Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop1,2

M, #10951, b. 1 August 1264, d. 26 June 1294
FatherSir Hugh Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop1 d. 26 Jun 1294
MotherSibyl (?)3
Last Edited3 Jan 2009
     Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop was born on 1 August 1264.4,3 He married Maud Fitz Alan, daughter of John Fitz Alan 7th (?) Earl of Arundel, Lord of Clun and Oswestry and Isabel (Isabella) de Mortimer, before 5 June 1283; her 1st husband.5,1,4,3,2
Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop died on 26 June 1294 at age 29.3
Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop was buried after 26 June 1294 at White Friars Church, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.3


     ; per Richardson: [quote]MAUD FITZ ALAN, married (1st) before 5 June 1283 PHILIP BURNELL, Knt.,
of Holgate, Acton Burnell, Condover, Eudon Burnell (in Chetton), and
Norton (in Condover), Shropshire, East and West Ham (in East Ham) and
Great Holland, Essex, Little Rissington, Gloucestershire, Ham (in
Kingston-upon-Thames) and Hatcham, Surrey, Great Cheverell, Wiltshire,
Kidderminster Burnell, Worcestershire, etc., king's yeoman, son and
heir of Hugh Burnell, Knt., of Wellington and Eudon Burnell,
Shropshire, by his wife, Sibyl. He was born 1 August 1264. She had
the manors of Cound, Frodesley, and Kenley, Shropshire as her
maritagium. They had one son, Edward, Knt. [Lord Burnell], and one
daughter, Maud (wife of John Lovel, 2nd Lord Lovel, and John de
Haudlo, Knt.) He was heir in 1292 to his uncle, Robert Burnell,
Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor of England. SIR PHILIP BURNELL
died 26 June 1294, and was buried in the White Friars church at
Oxford, Oxfordshire. His widow, Maud, married (2nd) by license dated
19 Sept. 1295 (as his 2nd wife) ROBERT DE BRUS, Knt. (died shortly
before 4 April 1304), Earl of Carrick (in Scotland), lord of Annandale
(in Scotland), Lord Brus (in England), of Hatfield Broad Oak and
Writtle, Essex, Governor of Carlisle Castle, son and heir of Robert de
Brus, Knt., lord of Annandale (nicknamed the Competitor), by his 1st
wife, Isabel, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knt., Earl of Gloucester
and Hertford, Magna Carta baron. He was born in July 1243. They had
no issue. In Feb. 1296 Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, and
Robert de Brus, his son, and three others owed £120 to John de
Abingdon, citizen of London. He accompanied Edward I into Scotland,
and fought at the Battle of Dunbar 28 April 1296. He again swore
fealty to King Edward I at Berwick 28 April 1296. However, on his
claims to the throne being thwarted by Edward, he again retired to
England, where he resided chiefly at Broomshawbury, Essex. In August
1296 Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, his son, Robert, and two
others owed a debt of £60 to Nicholas Daleroun, Simon Daleroun, and
Henry Daleroun, citizens and merchants of Winchester. In Oct. 1296 he
and his wife, Maud, were involved in a plea of dower regarding her
English lands. Robert was summoned to attend the King of England at
Salisbury 26 Jan. 1296/7. This marriage ended in divorce sometime
before Easter term 1299, when Maud sued regarding her right of dower
in a messuage in Gunton, Norfolk as "Maud who was the wife of Philip
Burnell," without reference to Robert de Brus as her spouse. In 1302,
as "Maud widow of Philip Burnel," she petitioned the king and council
in England regarding socages and burgages held in various counties by
her late husband, Philip Burnell. She and her son, Edward Burnell,
were sued in Michaelmas term, 6 Edward II (1312-3) by Henry de
Erdington regarding the manor of Wellington, Shropshire. She
presented to the church of Great Cheverell, Wiltshire in 1314 and in
1315. Maud married (3rd) before 19 June 1316 SIMON DE CRIKETOT. In
1296 Simon de Criketot, while with the king's army in Scotland, was
attached to answer Robert de Escores on a plea of trespass, regarding
which plea he had licence to make an agreement, saving to the marshal
his right; they submitted themselves to the arbitration of William
Talemasch and Thomas de Hauville. In Feb. 1320 he had letters
nominating John le Longe his attorney in Ireland for one year. SIMON
DE CRIKETOT was living 7 March 1320. His wife, Maud, was living 19
June 1316, but died shortly before 17 Nov. 1326 (death date of her
nephew, Edmund, Earl of Arundel), as indicated by a petition to the
king and council dated c.1330 submitted by her daughter and son-in-
law, Maud and John de Haudlo).

References:

Surtees, Hist. & Antiq. of Durham 3 (1823): 94 (Brus pedigree).
Tierney, Hist. & Antiq. of the Castle and Town of Arundel 1 (1834):
chart following 192, citing Vincent A Discoverie of Errours (1622):
34 (places Maud in wrong generation of Fitz Alan family). Eyton,
Antiqs. of Shropshire 6 (1858): 71-72, 90, 105, 121-136, 294; 9
(1859): 45. Year Books of Edward I 2 (Rolls Ser. 31a) (1873): 280-
283. Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages (1883):
93-94 (sub Burnell). Rye, Some Rough Materials for a Hist. of the
Hundred of North Erpingham 1 (1883): 82-85. Arch. Cambrensis 5th Ser.
1 (1884): 219-221 (Fitzalan pedigree). Bain, Cal. of Docs. rel. to
Scotland 2 (1884): pg. 217, no. 826 (Agreement dated 29 August 1296
between Chirstiana widow of Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale
plaintiff and Robert de Brus his son and heir defendant as to dower
both in England and Scotland. Robert grants her dower from the
freehold of his father in the valleys of Annan and Moffet as in John
late king of Scotland's time ... She also grants to the said Robert
her dower in the rents of the burghs of Annan and Lochmaben), pg.
223, no. 850 (""On 13 October 1296 at Kirkham. The King [Edward I.]
to John de Langetone to his chancellor. Empowers him to appoint some
fit person to receive the attorneys of Robert de Brus Earl of Carrick
and lord of Annandale, and Matill[idis] his`wife, in a plea of dower
whereof the said earl's clerk, the bearer, will acquaint him. Privy
Seals (Tower), 24 Edward I. Bundle 5."). Tresswell & Vincent, Vis. of
Shropshire 1623, 1569 & 1584 1 (H.S.P. 28) (1889): 92-93 (Burnell
pedigree: "Sr Philippe Burnell Kt baron of Holgate in com. Salop.
nephew & heire to Robert [Burnell]. = Mawde sister to Rich. fitzallen
vide Claud 11 E. 3 m. 7.") (Burnell arms: Argent, a lion rampant sable
crowned or within a bordure azure). Wrottesley, Staffordshire Suits:
Plea Rolls (Colls. Hist. Staffs. 12) (1891): 11-12. Trans. Shropshire
Arch. & Nat. Hist. Soc. 2nd Ser. 6 (1894): 196-202. Birch, Cat. of
Seals in the British Museum 4 (1895): 249 (seal of Robert de Brus,
Earl of Carrick dated circa A.D. 1285--Obverse. To the right. In
armour: hauberk of mail, short surcoat, grated vizor, sword, and
shield of arms. Horse galloping. Arms: a saltire (with curved
branches), and on a chief a leopard passant, guardant for "Le Comte de
Karrick." Legend: S. ROBERTI (DE BRVS) COMITIS DE CARRIK.)
Reverse. A shield of arms: as in the obverse. Legend: SIGILLVM
ROBERTI DE [BRUS COMIT]IS DE CARRIK.) C.P.R. 1292-1301 (1895): 147
(license dated 19 Sept. 1295 for Maud, late the wife of Philip Burnel,
tenant in chief, to marry Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale). C.P.R.
1313-1317 (1898): 479. Feudal Aids, 2 (1900): 130, 134, 159, 216,
218; 3 (1904): 469; 4 (1906): 229, 306, 319, 321, 349. Desc. Cat. of
Ancient Deeds, 4 (1902): 85-86. C.C.R. 1279-1288 (1902): 235 (Maud,
wife of Philip Burnell, styled sister of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of
Arundel). C.P.R. 1317-1321 (1903): 418, 423, 429. Scots Peerage 1
(1904): 7-8 (sub Kings of Scotland); 5 (108): 578, footnote 7 (sub
Mar). C.F.R. 1272-1307 (1911): 340. VCH Surrey 3 (1911): 505; 4
(1912): 43-43 (Burnell arms: Argent a lion sable crowned or in a
border azure), 87. Cal. IPMs 3 (1912): 116-126, 443-444. C.P. 2
(1912): 360-361 (sub Brus), 434 (sub Burnell); 3 (1913): 56 (sub
Carrick); 6 (1926): 109-111 (sub Grendon). VCH Worcester 3 (1913):
161. Year Books of Edward II 13 (Selden Soc. 34) (1918): 234-242.
Cal. Chancery Warrants (1927): 74. Moor Knights of Edward I 1 (H.S.P.
80) (1929): 167. Lyte, Hist. Notes of Some Somerset Manors (Somerset
Rec. Soc. Extra Ser. 1) (1931): 395-398. Trans. Shropshire Arch. &
Nat. Hist. Soc., 47 (1933-34): 49-53. Gandavo, Reg. Simonis de
Gandavo Diocesis Saresbiriensis 1297-1315 2 (Canterbury & York Soc.
41) (1934): 638, 827, 830, 833. VCH Warwick 3 (1945): 52-53 (Burnell
arms: Argent a lion sable with a crown or in a bordure azure).
Sanders, English Baronies (1960): 29. Wagner, Historic Heraldry of
Britain (1972): 44-45. VCH Essex 4 (1973): 10-11. VCH Wiltshire 10
(1975): 42-43 (errs in stating Maud died in late 1315 or early 1316).
Barrow, Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland
(1976): 92-93. VCH Shropshire 11 (1985): 215. Neville "A Plea Roll
of Edward I's Army in Scotland, 1296" in Miscellany of the Scottish
Hist. Soc. 11 (1990). Brault, Rolls of Arms Edward I (1272-1307) 2
(1997): 42 (arms of Philip Burnel: Argent, a lion rampant sable
surmounted by a bend gules). Blakely, The Brus Family in England and
Scotland, 1100-1295 (2005): pg. 232, no. 193 (charter dated 29 May
1298 Robert de Brus senior, Earl of Carrick and lord of Annandale,
releases and quitclaims to John Herolff a half virgate of land in
Writtle, Essex, citing Essex Record Ofice, Charter D/DP T1/1770). PRO
Documents, C 241/18/59 (Debtor: Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of
Carrick, Robert de Brus, his son, William de Roding, knight, William
de Badew, and John de Writtle, called Serich. Creditor: John de
Abingdon, citizen of London. Amount: £120. Before whom: John Breton,
Warden of London; John de Bakewell, Clerk. First term: 16/02/1296.
Last term: 25/03/1296. Writ to: Sheriff of Essex. Sent by: John
Breton, Warden of London; John de Bakewell, Clerk); C 241/31/103
(Debtor: Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, Robert de Brus, his
son, John de Sawbridgeworth, poulterer, and John ......; Creditor:
Nicholas Daleroun, Simon Daleroun, and Henry Daleroun, citizens and
merchants of Winchester. Amount: £60. Before whom: John Breton,
Warden of London.... .. ....... , Clerk . First term:
08/04/1296. Last term: 08/04/1296. Writ to: Sheriff of Middlesex.
Sent by: John Breton, Warden of London.... .. ........, Clerk); SC
8/52/2570 (petition dated c.1330 by John de Haudlo and Maud his wife
to the king and council) (see abstract further below); SC 8/313/E63
(petition dated 1302 from Maud, widow of Philip Burnel, to king and
council, requesting remedy as whereas her late husband held socages
and burgages in various counties of which he died seised and although
Burnel ought to have and hold these socages and burgages for the
upbringing of Edward her son, who is under age, these socages and
burgages are retained in the king's hand) (abstract of documents
available online at http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/search.asp). [end quote]4

