John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium1,2,3

M, #48211, b. 924, d. 10 January 976
Last Edited2 Sep 2004
     John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium married Theodora (?), daughter of Constantine/Konstantinos VII Porphyrogenetos (?) Emperor of Byzantium and Elena/Helena Lekapena.1,2
John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium married Maria Sklerina, daughter of Photeinos/Pantherios (Munir) Skleros and Gregoria (?).3
John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium was born in 924.2
John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium died on 10 January 976.2
     John I Tzimisces Emperor of Byzantinium was also known as Ioannes I Tzimiskes Emperor of Byzantinium.2 He was Emperor of Byzantium between 969 and 976.1

Family 1

Maria Sklerina

Family 2

Theodora (?)

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 189. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  3. [S1668] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 Aug 2004: "Re: Empress Theophano, wife of Otto II"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EJJcx5MLHhE/m/MsWrwPDeYBYJ) to e-mail address, 1 Aug 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 Aug 2004."

Eudokia (?) of Byzantium1,2

F, #48212
FatherConstantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium1,3,2 b. 961, d. 1028
MotherElena (?)4
Last Edited7 Apr 2004
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 141.2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 189. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudokia of Byzantium: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027732&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constantine VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027727&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027728&tree=LEO

Theodora (?) Empress of Byzantinium1,2,3

F, #48213, d. 31 August 1056
FatherConstantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium1,2,4,3 b. 961, d. 1028
MotherElena (?)3,5
Last Edited7 Apr 2004
     Theodora (?) Empress of Byzantinium died on 31 August 1056.2,3
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 141.3 She was Empress of Byzantium: THEODORA, empress, the elder sister of Zoë. An intelligent, vigorous, and popular ruler, but already advanced in age. between 1042 and 1056.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 189, 229. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodora: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027731&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constantine VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027727&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027728&tree=LEO

Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium1,2,3

F, #48214, b. 980, d. June 1050
FatherConstantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium1,2,4,5 b. 961, d. 1028
MotherElena (?)6,5
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium was born in 980.5 She married Romanus III Argyropolus (?) Emperor of Byzantium on 9 November 1028
;
Her 1st husband.1,2,5 Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium married Michael IV Paphlagonian (?) Emperor of Byzantium in 1034
;
Her 2nd husband.1,2,5 Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium married Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium, son of Theodosios Monomachos and NN Tornikaina, on 11 June 1042
;
Her 2nd husband; his 3rd wife.1,2,7,8,9,5
Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium died in June 1050.1,2,10,5
Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium was buried in June 1050 at Church of the Holy Apostles, Istanbul, Turkey (now); From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Istanbul, Turkey
     DEATH     Jun 1050, Istanbul, Turkey
     She reigned as Byzantine Empress alongside her sister Theodora from April 19 to June 11, 1042. She was also enthroned as the Empress Consort to a series of co-rulers beginning with Romanos III in 1028 until her death in 1050 while married to Constantine IX.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Constantine VIII 960–1028
          Helena Of Byzantium
     Spouses
          Romanos III Argyros unknown–1028
          Michael IV The Paphlagonian 1010–1041
          Constantine IX Monomachos 1000–1055
     BURIAL     Church of the Holy Apostles, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
     Created by: Mademoiselle
     Added: 30 Dec 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 122488136.10
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 141.5
; Per Med Lands:
     "KONSTANTINOS Monomachos ([1005/1010]-11 Jan 1055, bur Monastery of Mangana). Psellos names "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" when recording that Empress Zoe chose to marry him[1655]. His birth date is estimated from Psellos describing him as a "young man" at the time of the accession of Emperor Romanos III[1656]. Although well-born and held in respect, neither Emperor Basileios II nor Emperor Konstantinos VIII promoted him to office, for they were suspicious about his relations with the Skleros family after his second marriage[1657]. Nevertheless, Konstantinos appears to have enjoyed a close relationship with Empress Zoe, especially during the reign of Emperor Mikhael IV, although the latter fabricated charges against him and exiled him to the island of Lesbos. After her joint accession with her sister, Empress Zoe recalled Konstantinos from exile and married him, despite the Byzantine church's prohibition of third marriages[1658]. He was crowned 12 Jun 1042 as Emperor KONSTANTINOS IX. He started his reign with another flush of largesse, which exhausted his treasury[1659]. His general Giorgios Maniakis recaptured the eastern part of Sicily from the Arabs, but was ordered to withdraw by the emperor before he could push his advantage further. Resentful of this treatment, Maniakis rebelled and was acclaimed emperor by his troops, but was killed in battle in 1043 en route to Constantinople. Leon Tornikios (who had courted Emperor Konstantinos's sister Euprepia) rebelled, was proclaimed emperor Sep 1047, and besieged Constantinople but he was captured and blinded[1660]. After several years of lengthy dispute over the standardisation of the liturgy, the Patriarch Mikhael Cerularios in 1055 excommunicated the papal legates in Constantinople (who had just pronounced his own excommunication) and triggered the final separation of the Orthodox church from the Roman Catholic. Emperor Konstantinos suffered from a debilitating illness which attacked his joints and produced partial paralysis[1661]. Cedrenus records the burial of Emperor Konstantinos the day he died "in Manganis"[1662].
     "m firstly ---. Psellos records that "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" had "in the first place [become] the son-in-law to the outstanding member of court society but his wife fell ill and died"[1663]. There is no indication in the text who this might indicate.
     "m secondly (before 1025) --- Skleraina, daughter of BASILEIOS Skleros & his wife Pulcheria Argyre (-before 1034). Psellos records the second marriage of Konstantinos, arranged by Romanos Argyros before he became emperor, to "the daughter of his sister Pulcheria, who in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus", stating that she was her parents' only child[1664]. Zonaras records that, after the death of his first wife, Konstantinos married "imperatoris Romani nepte ex fratre"[1665]. According to Psellos, she died before her husband's exile to Lesbos[1666].
     "m thirdly (11 Jun 1042) as her third husband, Empress ZOE, widow firstly of Emperor ROMANOS III and secondly of Emperor MIKHAEL IV, daughter of Emperor KONSTANTINOS VIII & his wife Helena --- (980-1050).
     "Mistress (1): MARIA [Skleraina], daughter of --- (-[1044], bur Monastery of Mangana[1667]). Zonaras records that, after the death of his second wife, Konstantinos was unable to marry a third time but took as his mistress "consobrina uxoris suæ…adulescentula…et nobili Sclerorum familia orta"[1668]. Psellos records that "the niece of his late wife" became mistress of Konstantinos Monomakhos, the future Emperor Konstantinos IX, after the death of his second wife, being unable to marry her because of the Orthodox church's prohibition of third marriages[1669]. As Psellos, in an earlier passage, records that the second wife of Konstantinos was her parents' only child[1670], the word "niece" cannot be interpreted in its strict sense in this text. The editor of the edition of Psellos which has been consulted states that she was the sister of Romanos Skleros and granddaughter of Bardas (children of an otherwise unrecorded brother of Basileios Skleros), but the primary source on which this is based has not so far been identified[1671]. If this is correct, she and her brother must have been born from an otherwise second marriage of Basileios Skleros. Psellos hints that this might be correct when he refers to her in later passages as "Sclerena"[1672]. Another possibility is that one of Maria's parents was the daughter or son of either Pulcheria Argyre or Basileios Skleros (the parents of Konstantinos's first wife) by a second marriage: Psellos does suggest that Pulcheria and Basileios's marriage terminated early when he states that "…Pulcheria…in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus"[1673]. The primary source which confirms her name has not so far been identified. She followed him into exile on Lesbos in 1034. She was recalled to Constantinople after her husband's accession but was unpopular, her presence causing a riot 9 Mar 1044. Eventually, she was introduced openly to the Palace as her husband's mistress, acting as a junior consort, and was granted the title Augusta[1674]. Psellos records the death of "Sclerena" and the emperor's grief[1675].
     "Mistress (2): (after 1044) GORANDUXT of Georgia, daughter of GIORGI I King of Georgia & [his wife Mariam of Vaspurakan]. Psellos records that the emperor "fell in love with…one of our hostages from Alania…the daughter of the king there"[1676]. She became the emperor's mistress and was granted the title Augusta[1677]. Zonaras records that, after the death of Empress Zoe, Emperor Konstantinos fell in love with "adulescentulam quondam Alani principis filiam, obsidem Romanis datam" and installed her as "Augustam"[1678]. The Georgian Chronicle records that Emperor Konstantinos IX requested "of Bagrat his sister Goranduxt"[1679]. The Georgian Chronicle records that "Georgi" died leaving "two sons Bagrat and Demetre and two daughters"[1680]. The source contains no indication of the name of the mother of the two daughters."
Med Lands cites:
[1655] Psellos, pp. 161-2.
[1656] Psellos, p. 163.
[1657] Psellos, pp. 162-3.
[1658] Psellos, pp. 163-5.
[1659] Psellos, p. 170.
[1660] Psellos, pp. 205-219.
[1661] Psellos, pp. 221-4.
[1662] Cedrenus II, col. 342.
[1663] Psellos, p. 162.
[1664] Psellos, p. 163.
[1665] Zonaras XVII, 20, p. 615.
[1666] Psellos, p. 180.
[1667] Where her lover was buried beside her after his own death, see Psellos, p. 189, footnote 1.
[1668] Zonaras XVII, 21, p. 618.
[1669] Psellos, pp. 180-1.
[1670] Psellos, p. 163.
[1671] Psellos, p. 180 footnote 1.
[1672] Psellos, p. 184.
[1673] Psellos, p. 163.
[1674] Psellos, pp. 183-4.
[1675] Psellos, p. 189.
[1676] Psellos, p. 235.
[1677] Psellos, pp. 235-7.
[1678] Zonaras XVII, 28, p. 648.
[1679] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 103.
[1680] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 101.9
She was Empress of Byzantium: ZOË, empress. She was the third daughter of Constantine and, though 48 years old at her accession, married three times, associating her husbands: Romanos, Michael, and Constantine IX seriatum in the imperial office. between 1028 and 1050.1 She was Empress of Byzantium beside her sister Theodora between 19 April 1042 and 11 June 1042 at Constantinople, Byzantium.11

Family 3

Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium b. c 1000, d. 11 Jan 1055

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 189, 229. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zoe: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027726&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constantine VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027727&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zoe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027726&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027728&tree=LEO
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantine_IX_Monomachos. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konstantinos IX Monomakhos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027725&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#KonstantinosIXdied1055. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 October 2019), memorial page for Zoe Porphyrogenita (unknown–Jun 1050), Find A Grave Memorial no. 122488136, citing Church of the Holy Apostles, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey ; Maintained by Mademoiselle (contributor 46591139), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122488136/zoe-porphyrogenita. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoe_Porphyrogenita
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bagrat 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/georgia/bagrat2.html

Romanus III Argyropolus (?) Emperor of Byzantium1

M, #48215, d. circa 1034
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     Romanus III Argyropolus (?) Emperor of Byzantium married Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium, daughter of Constantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium and Elena (?), on 9 November 1028
;
Her 1st husband.1,2,3
Romanus III Argyropolus (?) Emperor of Byzantium died circa 1034.1,2
      ; ROMANUS III (Argyropolus), an official 60 years old, first husband of Zoë. He made great efforts to gain popularity by catering to the populace, the nobility, and especially the Church. The patriarchate was permitted to persecute the Monophysites of Syria, thousands of whom fled to Muslim territory. The hatred engendered by this policy helps to explain the Seljuk advance in subsequent years.1

Family

Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium b. 980, d. Jun 1050
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 189, 229. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zoe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027726&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bagrat 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/georgia/bagrat2.html

Michael IV Paphlagonian (?) Emperor of Byzantium1

M, #48216, d. circa 1041
Last Edited2 Jul 2020
     Michael IV Paphlagonian (?) Emperor of Byzantium married Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium, daughter of Constantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium and Elena (?), in 1034
;
Her 2nd husband.1,2,3
Michael IV Paphlagonian (?) Emperor of Byzantium died circa 1041.1,2
      ; MICHAEL IV (the Paphlagonian), second husband of Zoë. He was a man of lowly origin who promptly established his brothers (mostly men of energy and ability) in high office.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 189, 229. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zoe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027726&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium1

M, #48217, b. circa 1000, d. 11 January 1055
FatherTheodosios Monomachos2,3,4,5
MotherNN Tornikaina6
ReferenceEDV28
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium married Unknown (?), daughter of Pulkheria Argyra,
;
His 1st wife.4,7 Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium was born circa 1000; Genealogy.EU says b. c 980. Genealogics and Wikipedia say b. c 1000.8,9,3 He married Helena Skleraina, daughter of Basileios (?) Skleros Magistros and Pulcheria Argyropoulina, before 1025
;
His 2nd wife.9,10,4,11 Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium married Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium, daughter of Constantine VIII (?) Emperor of Byzantium and Elena (?), on 11 June 1042
;
Her 2nd husband; his 3rd wife.1,8,3,9,4,12 Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium married Irene (?) of Alania, daughter of Dorgholel (?) King of the Alans, in 1054
;
His 4th? wife; her 1st husband.
NB: Genealogy.EU seems to be the only source that shows this marriage.13
Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium died on 11 January 1055.1,3,9
Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium was buried after 11 January 1055 at Monastery of Mangana, Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now); From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1000
     DEATH     11 Jan 1055 (aged 54–55)
     He reigned as Byzantine emperor from June 11, 1042 to January 11, 1055. He had been chosen by the Empress Zoe as a husband and co-emperor in 1042, although he had been exiled for conspiring against her previous husband, Emperor Michael IV the Paphlagonian. They ruled together until Zoe died in 1050.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Zoe Porphyrogenita unknown–1050
     BURIAL     Monastery of Mangana, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
     Created by: Mademoiselle
     Added: 30 Dec 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 122487801.14
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Konstantinos IX Monomakhos was born about 1000, the son of Theodosios Monomachos, an important bureaucrat under emperors Basilius II and Konstantinos VII. At some point Theodosios had been suspected of conspiracy and his son's career suffered accordingly. Except for Psellos, there is no record of Konstantinos' first wife. Before 1025 he married a daughter (given by some sources as Pulcheria, by others as Helena) of Basileios (Basilos) Skleros, himself given in some sources as a grandson of Emperor Bardas Skleros (though other sources show no progeny for Bardas). Konstantinos' position improved as his second wife was a niece of Emperor Romanos III Argyros. With her he had a daughter 'Irene' Maria who would have progeny. Konstantinos' wife is said to have died between 1032 and 1034.
     "For catching the eye of Empress Zoe, daughter of Emperor Constantine VIII, Konstantinos was exiled to the island of Lesbos by her second husband, Emperor Michael IV (her first had been Emperor Romanos III, uncle of Konstantins' second wife). He was retrieved from exile in 1042, when he was appointed judge in Greece, but before he undertook his appointment, Konstantinos was summoned to Constantinople as Zoe's choice for husband. They were married on 11 June 1042, without the participation of Patriarch Alexius I of Constantinople, who refused to officiate over a third marriage (for both spouses). On the following day Konstantinos was formally proclaimed emperor, together with Zoe and her sister Theodora. Empress Zoe died about 1050, leaving no progeny, and her sister retired from her role.
     "Konstantinos purged the relatives of Michael IV from the court. The new emperor was pleasure-loving and prone to violent outbursts on suspicion of conspiracy. In August 1042, under the influence of the Skleroi (the family of his second wife), Konstantinos relieved General George Maniakes from his command in Italy, and Maniakes rebelled, declaring himself emperor in September. He transferred his troops into the Balkans and was about to defeat Konstantinos' army in battle when he was wounded and died on the field, ending the crisis in 1043. Immediately after the victory, Konstantinos was attacked by a fleet from Kievan Rus', which may have been part of the Maniakes rebellion. They too were defeated, with the help of Greek fire. In 1046 Konstantinos married his daughter 'Irene' Maria to Vsevolod I, the future grand duke of Kiev, the favourite son of his dangerous opponent Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch, grand duke of Kiev, by Ingegerd of Sweden.
     "In 1045 Konstantinos annexed the Armenian kingdom of Ani, but this expansion merely exposed the empire to new enemies. In 1046 the Byzantines came into contact for the first time with the Seljuk Turks. They met in battle in Armenia in 1048, and settled a truce the following year. However, Konstantinos foolishly disbanded the Armenian troops to save money in 1053, leaving the eastern frontier poorly defended at precisely the moment when its defences should have been strengthened. Even if Seljuk rulers were willing to abide by the treaty, their unruly Turcoman allies showed much less restraint. Thus Konstantinos weakened the Byzantine forces, which would later lead to their cataclysmic defeat at the Battle of Manzikert in 1071.
     "In 1047 Konstantinos was faced by the rebellion of his nephew Leo Tornikios in Adrianople. Tornikios gained support in most of Thrace and vainly attempted to take Constantinople. Forced to retreat, Tornikios failed in another siege, and was captured during his flight. The revolt had weakened Byzantine defences in the Balkans and in 1048 the area was raided by the Pechenegs, who continued to plunder it for the next five years. The emperor's efforts to contain the enemy through diplomacy merely exacerbated the situation, as rival Pecheneg leaders clashed on Byzantine ground, and Pecheneg settlers were allowed to live in compact settlements in the Balkans, making it difficult to suppress their rebellion. Faced with such difficulties, Konstantinos may have sought Hungarian support.
     "Internally, Konstantinos sought to secure his position by favouring the nobility _(dynatoi)_ and granting generous tax immunities to major landowners and the church. Similarly, he seems to have taken recourse to the _pronoia_ system, a sort of Byzantine feudal contract in which tracts of land (or the tax revenues from them) were granted to particular individuals in exchange for contributing and maintaining military forces. Both expedients gradually compromised the effectiveness of the state and contributed to the development of the crisis that engulfed Byzantium in the second half of the 11th century.
     "In 1054 the centuries-old differences between the Greek and Roman churches led to their final separation. Legates from Pope Leo IX excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople Michael Keroularios when Keroularios would not agree to adopt western church practices, and in return Keroularios excommunicated the legates. This sabotaged Konstantins' attempts to ally with the pope against the Normans, who had taken advantage of Maniakes' disappearance to take over Southern Italy.
     "Konstantinos tried to intervene, but he fell ill and died on 11 January of the following year. Theodora, the elderly daughter of Konstantinos VIII who had ruled with her sister Zoe since 1042, was recalled from her retirement and named empress.
     "Konstantinos IX was also a patron of the arts and literature, and during his reign the university in Constantinople expanded its juridical and philosophical programs. The literary circle at court included the philosopher and historian Michael Psellos, whose _Chronographia_ records the history of Konstantinos' reign. Psellos left a physical description of Konstantinos in his _Chronographia:_ he was 'ruddy as the sun, but all his breast, and down to his feet...(were) coloured the purest white all over, with exquisite accuracy. When he was in his prime, before his limbs lost their virility, anyone who cared to look at him closely would surely have likened his head to the sun in its glory, so radiant was it, and his hair to the rays of the sun, while the in rest of his body he would have seen the purest and most translucent crystal.'
     "Overall, Konstantinos' reign was a disaster for the Byzantine empire; in particular, the military weakness for which he was largely responsible greatly contributed to the subsequent loss of Asia Minor to the Turks, and the ultimate fall of Constantinople to the Muslim Ottomans in 1453.
     "Konstantinos' family name Monomakhos ('one who fights alone') was inherited by his grandson Vladimir Monomakh, grand duke of Kiev."9 EDV-28.

