orliens, fille au sire de Millen et fame de monsr d’Orlienz, frere du roy Charles ii”[1246]. Comte d'Angoulême. Duc de Valois. He succeeded his father 1407 as Duc d'Orléans. He was invested as Conte di Asti by Emperor Sigismund 12 Sep 1413. Captured at the battle of Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, he was taken to England where he remained a prisoner until 1440. Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII records that in Jun 1440 King Henry VI released “Charles duc d’Orléans” whom he had held in prison since the battle of Agincourt, adding that the ransom was rumoured to be “plus de quatre cens mille escuz”[1247]. He claimed the duchy of Milan in 1447 on the death of Filippo Maria Visconti, and entered the city 22 Oct 1447.
     "m firstly (contract 5 Jun 1406, Compiègne, Oise 6 Jun 1407) as her second husband, ISABELLE de France, widow of RICHARD II King of England, daughter of CHARLES VI King of France & his wife Elisabeth [Isabelle] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Palais du Louvre 9 Nov 1389-Blois before 9 Sep 1409, bur Chapelle de Notre-Dame des Bonnes-Nouvelles, Abbaye de Saint-Laumer, Blois, transferred 1624 to l'église des Célestins, Paris). The marriage contract between “nostre...fille Isabelle de France Reyne d’Angleterre” and “nostre...neveu Charles d’Angoulesme aisné fils de nostre frere [le Duc d’Orleans]” is dated 1404[1248]. Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records the marriage “au Chastel-Tyerry”, in May 1405 from the context, of “l’ainsné filz au duc d’Orlienz, frere du roy” and “la fille dudit roy, celle qui se disoit royne d’Engleterre et fame de Ricart roy d‘Engleterre”[1249]. She died from the after-effects of childbirth. Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records her death 13 Sep 1409, adding that she “n’ut omcques nul enfant” and that “le pleupe, clers et lays” were “mal contens pour ce qu’ilz estoient cousinz frareux”[1250].
     "m secondly (contract Gien, Loiret 18 Apr 1410, Riom, Puy-de-Dôme 15 Aug 1410) BONNE d'Armagnac, daughter of BERNARD [VII] Comte d'Armagnac & his wife Bonne de Berry (Lavardens, Gers 19 Feb [1395]-Castelnau-de-Montmiral, Tarn [1430[1251]/16 Nov 1435]). The testament of "Bonne de Berry comtesse d’Armaganc et de Rhodes vicomtesse de Carlades, veuve de Bernard comte d’Armagnac et Rhodes", dated 18 Sep 1430, bequeathed property to “...Bonne d’Armagnac sa fille duchesse d’Orléans...”[1252].
     "m thirdly (contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440) as her first husband, MARIA von Kleve, daughter of ADOLF II Duke of Kleve & his second wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] ([19 Sep 1426]-Chauny-en-Picardie, Aisne Jul 1486, bur Paris église des Célestins). Wernher Teschenmacher’s Annales Cliviæ (1630s) records the birth “pridie Matthæi Apostoli” 1426 of “Maria” who married “Carolo Valesio duci Aurelianensi”, but the editor of the edition consulted quotes no earlier primary source which confirms this information[1253]. She was brought up at the court of her uncle the duke of Burgundy. The long delay between her marriage and the birth of her children suggests that this reported year of her birth may not be correct. Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII records the marriage “à Saint-Omer” of “Charles duc d’Orléans” and “la niepce au duc de Bourguongne”, after his release from prison in England[1254]. Dame de Chaumont-sur-Loire, de La Borde et des Rochettes May 1466. She married secondly (secretly [1473/75]) Claude de Rabodanges Seigneur de Thun ([1441/42]-), who had arrived in Blois [1468] and became her maître d'hôtel[1255]."
Med Lands cites:
[1245] Bellaguet (1840), Tome II, Liv. XV, Chap. XIII, p. 247.
[1246] Robillard de Beaurepaire (1870), Chap. XV, p. 244.
[1247] Vallet de Viriville (1858), Tome I, Chap. 139, p. 260.
[1248] Godefroy (1653), p. 609.
[1249] Robillard de Beaurepaire (1870), Chap. XIII, p. 210.
[1250] Robillard de Beaurepaire (1870), Chap. XV, p. 244.
[1251] When she wrote her will.
[1252] Huillard-Bréholles (1874), Tome II, 5372, p. 243.
[1253] Dithmar, J. C. (1721) Wernheri Teschenmacheri ab Elverfeldt Annales Cliviæ, Juliæ, Montium, Marcæ, Westphalicæ, Ravensbergæ, Geldriæ et Zutphaniæ (Frankfurt, Leipzig), p. 289.
[1254] Vallet de Viriville (1858), Tome I, Chap. 139, p. 260.
[1255] Kerrebrouck (1990), p. 246 footnote 27.7


; See Wikipedia article.11 He was Duc d'Orléans.2

Family 1

Isabeau/Isabelle (?) of France b. 11 Sep 1389, d. 13 Sep 1409
Child

Family 2

Bonne/Bona (?) d'Armagnac d. 1415

Family 3

Marie von Kleve b. 14 Sep 1426, d. Jul 1486
Child

Family 4

Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 23 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet23.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Valentina Visconti: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004117&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles, Duc d'Orléans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005732&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p. 31. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesOrleansdied1465B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves5.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA%20(LOWER%20RHINE).htm#MarieClevedied1487
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 October 2019), memorial page for Charles d'Orléans (1394–4 Jan 1465), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21055, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21055/charles-d_orl_ans. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles,_Duke_of_Orl%C3%A9ans. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Marie von Kleve1,2

F, #23168, b. 14 September 1426, d. July 1486
FatherAdolf I-II (?) Herzog von Kleve, Graf von la Marck und Ravenstein1,2,3,4,5 b. 2 Aug 1373, d. 23 Sep 1448
MotherMarie (?) Duchess of Burgundy. Duchess of Cleves2,6,4,5 b. bt 1393 - 1394, d. 30 Oct 1463
Last Edited26 Jan 2020
     Marie von Kleve was born on 14 September 1426.1,7,2,5 She married Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans, son of Louis I (?) Cte de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, Touraine, et d'Orleans, Cte de Blois, de Dunois, d'Angouleme, de Perigord, de Dreux, et de Soissons and Valentina Visconti Cts d'Asti, Duchess of Orléans, on 6 November 1440 at St. Omer, France (now),
;
Her 1st husband; his 3rd wife. Per Med Lands she: "m firstly contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440". Med Lands says he: "m thirdly contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440."7,1,2,8,5,9 Marie von Kleve married Claude de Rabodanges Seigneur de Thun between 1473 and 1475
;
Her 2nd husband.5
Marie von Kleve was buried in July 1486 ; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH          19 Sep 1426
     DEATH     Jul 1486 (aged 59)
     Nobility, daughter of Adolf II Duke of Kleve and his second wife Marie de Bourgogne. She married Charles de Orleans as his third wife in 1440. She bore three children and retired to Blois after her husbands death. Around 1474 she married secretly Claude de Rabodanges.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Adolf II von Kleve 1373–1448
          Marie de Bourgogne 1393–1463
     Spouse
          Charles de Orleans 1394–1465
     Siblings
          Margarethe von Kleve 1416–1444
          Johann I von Kleve-Mark 1419–1481
     Children
          Marie d'Orleans 1457–1493
     BURIAL     Convent of the Celestines (ruins), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     PLOT     original burial place
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 12 Jul 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 93484782.10
Marie von Kleve died in July 1486 at Chauny-en-Picardie, France, at age 59; Genealogy.EU (Capet 23 page) says d. 1487.1,7,2,5
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA ([19 Sep 1426]-Chauny-en-Picardie, Aisne Jul 1486, bur Paris église des Célestins). Wernher Teschenmacher’s Annales Cliviæ (1630s) records the birth “pridie Matthæi Apostoli” 1426 of “Maria” who married “Carolo Valesio duci Aurelianensi”, but the editor of the edition consulted quotes no earlier primary source which confirms this information[1311]. The long delay between her marriage and the birth of her children suggests that this reported year of her birth may not be correct. She was brought up at the court of her uncle the duke of Burgundy. Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII records the marriage “à Saint-Omer” of “Charles duc d’Orléans” and “la niepce au duc de Bourguongne”, after his release from prison in England[1312]. Dame de Chaumont-sur-Loire, de La Borde et des Rochettes May 1466.
     "m firstly (contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440) CHARLES Duc d’Orléans, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Nov 1394-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 4 Jan 1465, bur Paris église des Célestins).
     "m secondly (secretly [1473/75]) CLAUDE de Rabodanges Seigneur de Thun, son of --- ([1441/42]-). He had arrived in Blois in [1468] and became the maître d'hôtel of the duchesse d’Orléans. "
Med Lands cites:
[1311] Dithmar (1721), p. 289.
[1312] Vallet de Viriville, A. (1858) Chronique de Charles VII roi de France, par Jean Chartier (Paris), Tome I, Chap. 139, p. 260.5

Family 1

Charles (?) Duc d'Orleans b. 26 May 1391, d. 4 Jan 1465
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves5.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005739&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA%20(LOWER%20RHINE).htm#AdolfKlevedied1448. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA%20(LOWER%20RHINE).htm#MarieClevedied1487
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005740&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 23 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet23.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles, Duc d'Orléans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005732&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesOrleansdied1465B
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 26 January 2020), memorial page for Marie von Kleve (19 Sep 1426–Jul 1486), Find A Grave Memorial no. 93484782, citing Convent of the Celestines (ruins), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93484782/marie-von_kleve. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France1,2,3

M, #23169, b. 17 November 1293, d. 22 August 1350
FatherCharles I (?) Comte de Valois et d'Alencon, de Chartres et du Perche, Ct d´Anjou1,2,3,4,5,6 b. 12 Mar 1270, d. 16 Dec 1325
MotherMarguerite (?) of Sicily Cts d'Anjou et du Maine1,2,3,5,7,6 b. c 1273, d. 31 Dec 1299
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France was born on 17 November 1293 at Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.1,2,5,8,9 He married Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France, daughter of Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne and Agnes (?) of France, in July 1313 at Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France,
;
His 1st wife.10,1,2,11,5 Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France married Blanche (?) of Navarre, daughter of Philippe III "le Bon" or "le Sage" (?) King of Navarre, Cte d'Evreux, Angouleme et de Longueville, Cte de Mortain and Jeanne II (Joan) (?) de France, Queen of Navarre, on 29 January 1349 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now),
;
His 2nd wife.12,2,5
Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France died on 22 August 1350 at Abbey de Coulombs, Nogent-le-Rotrou, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France (now), at age 56.2,1,8,9,5
Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France was buried after 22 August 1350 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     17 Nov 1293, ontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     22 Aug 1350 (aged 56), Nogent-le-Roi, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France
     French Monarch. Born the son of Charles I de France, Comte de Valois, the younger brother of King Phillipe IV, and Marguerite d'Anjou. When his cousin, Charles IV, died without a male heir he became one claimant to the throne, the other being Edward III of England, who was related to the French king on the matrilineal side. The assembly of French barons, however, found that as Philippe was the eldest direct male line descendant of Philippe III, he was the rightful king. He was crowned in May 1328. In 1334 he welcomed the fugitive king of Scotland, David II, to his court, angering Edward III. In 1337, Edward returned the slight by granting refuge to Robert of Artois, making him Earl of Richmond. He was a former friend and adviser to Philippe who had committed fraud and forgery in order to cheat the crown. Philippe's fury led him to declare Edward in forfeit of his territories in Aquitaine for rebellion and disobedience. Edward, in turn, renewed his claim on the French crown, the relatively petty tit for tat igniting The Hundred Years War. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Charles of Valois 1270–1325
          Marguerite d'Anjou 1273–1299
     Spouses
          Jeanne de Bourgogne 1293–1348
          Blanche de Navarre 1330–1398
     Siblings
          Jeanne de Valoisv1294–1342
          Marguerite de Valois 1295–1342
          Charles d'Alencon 1297–1346
          Charles II de Valois 1297–1346
     Half Siblings
          Marie de Valois 1309–1331
          Isabelle de Valois 1313–1383
          Blanche Marguerite de Valois 1317–1348
          Louis de Valois 1318–1328
     Children
          John II of France 1319–1364
          Louis de France 1330–1330
          Philippe de Valois 1336–1375
          Jeanne de France 1351–1371
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21104.9
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Philippe VI, king of France, was born in 1293, the son of Charles, comte de Valois, and Marguerite d'Anjou. In 1315 he married Jeanne de Bourgogne, daughter of Robert II, duke of Burgundy, and Agnès de France. They had six children of whom Jean II and Philippe would have progeny. As the nearest direct male heir after the death of King Charles IV, Philippe was chosen as king of France under the Salic Law. In the early years of his reign Philippe VI planned an Anglo-French crusade with Edward III of England; however, Edward withdrew his support and the plan never came to fruition.
     "Friction gradually built up between Philippe VI and Edward III, and when in 1337 Philippe declared Gascony confiscated, Edward retaliated by claiming the French crown. Edward III argued that his claim to the throne of France was stronger as his mother Isabella was the daughter of Philippe IV of France.
     "In 1339 the Hundred Years War broke out. On 24 June 1340 the English destroyed the French fleet at Sluis in Flanders. In 1343 the two kings signed a three-year truce; however, in 1345 Edward III invaded Normandy, and in 1346 he defeated the French at the Battle of Crécy where Philippe VI was badly wounded. In 1347 the English captured Calais, which they were to keep for the next two centuries. Philippe resorted to extraordinary taxes, including a salt tax, to pay for his campaigns, but he was unable to stem the English advance.
     "The Black Death carried off Philippe's wife Jeanne de Bourgogne in 1348 and his son Jean's wife Judith of Bohemia the following year. Philippe arranged a new marriage for his son with Blanche de Navarre-Evreux, the daughter of Philippe III, king of Navarre and through her mother the granddaughter of Louis X, king of France. When she arrived at the French court, Philippe fell in love with her himself and decided to marry her, although he was many years her senior. Another bride was found for Jean in Jeanne de Boulogne, whom he accepted without demur. Philippe wore himself out in his attempts to satisfy his new wife and prove his vigour, and within a year he sickened and died in August 1350, leaving a pregnant widow."5

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 5.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 88.
3. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia, London, 1990 , Hallam, Elizabeth; General Editor. 159
4. Debrett's Kings and Queens of Europe, London, 1988 , Williamson, David. Page 76, part of the biography
5. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2.5