; Weis [AR7] 215-30.5

Family

Maud Fitz Alan d. b 17 Nov 1326
Children

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burnell - Barons Burnell, p. 93. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fitz Alan 7.ii: p. 315. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Burnell 8: pp. 171-172.
  4. [S2199] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Maud Fitz Alan (died c.1326), wife of Philip Burnell, Robert de Brus,      and Simon de Criketot"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-30, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Burnell 9: p. 172.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud Burnell: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00487112&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Maud Fitz Alan1

F, #10952, d. before 17 November 1326
FatherJohn Fitz Alan 7th (?) Earl of Arundel, Lord of Clun and Oswestry2,3,1 b. 14 Sep 1246, d. bt 18 Mar 1271 - 1272
MotherIsabel (Isabella) de Mortimer2,3,1 b. c 1248, d. a 1300
Last Edited3 Jan 2009
     Maud Fitz Alan married Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop, son of Sir Hugh Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop and Sibyl (?), before 5 June 1283; her 1st husband.2,4,5,6,1 Maud Fitz Alan married Robert I de Bruce King of Scots, son of Sir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick and Marjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick, on 19 September 1295; her 2nd husband, his 2nd wife; date is date of license.5,6 Maud Fitz Alan and Robert I de Bruce King of Scots were divorced before March 1299; per Richardson: "This marriage ended in divorce sometime before Easter term 1299, when Maud sued regarding her right of dower in a messuage in Gunton, Norfolk as "Maud who was the wife of Philip Burnell," without reference to Robert de Brus as her spouse."5 Maud Fitz Alan married Simon de Criketot before 19 June 1316; her 3rd husband.5,6
Maud Fitz Alan died before 17 November 1326.5
     ; per Richardson: [quote]MAUD FITZ ALAN, married (1st) before 5 June 1283 PHILIP BURNELL, Knt.,
of Holgate, Acton Burnell, Condover, Eudon Burnell (in Chetton), and
Norton (in Condover), Shropshire, East and West Ham (in East Ham) and
Great Holland, Essex, Little Rissington, Gloucestershire, Ham (in
Kingston-upon-Thames) and Hatcham, Surrey, Great Cheverell, Wiltshire,
Kidderminster Burnell, Worcestershire, etc., king's yeoman, son and
heir of Hugh Burnell, Knt., of Wellington and Eudon Burnell,
Shropshire, by his wife, Sibyl. He was born 1 August 1264. She had
the manors of Cound, Frodesley, and Kenley, Shropshire as her
maritagium. They had one son, Edward, Knt. [Lord Burnell], and one
daughter, Maud (wife of John Lovel, 2nd Lord Lovel, and John de
Haudlo, Knt.) He was heir in 1292 to his uncle, Robert Burnell,
Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor of England. SIR PHILIP BURNELL
died 26 June 1294, and was buried in the White Friars church at
Oxford, Oxfordshire. His widow, Maud, married (2nd) by license dated
19 Sept. 1295 (as his 2nd wife) ROBERT DE BRUS, Knt. (died shortly
before 4 April 1304), Earl of Carrick (in Scotland), lord of Annandale
(in Scotland), Lord Brus (in England), of Hatfield Broad Oak and
Writtle, Essex, Governor of Carlisle Castle, son and heir of Robert de
Brus, Knt., lord of Annandale (nicknamed the Competitor), by his 1st
wife, Isabel, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knt., Earl of Gloucester
and Hertford, Magna Carta baron. He was born in July 1243. They had
no issue. In Feb. 1296 Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, and
Robert de Brus, his son, and three others owed £120 to John de
Abingdon, citizen of London. He accompanied Edward I into Scotland,
and fought at the Battle of Dunbar 28 April 1296. He again swore
fealty to King Edward I at Berwick 28 April 1296. However, on his
claims to the throne being thwarted by Edward, he again retired to
England, where he resided chiefly at Broomshawbury, Essex. In August
1296 Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, his son, Robert, and two
others owed a debt of £60 to Nicholas Daleroun, Simon Daleroun, and
Henry Daleroun, citizens and merchants of Winchester. In Oct. 1296 he
and his wife, Maud, were involved in a plea of dower regarding her
English lands. Robert was summoned to attend the King of England at
Salisbury 26 Jan. 1296/7. This marriage ended in divorce sometime
before Easter term 1299, when Maud sued regarding her right of dower
in a messuage in Gunton, Norfolk as "Maud who was the wife of Philip
Burnell," without reference to Robert de Brus as her spouse. In 1302,
as "Maud widow of Philip Burnel," she petitioned the king and council
in England regarding socages and burgages held in various counties by
her late husband, Philip Burnell. She and her son, Edward Burnell,
were sued in Michaelmas term, 6 Edward II (1312-3) by Henry de
Erdington regarding the manor of Wellington, Shropshire. She
presented to the church of Great Cheverell, Wiltshire in 1314 and in
1315. Maud married (3rd) before 19 June 1316 SIMON DE CRIKETOT. In
1296 Simon de Criketot, while with the king's army in Scotland, was
attached to answer Robert de Escores on a plea of trespass, regarding
which plea he had licence to make an agreement, saving to the marshal
his right; they submitted themselves to the arbitration of William
Talemasch and Thomas de Hauville. In Feb. 1320 he had letters
nominating John le Longe his attorney in Ireland for one year. SIMON
DE CRIKETOT was living 7 March 1320. His wife, Maud, was living 19
June 1316, but died shortly before 17 Nov. 1326 (death date of her
nephew, Edmund, Earl of Arundel), as indicated by a petition to the
king and council dated c.1330 submitted by her daughter and son-in-
law, Maud and John de Haudlo).

References:

Surtees, Hist. & Antiq. of Durham 3 (1823): 94 (Brus pedigree).
Tierney, Hist. & Antiq. of the Castle and Town of Arundel 1 (1834):
chart following 192, citing Vincent A Discoverie of Errours (1622):
34 (places Maud in wrong generation of Fitz Alan family). Eyton,
Antiqs. of Shropshire 6 (1858): 71-72, 90, 105, 121-136, 294; 9
(1859): 45. Year Books of Edward I 2 (Rolls Ser. 31a) (1873): 280-
283. Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages (1883):
93-94 (sub Burnell). Rye, Some Rough Materials for a Hist. of the
Hundred of North Erpingham 1 (1883): 82-85. Arch. Cambrensis 5th Ser.
1 (1884): 219-221 (Fitzalan pedigree). Bain, Cal. of Docs. rel. to
Scotland 2 (1884): pg. 217, no. 826 (Agreement dated 29 August 1296
between Chirstiana widow of Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale
plaintiff and Robert de Brus his son and heir defendant as to dower
both in England and Scotland. Robert grants her dower from the
freehold of his father in the valleys of Annan and Moffet as in John
late king of Scotland's time ... She also grants to the said Robert
her dower in the rents of the burghs of Annan and Lochmaben), pg.
223, no. 850 (""On 13 October 1296 at Kirkham. The King [Edward I.]
to John de Langetone to his chancellor. Empowers him to appoint some
fit person to receive the attorneys of Robert de Brus Earl of Carrick
and lord of Annandale, and Matill[idis] his`wife, in a plea of dower
whereof the said earl's clerk, the bearer, will acquaint him. Privy
Seals (Tower), 24 Edward I. Bundle 5."). Tresswell & Vincent, Vis. of
Shropshire 1623, 1569 & 1584 1 (H.S.P. 28) (1889): 92-93 (Burnell
pedigree: "Sr Philippe Burnell Kt baron of Holgate in com. Salop.
nephew & heire to Robert [Burnell]. = Mawde sister to Rich. fitzallen
vide Claud 11 E. 3 m. 7.") (Burnell arms: Argent, a lion rampant sable
crowned or within a bordure azure). Wrottesley, Staffordshire Suits:
Plea Rolls (Colls. Hist. Staffs. 12) (1891): 11-12. Trans. Shropshire
Arch. & Nat. Hist. Soc. 2nd Ser. 6 (1894): 196-202. Birch, Cat. of
Seals in the British Museum 4 (1895): 249 (seal of Robert de Brus,
Earl of Carrick dated circa A.D. 1285--Obverse. To the right. In
armour: hauberk of mail, short surcoat, grated vizor, sword, and
shield of arms. Horse galloping. Arms: a saltire (with curved
branches), and on a chief a leopard passant, guardant for "Le Comte de
Karrick." Legend: S. ROBERTI (DE BRVS) COMITIS DE CARRIK.)
Reverse. A shield of arms: as in the obverse. Legend: SIGILLVM
ROBERTI DE [BRUS COMIT]IS DE CARRIK.) C.P.R. 1292-1301 (1895): 147
(license dated 19 Sept. 1295 for Maud, late the wife of Philip Burnel,
tenant in chief, to marry Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale). C.P.R.
1313-1317 (1898): 479. Feudal Aids, 2 (1900): 130, 134, 159, 216,
218; 3 (1904): 469; 4 (1906): 229, 306, 319, 321, 349. Desc. Cat. of
Ancient Deeds, 4 (1902): 85-86. C.C.R. 1279-1288 (1902): 235 (Maud,
wife of Philip Burnell, styled sister of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of
Arundel). C.P.R. 1317-1321 (1903): 418, 423, 429. Scots Peerage 1
(1904): 7-8 (sub Kings of Scotland); 5 (108): 578, footnote 7 (sub
Mar). C.F.R. 1272-1307 (1911): 340. VCH Surrey 3 (1911): 505; 4
(1912): 43-43 (Burnell arms: Argent a lion sable crowned or in a
border azure), 87. Cal. IPMs 3 (1912): 116-126, 443-444. C.P. 2
(1912): 360-361 (sub Brus), 434 (sub Burnell); 3 (1913): 56 (sub
Carrick); 6 (1926): 109-111 (sub Grendon). VCH Worcester 3 (1913):
161. Year Books of Edward II 13 (Selden Soc. 34) (1918): 234-242.
Cal. Chancery Warrants (1927): 74. Moor Knights of Edward I 1 (H.S.P.
80) (1929): 167. Lyte, Hist. Notes of Some Somerset Manors (Somerset
Rec. Soc. Extra Ser. 1) (1931): 395-398. Trans. Shropshire Arch. &
Nat. Hist. Soc., 47 (1933-34): 49-53. Gandavo, Reg. Simonis de
Gandavo Diocesis Saresbiriensis 1297-1315 2 (Canterbury & York Soc.
41) (1934): 638, 827, 830, 833. VCH Warwick 3 (1945): 52-53 (Burnell
arms: Argent a lion sable with a crown or in a bordure azure).
Sanders, English Baronies (1960): 29. Wagner, Historic Heraldry of
Britain (1972): 44-45. VCH Essex 4 (1973): 10-11. VCH Wiltshire 10
(1975): 42-43 (errs in stating Maud died in late 1315 or early 1316).
Barrow, Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland
(1976): 92-93. VCH Shropshire 11 (1985): 215. Neville "A Plea Roll
of Edward I's Army in Scotland, 1296" in Miscellany of the Scottish
Hist. Soc. 11 (1990). Brault, Rolls of Arms Edward I (1272-1307) 2
(1997): 42 (arms of Philip Burnel: Argent, a lion rampant sable
surmounted by a bend gules). Blakely, The Brus Family in England and
Scotland, 1100-1295 (2005): pg. 232, no. 193 (charter dated 29 May
1298 Robert de Brus senior, Earl of Carrick and lord of Annandale,
releases and quitclaims to John Herolff a half virgate of land in
Writtle, Essex, citing Essex Record Ofice, Charter D/DP T1/1770). PRO
Documents, C 241/18/59 (Debtor: Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of
Carrick, Robert de Brus, his son, William de Roding, knight, William
de Badew, and John de Writtle, called Serich. Creditor: John de
Abingdon, citizen of London. Amount: £120. Before whom: John Breton,
Warden of London; John de Bakewell, Clerk. First term: 16/02/1296.
Last term: 25/03/1296. Writ to: Sheriff of Essex. Sent by: John
Breton, Warden of London; John de Bakewell, Clerk); C 241/31/103
(Debtor: Robert de Brus, knight, Earl of Carrick, Robert de Brus, his
son, John de Sawbridgeworth, poulterer, and John ......; Creditor:
Nicholas Daleroun, Simon Daleroun, and Henry Daleroun, citizens and
merchants of Winchester. Amount: £60. Before whom: John Breton,
Warden of London.... .. ....... , Clerk . First term:
08/04/1296. Last term: 08/04/1296. Writ to: Sheriff of Middlesex.
Sent by: John Breton, Warden of London.... .. ........, Clerk); SC
8/52/2570 (petition dated c.1330 by John de Haudlo and Maud his wife
to the king and council) (see abstract further below); SC 8/313/E63
(petition dated 1302 from Maud, widow of Philip Burnel, to king and
council, requesting remedy as whereas her late husband held socages
and burgages in various counties of which he died seised and although
Burnel ought to have and hold these socages and burgages for the
upbringing of Edward her son, who is under age, these socages and
burgages are retained in the king's hand) (abstract of documents
available online at http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/search.asp). [end quote]

; Weis [AR7] 215-30.2 She was living on 19 June 1316.5,6

Family 1

Sir Philip Burnell Knt., of Acton Burnell, co. Salop b. 1 Aug 1264, d. 26 Jun 1294
Children

Family 2

Robert I de Bruce King of Scots b. 11 Jul 1274, d. 7 Jun 1329

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fitz Alan 7.ii: p. 315. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-30, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 7: pp. 313-314.
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burnell - Barons Burnell, p. 93. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S2199] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007: "Maud Fitz Alan (died c.1326), wife of Philip Burnell, Robert de Brus,      and Simon de Criketot"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Nov 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 16 Nov 2007."
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Burnell 8: pp. 171-172.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Burnell 9: p. 172.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud Burnell: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00487112&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel1,2

M, #10953, b. 1252, d. before 1 October 1310
FatherJohn Lovel2 b. 1222, d. 1287
MotherMaud de Sydenham2
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited3 Aug 2008
     Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel married Joan de Ros, daughter of Sir Robert de Ros Lord of Helmsley and Belvoir and Isabel d'Albini of Belvoir Castle; his 2nd wife.2,3 Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel was born in 1252; Richardson says b. ca 1255.2,3 He married Isabel de Bois, daughter of Arnold de Bois, circa 1270; his 1st wife.2
Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel died before 1 October 1310.2,3
     He was 1st Lord (Baron) Lovel (of Castle Cary.)4 EDV-21.

; Weis AR7 200-31.5

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Isabel de Bois
Child

Family 3

Joan de Ros d. 13 Oct 1348
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 216-217, de ROS 6:vii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-29, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/F9_d7JZUuk0/m/5jgR9n064yQJ) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 200-31, p. 168.
  6. [S1712] David Utz, "Utz email 19 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descent to Col. William Bernard"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email 19 May 2005."
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Burnell 9: p. 172. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Joan de Ros1,2

F, #10954, d. 13 October 1348
FatherSir Robert de Ros Lord of Helmsley and Belvoir2 b. c 1223, d. 16 Jun 1285
MotherIsabel d'Albini of Belvoir Castle2 b. c 1233, d. 15 Jun 1301
Last Edited3 Aug 2008
     Joan de Ros married Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel, son of John Lovel and Maud de Sydenham; his 2nd wife.3,2
Joan de Ros died on 13 October 1348.3,1,2

Family

Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel b. 1252, d. b 1 Oct 1310
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 216*217, de ROS 6:vii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/F9_d7JZUuk0/m/5jgR9n064yQJ) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-29, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Burnell 9: p. 172. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Isabel de Bois

F, #10955
FatherArnold de Bois1
ReferenceEDV21
Last Edited18 Aug 2019
     Isabel de Bois married Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel, son of John Lovel and Maud de Sydenham, circa 1270; his 1st wife.1
     EDV-21.

Family

Sir John Lovel Knt., 1st Lord Lovel b. 1252, d. b 1 Oct 1310
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-29, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 212-31, p. 176.
  3. [S1712] David Utz, "Utz email 19 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descent to Col. William Bernard"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email 19 May 2005."

John Lovel1

M, #10956, b. 1222, d. 1287
FatherSir John Lovel Knt.1 d. b 23 Dec 1252
MotherKatherine Basset1
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited1 Jul 2005
     John Lovel married Maud de Sydenham, daughter of Sir William de Sydenham.1 John Lovel was born in 1222.1
John Lovel died in 1287.1
     EDV-22.

Family

Maud de Sydenham
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-28, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Gorges formerly of Wraxall Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 215-29, p. 179.

Maud de Sydenham1

F, #10957
FatherSir William de Sydenham1
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited23 Feb 2003
     Maud de Sydenham married John Lovel, son of Sir John Lovel Knt. and Katherine Basset.1
     EDV-22.

Family

John Lovel b. 1222, d. 1287
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-28, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Gorges formerly of Wraxall Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 215-29, p. 179.

Sir William de Sydenham1

M, #10958
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited23 Jan 2003
     EDV-23.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-28, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Sir John Lovel Knt.

M, #10959, d. before 23 December 1252
FatherWilliam de Lovel of Minster Lovel d. c 1212/13
MotherIsabel (?)
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited23 Jan 2003
     Sir John Lovel Knt. married Katherine Basset, daughter of Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe and Aline de Gai, before August 1216.1
Sir John Lovel Knt. died before 23 December 1252.1
     EDV-23.

Family

Katherine Basset
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 215-28, p. 179.

Katherine Basset

F, #10960
FatherAlan Basset Lord of Wycombe b. c 1175, d. 1231
MotherAline de Gai b. c 1160
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited23 Jan 2003
     Katherine Basset married Sir John Lovel Knt., son of William de Lovel of Minster Lovel and Isabel (?), before August 1216.1
     EDV-23.

Family

Sir John Lovel Knt. d. b 23 Dec 1252
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 215-28, p. 179.

Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe

M, #10961, b. circa 1175, d. 1231
FatherThomas Basset1 b. c 1130, d. 1181
MotherAlice de Dunstanville1 b. c 1134, d. 1186
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited20 Aug 2019
     Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe married Aline de Gai, daughter of Philip de Gai and Sedzilia (?).2,3 Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe was born circa 1175 at Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England.1
Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe died in 1231; Douglas Richardson says d. 1232.2
Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe died circa 1233.1
     GAV-23 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

; I am going to have to issue a mea culpa. I was misremembering the connection - there was a Basset/Sandford marriage, but not Laurence and Hawise (which, if nothing else, helps the chronology).


From a chart, p. xxxix in _Basset Charters, c. 1120 to 1250_, William T. Reedy ed., Publications of the Pipe Roll Society, n.s. vol. 50, London 1995

Alan Basset of Wycombe had:
1. Thomas, d. 1230
2. Gilbert, d. 1241, m. Isabel de Ferrers and had:
a. Gilbert, d. 1241.
3. Alice, m. John de Sandford
4. Fulk, Bishop of London, d. 1259
5. David
6. Warin, d. 1233
7. Philip, d 1271, m. H. de Gray, m.2 Ela, Countess of Warwick
a. Aline, m. Hugh Despenser, m.2 Roger Bigod

A Basset pedigree in History and Antiquities of Leicester, primarily derived from a manuscript of William Dugdale, gives more detail on the Basset/Sandford marriage:

"Alice, wife of Sir John Sandford, who was patron of the priory of Blackmere, from whence is the earl of Oxford"

(this last perhaps a reference to the marriage of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, to Alice de Sanford, daughter of Gilbert de Sanford, d. 1249.)


