Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc.1,2,3

M, #10141, d. after 1115
FatherRalph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford3,4,5 b. bt 1025 - 1026, d. 21 Dec 1057
MotherGetha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham3,6
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited16 Apr 2020
     Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc. married Matilda Lupus, daughter of Hugh Lupus Earl of Chester.1 Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc. married Maud (?) d'Avranches.1
Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc. died after 1115.7,1
     Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc.
HAROLD de SUDELEY; in the Domesday Survey 1086 is recorded as holding Burton Dasset, Warwicks, and land in Droitwich, Worcs, as well as his patrimony; granted land in Sudeley to Winchcombe Abbey.3 GAV-24 EDV-25. Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc. was also known as Harold de Ewyas Lord of Sudeley & Ewyas Harold.

Harold de Sudeley de Ewyas of Sudeley & Toddington, co. Glouc.
(an unknown value.)8 He was Domesday lord of Sudeley in 1086.2

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 234, de SUDELEY 2.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul 'the Timid': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314193&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Getha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314194&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 255-25, p. 228. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 235-22, p. 201.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3:iii.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3:iv.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3:v.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3:vi.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 80-81, de EWYAS 3:i.

Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford1,2,3,4

M, #10142, b. between 1025 and 1026, d. 21 December 1057
FatherDreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens3,5,6,4 b. bt 990 - 1000, d. 1 Jul 1035
MotherGodgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex3,7,8,9,4 b. bt 1004 - 1014, d. b 1049
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford married Getha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham, daughter of Osgood Clapa.10,2,3,7,11,4 Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford was born between 1025 and 1026.1,4
Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford died on 21 December 1057.10,1,3,4
Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford was buried after 21 December 1057 at Peterborough Abbey, Peterborough, Northamptonshire, England.1,4


     GAV-25 EDV-26.

Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford
Per Genealogics:
     "Raoul (Ralph), born in France, was the second son of Drogo, count of Amiens and the Vexin, and Godgifu of Wessex, daughter of Aethelred II, king of England. Raoul came to England with his uncle, Edward 'the Confessor', in 1041. He attested three charters of 1050 as earl; his sphere of authority was probably the east midlands, the region where the lands of his wife, Getha/Gytha, are to be found. Their distribution suggests that she was related to the local magnate Burgraed, whose lands lay in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, and Northamptonshire.
     "Raoul's tenure of the east midlands would have brought him into contact with Harold Godwinson, earl of East Anglia, and it is noteworthy that he named his son Harold. In 1052 he and Earl Odda commanded the royal fleet assembled against Godwin at Sandwich, but they could not prevent the earl's triumphant return. Godwin and his sons were reinstated in lands and office, but Swein Godwinson died on pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1052, and it was probably then that Raoul received Swein's earldom of Hereford. There was already a Norman presence into the shire, and at least one castle, at Hereford itself, though its builder, Osbern Pentecost, was driven out on Godwin's return.
     "In 1055 Raoul defended Herefordshire against the exiled Earl Aelfgar and his ally Gruffudd ap Llywelyn, but their encounter on 24 October was a disaster: 'before any spear had been thrown the English army fled because they were on horseback, and many were killed there - about four or five hundred men - and they killed none in return'. The invaders sacked Hereford. Later sources accuse Raoul and his Frenchmen of starting the flight. It was this engagement which later earned his opprobious nickname 'the Timid'. Raoul died on 21 December 1057, not much above thirty, and was buried at Peterborough."4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:657.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. XI 105-121.
3. Domesday Descendants, The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2002, Keats-Rohan, K.S.B. and Pipe Roll 31.
4. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography , Sellar, W. D. H. bio after Ann Williams.4


Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford
Per Burke's: "RALPH, described by contemporaries as Comes (possibly a courtier of comital rank but without a territorial earldom, at any rate in England, for he was French), to support the dignity; (see NORTHUMBERLAND, D, for a discussion of earldoms at this time), but also possibly Earl of Worcester or conceivably Hereford (he was employed at a high level against a Welsh incursion into England and revolts by various earls throughout the 1050s, though on one occasion he and his soldiers ran away before fighting even began); and/or even the E Midlands; held Sudeley and Toddington, Glos, and Chilvers Cotton, Warwicks; m Getha and d 21 Dec 1057."3

Reference: Weis [1992:223], Line 250-21.12

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 80, de EWYAS 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 234, de SUDELEY 1.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul 'the Timid': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314193&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#DrogoMantesdied1035. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030552&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  8. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godgifu of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012362&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 235-21, p. 201. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Getha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314194&tree=LEO
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 250-21, p. 223.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 2:ii.

Getha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham1,2,3

F, #10143
FatherOsgood Clapa1,2
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited16 Apr 2020
     Getha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham married Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford, son of Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens and Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex.4,5,6,2,3,7
     Getha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham
Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 657.3 GAV-25 EDV-26.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 80, de EWYAS 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Getha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314194&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 235-21, p. 201. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 234, de SUDELEY 1.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul 'the Timid': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314193&tree=LEO
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 2:ii.

Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens1,2,3,4

M, #10144, b. between 990 and 1000, d. 1 July 1035
FatherGautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin3,5,6,4,7 b. c 952, d. bt 1017 - 1024
MotherAdèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois6,8,4,7 d. 1012
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited28 Jul 2020
     Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens was born between 990 and 1000; Genealogics says b. 990/1000; Boyer [2001:80] says b. ca 1007.2,7 He married Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex, daughter of Aethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless and Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England, in 1013;
Her 1st husband.9,3,10,11,12,13,4,14,7,15
Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens was buried circa 1035 at Nice, France.2


Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens died on 1 July 1035 at Bithynia; Per Burke's: "died in Bithynia, Asia Minor, while in the company of Richard, Duke of Normandy, in 1035, and was buried in Nice...". Genealogics says d. June 1035. Med Lands says d. 13 Aub 1035.9,1,3,7,16
     Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Med Lands:
     "DREUX [Drogo] de Mantes (-[13 Aug] [1035]). "Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[28]. He succeeded his father as Comte de Mantes. Comte d'Amiens. "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[29]. “Droco...comes Wilcassianensium” restored “villam...Calceatus in Wlcassino” [Chaussy-en-Vexin] to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 7 Apr 1024[30]. Robert II King of France confirmed to the abbot of Saint-Germain and Saint-Vincent that he had forced “noster comes Drogo...cum duobus fratribus Fulcone...et Rodulfo necnon uxore cum filiis supramemorati Drogonis” to renounce rights to revenue from “in villa...Domni Martini...” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated [1 Jan/1 Mar]1031[31]. He accompanied Robert II Duke of Normandy to Jerusalem and died on the journey[32]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Henri I King of France took back the Vexin after the death of Comte Drogo[33]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "X Kal Aug" of "Drogo comes"[34].
     "m ([1025 or before]) as her first husband, GODGIFU [Goda] of England, daughter of ÆTHELRED II "the Unready" King of England & his second wife Emma de Normandie (-before 1049). Her parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Godgifu went into exile in Normandy with her brother[35] in 1013. According to Orderic Vitalis, her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy[36], indicating that she probably did not return to England. This information is suspect, assuming that the charter of "Robertus Rex", which names "Comes Drogo…cum duobus fratribus Fulcone…et Rodulpho necnon uxore cum filiis supra memorati Drogonis", is correctly dated to 1025 as Duke Robert did not succeed as duke until 1027[37]. Another possibility is that Drogo's children at that date were born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. There is no indication of the birth dates of his known children shown below, but the fact that none of them was given a typically Anglo-Saxon name also suggests that Godgifu may not have been the mother of all of them (although she is attested as mother of the son Raoul, see below). "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[38]. Godgifu married secondly ([1036]) as his first wife, Eustache [II] Comte de Boulogne. Her second marriage is referred to by Florence of Worcester[39]."
Med Lands cites:
[28] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170.
[29] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173.
[30] Saint-Wandrille, 7, p. 37.
[31] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LII, p. 82.
[32] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book III, p. 117, and Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[33] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[34] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 274.
[35] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[36] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[37] RHGF, Tome X, L, p. 622.
[38] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173.
[39] Florence of Worcester, 1051, p. 150.4


Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Burke's: "DREUX/DROGO, Count of Vexin and Amiens; m Godgifu (m 2nd Eustace II, Count of Boulogne), sis of EDWARD THE CONFESSOR OF ENGLAND and dau of ETHELRED II THE REDELESS by his 2nd w Emma (dau of RICHARD I, DUKE OF NORMANDY), and d on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land 1035."3



Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Dreux ou Drogon de Vexin, né vers 990-1000, mort le 2 juillet 1035, fut comte de Vexin et d'Amiens de 1024 à 1035. Il était fils de Gautier II le Blanc, comte de Vexin, d'Amiens et de Valois et d'une certaine Adèle, dont nous ne savons rien.
Biographie
     "À la mort de son père, afin de préserver le patrimoine familial, il partagea les comtés avec son frère Raoul III. Dreux reçut le Vexin et Amiens et resta fidèle aux capétiens, tandis que Raoul eut le Valois et se rapprocha du comte de Blois, devenu comte de Troyes et de Meaux. Le troisième frère, Foulque, était déjà évêque d'Amiens.
     "Outre l'alliance capétienne, Dreux II entretient de bonnes relations avec la Normandie, à l'image de ses prédécesseurs. Les enfants du roi anglais Æthelred le Malavisé et d'Emma de Normandie étant réfugiés à Rouen, et pour renforcer une alliance avec la Normandie, Dreux II épousa en 1013 Godgifu, fille d'Æthelred et d'Emma. Ils eurent :
** Gautier III (mort en 1063), comte de Vexin, d'Amiens et du Maine ;
** Foulques II (mort en 1058), évêque d'Amiens ;
** Ralph le Timide (mort en 1057), comte de Hereford.
     "En 1035, il accompagna le duc de Normandie Robert le Magnifique en pèlerinage à Jérusalem, mais meurt au retour à Nicée, en juin 1035.
Notes, sources et références
** (fr) Pierre Bauduin, La Première Normandie (xe-xie siècles), Caen, Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, 474 p. [détail des éditions] (ISBN 2-84133-145-8)
** (fr) Édouard de Saint Phalle, « Les comtes de Gâtinais aux xe et xie siècle », dans Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval, Oxford, Linacre College, Unit for Prosopographical Research, coll. « Prosopographica et Genealogica / 3 », 2000, 310 p. (ISBN 1-900934-01-9), p. 230-246
Liens internes
** Maison de Vexin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maison_de_Vexin
** Liste des comtes d'Amiens: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_d%27Amiens
** Famille de Boves: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famille_de_Boves
Lien externe
** (en) Foundation for medieval genealogy : comtes de Valois et du Vexin [archive]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#GautierIIValoisB."17



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 175.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . 190.
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 7.7


Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Per Genealogics:
     "Dreux or Drogo was born between 990 and 1000, the son of Gautier 'le Blanc' de Valois, comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin, and his wife Adèle.
     "On the death of his father he shared the family heritage with his brother Raoul III. Dreux received the Vexin and Amiens and remained faithful to the Capetingian King Robert II, whereas Raoul received the Valois and allied with the king's quarrelsome step-son Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Troyes et Champagne. The third brother Foulques was already bishop of Amiens.
     "In addition to his alliance with the Capetingians, Dreux maintained good relations with Normandy, like his predecessors. The children of Aethelred II 'the Unready', king of England, and his second wife Emma of Normandy were in Rouen as refugees, and to strengthen an alliance with Normandy, in 1103 Dreux married Godgifu of Wessex, the daughter of Aethelred and Emma. They had five children of whom Raoul and Adèle would have progeny.
     "In 1035 Dreux accompanied Robert 'the Devil', duke of Normandy, on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, but he died in Nicaea on the return journey in June 1035."7

GAV-26 EDV-26.