; This is the same person as:
”Constantine IX Monomachos” at Wikipedia and as
”Constantin IX” at Wikipédia (Fr.)3,15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 141.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 26.9
Constantine IX Monomachos (?) Emperor of Byzantium was also known as Konstantinos IX Monomachus Emperor of Byzantium.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "KONSTANTINOS Monomachos ([1005/1010]-11 Jan 1055, bur Monastery of Mangana). Psellos names "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" when recording that Empress Zoe chose to marry him[1655]. His birth date is estimated from Psellos describing him as a "young man" at the time of the accession of Emperor Romanos III[1656]. Although well-born and held in respect, neither Emperor Basileios II nor Emperor Konstantinos VIII promoted him to office, for they were suspicious about his relations with the Skleros family after his second marriage[1657]. Nevertheless, Konstantinos appears to have enjoyed a close relationship with Empress Zoe, especially during the reign of Emperor Mikhael IV, although the latter fabricated charges against him and exiled him to the island of Lesbos. After her joint accession with her sister, Empress Zoe recalled Konstantinos from exile and married him, despite the Byzantine church's prohibition of third marriages[1658]. He was crowned 12 Jun 1042 as Emperor KONSTANTINOS IX. He started his reign with another flush of largesse, which exhausted his treasury[1659]. His general Giorgios Maniakis recaptured the eastern part of Sicily from the Arabs, but was ordered to withdraw by the emperor before he could push his advantage further. Resentful of this treatment, Maniakis rebelled and was acclaimed emperor by his troops, but was killed in battle in 1043 en route to Constantinople. Leon Tornikios (who had courted Emperor Konstantinos's sister Euprepia) rebelled, was proclaimed emperor Sep 1047, and besieged Constantinople but he was captured and blinded[1660]. After several years of lengthy dispute over the standardisation of the liturgy, the Patriarch Mikhael Cerularios in 1055 excommunicated the papal legates in Constantinople (who had just pronounced his own excommunication) and triggered the final separation of the Orthodox church from the Roman Catholic. Emperor Konstantinos suffered from a debilitating illness which attacked his joints and produced partial paralysis[1661]. Cedrenus records the burial of Emperor Konstantinos the day he died "in Manganis"[1662].
     "m firstly ---. Psellos records that "Constantine the son of Theodosius…the last scion of the ancient family of the Monomachi in the male line" had "in the first place [become] the son-in-law to the outstanding member of court society but his wife fell ill and died"[1663]. There is no indication in the text who this might indicate.
     "m secondly (before 1025) --- Skleraina, daughter of BASILEIOS Skleros & his wife Pulcheria Argyre (-before 1034). Psellos records the second marriage of Konstantinos, arranged by Romanos Argyros before he became emperor, to "the daughter of his sister Pulcheria, who in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus", stating that she was her parents' only child[1664]. Zonaras records that, after the death of his first wife, Konstantinos married "imperatoris Romani nepte ex fratre"[1665]. According to Psellos, she died before her husband's exile to Lesbos[1666].
     "m thirdly (11 Jun 1042) as her third husband, Empress ZOE, widow firstly of Emperor ROMANOS III and secondly of Emperor MIKHAEL IV, daughter of Emperor KONSTANTINOS VIII & his wife Helena --- (980-1050).
     "Mistress (1): MARIA [Skleraina], daughter of --- (-[1044], bur Monastery of Mangana[1667]). Zonaras records that, after the death of his second wife, Konstantinos was unable to marry a third time but took as his mistress "consobrina uxoris suæ…adulescentula…et nobili Sclerorum familia orta"[1668]. Psellos records that "the niece of his late wife" became mistress of Konstantinos Monomakhos, the future Emperor Konstantinos IX, after the death of his second wife, being unable to marry her because of the Orthodox church's prohibition of third marriages[1669]. As Psellos, in an earlier passage, records that the second wife of Konstantinos was her parents' only child[1670], the word "niece" cannot be interpreted in its strict sense in this text. The editor of the edition of Psellos which has been consulted states that she was the sister of Romanos Skleros and granddaughter of Bardas (children of an otherwise unrecorded brother of Basileios Skleros), but the primary source on which this is based has not so far been identified[1671]. If this is correct, she and her brother must have been born from an otherwise second marriage of Basileios Skleros. Psellos hints that this might be correct when he refers to her in later passages as "Sclerena"[1672]. Another possibility is that one of Maria's parents was the daughter or son of either Pulcheria Argyre or Basileios Skleros (the parents of Konstantinos's first wife) by a second marriage: Psellos does suggest that Pulcheria and Basileios's marriage terminated early when he states that "…Pulcheria…in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus"[1673]. The primary source which confirms her name has not so far been identified. She followed him into exile on Lesbos in 1034. She was recalled to Constantinople after her husband's accession but was unpopular, her presence causing a riot 9 Mar 1044. Eventually, she was introduced openly to the Palace as her husband's mistress, acting as a junior consort, and was granted the title Augusta[1674]. Psellos records the death of "Sclerena" and the emperor's grief[1675].
     "Mistress (2): (after 1044) GORANDUXT of Georgia, daughter of GIORGI I King of Georgia & [his wife Mariam of Vaspurakan]. Psellos records that the emperor "fell in love with…one of our hostages from Alania…the daughter of the king there"[1676]. She became the emperor's mistress and was granted the title Augusta[1677]. Zonaras records that, after the death of Empress Zoe, Emperor Konstantinos fell in love with "adulescentulam quondam Alani principis filiam, obsidem Romanis datam" and installed her as "Augustam"[1678]. The Georgian Chronicle records that Emperor Konstantinos IX requested "of Bagrat his sister Goranduxt"[1679]. The Georgian Chronicle records that "Georgi" died leaving "two sons Bagrat and Demetre and two daughters"[1680]. The source contains no indication of the name of the mother of the two daughters."
Med Lands cites:
[1655] Psellos, pp. 161-2.
[1656] Psellos, p. 163.
[1657] Psellos, pp. 162-3.
[1658] Psellos, pp. 163-5.
[1659] Psellos, p. 170.
[1660] Psellos, pp. 205-219.
[1661] Psellos, pp. 221-4.
[1662] Cedrenus II, col. 342.
[1663] Psellos, p. 162.
[1664] Psellos, p. 163.
[1665] Zonaras XVII, 20, p. 615.
[1666] Psellos, p. 180.
[1667] Where her lover was buried beside her after his own death, see Psellos, p. 189, footnote 1.
[1668] Zonaras XVII, 21, p. 618.
[1669] Psellos, pp. 180-1.
[1670] Psellos, p. 163.
[1671] Psellos, p. 180 footnote 1.
[1672] Psellos, p. 184.
[1673] Psellos, p. 163.
[1674] Psellos, pp. 183-4.
[1675] Psellos, p. 189.
[1676] Psellos, p. 235.
[1677] Psellos, pp. 235-7.
[1678] Zonaras XVII, 28, p. 648.
[1679] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 103.
[1680] Georgian Chronicle (13th century) 17, p. 101.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter (-before 1034). Psellos records the second marriage of Konstantinos, arranged by Romanos Argyros before he became emperor, to "the daughter of his sister Pulcheria, who in the past had been married to Basil Sclerus", stating that she was her parents' only child[1459]. Zonaras records that, after the death of his first wife, Konstantinos married "imperatoris Romani nepte ex fratre"[1460]. According to Psellos, she died before her husband's exile to Lesbos[1461].
     "m (before 1025) as his second wife, KONSTANTINOS Monomachos, son of THEODOSIOS Monomachos & his wife --- ([1005/10]-11 Jan 1055, bur Monastery of Mangana). He succeeded in 1042 as Emperor KONSTANTINOS IX."
Med Lands cites:
[1459] Psellos, p. 163.
[1460] Zonaras XVII, 20, p. 615.
[1461] Psellos, p. 180.11
He was Emperor of Byzantium. Ruled alone after death of his wife Zoe between 1042 and 1055.1

; Per Enc. of World History: "CONSTANTINE IX (Monomachus), the third husband of Zoë, a scholarly person wholly out of sympathy with the army and with the military aristocracy. He systematically neglected the frontier defenses and the forces."1

Family 1

Unknown (?)

Family 2

Helena Skleraina d. bt 1032 - 1034
Child

Family 3

Zoe Porphyrogenita (?) Empress of Byzantium b. 980, d. Jun 1050

Family 4

Irene (?) of Alania d. 1108

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 189, 229. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theodosios Monomachos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00263739&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantine_IX_Monomachos. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#KonstantinosIXdied1055. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#TheodosiosMonomachos
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm#TornikaineMTheodosiosMonomachos
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00564480&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Byzantium 10 page (The Macedonian family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant10.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konstantinos IX Monomakhos: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027725&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN Skleraina: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220753&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#SklerainaMKonstantinosMonomachos
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Zoe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027726&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bagrat 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/georgia/bagrat2.html
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 02 July 2020), memorial page for Constantine IX Monomachos (1000–11 Jan 1055), Find a Grave Memorial no. 122487801, citing Monastery of Mangana, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey; Maintained by Mademoiselle (contributor 46591139), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/122487801/constantine_ix-monomachos. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Constantin IX: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantin_IX. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 1 page - Rurikids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, 'Irene' Maria Monamacha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027062&tree=LEO

Henri (?) Archbishop of Reims1,2

M, #48218, b. 1121, d. 13 November 1175
FatherLouis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France1,2,3 b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137
MotherAdelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France1,2,4 b. c 1092, d. 18 Aug 1154
Last Edited1 Nov 2019
     Henri (?) Archbishop of Reims was born in 1121.2
Henri (?) Archbishop of Reims died on 13 November 1175.2
Henri (?) Archbishop of Reims was buried after 13 November 1175 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France.2
     He was Archbishop of Rheims.2 He was Bishop of Beauvais.2

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO

Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France1,2,3,4,5

F, #48219, b. circa 1180, d. 20 July 1201
FatherBerthold III/VI von Andechs Duke of Meran and Dalmatia6,2,7,8,9,10,11 b. 1153, d. 12 Aug 1204
MotherAgnes (?) von Rochlitz2,12,8,11,4 d. 25 Mar 1195
Last Edited13 Oct 2020
     Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France was born circa 1180.2,9,10,11 She married Philippe II Auguste (?) King of France, Count of Artois, son of Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France and Adelaide (Alix, Adèle, Ala) de Blois Countess of Champagne, in June 1196
;
His 3rd wife. Med Lands says "m thirdly (bigamously 1 Jun 1196, repudiated 1200.)1,6,13,2,14,4,15,11" Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France and Philippe II Auguste (?) King of France, Count of Artois were divorced in 1200; repudiated.13,2,14,4,15,11
Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France died on 20 July 1201 at Château Poissy, Poissy, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France (now).6,2,9,10,11
Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France was buried after 20 July 1201 at Abbaye royale de Saint-Corentin, Septeuil, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1175
     DEATH     20 Jul 1201 (aged 25–26)
     Royalty. She was born some time between 1172 and 1175 as daughter of Berthold IV. of Andechs-Meraniea and his second wife Agnes von Rochlitz. She married Philippe II of France in 1196 despite him not being divorced from his second wife. She died after giving birth to her third child.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Berthold IV von Andechs 1153–1204
          Agnes of Rochlitz unknown–1195
     Spouse
          Philippe II Augustus of France 1165–1223
     Siblings
          Hedwig of Andechs 1174–1243
          Otto I von Andechs 1180–1234
          Gertrude von Andechs-Meran 1185–1213
     Children
          Marie de France 1198–1224
          Philippe de France 1200–1234
     BURIAL     Abbaye royale de Saint-Corentin, Septeuil, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 3 Feb 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 104557649.16
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPE de France, son of LOUIS VII King of France & his third wife Alix de Champagne (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis[508]). Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1165 that “regina Francorum” gave birth to “filium...Philippum”[509]. William of Tyre names him and records his parentage, specifying that he was his father's only son[510]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1165 the birth "un des jours d'août, jour de dimanche, dans l'octave de l'Assomption de sainte Marie" of "un fils…Philippe" to King Louis[511]. The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Philippum" as the son of "Ludovicus rex" and his wife Alix de Champagne[512]. He was consecrated associate-king 1 Nov 1179, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. He succeeded his father in 1180 as PHILIPPE II “Auguste” King of France. In 1183, following the death without a direct heir of Elisabeth de Vermandois (first wife of Philippe Count of Flanders), Philippe claimed her inheritance. He conquered Chauny and Saint-Quentin in 1182, and under the Treaty of Boves in Jul 1185 took parts of Valois and Amiénois. He took Tournai from Flanders in 1187. He left on the Third Crusade from Vézelay with Richard I King of England 4 Jul 1190, landing at Acre 20 Apr 1191. He returned to France in early Aug 1191 soon after the final capitulation of Acre 12 Jul 1191[513]. After the death of Philippe Count of Flanders in 1191, Philippe took control of Artois and parts of Vermandois. He was a candidate for the imperial throne in 1197, following the death of Emperor Heinrich IV. He recaptured Normandy from John King of England in 1204. He defeated the English/German/Flemish coalition at Bouvines 27 Jul 1214. He took possession of Alençon in Jan 1221, Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in 1218, Beaumont-sur-Oise in Apr 1223. The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "II Id Jul" of "domini Philippi regis Francie"[514]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1223 "à Mantes, la veille des ides de juillet" of King Philippe and his burial "dans le monastère de Saint-Denis en France"[515].
     "m firstly (Abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité, Bapaume, Pas-de-Calais 28 Apr 1180) ISABELLE de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut [BAUDOUIN VIII “le Courageux” Count of Flanders] & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders (23 Apr 1170-Paris 14/15 Mar 1190, bur Paris, Cathedral of Notre-Dame). The Chronicon Hanoniense records the birth "mense Aprili 1170" of "filiam Elizabeth" to "Balduinus [et] Margharetam…Mathie comitis Boloniensis sororem"[516]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1191 names "Elizabeth Francie reginam…Hyolenz uxorem Petri Autisiodorensis et Sibiliam domnam Bellioci uxorem Wichardi" as the three daughters of "Balduinus [Haynaco]"[517]. The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis names the wife of Philippe II King of France as "Elisabeth regina que fuit soror Balduini comitis Flandrie", when recording the birth of their son Louis in 1187[518]. Her marriage is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who also names her parents, although he incorrectly calls her "Margareta"[519]. This marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Philippe Count of Flanders while he was adviser to Philippe II King of France in 1180 after the latter's accession, with Artois as her dowry[520]. Consecrated Queen of France 29 May 1180, Abbaye de Saint-Denis. King Philippe planned to repudiate her in 1186, for lack of a male heir. The Flandria Generosa records the death in 1189 of "Elisabeth Francorum regina" after giving birth to twins, specifying her burial "in eccleisa beatæ Mariæ Parisius"[521]. The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the death "1189 Id Mar" of "Elysabeth regina uxor Philippi Francorum regis" and her burial "in ecclesiam beatissime virginis Marie Parisius"[522]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Id Mar" of "Isabel regina Francorum"[523].
     "m secondly (Notre-Dame d’Amiens, Somme 14 Aug 1193, repudiated later that year, annulled Compiègne 5 Nov 1193, annulment declared illegal 13 Mar 1195, remarried 1200) INGEBJÖRG of Denmark, daughter of VALDEMAR I King of Denmark & his wife Sofia --- (1174-Priory of Saint-Jean-en-l’Ile, near Corbeil, Essonne 29 Jul 1236, bur Saint Jean-en-l'Ile). The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the marriage of King Philippe in 1193 and "sororem regis Daciæ…Ingelburgh" and his repudiation of her after the wedding[524]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam…regis Dano", recording that he repudiated her after 8 days and imprisoned her[525]. She was known as ISAMBOUR in France. She was consecrated Queen of France 15 Aug 1193, but during the ceremony King Philippe "by the devil's suggestion, began to be horrified, to tremble and turn pale at the sight of her"[526]. The chronicler William of Newburgh reported that the king's aversion to Isambour was reported to be due to the fetid smell of her breath or to some hidden deformity[527]. King Philippe disavowed her, imprisoned her at Cysoing and procured an annulment from prelates at the synod of Compiègne, although this was not recognised by the Pope[528]. A charter dated 1193 records that Etienne Bishop of Tournai requested Guillaume Archbishop of Reims to protect "Reginam" who had sought protection in Cysoing abbey[529]. Protracted correspondence with successive Popes ensued, the dispute being complicated by the king's bigamous third marriage. King Philippe's refusal to restore Isambour eventually resulted in Pope Innocent III's interdict on France 13 Jan 1200. The king restored Isambour as queen from Apr 1213, although it is likely that the couple did not live together, Isambour living on her dower lands near Orléans[530]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1237 of "senior regina Francie…Guineburgis sive Indeburgis de Dacia" specifying that she was "domna Aurelianensis"[531]. The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Kal Aug" of "regina Ysenburgis…uxor regis Francorum Philippi"[532].
     "m thirdly (bigamously 1 Jun 1196, repudiated 1200) AGNES von Andechs-Merano, daughter of BERTHOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese of Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin ([1180]-Château de Poissy, Yvelines 18/19 Jul 1201, bur église abbatiale de Saint-Corentin, Rosay, near Mantes, Yvelines). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1196 of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie"[533]. The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the marriage in Jun 1196 of "Philippus rex" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et Boemie marchionisque Hystrie"[534]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Agnes regina Francie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" when recording her death, in 1250 which is incorrect[535]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the third marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam Bertoldi ducis de Durenbon", recording that she died giving birth to her third child[536]. Her children were recognised as legitimate by Pope Innocent III 2 Nov 1201. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1201 of "mater…Philippus puer et Maria soror eius" and her burial "iuxta Melentam in ecclesie beati Corentini"[537]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "Kal Aug XIII" of "Chuniza Agnes regina Francie filia ducis Meranie Berhtoldi"[538]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Aug" of "Agnes regina Francie"[539].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a lady from Arras. Kerrebrouck records that the mother of Pierre, son of King Philippe II, was "une dame d´Arras", citing the Chronique rimée of Philippe Mouskes[540]."
Med Lands cites:
[508] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1223, p. 82, "tertio autem idus Augusti mortuus est".
[509] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 512.
[510] William of Tyre XXII.IV, p. 1068.
[511] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 44.
[512] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 515.
[513] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 52.
[514] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 819.
[515] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 131.
[516] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 519.
[517] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1191, MGH SS XXIII, p. 868.
[518] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1187, MGH SS V, p. 46.
[519] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1180, p. 317.
[520] Count Philippe was never appointed regent of France nor guardian of the young king, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 114, footnote 14.
[521] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 7, MGH SS IX, p. 329.
[522] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1189, MGH SS XXVI, p. 291.
[523] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 312.
[524] Radulphi de Coggeshall, Chronicon Anglicanum, p. 62.
[525] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536.
[526] Gesta Innocentii III, xlviii. 93-4, quoted in Conklin, George 'Ingeborg of Denmark, Queen of France, 1193-1223', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 40 footnote 4.
[527] Howlett, R. (ed.) Chronicles of the Reigns of Stephen, Henry II and Richard I, 4 vols. RS 82 (London, 1884-89), I, 369, quoted in Conklin 'Ingeborg of Denmark', p. 40 footnote 5.
[528] Baldwin, J. 'La vie sexuelle de Philippe Auguste' Mariage et sexualité ay Moyen âge. Accord ou crise? Colloque international de Conques, sous la direction de M. Rouche, pp. 217-229, and Bruguières, N. B. 'Le mariage de Philippe Auguste et Isambour de Danemark, Aspects canoniques et politiques', Melanges offerts à Jean Dauvilier (Toulouse, 1979), pp. 135-56.
[529] Coussemaker, I. de (ed.) (1886) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Cysoing et de ses dépendances (Lille) ("Cysoing"), LX, p. 74.
[530] Conklin 'Ingeborg of Denmark', p. 51.
[531] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 942.
[532] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 162.
[533] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 872.
[534] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1196, MGH SS XXVI, p. 293.
[535] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.
[536] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536.
[537] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878.
[538] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[539] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.
[540] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 112, citing Philippe Mouskès Chronique rimée, vers 20723.15