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philip VI (French: Philippe; 1293 – 22 August 1350), called the Fortunate (French: le Fortuné) and of Valois, was the first King of France from the House of Valois. He reigned from 1328 until his death.
     "Philip's reign was dominated by the consequences of a succession dispute. When King Charles IV died without a male heir in 1328, the nearest male relative was his maternal nephew Edward III of England. It was held in France, however, that Edward was ineligible to inherit the French throne through the female line according to the ancient Salic Law. Philip, being Charles IV's cousin in the male line, acceded instead. At first, Edward seemed to accept the Valois succession to the crown, but he pressed his claim to the throne of France after a series of disagreements with Philip. The result was the beginning of the Hundred Years' War in 1337.
     "After initial successes at sea, Philip's navy was annihilated at the Battle of Sluys in 1340, ensuring that the war would occur on the continent. The English took another decisive advantage at the Battle of Crécy (1346), while the Black Death struck France, further destabilizing the country.
     "In 1349, Philip VI bought the Dauphiné from its ruined ruler Humbert II and entrusted the government of this province to his grandson Charles. Philip VI died in 1350 and was succeeded by his son John II, the Good.
Early life
     "Little is recorded about Philip's childhood and youth, in large part because he was of minor royal birth. Philip's father Charles, Count of Valois, the younger brother of King Philip IV of France,[1] had striven throughout his life to gain a throne for himself but was never successful. He died in 1325, leaving his eldest son Philip as heir to the counties of Anjou, Maine, and Valois.[2]
Accession to the throne
     "In 1328, Philip's first cousin Charles IV died without a son and with his widow Jeanne d'Évreux pregnant.[2] Philip was one of the two chief claimants to the throne. The other was King Edward III of England, who was the son of Charles's sister Isabella and his closest male relative. The question arose whether Isabella should have been able to transmit a claim that she herself did not possess.[3] The assemblies of the French barons and prelates and the University of Paris decided that males who derive their right to inheritance through their mother should be excluded according to Salic law. As Philip was the eldest grandson of Philip III of France through the male line, he became regent instead of Edward, who was a matrilineal grandson of Philip IV of France and great-grandson of Philip III.[4]
     "During the period in which Charles IV's widow was waiting to deliver her child, Philip rose to the regency with support of the French magnates, following the pattern set up by Philip V's succession over his niece Joan II of Navarre.[3] He formally held the regency from 9 February 1328 until 1 April, when Jeanne d'Évreux gave birth to a girl, named Blanche.[5] Upon this birth, Philip was named king and crowned at the Cathedral in Reims on 29 May 1328.[6] After his elevation to the throne, Philip sent the Abbot of Fécamp, Pierre Roger, to summon Edward III of England to pay homage for the duchy of Aquitaine and Gascony.[7] After a subsequent second summons from Philip, Edward arrived at the Cathedral of Amiens on 6 June 1329 and worded his vows in such a way to cause more disputes in later years.[7]
     "The dynastic change had another consequence: Charles IV had also been King of Navarre, but, unlike the crown of France, the crown of Navarre was not subject to Salic Law. Philip VI was neither an heir nor a descendant of Joan I of Navarre, whose inheritance (the kingdom of Navarre, as well as the counties of Champagne, Troyes, Meaux, and Brie) had been in personal union with the crown of France for almost fifty years and had long been administered by the same royal machinery established by Philip IV, the father of French bureaucracy. These counties were closely entrenched in the economic and administrative entity of the crown lands of France, being located adjacent to Île-de-France. Philip, however, was not entitled to that inheritance; the rightful heiress was the surviving daughter of Louis X, the future Joan II of Navarre, the heir general of Joan I of Navarre. Navarre thus passed to Joan II, with whom Philip struck a deal regarding the counties in Champagne: she received vast lands in Normandy (adjacent to her husband Philip's fief in Évreux) in compensation, and he kept Champagne as part of the French crown lands.
Reign
     "Philip's reign was plagued with crises, although it began with a military success in Flanders at the Battle of Cassel (August 1328), where Philip's forces re-seated Louis I, Count of Flanders, who had been unseated by a popular revolution.[8] Philip's wife, the able Joan the Lame, gave the first of many demonstrations of her competence as regent in his absence.
     "Philip initially enjoyed relatively amicable relations with Edward III, and they planned a crusade together in 1332, which was never executed. However, the status of the Duchy of Aquitaine remained a sore point, and tension increased. Philip provided refuge for David II of Scotland in 1334 and declared himself champion of his interests, which enraged Edward.[9] By 1336, they were enemies, although not yet openly at war.
     "Philip successfully prevented an arrangement between the Avignon papacy and Holy Roman Emperor Louis IV, although in July 1337 Louis concluded an alliance with Edward III.[10] The final breach with England came when Edward offered refuge to Robert III of Artois, formerly one of Philip's trusted advisers,[11] after Robert committed forgery to try to obtain an inheritance. As relations between Philip and Edward worsened, Robert's standing in England strengthened.[11] On 26 December 1336, Philip officially demanded the extradition of Robert to France.[11] On 24 May 1337, Philip declared that Edward had forfeited Aquitaine for disobedience and for sheltering the "king's mortal enemy", Robert of Artois.[12] Thus began the Hundred Years' War, complicated by Edward's renewed claim to the throne of France in retaliation for the forfeiture of Aquitaine.
Hundred Years' War
     "Philip entered the Hundred Years' War in a position of comparative strength. France was richer and more populous than England and was at the height of its medieval glory. The opening stages of the war, accordingly, were largely successful for the French.
     "At sea, French privateers raided and burned towns and shipping all along the southern and southeastern coasts of England.[13] The English made some retaliatory raids, including the burning of a fleet in the harbour of Boulogne-sur-Mer,[14] but the French largely had the upper hand. With his sea power established, Philip gave orders in 1339 to prepare an invasion of England (the Ordinance of Normandy) and began assembling a fleet off the Zeeland coast at Sluys. In June 1340, however, in the bitterly fought Battle of Sluys, the English attacked the port and captured or destroyed the ships there, ending the threat of an invasion.[14]
     "On land, Edward III largely concentrated upon Flanders and the Low Countries, where he had gained allies through diplomacy and bribery. A raid in 1339 (the first chevauchée) into Picardy ended ignominiously when Philip wisely refused to give battle. Edward's slender finances would not permit him to play a waiting game, and he was forced to withdraw into Flanders and return to England to raise more money. In July 1340, Edward returned and mounted the Siege of Tournai.[15] By September 1340, Edward was in financial distress, hardly able to pay or feed his troops, and was open to dialogue.[16] After being at Bouvines for a week, Philip was finally persuaded to send Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut to discuss terms to end the siege.[16] On 23 September 1340, a nine-month truce was reached.[16]
     "So far, the war had gone quite well for Philip and the French. While often stereotyped as chivalry-besotten incompetents, Philip and his men had in fact carried out a successful Fabian strategy against the debt-plagued Edward and resisted the chivalric blandishments of single combat or a combat of two hundred knights that he offered. In 1341, the War of the Breton Succession allowed the English to place permanent garrisons in Brittany. However, Philip was still in a commanding position: during negotiations arbitrated by the pope in 1343, he refused Edward's offer to end the war in exchange for the Duchy of Aquitaine in full sovereignty.
     "The next attack came in 1345, when the Earl of Derby overran the Agenais (lost twenty years before in the War of Saint-Sardos) and took Angoulême, while the forces in Brittany under Sir Thomas Dagworth also made gains. The French responded in the spring of 1346 with a massive counter-attack against Aquitaine, where an army under John, Duke of Normandy, besieged Derby at Aiguillon. On the advice of Godfrey Harcourt (like Robert III of Artois, a banished French nobleman), Edward sailed for Normandy instead of Aquitaine. As Harcourt predicted, the Normans were ill-prepared for war, and many of the fighting men were at Aiguillon. Edward sacked and burned the country as he went, taking Caen and advancing as far as Poissy and then retreating before the army Philip had hastily assembled at Paris. Slipping across the Somme, Edward drew up to give battle at Crécy.
     "Close behind him, Philip had planned to halt for the night and reconnoitre the English position before giving battle the next day. However, his troops were disorderly, and the roads were jammed by the rear of the army coming up, and by the local peasantry furiously calling for vengeance on the English. Finding them hopeless to control, he ordered a general attack as evening fell. Thus began the Battle of Crécy. When it was done, the French army had been annihilated and a wounded Philip barely escaped capture. Fortune had turned against the French.
     "The English seized and held the advantage. Normandy called off the siege of Aiguillon and retreated northward, while Sir Thomas Dagworth captured Charles of Blois in Brittany. The English army pulled back from Crécy to mount the siege of Calais; the town held out stubbornly, but the English were determined, and they easily supplied across the English Channel. Philip led out a relieving army in July 1347, but unlike the Siege of Tournai, it was now Edward who had the upper hand. With the plunder of his Norman expedition and the reforms he had executed in his tax system, he could hold to his siege lines and await an attack that Philip dared not deliver. It was Philip who marched away in August, and the city capitulated shortly thereafter.
Final years
     "After the defeat at Crécy and loss of Calais, the Estates of France refused to raise money for Philip, halting his plans to counter-attack by invading England. In 1348 the Black Death struck France and in the next few years killed one-third of the population, including Queen Joan. The resulting labour shortage caused inflation to soar, and the king attempted to fix prices, further de-stabilising the country. His second marriage to his son's betrothed Blanche of Navarre alienated his son and many nobles from the king.[17]
     "Philip's last major achievement was the acquisition of the Dauphiné[18] and the territory of Montpellier in the Languedoc in 1349. At his death in 1350, France was very much a divided country filled with social unrest. Philip VI died at Coulombes Abbey, Eure-et-Loir, on 22 August 1350[19] and is interred with his first wife, Joan of Burgundy, in Saint Denis Basilica, though his viscera were buried separately at the now demolished church of Couvent des Jacobins in Paris. He was succeeded by his first son by Joan of Burgundy, who became John II.
Marriages and children
     "In July 1313, Philip married Joan the Lame (French: Jeanne), daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy,[20] and Agnes of France, the youngest daughter of Louis IX. In an ironic twist to his "male" ascendancy to the throne, the intelligent, strong-willed Joan, an able regent of France during the king's long military campaigns, was said to be the brains behind the throne and the real ruler of France. Their children were the following:
1. John II (26 April 1319 – 8 April 1364).[21]
2. Marie (1326 – 22 September 1333), who married John of Brabant, the son and heir of John III, Duke of Brabant, but died shortly afterwards.
3. Louis (born and died 17 January 1329).
4. Louis (8 June 1330 – 23 June 1330).
5. A son [John?] (born and died 2 October 1333).
6. A son (28 May 1335), stillborn.
7. Phlip (1 July 1336 – 1 September 1375), Duke of Orléans
8. Joan (born and died November 1337).
9. A son (born and died summer 1343).
     "After Joan died in 1349, Philip married Blanche of Navarre,[22] daughter of Joan II and Philip III of Navarre, on 11 January 1350. They had one daughter:
-- Joan (Blanche) (May 1351 – 16 September 1371),[21] who was intended to marry John I of Aragon, but who died during the journey.
In fiction
     "Philip is a character in Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings), a series of French historical novels by Maurice Druon. He was portrayed by Benoît Brione in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series, and by Malik Zidi in the 2005 adaptation.[23]
References
1. David Nicolle, Crécy 1346: Triumph of the Longbow, (Osprey, 2000), 12.
2. Elizabeth Hallam and Judith Everard, Capetian France 987-1328, 2nd edition, (Pearson Education Limited, 2001), 366.
3. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War: Trial by Battle, Vol. I, (Faber & Faber, 1990), 106-107.
4. Viard, "Philippe VI de Valois. Début du règne (février-juillet 1328)", Bibliothèque de l'école des chartes, 95 (1934), 263.
5. Viard, 269, 273.
6. Curry, Anne (2003). The Hundred Years' War. New York: Rutledge. p. 18.
7. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War: Trial by Battle, 109-110.
8. Kelly DeVries, Infantry Warfare in the Early Fourteenth Century, (The Boydell Press, 1996), 102.
9. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 135.
10. The Hundred Years War:Not One But Many, Kelly DeVries, The Hundred Years War (part II): Different Vistas, ed. L. J. Andrew Villalon, Donald J. Kagay, (Brill, 2008), 15.
11. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 171-172.
12. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 184.
13. Oars, Sails and Guns:The English and War at Sea, c.1200-1500, Ian Friel, War at Sea in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, ed. John B. Hattendorf, Richard W. Unger, (The Boydell Press, 2003), 79.
14. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 320-328.
15. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 349.
16. Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War:Trial by Battle, 354-359.
17. Mortimer, Ian (2008). The Perfect King The Life of Edward III, Father of the English Nation. Vintage. p. 276.
18. The kingdom of Burgundy, the lands of the house of Savoy and adjacent territories, Eugene Cox, The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 5, c.1198-c.1300, ed. David Abulafia, Rosamond McKitterick, (Cambridge University Press, 1999), 371.
19. Jonathan Sumption, Hundred Years War:Trial by Fire, Vol. II, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999), 117.
20. David d'Avray, Papacy, Monarchy and Marriage 860–1600, (Cambridge University Press, 2015), 292.
21. Marguerite Keane, Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-century France, (Brill, 2016), 17.
22. Identity Politics and Rulership in France: Female Political Place and the Fraudulent Salic Law in Christine de Pizan and Jean de Montreuil, Sarah Hanley, Changing Identities in Early Modern France, ed. Michael Wolfe, (Duke University Press, 1996), 93 n45.
23. "Les Rois maudits: Casting de la saison 1" (in French). AlloCiné. 2005. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
Sources
-- Seward, Desmond (1999). The Hundred Years War. Penguin Books. ISBN 014-02-8361-7."8 EDV-19. He was Count of Maine between 1314 and 1328.8 He was Count of Anjou between 1325 and 1328.8 He was Count of Valois between 1325 and 1328.8 He was Per Enc. of World History:
     "King of France: PHILIP VI (nephew of Philip IV, son of Charles of Valois), the nearest male heir. Jeanne, daughter of Louis X, became queen of Navarre. Brittany, Flanders, Guienne, and Burgundy remained outside the royal sway. The papacy was under French influence; rulers of the Capetian house of Anjou were seated on the thrones of Naples, Provence, and Hungary; Dauphiné, the first important imperial fief added to French territory, was purchased (1336). The king had become less accessible; the kingdom, regarded as a possession rather than an obligation, was left to the administration of the royal bureaucracy.
     "1338: Philip declared Edward's French fiefs forfeited and invested Guienne. Edward was made vicar of the empire, and his title as king of France was recognized by the emperor. Thus began the Hundred Years' War, really a series of wars with continuous common objectives: the retention of their French “empire” by the English, the liberation of their soil by the French.
     "1340: Philip, by dismissing two squadrons of Levantine mercenary ships, lost his mastery of the Channel until 1372 and was overwhelmingly defeated by Edward at the naval battle of Sluys (June 24) on Scheldt estuary on (modern) Belgian border. This opened the Channel to the English and gave them free access to northern France." between 1328 and 1350.13,1,2,8

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France b. 24 Jun 1293, d. 12 Sep 1348
Children

Family 3

Beatrix de la Berruere b. 1294, d. 1348
Child

Family 4

Blanche (?) of Navarre b. 1331, d. 5 Oct 1398
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Sicily 7: pp. 654-5. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles, Comte de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000227&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000226&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesValoisdied1325B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002980&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_VI_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Philippe VI of France (17 Nov 1293–22 Aug 1350), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21104, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21104/philippe_vi-of_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 21 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet21.html
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201, 244. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003875&tree=LEO

Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France1,2,3,4,5

F, #23170, b. 24 June 1293, d. 12 September 1348
FatherRobert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne2,1,5 b. 1248, d. 1305
MotherAgnes (?) of France2,1,5 b. 1260, d. 1327
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France was born on 24 June 1293.2,1,4,6,5 She married Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France, son of Charles I (?) Comte de Valois et d'Alencon, de Chartres et du Perche, Ct d´Anjou and Marguerite (?) of Sicily Cts d'Anjou et du Maine, in July 1313 at Fontainebleau, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France,
;
His 1st wife.1,2,3,5,7
Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France died on 12 September 1348 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, at age 55; Genealogics says d. 12 Sep 1348; Find A Grave says d. 12 Nov 1348; Wikipedia says d. 12 Dec 1349.2,1,5,6,4
Jeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France was buried after 12 September 1348 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1293, France
     DEATH     12 Nov 1348 (aged 54–55), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     French queen, daughter of Robert II. and Agnes de France and sister of Marguerite de Bourgogne. She is described as very intelligent, well educated and strong willed. When she married Philippe of Valois in 1313 she couldn't hope to be queen of France one day and when King Philippe IV died one year later he left three grown sons. In 1319 she gave birth to a boy, that was named Jean and who will be the first of her children that survives his childhood. In the following years she gives birth to seven other children but only two will survive. Then the unthinkable happens in 1327 the third of the sons of Philippe IV dies without a heir. His widow Jeanne d'Evreux is pregnant but gives birth to a daughter. Philippe de Valois, who administrated the kingdom since the death of Charles IV, is crowned together with Jeanne, but Edward III a grandson of Philippe IV considers himself to be rightful king of France and declares war. In 1337 the Hundred Years' War between England and France starts with the invasion of the Guyenne by the french army. In August 1346 Philippe is defeated in the famous Battle of Crecy. In September 1348 Jeanne becomes a victim of the "Black Death" that kills one third of the European population and one quarter of the citizens of Paris. While her body was buried in St. Denis her heart was buried in the Abbey of Cîteaux beside her parents. In the following January Philippe married the sixteen years old Blanche de Navarre and died two years after Jeanne. Cause of Death: Bubonic Plague. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert II de Bourgogne 1248–1306
          Agnes de France 1260–1325
     Spouse
          Philippe VI of France 1293–1350
     Siblings
          Blanche de Bourgogne 1288–1348
          Marguerite de Bourgogne 1290–1315
          Hugues V de Bourgogne 1294–1315
          Eudes IV de Bourgogne 1295–1349
          Louis de Bourgogne 1297–1316
          Marie de Burgundy 1298–1336
          Marie de Bourgogne 1298–1335
          Robert de Bourgogne 1302–1334
     Children
          John II of France 1319–1364
          Louis de France 1330–1330
          Philippe de Valois 1336–1375
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 7 May 2006
     Find A Grave Memorial 14221071.1,6
      ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Joan of Burgundy (French: Jeanne; 24 June 1293[citation needed] – 12 December 1349), also known as Joan the Lame (French: Jeanne la Boiteuse), was Queen of France as the first wife of King Philip VI. Joan served as regent while her husband fought on military campaigns during the Hundred Years' War.
Background
     "Joan was the daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy, and Agnes of France.[1] Her older sister, Margaret, was the first wife of Louis X of France.[2] Joan married Philip of Valois, Louis's cousin, in July 1313. From 1314 to 1328, they were Count and Countess of Maine;[2] from 1325, they were also Count and Countess of Valois and Anjou.
Queenship
     "King Philip IV's sons: Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV, left no surviving male heirs, leading to the accession of Joan's husband to the French throne. The Hundred Years' War ensued, with Edward III of England, a nephew of Louis X, claiming the French crown. Intelligent and strong-willed, Joan proved a capable regent while her husband fought on military campaigns during the war. However, her nature and power earned both herself and her husband a bad reputation, which was accentuated by her deformity (which was considered by some to be a mark of evil), and she became known as la male royne boiteuse ("the lame evil Queen"). One chronicler described her as a danger to her enemies in court: "the lame Queen Jeanne de Bourgogne...was like a King and caused the destruction of those who opposed her will."[3]
     "She was also considered to be a scholarly woman and a bibliophile: she sent her son, John, manuscripts to read, and commanded the translation of several important contemporary works into vernacular French, including the Miroir historial of Vincent de Beauvais (c.1333) and the Jeu d'échecs moralisés of Jacques de Cessoles (c.1347), a task carried out by Jean de Vignay.
     "Joan died of the plague 12 December 1349.[4] She was buried in the Basilica of Saint Denis; her tomb, built by her grandson Charles V, was destroyed during the French Revolution.
Family, children and descent
     "Her children with Philip VI were:
John II (26 April 1319 – 8 April 1364).
Marie (1326 – 22 September 1333), who married John of Brabant, the son and heir of John III, Duke of Brabant, but died shortly afterwards.
Louis (born and died 17 January 1329).
Louis (8 June 1330 – 23 June 1330).
A son [John?] (born and died 2 October 1333).
A son (28 May 1335), stillborn.
Philip (1 July 1336 – 1 September 1375), Duke of Orléans
Joan (born and died November 1337).
A son (born and died summer 1343).
     "In 1361, Joan's grandnephew, Philip I of Burgundy, died without legitimate issue, ending the male line of the Dukes of Burgundy. The rightful heir to Burgundy was unclear: King Charles II of Navarre, grandson of Joan's elder sister Margaret, was the heir according to primogeniture, but John II of France (Joan's son) claimed to be the heir according to proximity of blood. In the end, John won.
In fiction
     "Joan is a character in Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings), a series of French historical novels by Maurice Druon. She was portrayed by Ghislaine Porret in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series.
References
1. Setton 1975, p. 773.
2. Hallam 1980, p. 282.
3. Knecht 2004, p. 11.
4. Sumption 1999, p. 49.
Sources
-- Hallam, Elizabeth (1980). Capetian France: 987-1328. Longman.
-- Knecht, Robert (2004). The Valois: Kings of France 1328-1589. Hambledon Continuum.
-- Setton, Kenneth Meyer, ed. (1975). A History of the Crusades: The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Vol. III. University of Wisconsin Press.
-- Sumption, Jonathan (1999). The Hundred Years War II:Trial by Fire. University of Pennsylvania Press."4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 88.
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. page 25.
3. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 30.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.5