Of particular interest is the following, from The Catalogue formerly known as PROCAT:

E 40/501

A. D. 1213-1234
Grant by William, the prior, and the canons of Blakemore. THe late Alan de Sanford, son of the late knt. their patron, Sir John de Sanford, had elected to be buried in their church near his forefathers, and SIr Gilbert Basset, uncle (advunculus) of the same Alan, had converted to their use 30 acres which lady Alice de Snford held of them in Alfladewike, for the "remedium" of his said deceased grandson and knt. and by this and other largesses the said Gilbert, with their said patron and lady Alice his wife, have cuased their church to have perpetual memory of the deceased. Wherefore they grant to Gilbert and his heirs the right of presenting one canon, whom they shall be bound to admit; such canon to be called the 'Basset' canon. Witnesses:- Sir Fulk Basset, provost of Beverley, Sir John de Sanford, Sir Thomas Basset, and Sir Warin, brothers, Sir Adam de Periton, Sir Robert de Wattevile, Sir Thomas de Gulafre, Sir Geoffrey de Bidefor, Gilbert de Sanford.


This is a little confusing, particularly the "of the said deceased grandson and knt" part. However, it shows that Alice had at least one son, Alan, and I would suggest that Gilbert and Sir John are also her sons.

This appears to give Gilbert Basset an earlier wife, Alice, prior to his marriage to Isabel de Ferrers. The provost of Beverley is presumably the future Bishop of London, while Thomas Basset and his brother Warin are also the so-named siblings of Alice.


We have already seen Philip serving as witness for a grant of Nicolas de Sandford, son of John to his brother Laurence, and here are a few more Basset/Sandford interactions:


E 40/199

41 Hen. III
Demise by Sir Laurence de Saunford to Sir James de Aldateles, for his life, of all land he held at Wymabank, Newhall, and Hesinglinton, for 20/. yearly, to be paid at Burncester at Sir James' cost, the first tem to being at Easter, 41 Henry III; and for this demise Sir James has paid 25/. Witnesses:- Sirs Philip Basset, William Lungspere, Henry de Baton, Henry de Mar, Hugh Dispenser, William de Insula, William de Gorham, and others (named) Endorsed: Inter Laur's de Samford et Jacob' de Audel.' Chesh


E 40/4636

London, feast of St. Gregory, 45 Henry III.
Letters patent by Hawisia de Saumford, acknowledging the receipt from Sir Philip Basset and the executors of Sir Laurence de Samford, her late husband, of a charter of feoffment of Dauntesye, made to the said Laurence by Sir Gilbert de Dauntesye, and of a charter of confirmation thereof by Sir Gilbert de Dauntesye, and of a charter of confirmation thereof by Sir Richard de Dauntesye; also of the chirograph made between the said Sir Laurence and Gilbert of land in Dauntesye, Bremelham, Wivelesford &c. and of the letter of attorney by the said Glbert to give seisin to the said Laurence of the manor of Dauntesye: [Wilts.]


E 40/2595

[A.D. 1227-1243.]
Grant by Hubert de Burgo, Earl of Kent, to Philip Basset of his messuage of Biestun with the circuit of the same manor, which remained to him above the extent of the said manor which he made to Philip in exchange for the manor of Crokestun which he had formerly given him. Witnesses:_ Sirs Gilbert and Nicholas de Sandford, Henry de Wintersell, William de Gorham, and others (named): [Middx.]


Based on this, I would tentatively add Nicolas and Laurence to the list of children of Alice Basset and John de Sandford. The only problem here is the marriage of Laurence to a Hawise, who, apparently a widow in 1297 fits more comfortably in the generation after Philip and Alice Basset, is herself called daughter of Lord Basset. She would appear to derive from a more distant branch of that family. (I don't have handy access to the appropriate volume of CP - How many Lord Bassets were there at the time?)


The next entry of interest, another with Sandford witnessing for Basset:

E 40/844

(A.D.1245-1259)
Grant by William . . . to Sir Philip Basset, of lands called 'Ayswelle,' 'Tenakeresh(e)gge,' &c., in Boytun, in Finchingefeld parish. Witnesses:-Sir Gilbert de Sanford, Master Fulk de Sanford, treasurer of St. Paul's, London, Sir Ralph de Ardern, Sir Geoffrey Neirenut, and others (named). (Essex)


Here, in Master Fulk de Sandford, I suspect we have the future Archbishop of Dublin. He would have owed his position as treasurer to his presumed uncle, Bishop Fulk Basset. (That his uncle was his patron in advancement would have, perhaps, provided the impetus to use his uncle's surname - it would have reaffirmed the connection.) I suggest we place him, too, as son of a John and Alice. As to Archbishop John, I am not so sure. Do we _know_ he was brother of Fulk? If so, he would be the second John in the family I have proposed, but given that he outlived Fulk by 23 years, I wonder of they might instead have been uncle and nephew.








Some additional Sandford documents from the database formerly known as PROCAT:


E 101/232/22

24 Edward I.
Letter and memorandum as to the goods of J. de Sandford, archbishop of Dublin, a crown debtor.



SC 8/66/3257

[c. 1318]
Petitioners: Roger [de Pembrok (Pembroke)], son of Roger de Pembrok (Pembroke).
Addressees: King's council.
Places mentioned: County Tipperary, [Ireland]; Athlone, [County Westmeath, Ireland]; Belaghnegarmyn (unidentified), County Tipperary, [Ireland]; Scotland.
Other people mentioned: Roger de Pembrok (Pembroke), formerly Sheriff of County Tipperary; [Edward I], King of England; John de Sandford, Archbishop of Dublin & Justiciar of Ireland; Walter Lenfaunt, Keeper of the castle of Athlone; [Richard de Burgh], Earl of Ulster.
Nature of request: Roger, son of Roger de Pembrok, formerly Sheriff of County Tipperary, makes two requests:
1) He asks that the Justiciar and Treasurer of Ireland be ordered to inquire into two payments, amounting to £40, made by his father at the command of John de Sandford, Archbishop of Dublin and Justiciar of Ireland, for which he never received an allowance, and that they might be allowed to him.
2) He requests a writ to the Treasurer of Ireland to levy £30 owed by various debtors in County Tipperary, for which he can show evidence, and that he might be able to pay the rest of the £115 demanded of him in terms of 6 marks annually, as the king's father granted to his father.
Endorsement: The Justiciar and Treasurer of Ireland are to be ordered that, when they have examined all the rolls and memoranda of the said Justiciar in the Exchequer, if they find that the £40 mentioned in the petition were paid for the king's benefit, as is contained in the petition, then they are to give him an allowance for them in the Exchequer. And with regard to the payment in instalments of the remainder of the debt, considering the estate of the person and the service he has done to the king, they are to do what seems to them to be done. The Treasurer is also to be written to, to have the £30 levied from the various debtors whose names the same Roger will give him, in exoneration of the same Roger.



E 40/3242

Morrow of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, A.D. 1223. (Hants)

Agreement between Theobald the abbot, and the convent of Tyron,' (Andewell) and Alan Basset to settle their disputes. They release to Alan all claim in Hoc (Hook) wood and give him land in the field 'del su' of the chapel of Mapeldurewelle, retaining one third of the moor called 'Estmore.' He restores them a way sufficient for a horse laden to go along with his leader in the head of his tillage toward the water of Mapeldurewelle to the house of Enedewelle. Present:- witnesses from Bradenestoke and St. Fromund, Gilbert Basset, Roger de Dantesia, Alan Bradenstoke and St. Fromund, Gilbert Basset, Roger de Dantesia, Alan de Sanford, and others (named). Hants Morrow of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, A.D. 1223. (Hants)



Piece details: SC 13/H 8

1284x1294
John de Sanford, archbishop of Dublin: seal with counter seal. ORDER THIS DOCUMENT AS SC 13/H 7



And with regard to the Sanford/Vere connection:

SC 8/51/2549

[1278-1281]

The Earl of Hereford and Earl of Oxford state that after the death of Joan de Sanford, who held Lashbrook of the Earl of Oxford and Shelley of the Earl of Hereford, they seized these tenements into their hands, but because one John de Munteny claimed to be her heir and to hold of the king in chief, an inquest was held in three counties. In Oxfordshire and Essex it was found that she held nothing in chief, but the inquest in Suffolk, held partly with the villeins of John's kinsman Robert de Munteny, found that she did, so that the Earls were expelled from their manors. The Earl of Oxford complained and a new inquest was ordered in Suffolk, to be taken by Richard de Holebrok, but this was halted by a writ acquired by John de Munteny to associate William de Burle. The Earls dispute that Joan held any tenements in chief of the king in Suffolk or elsewhere, and ask for justice to be done to them.4



; named in Magna Charta.5
; signed Magna Carta.
Counsellors named in Magna Carta
     "The preamble to Magna Carta includes the names of the following 27 ecclesiastical and secular magnates who had counselled John to accept its terms. The names include some of the moderate reformers, notably Archbishop Stephen Langton, and some of John's loyal supporters, such as William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke. They are listed here in the order in which they appear in the charter itself:[62]
1. Stephen Langton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Cardinal
2. Henry de Loundres, Archbishop of Dublin
3. William of Sainte-Mère-Église, Bishop of London
4. Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester
5. Jocelin of Wells, Bishop of Bath and Glastonbury
6. Hugh of Wells, Bishop of Lincoln
7. Walter de Gray, Bishop of Worcester
8. William de Cornhill, Bishop of Coventry
9. Benedict of Sausetun, Bishop of Rochester
10. Pandulf Verraccio, subdeacon and papal legate to England
11. Eymeric, Master of the Knights Templar in England
12. William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke
13. William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury
14. William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey
15. William d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel
16. Alan of Galloway, Constable of Scotland
17. Warin FitzGerold
18. Peter FitzHerbert
19 Hubert de Burgh, Seneschal of Poitou
20. Hugh de Neville
21. Matthew FitzHerbert
22. Thomas Basset
23. Alan Basset
24. Philip d'Aubigny
25. Robert of Ropsley
26. John Marshal
27. John FitzHugh

The Council of Twenty-Five Barons
     "The names of the Twenty-Five Barons appointed under clause 61 to monitor John's future conduct are not given in the charter itself, but do appear in four early sources, all seemingly based on a contemporary listing: a late 13th-century collection of law tracts and statutes, a Reading Abbey manuscript now in Lambeth Palace Library, and the Chronica Majora and Liber Additamentorum of Matthew Paris.[63][64][65] The process of appointment is not known, but the names were drawn almost exclusively from among John's more active opponents.[66] They are listed here in the order in which they appear in the original sources:
1. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford
2. William de Forz, Earl of Albemarle
3. Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester
4. Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester
5. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford
6. Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk
7. Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford
8. William Marshal junior
9. Robert Fitzwalter, baron of Little Dunmow
10. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford
11. Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle
12. Hugh Bigod, heir to the Earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk
13. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle
14. William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London
15. William de Lanvallei, Lord of Walkern
16. Robert de Ros, Baron of Helmsley
17. John de Lacy, Constable of Chester and Lord of Pontefract Castle
18. Richard de Percy
19. John FitzRobert de Clavering, Lord of Warkworth Castle
20. William Malet
21. Geoffrey de Saye
22. Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire[f]
23. William of Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk
24. Richard de Montfichet
25. William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir

Excommunicated rebels
     "In September 1215, the papal commissioners in England – Subdeacon Pandulf, Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester, and Simon, Abbot of Reading – excommunicated the rebels, acting on instructions earlier received from Rome. A letter sent by the commissioners from Dover on 5 September to Archbishop Langton explicitly names nine senior rebel barons (all members of the Council of Twenty-Five), and six clerics numbered among the rebel ranks:[67]
Barons
1. Robert Fitzwalter
2. Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester
3. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford
4. Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester
5. Eustace de Vesci
6. Richard de Percy
7. John de Lacy, Constable of Chester
8. William d'Aubigny
9. William de Mowbray
Clerics
10. Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford
11. William, Archdeacon of Hereford
12. Alexander the clerk [possibly Alexander of St Albans]
13. Osbert de Samara
14. John de Fereby
15. Robert, chaplain to Robert Fitzwalter.6

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11272
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1713] David Utz, "Utz email #1 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Anne Arundell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #1 29 May 2005."
  4. [S1785] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie email 8 Sept 2005 "Basset and Sandford (was Re: Trusted Sources)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 8 Sept 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 8 Sept 2005."
  5. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 159-4, p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magna_Carta. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 238, TALBOT 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aliva Bassett: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00337613&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I2375

Aline de Gai1,2,3

F, #10962, b. circa 1160
FatherPhilip de Gai b. c 1122
MotherSedzilia (?)
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited20 Aug 2019
     Aline de Gai married Alan Basset Lord of Wycombe, son of Thomas Basset and Alice de Dunstanville.4,5 Aline de Gai was born circa 1160.1
      GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-22. Aline de Gai was also known as Aline de Grey. Aline de Gai was also known as Aline de Gay. Aline de Gai was also known as Aline Gay.

Citations

  1. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I41617
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 238 TALBOT 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1713] David Utz, "Utz email #1 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Anne Arundell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #1 29 May 2005."
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 238, TALBOT 3.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aliva Bassett: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00337613&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I2375

Philip de Gai1,2

M, #10963, b. circa 1122
FatherRobert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester3 b. c 1090, d. 31 Oct 1147
MotherMaud Mabel Fitz Hamon3
ReferenceGAV24 EDV23
Last Edited23 Nov 2002
     Philip de Gai married Sedzilia (?)4 Philip de Gai was born circa 1122.3
     GAV-24 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

Philip de Gai was also known as Philip de Grey Lord of Wooton Basset & Broadtown.

Family

Sedzilia (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 238 TALBOT 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I45350
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Sedzilia (?)

F, #10964
ReferenceGAV24 EDV23
Last Edited15 Nov 2002
     Sedzilia (?) married Philip de Gai, son of Robert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester and Maud Mabel Fitz Hamon.1
     GAV-24 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

Family

Philip de Gai b. c 1122
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-27, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

William de Lovel of Minster Lovel

M, #10965, d. circa 1212/13
FatherGuillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval, d. bt 1166 - 1170
MotherAuberée/Maud de Beaumont de Meulan d. a 1189
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited23 Jan 2003
     William de Lovel of Minster Lovel married Isabel (?) before 1190.1
William de Lovel of Minster Lovel died circa 1212/13.1
     He was Crusader.1 EDV-24.

Family

Isabel (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-26, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Isabel (?)

F, #10966
ReferenceEDV24
Last Edited23 Jan 2003

Family

William de Lovel of Minster Lovel d. c 1212/13
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-26, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Guillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval,1,2,3

M, #10967, d. between 1166 and 1170
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited16 May 2009
     Guillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval, married Auberée/Maud de Beaumont de Meulan, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester, Comte de Beaument et Meulan Meulan and Isabelle/Elisabeth de Vermandois Countess of Leicester.4,2 Guillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval, married Isabelle de Crépon, daughter of Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford and Adelise (Alice) de Toeni.3
Guillaume/William "Louvel" (?) seigneur d’Ivry et Bréval, died between 1166 and 1170.4,1
     EDV-25.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 18, de BEAUMONT-6:vi. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 215-25, p. 179. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Robert de Holand of Nether Kellet, Lancashire1,2

M, #10968, d. 1372/73
FatherSir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland3,4,2 b. c 1312, d. 16 Mar 1372/73
MotherElizabeth (?)4,5,2 d. b 16 Mar 1372
Last Edited3 Jan 2009
     Robert de Holand of Nether Kellet, Lancashire married Alice de Lisle, daughter of John de Lisle 2nd Lord Lisle of Rougemont, before 1355.6,7,2,1
Robert de Holand of Nether Kellet, Lancashire died in 1372/73; dspm & vp.6,7,2,1
     He was served in the Crécy and Siege of Calais campaign between 1346 and 1347.7

Family

Alice de Lisle d. b 31 Dec 1401
Child

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 9: p. 400. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377417&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377414&tree=LEO
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Holand 8: p. 399.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377416&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47A-32, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Lovel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377419&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377420&tree=LEO

Alice de Lisle1

F, #10969, d. before 31 December 1401
FatherJohn de Lisle 2nd Lord Lisle of Rougemont1
Last Edited3 Jan 2009
     Alice de Lisle married Richard Wychingham of Wychingham, Norfolk; her 3rd husband.1 Alice de Lisle married Robert de Holand of Nether Kellet, Lancashire, son of Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland and Elizabeth (?), before 1355.2,3,4,1 Alice de Lisle married Sir Edmund de Hemegrave Knt., of Hengrave, Suffolk, son of Sir Thomas de Hemegrave Knt., before 1372; her 2nd husband.1
Alice de Lisle died before 31 December 1401.1

Her estate was probated on 19 January 1402.1

     

Alice de Lisle left a will on 12 August 1401.1

Family 1

Richard Wychingham of Wychingham, Norfolk

Family 2

Robert de Holand of Nether Kellet, Lancashire d. 1372/73
Child

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 9: p. 400. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47A-32, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377417&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Lovel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377419&tree=LEO

Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland1,2,3

M, #10970, b. circa 1312, d. 16 March 1372/73
FatherSir Robert de Holand Knt., 1st Lord Holand of Upholland1,4,5,3 b. c 1270, d. 7 Oct 1328
MotherMaud La Zouche1,6,5,3 b. c 1290, d. 31 May 1349
Last Edited20 Dec 2008
     Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland was born circa 1312; Richardson says "aged 16 in 1328, aged 30 and more in 1349."7,1,2,3 He married Elizabeth (?), daughter of Guillaume I/III 'Le Bon' (?) comte de Hainaut, et d'Ostrevant, de Hollande, Frise et Zelande, before 1343.7,1,3,2
Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland was buried after 16 March 1373 at St. James Chapel, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.3,2


Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland died on 16 March 1372/73 at Halse (Hawes), Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.7,1,3,2
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: 48
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VI 531
3. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 270.3

; served Hundred Years War (thought to have been at Crécy.)1

Family

Elizabeth (?) d. b 16 Mar 1372
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 8: p. 399. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377414&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026789&tree=LEO
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Holand 7: p. 398.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud La Zouche: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026790&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47A-31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377417&tree=LEO
  9. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Calvert: p. 180.

Elizabeth (?)1

F, #10971, d. before 16 March 1372
FatherGuillaume I/III 'Le Bon' (?) comte de Hainaut, et d'Ostrevant, de Hollande, Frise et Zelande b. c 1286, d. 7 Jun 1337; Richardson says "possibly an illegitimate daughter of Guillaume III le Bon, Count of Hainault, Holland and Seeland, lord of Friesland"2,3
Last Edited26 Dec 2012
     Elizabeth (?) married Sir Robert de Holand Ktn., 2nd Lord Holand of Upholland, son of Sir Robert de Holand Knt., 1st Lord Holand of Upholland and Maud La Zouche, before 1343.4,5,6,2
Elizabeth (?) died before 16 March 1372.2
     ; van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VI 531.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377416&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 8: p. 399. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 8: pp. 655-9.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47A-31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377414&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00377417&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Calvert: p. 180.

Margaret de Holand1,2,3,4

F, #10972, d. circa 21 August 1349
FatherSir Robert de Holand Knt., 1st Lord Holand of Upholland1,5,2,3 b. c 1270, d. 7 Oct 1328
MotherMaud La Zouche6,2,3 b. c 1290, d. 31 May 1349
Last Edited14 Aug 2019
     Margaret de Holand married Sir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire, son of Sir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre and Joan de Grelle, before 1326.7,1,2,3,4,8
Margaret de Holand died circa 21 August 1349.7,1,3,4
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques, Reference: 420
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: 48.3

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 7: p. 398. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214404&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Humphrey 8: pp. 400-401.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026789&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud La Zouche: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026790&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214403&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214405&tree=LEO

Sir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire1,2,3,4

M, #10973, d. before 24 June 1331
FatherSir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre1,3,4,5 b. c 1277, d. 9 May 1347
MotherJoan de Grelle1,3,4,6 d. bt 21 Mar 1352 - 1353
Last Edited1 Sep 2019
     Sir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire married Margaret de Holand, daughter of Sir Robert de Holand Knt., 1st Lord Holand of Upholland and Maud La Zouche, before 1326.7,1,2,8,3,4
Sir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire died before 24 June 1331.7,1,3,4
     ; La WARRE; m Margaret de Holand (d 20/22 Aug 1349), dau of 1st Lord (Baron) De Holand of the 1314 cr, and dvp just before 24 June 1331, leaving issue.1

; van de Pas cites: 1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques, Reference: 420
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: 48
3. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: IV 144.4

; "...of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne."9

Family

Margaret de Holand d. c 21 Aug 1349
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Holand 7: p. 398. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Humphrey 8: pp. 400-401.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214403&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre, 2nd Lord la Warre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422641&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Grelle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422642&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214404&tree=LEO
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214405&tree=LEO

Sir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre1,2

M, #10974, b. circa 1277, d. 9 May 1347
FatherSir Roger la Warre 1st Lord La Warre1,2 d. 20 Jun 1320
MotherClarice de Tregoz1,3,2 d. 28 Aug 1300
ReferenceGAV20
Last Edited1 Sep 2019
     Sir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre was born circa 1277.1 He married Joan de Grelle, daughter of Sir Robert de Grelle Knt., Baron of Manchester and Cuerdley, Lancs and Hawise de Burgh, after 19 November 1294.4,1,5,6,2,7
Sir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre died on 9 May 1347.8,2
     He was 2nd Baron de la Warre.8,1

; JOHN LA WARRE, 2nd LORD (Baron) LA WARRE, KB; b c 1276/7; present Siege Carlaverock, ktd 1306, called to Parl by writs 26 Aug 1307-25 Aug 1318 made out to 'John la Warre, de la Warre or le Warre' thus apparently by later doctrine undergoing the absurdity of being cr LORD (Baron) LA WARRE during his f 's lifetime and by the same title, though his possession of the castle and manor of Ewyas Harold, Herefs (inherited through his mother) as a tenant in chief of the Crown may by contemporaries have been deemed to justify his summons to Parl as a lord baron of Parl (see ABERGAVENNY, M, for a discussion of the concept of barony by tenure); m shortly after 19 Nov 1294 Joan de Grelle/Grelley (d 20/1 March 1352/3), er dau of Sir Robert de Grelle, of Manchester and Cuerdley, Lancs, and sis and heir of 1st Lord (Baron) Grelle of the 1308 cr, thus acquiring the great possessions of the Gresleys, and d 9 May 1347, leaving issue, with a dau ([12444] Catherine, m de jure 2nd Lord (Baron) Latimer (of Braybrook); see LATYMER, B): JOHN La WARRE.1 GAV-20.



Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. IV 141.2

Family

Joan de Grelle d. bt 21 Mar 1352 - 1353
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre, 2nd Lord la Warre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422641&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clarice Tregoz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422638&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, pp. 21-22. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Humphrey 8: pp. 400-401. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Grelle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422642&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 99-33, pp. 95-96.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 47B - 31, p. 48
    line 99-33, pp. 95-96: "...famous soldier in Flanders 1297, Scotland 1298-1327, at Sluys 1340 and Crecy 25 Aug. 1346."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214403&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catharine la Warre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385464&tree=LEO
  12. [S2230] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 10 Feb 2008: "Re: Elizabeth la Ware, wife of Sir Edmund Bacon"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 10 Feb 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 10 Feb 2008."

Joan de Grelle1,2

F, #10975, d. between 21 March 1352 and 1353
FatherSir Robert de Grelle Knt., Baron of Manchester and Cuerdley, Lancs3,1,2,4,5 b. 1252, d. 15 Feb 1282
MotherHawise de Burgh1,4,6 b. 1256, d. a 1282
ReferenceGAV20
Last Edited8 Sep 2019
     Joan de Grelle married Sir John la Warre 2nd Lord la Warre, son of Sir Roger la Warre 1st Lord La Warre and Clarice de Tregoz, after 19 November 1294.7,3,1,2,8,4
Joan de Grelle died between 21 March 1352 and 1353.3,4
     ; Joan de Grelle/Grelley (d 20/1 March 1352/3), er dau of Sir Robert de Grelle, of Manchester and Cuerdley, Lancs, and sis and heir of 1st Lord (Baron) Grelle of the 1308 cr.3 GAV-20.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. IV 142, 143
     2. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States; Baltimore, 2004, Roberts, Gary Boyd. 463.7,4

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, pp. 21-22. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Humphrey 8: pp. 400-401. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Grelle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422642&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert de Grelle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385224&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hawise de Burgh: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385225&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 31, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre, 2nd Lord la Warre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00422641&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214403&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catharine la Warre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385464&tree=LEO
  11. [S2230] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 10 Feb 2008: "Re: Elizabeth la Ware, wife of Sir Edmund Bacon"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 10 Feb 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 10 Feb 2008."

Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre1,2,3

M, #10976, b. 30 November 1326, d. 27 August 1370
FatherSir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire1,4,5,3 d. b 24 Jun 1331
MotherMargaret de Holand1,6,4,3 d. c 21 Aug 1349
Last Edited16 Aug 2019
     Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre was born on 30 November 1326.7,1,2,3 He married Elizabeth de Welle, daughter of Adam de Welle 3rd Lord Welle and Margaret Bardolf, before 14 October 1338; his 1st wife.8,1,2,3,9 Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre married Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray, daughter of Sir John de Mowbray Knt., 3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme and Thirsk and Joan (?) of Lancaster, before 23 July 1358; his 2nd wife; her 1st husband.7,1,2,3,10,11
Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre died on 27 August 1370 at Gascony, France, at age 43.7,1,2,3
     ; ROGER La WARRE, 3rd LORD (Baron) LA WARRE; b 30 Nov 1326; in the retinue of The Black Prince at Battle of Crécy and Siege of Calais 1346-47, served Gascony Sept 1355 and again 1364, 1366, 1368, 1368/9 and 1370, present Battle of Poitiers 1356, served Picardy and Caux July-Nov 1369 under John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster; m 1st Elizabeth de Welle, 2nd dau of 3rd Lord (Baron) Welle of the 1299 cr, and d 27 Aug 1370, leaving issue. The 3rd LORD (Baron) LA WARR m 2nd Alianore de Mowbray (m 2nd by 12 Feb 1372/3 Sir Lewis de Clifford (d 1404) and d by 18 June 1387), dau of Lord (Baron) Mowbray (see MOWBRAY, SEGRAVE and STOURTON, B) and d 27 Aug 1370, leaving further issue.1 He was 3rd LORD (Baron) LA WARRE.1

; van de Pas cites: 1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques, Reference: 420
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: 48
3. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: IV 144.12,3

Family 1

Elizabeth de Welle
Children

Family 2

Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray d. b 10 Jun 1387
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Humphrey 9: p. 401. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214405&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Humphrey 8: pp. 400-401.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214403&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret de Holand: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214404&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 32, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), HUMPHREY 10, p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth de Welles: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214406&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor|Alinore de Mowbray: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026836&tree=LEO
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Mowbray 8.iii: pp. 531.
  12. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 188 (see note for his spouse, Alinore (Eleanor) Mowbray.).

Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray1,2,3,4,5

F, #10977, d. before 10 June 1387
FatherSir John de Mowbray Knt., 3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme and Thirsk6,2,3,4,7,8 b. 29 Nov 1310, d. 4 Oct 1361
MotherJoan (?) of Lancaster9,2,3,4,10,8 b. c 1312, d. 7 Jul 1349
Last Edited10 Dec 2020
     Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray married Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre, son of Sir John la Warre Knt., of Wickwar, Gloucestershire and Margaret de Holand, before 23 July 1358; his 2nd wife; her 1st husband.11,1,2,12,3,5 Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray married Sir Louis de Clifford Knt., son of Sir Roger de Clifford 5th Lord Clifford, of Appleby, Lord of Westmoreland and Maud de Beauchamp, before 13 October 1375; her 2nd husband.13,1,14,2
Eleanor (Alianore) de Mowbray died before 10 June 1387; died testate; van de Pas says d. "abt 18 Aug 1387."13,2,3
     Reference: van de Pas cites: 1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 387
2. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques, Reference: 983
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter, Reference: 22 first name.3

; per Faris (1999) p. 188: [quote] ALIANOR MOWBRAY, was married for the first time before 23 July 1358 to ROGER LA WARRE, Kin., 3rd Lord Ia Warre, son and heir of John Ia Warre, Knt. (of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne), by Margaret (descendant of Charlemagne), daughter of Robert de Holand, 1st Lord Holand, of Upholland, co. Lancaster. He was born on 30 Nov. 1326, and was grandson and heir of John Ia Warre, 2nd Lord Ia Warre. He had been married previously before 14 Oct. 1338 to Elizabeth de Welle, daughter of Adam de Welle, Knt., of Well, co. Lincoln, by his wife Margaret (and had sons and heirs, John and Thomas, 4th & 5th Lords Ia Warre, respectively). She was living on 24 Feb. 1344/5. He had been married previously for the second time before 3 Feb. 1353/4 to Elizabeth ________. He was at the Battle of Poitiers where he captured the King of France. He was summoned to Parliament from 14 Aug. 1362 by writs directed Rogero de (a Warre. "Roger Ia Warre, Knt., of Wakerle, Northants, Swynesheved Lincs", died testate (Linc. Epis. Reg., 96 Bokingham) aged forty-three in Gascony on 27 Aug. 1370 (will requested burial in the Abbey of Swinehead, co. Lincoln). She was married for the second time to LEWIS CLIFFORD, Knt. (died testate 1404), and died testate before 10 June 1387.
Nichols 2(1):210 (1795). Test. Vetusta, p. 75. C.P. 4:144-151, 147 footnote d (1916) (he was a Lollard). C.P. 7:452 chart, 453-454 (1929). Comber (1933), pp. 302-303 (arms: Gules, crusilly fitchy a lion rampant argent).
[end quote]11,13

Family 1

Sir Roger la Warre Knt., 3rd Lord La Warre b. 30 Nov 1326, d. 27 Aug 1370
Child

Family 2

Sir Louis de Clifford Knt. d. 5 Dec 1404

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de la Warr Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Humphrey 9: p. 401. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor|Alinore de Mowbray: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026836&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Mowbray 8: pp. 530-31.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Mowbray 8.iii: pp. 531.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Mowbray: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007807&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Mowbray: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026833&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3L-O.htm#John3Mowbraydied1361. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth de Segrave: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007808&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of Lancaster (Plantagenet): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005204&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 47B - 32, p. 48. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger la Warre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214405&tree=LEO
  13. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 188. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de Clifford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028362&tree=LEO

Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England1

M, #10978, b. circa March 1005, d. 4 January 1066
FatherAethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless1,2,3,4 b. c 968, d. 23 Apr 1016
MotherEmma (?) of Normandy Queen of England1,2,5,4 b. c 985, d. 6 Mar 1051/52
Last Edited18 Jul 2020
     Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England was born circa March 1005 at Islip, Oxfordshire, England.6,7,1 He married Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex, daughter of Godwine (?) Earl of Wessex and Gytha Thorkelsdóttir (?) of Denmark, on 23 January 1045 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England.6,8,7,9,2
Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England died on 4 January 1066 at Westminster, co. Middlesex, England.6,8,7
Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England was buried after 4 January 1066 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.8,7


     ; EDWARD III (age 15 at his accession). Council of regency and rule (1327-30) under Mortimer, Isabelle's paramour; Bruce's invasion of England forced the acknowledgment of Scottish independence (1328). Edward led the baronial opposition to Mortimer (hanged, 1330) and opened his personal rule (1330).