Reference: Weis [1992:223], Line 250-20.18

Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens and Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex
Per Racines et Histoire: "Dreu (Drogo) + 16/12/1035 comte d’Amiens, Valois, Pontoise et Mantes
     ép. Goda (fille du Roi Ethelred II d’Angleterre."19



Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens and Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex
Per Med Lands:
     "GODGIFU [Goda] (-before 1049). Her parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Godgifu went into exile in Normandy with her brother[1871] in 1013. According to Orderic Vitalis, her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy[1872], indicating that she probably did not return to England after leaving for exile. However, this information is suspect, assuming that the charter of "Robertus Rex", which names "Comes Drogo…cum duobus fratribus Fulcone…et Rodulpho necnon uxore cum filiis supra memorati Drogonis", is correctly dated to 1025 as Duke Robert did not succeed as duke of Normandy until 1027[1873]. Another possibility is that Drogo's children at that date were born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. There is no indication of the birth dates of his known children, but the fact that none of them was given a typically Anglo-Saxon name also suggests that Godgifu may not have been the mother of all or any of them. Godgifu's second marriage is referred to by Florence of Worcester[1874].
     "m firstly ([1025 or before]) DREUX [Drogo] Comte de Mantes et du Vexin, son of GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc" Comte de Mantes, d'Amiens et du Vexin & his wife Adèle --- (-[13 Aug] 1035). m secondly ([1036]) as his first wife, EUSTACHE [II] Comte de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain (-[soon after 1070/1087]). "
Med Lands cites:
[1871] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[1872] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[1873] RHGF X, L, p. 622.
[1874] Florence of Worcester, 1051, p. 150.14

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 74, ENGLAND 19:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#DrogoMantesdied1035. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GautierIValoisdied987
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030552&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139719&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 235-20, p. 201. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1770] Anthony J. Camp, My Ancestors Came with the Conqueror: Those Who Did, and Some of Those Who Probably Did Not (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998), p. 34. Hereinafter cited as Camp (1998): My Ancestors Came with the Conquero.
  11. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  12. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Godgifudiedbefore1049.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godgifu of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012362&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#GautierIIIMantesdied1064
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Dreux de Vexin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreux_de_Vexin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 250-20, p. 223.
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  20. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1:iii.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00361574&tree=LEO
  23. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1:i.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godfigu of Wessex: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012362&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Mantes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030551&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul 'the Timid': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314193&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00361575&tree=LEO

Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #10145, b. between 1004 and 1014, d. before 1049
FatherAethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless7,4,8,6,9,10,11,12 b. c 968, d. 23 Apr 1016
MotherEmma (?) of Normandy Queen of England7,4,8,6,9,10,13,12 b. c 985, d. 6 Mar 1051/52
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited28 Jul 2020
     Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex was born between 1004 and 1014; Genealogy.EU says v. 1004-1014; Genealogics says b. ca 1002.4,10 She married Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens, son of Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin and Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois, in 1013;
Her 1st husband.14,7,15,8,16,6,17,9,18,10
Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex died in 1034.8 She married Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens, son of Eustache I «A l’oeil» (?) Comte de Boulogne and Mathilde/Matilda/Maud (?) de Louvain, circa 1036;
Her 2nd husband; his 1st wife; Richardson says m. bef 1049.1,7,19,15,8,16,10,20,21
Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex died before 1049 at England; Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 2 page) says d. bef 1049; Genealogics says d. abt 1049; Med Lands says bef 1049.14,2,4,6,9,10
     Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex and Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens
Per Med Lands:
     "EUSTACHE [II] "Gernobadatus" de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain ([1015/20]-[soon after 1070/1087]). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Eustachium et Lantbertum" were sons of "comes Eustachius de Bolonia" and his wife Mathilde[457]. His birth date range is estimated from the date of his first marriage, and bearing in mind the estimated birth date range of his mother. He succeeded his father in [1049] as Comte de Boulogne. Simeon of Durham records that "Eustace the elder earl of Boulogne who had married king Eadward's sister Goda" landed at Dover in Sep 1051[458]. When returning from visiting Edward "the Confessor" King of England in 1051, he was involved in an affray at Canterbury during which one of his men was killed. The refusal of Godwin Earl of Wessex to punish the offenders led to the Earl's temporary banishment from England[459]. Comte de Lens 1054. "Eustatii comitis" witnessed a charter of "Balduinus Flandrensium comes" dated 6 Jan 1056[460]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Eustachium comitem” was seriously wounded during the battle of Hastings but escaped “quasi moribundus”[461]. He was awarded a large fief "the honour of Boulogne"[462], but soon quarrelled with William I King of England. He launched an attack on England in 1067, but withdrew after landing. His English lands were confiscated, but later restored. Boulogne's strategic importance grew as it became the main port for importing English wool for the Flemish cloth trade.
     "m firstly ([1036]) as her second husband, GODGIFU [Goda] of England, widow of DREUX [Drogo] Comte de Mantes et du Vexin, daughter of ÆTHELRED II King of England & his second wife Emma de Normandie (-before 1049). Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she went into exile in Normandy with her brother[463], which can be dated from other sources to 1013. Her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy[464], indicating that she probably did not return to England. Her second marriage is referred to by Florence of Worcester[465]. Simeon of Durham records that "Eustace the elder earl of Boulogne who had married king Eadward's sister Goda" landed at Dover in Sep 1051[466].
     "m secondly IDA of Lotharingia, daughter of GODEFROI Duke of Upper Lorraine Comte de Verdun & his first wife Doda [de Rethel] ([1038/43][467]-13 Aug 1113). Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that she was the sister of "Godfrey Duke of Lotharingia" and names her three sons[468]. The Vita B. Idæ Boloniensis Comitissæ records that she was the daughter of "pater…Godefridus, mater…Doda"[469]. She made a donation to Saint-Bertin for the soul of "Eustachii domini mei comitis" with her sons "Godefridi et Balduini"[470]. The Lamberti Audomariensis Chronica records the death "Id Apr 1113" of "Ida comitissa Boloniæ"[471]."
Med Lands cites:
[457] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, p. 301.
[458] Simeon of Durham, p. 534.
[459] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, 1052 [1051], and E, 1048 [1051].
[460] Saint-Bertin, I.14, 1056, p. 184.
[461] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, XIV, p. 151.
[462] Murray (2000), p. 29.
[463] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[464] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[465] Florence of Worcester, 1051, p. 150.
[466] Simeon of Durham, p. 534.
[467] Birth date range estimated from the likely birth of her second son in [1060].
[468] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book IX, p. 175.
[469] Ex Vita B. Idæ Boloniensis Comitissæ, RHGF, Tome XIV, p. 113.
[470] Saint-Bertin II.16, p. 227.
[471] Lamberti Audomariensis Chronica 1113, Catalogus Regum Langobardorum et Imperatorum, MGH SS V, p. 65.21


Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex and Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens
Per Racines et Histoire (Boulogne): “Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (Gernobadatus) de Boulogne ° 1015/20 + peu après 1070/87 comte de Boulogne (1049), comte de Lens (1054), X à Hastings (14/10/1066), reçoit des fiefs en Angleterre mais se rebelle contre le Roi Guillaume 1er , échoue dans sa tentative de débarquement en Angleterre (1067) (ses fiefs sont confisqués mais restitués ultérieurement) (cité témoin d’une charte du comte Baudouin de Flandres 06/01/1056)
     ép. 1) 1036 Godgifu (Goda) d’Angleterre + avant 1049 (fille d’Ethelred II, Roi d’Angleterre et d’Emma de Normandie ; veuve de Dreu, comte de Mantes et du Vexin ; exilée en Normandie ~1013 ; ép. 2) ?)
     ép. 2) Ida de Lotharingie (Lorraine) héritière de Bouillon (Ardennes, Belgique) ° 1038/43 + 13/08/1113 (fille de Godefroi, duc de Haute-Lorraine, comte de Verdun, et de Doda de Réthel) (citée donation à Saint-Bertin 06/01/1056)”.6

Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex and Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens
Per Genealogy.EU (Boulogne): “A1. Cte Eustache II de Boulogne et de Lens, +1070/82; 1m: ca 1036 Goda of England; 2m: Ida of Lorraine (+1113)”.22

Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex and Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Racines et Histoire: "Dreu (Drogo) + 16/12/1035 comte d’Amiens, Valois, Pontoise et Mantes
     ép. Goda (fille du Roi Ethelred II d’Angleterre."23



Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex
Per Genealogics:
     "Godgifu was born after 1002, the daughter of Aethelred II 'the Unready', king of England, and his second wife Emma of Normandy. She and her brother Edmund Ironside were refugees in Normandy. While there she married Dreux, comte de Mantes et de Vexin, son of Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois, comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin, and his wife Adèle. They had five children of whom Raoul and Adèle would have progeny. Dreux died in Nicea in June 1035 on his way home from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. About 1036 Godgifu married Eustace II, comte de Boulogne, son of Eustace I, comte de Boulogne, and Matilde de Louvain. However they did not have children. Godgifu died about 1049. Eustace had children with his second wife Ida de Lorraine. After the Norman conquest of England by Godgifu's cousin William the Conqueror, the land she owned in Buckinghamshire was shared between Bertram de Verdun, lord of Farnham Royal, and Raoul, comte de Fougères."10

Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex
This is the same person as ”Godgifu, daughter of Æthelred the Unready” at Wikipedia and as ”Godgifu” at Wikipédia (FR).24,25 Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex was also known as Goda (?)26 GAV-26 EDV-27.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . page 190.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. page 175.10


Godgifu/Goda (?) of Wessex and Dreux (Drogo, Drew, Walter) de Mantes Comte de Mantes et d'Amiens
Per Med Lands:
     "GODGIFU [Goda] (-before 1049). Her parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Godgifu went into exile in Normandy with her brother[1871] in 1013. According to Orderic Vitalis, her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy[1872], indicating that she probably did not return to England after leaving for exile. However, this information is suspect, assuming that the charter of "Robertus Rex", which names "Comes Drogo…cum duobus fratribus Fulcone…et Rodulpho necnon uxore cum filiis supra memorati Drogonis", is correctly dated to 1025 as Duke Robert did not succeed as duke of Normandy until 1027[1873]. Another possibility is that Drogo's children at that date were born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. There is no indication of the birth dates of his known children, but the fact that none of them was given a typically Anglo-Saxon name also suggests that Godgifu may not have been the mother of all or any of them. Godgifu's second marriage is referred to by Florence of Worcester[1874].
     "m firstly ([1025 or before]) DREUX [Drogo] Comte de Mantes et du Vexin, son of GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc" Comte de Mantes, d'Amiens et du Vexin & his wife Adèle --- (-[13 Aug] 1035). m secondly ([1036]) as his first wife, EUSTACHE [II] Comte de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain (-[soon after 1070/1087]). "
Med Lands cites:
[1871] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[1872] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[1873] RHGF X, L, p. 622.
[1874] Florence of Worcester, 1051, p. 150.9