; Per Genealogics:
     "Jeanne de Bourgogne was born about 1293, the daughter of Robert II, duc de Bourgogne, and Agnès de France. Her mother was the youngest daughter of St. Louis IX and Marguerite de Provence. Her elder sister Marguerite was the first wife and queen of Louis X of France. Her brothers Hugues V and Eudes IV would both be dukes of Burgundy.
     "In July 1313 Jeanne married Philippe de Valois, son of Charles, comte de Valois, and Marguerite d'Anjou. From 1315 to 1328 they were count and countess of Maine; from 1325 they were also count and countess of Valois and Anjou. In 1328 her husband was chosen as king of France under the Salic Law, as the nearest direct male heir after the death of King Charles IV. They had six children of whom Jean II and Philippe would have progeny.
     "Intelligent and strong-willed, Jeanne proved a capable regent while her husband fought on military campaigns during the Hundred Years War. However her nature and power earned both herself and her husband a bad reputation, which was accentuated by her deformity (considered by some to be a mark of evil), and she became known as _la male royne boiteuse_ ('the lame male Queen'), supposedly the driving force behind her weaker husband. One chronicler described her as a danger to her enemies in court: 'the lame Queen Jeanne de Bourgogne...was like a King and caused the destruction of those who opposed her will.'
     "She was also considered to be a scholarly woman and a bibliophile; she sent her son Jean manuscripts to read, and commanded the translation of several important contemporary works into vernacular French, including the _Miroir historial_ of Vincent de Beauvais (c.1333) and the _Jeu d'échecs moralisés_ of Jacques de Cessoles (c.1347), a task carried out by Jean de Vignay.
     "Jeanne died on 12 September 1348 of the plague. She was buried in the Basilica of Saint Denis; her tomb, built by her grandson Charles V, was destroyed during the French Revolution."5 EDV-19.

Family

Philippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France b. 17 Nov 1293, d. 22 Aug 1350
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_the_Lame. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Jeanne de Bourgogne (1293–12 Nov 1348), Find A Grave Memorial no. 14221071, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave , at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14221071/jeanne-de_bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000226&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003875&tree=LEO

Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France1,2,3

M, #23171, b. 26 April 1319, d. 8 April 1364
FatherPhilippe VI "le Pious" (?) King of France3,4,5 b. 17 Nov 1293, d. 22 Aug 1350
MotherJeanne/Joan "la Boiteuse" (?) de Bourgogne, Queen of France3,4,6 b. 24 Jun 1293, d. 12 Sep 1348
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France was born on 26 April 1319 at Chateau de Gue-de-Maulin, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Lorraine, France (now).4,3,7,8 He married Judith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg, daughter of Jean|Johann 'the Blind' (?) Duke of Luxemburg, King of Bohemia and Eliska/Elisabeth 'of Bohemia' (?) Queen of Poland and Bohemia, on 28 March 1332 at Notre-Dame de Melun, Melun, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France,
;
His 1st wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 28 Mar 1332; Genealogy.EU Luxemburg 9 page says m. 6 Aug 1332; Wikipedia says m. 28 July 1332; Med Lands says m. 28 July 1332.1,4,3,9,7,8,10,11 Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France married Jeanne (?) Cts d'Auvergne et de Boulogne, daughter of Guillaume XII (?) Cte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne and Marguerite (?) d'Evreux, on 19 February 1350 at Nanterre, France (now),
;
His 2nd wife, her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Capet 20 page) says m. 19 Feb 1349.4,3,12,7,8
Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France died on 8 April 1364 at London, City of London, Greater London, England, at age 44; died a prisoner in London.4,3,13,8,7
Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France was buried after 8 April 1364 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     16 Apr 1319m Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     8 Apr 1364 (aged 44), London, City of London, Greater London, England
     French Monarch. Jean le Bon. Born the son of Philippe VI and Jeanne of Burgundy. At thirteen, he married Bonne of Luxemburg, with whom he eventually had nine children. Bonne died one year before his ascension to the throne in 1350 and he married Joanna, Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne. The early part of his reign was marred by his choice of corrupt advisors who robbed the treasury and passed oppressive measure. An economic crisis led to him debasing the kingdom's coinage to pay for the ongoing Hundred Years War between France and England. His eldest daughter, Jeanne, married Charles II of Navarre with whom King Jean maintained a chronic antagonism. In 1356 he fought at the Battle of Poitiers, where he suffered a humiliating defeat and was taken as captive by Prince Edward of England. The treaty of Bretigny in 1360 fixed his ransom at 3,000,000 crowns. The captive king was held in England to await ransom payment. He was first held in the Savoy Palace, then at Windsor, Hertford, Somerton, and at last in the Tower's royal apartments. He was accorded royal privileges, permitted to travel, and to enjoy a lifestyle to which he was accustomed. When his son, Louis of Anjou, surrendered in English-held Calais as a replacement hostage, Jean was allowed to return to France in order to raise his ransom. When Louis escaped English custody in the summer of 1363, Jean resubmitted himself to English custody in order, he claimed, to preserve the honor of his crown. He returned to England where he was well received, and was again maintained in the Savoy. He was also a frequent guest of King Edward. He died less than a year later. His body was sent back to France with royal honors and interred at Saint Denis' Basilica. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philippe VI of France 1293–1350
          Jeanne de Bourgogne 1293–1348
     Spouse
          Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
     Siblings
          Louis de France 1330–1330
          Philippe de Valois 1336–1375
     Half Siblings
          Jeanne de France 1351–1371
     Children
          Charles V 1338–1380
          Louis I d'Anjou 1339–1384
          Jean I de Berry 1340–1416
          Philip II of Burgundy 1342–1404
          Jeanne de France 1343–1373
          Marie Princesse de France de Bar 1344–1404
          Isabelle de France 1348–1373
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21082.3,7,13
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUTA (Prague 20 May 1315-Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val-d'Oise 3 or 11 Sep 1349, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson). The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Guta" as second daughter of "Regina"[421]. The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1322 of "Iohannes Rex…Gutam…filiam…minorem" and "Friderico Marchioni Misnensi"[422]. The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage 28 Jul 1332 “à Melun-sur-Sainne“ of “Jehan dit de France de l´aage de xv ans ou environ filz de Philippe le roy de France” and “ma dame Bonne fille Jehan le roy de Behangne“[423]. She was known as BONNE in France, and called Duchesse de Normandie. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "III Non Sep" of "domina Bona filia regis Bohemie quondam ducissa Normannie"[424].
     "[425]Betrothed (contract broken 1322) to KAZIMIERZ of Poland, son of W?ADYS?AW I "?okietek/the Short" King of Poland & his wife Jadwiga of Poland (30 Apr 1310-Krakow 5 Nov 1370, bur Krakow Cathedral). He succeeded his father in 1333 as KAZIMIERZ III "Wielki/the Great" King of Poland.
     "Betrothed (1322, contract broken before May 1323) to FRIEDRICH von Meissen, son of FRIEDRICH I "dem Freidigen" Markgraf von Meissen & his second wife Elisabeth von Lobdeburg-Arnshaugk (Gotha 1310-Wartburg 18 Nov 1349, bur Altzelle). He succeeded his father in 1323 as FRIEDRICH II "der Ernsthafte" Markgraf von Meissen and Landgraf of Thuringia.
     "m (Notre-Dame de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 28 Jul 1332) as his first wife, JEAN de France Duc de Normandie, Comte d'Anjou et de Maine, son of PHILIPPE VI King of France & his first wife Jeanne "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne [Capet] (Château de Gué-de-Mauny, Le Mans, Sarthe 26 Apr 1319-Savoy Hotel, London 8 Apr 1364, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). Installed as Comte de Poitou [Jan/26 May] 1344. Created Duc de Guyenne 11 Sep 1345. He succeeded his father in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France."
Med Lands cites:
[421] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput I, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 115.
[422] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 131.
[423] Hellot, A. (ed. (1884) Chronique Parisienne anonyme du XIV siècle (Nogent) (“Chronique Parisienne”), 230, p. 150.
[424] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656.
[425] Rowell, S. C. (1994) Lithuania Ascending: A Pagan Empire within East-Central Europe (Cambridge University Press), p. 232.11


; Per Genealogy.EU (): “D6. Jutta=Bona, *21.5.1315, +Maubuisson 11.9.1349, bur there; m.Melun 6.8.1332 King Jean II of France (*26.4.1319 +8.4.1364)”.14 EDV-18.

; Per Ravilious email [2003]:
     "This identification of David II, King of Scots as 'kinsman' by Jean II, King of France provides good supportfor J. C. Parsons' theory that Margaret/Marguerite, wife of Richard de Burgh, was the daughter of Arnold III of Guines. Further, your chart showing the two kings as 4th cousins (1x removed) is accurate, based on this identification.
     "The ancestry of Jean II of France is quite helpful in supporting this identification, as it is well-known through his great-great grandparents, and provides noevidence of another possible link outside the Dreux, de Coucy and de St. Valery families. I have reviewed my records concerning the continental descendants of the daughters of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumberland and Huntingdon (d. 1152) - gggg grandfather of King David II - and find no descents to Jean II of France. With the exception of the notable gap in David II's Carrick ancestry (his great-grandmother, wife of Neil, Earl of Carrick is unknown) - which is most likely a Scots connection - there is no other avenue for a connection between the two kings not involving Margaret, wife of Richard de Burgh.
     "I have appended below an for Jean II of France for general information and review (an earlier post in this thread gave the AT for David II of Scots). The ancestry of Jean II is quite interesting, esp. in noting that all four grandparents (Charles of Valois, Marguerite of Naples, Robert II of Burgundy and Agnes of France) were male-line Capetians. The rubber stamp for dispensations was evidently in heavy use: Charles of Valois and Marguerite of Naples were 2nd cousins; and Jean II's parents, Philip VI of France and Jeanne of Burgundy, were 1st cousins once removed (3rd & 2nd degree of consanguinity). If the repeats in his ancestry are problematic, I would ask, 'dispensa mea'.
     "Thanks again; yet another great (and helpful) find. Cheers, John *
ANCESTRY OF JEAN II OF FRANCE
1 Jean II of France. Born on 16 Apr 1319. Jean died in London (prisoner following Battle of Poitiers) on 8 Apr 1364, he was 44. Occupation: King of France 1350-1364.
2 Philip VI of France. Born in 1293. Philip VI died on 22 Aug 1350, he was 57. Occupation: King of France 1328-1350. first of the Valois Kings of France. In 1313 when Philip VI was 20, he married Jeanne of Burgundy.
3 Jeanne of Burgundy. Born in 1293. Jeanne died in Paris in 1348, she was 55.
4 Charles of Valois. Charles died in Nogent-le-Roy, France bef 17 Dec 1325, he was 55. Born on 12 Mar 1270. Buried in St.-Jacques, Paris. Occupation: Count of Valois. Count of Valois, later of Anjou and Maine. French & Papal candidate for King of Aragon during anti-Aragonese crusade of 1285 (Failed). On 16 Aug 1290 when Charles was 20, he married Margaret of Naples, in Corbeil.
5 Margaret of Naples. Born in 1273. Margaret died on 31 Dec 1299, she was 26. Buried in St.-Jacques, Paris. Occupation: Countess of Anjou and Maine.
6 Robert II of Burgundy. Born in 1248. Robert II died on 21 Mar 1305, he was 57. Occupation: Duke of Burgundy. Robert II married Agnes of France.
7 Agnes of France. Born in 1260. Agnes died in 1327, she was 67.
8 Philip III 'le Hardi' of France. Born on 1 May 1245 in Poissy, France. Philip III 'le Hardi' died in Perpignan, France on 5 Oct 1285, he was 40. Occupation: King of France 1270-1285. King of France. he m. lstly Isabella of Aragon, 2ndly Marie of Brabant. On 6 Jul 1262 when Philip III 'le Hardi' was 17, he married Isabella of Aragon, in Clermont, Auvergne.
9 Isabella of Aragon. Born ca 1247. Isabella died in Cosenza, Italy on 28 Jan 1270, she was 23.
1st wife
10 Charles II 'of Salerno' of Naples. Charles II died on 5 May 1309 in Naples. Occupation: King of Naples 1285-1309. King of Sicily also Duke of Apulia, and count of Provence, Anjou and Maine (in France). ceded Anjou and Maine to his son-in-law Charles of Valois, 1290. In 1270 Charles II 'of Salerno' married Maria of Hungary.
11 Maria of Hungary. Maria died on 25 Mar 1323 in Naples.
12 Hugh IV of Burgundy. Born on 9 Mar 1212. Hugh IV died on 27 Oct 1272, he was 60. Occupation: Duke of Burgundy 1218-1272. Crusader, 1240, 1248. ca 1229 when Hugh IV was 16, he married Yolande de Dreux.
13 Yolande de Dreux. Yolande died on 30 Oct 1248. Occupation: Countess of Auxonne.
2nd wife
14 Louis IX (St. Louis) of France. Louis IX died in Tunis, Africa (on Crusade) on 25 Aug 1270, he was 56. Born on 25 Apr 1214. Occupation: King of France 1226-1270. On 27 May 1234 when Louis IX (St. Louis) was 20, he married Margaret of Provence.
15 Margaret of Provence. Born ca 1221. Margaret died in Paris on 21 Dec 1295, she was 74. Buried in St-Denis.
16 Louis IX (St. Louis) of France. Louis IX died in Tunis, Africa (on Crusade) on 25 Aug 1270, he was 56. Born on 25 Apr 1214. Occupation: King of France 1226-1270.
[see #14 above]
17 Margaret of Provence. Born ca 1221. Margaret died in Paris on 21 Dec 1295, she was 74. Buried in St-Denis.
[ see # 15 above]
18 Jaime (James) 'el Conquistador' of Aragon. Born ca 1208. Jaime died in Valencia, Aragon on 27 Jun 1276, he was 68. Occupation: King of Aragon 1213-1276. given into custody of Simon de Montfort at Carcassonne, ca 1210; returned to Catalonia in 1214, under custodianship of the Templars at Monzon [uncle Sancho, regent] by the testament of his mother (1209) knighted Feb 1221, and married (1stly) to Leonor of Castile. On 8 Sep 1235 when Jaime (James) 'el Conquistador' was 27, he married Yolande of Hungary, in Barcelona, Catalonia.
19 Yolande of Hungary. Yolande died on 12 Oct 1251 in Huesca, Aragon.
20 Charles of Anjou. Charles died on 7 Jan 1284, he was 57. Born in 1227 (posthumous). Occupation: King of Naples (Sicily) 1265 - 1285. Count of Anjou and Maine accompanied his brother King Louis on crusade from Aigues-Mortes, 25 Aug 1248 commander of the left wing of the French army at Mansurah (2nd battle), 11 Feb 1250 given title as King of Sicily and papal mandate against the Hohenstaufen empire; defeated and slew Manfred at Benevento, 26 Feb 1265/6 captured and executed Conradin, 1268. plans against the Byzantine Empire thwarted by the rebellion of the 'Sicilian Vespers', 30 Mar 1282. On 31 Jan 1246 when Charles was 19, he married Beatrice of Provence.
21 Beatrice of Provence. Born in 1231. Beatrice died on 23 Sep 1267, she was 36. Occupation: Countess of Provence. youngest sister; designated heiress of Provence
22 Stephen V of Hungary. Stephen V died in 1272. Occupation: King of Hungary 1270-1272. Stephen V married Elizabeth of the Kumans.
23 Elizabeth of the Kumans.
24 Eudes III of Burgundy. Born in 1166. Eudes III died on 6 Jul 1218, he was 52. Occupation: Duke of Burgundy 1193-1218. In 1199 when Eudes III was 33, he married Alix de Vergy.
25 Alix de Vergy. Alix died on 8 Mar 1250.
26 Robert III de Dreux. Born in 1185. Robert III died on 3 Mar 1233, he was 48. Occupation: Count of Dreux. Count of Dreux
     "In regard to the English lands of Aenor de St. Valery his wife, Keats-Rohan wrote:
' Robert consistently supported Philip Augustus against King John, but made his peace with Henry III in 1217. He became Count of Dress [sic] in 1218 and in February 1219 was awarded the lands that Thomas of St. Valery had held in England. By the end of 1226, as he had again chosen to side with France, Henry III seized all his English lands.'