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “G5. [3m.] King PHILIPPE II AUGUSTE of France (1180-1223) cr 1179, *Gonesse 22.8.1165, +Mantes 14.7.1223, bur St.Denis; 1m: Bapaume 28.4.1180 Cts Isabelle d'Artois (*1170 +15.3.1190); 2m: 14.8.1193 (repudiated later that year, but remarried 1200) Ingeborg of Denmark (*1175 +1236); 3m: VI.1196 (repudiated 1200) Agnes von Andechs (+1201); for his descendants see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html”.17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: yr 1961.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1 86B.10


; Per Genealogics:
     "Agnès was born about 1176, the daughter of Berthold VI von Andechs, duke of Meran and Dalmatia, and Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz. She was the sister of Hedwig, later to be canonised, who married Henryk I 'the Bearded', Herzog von Schlesien und Krakau.
     "Philippe II August, king of France, widower of Isabelle of Flanders, wanted to befriend the king of Denmark by marrying his daughter Ingeborg. But the Danes were then very backward in culture and learning, and Ingeborg was dull, and ignorant, not the sort of courtly lady Philippe was accustomed to.
     "Philippe took such a dislike to her that he sent her into a convent and instead, in June 1196, he married the beautiful Agnès. They had a daughter Marie and son Philippe who would have progeny. However Pope Innocent III espoused the cause of Ingeborg and eventually put the kingdom under an interdict. He threatened to forbid any service in any church except in those of the monks and nuns, and there only with the doors shut against outsiders. The whole nation was to be cut off from God because of the monarch's sin.
     "Philippe pretended to agree to a separation from Agnès, and they were divorced in 1200, whereupon he married Ingeborg. In fact he did not turn Agnès away and Ingeborg was imprisoned. Agnès died in 1201, and the pope acknowledged the legitimacy of her children by Philippe."10

; This is the same person as ”Agnes of Merania” at Wikipedia, as ”Agnès de Méranie” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien” at Wikipedia (DE).8,18,5 Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France was also known as Agnes Maria of Andechs-Merania.8 Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France was also known as Agnès de Meran.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Diessen 1): “D6. Agnes, *1180, +château de Poissy 1201, bur there; m.1196 (div 1200) King Philippe II Augustus of France (+1223)”.19

; Per Med Lands: "AGNES ([1180]-Château de Poissy, Yvelines [18/20] Jul 1201, bur église abbatiale de Saint-Corentin, Rosay, near Mantes, Yvelines). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1196 of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie"[368]. The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the marriage in Jun 1196 of "Philippus rex" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et Boemie marchionisque Hystrie"[369]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Agnes regina Francie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" when recording her death, in 1250 which is incorrect[370]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the third marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam Bertoldi ducis de Durenbon", recording that she died giving birth to her third child[371]. Her children were recognised as legitimate by Pope Innocent III 2 Nov 1201. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1201 of "mater…Philippus puer et Maria soror eius" and her burial "iuxta Melentam in ecclesie beati Corentini"[372]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "Kal Aug XIII" of "Chuniza Agnes regina Francie filia ducis Meranie Berhtoldi"[373]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Aug" of "Agnes regina Francie"[374]. m (1 Jun 1196, divorced 1200) PHILIPPE II "Auguste" King of France, son of LOUIS VII King of France & his third wife Alix de Champagne (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)."
Med Lands cites:
[368] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 872.
[369] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1196, MGH SS XXVI, p. 293.
[370] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.
[371] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536.
[372] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878.
[373] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[374] Obituaires de Sens Tome I, 1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES ([1180]-Château de Poissy, Yvelines [18/20] Jul 1201, bur église abbatiale de Saint-Corentin, Rosay, near Mantes, Yvelines). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1196 of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie"[368]. The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the marriage in Jun 1196 of "Philippus rex" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et Boemie marchionisque Hystrie"[369]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Agnes regina Francie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" when recording her death, in 1250 which is incorrect[370]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the third marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam Bertoldi ducis de Durenbon", recording that she died giving birth to her third child[371]. Her children were recognised as legitimate by Pope Innocent III 2 Nov 1201. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1201 of "mater…Philippus puer et Maria soror eius" and her burial "iuxta Melentam in ecclesie beati Corentini"[372]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "Kal Aug XIII" of "Chuniza Agnes regina Francie filia ducis Meranie Berhtoldi"[373]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Aug" of "Agnes regina Francie"[374].
     "m (1 Jun 1196, divorced 1200) PHILIPPE II "Auguste" King of France, son of LOUIS VII King of France & his third wife Alix de Champagne (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)."
Med Lands cites:
[368] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 872.
[369] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1196, MGH SS XXVI, p. 293.
[370] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330.
[371] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536.
[372] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878.
[373] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
[374] Obituaires de Sens Tome I, 1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.11
She was Queen consort of France between 1196 and 1200.8

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/diessen/diessen2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Meran: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004025&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004025&tree=LEO
  5. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Agnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes-Maria_von_Andechs-Meranien. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthold VI von Andechs: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033350&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Merania. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#BertoldIIIAndechsMeranodied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004025&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#AgnesMeranodied1201
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Nieder-Lausitz: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033351&tree=LEO
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe II Auguste: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000170&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIIdied1223B
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 November 2019), memorial page for Agnes Marie of Andechs (1175–20 Jul 1201), Find A Grave Memorial no. 104557649, citing Abbaye royale de Saint-Corentin, Septeuil, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/104557649/agnes-marie-of_andechs. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#P2
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Agnès de Méranie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agn%C3%A8s_de_M%C3%A9ranie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Diessen 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/diessen1.html#AB3
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012284&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Mariedied1238

Philippe dit Tristan Hurepel (?) Cte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, de Mortain, d'Aumale, de Boulogne et de Dammartin1,2

M, #48220, b. 1200, d. 19 July 1234
FatherPhilippe II Auguste (?) King of France, Count of Artois3,4,5 b. 22 Aug 1165, d. 14 Jul 1223
MotherAgnes-Maria von Andechs-Meranien Queen of France3,5,6 b. c 1180, d. 20 Jul 1201
Last Edited8 Aug 2020
     Philippe dit Tristan Hurepel (?) Cte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, de Mortain, d'Aumale, de Boulogne et de Dammartin was born in 1200.1,2,7 He married Mathilde/Mahaut/Mafalda (?) Cts de Dammartin et de Boulogne, daughter of Renaud I (?) comte de Boulogne de Dammartin, d’Aumale et de Mortain and Ida (?) of Flanders, Cts de Boulogne-sur-Mer, in 1216
;
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says: "contract Compiègne, Oise Aug 1201, contract Saint-Germain-en-Laye May 1210, 1216."1,2,8,9,7,10,11
Philippe dit Tristan Hurepel (?) Cte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, de Mortain, d'Aumale, de Boulogne et de Dammartin died on 19 July 1234 at Corbeil, France; Wikipedia says d. 1235.1,2,8,7,9
Philippe dit Tristan Hurepel (?) Cte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, de Mortain, d'Aumale, de Boulogne et de Dammartin was buried after 19 July 1234 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     Jul 1200
     DEATH     18 Jan 1234 (aged 33)
     Noblility. Son of Philippe Auguste and his third wife Agnes of Andechs.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philippe II Augustus of France 1165–1223
          Agnes Marie of Andechs 1175–1201
     Spouse
          Mahaut de Dammartin unknown–1259
     Siblings
          Marie de France 1198–1224
     Half Siblings
          Louis VIII Capet, King of France 1187–1226
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 19 Jan 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 103787919.2,12
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 14.7

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philip I of Boulogne (Philip Hurepel)[1] (1200–1235) was a French prince, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in his own right, and Count of Boulogne,[1] Mortain, Aumale, and Dammartin-en-Goële jure uxoris.
     "He was the son of Philip II of France[2] and his controversial third wife Agnes of Merania. Illegitimacy shadowed his birth and career,[3] but he was legitimated by Pope Innocent III. He was associated with founding the Tour du Guet in Calais.[4] He is the first recorded person to bear a differenced version of the arms of France.[5]
     "He was married in c. 1223 to Matilda II, Countess of Boulogne.[1] Young Philip, by right of his wife, became Count of Boulogne, Mortain, Aumale, and Dammartin-en-Goële. He revolted against his sister-in-law Blanche of Castile when his elder half-brother Louis VIII died in 1226.[6] When Philip died in 1235, Matilda continued to reign and was married to Afonso III of Portugal.
     "Matilda and Philip had a son Alberic and daughter Joan, who both survived Philip.
     "Alberic reportedly renounced his rights and went to England, for unknown reasons. Apparently he survived his mother and died in 1284.
     "Joan of Boulogne married Gaucher de Châtillon in 1236.
Sources
1. Charles T. Wood, The French Apanages and the Capetian Monarchy: 1224-1328, (Harvard University Press, 1966), 9.
2. John Baldwin, The Government of Philip Augustus, (University of California Press, 1991), 357. ISBN 9780520911116
3. The Empire and the Papacy by T.F. Tout
4. "Monuments historiques". Culture.gouv.fr. Retrieved 8 February 2012.
5. (Neubecker 1976, p. 98)
6. Malcolm Barber, The Two Cities: Medieval Europe 1050–1320, (Routledge, 1992), 266.9

Family

Mathilde/Mahaut/Mafalda (?) Cts de Dammartin et de Boulogne b. c 1202, d. 19 Jul 1258
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  3. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe II Auguste: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000170&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIIdied1223B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Meran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004025&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161626&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Portugal 5: p. 588. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_I,_Count_of_Boulogne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#MathildeDammartindied1259
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mafalda de Dammartin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00107275&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for Philippe “Hurepel” de France (Jul 1200–18 Jan 1234), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103787919, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/103787919/philippe-de_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00161630&tree=LEO
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Donzy.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne1,2,3

M, #48221, b. 20 November 1220, d. 21 August 1271
FatherLouis VIII "Le Lion" (?) King of France1,2,3,4,5 b. 5 Sep 1187, d. 8 Nov 1226
MotherDoña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France1,2,3,4,6 b. 4 Mar 1187/88, d. 27 Nov 1252
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne was born on 20 November 1220.2,3,7 He and Isabelle de Lusignan Dame de Beauvoir-sur-Mer, Marcillac et Chantoce were engaged in 1227; Med Lands says: "Betrothed (by treaty Vendôme Mar 1227) to ALPHONSE de France, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla (11 Nov 1220-Castle of Corneto, near Siena 21 Aug 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis.)8" Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne married Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse, daughter of Raimond VII 'le Jeune' (?) Comte de Toulouse, Marquis de Provence and Doña Sancha (?) Infanta de Aragón, in 1241.1,2,3,9,7,10

Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne died on 21 August 1271 at Castle of Corneto, near Siena, Toscana (Tuscany), Italy (now), at age 50.2,3,7
Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne was buried after 21 August 1271 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     11 Nov 1220
     DEATH     21 Aug 1271 (aged 50)
     Count of Poitiers and Toulouse. Born the seventh child of Louis VIII and Blanche de Castille. He was married to Jeanne de Toulouse, only child of Raimund VII.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis VIII Capet, King of France 1187–1226
          Blanche de Castile 1188–1252
     Spouse
          Jeanne de Toulouse 1220–1271
     Siblings
          Philippe de France 1209–1218
          Louis IX of France 1214–1270
          Robert I d'Artois 1216–1250
          Philippe Dagobert de France 1222–1232
          Isabelle of France 1225–1270
          Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
          Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
          
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 10 Sep 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 116896461.3,7,11
     He was Count of Poitou and Toulouse.2

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 15.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:12.7


; See Wikipedia article.12

Family 2

Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse b. 1220, d. 25 Aug 1271

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), France 4: p. 339. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis XIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000162&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alphonse de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003843&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#IsabelleLusignandied1300. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Toulouse: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013782&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 October 2019), memorial page for Alphonse III de Poitiers (11 Nov 1220–21 Aug 1271), Find A Grave Memorial no. 116896461, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116896461/alphonse_iii-de_poitiers. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse,_Count_of_Poitiers. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse1,2,3