Family 2

Eustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens b. bt 1015 - 1020, d. bt 1070 - 1082

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 74, ENGLAND 19:IV. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1.
  3. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix: Kings of Wessex and England 802-1066. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 2 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic2.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godfigu of Wessex: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012362&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  8. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Godgifudiedbefore1049. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Godgifu of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012362&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aethelred II 'the Unready': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020112&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#AethelredIIdied1016B.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020115&tree=LEO
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 235-20, p. 201. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S1770] Anthony J. Camp, My Ancestors Came with the Conqueror: Those Who Did, and Some of Those Who Probably Did Not (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998), p. 34. Hereinafter cited as Camp (1998): My Ancestors Came with the Conquero.
  16. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#DrogoMantesdied1035
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030552&tree=LEO
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page (Counts of Boulogne sur Mer): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eustace II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012361&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#EustacheIIB
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Counts of Boulogne sur Mer (Boulogne): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godgifu,_daughter_of_%C3%86thelred_the_Unready. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  25. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Godgifu: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godgifu. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  26. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/wessex.pdf "Kings of Wessex and England: 802-1066". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  27. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1:iii.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00361574&tree=LEO
  29. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 80, de EWYAS 1:i.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Mantes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030551&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul 'the Timid': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314193&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00361575&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#GautierIIIMantesdied1064

Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin1,2,3,4

M, #10146, b. circa 952, d. between 1017 and 1024
FatherGauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin1,5,6,7,8,9 b. bt 920 - 925, d. bt 992 - 998
MotherAdele (?) d'Anjou1,3,10,7,8,9 b. c 914
ReferenceGAV27 EDV28
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin was born circa 952.8 He married Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois, daughter of Bernard (?) comte de Senlis,, circa 989.11,2,3,8,7,12
Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin died between 1017 and 1024.11,1,8,7
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 657.8

Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin
Per Burke's: "WALTER II, 'The White', Count of Vexin, Valois and Amiens; built the Castle of Crespy in Valois, fndr Monastery of St Arnulf, Valois, 1008; m Adela and d 1017-24."1



Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin
Per Genealogics:
     "Gautier II, known as 'le Blanc' (the White), was the son of Gautier I de Valois, comte de Valois, Amiens et du Vexin, and Adèle (d'Anjou). About 980 he married Adèle, about whom nothing is recorded. They had at least five children, of whom Raoul II, Dreux and a daughter possibly called Oda would have progeny; she married Hugues I, comte de Meulan.
     "About 1006 he exempted the abbeys of Jumièges and Sainte-Wandrille from levies, pointing to his good relations with the duchy of Normandy and the bishopric of Rouen. He also negotiated the marriage of his son with Godgifu of Wessex, the sister of Edmund II Ironside, king of England, a refugee at the court of Normandy in 1013.
     "He died between 1017 and 1024, at a time of considerable tension between Robert II 'le Pieux', king of France, and his step-son Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Troyes et Champagne, which influenced the division between his sons Dreux and Raoul III. Amiens and Vexin went to Dreux, who remained faithful to King Robert II, whereas the Valois, close to Champagne, went to Raoul who supported Eudes II."8


Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin
Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Gautier (Walthar) II de Vexin, dit le Blanc, mort entre 1017 et 1024, fut comte de Vexin, de Mantes, d'Amiens et de Valois. Il était fils de Gautier Ier, comte de Vexin, d'Amiens et de Valois, et une certaine Adèle, dont nous ne savons rien.
Comte de Vexin, de Valois et d'Amiens
     "Vers 1006, il exempte les abbayes de Jumièges et de Sainte-Wandrille, ce qui montre de bonnes relations avec le duché de Normandie et l'évêché de Rouen. Il négocia également le mariage de son fils avec la sœur du roi d'Angleterre, réfugié à la cour de Normandie en 1013.
     "Il meurt entre 1017 et 1024, à une époque où le roi Robert II de France et Eudes II, comte de Blois, de Troyes et comte de Meaux se brouillent, ce qui a pu orienter le partage entre ses deux fils : Amiens et le Vexin pour Dreux, qui reste fidèle au Capétien, et le Valois pour Raoul, qui se rapproche du Champenois.
     "Il avait épousé vers 980 une certaine Adèle, dont nous ne savons rien, et fut le père de :
** Oda, mariée à Hugues Ier, comte de Meulan
** Dreux (Drogo) de Vexin († 1035), comte d'Amiens et de Vexin
** Foulques Ier (v. 995 † 1030), évêque d'Amiens
** Raoul III de Vexin, († 1038), comte de Valois
** Guy

Comte de Gâtinais ?
     "Gautier le blanc avait un frère nommé Geoffroy, cité en 987, qui est identifié à Geoffroy Ier, comte de Gâtinais. Ce Geoffroy meurt vers 992-7, laissant un fils en bas âge. Le Gâtinais est alors tenu par un comte dont on ignore le nom complet, le document le mentionnant en 997 indiquant un nom commençant par Wal... Ce comte est identifié à Gautier II le Blanc, qui aurait été ainsi également comte de Gâtinais. Après lui, le Gâtinais est tenu par Aubry le Tors, fils de Geoffroy, cité pour la première fois en 1006.
Sources
** (fr) Pierre Bauduin, La Première Normandie (xe-xie siècles), Caen, Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, 474 p. [détail des éditions] (ISBN 2-84133-145-8)
** (fr) Édouard de Saint Phalle, « Les comtes de Gâtinais aux xe et xie siècle », dans Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval, Oxford, Linacre College, Unit for Prosopographical Research, coll. « Prosopographica et Genealogica / 3 », 2000, 310 p. (ISBN 1-900934-01-9), p. 230-246
Lien externe
** (en) Foundation for medieval genealogy : comtes de Valois et du Vexin [archive]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc129831911."13



Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin
Per Med Lands:
     "GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc", son of GAUTHIER [I] Comte d'Amiens & his [first/second] wife [Eva---/Adela ---] (-after 1017). "Wauterii comitis, Walterii et Radulfi filiorum eius" subscribed a charter dated 975 under which "Hugo Francorum dux" restored the abbey of Saint-Jean to the abbey of Sainte-Croix d'Orléans[23]. A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[24]. Comte de Mantes. "Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[25]. Comte d'Amiens et du Vexin.
     "m ADELA, daughter of ---. "Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[26]. "
Med lands cites:
[23] Sainte-Croix d'Orléans LXIII, p. 123.
[24] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552.
[25] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170.
[26] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170.7


Reference: Weis [1992:223] Line 250-19.11 Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin was also known as Gauthier II "le Blanc" de Vexin Count of Vexin.14 GAV-27 EDV-28.

Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin and Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 3): "Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis et de Valois
     ép. ~989 Gauthier II, comte de Vexin et de Valois"
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 7): "2) Gauthier II «Le Blanc» + 1027 comte de Vexin, Valois et Amiens
     ép. ~989 Adèle de Vermandois + 1012 comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois"
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 13): "Gauthier II «Le Blanc» de Mantes + après 1017 comte de Mantes (1017), comte de Valois, d’Amiens et du Vexin (cité chartes 975 et 987) ép. Adela."15

Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin was comte de Gâtinais (?) Between 992 and 1006.13 He was living in 998.4 He was comte de Vexin et d'Amiens, comte de Valois between 998 and 1017.13

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page (de Valois): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page - de Valois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier I de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139716&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GautierIValoisdied987. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (d'Anjou): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139717&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-19, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139719&tree=LEO
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gautier II de Vexin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gautier_II_de_Vexin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30673
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, pp. 3, 7, 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#FoulquesMantesAmiens
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00452396&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#DrogoMantesdied1035
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030552&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul II de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139714&tree=LEO

Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois1,2,3

F, #10147, d. 1012
FatherBernard (?) comte de Senlis,1,4
ReferenceGAV27 EDV28
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois married Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin, son of Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin and Adele (?) d'Anjou, circa 989.5,1,2,6,7,8
Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois died in 1012.9
     Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois and Gautier II "le Blanc" (?) Comte de Mantes, Amiens, Valois et du Vexin
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 3): "Adèle de Vermandois comtesse de Senlis et de Valois
     ép. ~989 Gauthier II, comte de Vexin et de Valois"
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 7): "2) Gauthier II «Le Blanc» + 1027 comte de Vexin, Valois et Amiens
     ép. ~989 Adèle de Vermandois + 1012 comtesse de Senlis, dame de Valois"
Per Racines et Histoire (p. 13): "Gauthier II «Le Blanc» de Mantes + après 1017 comte de Mantes (1017), comte de Valois, d’Amiens et du Vexin (cité chartes 975 et 987) ép. Adela."3



Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:657.8 GAV-27 EDV-28.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page (de Valois): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, pp. 3, 7, 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, pp. 3, 7, 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-19, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GautierIValoisdied987. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139719&tree=LEO
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#FoulquesMantesAmiens
  11. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30671
  12. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gautier II de Vexin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gautier_II_de_Vexin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00452396&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#DrogoMantesdied1035
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030552&tree=LEO
  16. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30674
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page - de Valois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul II de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139714&tree=LEO

Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin1,2,3

M, #10148, b. between 920 and 925, d. between 992 and 998
FatherRaoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois4 d. bt 926 - 943
MotherAdelais/Adelaide (?)5 b. bt 908 - 916
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin married Eva/Eve de Dreux, daughter of Landry (?) Comte de Dreux;
His 1st wife.6 Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin was born between 920 and 925; Med lands says b. bef 925; Genealogics says b. ca 920; Racines et Histoire says b. ca 920.7,6,8,9,10 He married Adele (?) d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques I "le Roux" (?) Vcte de Tours et d'Anjou, Cte de Nantes, Cte d'Anjou and Roscille/Roscilla de Loches Dame de Loches, La Haye et Villandry, circa 950;
His 2nd wife.11,4,12,2,13,8,9
Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin died between 992 and 998; Racines et Histoire says d. 987.11,4,13,8
     GAV-28 EDV-29.

Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Genealogics:
     "Gautier was born about 920. His parentage is not known with certainty; it was long considered he was the son of Raoul II de Gouy, Amiens et du Vexin, and his wife Lietgarde, but subsequent studies have shown that Lietgarde died childless. It is now thought that Gautier's father was either the brother of Raoul II or the second son of Raoul I d'Ostrevent and Hildegardis d'Amiens.
     "Quite young at the death of his brother, killed in a battle, Gautier could not restore the union of the three counties of Amiens, Vexin and Valois until about 965. He maintained good relations with Hugues II, archbishop of Rouen, as the Vexin was dependent on the diocese. Henri, a relative of Gautier, was also married to a sister of Hugues. In 991 his sister-in-law Ligardis, comtesse de Meulan et de Mantes, died; she had held the viscounties of Mantes and Meulan as her dower following her marriage to Galeran I, comte de Meulan, who had died a few years earlier. Gautier recovered Mantes, while Meulan returned to Ligardis' son Galeran II.
     "Gautier's first wife was called Eva, but nothing is known about her and she died without progeny. Around 950 he married his second wife Adèle (d'Anjou), possibly a daughter of Foulques II 'the Good', comte d'Anjou, and Gerberge de Tours. They had at least five sons, of whom Gautier II would have progeny.
     "Gautier died between 992 and 998."8



Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 657.8

Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Burke's: "WALTER I, Count of Amiens and probably also of Vexin and Valois; m Adela, probably dau of Fulk I, Count of Anjou, and d 992-98."4



Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Weis [1992:223]: "Walter I was the son of Ralph, Count of Valois, which Ralph is either identical with [line 250-17], or a son of [line 250-17] with the same name. Turton in error calls Walter I son of Walerian."11

Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin was also known as Walter I (?) Count of Amiens, Valois & the Vexin.4

Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Med Lands:
     "GAUTHIER [I] ([before 925]-after 987). Two possible parentages of Gauthier [I] have been suggested. Firstly, Edouard de Saint-Phalle suggests that he was Gauthier, son of Raoul [I] Comte [d'Ostrevant][3]. This possible parentage is also shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[4]. The primary source which suggests that this might be the case has not been identified. The second possibility is that he was the same person as Gauthier Comte de Dreux: the editor of the compilation of Chartres charters suggests that "Walterius…comitis Waleranni filius" (Gauthier Comte de Dreux) inherited "comes Velcassinus" (Vexin) from his father, and "Ambianensis" (Amiens) from "matre autem Eldegarde" (acquiring Dreux from his wife's family)[5]. The primary sources on which this information is based have not been identified. However, two facts suggest that this second hypothesis may be correct. Firstly, Gauthier Comte de Dreux is also recorded with a wife named Eva (although the necrology entries quoted here and in PARIS REGION NOBILITY (Comtes de Dreux) suggest that there were two countesses of that name at the time). Secondly, the castle of Mantes, occupied by the descendants of Gauthier Comte d'Amiens, was near Dreux. One possible resolution of the problem is signposted by Seversmith who states that Gauthier [I] was the son of "Raoul de Gouy" whose wife he names "Eldearde"[6]. As will be seen above, the wife of Waleran, supposed father of Gauthier [I] under the second possible case, is named "Eldegardis". If Seversmith is correct, it is possible that Eldegardis married firstly Raoul [I] Comte [d’Ostrevant] and secondly Gauthier Comte de Dreux, and that Gauthier [I] was the son of her first marriage. It should be noted that the charter dated to before 967 under which Eldegardis made a donation for the soul of her husband Waleran, with the consent of "Walterio comite filio meo", does not specify that Gauthier was Waleran’s son[7], although the omission of an earlier husband from the document would be surprising if that husband had been Gauthier’s father. "Wauterii comitis, Walterii et Radulfi filiorum eius" subscribed a charter dated 975 under which "Hugo Francorum dux" restored the abbey of Saint-Jean to the abbey of Sainte-Croix d'Orléans[8]. Comte d'Amiens. A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[9]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XIX Kal Feb" of "Gualterii comitis"[10].
     "m firstly EVA, daughter of --- (-[19 Jan or 23 Nov] ----). “Aeva” donated “alodum...Fulloni Campum et Mansum Roberti in villa Ludolmis in pago Castrinse” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, for the souls of “meæ...senioris mei Walterii”, by undated charter[11]. The necrology of the abbey of Sainte-Colombe records the death "XIV Kal Feb" of "Eve comitisse"[12].
     "m secondly ADELA, daughter of ---. A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "…Walterius comes, Adela comitissa…"[13]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[14], she was Adela d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques [I] "le Roux" Comte d'Anjou & his wife Roscilla [de Loches] (after 909-). The primary source on which this is based has not been identified; it is possible that it is speculative, based on one of her sons being named Foulques.
Comte Gauthier [I] & his [first/second] wife had five children"
Med lands cites:
[3] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais aux X et XI siècles' (2000), p. 234.
[4] ES III 657.
[5] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, p. 56 footnote 1.
[6] Seversmith (1939-58), Vol. 5, p. 2468 [information provided to the author by Janet Bjorndahl in a private email dated 25 Apr 2011].
[7] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Quartus, Cap. V, p. 87.
[8] Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, LXIII, p. 123.
[9] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552.
[10] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 248.
[11] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, XLVII, p. 76.
[12] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Sainte-Colombe, p. 15.
[13] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015.
[14] ES III 657.9


Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Gautier (Walthar) Ier de Vexin, né vers 920-5, mort après 992, fut comte de Vexin, d’Amiens et de Valois.
     "Sa filiation n’est pas connue avec certitude : on a longtemps considéré qu’il était fils de Raoul II de Gouy, comte de Vexin, d’Amiens et de Valois, et de Lietgarde, mais des études ultérieures ont montré que Lietgarde est morte sans enfant de son mariage avec Raoul, et l’on admet actuellement qu’il était plutôt le frère de Raoul II, soit le second fils de Raoul Ier d’Ostrevent et d’Hildegarde d’Amiens. On lui donne aussi pour père un Waléran de Crépy, mais il s’agit probablement d’une confusion avec Galéran Ier, vicomte de Meulan et de Mantes, second mari de Lietgarde, que l’on présentait, à tort, comme le régent des comtés entre la mort de Raoul II et la majorité de Gautier.
     "Assez jeune à la mort de son frère, tué dans une bataille, il ne put reconstituer l’union des trois comtés d’Amiens, de Vexin et de Valois que vers 965. Il entretint des bonnes relations avec l’archevêque de Rouen Hugues II, le Vexin étant dépendant de ce diocèse. Henri, un parent de Gautier, épousa d’ailleurs une sœur d’Hugues. En 991, mourut sa belle-sœur Lietgearde, qui tenait les vicomtés de Mantes et de Meulan en douaire. Gautier récupéra Mantes, tandis que Meulan revint au fils de Lietgarde, Galéran II.
     "Il épousa en premières noces une Eva, dont on ne sait pas grand-chose. Il s'agit peut-être de Eve, fille de Landry, comte de Dreux, puis en secondes noces vers 950 Adèle, probablement fille de Foulque II le Bon, comte d’Anjou, et de Gerberge (d'Orléans, sœur du vicomte Aubri/Albéric et fille du vicomte Geoffroy/Gausfred, deux Rorgonides ?). De ce second mariage, il eut :
** Gautier II le Blanc, comte d’Amiens, de Valois et de Vexin
** Guy († 995), évêque de Soissons
** Raoul, cité en 975
** Geoffroy, cité en 987, qui est peut-être identique à Geoffroy Ier († 992/7), comte du Gâtinais (selon Christian Settipani)
** Foulques