     "King Henry III granted these lands to his brother Richard, Earl of Cornwall in 1227
     "Robert III married Aenor de St. Valery.
27 Aenor de St. Valery. Aenor died aft 15 Nov 1250. heiress of her father
28 Louis VIII of France. Born on 5 Sep 1187. Louis VIII died in Montpensier on 8 Nov 1226, he was 39. Occupation: King of France 1223-1226. On 23 May 1200 when Louis VIII was 12, he married Blanche of Castile, in Abbey of Port-Mort, Normandy.
29 Blanche of Castile. Born on 4 Mar 1188 in castle of Palencia, Castile. Blanche died in Melun on 26 Nov 1252, she was 64. brought the county of Evreux as her dowry (maritagium), through the arrangement between John of England and Amauri de Montfort, former Count of Evreux (later Earl of Gloucester - see #8656). name originally Blanca (Castilian), changed to Blanche due to her marriage in France
30 Ramon-Berengar IV of Provence. Born in 1198. Ramon-Berengar IV died on 19 Aug 1245, he was 47. Occupation: Count of Provence. also styled Ramon Berengar IV of Provence (evidently not including the brother of Alfonso II of Aragon/Alfons I of Provence in the list of Counts of Provence). In Dec 1220 when Ramon-Berengar IV was 22, he married Beatrice of Savoy.
31 Beatrice of Savoy. Born in 1198. Beatrice died in Dec 1266, she was 68.
32 Louis VIII of France. Born on 5 Sep 1187. Louis VIII died in Montpensier on 8 Nov 1226, he was 39. Occupation: King of France 1223-1226. On 23 May 1200 when Louis VIII was 12, he married Blanche of Castile, in Abbey of Port-Mort, Normandy.
33 Blanche of Castile. Born on 4 Mar 1188 in castle of Palencia, Castile. Blanche died in Melun on 26 Nov 1252, she was 64. brought the county of Evreux as her dowry (maritagium), through the arrangement between John of England and Amauri de Montfort, former Count of Evreux (later Earl of Gloucester - see #8656). name originally Blanca (Castilian), changed to Blanche due to her marriage in France
34 Ramon-Berengar IV of Provence. Born in 1198. Ramon-Berengar IV died on 19 Aug 1245, he was 47. Occupation: Count of Provence. also styled Ramon Berengar IV of Provence (evidently not including the brother of Alfonso II of Aragon/Alfons I of Provence in the list of Counts of Provence). In Dec 1220 when Ramon-Berengar IV was 22, he married Beatrice of Savoy.
35 Beatrice of Savoy. Born in 1198. Beatrice died in Dec 1266, she was 68.
36 Pedro II 'el Catolico' of Aragon. Pedro II died on 12 Sep 1213 in Battle of Muret. Occupation: King of Aragon and count of Catalonia 1196-1213.. Pere I, Count of Catalonia. crowned King of Aragon at Rome, 1204. joined Alfonso VIII of Castile, defeating Almohads at Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa (1212); maintained suzerainty over Carcassonne (accepted Simon de Montfort's fealty in 1209 after its fall in Albigensian crusade); killed in battle of Muret against Simon de Montfort, 1213. In 1204 Pedro II 'el Catolico' married Marie of Montpellier.
37 Marie of Montpellier. Born in 1182. Marie died in Rome on 21 Apr 1213, she was 31. Buried in Cathedral of St. Peter, Rome. heiress of Montpellier
38 Andrew II of Hungary. Andrew II died in 1235. Occupation: King of Hungary 1201-1235. King of Hungary. he m. lstly Gertrude of Meran, 2ndly Yolande de Courtenay. Andrew II married Yolande of Courtenay.
39 Yolande of Courtenay.
40 Louis VIII of France. Born on 5 Sep 1187. Louis VIII died in Montpensier on 8 Nov 1226, he was 39. Occupation: King of France 1223-1226. On 23 May 1200 when Louis VIII was 12, he married Blanche of Castile, in Abbey of Port-Mort, Normandy.
41 Blanche of Castile. Born on 4 Mar 1188 in castle of Palencia, Castile. Blanche died in Melun on 26 Nov 1252, she was 64. brought the county of Evreux as her dowry (maritagium), through the arrangement between John of England and Amauri de Montfort, former Count of Evreux (later Earl of Gloucester - see #8656). name originally Blanca (Castilian), changed to Blanche due to her marriage in France
42 Ramon-Berengar IV of Provence. Born in 1198. Ramon-Berengar IV died on 19 Aug 1245, he was 47. Occupation: Count of Provence. also styled Ramon Berengar IV of Provence (evidently not including the brother of Alfonso II of Aragon/Alfons I of Provence in the list of Counts of Provence) In Dec 1220 when Ramon-Berengar IV was 22, he married Beatrice of Savoy.
43 Beatrice of Savoy. Born in 1198. Beatrice died in Dec 1266, she was 68.
44 Bela IV of Hungary. Bela IV died on 3 May 1270. Occupation: King of Hungary 1235-1270. In 1218 Bela IV married Maria Lascaris.
45 Maria Lascaris. Maria died in 1270.
46 Kuthen of the Kumans. Occupation: Khan of the Kumans.
48 Hugh III of Burgundy. Hugh III died on 25 Aug 1192 in Tyre, Palestine (on crusade). Occupation: Duke of Burgundy 1162-1192. divorced from first wife Adelaide (or Alix), 1183. m. 2ndly Beatrix d'Albon, Dauphine of Vienne. follower of Philip of France in the Third Crusade commander of the French forces at the battle of Arsuf, 7 Sept 1191, bef 1166 Hugh III married Alix of Lorraine.
49 Alix of Lorraine.
1st wife
married before 1170 according to P. Theroff (shown here as 1166 or before: son Eudes born in 1166) divorced 1183
50 Hugh de Vergy. Hugh died in 1205. Occupation: seigneur de Vergy. Hugh married Gille de Trainel.
51 Gille de Trainel. Gille died aft 1224.
52 Robert II of Dreux. Born ca 1154. Robert II died on 28 Dec 1218, he was 64. Occupation: Count of Dreux 1188-1218. Count of Dreux and Braine. participant in Third Crusade (at Acre, 1191); fought for King Philip at Bouvines, 1214. In 1184 when Robert II was 30, he married Yolande de Coucy.
53 Yolande de Coucy. Born ca 1168. Yolande died on 18 Mar 1221, she was 53.
2nd wife
54 Thomas de St. Valery. Thomas died in 1219. of Tetbury, co. Glocs., Studley, co. Bucks., and Beckley and Horton, co. Oxon.
paid a fine for relief re: his father's lands in Beckley and Horton, 1191/2; 'deprived of his estates before 1197' [C. Phillips, citing VCH Gloucestershire 11: 264]; evidently opted for France and retained French lands (or had same restored) following the Pacification of 1204. fought at the Battle of Bouvines, 1214 Returned to the peace of King John and restored to his English lands, 1215. Thomas married Adela de Ponthieu.
55 Adela de Ponthieu. Adela died in 1241.
56 Philip II 'Augustus' of France. Born on 22 Aug 1165. Philip II 'Augustus' died in 1223, he was 57. Occupation: King of France 1180-1223. King of France, actual name was 'Philippe Auguste' [born in August]; leader of the Third Crusade (1190-1192) with Richard of England and the Emperor Frederick 'Barbarossa'
he m. lstly Isabella of Flanders (Hainaut),
2ndly Ingeborg of Denmark (repudiated),
3rdly Agnes of Meran (uncanonical/not recognized by Rome)
ca 1184 when Philip II 'Augustus' was 18, he married Isabel of Flanders.
57 Isabel of Flanders. Born ca 1170. Isabel died in 1190, she was 20.
1st wife
also called Isabel (Isabeau) of Hainault the county of Artois was her dowry
58 Alfonso VIII of Castile. Born abt 1155. Alfonso VIII died in Burgos, Castile on 6 Oct 1214, he was 59. Buried in Monastery of Las Huelgas, Castile. Occupation: King of Castile ca 1158-1214. defeated the Almohads at Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, 1214 in alliance with Peter (Pere) II of Aragon; In Sep 1177 when Alfonso VIII was 22, he married Eleanor of England, in Tarragona.
59 Eleanor of England. Born on 13 Oct 1162 in Domfront, Normandy. Eleanor died in Burgos, Castile on 31 Oct 1214, she was 52. Buried in Las Huelgas.
2nd daughter
60 Alfons II of Provence. Occupation: Count of Provence 1196-1209. Count of Forcalquier 1208-1209. In 1193 Alfons II married Gersinde of Sabran.
61 Gersinde of Sabran. heiress of Forcalquier
62 Thomas I of Savoy. Born on 20 May 1178 in Carbonnieres, Savoy [now France]. Thomas I died in Aosta, Savoy on 1 Mar 1232, he was 53. Buried in St-Michel de la Cluse, Aosta. Occupation: Count of Savoy 1188-1233. In May 1195 when Thomas I was 16, he married Margaret of Geneva.
63 Margaret of Geneva. Born ca 1180. Margaret died aft 1255, she was 75. identified in some older chronicles as Beatrice (note: her sister named Beatrice.)15"

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:22.
3. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia, London, 1990 , Hallam, Elizabeth; General Editor. 112.7
Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France was also known as John II "the Good" (?) King of France.16,4

; Per Genealogics:
     "Jean II 'the Good, king of France, was born on 26 April 1319, the son of Philippe VI, king of France, and Jeanne de Bourgogne. He was only thirteen when he married Judith of Bohemia, daughter of Johann 'the Blind' of Luxembourg, king of Bohemia, and Elisabeth of Bohemia. They had eleven children of whom four sons and three daughters would have progeny.
     "In 1350 Jean succeeded his father as king of France. His first act was the execution of the constable of France Raoul II de Brienne, comte d'Eu, for treason. He then conferred the office on his favourite, Charles de la Cerda. At Poitiers on 19 September 1356, the French army was overwhelmingly defeated by English forces under Edward, prince of Wales, and Jean II was captured.
     "He was taken to London in May 1357, and Edward III housed him in the Tower of London and treated him as an honoured guest. Edward III then negotiated with Jean II's son, the future King Charles V, who acted as regent in France. The ransom for Jean II was set at 700,000 pounds in the first Treaty of London of May 1358, which also called for French recognition of English sovereignty over Aquitaine and parts of northern France.
     "Charles rejected Edward III's terms and Jean II remained in English hands until 1360 when, at the end of a brief campaign in France, Edward III resumed negotiations at Brétigny. By the Treaty of Brétigny in May 1360 Jean II was ransomed for 500,000 pounds, a sum for which a group of hostages, including his second son Louis, was sent as surety to England until payment had been completed. Louis escaped from English captivity in 1364, and in accordance with the chivalric code Jean II returned to England, where he died later the same year."17,7

; This is the same person as:
”John II of France” at Wikipedia and as
”Jean II le Bon” at Wikipédia (Fr.)8,18

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 20): “B1. King JEAN II "le Bon" of France (1350-64), cr Reims 26.9.1350, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne 1331, *Château de Gué-de-Maulin 26.4.1319, +a prisoner in London 8.4.1364, bur St.Denis; 1m: Melun 6.8.1332 Judith=Bonne de Luxembourg (*21.5.1315, +11.9.1349) dau.of King Johann of Bohemia; 2m: Nanterre 19.2.1349 Jeanne, Cts d'Auvergne et de Boulogne (*1326, +Château d'Argily 21.11.1361, bur St.Denis) dau.of Cte Guillaume XII”.3 He was Duke of Normandy between 1332 and 1350.8 He was Count of Anjou and Maine between 1332 and 1350.8 He was King of France, JOHN II (the Good Fellow), a “good knight and a mediocre king,” a spendthrift who repeatedly debased the currency.

1356: The Black Prince (the English “model of chivalry”) defeated John, the last “chivalrous” king of France, at Poitiers (Sept. 19). Royal authority in France was reduced to a shadow; civil chaos reigned. Charles, the 18-year-old son of John, became regent. between 1350 and 1364.19,4

Family 1

Judith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg b. 20 May 1315, d. 11 Sep 1349
Children

Family 2

Jeanne (?) Cts d'Auvergne et de Boulogne b. 8 May 1326, d. 29 Sep 1360
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 57. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000226&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000225&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#Juttadied1349. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013790&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 October 2019), memorial page for John II of France (16 Apr 1319–8 Apr 1364), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21082, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21082/john_ii_of_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg9.html
  15. [S1523] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 23 Aug 2003: "Re: Margaret, wife of Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Aug 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 23 Aug 2003."
  16. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38954
  17. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 205-206. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Jean II le Bon: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_II_le_Bon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 244. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVdied1380B
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe 'the Bold': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002121&tree=LEO
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38966

Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France1,2,3

M, #23172, b. between 21 January 1337 and 1338, d. 16 September 1380
FatherJean II "le Bon" (?) King of France1,3,4,5 b. 26 Apr 1319, d. 8 Apr 1364
MotherJudith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg1,3,6,5 b. 20 May 1315, d. 11 Sep 1349
Last Edited8 Dec 2020
     Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France was born between 21 January 1337 and 1338 at Chateau de Vincennes, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France.3,1,7,8,9,5 He married Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France, daughter of Pierre I (?) Duc de Bourbon and Isabelle de Valois, on 8 April 1350 at Tain-en-Viennois, France,
; Per Med Lands "contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350."1,3,10,8,5
Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France died on 16 September 1380 at Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France.1,7,9,8,5
Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France was buried after 16 September 1380 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     31 Jan 1338, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     16 Sep 1380 (aged 42), Nogent-sur-Marne, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     French Monarch. Born at Vicennes, France, the eldest son of Jean II, King of France and Bonne Judith de Luxembourg. He was the first heir apparent of France to bear the title Dauphin. He married Jeanne de Bourbon in April 1350, and with her had at least nine children, six of whom predeceased him. With his father's capture at the Battle of Poitiers, Charles served as Regent during the king's imprisonment in England. He rejected a 1359 treaty the king signed while being held, eventually forcing the English to reduce terms. He succeeded to the title of King Charles V of France in 1364 at the death of his father. He spent much of his reign attempting to disperse the marauding bands of discharged soldiers in the country side, and recovering the territories ceded to the English; where he could, he negotiated with towns and cities to bring them back under the French crown. By 1374, he had recovered all of France except Calais and Aquitaine. A patron of the arts, he established the royal library and worked to embellish the Louvre. In 1376, when Pope Gregory XI decided to move his court back to Rome after nearly 70 years in Avignon, he ignored Charles' entreaties to remain in France. With Gregory's death 18 months later, Roman mobs surrounded the Vatican and demanded they elect a Roman, resulting in the election of Pope Urban VI; the majority French cardinals later declared the election invalid and voted for Pope Clement VII. Charles recognized Clement as Pope and forbade obedience to Urban in his kingdom, leading to the Papal Schism. The king died the following year, at the age of 42, and was succeeded by his 12-year-old son. He was also known as Charles the Wise. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
      John II of France 1319–1364
      Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
     Spouse
      Jeanne de Bourbon 1338–1378
     Siblings
      Louis I d'Anjou 1339–1384
      Jean I de Berry 1340–1416
      Philip II of Burgundy 1342–1404
      Jeanne de France 1343–1373
      Marie Princesse de France de Bar 1344–1404
      Isabelle de France 1348–1373
     Children
      Jeanne de Valois 1366–1366
      Charles VI 1368–1422
      Louis of Orleans 1372–1407
      Isabelle de Valois 1373–1378
      Catherine de France 1378–1388
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21051.1,7
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Charles was born on 21 January 1337, the son of Jean II 'the Good', king of France, and Judith of Bohemia. As crown prince he was the first to bear the title of Dauphin, a name derived from the Dauphiné, an area his grandfather Philippe VI had acquired in 1349.
     "He was more a scholar than a warrior, and his health may have been damaged by a poisoning attempt. Poet Christine de Pisan referred to his beautiful chestnut eyes, his pale skin, even temper and pleasant voice. In 1356 while his father was imprisoned in England he acted as regent. However, the parliament refused to give money for the war with England without the promise of administrative reforms. The ensuing unrest in 1358 resulted in opposition led by Charles II 'the Bad' of Navarre, which was further escalated by the 'Jacquerie', a peasant revolt.
     "When in 1359 Charles revoked the Treaty of London signed by his imprisoned father, his parliament at last supported him and the peasants were brutally suppressed. In 1364, after his father had died a prisoner in London, he became king, and under his constable Bertrand Du Guesclin the royal French armies started to force the English to retreat.
     "At thirteen he had married the plump and slightly unstable Jeanne de Bourbon, daughter of Pierre I, duc de Bourbon, and Isabelle de Valois. In their early years he preferred his mistress Biette Cassinel, but once he was king he became and remained faithful to his wife. After the birth of their ninth child in February 1377, Jeanne died, leaving him grief-stricken.
     "Two years later, suffering from gout in both hands and feet, he succumbed to kidney failure and died on 16 September 1380 at Beauté-sur-Vincennes, aged forty-three. He was succeeded by his son Charles VI."8

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:22.8

; This is the same person as:
”Charles V of France” at Wikipedia and as
”Charles V le Sage” at Wikipédia (Fr.)9,11

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 20): “C1. CHARLES V "le Sage" of France (1364-80), *Château de Vincennes 21.1.1337, +Château de Beaute-sur-Marne 1380, bur St.Denis; m.Tain-en-Viennois Jeanne de Bourbon (*1339 +1378)"


Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 22): “C2. Jeanne, *Vincennes 1339, +Paris 1378, bur St.Denis; m.Tain-en-Viennois 1350 King Charles V of France (*21.1.1337 +1380)”.12,13