F, #48222, b. 1220, d. 25 August 1271
FatherRaimond VII 'le Jeune' (?) Comte de Toulouse, Marquis de Provence4,2,5,6 b. Jul 1197, d. 27 Sep 1249
MotherDoña Sancha (?) Infanta de Aragón2,6 b. 1186, d. a 1241
Last Edited28 Oct 2019
     Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse was born in 1220.3,2,6 She and Hugues XI "le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de la Marche et Angouleme,Comte de Ponthieu were engaged in 1224.7,8 Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse married Alphonse III (?) de France, Cte de Poitiers et Toulouse, Duc d'Auvergne, son of Louis VIII "Le Lion" (?) King of France and Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France, in 1241.1,4,3,2,9,6

Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse died on 25 August 1271 at Castle of Corneto, near Siena, Toscana (Tuscany), Italy (now).3,2,6
Jeanne/Joan (?) Cts de Toulouse was buried after 25 August 1271 at Abbaye de Gercy, Varennes-Jarcy, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France (now); From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1220
     DEATH     26 Aug 1271 (aged 50–51)
     French nobility. Last Countess of Toulouse. Born the only child and heiress of Raymond VII and Sancha of Aragon, a daughter of Alfonso II. She succeeded her father as Countess of Toulouse in 1249. In 1225 she was betrothed to Hughues XI de Lusignan, but married Alphonse de France in 1237 instead. He became Count of Toulouse in her right. As their marriage remained childless the county fell to the crown of France by inheritance after her death.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Raymond VII of Toulouse 1197–1249
     Spouse
          Alphonse III de Poitiers 1220–1271
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Gercy, Varennes-Jarcy, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Lutetia
     Originally Created by: P Fazzini
     Added: 24 Mar 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 126813204.10
      ; [1m.] Css Jeanne de Toulouse (1249-71), *1220, +Corneto 25.8.1271; m.1241 Cte Alphonse de Poitiers (*1220 +1271.)2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 15, 41.6

; See Wikipedia article.8 She was Comtesse de Toulouse between 1249 and 1271.2,8

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028521&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Toulouse: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013782&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Countess_of_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alphonse de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003843&tree=LEO
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 October 2019), memorial page for Jeanne de Toulouse (1220–26 Aug 1271), Find A Grave Memorial no. 126813204, citing Abbaye de Gercy, Varennes-Jarcy, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/126813204/jeanne-de_toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #48223, b. September 1250, d. 11 July 1302
FatherRobert I (?) de France, Comte d'Artois1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 b. 17 Sep 1216, d. 8 Feb 1249/50
MotherMathilde/Mahaut/Maud (?) of Brabant, Countess of Artois1,2,4,5,6,9,10,11,8 b. 14 Jun 1224, d. 29 Sep 1288
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois was born in September 1250; born posthumously.2,3,5,6 He married Amicie de Courtenay heiress of Conches, Mehun, Selles, Châteaurenard and Charny, daughter of Pierre I de Courtenay sn de Conches et de Mehun and Perenelle de Joigny Dame de Chateaurenard et d'Amilly, in 1262 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now),
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 18 page) says m. 1262; his 1st wife.2,12,3,6,8 Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois married Agnes de Bourbon-Dampierre Dame de Bourbon, heiress of Nevers, Auxerre et Tonnerre, daughter of Archambaud IX «Le Jeune» de Bourbon seigneur de Bourbon and Yolande de Châtillon-Saint-Pol comtesse de Nevers, Auxerre et Tonnerre, dame du Perche-Goët, Montjoy, Thorigny, Broigny, Donzy et Saint-Aignan, before 13 June 1277
; her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.2,13,14,3,5,6,8 Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois married Margaretha de Hainaut, daughter of Jan II d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, Graaf van Holland and Philippa/Philippine (?) of Luxemburg, on 18 October 1298
; his 3rd wife.15,2,16,3,4,6,8,17,18
Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois died on 11 July 1302 at Battle of Courtrai/Kortrijk-Battle of the Golden Spurs, Courtrai/Kortrijk, West Flanders, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now), at age 51.1,2,3,5,6,19
Robert II "le Noble" (?) Cte d'Artois was buried after 11 July 1302 at Abbey de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     Sep 1250
     DEATH     11 Jul 1302 (aged 51)
     Count of Artois, posthumously born he succeeded his father Robert I at birth. He was married thrice and had three children from his first wife.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Matilda de Brabant Chatillon 1224–1288
     Spouses
      Amicie de Courtenay 1250–1275 (m. 1262)
      Agnes de Bourbon 1237–1287 (m. 1277)
      Marguerite de Hainaut 1274–1342 (m. 1289)
     Siblings
      Blanche d'Artois 1248–1302
      Beatrix de Chatillon 1255–1304
      Guy III de Chatillon 1258–1317
     Children
      Mathilde d'Artois 1268–1329
      Philipp d'Artois 1269–1298
     BURIAL     Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 24 Oct 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 60560601.2,20
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Robert II, comte d'Artois, was born in September 1250, the posthumous son and heir of Robert I, comte d'Artois, and Mathilde of Brabant. In 1262 he married Amicie de Courtenay, heiress of Conches, Méhun-sur-Yèvre, daughter of Pierre I de Courtenay, seigneur de Conches, de Méhun-sur-Yèvre, and Pérenelle de Joigny, dame de Châteaurenard et d'Amilly. They had three children of whom Mathilde and Philippe would have progeny.
     "After Amicie's death in Rome in 1275, Robert married twice more. In 1277 he married Agnès de Dampierre, dame de Bourbon, widow of Jean de Bourgogne, sire de Charolais, and daughter of Archambaud IX de Dampierre, seigneur de Bourbon, and Yolande de Châtillon, heiress of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre. She died in 1288, and in October 1298 Robert married Margaretha van Holland en Hainault, daughter of Jan II d'Avesnes, Graaf van Holland en Hainault, and Philippine de Luxembourg. Neither marriage resulted in progeny.
     "Robert was knighted by his uncle Louis IX, king of France. He took part in the Tunis crusade of 1270, in which he fought with great ferocity to avenge his father, who had been killed in the preceding crusade. His sister Blanche took refuge in France with her young daughter Jeanne following the death in 1274 of her husband Enrique I, king of Navarre. Robert's cousin Philippe III 'le Hardi', king of France, sent him to Navarre to re-establish his sister's authority as regent of Navarre. He did so, capturing Pamplona.
     "Following the Sicilian Vespers, the rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I Etienne, king of Naples, Robert came to Naples to help the king, his paternal uncle. In 1284 he took part in the Aragónese Crusade. On Charles' death in 1285 Robert acted as regent of Naples, as Charles' son Charles II was a prisoner of Pedro III, king of Aragon, having been captured by the admiral of the Sicilian fleet, Ruggiero de Lauria, in a naval battle outside Naples. When Charles II was freed on a promise to give up his claim to Sicily, Robert was incensed and left Italy in September 1289.
     "In 1296 King Philippe IV 'le Bel', married to Robert's niece Jeanne, sent Robert to Guyenne to fight the English. He defeated the Flemings in 1297 at the Battle of Furnes, but his son Philippe, fighting at his side, was gravely wounded and died a year later. Robert was again sent into Flanders in July 1302, where he began to ravage the countryside and attempted to take the town of Kortrijk. There he met the Flemish army at the Battle of the Golden Spurs (also known as the Battle of Courtrai) on 11 July. His infantry advanced with great success against the Flemish (mostly city militia), but he ordered their recall to allow his cavalry to make the final, victorious charge. However, on the broken, marshy ground, his knights were unable to gain enough momentum to break the Flemish shield wall, and they were knocked down and slaughtered. Robert led some of the reserves in a second charge in an attempt to reverse their fortunes, but he was cut down by the Flemish infantry. He was buried in the abbey of Maubuisson.
     "Robert's daughter Mathilde inherited Artois, though his grandson Robert III, son of her younger brother Philippe, would unsuccessfully attempt to claim it."8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:70.
     2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 7.
     3. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. page 38.
     4. Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises, 1977, Saillot, Jacques. page 231 nr.28.8

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert II (September 1250 – 11 July 1302) was the Count of Artois, the posthumous son and heir of Robert I and Matilda of Brabant.[1] He was a nephew of Louis IX of France. He died at the Battle of the Golden Spurs.
Life
     "An experienced soldier, he took part in the Aragonese Crusade and attempted an invasion of Sicily in 1287.[2] In 1288 Robert began work on a great park at Hesdin. The park contained a menagerie, aviaries, fishponds, orchards, an enclosed garden and facilities for tournaments.[3] It also contained mechanical statues including waving monkeys draped in skins.[4]
     "He defeated the Flemings in 1297 at the Battle of Furnes.[5] He was again sent into Flanders in July 1302, where he began to ravage the countryside and attempted to take the town of Kortrijk (Courtrai).
Battle of the Golden Spurs
     "He then met the Flemish army at the Battle of the Golden Spurs. His infantry advanced with great success against the Flemings (mostly city militia), but he ordered their recall to allow his cavalry to make the final, victorious charge. But on the broken, marshy ground, his knights were unable to gain enough momentum to break the Flemish shieldwall, and they were knocked down and slaughtered. Robert led some of the reserves in a second charge in an attempt to reverse their fortunes. Artois was unhorsed by Willem van Saeftinghe. He and his troops were cut down by the Flemish infantry.[6]
Family
     "In 1262 in Paris Robert married Amicie de Courtenay (1250–1275),[7] daughter of Pierre de Courtenay, Seigneur de Conches, a great-grandson of Louis VI, and Perronelle de Joigny. They had three children:
** Mahaut (1268–1329)[7]
** Philip (1269–1298)[7]
**Robert (born 1271, died young).

     "After Amicie's death, Robert married twice more: first, in 1277, to Agnes of Dampierre (1237–1288), heiress of Bourbon,[7] and then, on 18 October 1298 to Margaret (died 1342),[7] daughter of John II, Count of Hainaut. After Robert's death, his daughter Mahaut inherited Artois, but his grandson Robert III unsuccessfully tried to claim it.[1]
References
1. Henneman Jr. 1995, p. 143.
2. Housley 1992, p. 204.
3. Landsberg 1995, p. 22.
4. Macdougall 1986, p. 117,127.
5. Funck-Brentano 1922, p. 375.
6. Dunbabin 1991, p. 178.
7. Dunbabin 2011, p. xiv.
Sources
** Dunbabin, Jean (1991). A Hound of God: Pierre de la Palud and the Fourteenth-Century Church. Oxford University Press.
** Dunbabin, Jean (2011). The French in the Kingdom of Sicily, 1266–1305. Cambridge University Press.
** Funck-Brentano, Frantz (1922). The Middle Ages. Heinemann.
** Henneman Jr., John Bell (1995). "Artois". In Kibler, William W; Zinn, Grover A; Earp, Lawrence (eds.) Medieval France: An Encyclopedia. Routledge.
** Housley, Norman (1992). The Later Crusades, 1274–1580: From Lyons to Alcazar. Oxford University Press.
** Landsberg, Sylvia (1995). The Medieval Garden. Thames and Hudson.
** Macdougall, Elisabeth B., ed. (1986). Medieval Gardens. Dumbarton Oaks.
External links
** Coat of Arms in the Wijnbergen Roll: https://web.archive.org/web/20060316034150/http://www.briantimms.com/wijnbergen/wnartois1.htm."21

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT d'Artois (posthumously Sep 1250-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson). He succeeded his father at birth as ROBERT II "le Bon/le Noble" Comte d'Artois. His paternal uncle Charles I King of Sicily named him Captain and Vicar-General of the kingdom of Sicily 25 Dec 1275, a post which he held until 3 Mar 1276. Regent of Sicily in 1284-1289 for his cousin King Charles II, during the latter's period of imprisonment, Robert was named Captain General after the king's release 15 Sep 1289. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "V Id Jul" of "Roberti quondam Attrebatensis comitis et Mathildis defuncti filie comitisse Attrebatensis et Burgundie"[14].
     "m firstly (contract Paris 13 Jun 1359, 1262) AMICIE de Courtenay Dame de Conches-en-Ouches, daughter and heiress of PIERRE [I] de Courtenay Seigneur de Conches (1250-Rome 1275, bur Rome).
     "m secondly (before 13 Jun 1277) as her second husband, AGNES de Dampierre Dame de Bourbon, widow of JEAN de Bourgogne Seigneur de Charolais, daughter and co-heiress of ARCHAMBAUD [IX] Sire de Bourbon & his wife Yolande de Châtillon heiress of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre (1237-Foggia, Apulia [5 Sep 1287/30 Jun 1288], bur Champaigue-en-Bourbonnais, église des Cordeliers).
     "m thirdly (18 Oct 1298) MARGUERITE de Hainaut, daughter of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut and Holland & his wife Philippa de Luxembourg (-19 Oct 1342, bur Valenciennes, église des Cordeliers). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "…Margareta comitissam Atrabatensem…" as children of Count Jean & his wife[15]. Comte Robert II & his first wife had three children:
a) PHILIPPE d'Artois (1269-near Furnes 11 Sep 1298, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). He succeeded his mother in 1275 as Seigneur de Conches.
b) ROBERT (1271-young).
c) MATHILDE d'Artois (1268-Paris 27 Oct 1329, bur Maubuisson, église abbatiale)."3 He was Comte d'Artois between 1250 and 1302.21

Family 3

Margaretha de Hainaut d. 18 Oct 1342

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 18 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet18.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, A. COMTES d'ARTOIS 1237-1329 (CAPET) http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc182712959. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-ancien.pdf, p. 4.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I , Comte d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005200&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II, Comte d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005218&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2019), memorial page for Matilda de Brabant Chatillon (14 Jun 1224–29 Sep 1288), Find A Grave Memorial no. 84623354, citing Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/84623354/matilda-chatillon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde of Brabant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005201&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Brabant,_Countess_of_Artois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 12 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet12.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 4 page (Dampierre family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders4.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Dampierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028315&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 3 page (Dampierre family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders3.html
  16. [S2076] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 2 June 2006: "Jan II d'Avesnes, Count of Holland & Hainault"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 2 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 2 June 2006."
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaretha of Holland and Hainault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008747&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#MargueriteHainautdied1342
  19. [S140] Unknown author, Record of Logan Co., KY, Wills - "Abstracted for the Period of Years 1792-1851 Inclusive" as quoted in note by Jerry Williams (30 July 1993):
    Clevenger, Asa Dec. 23, 1851
    Estate to wife, Rebecka Clevenger, Children, Namely, Enis Clevenger, Elizabeth Williams. Executrix, Rebecka Clevenger. Witnesses: Robert Henry, John King, George Whitescarver.
    Book H, page 185 Probated 28 June 1852
    (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), Robert II, Comte d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005218&tree=LEO
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 October 2019), memorial page for Robert II de Artois (Sep 1250–11 Jul 1302), Find A Grave Memorial no. 60560601, citing Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60560601/robert_ii-de_artois
  21. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Artois.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005219&tree=LEO
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahaut,_Countess_of_Artois.

Geoffroy I (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun1,2

M, #48224, b. circa 906, d. after 986
FatherGausfred (?) Vicomte de Chartres3,4,5 b. 900, d. a 942
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited19 Aug 2020
     Geoffroy I (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun was born circa 906.6 He married Hildegarde (?) vicomtesse de Châteaudun, daughter of Hervé I de Mortagne comte de Mortagne-au-Perche,
; her 2nd husband.4,7,5,2,8,9
Geoffroy I (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun died after 986; The Henry Project says "probably 985-989."1,2,7,8
      ; This is the same person as ”Geoffrey I, Viscount of Châteaudun” at Wikipedia.


This is also the same person as ”Geoffroy (I)” at The Henry Project.1,8 GAV-28 EDV-29. Geoffroy I (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun was also known as Gausfred Vicomte de Châteaudunm.3

; Per France Balade:
     "Geoffroy I (967-986)
     "Fils du précedent [Geoffroy Vicomte de Chartres], il épouse Hildegarde (v970- v1020) une petite fille de Hugues I Comte du Maine. Hildegarde était veuve de Ernaud Seigneur de la Ferté(-Vidame). Geoffroy et Hildegarde ont eu quatre enfants:
- Hugues I Vicomte de Chateaudun, Archeveque de Tours qui suit,
- Geoffroy II qui suit,
- Adalaud Seigneur de Chinon,
- une fille épouse d'Albert Abbé de Micy (lié à la famille de Belleme). Ce sont les parents d'Arnulf qui devient Archeveque de Tours en 1023 à la suite de son oncle Hugues.
“.10


; Per Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): “Geoffroi 1er de Châteaudun vicomte de Châteaudun (967-986)
     ép. Hildegarde ° 970 + 1020 (petite-fille d’Hugues 1er, comte du Maine et veuve de Ernaud, seigneur de La Ferté-Vidame)”.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "GEOFFROY, son of --- (-after 986). Vicomte [de Châteaudun]. The Breve Chronicon of Bonneval abbey records that “vicecomes Castridunensis Gaufridus” donated “alodum...Villa Siltula”, for the souls of “sue et uxoris Hermengardis”, and that “filius suus...Hugo” donated “aliam villam juxta sitam...Buxeriam”, undated[851]. "…Gauzfredi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated Mar 967 under which "Girardus Sancti Martini canonicus et sacerdos" donated property "Taiseis" to Tours Saint-Julien[852].
     "m ERMENGARDE, daughter of ---. The Breve Chronicon of Bonneval abbey records that “vicecomes Castridunensis Gaufridus” donated “alodum...Villa Siltula”, for the souls of “sue et uxoris Hermengardis”, and that “filius suus...Hugo” donated “aliam villam juxta sitam...Buxeriam”, undated[853]."
Med Lands cites:
[851] Bigot (1875), Introduction, Breve Chronicon, p. lxv.
[852] Tours Saint-Julien (Grandmaison), XXI, p. 60.
[853] Bigot (1875), Introduction, Breve Chronicon, p. lxv.2

; See attached image of a chart showing the descent of Hildegardis (who m. Geoffroy I, vicomte de Châteaudun), based on the work of Settipani [2000].11,3

; NB: The lineage of the Vicomtes de Châteaudun is not clear. A 1998 email from Wilson [reprinted in a separate note, here] outlines the more-or-less received wisdom at that point. Med Lands and Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun) show two different lines for the early vicomtes. France Balade shows one line. Genealogics seems to skip the early generations. Wikipedia and Wikipédia (Fr.) offer slightly different lines. Settipani [2000] presents a synthesis of the various facts available into a more coherent picture. I show here what each source says about the generations in a direct line from Geoffroy III Vicomte de Châteaudun (b. ca 980 - d. 1040), backward. In each descent, I have underlined this individual.
     The Henry Project page on "Geoffroy (II)" (Geoffrey II/III, d. 1038/39, has a good discussion on the ancestry of this individual and of the vicomtes de Châteaudun. It is worth referring to that discussion to get more clarity on the issues and individuals I discuss here.