Outbreak of the Hundred Years' War. Edward did homage (1329) for his French lands and renewed the homage (1331). French support of Scottish aggression continued, and Edward, profiting by civil war in Scotland, supported Baliol; after a series of expeditions, he avenged Bannockburn at Halidon Hill (1333). French intrigues to alienate Aquitaine continued. The economic interdependence, due to the wool trade, of England and the Flemish cities made an English alliance with them likely. Philip continued his advance into the English lands south of the Loire (1337), and open hostilities broke out (1338). Edward ravaged northern and eastern France without a decisive battle. Urged on by the Flemings, Edward proclaimed himself king of France (in right of his mother, Isabelle), and enabled the Flanders towns under Jan van Arteveldt to support him without violating their oaths.

1340: The naval victory of Sluys transferred the mastery of the Channel from France to England (until 1372). Intermittent truces (1340-45) were followed by Edward's invasion of France.

1347-1355: A series of truces with France was ended by the expedition of Edward's son, the Black Prince (so called because of the color of his armor), to Bordeaux, followed by ruthless plundering raids using Bordeaux as a base, which enriched the English and alienated the populace.

1360: Edward's personal rule and domestic developments in England. Edward, a majestic, affable man, opened his reign with generous concessions to the baronage and a courteous welcome to the complaints of the middle class. He grew steadily in popularity. He was fond of war and the war was popular; the nation backed him.

Edward the Confessor, of the line of Alfred, was under Godwin's domination. Brought up at the Norman court, speaking French, he tried to Normanize the English court. Godwin's influence led to the deposition of the Norman archbishop of Canterbury and the selection of the Saxon Stigand by the witan. Godwin's son Harold succeeded him (1053) as earl of Wessex and dominated Edward as his father had. Another son of Godwin, Tostig, became earl of Northumbria. Harold (c. 1064) was driven ashore on the Channel, fell into the hands of William, duke of Normandy, a cousin of Edward the Confessor, and was forced to take an oath to help William attain the crown of England, which William declared Edward had promised him.10

; St.Edward "the Confessor", King of England (1042-66) -cr Winchester Cathedral 3.4.1043, *Islip, Oxfordshire ca III.1005, +Palace of Westminster 5.1.1066, bur Westminster Abbey; m.23.1.1045 Edith of Wessex (*ca 1020, +18.12.1075.)1

; Leo van de Pas cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 310.7 He was King of England: [Ashley, pp. 491-494] EDWARD THE CONFESSOR King of England, 8 June 1042-4 January 1066. Crowned: Winchester, 3 April 1043. Born: c1004, Islip, Oxfordshire; Died: Westminster, 4 January 1066, aged 61. Buried: Westminster Abbey. Married: 23 January 1045 at Winchester Cathedral, Edith (c1020-75) dau. of Earl Godwin of Wessex: no children. After the welcome death of HARTHACANUTE, there was no surviving male heir of CANUTE'S line. His cousin, Swein, had believed himself heir, but his entitlement was overridden. In Scandinavia, Canute's domain was overrun by Magnus of Norway whilst England saw the return of the Saxon dynasty descended from EGBERT in the form of Edward, the only surviving son of ATHELRED (THE UNREADY) and his second wife, Emma, the daughter of Duke Richard of Normandy. Edward was half-Norman and had spent most of his youth (since the age of nine) in exile in Normandy. He thus grew up favouring Norman customs and, never having expected to become king, was also a rather idle and dissolute man. Upon his accession he realised he had a kingdom divided between Saxons, Danes and Norse with powerful earls of all factions. It is to Edward's credit that he succeeded in governing despite these differences. Critics of Edward accuse him of being a vacillating and indecisive king, like his father, but this may have been a façade for a cunning tactician, because Edward succeeded in ruling for over twenty-three years amidst much popular support. The fact that he was prepared to make strong decisions is evident from the start of his reign, when he confiscated his mother's property because she retained control over much of the Treasury. Emma was the most powerful and probably the richest woman in England, being the widow of two previous kings (Athelred and Canute), but her support for Edward had been limited. In fact she seemed to have almost disowned her marriage to Athelred and had become a strong supporter of the Danish court. Although Edward dispossessed her she was not sent into exile but remained in England. Charges were brought against her of involvement in the death of her sons by her first marriage and in supporting the Danish king Magnus. She seems to have bought her way out of this, although the more colourful records state that a trial by ordeal was arranged. Emma purportedly walked over nine red-hot ploughshares unscathed and at this show of innocence Edward restored all her lands and property and begged her forgiveness. She lived on at Winchester where she died on 6 March 1052, aged about sixty-six.
The power base in England at this time was with Godwin, earl of Wessex, and his many sons. It was Godwin's position that secured Edward his kingship, as the English Danes had previously recognized Canute's nephew Swein as successor. Godwin had married first the daughter of SWEIN (Canute's father) and after her death, Gytha, granddaughter of Swein's sister. Godwin regarded himself as a kingmaker (he had succeeded in raising HAROLD (I) to the throne and expected his son HAROLD (II) to become king in turn). To further cement this royal connection Godwin secured the marriage of Edward to Edith, the eldest child of Godwin and Gytha, in 1045. The marriage was apparently never consummated, and popular tradition has ascribed this to Edward's piety or effetism. Edward was to all intents married to the church. His single most lasting achievement was the construction of Westminster Abbey, which he financed personally and which was consecrated within a week of his death. Edward was not especially learned himself, but he loved to surround himself with knowledge and culture and encouraged scholarship throughout the country. With England benefitting from the first period of lasting peace for over seventy years, Edward's reign was the last glow of a Saxon golden age.
Edward had no reason to like Godwin, for all that he knew he needed his support. Godwin had been implicated in the murder of Edward's brother Alfred, who had been imprisoned and blinded in 1036/7 at the order of Harold I. Furthermore Godwin had twice changed sides, having come to power under Canute and supported Harthacanute before switching to Harold I, only to back Edward after Harold's death instead of the obvious successor Swein Ulfsson. Finally, the two had politically opposed ideals. Edward was primarily a Norman. He filled his court with Normans and appointed them to the most senior posts, whilst Godwin believed these posts should be given to the Saxon and Danish nobility. It was a conflict over Edward's favouritism to the Normans that led to an argument between Edward and Godwin in 1051. Edward, now feeling secure, banished Godwin and his sons, and despatched Edith to a convent. It was not a popular move as the Godwins were held in high regard by the English. It may have been partly to ameliorate this that Edward abolished the danegeld in 1051, the oppressive tax that Athelred had levied to pay the Danish pirates.
During this power vacuum, WILLIAM of Normandy visited Edward. William's father was Edward's cousin, and William knew that Edward had no formal heir and would not want the kingdom inherited by Godwin's sons. Although there is no record of any agreement at this time, it was later claimed that Edward then nominated William as his successor. However the following year Godwin and his sons invaded England. Edward was prepared to fight but the witan did not want a civil war. With bad grace, Edward pardoned Godwin and restored him and his sons to their earldoms. This made them more powerful than before. Godwin also secured his son Harold as senior amongst Edward's advisors, so much so that by 1053 Edward had more or less passed all administration over to Harold, leaving himself able to devote his energies to church matters and to hunting. Surprisingly during this period Edward supported the claim of MALCOLM (III) to the kingship of Scotland and gave his authority to an invasion of Scotland by Siward, earl of Northumbria, to depose MACBETH and place Malcolm on the throne. The initial onslaught was only partially successful but Malcolm eventually succeeded to the Scottish throne in 1058 and his friendship to the Saxons would prove valuable to Saxon exiles in future years.
In the meantime Harold Godwinson grew from strength to strength. It was he who led most of the assaults against the Welsh who had harried the border territories for many years. During these campaigns Harold demonstrated his superior soldiery and skills as a general. Harold was increasingly looking like a successor to Edward, which Edward did not want. Even though he may have promised the succession to William, the anti-Norman feeling in England made this too dangerous a course to promote. Edward was thus relieved when he learned in 1054 that his nephew, known as Edward the Exile, was alive and well in Hungary. An embassy was despatched to recall him to England. As the son of EDMUND IRONSIDE he was the natural successor. His return was delayed but Edward finally arrived in England in August 1057. Within a few weeks he was dead, probably killed by order of Harold, though there is no evidence. Edward's succession plans were thwarted, although he now raised Edward the Exile's four-year old son, EDGAR, as his heir (atheling). Edward was forced to acknowledge that should he die before Edgar came of age, Harold would be regent. As a result the final years of Edward's reign were ones of increasing uncertainty. Edward still favoured William of Normandy as his successor, whilst the English increasingly favoured Harold, at least as war-leader if Edward died before the young atheling came of age. There was another claimant, Harald Haadraada of Norway, who already ruled Orkney and the Western Isles, and believed England was his by right. In 1065, Godwin's son Tostig was deprived of his earldom in Northumbria following his inept and tyrannical rule, and was banished to Flanders. He soon threw in his lot with Harald Haadraada, so that by the end of 1065, when it was clear that Edward was dying, the English throne was under considerable threat and needed strong leadership. Thus, when Edward died in that first week of January 1066, it was Harold who became the last king of the Saxons. between 8 June 1042 and 4 January 1066.11,8

Family

Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex b. c 1020, d. 18 Dec 1075

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  2. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aethelred II 'the Unready': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020112&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#AethelredIIdied1016B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020115&tree=LEO
  6. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward III 'the Confessor': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028865&tree=LEO
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 468 (Chart 30), 491-494. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wessex page (The House of Wessex): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/wessex.html
  10. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 181-2. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  11. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 181.