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES de France, son of JEAN de France Duc de Guyenne [later JEAN II "le Bon" King of France] & his first wife Jutta [Bonne] of Bohemia [Luxembourg] (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Chronique Parisienne records the birth “vigille de feste saint Vincent...au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1338 of “Charles filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normandie et de ma dame Bonne sa fame fille le conte de Lucembourc”[1015]. Zurita records negotiations in 1349 for the betrothal of “la Infanta doña Costança hija mayor del Rey de Aragon” and “el hijo mayor de Juan Duque de Normandia hijo primogenito del Rey Filippo de Francia”[1016]. He was invested as Dauphin de Viennois 16 Jul 1349, after Humbert II Dauphin de Viennois ceded his territories 30 Mar 1349, called thereafter "Monsieur le Dauphin". The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that his father knighted “Charles son ainsné filz, dalphin de Vienne” after his coronation in 1350[1017]. Comte de Poitiers 1354. Duc de Normandie 7 Dec 1355, installed at Notre-Dame de Rouen 10 Jan 1356. He took the title "Lieutenant du Roi" during the imprisonment of his father after the battle of Poitiers 1356, and that of regent 14 Mar 1358 until his father's release in 1360. Duc de Touraine, after his brother Philippe's nomination as Duke of Burgundy in 1363. He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 19 May 1364. He confiscated the duchy of Guyenne from the king of England 30 Nov 1369, war with England having broken out once more. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 16 Sep 1380 “en l’ostel de Beauté-sur-Marne” of “le roy de France Charles...le V” and his burial “à Saint-Denys”[1018].
     "m (contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350) JEANNE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Isabelle de Valois (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The marriage contract of "Jehan ainsnez fils du Roy de France, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne…Charles de France nostre ainsnez fils" and "Pierre Duc de Bourbonnois conte de Clermont et de la Marche…Jehanne de Bourbon nostre ainsnée fille" is dated Jul 1349[1019]. Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon” married “el Rey de Francia Don Carlos” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[1020]. She was consecrated Queen of France with her husband 19 May 1364. She died from a fever following childbirth. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 8 Feb 1377 (O.S.) of “la...Royne...ou...hostel de Saint-Pol” and her burial “à Saint-Denis”[1021].
     "The possibility that Biette de Cassinel, wife of Gérard de Montaigu, was the mistress of the future King Charles V is discussed in the document PARIS REGION - CORBEIL & ROCHEFORT.
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of the king’s mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[1015] Chronique Parisienne, 291, p. 173.
[1016] Zurita, J. (1668) Anales de la Corona de Aragon (Zaragoza), Tome II, lib. VIII, XXXIV, fol. 234 (first page).
[1017] Delachenal, Tome I (1910), p. 25.
[1018] Delachenal, Tome II (1916), p. 382.
[1019] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné (Geneva), Tome II, CCLXXVII, p. 607.
[1020] López de Ayala, P. (1779) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Secundo, Cap. XV, p. 53.
[1021] Delachenal, Tome II (1916), p. 278.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "JEANNE de Bourbon (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). [Gilles de Roye’s Annales Belgici record the marriages in 1347 in Paris of “duo filii ducis Brabantiæ...Henricus primogenitus filiam ducis Normanniæ et Godefridus filiam ducis Borbonii”[226]. The identity of the betrothed of Godefroi de Brabant is not specified. However, it was probably Jeanne if she was her father’s oldest daughter and therefore most likely the first to have been betrothed.] The marriage contract of "Dom. Humberti Dalphini Vienn." and "Dom. Johannam primogenitam Dom. Ducis [Borbonesii]" is dated 24 Jun 1348[227]. The marriage contract of "Jehan ainsnez fils du Roy de France, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne…Charles de France nostre ainsnez fils" and "Pierre Duc de Bourbonnois conte de Clermont et de la Marche…Jehanne de Bourbon nostre ainsnée fille" is dated Jul 1349[228]. Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon” married “el Rey de Francia Don Carlos” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[229]. She was crowned Queen of France with her husband 19 May 1364. She died from a fever following childbirth. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 8 Feb 1377 (O.S.) of “la...Royne...ou...hostel de Saint-Pol” and her burial “à Saint-Denis”[230].
     "[Betrothed (Paris 1347) to GODEFROI de Brabant, son of JEAN III Duke of Brabant & his wife Marie d'Evreux (-after 3 Feb 1352, bur Tervueren).]
     "Betrothed (24 Jun 1348) to HUMBERT [II] Dauphin de Viennois, son of JEAN [II] Comte d’Albon Dauphin de Viennois [la Tour du Pin] & his wife Béatrice of Hungary ([1312]-Clermont-en-Auvergne 22 May 1355, bur Paris Dominican convent).
     "m (contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350) CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois, son of JEAN de France Duc de Guyenne [later JEAN II "le Bon" King of France] & his first wife Jutta [Bonne] of Bohemia [Luxembourg] (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). Comte de Poitiers 1354. Duc de Normandie 7 Dec 1355. He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V King of France."
Med Lands cites:
[226] Sweerts, F. (1620) Rerum Belgicarum Annales Chronici et Historici (Frankfurt), Tome I, Ægidii de Roya Annales Belgici, 1347, p. 61.
[227] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné (Geneva), Tome II, CCLXII, p. 576.
[228] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCLXXVII, p. 607.
[229] López de Ayala, P. (1779) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Secundo, Cap. XV, p. 53.
[230] Delachenal, R. (1916) Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V, Tome II (Paris), p. 278.14


; Per Racines et Histoire (Bourbon): “Jeanne de Bourbon ° 03/02/1339 (Vincennes) + 06/02/1378 (Hôtel Saint-Pol, Paris) Reine de France (couronnée 19/05/1364)
     fiancée 24/06/1348 à Humbert II Dauphin du Viennois ° 1312 + 22/05/1355 (Clermont) (fils de Jean II, comte d’Albon et de Béatrice de Hongrie)
     ép. (c.m.) 06/1349 (Lyon) & 08/04/1350 (Tain-enViennois) Charles, Dauphin de France puis Roi Charles V (1364) ° 21/01/1338 (Vincennes) + 16/09/1380 (Beauté-sur-Marne) comte de Poitiers (1354), duc de Normandie (07/12/1355) (fils de Jean II «Le Bon» et de Judith (Jutta, Bonne) de Bohême)”.15 He was Dauphin de Viennois between 1350 and 1368.11 He was Duc de Normandie between 1355 and 1364.9

; Per Enc. of World History (Online):
     “"CHARLES V (the Wise), neither strong of body, handsome, nor chivalrous; a pious, refined, realistic statesman of “modern” cast. He saved France and made it plain that national well-being depended on the monarchy rather than on the Estates General.
     “The reign opened with bad harvests, plague, and pillage by the free companies. The Breton Bertrand Du Guesclin, the first great soldier on the French side in the Hundred Years' War, was sent with some 30,000 men to support Henry of Trastamara against Pedro the Cruel of Castile, who had become an ally of the Black Prince.
     “Charles managed to dominate the new financial machinery set up by the Estates General, continued the war levies (e.g., hearth tax, gabelle, sales taxes) and utilized the peace for general reform and reconstruction: castles were rebuilt, and royal control of them strengthened; permanent companies of professional cavalry and infantry were established; artillery was organized and supported by pioneers and sappers; a military staff and hierarchy of command was established in the army (1374); the navy was reorganized, and French sea power restored. New walls were built around Paris.
     “The grant from the estate of Langue d'Oïl (1360) for John's ransom had been for a term of six years; the grant of a hearth tax (1363) was without a time limit. Following these precedents, Charles was able (1369) to induce the estates to agree to the general principle that old grants of funds need not be renewed by the estates unless their terms were to be changed. This freed the king from control by the estates unless new taxes were needed, and it meant that the estates no longer had a vital function. The financial control established by the estates (1357) was transferred to the royal chambre de comptes in Paris.
     “1369: The appeal of the count of Armagnac to Charles against the Black Prince and the Black Prince's refusal to appear at Charles's court served as an excuse for the resumption of the war. The reconquest of Poitou and Brittany (1370-72) was followed by the death of the Black Prince (1376); the French fleet, supported by the Castilian, regained control (La Rochelle, 1372) of the Channel, and blocked English transport in the north. By 1380 the English held only Bordeaux, Bayonne, Brest, Calais, Cherbourg, Valais, and their immediately surrounding territory. France was cleared of the enemy, but it was in ruins."16,3

Family 1

Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France b. 3 Feb 1339, d. 6 Feb 1378
Children

Family 2

Unknown Mistress (?)
Child

Family 3

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 246. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000225&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVdied1380B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 October 2019), memorial page for Charles V (31 Jan 1338–16 Sep 1380), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21051, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21051/charles_v. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000224&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_V_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourbon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001541&tree=LEO
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Charles V le Sage: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_V_le_Sage. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html#JP1
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#Jeannedied1378
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Bourbon, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-duche.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  16. [S4773] The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (online), online <http://worldhistory.50webs.com/index.html>, http://worldhistory.50webs.com/521.html. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  17. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I34403
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVIdied1422B

Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France1,2

F, #23173, b. 3 February 1339, d. 6 February 1378
FatherPierre I (?) Duc de Bourbon3,2,1,4 b. 1311, d. 1356
MotherIsabelle de Valois2,1,5,4 b. c 1313, d. 26 Jul 1383
ReferenceEDV17
Last Edited29 Jun 2020
     Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France was born on 3 February 1339 at Château du Bois de Vincennes, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France; Genealogy.EU (Capet 22 page) says b. 1339.3,1,6,7,4 She and Godfried (?) of Brabant were engaged in 1347 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now).4,8 Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France and Humbert II (?) Dauphin de Viennois were engaged on 24 June 1348.4,9 Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France married Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France, son of Jean II "le Bon" (?) King of France and Judith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg, on 8 April 1350 at Tain-en-Viennois, France,
; Per Med Lands "contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350."10,3,6,11,12
Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France died on 6 February 1378 at Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, at age 39; Louda & Maclagan (Table 62) and Genealogics say d. 6 Feb 1377. Find A Grave and Wikipedia say d. 6 Feb 1378.3,1,6,7,13,4
Jeanne (?) de Bourbon, Queen of France was buried after 6 February 1378 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; Per Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     3 Feb 1338, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     6 Feb 1378 (aged 40), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     French Monarch. Daughter of Pierre I de Bourbon and Isabelle de Valois, a half sister of King Philippe VI who was also grand-father of her furture husband. Jeanne and Charles where both born in Vincennes. Charles parents where her godparents. In 1350 they where married, both only 12 years old. In the same year Philippe VI died and was succeeded by is son Jean II. Charles and Jeanne are named Monseigneur le Dauphin and Madame la Dauphine, titles all successors to the french throne and their wives wore from then on. It is probably due to the fact that they were raised together that her marriage was happy and full of love. In 1364 Jean II died an a english prison and in May Charles and Jeanne were crowned in Reims. During Charles reign the english troops are mostly defeated and have to leave most of France. From the eight children, six girls and two boys, she gave birth to only the boys survived their childhood. The first one, Charles succeeded his father and Louis founded the branch Valois-Orleans, his grandson was Louis XII. She died after giving birth to her eight child and was deeply mourned by her husband. Her heart was buried in the convent of the Cordeliers and her entrails in the Church of the Celestines in Paris. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Pierre I de Bourbon 1311–1356
          Isabelle de Valois 1313–1383
     Spouse
          Charles V 1338–1380
     Siblings
          Louis II de Bourbon 1337–1410
          Blanche de Bourbon 1339–1361
          Bonne de Bourbon 1340–1402
          Catherine de Bourbon 1342–1427
     Children
          Jeanne de Valois 1366–1366
          Charles VI 1368–1422
          Louis of Orleans 1372–1407
          Isabelle de Valois 1373–1378
          Catherine de France 1378–1388
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21084.7
      ; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 20): “C1. CHARLES V "le Sage" of France (1364-80), *Château de Vincennes 21.1.1337, +Château de Beaute-sur-Marne 1380, bur St.Denis; m.Tain-en-Viennois Jeanne de Bourbon (*1339 +1378)"


Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 22): “C2. Jeanne, *Vincennes 1339, +Paris 1378, bur St.Denis; m.Tain-en-Viennois 1350 King Charles V of France (*21.1.1337 +1380)”.14,15

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES de France, son of JEAN de France Duc de Guyenne [later JEAN II "le Bon" King of France] & his first wife Jutta [Bonne] of Bohemia [Luxembourg] (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Chronique Parisienne records the birth “vigille de feste saint Vincent...au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1338 of “Charles filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normandie et de ma dame Bonne sa fame fille le conte de Lucembourc”[1015]. Zurita records negotiations in 1349 for the betrothal of “la Infanta doña Costança hija mayor del Rey de Aragon” and “el hijo mayor de Juan Duque de Normandia hijo primogenito del Rey Filippo de Francia”[1016]. He was invested as Dauphin de Viennois 16 Jul 1349, after Humbert II Dauphin de Viennois ceded his territories 30 Mar 1349, called thereafter "Monsieur le Dauphin". The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that his father knighted “Charles son ainsné filz, dalphin de Vienne” after his coronation in 1350[1017]. Comte de Poitiers 1354. Duc de Normandie 7 Dec 1355, installed at Notre-Dame de Rouen 10 Jan 1356. He took the title "Lieutenant du Roi" during the imprisonment of his father after the battle of Poitiers 1356, and that of regent 14 Mar 1358 until his father's release in 1360. Duc de Touraine, after his brother Philippe's nomination as Duke of Burgundy in 1363. He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 19 May 1364. He confiscated the duchy of Guyenne from the king of England 30 Nov 1369, war with England having broken out once more. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 16 Sep 1380 “en l’ostel de Beauté-sur-Marne” of “le roy de France Charles...le V” and his burial “à Saint-Denys”[1018].
     "m (contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350) JEANNE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Isabelle de Valois (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The marriage contract of "Jehan ainsnez fils du Roy de France, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne…Charles de France nostre ainsnez fils" and "Pierre Duc de Bourbonnois conte de Clermont et de la Marche…Jehanne de Bourbon nostre ainsnée fille" is dated Jul 1349[1019]. Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon” married “el Rey de Francia Don Carlos” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[1020]. She was consecrated Queen of France with her husband 19 May 1364. She died from a fever following childbirth. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 8 Feb 1377 (O.S.) of “la...Royne...ou...hostel de Saint-Pol” and her burial “à Saint-Denis”[1021].
     "The possibility that Biette de Cassinel, wife of Gérard de Montaigu, was the mistress of the future King Charles V is discussed in the document PARIS REGION - CORBEIL & ROCHEFORT.
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of the king’s mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[1015] Chronique Parisienne, 291, p. 173.
[1016] Zurita, J. (1668) Anales de la Corona de Aragon (Zaragoza), Tome II, lib. VIII, XXXIV, fol. 234 (first page).
[1017] Delachenal, Tome I (1910), p. 25.
[1018] Delachenal, Tome II (1916), p. 382.
[1019] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné (Geneva), Tome II, CCLXXVII, p. 607.
[1020] López de Ayala, P. (1779) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Secundo, Cap. XV, p. 53.
[1021] Delachenal, Tome II (1916), p. 278.12


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 23.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:22.6


; This is the same person as:
”Joanna of Bourbon” at Wikipedia and as
”Jeanne de Bourbon (1338-1378)” at Wikipédia (Fr.)13,16 EDV-17.