I. Med Lands: Med Lands shows to lines, running roughly 967-1080, but no connection is described between the two lines.
I. A. Med Lands Line 1 - This starts with a Geoffrey and runs 4 generations:
I.A.1. GEOFFROY, son of --- (-after 986).
I.A.2. HUGUES (I) (-989 or after). Vicomte de Châteaudun
I.A.3. HUGUES (II) de Châteaudun (-10 Jun 1026). Vicomte de Châteaudun (980/1003), Archbishop of Tours 1005, two illegitimate sons by an unknown mistress or mistresses
I.A.4. HELGAUD
I.A.4. HUGUES
I.A.3. ADALAUD.
I.A.3. [MELISENDE (-before 1040). Vicomtesse de Châteaudun. m FULCOIS Seigneur de Nogent-le-Rotrou Comte de Mortagne
I.A.3. NN daughter . m (before 989) ALBERT [II] de la Ferté-en-Beauce

I.B. Med Lands Line 2 - This starts with a Rotrou and runs 4 generations:
I.B.1. ROTROU (-after 12 Feb 996). Seigneur de Nogent.
I.B.2. FULCOIS Comte de Mortagne. m MELISENDE Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, daughter of [HUGUES [I] Vicomte de Châteaudun [NB: It is not explained if this Hugues [I] is one of the Hugues in Line #1]
I.B.3. GEOFFROY (-murdered Chartres [1039/40]) m HELVISE [Elisabeth] Vicomte de Châteaudun
I.B.4. GEOFFROY (-[1015/28] or after).
I.B.4. HUGUES m ADELA, daughter of ---.
I.B.4. ROTROU (-1 Mar [1080]). Vicomte de Châteaudun. Comte de Mortagne m ADELISE de Bellême
I.B.3. Hugues du Perche Comte de Gâtinais m ([1000]) as her second husband, BEATRIX de Mâcon
I.B.4. GEOFFROY [II] "Ferréol" de Gâtinais (-30 Apr [1043/47]), Comte de Gâtinais, Seigneur de Château-Landon. m ([1035]) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou. Descendants COMTES d'ANJOU
I.B.4. LIETAUD (-[1050] or after). Descendants VICOMTES de CHÂTEAU-LANDON

II. Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): Racines et Histoire also shows two lineages, without any connection described.
II.A. Racines et Histoire Line 1 - 5 generations:
II.A.1. Mathilde de Vendôme ° ~960 ép. ~972 Rampo de Châteaudun ° ~954 + 986 1er seigneur de Châteaudun
II.A.2. Hugues 1er de Châteaudun ° ~975 + ~1012 seigneur de Châteaudun ép. Hildegarde
II.A.3. Mélissende de Châteaudun ° 997 + 1035 ép. Guarin d’Alençon (alias Foulques de Mortagne ?) seigneur de Mortagne + 1026
II.A.4. Geoffroi 1er d’Alençon ° ~1012 + ~1051 comte de Mortagne, seigneur de Nogent et d’Illiers (fortifie Gallardon) ép. Helvise, dame de Mortagne ° ~1010 (fille de Rainard, seigneur de Pithiviers, et d’Héloïse, fille d’Eudes 1er comte de Chartres)
II.A.5. Rotrou 1er de Châteaudun ° ~1034 + avant 1079 comte de Mortagne, seigneur de Nogent et Châteaudun ép. ~1050 Adeline de Domfront (fille de Guarin de Bellême, seigneur de Domfront)

II.B. Racines et Histoire Line 1 - 5 generations:
II.B.1. Rampo de Châteaudun 1er vicomte de Châteaudun ~860 à titre d’office
II.B.2. Geoffroi vicomte de Chartres et de Châteaudun ~940
II.B.3. Geoffroi 1er de Châteaudun vicomte de Châteaudun (967-986) ép. Hildegarde ° 970 + 1020 (petite-fille d’Hugues 1er, comte du Maine et veuve de Ernaud, seigneur de La Ferté-Vidame)
II.B.4. Hugues 1er + 12/05/1023 vicomte de Châteaudun (989-1003), seigneur du Vivier, Archevêque de Tours (1003-1023)
II.B.4. Geoffroi II vicomte de Châteaudun (1004-1023) seigneur de Nogent (987, Perche) ép. Mélissende de Nogent (fille de Rotrou, seigneur de Nogent de 950 à 990)
II.B.5. Geoffroi III ° ~1012 + 1040 (Chartres, ass.) vicomte de Châteaudun (1023-1040) comte de Mortagne, seigneur de Nogent, Châtelain d’Illiers et de Gallardon ép. Helvise Corbon (Héloïse, Avoise, Elisabeth) dame de Mortagne ° ~1010 (fille de Foulques dit «Corbon», comte de Mortagne) [ ? ou Héloïse de Pithiviers (fille de Rainard, seigneur de Pithiviers, et d’Héloïse, fille d’Eudes 1er comte de Chartres ?) ]
II.B.4. Alo (Adalard) seigneur de Chinon ép. Senagaudis
II.B.4. Mélissende ? ép. Albert, Abbé de Micy (de la famille des Bellême)

III. France Balade: France Balade presents a fragmented view of the various Vicomtes from a Rampo (ca 860) down to Geoffroy III (d. 1040), in 4 or 5 generations.
III.A.1. Rampo - Vicomte de Châteaudun, à titre d'office, dans les années 860.
III.B.2. Geoffroy Vicomte de Chartres (les années 940) "il semble avoir assuré les fonctions de Vicomte de Châteaudun à cette époque meme s'il n'en portait pas explicitement le titre." [Translation: "he seems to have assumed the functions of Vicomte de Châteaudun at that time even if he did not explicitly bear the title."] No connection to Rampo is described.
III.B.2. Geoffroy I (967-986), Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of the former, m. Hildegarde widow of Ernaud Seigneur de la Ferté(-Vidame)
III.B.3. Hugues I Vicomte de Châteaudun (989-1003) then Archevêque de Tours (1003-1023), son of Geoffroy and Hildegarde
III.B.3. Geoffroy II Vicomte de Châteaudun (1004-1023), son of Geoffroy and Hildegarde, m. Mélissende, dau. of Rotrou, Seigneur de Nogent.
III.B.4. Geoffroy III (1023-1040), son Geoffroy II, Vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Nogent dans le Perche, m. Helvise (Héloise) de Mortagne fille de Foulques Comte de Mortagne (aka Corbon)

IV. Genealogics: Genealogics only describes 2 generations:
IV.A.1. Fulcois Vicomte de Châteaudun m. Mélissende Nogent (no parents given)
IV.A.2 Geoffroy III b. ca 980 d. 1040), Vicomte de Châteaudun, Comte de Mortagne m. Helvis/Elizabeth, dau. of Fulcuich, Comte de Corbon.

V. Wikipedia: Wikipedia lists 10 Viscounts/Vicountesses of Châteaudun from Geoffrey I to Geoffrey III, some of whom are shown as related.
V.1. Geoffrey I (967–985), Viscount of Châteaudun
V.2. Hugues I (985–989), Viscount of Châteaudun, son of the previous m.
V.2. Hildegarde (989–1022), Viscountess of Châteaudun, wife of the previous
V.3. Hugues II (1022–1026), Viscount of Châteaudun and Archbishop of Tours, son of the previous
V.4. Geoffrey II (1030–1039), Viscount of Châteaudun and Count of Perche (as Geoffrey I), son of the previous
V.5. Hugues III de Perche (1039–1044), Viscount of Châteaudun and Count of Perche (as Hugues I), son of the previous
V.5. Rotrou I de Perche (1044–1080), Viscount of Châteaudun and Count of Perche (as Rotrou II), brother of the previous
V.6. Hugues IV (1080–1110), Viscount of Châteaudun, son of the previous
V.7. Geoffrey III (1110–1145), Viscount of Châteaudun, son of the previous
V.3. Melisende (1026–1030), Viscountess of Châteaudun, sister of the previous

VI. Wikipédia (Fr.): Wikipédia (Fr.) lists 9 various Vicomtes (without Vicomtesses) covering 6 generations (initial dates are approximate reigns as Vicomte):
VI.A.1. ca 860 Rampo
VI.B.1. 956-986 : Geoffroy Ier (Gauzfred), vicomte de Châteaudun, m. Hildegarde ou Ermengarde
VI.B.2. 989-1003 : Hugues I (d. 1023), son of the previous, Vicomte de Châteaudun, then (1003) Archevêque de Tours
VI.B.2. Unnamed brother or sister of the previous
VI.B.3. 1003-1039 : Geoffroy II, nephew of Hugues I, vicomte de Châteaudun, comte de Mortagne et de Nogent
VI.B.4. 1039-1045 : Hugues II, son of the previous, Vicomte de Châteaudun, comte de Mortagne et de Nogent m. Adila, s.p.
VI.B.4. 1051-1080 : Rotrou Ier, son of the previous, Vicomte de Châteaudun, comte de Mortagne et de Nogent m. Adelise/Adeline de Bellême-Alençon
VI.B.5. 1080-vers 1110 : Hugues III, vicomte de Châteaudun, dit d'Alençon, son of the previous. m. Agnès de Fréteval
VI.B.6. vers 1110-1140/1150 : Geoffroy III, vicomte de Châteaudun, son of the previous ; m. his 1st cousin Helvise de Mondoubleau-Fréteval

VII. Settipani [2000] uses the Latin names given in early sources. He outlines 4 generations from the so-called Gausfred I (Geoffrey I) to Gausfred III (Geoffrey III), plus an earlier ancestor, father of Geoffrey I. An image of a chart from Settipani's paper is attached to demonstrate the total structure he proposed.
VII.A.I. Gausfred (900-aft 942), Vicomte de Chartres
VII.A.2. Gausfred (925-986/9), Vicomte de Châteaudun, m. Hildegardis (ca 935 - aft ca 1020)
VII.A.3. Hugo (950-1023), Vicomte de Châteaudun, Archevêque de Tours
VII.A.3. Fulcois (ca 950/5-bef 1003), Comte de Perche m. Melisendis (955-aft 1029) fl. Nogent
VII.A.4. Gausfred (ca 970/75-1038/9), Vicomte de Châteaudun, m. Helvidis (980-unk)
VII.A.5. Rotrocus (1005-aft 1051/60). Vicomte de Châteaudun, Comte de Perche m. Adelais de Bellême
Conclusion: Frankly, I am still trying to organize all of this information in my mind and have not decided on what I will finally show for the ancestors of Geoffrey III. What I currently have should be considered a draft work in progress. I accept the scholarship of Settipani, but am still trying to fit all of the pieces together and evaluate the information given in the other sources. GA Vaut.5,2,10,12,13,3,14,15

; From Wilson:
     "Settipani and Keats-Rohan, in the essays listed below, seem to have sorted out the early viscounts of Chateaudun whose line is disconnected in ES iii, 689, and apparently in error in earlier secondary sources. I would appreciate it if someone would let me know if I have misread the relevant portions of these essays, or if you note other errors in the pedigree below.

First Generation
     "1 Routrou I Count of Mortagne.[233, iii, 636, 689],[74, See 151:24],[73, p. 49],[82, 455:20->685:04],[411, pp. 467, 468 (tables 4, 6)],[467],[376, ³Bellesmes² 24, p. 36],[151, 249:31],[104, pp. 18, 179] Routrou I died ca 1080.[233] Vicomte of Chateaudun; seigneur of Nogent-le-Rotrou.[151]
bef 1041 Routrou married Adeline of Domfront[233, iii, 636, 689],[74, See 151:24],[73, p. 49],[411, pp. 467, 468 (tables 4, 6)],[376, See ³Bellesmes² 24, p. 36],[151, See 249:31],[104, pp. 18, 179],[82, 455:21->685:05].[151]

Second Generation
     "2 Geoffrey III Viscount of Chateaudun.[233, iii, 689],[73, p. 49],[466],[467],[376, ³Bellesmes² 25, p. 36],[151, 249:32],[104, p. 179],[82, 685:08] Geoffrey III was alive in 1031.[233, iii, 689],[466] Geoffrey III died in 1039/1040.[233, iii, 689 +] Seigneur of Nogent-le-Rotrou.[151],[467]
     "3 Heloise \ Elisabeth of Mortaigne.[233, iii, 689],[73, p. 49],[467],[376, See ³Bellesmes² 25, p. 36],[151, See 249:32],[104, p. 179],[82, 685:09] Born abt 995.

Third Generation
     "4 Geoffrey II Viscount of Chateaudun.[73, p. 48],[466],[467],[151, See 249:33 (Hugh I, brother)] Geoffrey II was alive in 1004.[466] Viscount of Chateaudun .[467]
     "5 Melisinda of Nogent.[73, p. 48],[466],[467]
     "6 Fulk Count of Mortagne [233, iii, 689],[73, p. 48],[467],[151, See 249:32] Count of Corbon.[233]

Fourth Generation
     "8 Geoffrey I Viscount of Chateaudun.[233, iii, 689],[73, p. 48 (? Hugh I, brother of Geoffrey II)],[466],[467] Geoffrey I died aft 986.[233, iii, 689 +] Viscount of Chateaudun .[467] ca 1020 Geoffrey I married Hildegarde.[233, iii, 689 =]
     "9 Hildegarde.[233, iii, 689],[73, p. 48],[466],[467] Hildegarde was alive ca 970.[467] was alive ca 1020.[467] Hildegarde died bef 1023.[233, iii, 689 +] Hildegarde is suggested to be a granddaughter of Hugh I, Count of Maine.[466]
     "10 Rotrou Seigneur of Nogent.[467] Rotrou was alive in 967.[467] was alive in 996.[467] Seigneur of Nogent .[467]

REFERENCES
73. Moriarty, George Andrews, The Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III and Queen Philippa, Salt Lake City, Utah: Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Society, 1985.
74. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700; 7th ed., with additions and correctiuons by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; assisted by David Faris, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.
82. Call, Michel L., Royal Ancestors of Some American Families ; Pedigree Charts., Printed by the author, 1991.
104. Turton, William Harry, The Plantagenet ancestry, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993.
151. Stuart, Roderick W., Royalty for commoners : the complete known lineage of John of Gaunt. . . second edition, Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1992.
233. Schwennicke, Detlev (ed.), Europaische Stammtafeln : Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten / begrundet von Wilhelm Karl Prinz zu Isenburg ; fortgefuhrt von Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven ; neue Folge herausgegeben vonŠ., Marburg: Stargardt, 1978-<1995 >.
376. Winkhaus, Eberhard, Ahnen Zu Karl Dem Grossen Und Widukind, Westfalen, 1950.
411. Barlow, Frank, William Rufus, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983.
466. Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., ³ŒUn vassal sans histoire¹?: Count Hugh II (c. 940/955-992) and the Origins of Angevin Overlordship in Maine,² K.S.B. Keats-Rohan (ed.), Family Trees and the Roots of Politics, Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Boydell Press, 1997, 189-210.
467. Settipani, Christian, ³Les comtes d¹Anjou et leurs alliances aux Xe et XIe siecles,² K.S.B. Keats-Rohan (ed.), Family Trees and the Roots of Politics, Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Boydell Press, 1997, 211-267.