Aelfgifu (Elfgiva) (?) of Northampton1,2

F, #10979
FatherAlfhelm (?) Ealdorman of Northampton2 d. 1006
Last Edited18 Jul 2020
     Aelfgifu (Elfgiva) (?) of Northampton married Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway, son of Svend I Haraldsen Tveskæg/Forkbeard' (?) King of Denmark and England and Gunhild (?) of the Wends, circa 1014;
His 1st wife. Med Lands says she was his mistress. Genealogics says she was his wife.3,2,4,5,6
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Denmark 1): “C1. Knud II "the Great", King of England (1016-35) as Canute "the Great", King of Denmark (1018-35), and of Norway (1028-35), *995, +Shaftesbury 12.11.1035; 1m: Alfifa N; 2m: 1017 Emma of Normandy (*ca 985 +1052)”.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "KNUD Svendsen, son of SVEND I "Tveskæg/Forkbeard" King of Denmark & his first wife [Gunhild] --- ([995]-Shaftesbury, Dorset 12 Nov 1035, bur Winchester Cathedral, Old Minster[1970]). The Encomium Emmæ Reginæ names "Cnutone filio suo [=Sueinum] maiore"[1971]. However, the identity of Knud's mother is uncertain. Adam of Bremen names "Chnut" as son of King Svend & his wife "Herici relictam, matrem Olaph"[1972]. The Fagrskinna suggests that Knud was the son of King Svend's first marriage by stating that Astrid, daughter of King Svend and Sigrid Skoglar-Tosta, had the same father as King Knud and the same mother as Olof King of Sweden[1973]. According to Ronay[1974], Knud was taken back to Poland with his mother after her divorce and fostered by Thorkell "the Tall" at the fortress of Jömsborg at the mouth of the River Oder but the author cites no primary source to support this. Knud took part in the invasion of England in 1013 led by his father. After his father's death, Æthelred II King of England counter-attacked the Danes in Lindsey, whereupon the Danish fleet under Knud withdrew to Denmark. In August 1015, Knud invaded England again. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Danamarchæ...regique Sveno” invaded England but died “apud Lundoniam”, was buried “apud Danamarcham”, and succeeded by “filius eius...Chunutus” who launched a new invasion with “Lacman equidem Suauorum et Olavum Noricorum”[1975]. By the end of 1015, he was in control of Wessex, helped by the defection of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor" Ealdorman of Mercia. The Danes controlled Northumbria in early 1016, then turned their attention to London and the south-east. After the death of King Æthelred in Apr 1016, the Witan offered the throne to Knud, to whom a group of nobles and church dignitaries from southern England swore allegiance at Southampton[1976]. Knud's fleet laid siege to London, which was relieved by King Æthelred's son King Edmund "Ironside" who had been proclaimed king by an assembly in London. Knud turned his attention to Mercia, Eadric "Streona" defecting back to King Edmund's forces at Aylesford, only to return to Knud at Ashingdon in Essex where Danish forces finally defeated King Edmund in Oct 1016[1977]. At Alney, near Deerhurst, the king agreed a compromise division of the country with Knud, Edmund taking Wessex and Knud the north, but Edmund died in Nov 1016 before this could be implemented. After the death of King Edmund, Knud was accepted as CANUTE King of England, crowned maybe at Old St Paul’s Cathedral, London 6 Jan 1017. After succeeding in England, he divided the country into four districts for administrative purposes[1978]. He appointed Eadric "Streona" as Ealdorman of Mercia ("slain in London" the same year, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle[1979]), gave East Anglia to Thorkell the tall, confirmed Erik Haakonsson Jarl in Norway as Earl of Northumbria, and kept direct control over Wessex. He held a national assembly at Oxford in 1018 which decided the legal form of his rule, largely following that of King Edgar "the Peaceable". He succeeded his brother in 1018 as KNUD I "den Storre/the Great" King of Denmark, leaving England for Denmark to take possession in 1019. His position in Denmark did not go unchallenged, for he was defeated at the Holy River in [1025] by Olaf King of Norway and Amund King of Sweden[1980]. He expelled Olav King of Norway in 1028, declaring himself KNUD King of Norway. Malcolm II King of Scotland submitted to him in 1031[1981]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Canute at Shaftesbury on 12 Nov 1035 and his burial in the Old Minster, Winchester[1982]. The Libellus de Anniversariis of Ramsey Monastery records the death “Id Nov” of “Knuto rex qui dedit nobis S. Felicem”[1983].
     "m (2 or 31 Jul 1017) as her second husband, EMMA de Normandie, widow of ÆTHELRED II King of England, daughter of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his second wife Gunnora --- ([985]-Winchester 14 Mar 1052, bur Winchester Cathedral, Old Minster[1984]). Guillaume de Jumièges names Emma as one of the three daughters of Duke Richard and Gunnor[1985]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Emma Anglorum regina" as sister of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[1986]. Roger of Wendover records the marriage in Jul 1018 of "Cnuto" and "ducem Ricardum…Emmam sororem suam et regis Ethelredi relictam"[1987]. She was known as ÆLFGIFU in England[1988]. Her first husband sent her to her brother's court in Normandy in 1013 after the invasion of Svend King of Denmark[1989]. She was living in Normandy in 1017 when King Æthelred's successor King Canute proposed marriage to her. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Edelredus rex”, “Emmam reginam” married “rex...Chunutus...Christiano more”, and names their children “Hardechunutum postmodum regem Danorum et filiam...Gunnildem quæ nupsit Henrico Romanorum Imperatori”[1990]. After the death of her second husband, she continued to live at Winchester. After the election of her step-son as regent in early 1036, it was recognised that she would continue to live there to look after the interests of her son Harthacnut who had nominally succeeded his father as King of England and Denmark but was still absent in Denmark. It is likely that she encouraged her sons by her first husband, Edward and Alfred, to join her, Alfred being captured and murdered during the visit. After Harold was recognised as king of England in 1037, Queen Emma was expelled and took refuge at Bruges[1991]. She commissioned the Encomium Emmæ Reginæ from a Flemish convent at Saint-Omer, maybe St Bertin's, designed to promote her son Harthacnut's claim to the English throne. Harthacnut joined her in Bruges in early 1040, and after the death of King Harold, they returned together to England. After the accession of Edward "the Confessor", her son by her first husband, Emma appears to have supported the rival claim of Magnus King of Norway[1992]. Whatever the truth of this, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports that King Edward did confiscate her property in 1043[1993]. She seems to have spent the last years of her life in retirement in Winchester[1994]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of "Ælfgifu Emma, the mother of king Edward and of king Harthacnut" in 1052[1995].
     "Mistress (1): ÆLFGIFU [Alfifa] Ælfhelmsdotter of Northampton, daughter of Ealdorman ÆLFHELM of Deira & his wife Wulfrun[1996] (-after 1036). Roger of Wendover names "Algiva, Elfelmi comitis filia" as first wife of "regis Cnutonis" and mother of "duos…filios Suanum…et Haroldum"[1997]. She was known as ALFIFA in Denmark and Norway. King Knud took her as a "temporary wife"[1998], but the "marriage" was not recognised by the church. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Harold claimed that he was the son of King Canute by "Ælfgifu of Northampton, although it was not true", another passage commenting that "many thought this [claim] quite incredible"[1999]. She continued to behave as Queen in the north of England after King Canute married Emma. King Canute appointed her co-regent in Norway in 1030 for their son Svend. Morkinskinna records that “Álfifa” accompanied her son Svend back to Denmark after he was overthrown as king of Norway (in 1035)[2000]. Morkinskinna records that “Álfifa” tried unsuccessfully to poison Magnus King of Norway but killed “King Hordaknútr” instead (dated to 1042), and that “she vanished instantly so that she could not be punished”, stating that this took place “in the sixth year of King Magnus’s reign”[2001]. Morkinskinna records that “Álfífa” tricked “a powerful duke named Otto south in Saxony”, when visiting “Norway and arrived in Vik”, into thinking that “her daughter…not King Sveinn’s sister by the same father” was Ulfhild, sister of Magnus King of Norway[2002]. The paragraph refers to Ordulf Duke of Saxony who later married Ulfhild, their marriage being dated to Nov 1042. This is the only reference so far identified to this supposed daughter. However, it seems surprising that Ælfgifu would have been present in Norway and have been in a position to welcome foreign visitors, given that her son by King Canute had been overthrown as king of Norway by King Magnus. All passages in Morkinskinna which refer to “Álfífa” treat her with disdain as the archetypal wicked queen figure, suggesting that they should all be treated with caution. Weir gives her date of death as “1044?” without any basis for her conjecture[2003]. Roger of Wendover records that death "Algiva, Elfelmi comitis filia", first wife of "regis Cnutonis", died in 1018[2004], but this date is incompatible with the other sources quoted above."
Med Lands cites:
[1970] Florence of Worcester, 1035, p. 140.
[1971] Encomium Emmæ Reginæ I.3, MGH SS.
[1972] Adami, Gesta Hammenburgensis Ecclesiæ Pontificum II.37, MGH SS VII, p. 319.
[1973] Fagrskinna, Chapter 49, p. 218, quoted by Rafal T. Prinke, at (26 Mar 2005).
[1974] Ronay (1989), p. 55.
[1975] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, VII, VIII, pp. 251-2.
[1976] Ronay (1989), p. 10.
[1977] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, E and F, 1016.
[1978] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, 1017.
[1979] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1017.
[1980] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1025.
[1981] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1031.
[1982] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1035, D, 1035, E, 1036 [1035].
[1983] Dugdale Monasticon II, Ramsey Monastery, Huntingdonshire, XXV, Ex Libello de Anniversariis in Ecclesia Ramesiensi observatis, p. 566.
[1984] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1051.
[1985] WJ IV.18, p. 104.
[1986] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1026, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783.
[1987] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 463.
[1988] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, F, 1013 and 1017.
[1989] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1013.
[1990] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, IX, p. 253.
[1991] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E and F, 1037.
[1992] Barlow (1983), pp. 51-6.
[1993] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C and D, 1043, and E, 1042 [1043].
[1994] Stafford, P. 'Emma: The Powers of the Queen in the Eleventh Century', Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 6.
[1995] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle E, 1052.
[1996] She is called "the noble lady Wulfruna" in Florence of Worcester, 1035, p. 140.
[1997] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 462.
[1998] Stenton (2001), p. 397.
[1999] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C and D, 1035, E, 1036.
[2000] Andersson, T. M. and Gade, K. E. (trans.) (2000) Morkinskinna (Cornell), 2, p. 100.
[2001] Morkinskinna, 4, p. 111.
[2002] Morkinskinna, 5, p. 116.
[2003] Weir (2002), p. 30.
[2004] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 462.6


Family

Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway b. c 995, d. 12 Nov 1035
Children

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 489 (Chart 33), 486-487. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1 page (Denmark family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Knud 'den Store': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027249&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Canutedied1035B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html#K2
  8. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.

Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex1,2,3

F, #10980, b. circa 1020, d. 18 December 1075
FatherGodwine (?) Earl of Wessex2,3,4,5 b. c 990, d. 15 Apr 1053
MotherGytha Thorkelsdóttir (?) of Denmark2,3,6,5 b. c 1000, d. a Jun 1069
Last Edited26 Aug 2020
     Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was born circa 1020; British Monarchy says b. ca 1022.7,8,3 She married Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England, son of Aethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless and Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England, on 23 January 1045 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England.9,7,10,3,11
Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex died on 18 December 1075 at Winchester.9,8,2,3
Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was buried after 18 December 1075 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.3


     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 191
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 78.2 Edith/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was also known as Edgyth (?)12

Family

Edward III "the Confessor" (?) King of England b. c Mar 1005, d. 4 Jan 1066

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eadgyth of Wessex: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028866&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Wessex page (The House of Wessex): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/wessex.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godwin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080021&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Godwindied1053B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gytha: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00080022&tree=LEO
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 468 (Chart 30), 491-494. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  8. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix: Kings of Wessex and England 802-1066. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  9. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward III 'the Confessor': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028865&tree=LEO
  11. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.