; Per Genealogics: "Jeanne was born in 1338 in Vincennes, the daughter of Pierre I, duc de Bourbon, and Isabelle de Valois. By her marriage on 8 April 1350 at Tain-l'Hermitage with the future Charles V, king of France, she became queen of France from 1364 to 1378. Her marriage to King Charles V resulted in nine children of whom two sons, Charles and Louis, would have progeny. Jeanne died on 6 February 1378 in Paris, giving birth to her daughter Catherine."6

; Per Med Lands:
     "JEANNE de Bourbon (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). [Gilles de Roye’s Annales Belgici record the marriages in 1347 in Paris of “duo filii ducis Brabantiæ...Henricus primogenitus filiam ducis Normanniæ et Godefridus filiam ducis Borbonii”[226]. The identity of the betrothed of Godefroi de Brabant is not specified. However, it was probably Jeanne if she was her father’s oldest daughter and therefore most likely the first to have been betrothed.] The marriage contract of "Dom. Humberti Dalphini Vienn." and "Dom. Johannam primogenitam Dom. Ducis [Borbonesii]" is dated 24 Jun 1348[227]. The marriage contract of "Jehan ainsnez fils du Roy de France, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne…Charles de France nostre ainsnez fils" and "Pierre Duc de Bourbonnois conte de Clermont et de la Marche…Jehanne de Bourbon nostre ainsnée fille" is dated Jul 1349[228]. Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon” married “el Rey de Francia Don Carlos” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[229]. She was crowned Queen of France with her husband 19 May 1364. She died from a fever following childbirth. The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the death 8 Feb 1377 (O.S.) of “la...Royne...ou...hostel de Saint-Pol” and her burial “à Saint-Denis”[230].
     "[Betrothed (Paris 1347) to GODEFROI de Brabant, son of JEAN III Duke of Brabant & his wife Marie d'Evreux (-after 3 Feb 1352, bur Tervueren).]
     "Betrothed (24 Jun 1348) to HUMBERT [II] Dauphin de Viennois, son of JEAN [II] Comte d’Albon Dauphin de Viennois [la Tour du Pin] & his wife Béatrice of Hungary ([1312]-Clermont-en-Auvergne 22 May 1355, bur Paris Dominican convent).
     "m (contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350) CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois, son of JEAN de France Duc de Guyenne [later JEAN II "le Bon" King of France] & his first wife Jutta [Bonne] of Bohemia [Luxembourg] (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). Comte de Poitiers 1354. Duc de Normandie 7 Dec 1355. He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V King of France."
Med Lands cites:
[226] Sweerts, F. (1620) Rerum Belgicarum Annales Chronici et Historici (Frankfurt), Tome I, Ægidii de Roya Annales Belgici, 1347, p. 61.
[227] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné (Geneva), Tome II, CCLXII, p. 576.
[228] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCLXXVII, p. 607.
[229] López de Ayala, P. (1779) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Secundo, Cap. XV, p. 53.
[230] Delachenal, R. (1916) Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V, Tome II (Paris), p. 278.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Bourbon): “Jeanne de Bourbon ° 03/02/1339 (Vincennes) + 06/02/1378 (Hôtel Saint-Pol, Paris) Reine de France (couronnée 19/05/1364)
     fiancée 24/06/1348 à Humbert II Dauphin du Viennois ° 1312 + 22/05/1355 (Clermont) (fils de Jean II, comte d’Albon et de Béatrice de Hongrie)
     ép. (c.m.) 06/1349 (Lyon) & 08/04/1350 (Tain-enViennois) Charles, Dauphin de France puis Roi Charles V (1364) ° 21/01/1338 (Vincennes) + 16/09/1380 (Beauté-sur-Marne) comte de Poitiers (1354), duc de Normandie (07/12/1355) (fils de Jean II «Le Bon» et de Judith (Jutta, Bonne) de Bohême)”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "GODEFROI (-after 3 Feb 1352, bur Tervueren). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names "Johannem, Henricum et Godefridum" as the three sons of "Johannes tertius" and his wife "Mariam filiam Ludowici comitis Eboracensis"[439]. Heer van Aarschot 1346.
     "Betrothed (Paris 1347) to [JEANNE] de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE Duc de Bourbon & his wife Isabelle de Valois (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). Gilles de Roye’s Annales Belgici record the marriages in 1347 in Paris of “duo filii ducis Brabantiæ...Henricus primogenitus filiam ducis Normanniæ et Godefridus filiam ducis Borbonii”[440]. The identity of the betrothed of Godefroi de Brabant is not specified. However, it was probably Jeanne if she was her father’s oldest daughter and therefore most likely the first to have been betrothed.]"
Med Lands cites:
[439] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 72.
[440] Ægidii de Roya Annales Belgici (1620), 1347, p. 61.8

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUMBERT [II] ([1312]-Clermont-en-Auvergne 22 May 1355, bur Paris Dominican convent). The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus names "Guigonem et Humbertum" as the sons of "Ioanni" and his wife[386]. He succeeded his brother in 1333 as Dauphin de Viennois. "Humbertus Dalphinus Viennensis, dux Campisauri, Vienne et Albonis comes ac palatinus" donated property to Cremieu monastery, founded by "dominum Joannem Delphinum quondam patrem nostrum", with the consent of "B. matris eius", by charter dated 7 Feb 1337[387]. A charter dated 31 Jul 1343 records an agreement between "Dominus Humbertus Dalphinus Viennensis" agreed with "dominus Philippus de Vienna dominus de Pymont et Guido de Vienna eius filius primogenitus, consanguinei eiusdem domini Delphini" about the inheritance of "domina Margareta de Montelupello, uxore quondam eiusdem domini Philippi…filia Guidonis quondam domini Montislupelli"[388]. He became a Dominican monk at Beauvoir in 1343[389]. Appointed leader of a crusade against Umur Pasha, he left from Marseille in May 1345, but his fleet was attacked by the Genoese near Rhodes[390]. The testament of "Dom. Humb. Dalph. Vienn. Sedis Apst. Capitaneus Generalis" is dated 29 Jan 1347 at Rhodos, provided a pension for "Dom. Mariæ de Baucio Dalph. Vienn…consorti meæ", and made bequests to "Hugoni de Gebennis Dom. de Antone et de Varey…consanguineo meo…Galiaco de Salutiis…nepoti meo…Dom. Johannis bastardo quondam…Dom. Guigonis Dalphini fratris mei…Amedeo bastardo meo…Johanni bastardo de Fucigniaco…Humberto de Fucigniaco…Dom. Politæ uxori Dom. Hugonis de Gebennis…Dom. Guillelmæ Alamandi…bastardæ meæ quæ est in monasterio de Salectis…nepti meæ filiæ principis Auraicæ moniali de Salectis ordinis Cartusiensis…"[391]. He returned to France having achieved nothing, before the crusading army defeated a Turkish army at Smyrna[392]. He abdicated as Dauphin 16 Jul 1349 in favour of the king of France, to whom he sold the Dauphiné for 400,000 écus and an annual pension[393]. He adopted the titles Prince de Briançonnois, Duc de Champsor, and Marquis de Cézane. He was awarded the titles Patriarch of Alexandria and Perpetual administrator of the archiepiscopal church of Reims[394]. The testament of "Dominus Humbertus…Patriarcha Alexandrinus, administrator perpetuus ecclesiæ Remensis et Dalphinus antiquior Vienn." is dated 21 May 1355 and chose his burial "in ecclesia Fratrum Prædictorum Parisiens. juxta sepulchrum bonæ memoriæ Dom. Clementiæ quondam Reginæ Franciæ amitæ nostræ"[395]. The necrology of Vauvert records the death "X Kal Jun" of "patriarcha Alexandrinus quondam delphinus Viennensis postea archiepiscopus Remensis"[396].
     "m (after 26 Jul 1332) MARIE de Baux, daughter of BERTRAND de Baux, Seigneur de Berre, Conte d'Andria e di Montescaglioso & his first wife Béatrice of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (-Rhodes [Feb/Apr] 1347). The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records the marriage of "Humbertus Delphinus" and "Mariam Bauciam comitis Montis Campi filiam, Roberti regis Siciliæ neptem"[397]. "Roberti…Hierusalem et Siciliæ Regis" granted revenue to "Dom. Humbertus Dalphini…nepos noster" in consideration of his marriage with "Domicella Maria nata…Bertrandi de Baucio Montis Caveosi comitis nepte nostra" by charter dated 26 Jul 1332[398]. The Chronicle of Matthias Nuewenburgensis records that "Delphini Viennenses…iunior Humbertus" married "filiam sororis Roberti regis…[et] [comitis] Novellus"[399]. The testament of "Dom. Humb. Dalph. Vienn. Sedis Apst. Capitaneus Generalis" is dated 29 Jan 1347 at Rhodos provided a pension for "Dom. Mariæ de Baucio Dalph. Vienn…consorti meæ"[400]. Pope Clement VI sent letters of condolence to "Humberto Dalphino Vienn." on the death of "quondam Mariam conjugem tuam" dated 15 May 1347[401].
     "Betrothed (1347) to BLANCHE MARIE de Savoie, daughter of AYMON Comte de Savoie & his wife Violanta di Monferrato ([1335]-Pavia 31 Dec 1387, bur Pavia Santa Chiara). The marriage contract of "Dom. Dalphini" and "Dom. Blanchæ" is dated 15 May 1347 and provides for a dowry given by "Dom. comes Sabaudiæ…dictæ…Blanchæ sorori suæ"[402].
     "Betrothed (24 Jun 1348) to JEANNE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE Duc de Bourbon & his wife Isabelle de Valois (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The marriage contract of "Dom. Humberti Dalphini Vienn." and "Dom. Johannam primogenitam Dom. Ducis [Borbonesii]" is dated 24 Jun 1348[403]."
Med Lands cites:
[386] De Allobrogibus VIII, p. 457.
[387] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, XXIII, p. 218.
[388] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria II, XXII, p. 215.
[389] ES III 115.
[390] Sturdza (1999), p. 504, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 452.
[391] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCXXXIX, p. 541.
[392] Sturdza (1999), p. 504, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 452.
[393] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCLXXIV, p. 594.
[394] Sturdza (1999), p. 504.
[395] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCLXXXVII, p. 618.
[396] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 700.
[397] De Allobrogibus VIII, p. 469.
[398] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, I, p. 238.
[399] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 216.
[400] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCXXXIX, p. 541.
[401] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCXLIII, p. 554.
[402] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, CCLI, p. 569.9

Family 1

Godfried (?) of Brabant b. c 1332, d. a 2 Mar 1352

Family 2

Humbert II (?) Dauphin de Viennois b. 1312, d. 22 May 1355

Family 3

Charles V "le Sage" (?) King of France b. bt 21 Jan 1337 - 1338, d. 16 Sep 1380
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 65: France - House of Bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#Jeannedied1378. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002076&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourbon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001541&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Jeanne de Bourbon (3 Feb 1338–6 Feb 1378), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21084, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21084/jeanne-de_bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#GodefroiBrabantdied1352.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkvien.htm#HumbertIIdied1355
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000224&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVdied1380B
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_of_Bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html#JP1
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Jeanne de Bourbon (1338-1378): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeanne_de_Bourbon_(1338-1378). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Bourbon, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-duche.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  18. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I34403
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVIdied1422B

Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France1,2

M, #23174, b. 1403, d. 22 July 1461
FatherCharles VI "le Bien-Aime/le Fol" (?) King of France3,2,1,4,5 b. 3 Dec 1368, d. 22 Oct 1422
MotherIsabeau/Elisabeth (?) Duchess of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, Queen of France3,1,6 b. bt 1369 - 1370, d. 24 Sep 1435
Last Edited29 Jun 2020
     Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France was born in 1403.2,1 He married Marie (?) d'Anjou, daughter of Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples and Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel, in 1422.7,2,1

Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France died on 22 July 1461 at Chateau de Mehun-de-Yevre, France.1,2
Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France was buried after 22 July 1461 at St. Denis, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.1
      ; King CHARLES VII "le Victorieux" of France (1422-61), *Paris 1403, +Chaâteau de Mehun-de-Yevre 22.7.1461, bur St.Denis; m.1422 Maria of Naples (*1404 +1463.)1 He was King of France: CHARLES VII (the Roi de Bourges, not crowned until 1429). Physically weak, bowed, and lethargic from misfortune; the puppet of unscrupulous advisers until the advent of a better group. Regency of the duke of Bedford (1422-28) for the infant Henry VI of England, who was recognized as king of France in the north, supported by the Burgundians, and crowned in Paris (1436). between 1422 and 1461.8,2

Family

Marie (?) d'Anjou b. 1404, d. 1463
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38948
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles VI 'the Mad': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001542&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#CharlesVIdied1422B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabeau von Bayern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001543&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 246. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 262.
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême.

Marie (?) d'Anjou1

F, #23175, b. 1404, d. 1463
FatherLouis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples1 b. 5 Oct 1377, d. 29 Apr 1417
MotherViolante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel1 b. 1380, d. 1443
Last Edited13 Oct 2003
     Marie (?) d'Anjou was born in 1404.2,1 She married Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France, son of Charles VI "le Bien-Aime/le Fol" (?) King of France and Isabeau/Elisabeth (?) Duchess of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, Queen of France, in 1422.1,2,3

Marie (?) d'Anjou died in 1463 at Abbaye de Chateliers-en-Poitou, France.2,1
Marie (?) d'Anjou was buried in 1463 at St. Denis, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.1
      ; Marie, *1404, +Abbaye de Chateliers-en-Poitou 1463, bur St.Denis; m.Bourges 1422 King Charles VII of France (+1461.)1

Family

Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France b. 1403, d. 22 Jul 1461
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  4. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 262. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême.

Charlotte (?) of Savoy1,2

F, #23176, b. 11 November 1441, d. 1 December 1483
FatherLouis/Ludovico I (?) Duke of Savoy, Count of Aosta, Moriana and Nice, Principe del Piemonte1,2,3 b. 24 Feb 1413, d. 29 Jan 1465
MotherAnne de Lusignan Princess of Cyprus2 b. c 24 Sep 1419, d. 11 Nov 1462
Last Edited17 Sep 2004
     Charlotte (?) of Savoy was born on 11 November 1441.2 She married Louis XI "le Prudent" (?) King of France, son of Charles VII "le Victorieux" (?) King of France and Marie (?) d'Anjou, on 9 March 1451
; his 2nd wife.1,4,2
Charlotte (?) of Savoy died on 1 December 1483 at age 42.2
Charlotte (?) of Savoy was buried after 1 December 1483 at Clery .2
      ; Charlotte, *11.11.1441, +Amboise 1.12.1483, bur Clery; m.Chambéry 9.3.1451/57 King Louis XI of France (*3.7.1432 +30.8.1483.)2

Family

Louis XI "le Prudent" (?) King of France b. 3 Jul 1423, d. 30 Aug 1483
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004017&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.

Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples1,2

M, #23177, b. 5 October 1377, d. 29 April 1417
FatherLouis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence1,3,2 b. 23 Jul 1339, d. a 20 Sep 1384
MotherMarie de Chatillon Cts de Blois et de Guise1 b. c 1343, d. 1404
Last Edited7 Aug 2004
     Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples was born on 5 October 1377.3,4 He and Lucy/Lucia Visconti were engaged on 2 August 1384.5,6 Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples married Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel, daughter of Juan I "el Cazador" (?) King of Aragon and Valencia, conde de Barcelona and Marie/Martha (?) d'Armagnac, on 2 December 1400 at Arles-en-Provence, France (now).4,7,1

Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples died on 29 April 1417 at Chateau d'Angers, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now), at age 39.1,4
      ; Duc Louis II d'Anjou (1384-1417), King of Naples, etc, *1377, +Chateau d'Angers 1417, bur Angers; m.Arles-en-Provence 1400 Yolanda of Aragon (*1384 +1443), she was a contestant for the Aragonese throne in 1410.1 He was titular King of Naples in 1377.7,1 He was Duc d'Anjou between 1384 and 1417.1

Family 1

Lucy/Lucia Visconti b. c 1372, d. 14 Apr 1424

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  2. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/9-12/26/429.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucy Visconti: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008719&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004077&tree=LEO
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39091
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007652&tree=LEO

Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel1

F, #23178, b. 1380, d. 1443
FatherJuan I "el Cazador" (?) King of Aragon and Valencia, conde de Barcelona2,1 b. 27 Dec 1350, d. 27 May 1395
MotherMarie/Martha (?) d'Armagnac2,1 d. c 13 Jul 1378
Last Edited7 Aug 2004
     Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel was born in 1380 at Barcelona, Provinicia de Barcelona, Cateluna, Spain (now); Genealogy.EU (Barcelona 2 page) says b. 11 Aug 1384.2,1 She married Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples, son of Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence and Marie de Chatillon Cts de Blois et de Guise, on 2 December 1400 at Arles-en-Provence, France (now).1,2,3

Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel died in 1443 at Chateau de Tuce-de-Saumur; Genealogy.EU (Barcelona 2 page) says d. 14 Nov 1442.2,1
     Violante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel was also known as Yolante (?) of Aragon.2

Family

Louis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples b. 5 Oct 1377, d. 29 Apr 1417
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39091
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007652&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence1,2,3

M, #23179, b. 23 July 1339, d. after 20 September 1384
FatherJean II "le Bon" (?) King of France1,2,4 b. 26 Apr 1319, d. 8 Apr 1364
MotherJudith/Bona/Guta (?) of Luxemburg1,2,5 b. 20 May 1315, d. 11 Sep 1349
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence was born on 23 July 1339 at Chateau du Bois-de-Vincennes, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France.2,1,3,6,7,8 He married Marie de Chatillon Cts de Blois et de Guise, daughter of Charles de Chatillon Count of Blois, Duc de Bretagne and Jeanne "le Boiteuse" de Dreux Dss de Bretagne, in 1360.2,1,3

Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence was buried in 1384 at Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now).1,3
Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence died after 20 September 1384 at Barletta, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy.1,2,3,6
Louis I (?) Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence was buried after 20 September 1384 at Cathedrale Saint-Maurice d'Angers, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now); From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     23 Jul 1339, Vincennes, Departement du Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     20 Sep 1384 (aged 45), Barletta, Provincia di Barletta - Andria - Trani, Puglia, Italy
     Royalty. Born the second son of Jean II and Bonne of Luxemburg. He was Duke of Anjou and Touraine, Count of Maine, Provence and Forcalquier as well as titular king of Naples and Jerusalem. He married Marie de Châtillon-Blois in 1360 who bore him three children.
     Family Members
     Parents
      John II of France 1319–1364
      Bonne of Luxembourg 1315–1349
     Spouse
      Marie de Chatillon 1345–1404
     Siblings
      Charles V 1338–1380
      Jean I de Berry 1340–1416
      Philip II of Burgundy 1342–1404
      Jeanne de France 1343–1373
      Marie Princesse de France de Bar 1344–1404
      Isabelle de France 1348–1373
     Children
      Louis II d'Anjou 1377–1417
      Charles d'Anjou 1380–1404
     BURIAL     Cathedrale Saint-Maurice d'Angers, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 13 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91859213.6
      ; Duc Louis d'Anjou et de Touraine (1360-84), etc, titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence, etc; *Château-du-Bois-de-Vincennes 1339, +Biselia 1384, bur Angers; m.1360 Marie, Cts de Blois et de Guise (*1343 +Angers 1404, bur there) dau.of Charles de Chatillon-Blois, some-time Duc de Bretagne; for his descendants see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html.1,3

; Duc Louis I d'Anjou et de Touraine, etc., was adopted by Queen Joanna I of Naples and became titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem, Cte de Provence, etc; his descendants battled with the Aragonese over the Neapolitan and Sicilian crowns for decades; *Chateau-du-Bois-de-Vincennes 1339, +Biselia 1384, bur Angers; m.1360 Cts Marie de Blois et de Guise (*1343 +Angers 1404, bur there) dau.of Charles de Chatillon-Blois, some-time Duc de Bretagne. Louis left issue.3 He was titular King of Naples, Sicily & Jerusalem.2,1

; See Wikipedia article.8 He was Cte de Provence.1 He was Duc d'Anjou et de Touraine between 1360 and 1384.2,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 20 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet20.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000225&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bonne|Judith de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004092&tree=LEO
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Louis I d'Anjou (23 Jul 1339–20 Sep 1384), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91859213, citing Cathedrale Saint-Maurice d'Angers, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91859213/louis_i-d_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007650&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_I_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 63: France - The Hundred Year's War.
  10. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/9-12/26/429.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.