Alan B. Wilson abwilson@uclink2.berkeley.edu“.16

; The Henry Project has a good discussion of the debate of the marriage of Melisende and Fulcois and of which of these two was the child of Geoffroy I and Hildegarde:
The parentage of Melisende
     "The one early source mentioning Melisende says nothing about her parentage. However, her son Geoffroy became viscount of Châteaudun, so it is natural to investigate how he came to hold that title. Archbishop Hugues of Tours, earlier viscount of Châteaudun, was succeeded as viscount in 1003×4 by Geoffroy, probably the same as Melisende's son. On two occasions, a nepos of archibishop Hugues named Geoffroy is mentioned [1005×23: "... Hugo archipræsul. Gaufridi, nepotis ejus. ..." Cart. S.-Père de Chartres, 1: 117-8 (#6); 1032: "Gauffredi nepotis Hugonis archiepiscopi" Settipani (1997), 261 n. 247, citing Coll. Tour. Anj., ii1, #419]. It is probable that Geoffroy, nepos (probably to be interpreted as "nephew") of Hugues, was the same person as the latter's successor as viscount. See the page of Geoffroy (II) for a more detailed discussion of this.
Did the Châteaudun connection come through Melisende or through her husband?
     "If the likely conclusion that Melisende's son Geoffroy was a nephew of archbishop Hugues is accepted as a working hypothesis, there is still the problem of whether this relationship would be on the side of Geoffroy's father or his mother. This in turn could depend heavily on the identity of Melisende's husband. If Melisende's husband were an earlier viscount Geoffroy, then he would probably be a brother of archbishop Hugues. If Melisende's husband were Rotrou de Nogent, then it would be Melisende who was probably a sister of Hugues. However, the most likely possibility is that Melisende's husband was count Fulcois, but in that case it is hard to determine which parent of Geoffroy was a sibling of archbishop Hugues, because we have no indication of the ancestry of Fulcois. Most of those who accept Fulcois as the husband of Melisende have placed her as a sister of archbishop Hugues [Cuissard (1894-6), 43, 120 (table); Estournet (1928), 116, table; Saint-Phalle (2000), 236, 245]. The case in which Fulcois is placed as a brother of Hugues was put forward by Christian Settipani [Settipani (2000), 252-3].
     "Romanet argued that Melisende had brough the lordship of Nogent to her husband, because when her son Geoffroy donated the church of Champrond in that lordship to Saint-Denis de Nogent in 1031×2, he had reserved the usufruct for his mother [Romanet (1890-1902), 37]. On the other hand, Estournet argued from the fact that Melisende did not witness the act that her consent was unnecessary, and that the donation was therefore not a part of her patrimony [Estournet (1928), 117-8]. In 1997, mistakenly stating that Melisende subscribed to the act, Settipani said that her consent was effective [Settipani (1997), 263 n. 254]. However, this line of argument does not seem conclusive in either direction.
     "The future archbishop Hugues was evidently succeeded as viscount of Châteaudun in 1003×4 by his nephew Geoffroy. As Settipani pointed out, there is the question of whether a maternal nephew would succeed as viscount when Hugues had a son Helgaud and a brother Alo de Chinon still living [Settipani (2000), 253; Alo was still alive in 1009×12, Lex (1892), 136-140 (Pièces justificatives #10)]. Helgaud may have been illegitimate, or not old enough to become viscount in 1003×4. The claim of Cuissard that Alo was only a maternal half-brother of Hugues is worth mentioning in this context [Cuissard (1894-6), 120 (table)], but it is not clear that there is any evidence to support the supposed earlier marriage of Hildegarde (mother of Hugues) [See the page of Hildegarde for more]. Nevertheless, the fact that Alo was still alive in 1003×4 would seem to be an argument in favor of Geoffroy's probable father Fulcois being a brother of Hugues.
     "However, the comital title of Fulcois would appear to point in the opposite direction, for there is no indication that the viscounts of Châteaudun during the period 967-1004 had any claim to a comital title, making it seem less likely that count Fuclois was a member of that family. Settipani, who conjectures Fulcois as a son of viscount Geoffroy (I) and Hildegarde in his most recent account [Settipani (2000), 252-3], suggests that the comital title arrived in the family via Hildegarde, who is placed as a possible daughter of count Hervé of Mortagne [ibid., 256-8]. However, this is very conjectural.
     "Chronology should also be considered here. If the conjecture that Melisende was the mother of Hugues du Perche is correct, then we have a possible tight chronology, although it is difficult to measure the extent of the problem because of the uncertainties involved. Although a birth in 980 or later for Hugues du Perche cannot be ruled out, ca. 970 would seem to be a better estimate [see the page of Hugues du Perche]. However, the viscountess Hildegarde appears in a charter whose date is estimated by the editor to be ca. 1020, although it could be as early as 1005 [Cart. S.-Père de Chartres, 1: 117-8 (#6); see the page of Hildegarde]. If the editor's estimated date for Hildegarde's charter is correct, or nearly so, and Hildegarde really was the grandmother of Hugues du Perche, then the chronology between Hildegarde and Hugues would be tight if Hildegarde was born as late as 940. Since female generations are generally shorter than male generations, this chronological tightness would be relieved slightly if the generation between Hildegarde and Hugues were female, i.e., if Melisende were a daughter of Hildegarde. This argument should not be pressed too far, but it does seem to tilt the probability slightly in that direction.
     "None of the above arguments is particularly strong. Thus, even though it was probably the case that Melisende's son Geoffroy was a grandson of the viscountess Hildegarde, it is difficult to say with any degree of confidence whether the intervening generation was Melisende or her husband. Thus, with regard to the parentage of Melisende, all we can do is list some possibilities.“
The Henry Project cites:
** Cart. S.-Père de Chartres = Benjamin Guérard, Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres, 2 vols. (Paris, 1840).
** Cuissard (1894-6) = Charles Cuissard, "Chronologie des Vicomtes de Châteaudun (960-1395)", Bulletins de la Société dunoise 8 (1894-6): 25-120.
** Estournet (1928) = "Les origines historiques de Nemours et sa charte de franchises (1170)" (parts I-III), Annales de la Société Historique & Archéologique du Gâtinais 39 (1928): 105-158.
** Lex (1892) = Léonce Lex, Eudes, comte de Blois, de Tours, de Chartres, de Troyes et de Meaux (995-1037) et Thibaud, son frère (995-1004) (Troyes, 1892).
** Romanet (1890-1902) = Vicomte de Romanet, Géographie du Perche et chronologie de ses comtes (Documents sur la province du Perche, ser. 2, no. 1, Mortagne, 1890-1902).
** Saint-Phalle (2000) = Edouard de Saint-Phalle, "Les comtes de Gâtinais aux Xe et XIe siècles", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000), 230-246.
** Settipani (1997) = Christian Settipani, "Les comtes d'Anjou et leur alliances aux Xe et XIe siècles", in K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ed., Family Trees and the Roots of Politics (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1997): 211-267.
** Settipani (2000) = Christian Settipani, "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leur alliés", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000), 247-261.8

; The Henry Project identifies Gausfred (Geoffroy) as the "conjectured father (plausible, but direct evidence lacking)" of Geoffroy I, Vicomte de Châteaudun:
     "Geoffroy, fl. May 942, viscount of Chartres.
     "[Settipani (2000), 249] He appears as a witness in a charter of Hugues le Grand ["S. Gauzfridi Carnotensium vicecomitis. ... Data mense maio ... anno scilicet Dominicæ incarnationis DCCCCXLIIº sive anno tertio regnante Hludovico rege." Rec. Chron. Touraine, 234; also RHF 9: 723, dating it to May 939, with the words "anno scilicet Dominicæ incarnationis DCCCCXLIIº sive" missing]. The obvious onomastic argument, plus the frequent connection between Chartres and Châteaudun, suggest a connection, but there is no direct evidence. Saint-Phalle instead identifies Geoffroy of Chartres as the same person as Geoffroy (I) of Châteaudun [Saint-Phalle (2000), 245 (table 6)].“
The Henry Project cites:
** Saint-Phalle (2000) = Edouard de Saint-Phalle, "Les comtes de Gâtinais aux Xe et XIe siècles", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000), 230-246.
** Settipani (2000) = Christian Settipani, "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leur alliés", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000), 247-261.8 He was vicomte de Châteaudun between 967 and 986.13,10,7,8

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_I,_Viscount_of_Ch%C3%A2teaudun. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#_Toc479931729. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S4756] Christian Settipani, "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés," in Onomastique et Parenté dans l’Occident médiéval, K. S. B. Keats-Rohan and Christian Settipani, editor. (Linacre College, Oxford University: Oxford Unit for Prosopographical Research, 2000). Hereinafter cited as "Settipani [2000] Les vicomtes de Châteaudun."
  4. [S4748] France Balade, online <http://www.francebalade.com/>, http://www.francebalade.com/chartres/ctdunois.htm. Hereinafter cited as France Balade Website (FR).
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I44689
  7. [S1529] Alan B. Wilson, "Wilson email 5 June 1998 "Early viscounts of Chateaudun"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/g1HK4TjyRZg/m/B_wyzebDT3AJ) to soc.genealogy.medieval, 5 June 1998. Hereinafter cited as "Wilson email 5 June 1998."
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff006.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/hilde002.htm
  10. [S4748] France Balade Website (FR), online http://www.francebalade.com/, Les Vicomtes de Chateaudun: http://www.francebalade.com/chartres/ctdunois.htm
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hervé Ier de Mortagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herv%C3%A9_Ier_de_Mortagne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des comtes et vicomtes de Châteaudun: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_et_vicomtes_de_Ch%C3%A2teaudun
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counts_and_Viscounts_of_Ch%C3%A2teaudun
  14. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 16 Aug 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff004.htm
  16. [S1529] Alan B. Wilson, "Wilson email 5 June 1998," e-mail to soc.genealogy.medieval, 5 June 1998, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/g1HK4TjyRZg/m/B_wyzebDT3AJ (accessed 16 Aug 2020).
  17. [S4748] France Balade Website (FR), online http://www.francebalade.com/
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 3.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#HuguesChateaudundied989
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#dauHuguesChateaudunMAlbertFerte
  21. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/fulco000.htm

Pierre I (?) Cte d'Alençon, de Blois et de Chartres1,2,3

M, #48225, b. 1251, d. 1283
FatherLouis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France1,2,3,4,5 b. 25 Apr 1215, d. 25 Aug 1270
MotherMarguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France1,2,3,5 b. 1221, d. 21 Dec 1295
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     Pierre I (?) Cte d'Alençon, de Blois et de Chartres was born in 1251.2,3 He married Jeanne (?) de Châtillon , Cts de Blois de Chartres et de Dunois, daughter of Jean I de Châtillon Cte de Blois, in 1272.2,3

Pierre I (?) Cte d'Alençon, de Blois et de Chartres died in 1283 at Salerno; Genealogy.EU (Capet 5 page) say d. 6 April 1284.2,3
Pierre I (?) Cte d'Alençon, de Blois et de Chartres was buried at Cordeliers, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.3
      ; Pierre, Cte d'Alençon 1269, de Blois et de Chartres, *1251, +Salerno 6.4.1284, bur Cordeliers, Paris; m.1272 Cts Jeanne de Blois de Chartres et de Dunois (she sold Blois to the crown 1286) (*1258 +19.1.1291, bur Abbaye Guiche, nr Blois) dau.of Jean I de Chatillon, Cte de Blois, etc.3 He was Cte de Blois et de Chartres.3 He was Cte d'Alençon in 1269.3

Family

Jeanne (?) de Châtillon , Cts de Blois de Chartres et de Dunois b. 1254, d. 19 Jan 1291
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisIXdied1270B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Robert (?) comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Saint-Just, Creil, sn de Bourbon1,2,3,4,5

M, #48226, b. 1256, d. 7 February 1317
FatherLouis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France1,2,3,6,7 b. 25 Apr 1215, d. 25 Aug 1270
MotherMarguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France1,2,3,7 b. 1221, d. 21 Dec 1295
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited9 Aug 2020
     Robert (?) comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Saint-Just, Creil, sn de Bourbon was born in 1256.2,3,4,5,8 He married Béatrix/Beatrice de Bourgogne dame de Bourbon, dame de Charolais et de Saint-Just, daughter of Jean II (?) de Bourgogne, sn de Bourbon et de Charolais and Agnes de Bourbon-Dampierre Dame de Bourbon, heiress of Nevers, Auxerre et Tonnerre, in 1272 at Clermont-en-Beauvais, France.1,2,3,9,4,5,10

Robert (?) comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Saint-Just, Creil, sn de Bourbon died on 7 February 1317; Genealogics says d. 7 Feb 1318. Find A Grave and Wikipedia say d. 7 Feb 1317.2,3,5,8,11,12
Robert (?) comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Saint-Just, Creil, sn de Bourbon was buried after 7 February 1317 at Couvent des Jacobins de la rue Saint-Jacques, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1256
     DEATH     7 Feb 1317 (aged 60–61)
     French nobility. Born the youngest son of King Louis IX and Marguerite de Provence. He received the county of Clermont in 1269 and married Beatrice de Bourgogne, Dame de Bourbon in 1272. He is the progenitor of the Bourbon family whose members reigned France from 1589 on and reign today in Spain and Luxembourg. His heart was buried at the Couvent de Cordeliers.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis IX of France 1214–1270
          Marguerite de Provence 1221–1295
     Spouse
          Beatrice de Bourgogne 1258–1310
     Siblings
          Blanche de France 1240–1243
          Isabelle de France 1241–1271
          Louis of France 1243–1260
          Philippe III of France 1245–1285
          Jean de France 1247–1248
          Jean de France 1250–1270
          Pierre d'Alencon 1251–1284
          Blanche de France 1253–1320
          Marguerite de France 1255–1271
          Agnes de France 1260–1325
     Children
          Louis I de Bourbon 1279–1342
          Blanche de Clermont 1281–1304
          Jean de Clermont 1286–1322
          Marguerite de Clermont 1289–1309
     BURIAL     Couvent des Jacobins de la rue Saint-Jacques, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     PLOT     Chapelle St Thomas d'Aquin, made of black marble, grave destroyed
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 4 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 86222056.3
      ; Per Genealogics:
     "Robert was born in 1256, the son of Louis IX, king of France, and Marguerite de Provence. Louis did not like to give his sons very large counties, preferring to see them married to women who would inherit large territories, though they should not be adjoining, to avoid the possibility of creating one large territory that could be a threat to other duchies.
     "In 1269 Louis created Robert the count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and seigneur de Creil-sur-Oise and of Sassy-le-Grand. He also selected his future wife. In 1272, two years after his father's death, Robert married Beatrice de Bourgogne, heiress of Bourbon, the only child of Jean de Bourgogne, sire de Charolais and Agnès de Dampierre, dame de Bourbon. They had six children of whom two sons and a daughter would have progeny.
     "Robert, who was totally devoted to the ideals of knighthood, joined his father and the Church in the war against Roger-Bernard III, comte de Foix. In 1278, aged only twenty-two, he was injured at a tournament and lost the full use of his mental faculties. He was only occasionally lucid thereafter, and in his bad spells he ran up immense debts, far beyond what even the wealthiest prince did in those days. The county of Clermont, a royal appanage, became in danger of foreclosure by Robert's creditors. In 1288 by rights of his wife, he became sire de Bourbon, de Charolais and de Saint Just-en-Champagne.
     "By an undated charter from the reign of Louis X 'le Hutin', grandson of Robert's elder brother Philippe III 'le Hardi', apparently agreed upon while Robert was temporarily in his right mind, the situation was dealt with by having Robert cede the usufruct of the county to his son Louis for a term of eight years; if Robert died within those eight years, the county itself would descend to Louis, or if Louis should predecease Robert the county would descend to Louis' male heir. Louis was to pay Robert 4000 livres tournois yearly, and would assume responsibility for all Robert's debts contracted before that time. Louis would bear no responsibility for any debts Robert contracted after the charter was sealed. Robert promised that he would not pledge the county as surety for future debts nor allow any other liens to be placed against it. He died on 7 February 1318, and was succeeded by Louis.
     "Robert was born in 1256, the son of Louis IX, king of France, and Marguerite de Provence. Louis did not like to give his sons very large counties, preferring to see them married to women who would inherit large territories, though they should not be adjoining, to avoid the possibility of creating one large territory that could be a threat to other duchies.
     "In 1269 Louis created Robert the count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and seigneur de Creil-sur-Oise and of Sassy-le-Grand. He also selected his future wife. In 1272, two years after his father's death, Robert married Beatrice de Bourgogne, heiress of Bourbon, the only child of Jean de Bourgogne, sire de Charolais and Agnès de Dampierre, dame de Bourbon. They had six children of whom two sons and a daughter would have progeny.
     "Robert, who was totally devoted to the ideals of knighthood, joined his father and the Church in the war against Roger-Bernard III, comte de Foix. In 1278, aged only twenty-two, he was injured at a tournament and lost the full use of his mental faculties. He was only occasionally lucid thereafter, and in his bad spells he ran up immense debts, far beyond what even the wealthiest prince did in those days. The county of Clermont, a royal appanage, became in danger of foreclosure by Robert's creditors. In 1288 by rights of his wife, he became sire de Bourbon, de Charolais and de Saint Just-en-Champagne.
     "By an undated charter from the reign of Louis X 'le Hutin', grandson of Robert's elder brother Philippe III 'le Hardi', apparently agreed upon while Robert was temporarily in his right mind, the situation was dealt with by having Robert cede the usufruct of the county to his son Louis for a term of eight years; if Robert died within those eight years, the county itself would descend to Louis, or if Louis should predecease Robert the county would descend to Louis' male heir. Louis was to pay Robert 4000 livres tournois yearly, and would assume responsibility for all Robert's debts contracted before that time. Louis would bear no responsibility for any debts Robert contracted after the charter was sealed. Robert promised that he would not pledge the county as surety for future debts nor allow any other liens to be placed against it. He died on 7 February 1318, and was succeeded by Louis."8 EDV-20.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert of Clermont (1256 – 7 February 1317) was created Count of Clermont in 1268. He was the son of King Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence.[1] In 1272, Robert married Beatrice of Burgundy, heiress of Bourbon[2] and had the following issue:
-- Louis I, le Boiteux (1279–1342), first Duke of Bourbon.
-- Blanche of Clermont (1281–1304); married in 1303 in Paris Robert VII, Count of Auvergne and Boulogne, grandmother of Joan I, Countess of Auvergne.
-- John of Clermont (1283–1316), Baron of Charolais; married c. 1309 Jeanne d'Argues, widow of Hugh, Count of Soissons, and had issue.
-- Mary of Clermont (1285–1372, Paris), Prioress of Poissy
-- Peter of Clermont (1287 – aft. 1330), Archdeacon of Paris
-- Margaret of Clermont (1289–1309, Paris); married firstly, in 1305, Raymond Berengar of Andria, and secondly, in 1308, John I, Marquis of Namur.
     "During his first joust, in 1279, Robert suffered head injuries which rendered him an invalid for the remainder of his life.[3]
     "Robert is considered the founder of the House of Bourbon, a family which, with the passing of centuries came to reign as kings of Navarre (1572-1830), kings of France (1589–1848; due to the extinction of all legitimate agnatic progeny of all his elder brothers), kings of Spain (1700–present), kings of the Two Sicilies (1735–1860), dukes of Parma (1748–1796 and 1847–1859) and grand dukes of Luxembourg (1964–present).
     "Robert's godfather, chosen by Louis IX, was Humbert of Romans, the Dominican Master of the Order at the time of Robert's birth.[4]
     "Robert is mentioned in the prologue of the Coutumes de Beauvaisis by Philippe de Beaumanoir.[5]
     "He was buried in the now-demolished church of the Couvent des Jacobins in Paris.
     "Robert is a supporting character in Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings), a series of French historical novels by Maurice Druon. He was portrayed by Alexandre Rignault in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series, and by Ioan Siminie in the 2005 adaptation.
References
1. Bourbon, John Bell Henneman Jr., Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, Ed. William W. Kibler, (Routledge, 1995), 138.
2. Bourbon, John Bell Henneman Jr., Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, 138.
3. Keen, Maurice (1984). "The Rise of the Tournament". Chivalry. Yale University Press. p. 87. ISBN 0-300-03360-5.
4. Brett, E.T., Humbert of Romans, (PIMS, 1984), 37
5. de Beaumanoir, Philippe (1899–1900). "Prologues". Coutumes de Beauvaisis. Alphonse Picard et Fils, Éditeurs. p. 2.11