Louis III (?) Duc d'Anjou, titular King of Naples1

M, #23180, b. 25 September 1403, d. 12 November 1434
FatherLouis II (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Naples2,1 b. 5 Oct 1377, d. 29 Apr 1417
MotherViolante/Yolanda (?) of Aragon, Bss de Lunel2,1 b. 1380, d. 1443
Last Edited26 Jan 2020
     Louis III (?) Duc d'Anjou, titular King of Naples was born on 25 September 1403.1,3 He married Margherita (?) di Savoie, daughter of Amadeus VIII "il Pacifico" (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta, Moriana and Nice and Marie (?) Duchess of Burgundy, on 31 August 1432 at Thono-les-Bains
;
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says: "m firstly (contract 31 Mar 1431, contract Thonon-les-Bains, Savoie 22 Jul 1431, contract 31 Aug 1431.)3,4,5"
Louis III (?) Duc d'Anjou, titular King of Naples died on 12 November 1434 at age 31; died of malaria; buried there.1,3
      ; Duc Louis III d'Anjou (1417-34), titular King of Naples, etc; adopted by Queen Joanna II of Naples; *1403, +of malaria, Cosenza 1434, bur there; m.1432 Margaret of Savoy (*1416 +1479.)1

Family

Margherita (?) di Savoie b. 7 Aug 1420, d. 30 Sep 1479

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39091
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy2.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margarethe de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012500&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Margueritedied1479. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem1,2,3

F, #23181, b. 2 November 1428, d. circa 23 March 1483
FatherRene (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Sicily and Naples, Duc de Lorraine1,3 b. 1409, d. 1480
MotherIsabelle (?) Duchess of Lorraine1 b. 1410, d. 28 Feb 1453
Last Edited29 Nov 2004
     Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem was born on 2 November 1428 at Nancy, Lorraine, France.2,1,3 She married Frederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont, son of Antoine I (?) de Lorraine, Count of Vaudemont and Marie d'Harcourt Comtesse d'Aumale, in 1445 at Nancy, Lorraine, France.1,3

Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem died circa 23 March 1483 at Nancy, Lorraine, France.2,1,3
Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem was buried in 1483 at Joinville, France.1
      ; Yolande, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem, *Nancy 2.11.1428, +Nancy ca 23.3.1483, bur Joinville; m.Nancy 1445 Frederic VI de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont (*1417 +31.8.1470.)1

Family

Frederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont b. 1417, d. 31 Aug 1470
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  2. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/25.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine4.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, René II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011402&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008853&tree=LEO

Frederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont1,2,3

M, #23182, b. 1417, d. 31 August 1470
FatherAntoine I (?) de Lorraine, Count of Vaudemont2,1 b. c 1396, d. 22 Mar 1458
MotherMarie d'Harcourt Comtesse d'Aumale2,1,4 b. 9 Sep 1398, d. 19 Apr 1476
Last Edited28 Jan 2020
     Frederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont was born in 1417; Ancestors of Charles II says b. 1417; Genealogy.EU (Lorraine 4 page) says b. 1417/May 1428.2,1 He married Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem, daughter of Rene (?) Duc d'Anjou, King of Sicily and Naples, Duc de Lorraine and Isabelle (?) Duchess of Lorraine, in 1445 at Nancy, Lorraine, France.3,1

Frederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont died on 31 August 1470 at Joinville, France.1

Family

Yolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem b. 2 Nov 1428, d. c 23 Mar 1483
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine4.html
  2. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/25.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 24 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet24.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie d'Harcourt: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011409&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, René II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011402&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008853&tree=LEO

René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar1,2,3

M, #23183, b. 2 May 1451, d. 10 December 1508
FatherFrederic VI (?) de Lorraine, Cte de Vaudemont2,3 b. 1417, d. 31 Aug 1470
MotherYolande (?) d'Anjou, Dss of Lorraine, titular Queen of Sicily and Jerusalem1,2 b. 2 Nov 1428, d. c 23 Mar 1483
Last Edited28 Jan 2020
     René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar was born on 2 May 1451 at Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now).4,1,2,5,3 He married Jeanne d'Harcourt Comtesse de Tancarville, Dame de Montreuil-Bellay, daughter of Guillaume d'Harcourt Baron de Montgommery, Comte de Tancarville, Vicomte de Melun and Yolande de Laval, on 9 September 1471
;
His 1st wife. Per Med Lands: "m firstly contract 20 Jun 1471, 9 Sep 1471, divorced 1475."6,1,7,2,5 René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar and Jeanne d'Harcourt Comtesse de Tancarville, Dame de Montreuil-Bellay were divorced on 8 August 1485; Genealogy.EU (Harcourt 2 page) says div. 1475; Leo van de Pas says div. 1485.1,6,7,2 René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar married Philippa van Gelre, daughter of Adolf van Egmond Duke of Gelre and Catherine de Bourbon, on 1 September 1485 at Orleans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France,
;
His 2nd wife. Per Med Lands: "m secondly contract 28 Aug 1485, Papal dispensation 31 Jan 1488, Orléans 1 Sep 1485."4,2,8,1,9,10,5
René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar died on 10 December 1508 at Château de Fains, France, at age 57.4,1,2,5,3
René II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Duc de Bar was buried after 10 December 1508 at Eéglise des Franciscains, Nancy, Departement de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France.5
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "RENE de Vaudémont, son of FERRY de Vaudémont & his wife Yolande d’Anjou (Angers 2 May 1451-10 Dec 1508, bur Nancy, église des Franciscains). Comte de Vaudémont. The Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI records the death in Jul 1473 “de pestilence à Nancy” of “le Duc de Calabre” and that immediately afterwards “ung Alamant” [not yet identified] who had led the army “dudit de Calabre” captured “le Conte de Vaudesmons heritier de ladicte Duchié de Lorraine” on behalf of the “Duc de Bourgongne”, before he was released in return for the capture “pour marque” in Paris of “ung jeune fils escollier, nepueu de l’Empereur d’Allemaigne” [not yet identified, maybe one of the sons of Karl I Markgraf von Baden][607]. He succeeded 11 Aug 1473 as RENE II Duke of Lorraine. Captain of Angers, Seneschal and Governor of Anjou 1473. Duc de Bar et Marquis de Pont-à-Mousson, Baron de Joinville, Comte de Vaudémont, d'Harcourt et de Guise 1480. He claimed to be Titular King of Sicily and Jerusalem.
     "m firstly (contract 20 Jun 1471, 9 Sep 1471, divorced 1475) JEANNE d’Harcourt, daughter of GUILLAUME d’Harcourt Comte de Tancarville & his second wife Yolande de Laval (-8 Nov 1488, bur Notre-Dame de Montreuil-Bellay). Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage contract dated 20 Jun 1471, noting that her husband left her because she was “petite, bossue et incapable d’avoir des enfants, suivant Richard de Wassebourg”[608]. Ctss de Tancarville 1484. Dame de Montreuil-Bellay et de Parthenay. Père Anselme records her testament dated 7 Nov 1488 appointing her cousin François d’Orléans Comte de Dunois et de Longueville as her heir[609].
     "m secondly (contract 28 Aug 1485, Papal dispensation 31 Jan 1488, Orléans 1 Sep 1485) PHILIPPA van Gelre, daughter of ADOLF van Egmond Duke of Gelre & his wife Catherine de Bourbon ([1465]-Pont-à-Mousson 26 Feb 1547, bur Pont-à-Mousson). She became a Clarissan nun at Pont-à-Mousson in 1519. "
Med Lands cites:
[607] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 250.
[608] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 138.
[609] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 138.5


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 375.
2. Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond, Den Haag, 1958, Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 22.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.2:206.1


; See Wikipedia entry.11

; Per Genealogics:
     "René II was born on 2 May 1451, son of Frédéric VI of Lorraine, count of Vaudémont and Yolande of Anjou, duchess of Lorraine and Bar.
     "René spent his youth at the court of his grandfather René I, duc d'Anjou, between Angers and Provence. In 1470 he succeeded his father as count of Vaudémont. On 9 September 1471 he married Jeanne d'Harcourt, countess of Tancarville, daughter of Guillaume d'Harcourt, baron de Montgommery, and Yolande de Laval.
     "In 1473 René inherited from his uncle Nicholas d'Anjou the positions of captain of Angers and seneschal and governor of Anjou. In 1473 after the childless death of his cousin Nicholas d'Anjou, duc de Lorraine, René's mother inherited the duchy of Lorraine and immediately transferred it to him; however the duchy was caught between the spheres of influence of Louis XI, king of France, and Charles 'the Bold', duke of Burgundy.
     "René leant first towards Burgundy, but when Charles began to place garrisons in Lorraine, René on 9 July 1474 secretly swung his allegiance to France, and renounced his alliance with Burgundy in 1475. Charles invaded the duchy, and René was forced to flee from Nancy on 11 January 1476. He recaptured the city on 5 October of the same year, and travelled to Switzerland to seek the reinforcements which finally sealed the fate of the duke of Burgundy at the Battle of Nancy on 5 January 1477.
     "Following that victory, René ordered the construction of the great basilica of Saint-Nicolas-de-Port and the ducal palace in Nancy.
     "In 1480 René's mother inherited the duchy of Bar from her father René I, duc d'Anjou, and she again immediately transferred it to her son René. René's alliance with Louis XI was finally broken after Louis in 1481 annexed most of his inheritance from his grandfather René I, leaving him only the duchy of Bar. In the same year René entered Italy and sided with the Venetians in their war with the duke of Ferrara, defeating the latter at Adria in that year.
     "Because his marriage to Jeanne d'Harcourt had remained childless René divorced his wife on 8 August 1485. On 1 September 1485 in Nancy he married Philippa van Egmond, daughter of Adolf van Egmond, duke of Gelre, and Catherine de Bourbon. They had twelve children, of whom two sons, Antoine and Claude, would have progeny.
     "Also in 1485 René took part in the first phase of the 'guerre folle' against Anne de Beaujeu, regent of France after the death of her father Louis XI until the majority of her brother, the young king Charles VIII. However at the Peace of Bourges in the same year he wisely withdrew from the coalition of princes opposing Anne.
     "In 1488 the subjects of the king of Naples revolted, and offered the crown to René, who organised an expedition to take possession of the kingdom, but he was prohibited from proceeding by King Charles VIII, who intended to conquer Naples in his own right (marking the start of the Italian Wars).
     "René caught a chill during a hunt near Fains, and died on 10 December 1508 in the château de Fains. Philippa survived him by many years and died on 28 February 1547 in Nancy.
     "Through his son Antoine, René is the dynastic ancestor of the house of Habsburg-Lorraine, following the marriage of his descendant in the ninth generation Franz I Stephan, duke of Lorraine with Archduchess Maria Theresia of Austria, queen of Hungary and Bohemia. He is also an ancestor of all the other royal houses of Europe."3 He was Comte de Vaudémont between 1470 and 1508.11 He was Comte d'Harcourt between 1473 and 1495.11 He was Duc de Lorraine between 1473 and 1508.11 He was Baron of Elbeuf between 1473 and 1508.11 He was Marquis de Pont-à-Mousson between 1480 and 1508.11 He was Duc de Bar between 1483 and 1508.11 He was Comte d'Aumale between 1495 and 1508.11 He was Comte de Guise between 1504 and 1508.11

Family 2

Philippa van Gelre b. bt 1464 - 1465, d. 26 Feb 1547
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, René II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011402&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lorraine 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, René II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011402&tree=LEO
  4. [S1451] Graphical Index to the Ancestry of Charles II: Table I - Ancestors of Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-1685), online http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/Gen1-6.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/CharlesII/5-10/19.htm. Hereinafter cited as Ancestors of Charles II.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#ReneIIdied1508B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne d'Harcourt: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013230&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Harcourt 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/harcourt/harcourt2.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Egmond 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/egmond/egmond2.html
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#PhilippaGelredied1547
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa van Egmond: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011403&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren%C3%A9_II,_Duke_of_Lorraine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-Dynastie-Royale.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Raoul (Rodulfus) (?) Count of Vermandois, comte (châtelain) de Cambrai et de Gouy1,2,3,4

M, #23184, b. circa 867, d. 28 June 896
FatherBaudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres1,3,5,6,7 b. bt 837 - 840, d. 879
MotherJudith (?) de France1,3,8,9,6,10 b. 844, d. a 879
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Raoul (Rodulfus) (?) Count of Vermandois, comte (châtelain) de Cambrai et de Gouy was born circa 867; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 865.1,3,11
Raoul (Rodulfus) (?) Count of Vermandois, comte (châtelain) de Cambrai et de Gouy died on 28 June 896; Racines et Histoire says d. 17/6/896 and "ass. sur ordre de Héribert 1er, comte de Vermandois."2,3,11
     GAV-30.

; per Racines et Histoire: "allié à Zwentibold de Lotharingie (895), (conquiert Arras, Péronne et Saint-Quentin mais est défait, capturé puis assassiné par Heribert 1er, comte de Vermandois) ép. ?8" Raoul (Rodulfus) (?) Count of Vermandois, comte (châtelain) de Cambrai et de Gouy was also known as Raoul (Rodolphe, Rudolf) (?) de Flandres comte et abbé de Cambrai.8 He was Count of Vermandois between 895 and 896.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/judit002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Cambrai.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf: p. 2.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018643&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIdied879B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2.
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Judith: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit002.htm
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018644&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Amaurydiedafter973
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#dauRaoulCambraiMIsaac.

Henri II de Valois King of France1,2,3,4

M, #23185, b. 31 March 1519, d. 10 July 1559
FatherFrançois I (?) of Angoulême, King of France5,1,2 b. 12 Sep 1494, d. 31 Mar 1547
MotherClaudia/Claude (?) Dss de Bretagne et de Berry5,1,2 b. 1499, d. 1524
Last Edited28 Oct 2019
     Henri II de Valois King of France was born on 31 March 1519 at Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, St. Germain-en-Laie, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France (now).1,2,3,6 He married Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France, daughter of Lorenzo II "il Giovane" de Medici Duke of Florence, Duke of Urbino and Madeleine de la Tour d'Auvergne, on 28 October 1533 at Marseilles, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France.7,8,1,2,9,4