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser . yr.1961.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 23.8


; founder of the House of Bourbon.1

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-ancien.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisIXdied1270B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002071&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002072&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert,_Count_of_Clermont. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Robert de Clermont (1256–7 Feb 1317), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86222056, citing Couvent des Jacobins de la rue Saint-Jacques, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86222056/robert-de_clermont. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 7.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#LouisIDucdied1342B
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002073&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche de Clermont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00111025&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330640&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#MargueriteClermontdied1309

Béatrix/Beatrice de Bourgogne dame de Bourbon, dame de Charolais et de Saint-Just1,2,3,4

F, #48227, b. 1257, d. 1 October 1310
FatherJean II (?) de Bourgogne, sn de Bourbon et de Charolais2,3,4,5 b. 1231, d. 29 Sep 1268
MotherAgnes de Bourbon-Dampierre Dame de Bourbon, heiress of Nevers, Auxerre et Tonnerre6,7,4,5 b. c 1237, d. 7 Sep 1288
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited9 Aug 2020
     Béatrix/Beatrice de Bourgogne dame de Bourbon, dame de Charolais et de Saint-Just was born in 1257.6,4,5 She married Robert (?) comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Saint-Just, Creil, sn de Bourbon, son of Louis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France and Marguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France, in 1272 at Clermont-en-Beauvais, France.1,2,3,6,8,4,5

Béatrix/Beatrice de Bourgogne dame de Bourbon, dame de Charolais et de Saint-Just died on 1 October 1310 at Château Murat, Murat, Departement d'Allier, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France (now); Genealogy.EU says d. 1 Oct 1310; Racines et Histoire says d. 9 Oct 1310; Genealogics says d. 1 Oct 1319; Wikipedia says d. 1 Oct 1310.2,6,4,5,9,10
Béatrix/Beatrice de Bourgogne dame de Bourbon, dame de Charolais et de Saint-Just was buried after 1 October 1310 at Couvent des Cordelières de Champaigue, Souvigny, Departement de l'Allier, Auvergne, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1258
     DEATH     1 Oct 1310 (aged 51–52)
     Nobility, only child and heir of her parents Jean de Bourgogne and Agnes de Bourbon. She married Robert de Clermont in 1274 and bore him six children. She succeeded her mother as Dame de Bourbon in 1287.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Agnes de Bourbon 1237–1287
     Spouse
          Robert de Clermont 1256–1317
     Children
          Louis I de Bourbon 1279–1342
          Blanche de Clermont 1281–1304
          Jean de Clermont 1286–1322
          Marguerite de Clermont 1289–1309
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordelières de Champaigue, Souvigny, Departement de l'Allier, Auvergne, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 6 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 89638221.6,10
     EDV-20.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Beatrice of Burgundy (1257 – October 1, 1310) was a ruling Lady of Bourbon in 1288-1310 and, through her mother, heiress of all Bourbon estates.
     "She was the daughter of John of Burgundy (son of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy) and Agnes of Dampierre. In 1272 Beatrice married Robert, Count of Clermont and their eldest son Louis I, le Boiteux became the first Duke of Bourbon. It is through her that her distant male descendants of the French House of Bourbon get their name.
Issue
     "Robert and Beatrice had the following children:
-- Louis I, le Boiteux (1279–1342), first Duke of Bourbon
-- Blanche (1281–1304), married in 1303 in Paris Robert VII, Count of Auvergne and Boulogne, grandmother of Joan I, Countess of Auvergne
-- John (1283–1322), Baron of Charolais, married c. 1309 Jeanne d'Argies and had issue
-- Mary (1285–1372, Paris), Prioress of Poissy
-- Peter (1287 – aft. 1330), Archdeacon of Paris
-- Margaret (1289–1309, Paris), married firstly in 1305 Raymond Berengar of Andria (who died in 1307) and secondly in 1308 John I, Marquis of Namur
Physical Appearance
     "Ottone and Acerbo Morena in their Historia Frederici I described Beatrice as "[O]f medium height, her hair shone like gold, her face most beautiful..."[1]
References
1. The origins of courtliness, C. Stephen Jaeger, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1985,p. 172.9

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. yr.1961.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.5


; Per Genealogics: "Beatrice de Bourgogne was born in 1257, the daughter of Jean de Bourgogne, sire de Charolais, and Agnès de Dampierre, dame de Bourbon. Through her mother, Beatrice was heiress of all Bourbon estates. At Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in 1272 Beatrice married Robert de France, comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, son of Louis IX, king of France, and Marguerite de Provence. They had six children of whom two sons and a daughter would have progeny. Their eldest son Louis I 'le Boiteux' became the first duke of Bourbon. It is through her that her distant male descendants of the French House of Bourbon get their name. Beatrice died at the château of Murat on 1 October 1319."5

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bourbon-ancien.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002072&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Dampierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028315&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beatrice_of_Burgundy,_Lady_of_Bourbon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for Beatrice de Bourgogne (1258–1 Oct 1310), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89638221, citing Couvent des Cordelières de Champaigue, Souvigny, Departement de l'Allier, Auvergne, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89638221/beatrice-de_bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avesnes.pdf, p. 7.
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOURBON.htm#LouisIDucdied1342B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002073&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche de Clermont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00111025&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330640&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#MargueriteClermontdied1309

Isabella (?) of France1,2,3

F, #48228, b. 2 March 1241, d. 17 April 1271
FatherLouis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France1,2,3,4,5 b. 25 Apr 1215, d. 25 Aug 1270
MotherMarguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France1,2,3,5 b. 1221, d. 21 Dec 1295
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     Isabella (?) of France was born on 2 March 1241.2,6 She married Teobaldo (Thibault) II (?) King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne et de Brie, son of Teobaldo (Thibault) I-IV "le Grand" (?) King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne et de Brie and Marguerite de Bourbon Queen of Navarre and Champagne, on 6 April 1255 at Melun, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.1,7,3,8

Isabella (?) of France died on 17 April 1271 at Hyères, Departement de Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France (now), at age 30.2,6
Isabella (?) of France was buried after 27 April 1271 at Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France (now); From Find A Grave:
     
     BIRTH     18 Mar 1241
     DEATH     27 Apr 1271 (aged 30)
     Royalty. Born the second child of Louis IX de France and Marguerite de Provence. In 1255 she was married to Thibaut de Champagne, King of Navarra. In 1270 they joined her father in Tunis but left soon after his death. She survived her husband by only four months.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis IX of France 1214–1270
          Marguerite de Provence 1221–1295
     Spouse
          Thibaut II de Navarra 1238–1270
     Siblings
          Blanche de France 1240–1243
          Louis of France 1243–1260
          Philippe III of France 1245–1285
          Jean de France 1247–1248
          Jean de France 1250–1270
          Pierre d'Alencon 1251–1284
          Blanche de France 1253–1320
          Marguerite de France 1255–1271
          Robert de Clermont 1256–1317
          Agnes de France 1260–1325
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 Sep 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 117666466.9
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 15.
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. vol 30 page 8.6

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#IL9
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisIXdied1270B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003749&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013786&tree=LEO
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 October 2019), memorial page for Isabelle de France (18 Mar 1241–27 Apr 1271), Find A Grave Memorial no. 117666466, citing Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117666466/isabelle-de_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Pedro (?) de Navarra; Senor de Maruzabel1,2

M, #48229, b. circa 1241, d. 22 May 1265
FatherTeobaldo (Thibault) I-IV "le Grand" (?) King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne et de Brie1,2,3,4 b. 30 May 1201, d. 8 Jul 1253
MotherMarguerite de Bourbon Queen of Navarre and Champagne1,5,2 b. 1211, d. 12 Apr 1256
Last Edited17 Oct 2019
     Pedro (?) de Navarra; Senor de Maruzabel was born circa 1241.6
Pedro (?) de Navarra; Senor de Maruzabel died on 22 May 1265.1,2,7,6
Pedro (?) de Navarra; Senor de Maruzabel was buried after 22 May 1265 at Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1241
     DEATH     22 May 1265 (aged 23–24)
     Royalty. Born around 1241 as the second son of Thibaut I and his third wife Marguerite de Bourbon
     BURIAL     Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 Sep 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 117666601.6
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:47.7 Pedro (?) de Navarra; Senor de Maruzabel was also known as Pedro (?) de Champagne, Seigneur de Muruzabal.7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut IV-I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014214&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_I_of_Navarre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Bourbon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014215&tree=LEO
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 October 2019), memorial page for Pierre de Navarra (1241–22 May 1265), Find A Grave Memorial no. 117666601, citing Couvent des Cordelières, Provins, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117666601/pierre-de_navarra. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro de Champagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330746&tree=LEO

Pedro Nunes de Guzman Count of Puebla1,2,3

M, #48230
Last Edited23 May 2020
     Pedro Nunes de Guzman Count of Puebla married Juana Fernandez (?) Ponce de Leon.4,3

      ; Leo van de Pas cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: yr 1968.3

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea8.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro Nuñez de Guzmán: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005038&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Juana Fernández Ponce de Leon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005039&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore de Guzmán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005037&tree=LEO

Blanche de Bourbon1,2,3

F, #48231, b. 1338, d. 1361
FatherPierre I (?) Duc de Bourbon1,2,3,4 b. 1311, d. 1356
MotherIsabelle de Valois2,3,5 b. c 1313, d. 26 Jul 1383
Last Edited14 Oct 2019
     Blanche de Bourbon was born in 1338; Genealogy.EU (Capet 22 and Ivrea 8 pages) say b. 1339.1,3,4 She married Pedro I "The Cruel" (?) King of Castile and Leon, son of Alfonso XI 'el Justiciero' (?) King of Castile and León and Dona María (?) Infanta de Portugal, between 3 June 1353 and 1353 at Valladolid, Castile, Spain (now),
; his 2nd wife.1,3,6,7,4
Blanche de Bourbon died in 1361 at Medina Sidonia; died of poisoning.1,3,4
      ; Blanche, *1339, +of poisoning at Medina Sidonia 1361; m.Valladolid 1353 King Pedro I of Castile.3

Family

Pedro I "The Cruel" (?) King of Castile and Leon b. 30 Aug 1334, d. 23 Mar 1369

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 48: Castile: Union with Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 65: France - House of Bourbon.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 22 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet22.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea8.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002076&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1543] Clara Estow, Pedro the Cruel of Castille 1350-1369 (Leiden, New York, Koln: E. J. Brill, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Pedro the Cruel.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro I 'the Cruel': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005047&tree=LEO

Marguerite (?) of France1,2

F, #48232, b. 1255, d. July 1271
FatherLouis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France1,2,3,4 b. 25 Apr 1215, d. 25 Aug 1270
MotherMarguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France1,2,4 b. 1221, d. 21 Dec 1295
Last Edited16 Dec 2019
     Marguerite (?) of France was born in 1255; Genealogy.EU and Find A Grave say d. 1255; Genealogics says d. ca 1258; Wikipedia says d. 1254.2,5,6,7 She married Jean I "Victorious" (?) Duke of Brabant and Limburg, son of Hendrik/Heinrich III (?) Herzog von Brabant and Adelheid|Alix|Adélaïde de Bourgogne Duchess of Brabant, circa 5 September 1270
;
His 1st wife.1,8,9,6
Marguerite (?) of France died in July 1271.2,7,6,5
Marguerite (?) of France was buried in July 1271 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1255
     DEATH     Jul 1271 (aged 15–16)
     French royalty. Born the ninth child of Louis IX and Marguerite de Provence. She married Jean I de Brabant in 1269 and died a year later in childbirth. The child, a son, died soon after her. Jean then married Marguerite of Flanders who made him father of four children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis IX of France 1214–1270
          Marguerite de Provence 1221–1295
     Spouse
          Jean I Duke of Brabant 1253–1294 (m. 1271)
     Siblings
          Blanche de France 1240–1243
          Isabelle de France 1241–1271
          Louis of France 1243–1260
          Philippe III of France 1245–1285
          Jean de France 1247–1248
          Jean de France 1250–1270
          Pierre d'Alencon 1251–1284
          Blanche de France 1253–1320
          Robert de Clermont 1256–1317
          Agnes de France 1260–1325
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 21 Aug 2006
     Find A Grave Memorial 15449800.2,7
      ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Margaret of France (1254–1271) was a daughter of Louis IX of France and his wife Margaret of Provence. She was a member of the House of Capet and was Duchess of Brabant by her marriage to John I, Duke of Brabant.
Biography
     "Margaret was originally in 1257 betrothed to Henry IV, Duke of Brabant, son of Henry III, Duke of Brabant and Alice of Burgundy. This betrothal was terminated because of the imbecility of Henry.[1]
     "Henry was deposed in 1267. Henry's brother, John I, Duke of Brabant married Margaret on September 5, 1270.
     "Margaret became pregnant in 1270/1271. Margaret gave birth to a son in 1271. Mother and baby did not survive and both died shortly after the birth.
References
1. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, CAPET.5

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. yr 1961.6

Family

Jean I "Victorious" (?) Duke of Brabant and Limburg b. c 1252, d. 4 May 1294
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisIXdied1270B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_France,_Duchess_of_Brabant. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003746&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for Marguerite de France (1255–Jul 1271), Find A Grave Memorial no. 15449800, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15449800/marguerite-de_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant3.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012371&tree=LEO

Philippe (?)1

M, #48233
FatherHendrik II (?) Duke of Brabant1,2,3 b. c 1207, d. bt 1 Feb 1247 - 1248
MotherMaria (?) von Hohenstaufen, Princess of Germany1,4,5,3 b. 3 Apr 1201, d. 29 Mar 1235
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Philippe (?) died; died young.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant3.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hendrik II, Duke of Brabant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#HenriIIBrabantdied1248B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria von Hohenstaufen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012285&tree=LEO
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_of_Swabia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Agnes (?) of France1,2,3

F, #48234, b. 1260, d. 1327
FatherLouis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France1,2,3,4,5 b. 25 Apr 1215, d. 25 Aug 1270
MotherMarguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France1,2,3,5 b. 1221, d. 21 Dec 1295
Last Edited8 Dec 2020
     Agnes (?) of France was born in 1260.3 She married Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne, son of Hugues IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte de Châlons, titular King of Thessalonica and Yolande de Dreux Comtesse d'Auxonne, in 1279.1,2,3,6

Agnes (?) of France died in 1327 at Chateau de Lantenay.2,3
Agnes (?) of France was buried in 1327 .3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisIXdied1270B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne1,2,3,4