Henri II de Valois King of France died on 10 July 1559 at Hôtel des Tournelles, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, at age 40; killed.2,1,3,6
Henri II de Valois King of France was buried on 13 August 1559 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     ORIGINAL NAME     Henri de Valois II
     BIRTH     31 Mar 1519, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     10 Jul 1559 (aged 40), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     French Monarch. He reigned as King of France from about 1547 until 1559 when he was killed while competing in a jousting tournament at his daughter's wedding.
     Family Members
     Parents
          François Ier de Valois Angoulême 1494–1547
          Claude de France 1499–1524
     Spouse
          Catherine de Medici 1519–1589
     Siblings
          Louise de France 1515–1518
          Charlotte de Valois 1516–1524
          Francois de France 1518–1536
          Madeleine of Valois 1520–1537
          Charles de France 1522–1545
     Children
          Diane de France 1538–1618
          Francois II 1544–1560
          Elisabeth de Valois 1545–1568
          Claude de France 1547–1575
          Louis de France 1549–1550
          Charles IX de Valois 1550–1574
          Henri III de France 1551–1589
          Marguerite de Valois 1553–1615
          François Hercule de Alencon 1555–1584
          Victoire de France 1556–1556
          Jeanne de France 1556–1556
          Henri de Saint-Rémi 1557–1621
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     PLOT     cadaver tomb in the basilica next to his wife
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 5 Sep 2000
     Find A Grave Memorial 12289.2,3,6
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Henri was born on 31 March 1519 in St.Germain-en-Laye, second son of François I, king of France and his wife Claude, daughter of Louis XII, king of France. After François I's defeat in Italy and imprisonment in Spain, the only way for him to gain his freedom was to agree to a treaty with Emperor Charles V. François was to be married to the emperor's sister and had to send his two sons as hostages to Spain. The years of imprisonment seriously affected Henri.
     "In 1529 Bodin, a gentleman-usher of the boys' grandmother visited Henri and his brother François in their prison. He wrote that it was 'very dark, without any carpet or decoration save a straw mattress, in which chamber my Lords were seated on small stone stools beneath a window, barred inside and out with great iron bars, and with walls eight or ten feet thick, the said window so high that scarcely could my Lords have air or the pleasure of daylight'. So shabby were their clothes that Bodin could not keep back his tears. They had forgotten French because they had no one with whom they could speak it. They had been captives for three years. The dauphin François was now eleven, Henri d'Orléans ten.
     "Diane de Poitiers was one of the ladies who had met Henri and François on their return from Spain. At fourteen Henri was a cold and reserved boy, already in love with Diane. However his father had arranged his marriage with Catharina de' Medici, daughter of Lorenzo II de' Medici, duke of Urbino, and Madeleine de La Tour d'Auvergne. The marriage took place on 28 October 1533 in Marseilles in the presence of Pope Clement VII (Giulio de' Medici), who had arranged it. The bride was also fourteen, black haired with a pale face and bulging eyes.
     "Henri's father had hoped to obtain the duchy of Milan for Henri through this marriage but a year later the pope died, and Catharina became an encumbrance instead of an asset. On 10 August 1536 the dauphin died aged eighteen making Henri heir to the French throne. Henri was now dauphin and duke of Brittany.
     "In 1542 Anne, duc de Montmorency, the constable of France, was brought down by his powerful enemies, among them the king's sister as well as the king's mistress. His chief supporters were Henri and his mistress Diane de Poitiers. Marino Cavalli described the relationship of Henri and Diane: 'The Dauphin has real affection for her, but people consider there is nothing lustful in it, that it is more like that which exists between mother and son. They say she has taken it on herself to teach, correct and counsel the Dauphin and make him act in a way worthy of him.' Marino Cavalli also described Henri: 'His qualities promise France the finest king that she has had for two centuries. At twenty-eight years, this prince is of a very robust constitution, but somewhat melancholy in humour. He is very skilled in the use of arms. He is not a good conversationalist, but very clear and firm in his opinions. He is of mediocre intelligence, slow to react'.
     "In 1539 Henri had raped a girl in Piedmont, who bore him a daughter. The birth appeared to put the stigma of barrenness on Henri's wife Catharina de' Medici and divorce was discussed. Catharina threw herself at the feet of her father-in-law and begged that after the divorce she be allowed to retreat to a convent. King François I, however, responded that God had ordained her to be the dauphin's wife and God would answer her prayers for a child.
     "In July 1542 imperialist agents murdered two French diplomats who were on their way to negotiate an alliance with Sultan Suleiman. Later that month France declared war upon the emperor. Henri and Marshal d'Annebaut laid siege to Perpignan for six weeks. It was defended by the duke of Alba and they had little success. When the news came that the French garrisons in Piedmont were beleaguered, Henri took his troops to their rescue. The campaigns throughout 1542 and early 1543 were inconclusive. In June 1543 Henry VIII, to aid the emperor, declared war on France.
     "Diane had urged Henri to sleep with his wife, and in the spring of 1543 Catharina became pregnant at last. On 16 January 1544 a son, the future François II, was born. He was followed by another nine children. Their son Charles and two daughters, Elisabeth and Claude, would have progeny.
     "On 11 April 1544 François d'Enghien defeated the imperial army at Ceresole d'Alba, a village about thirty miles from Turin. The year 1544 was proving to be the most dangerous year in the reign of King François I. In June 1544 the emperor invaded Champagne, and by July he had reached Saint-Dizier. After Saint-Dizier was taken the emperor marched on Paris. At this time François I became ill and Paris was in a state of panic. Henry VIII saved Paris; instead of joining the emperor he moved on to Boulogne.
     "The emperor became desperate, as Henri had adopted a most effective scorched-earth policy, breaking down bridges and destroying any corn, wine, or other provisions that could not be removed. On 18 September 1544 the Peace of Crépy was signed between the emperor and the king of France. A day later the English captured Boulogne and Henry VIII returned to England. However Henri deeply resented the terms of Crépy, believing that they it would endanger his inheritance.
     "On 9 September 1545 Henri's younger brother Charles, duc d'Orléans died and shortly afterwards François I asked Henri to preside over meetings of the council, as it would be good experience for him. Henri refused, 'because everything goes ill at present' and afterwards people might blame him for it.
     "On 31 March 1547 François I died and Henri succeeded him as King Henri II of France. Henri's reign was marked by the great growth in power of the house of Guise led by François, duc de Guise and his brother Charles, cardinal de Lorraine. The reformed religion was also spreading from Germany and a persecution of French Protestants began. War was pursued with Emperor Charles V, but ended with the Peace of Cateau-Cambresis signed on 3 April 1559.
     "To celebrate the treaty Henri ordered a round of tournaments in which he himself took part. At one of these on 30 June 1559 the lance of his opponent splintered and a piece of it pierced the king in the eye. The crude surgery of the day only served to aggravate the condition and after ten days of agony he died on 10 July, at the early age of forty, in the palais du Tournelles."4

; King HENRI II of France (1547-59), *St.Germain-en-Laye 31.3.1519, +Paris 10.7.1559, bur St.Denis; m.Marseille 1533 Catarina de Medici, Pss di Urbino (*1519 +5.1.1589.)2

; See Wikipedia article.6

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 17.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 148.4
Henri II de Valois King of France was also known as Henri II King of France. He was King of France between 31 March 1547 and 10 July 1559.10,1,6 He was 326 Knight of the Garter in 1551.4

Family 1

Filippa Duco sna di Coui
Child

Family 2

Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France b. 3 Apr 1519, d. 5 Jan 1589
Children

Family 3

Philippe Duc b. c 1520
Child

Family 5

Nichole de Savigny Bss de Fontette b. 1535, d. 1590
Child

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 23 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet23.html
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 October 2019), memorial page for Henry II of France (31 Mar 1519–10 Jul 1559), Find A Grave Memorial no. 12289, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12289/henry_ii_of_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003658&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39266
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39267
  8. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Medici 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici2.html
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 292.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 49: Spain - House of Hapsburg.
  12. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I27973
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Diane légitimée de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00011537&tree=LEO
  14. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 26 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet26.html

Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France1,2

F, #23186, b. 3 April 1519, d. 5 January 1589
FatherLorenzo II "il Giovane" de Medici Duke of Florence, Duke of Urbino1,3,2 b. 13 Sep 1492, d. 4 May 1519
MotherMadeleine de la Tour d'Auvergne1,2,4 b. 1501, d. 28 Apr 1519
Last Edited28 Oct 2019
     Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France was born on 3 April 1519 at Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy (now).3,2,5 She married Henri II de Valois King of France, son of François I (?) of Angoulême, King of France and Claudia/Claude (?) Dss de Bretagne et de Berry, on 28 October 1533 at Marseilles, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France.6,1,3,7,2,8

Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France died on 5 January 1589 at Blois, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France, at age 69.3,2,5
Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France was buried after 5 January 1589 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     13 Apr 1519, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy
     DEATH     5 Jan 1589 (aged 69), Blois, Departement du Loir-et-Cher, Centre, France
     French Monarch. She was the Queen of France and wife of King Henry II.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Lorenzo de Medici 1492–1519
     Spouse
          Henry II of France 1519–1559
     Children
          Francois II 1544–1560
          Elisabeth de Valois 1545–1568
          Claude de France 1547–1575
          Louis de France 1549–1550
          Charles IX de Valois 1550–1574
          Henri III de France 1551–1589
          Marguerite de Valois 1553–1615
          François Hercule de Alencon 1555–1584
          Victoire de France 1556–1556
          Jeanne de France 1556–1556
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21049.2,5
      ; Caterina, Comtesse d'Auvergne (1519-89), Queen of France (1547-59)+(1574-1589), Regent of France (1552)+(1560-IX.1574), *Florence 13.4.1519, +Blois 5.1.1589, bur St.Denis; m.1533 King Henri II of France (*31.3.1519 +10.7.1559.)2 Caterina de Medici Comtesse d'Auvergne, Queen of France was also known as Catherine de Medici.6 She was Comtesse d'Auvergne between 3 April 1519 and 5 January 1589.2 She was Queen of France between 1547 and 1559.2 She was Regent of France in 1552.2 She was Regent of France between 1560 and September 1574.2 She was Queen of France between 1574 and 1589.2

Family

Henri II de Valois King of France b. 31 Mar 1519, d. 10 Jul 1559
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 257. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Medici 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/medici2.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 64: France - House of Valois-Orléans and Angoulême. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1550] Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane [This website is now defunct. Some information has been transferred to the pay site "Genealogie delle Famiglie Nobili Italine" at http://www.sardimpex.com/], online http://www.sardimpex.com/, De'Medici: http://www.sardimpex.com/medici2.htm. Hereinafter cited as Genealogie Delle Dinastie Ialiane.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 October 2019), memorial page for Catherine de Medici (13 Apr 1519–5 Jan 1589), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21049, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21049/catherine-de_medici. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I39267
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 23 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet23.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003658&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 49: Spain - House of Hapsburg.
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 292.
  11. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I27973

Archibald Campbell PC, 5th Earl of Argyll1

M, #23187, b. circa 1532, d. 12 September 1575
FatherArchibald Campbell 4th Earl of Argyll2 d. 2 Dec 1558
MotherLady Helen Hamilton2
Last Edited29 Nov 2002
     Archibald Campbell PC, 5th Earl of Argyll was born circa 1532.2 He married Jean Stuart, daughter of James V Stuart King of Scots and Elizabeth Beatoun, on 1 July 1553.1,2
Archibald Campbell PC, 5th Earl of Argyll and Jean Stuart were divorced on 23 June 1573.1,2 Archibald Campbell PC, 5th Earl of Argyll married Lady Janet Cuninghame, daughter of William Cuninghame 6th Earl of Glencairn and Janet Gordon of Lochinvar, circa 5 August 1573.2

Archibald Campbell PC, 5th Earl of Argyll died on 12 September 1575; dsp.3
     He was 5th Earl of Argyll.4,2

; ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, B5th Earl of Argyll, PC (S, 1571); b c 1532; made Justiciar Scotand 1558 by MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS, opposed her 1565 and helped plot Darnley's murder, nevertheless cmded (albeit indecisively) MARY's forces at the Battle of Langside 1568, only to come to an agreement with the Regent Morton 1572 and by the latter be made Ld Chllr; m 1st c 1 July 1553 (divorce 23 June 1573) Jean Stuart (d 7 Jan 1587/8), illegitimate dau of JAMES V by Elizabeth, dau of John Bethune of Creich; m 2nd c 5 Aug 1573 Lady Janet Cunningham (m 2nd 1583 Humphrey Colquhoun of Luss (see that Bt) and dsp 1584), 2nd dau of 6th Earl of Glencairn (see CUNING-HAME, Bt), and dsp 12 Sept 1575.2

Family 1

Jean Stuart d. bt 7 Jan 1587 - 1588

Family 2

Lady Janet Cuninghame d. 1584

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Argyll Family Page.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Argyll Family Page (see CUNING-HAME, Bt).
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page (see ARGYLL, D).

Conon/Falco de Grandson1,2

M, #23188, b. circa 1050, d. before 1114
FatherAdalbert III de Grandson3 b. c 1030, d. 1086
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited13 Oct 2020
     Conon/Falco de Grandson married Adelheid/Aelis de Ramerupt, daughter of Hildouin IV de Montdidier comte de Montdidier, seigneur de Ramerupt, d’Arcis et de Breteuil, comte de Roucy and Adele (Adelix) de Roucy.3
Conon/Falco de Grandson was born circa 1050 at la Sarraz, Waddt, Switzerland.
Conon/Falco de Grandson died before 1114.3
     GAV-27 EDV-27. Conon/Falco de Grandson was also known as Conon "Falcon" de La Sarraz.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONON [Falcon] (-[before 1114]). “Rigaldus miles de Grantione filius Adalberti” donated serfs to Romainmotier, when “filio nostro Petro” entered the convent, with the consent of “uxore mea Helena et filiis meis Ottone, Ademaro, Artaldo atque Jarentone et fratribus meis Ottone atque Conone qui et Falco”, by charter dated to [1075/87][1101]. [Bouchard suggests that the husband of Aelis de Ramerupt was the same person as Foulques de Bourgogne, son of Renaud Comte de Bourgogne[1102]. However, if it is correct, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln, that Conon died soon “before 1114” (which date has not been verified), the suggestion is unlikely to be correct.] The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis names him “quidam...nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia...Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata” when recording his marriage[1103]. The explanation for “de Jur” [Joux?] has not been found. No connection has been found between Conon/Falcon and the family of the seigneurs de Joux (whose genealogy was studied in the mid-19th century by Estavayer[1104]). One possible explanation is confusion with “Falco” son of Amaury de Joux, who witnessed the following charter: “Amaldricus” [identified as Amaury [I] de Joux] disputed properties with Romainmotier by charter dated Jan [before 1075], witnessed by “...filiis Amaldrici, Hugone, Falcone, Landrico”[1105]. He presumably died before 4 Jun 1114, the date of the charter of his sons quoted below.
     "m AELIS de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] de Montdidier et de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Adelaide de Roucy. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “Aeliz de Sarrata in Burgundia” as fifth daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy[1106]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names “sexta filia Hilduini comitis Adelidis” as mother of “filium columbine simplicitatis nomine Bartholomeum…[et] Ebalum”[1107]. The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis records that “nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia…Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata” married “comitis Hilduini [comes Rociensis]…unam ex filiabus eius…Adeladam”[1108]."
Med Lands cites.3,4


; Per Med Lands:
     "AELIS de Ramerupt . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "sexta filia Hilduini comitis Adelidis" as mother of "filium columbine simplicitatis nomine Bartholomeum…[et] Ebalum"[674]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aeliz de Sarrata in Burgundia" as fifth daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy[675]. The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis records that "nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia…Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata" married "comitis Hilduini [comes Rociensis]…unam ex filiabus eius…Adeladam"[676].
     "m CONON "Falcon" de La Sarraz [Grandson], son of ADALBERT & his wife --- (-before 1114)."
Med Lands cites:
[674] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[675] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.
[676] Hermanni Monachi de miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis, Liber I, II, Patrologia Latina, Tome CLVI, col. 966.4

Family

Adelheid/Aelis de Ramerupt b. c 1050
Children

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30456
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkvaud.htm#ErmentrudeSarrazJouxMHenriGrandpre. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkvaud.htm#CononFalconLaSarrazdiedbefore1114
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#AdelaideRoucyMCononFalconSarrazGrandson

Adelheid/Aelis de Ramerupt1,2

F, #23189, b. circa 1050
FatherHildouin IV de Montdidier comte de Montdidier, seigneur de Ramerupt, d’Arcis et de Breteuil, comte de Roucy3,2 b. c 1010, d. c 1063
MotherAdele (Adelix) de Roucy3,4,2 b. c 1014, d. 1062
ReferenceGAV27EDV27
Last Edited13 Oct 2020
     Adelheid/Aelis de Ramerupt married Conon/Falco de Grandson, son of Adalbert III de Grandson.5
Adelheid/Aelis de Ramerupt was born circa 1050.
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "CONON [Falcon] (-[before 1114]). “Rigaldus miles de Grantione filius Adalberti” donated serfs to Romainmotier, when “filio nostro Petro” entered the convent, with the consent of “uxore mea Helena et filiis meis Ottone, Ademaro, Artaldo atque Jarentone et fratribus meis Ottone atque Conone qui et Falco”, by charter dated to [1075/87][1101]. [Bouchard suggests that the husband of Aelis de Ramerupt was the same person as Foulques de Bourgogne, son of Renaud Comte de Bourgogne[1102]. However, if it is correct, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln, that Conon died soon “before 1114” (which date has not been verified), the suggestion is unlikely to be correct.] The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis names him “quidam...nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia...Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata” when recording his marriage[1103]. The explanation for “de Jur” [Joux?] has not been found. No connection has been found between Conon/Falcon and the family of the seigneurs de Joux (whose genealogy was studied in the mid-19th century by Estavayer[1104]). One possible explanation is confusion with “Falco” son of Amaury de Joux, who witnessed the following charter: “Amaldricus” [identified as Amaury [I] de Joux] disputed properties with Romainmotier by charter dated Jan [before 1075], witnessed by “...filiis Amaldrici, Hugone, Falcone, Landrico”[1105]. He presumably died before 4 Jun 1114, the date of the charter of his sons quoted below.
     "m AELIS de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] de Montdidier et de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Adelaide de Roucy. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “Aeliz de Sarrata in Burgundia” as fifth daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy[1106]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names “sexta filia Hilduini comitis Adelidis” as mother of “filium columbine simplicitatis nomine Bartholomeum…[et] Ebalum”[1107]. The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis records that “nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia…Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata” married “comitis Hilduini [comes Rociensis]…unam ex filiabus eius…Adeladam”[1108]."
Med Lands cites.5,2
GAV-27 EDV-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "AELIS de Ramerupt . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "sexta filia Hilduini comitis Adelidis" as mother of "filium columbine simplicitatis nomine Bartholomeum…[et] Ebalum"[674]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aeliz de Sarrata in Burgundia" as fifth daughter of Hilduin Comte de Roucy[675]. The Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis records that "nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia…Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata" married "comitis Hilduini [comes Rociensis]…unam ex filiabus eius…Adeladam"[676].
     "m CONON "Falcon" de La Sarraz [Grandson], son of ADALBERT & his wife --- (-before 1114)."
Med Lands cites:
[674] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[675] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794.
[676] Hermanni Monachi de miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis, Liber I, II, Patrologia Latina, Tome CLVI, col. 966.2

Family

Conon/Falco de Grandson b. c 1050, d. b 1114
Children

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30457
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamdampjo.htm#AdelaideRoucyMCononFalconSarrazGrandson. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I2809
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (Alice) de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020523&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkvaud.htm#CononFalconLaSarrazdiedbefore1114

Adalbert III de Grandson1

M, #23190, b. circa 1030, d. 1086
FatherAdelbert de Grandson b. c 1009, d. 1059
MotherDietberga (?) b. c 1000
ReferenceGAV27 EDV28
Last Edited13 Oct 2020
     Adalbert III de Grandson was born circa 1030.
Adalbert III de Grandson died in 1086.
     GAV-27 EDV-28.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30458
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgkvaud.htm#CononFalconLaSarrazdiedbefore1114. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.