M, #48235, b. 1248, d. 1305
FatherHugues IV (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte de Châlons, titular King of Thessalonica4,5,6 b. bt 9 Mar 1212 - 1213, d. 27 Oct 1272
MotherYolande de Dreux Comtesse d'Auxonne4,6,7 b. 1212, d. 30 Oct 1248
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited28 Nov 2020
     Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne was born in 1248.3,4 He married Agnes (?) of France, daughter of Louis IX "Saint Louis" (?) King of France and Marguerite (?) de Provence, Queen of France, in 1279.1,2,3,4

Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne died in 1305 at Vernon-sur-Seine, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Capet 10 pages) say d. 21 March 1306.2,3,4
Robert II (?) Duc de Bourgogne was buried at Citeaux, France (now).4
     EDV-20. He was Duc de Bourgogne between 1273 and 1305.4

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 10 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet10.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005057&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#HuguesIVDucdied1272B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005058&tree=LEO
  8. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 62: France - Succession of the House of Valois.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004020&tree=LEO
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Jean II de Brienne Cte d'Eu et de Guines1

M, #48236, d. 1302
FatherJean I de Brienne Cte d'Eu1,4 d. 12 Jun 1294
MotherBeatrix de Châtillon1,2,3 b. 1255, d. 1304
Last Edited14 Oct 2019
     Jean II de Brienne Cte d'Eu et de Guines married Jeanne (?) Cts de Guines, daughter of Baudoin de Guines chatelain de Bourbourg, sn d'Ardres and Jeanne de Montmorency.1,5

Jean II de Brienne Cte d'Eu et de Guines died in 1302 at Courtrai/Kortrijk, West Flanders, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium (now); killed in battle.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 October 2019), memorial page for Beatrix de Chatillon (1255–1304), Find A Grave Memorial no. 87077478, citing Abbaye de Cercamp, Frevent, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/87077478/beatrix-de_chatillon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix de Châtillon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013387&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I de Brienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064502&tree=LEO
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Guines page (Guines family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/guines.html

Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria1,2,3,4

M, #48237, b. circa 1073, d. 24 September 1120
FatherWelf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria1,2,3,5 b. c 1036, d. 9 Nov 1101
MotherJudith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland3,5,6,7 b. c 1033, d. 5 Mar 1094
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria was born circa 1073.3 He married Matilda (?) Dss of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa, daughter of Boniface I di Canossa Marquess of Tuscany and Beatrix (?) of Lorraine, in 1089.1,3

Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria died on 24 September 1120 at Burg Kaufering, Bavaria, Germany (now).1,3
      ; [2m.] Duke Welf V of Bavaria (1101-20), *ca 1073, +Burg Kaufering 24.9.1120; m.1089 Dss Matilda of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa (+1115), dau.of Bonifacius of Canossa, Mgve and Ct of Reggio, Modena and Brescia, Mgve of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto.3 Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria was also known as Guelph V Duke of Bavaria.2 He was Duke of Bavaria between 1101 and 1120.3

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/judit000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#WelfIVBavariaIdied1101. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020476&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit000.htm

Matilda (?) Dss of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa1,2

F, #48238, d. 1115
FatherBoniface I di Canossa Marquess of Tuscany2,3 d. 6 May 1052
MotherBeatrix (?) of Lorraine3 b. c 1020, d. 18 Apr 1076
Last Edited14 Nov 2019
     Matilda (?) Dss of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa married Godfrey V/III "the Hunchback" (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, son of Godfrey IV/II "The Bearded" de Bouillon Duke of Upper & Lower Lorraine, Count of Verdun and Uda (?), between 1069 and 1070.3
Matilda (?) Dss of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa married Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria, son of Welf I/IV (?) Duke of Bavaria and Judith (?) van Vlaanderen, Countess of Northumberland, in 1089.1,2

Matilda (?) Dss of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa died in 1115.2,3
      ; Matilda (+1115) dau.of Mgve Boniface of Tuscany by Beatrix, Godfrey's stepmother.3

; Dss Matilda of Tuscany, Lady of Canossa (+1115), dau.of Bonifacius of Canossa, Mgve and Ct of Reggio, Modena and Brescia, Mgve of Tuscany, Duke of Spoleto.2

Family 2

Welf II/V (?) Duke of Bavaria b. c 1073, d. 24 Sep 1120

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 1 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg1.html

Lothar III (?) von Supplinburg, Duke of Saxony, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4

M, #48239, b. before 9 June 1075, d. 4 December 1137
FatherGerhard (?) Graf von Süpplinburg, Graf im Harzgau5,6,3,2 d. 9 Jun 1075
MotherHedwig (?) Grafin von Formbach7,3,2 b. 1050, d. 1088
ReferenceEDV28
Last Edited14 Dec 2020
     Lothar III (?) von Supplinburg, Duke of Saxony, Holy Roman Emperor was born before 9 June 1075.3,2 He married Richenza (?) von Northeim, daughter of Heinrich "der Fette" (?) von Northeim, Markgraf in Friesland, Duke of Saxony and Gertrud (?) von Meissen, in 1100.8,3,9,10,11

Lothar III (?) von Supplinburg, Duke of Saxony, Holy Roman Emperor died on 4 December 1137 at Breitenwang am Loch, Tyrol, Austria (now); Lothair apparently planned to create a vast dynastic holding for his son-in-law, the Welf Henry the Proud, to include Bavaria, Swabia, Saxony, the allodial lands and fiefs of Matilda of Tuscany, and to secure for him the imperial crown. Lothair died suddenly on his return from an expedition against King Roger II of Sicily.12,5,3,9
Lothar III (?) von Supplinburg, Duke of Saxony, Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 4 December 1137 at Kaiserdom Königslutter, Königslutter am Elm, Landkreis Helmstedt, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     9 Jun 1075, Unterluss, Landkreis Celle, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     DEATH     4 Dec 1137 (aged 62), Breitenwang, Reutte Bezirk, Tyrol (Tirol), Austria
     Lothair III of Supplinburg, was Duke of Saxony (1106), King of Germany (1125), and Holy Roman Emperor from 1133 to 1137. He was a posthumous child, born in June 1075 shortly after his father, Gebhard of Supplinburg, died in the battle of Langensalza against troops loyal to the Emperor Henry IV. His reign was troubled by the constant intriguing of Frederick II, Duke of Swabia and Duke Conrad of Franconia. He died on his way home from a successful campaign against the Normans in southern Italy.
     Around 1100, he married Richenza of Northeim, the daughter of Henry the Fat of Northeim (d. 1101) and Gertrud of Brunswick. They were the parents of one daughter Gertrude, born April 18, 1115. She married Henry the Proud, the duke of Bavaria, on May 29, 1127. Their son was Henry the Lion.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Richeza of Nordheim 1087–1141
     Children
          Gertrud von Supplinburg 1115–1143
     BURIAL     Kaiserdom Königslutter, Königslutter am Elm, Landkreis Helmstedt, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 11 Apr 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 68212576.13
      ; Per Genealogics:
     “Lothar was born in June 1075, the son of Gebhard, Graf von Süpplinburg and Hedwig von Formbach. Lothar's father belonged to the Saxon high nobility and the opposition against Emperor Heinrich V. In 1100 Lothar married heiress Richenza von Northeim, daughter of Heinrich 'der Fette' von Northeim, Markgraf in Friesland, and Gertrud von Braunschweig. They had a daughter Gertrud who would have progeny.
     “When Duke Magnus Billung of Saxony died in 1106 without successors, Heinrich V, the last of the Salian line of Holy Roman Emperors, appointed Lothar to the duchy of Saxony. In the Saxon-Salian disputes Lothar distinguished himself as a clever politician and skilful military leader, as in the battle of Hettstedt in 1115, where the Saxon army destroyed that of Heinrich V. From then the political leadership of the duke was indisputable.
     “When Heinrich V died without heirs in 1125, Lothar was surprisingly elected on 24 August of that year as German king, over the claims of Konrad III, duke of Swabia. Thereby the main territorial focus of medieval history moved to the north of the empire.
     “On 8 June 1133 Lothar was crowned as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Innocent II. Before this, Lothar had backed the pope against counter-pope Anacleto II, who was backed by Roger II, the Norman king of Sicily. As his successor Lothar chose his son-in-law Duke Heinrich X 'the Proud' of Bavaria, who was married to Lothar's daughter Gertrud, but he could not prevail in this against the claim of Konrad III von Hohenstaufen. He clashed repeatedly with Konrad III over the throne, defeating him in the battle of Mühlhausen in Thuringia in 1135. He defeated Roger II of Sicily in Italy in 1136.
     “Lothar died aged 62 on 4 December 1137 in Breitenwang bei Reute, Tyrol, Austria, and was buried in Königslutter, east of Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany. In the subsequent election for German king, Konrad III defeated Heinrich X 'the Proud', and the Hohenstaufen era of German kings and emperors began.
     “Some have portrayed Lothar's period as emperor merely as an intermezzo between the Salian and Hohenstaufen eras, but this undervalues his contribution. After his death Lothar was mourned as a king who had brought peace, unity and order to his empire, even if his political vision of the foundation of a Welf monarchy did not prevail.”.3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 11.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 8:131b.3


; This is the same person as ”Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor” at Wikipedia, as ”Lothaire de Supplinbourg” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Lothar III. (HRR)” at Wikipedia (DE).14,15,16 EDV-28. He was Duke of Swabia.

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOTHAR von Süpplingenburg, son of GERHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau & his wife Hedwig von Formbach ([1/8] Jun 1075-Breitenwang am Loch in Tirol 4 Dec 1137, bur Königslutter). He is named as son of Gebhard in the Annalista Saxo[392]. The Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ name "Lotharii regis et Ite comitisse de Purchausen" as children of "Hadewic"[393]. He was invested as LOTHAR Duke of Saxony in 1106 by Heinrich V King of Germany after the death of Magnus Billung Duke of Saxony[394]. Duke Lothar immediately sought to build-up his lordship, and triggered in 1112 the intervention of the emperor to whom he submitted in 1114. The dispute culminated in the defeat of the imperial army by the Saxons at Welfesholz in 1115[395]. He was elected LOTHAR III King of Germany at Mainz 24 Aug 1125, largely through the manœuvrings of Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz and because he was seen by the German nobility as less of a dynastic threat than his rival Friedrich II Duke of Swabia [Staufen][396]. He was crowned 13 Sep 1125 at Aachen. In 1130, King Lothar became embroiled in the dispute between rival Popes Anacletus II and Innocent II, in the hope of securing a return to the full right of lay investiture. He was crowned Emperor at the Lateran in Rome 4 Jun 1133 by Pope Innocent II, as Pope Anacletus II was occupying St Peter's[397]. He installed his son-in-law as administrator of the lands previously held by Matilda Ctss of Tuscany, after conceding papal ownership of them in return for a usufruct[398]. Following Roger II King of Sicily's expulsion of Pope Innocent II from Rome, Emperor Lothar launched an expedition to Italy in 1136. King Roger offered peace negotiations after the army took Benevento and Bari, but jurisdictional disputes broke out between the emperor and the Pope and the army returned to Germany, Emperor Lothar dying en route[399]. He invested his son-in-law as Duke of Saxony in 1137 shortly before his death[400].
     "m (1100) RICHENZA von Northeim, daughter of HEINRICH "der Fette" Graf von Northeim & his wife Gertrud von Braunschweig (-1141). The Annalista Saxo names "Richenzam postea imperaticem et Gertrudem palatinam comitissam" as the two daughters of Heinrich & his wife Gertrud[401]. The Annalista Saxo names "Richeza ductrix" wife of Lothar, specifying that she gave birth in 1115 during the Easter festival after 15 years of sterility[402]. Heiress to Brunswick, inherited from her mother."
Med Lands cites:
[392] Annalista Saxo 1009 and 1106.
[393] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 77.
[394] Annalista Saxo 1106.
[395] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), pp. 89-90.
[396] Haverkamp (1988), p. 137.
[397] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 120.
[398] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 121.
[399] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 121.
[400] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 124.
[401] Annalista Saxo 1101.
[402] Annalista Saxo 1115.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "RICHENZA von Northeim (-1141). The Annalista Saxo names "Richenzam postea imperaticem et Gertrudem palatinam comitissam" as the two daughters of Heinrich and his wife Gertrud[1522]. Heiress to Braunschweig, inherited from her mother. The Annalista Saxo names "Richeza ductrix" as wife of Lothar, specifying that she gave birth in 1115 during the Easter festival after 15 years of sterility[1523]. A charter dated 1134, under which Emperor Lothar donated property to the monastery of St Marie at Brunswick, names "Gertrudis marchionissa, filia Ekeberti marchionis" as founder and also names "coniuge nostra Rikensa, eiusdem marchionisse filia…[et] filii sui Ottonis et filiarum, Richenze coniugis nostre et Gertrude Palatine comitisse"[1524].
     "m (1100) LOTHAR Graf von Süpplingenburg, son of GERHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau & his wife Hedwig von Formbach ([1/8] Jun 1075-Breitenwang am Loch in Tirol 4 Dec 1137, bur Königslutter). He was invested as LOTHAR Duke of Saxony in 1106. He was elected LOTHAR King of Germany at Mainz 24 Aug 1125, crowned 13 Sep 1125 at Aachen. He was crowned Emperor at Rome 4 Jun 1133."
Med Lands cites:
[1522] Annalista Saxo 1101.
[1523] Annalista Saxo 1115.
[1524] Codex diplomatum Benthemiensi, V, p. 9.11
He was Holy Roman Emperor: Henry left no direct heir, and at the bitterly fought election of 1125, the archbishops of Mainz and Cologne, foes of the anticlerical Salian line, cleverly prevented, with papal aid, the election of the nearest heir, Frederick of Swabia, of the house of Hohenstaufen, on the grounds that the hereditary principle was dangerous. Lothair of Supplinburg, duke of Saxony, was chosen, opening the great struggle of Welf and Waiblinger (Hohenstaufen) in Germany (Guelf and Ghibelline in Italy). ... Lothair II. Elected with the support of the clergy, he remained loyal to the Church, was the first German king to ask for papal approval of his election, and did not exercise his rights under the Concordat of Worms for some years. Bitter civil war against the Hohenstaufens (1125-35); vigorous policy of German expansion among the Wends and Scandinavians; renewal of Wendish conversions (1127). between 1125 and 1137.12,5

Family

Richenza (?) von Northeim b. c 1085, d. 10 Jun 1141
Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 27 Mar 2006: "Ducal Kinsfolk: Duke Henry of Bavaria & Saxony's kinsman, Friedrich II, Count Palatine of Saxony"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ) to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/Bwy-wiR4HzY/m/_WjBWUor01IJ. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar von Supplinburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060070&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Lothardied1137. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#Gerharddied1075
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hedwig: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026282&tree=LEO
  8. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006.
  9. [S2052] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 26 Mar 2006," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Mar 2006, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Lothardied1137
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richenza von Northeim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060071&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXON%20NOBILITY.htm#RichenzaNortheimdied1141
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 206.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 14 December 2020), memorial page for Lothar von Supplinburg (9 Jun 1075–4 Dec 1137), Find a Grave Memorial no. 68212576, citing Kaiserdom Königslutter, Königslutter am Elm, Landkreis Helmstedt, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/68212576. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_III,_Holy_Roman_Emperor. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Lothaire de Supplinbourg: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothaire_de_Supplinbourg. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Lothar III. (HRR): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothar_III._(HRR). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Babenberg page (The Babenbergs): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/babenberg/babenberg.html
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  19. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.5. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gertrud von Süpplinburg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020372&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Gertruddied1143

Otto I "das Kind/the Child" (?) Duke von Braunschweig and Lüneburg1

M, #48240, b. 1204, d. 9 June 1252
FatherWilhelm "the Elder" (?) Duke of Brunswick & Luneburg2,3,1 b. 1184, d. 1213
MotherHelene (?) of Denmark1 d. 22 Nov 1233
Last Edited30 Apr 2020
     Otto I "das Kind/the Child" (?) Duke von Braunschweig and Lüneburg was born in 1204.1 He married Mathilde (?) von Brandenburg, daughter of Albrecht II von Brandenburg Markgraf von Brandenburg and Mathilde (?) Markgräfin von der Nieder-Lausitz, in 1228.1,4

Otto I "das Kind/the Child" (?) Duke von Braunschweig and Lüneburg died on 9 June 1252 at Braunschweig, Stadtkreis Braunschweig, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany (now).5,3,1
      ; Duke Otto I "das Kind" ("the Child") of Braunschweig and Lüneburg (1213-52), *1204, +Braunschweig 9.6.1252; m.1228 Matilda of Brandenburg (+10.6.1261.)1 Otto I "das Kind/the Child" (?) Duke von Braunschweig and Lüneburg was also known as Otto I (?) Duke of Brunswick.6 He was Duke von Braunschweig and Lüneburg between 1213 and 1252.1,5,6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf2.html
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 207. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ascan 1 page - House of Ascania: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ascania/ascan1.html
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 85: Brunswick and Hanover - General Survey (House of Guelph).
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Johann I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00060069&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1512] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email "King;s Kinsfolk: King Edward III's kinsman, Magnus II, King of Norway"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Aug 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 23 Aug 2003."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilde of Brunswick-Lüneburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030473&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto I 'das Kind': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015336&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Duchess Helene of Brunswick-Lüneburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00029981&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Duchess Elisabeth of Brunswick-Lüneburg: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013290&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012346&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRUNSWICK.htm#AlbrechtIdied1279. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.