Sources
** (fr) Pierre Bauduin, La Première Normandie (xe-xie siècles), Caen, Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, 474 p. [détail des éditions] (ISBN 2-84133-145-8)
** (fr) Édouard de Saint Phalle, « Les comtes de Gâtinais aux xe et xie siècle », dans Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval, Oxford, Linacre College, Unit for Prosopographical Research, coll. « Prosopographica et Genealogica / 3 », 2000, 310 p. (ISBN 1-900934-01-9), p. 230-246
Lien externe
** (en) Foundation for medieval genealogy : comtes de Valois et du Vexin [archive]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc261249248."14


Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin and Adele (?) d'Anjou
Per Racines et Histoire: "Gauthier 1er de Valois °~920 + ~ 987/998 comte de Pontoise, Mantes, Valois, Vexin et Amiens
     ép. 1) Eve de Dreux (fille de Landerich, comte de Dreux)
     ép. 2) Adèl(aïd)e d’Anjou (fille de Foulques 1er, comte d’Anjou)
     (ép. aussi ? ~995 Béatrice de Mâcon, comtesse de Gâtinais + après 1030 ?)6"



Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin and Adele (?) d'Anjou
Per Racines et Histoire: "Adèle ° après 909 ép. Gautier 1er, comte de Vexin et Valois ° ~925 + 987."10


Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin was a witness to the      Racines et Histoire reverses the order of Raoul I and Raoul II (called Raoul 1er de Cambrai). It also shows Gauthier I as the son of Raoul 1er de Cambrai.See attached diagram from Racines et Histoire (Vermandois, et al, p. 6)
To further complicate the discussion,
I have chosen to follow the lineage as laid out by Med Lands. GA Vaut

with Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis and Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois.6,15 Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin was Comte de Valois, Amiens et du Vexin between 943 and 992.3

Family 1

Eva/Eve de Dreux

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier I de Valois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139716&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page - de Valois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counts_and_dukes_of_Valois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Raouldied926. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier I de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139716&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GautierIValoisdied987
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-18, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (d'Anjou): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139717&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 3.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gautier Ier de Vexin: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gautier_Ier_de_Vexin. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 15 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  16. [S4756] Christian Settipani, "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés," in Onomastique et Parenté dans l’Occident médiéval, K. S. B. Keats-Rohan and Christian Settipani, editor. (Linacre College, Oxford University: Oxford Unit for Prosopographical Research, 2000), pp. 247-261. Hereinafter cited as "Settipani [2000] Les vicomtes de Châteaudun."
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Geoffroy Ier de Gâtinais: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffroy_Ier_de_G%C3%A2tinais
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf

Adele (?) d'Anjou1,2,3,4,5

F, #10149, b. circa 914
FatherFoulques I "le Roux" (?) Vcte de Tours et d'Anjou, Cte de Nantes, Cte d'Anjou1,2,5,6,7 b. c 870, d. bt 941 - 942
MotherRoscille/Roscilla de Loches Dame de Loches, La Haye et Villandry2,5,6,7 b. c 874, d. Jul 929
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited1 Aug 2020
     Adele (?) d'Anjou was born circa 914 at Anjou, Departement de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France (now); Genelaogy.EU & Racines et Histoire say b. aft 909. Find A Grave says b. 924.8,2,9,6 She married Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin, son of Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois and Adelais/Adelaide (?), circa 950;
His 2nd wife.10,1,3,11,4,12,13
     Adele (?) d'Anjou and Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Racines et Histoire: "Gauthier 1er de Valois °~920 + ~ 987/998 comte de Pontoise, Mantes, Valois, Vexin et Amiens
     ép. 1) Eve de Dreux (fille de Landerich, comte de Dreux)
     ép. 2) Adèl(aïd)e d’Anjou (fille de Foulques 1er, comte d’Anjou)
     (ép. aussi ? ~995 Béatrice de Mâcon, comtesse de Gâtinais + après 1030 ?)14"



Adele (?) d'Anjou
Per Med Lands:
     "[ADELA d'Anjou . A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "…Walterius comes, Adela comitissa…"[50]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[51], Adela was the possible daughter of Foulques I Comte d'Anjou. The primary source which confirms her origin has not been identified. It is possible that it is speculative, based on one of her sons being named Foulques.
     "m as his second wife, GAUTHIER [I] Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin, son of --- ([925]-987).]"
Med lands cites:
[50] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015.
[51] ES III 657.5


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 657.15 GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29. Adele (?) d'Anjou was also known as Adele (?) d'Anjou.9

Adele (?) d'Anjou and Gauthier I (?) Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin
Per Racines et Histoire: "Adèle ° après 909 ép. Gautier 1er, comte de Vexin et Valois ° ~925 + 987."6

Adele (?) d'Anjou was living in 987.3

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (d'Anjou): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139717&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaMGautierIValoisdied987. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIdied941.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I31019
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2019), memorial page for Adele d'Anjou Vexin (924–948), Find A Grave Memorial no. 189186599, ; Maintained by Our Family History (contributor 47719401) Burial Details Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/189186599/adele-vexin. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-18, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page - de Valois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier I de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139716&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GautierIValoisdied987
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle (d'Anjou): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139717&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Valois 1 page (de Valois): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/valois1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gautier II 'le Blanc' de Valois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139718&tree=LEO
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf

Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois1

M, #10150, d. between 926 and 943
FatherHucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis2,3 d. a 890
MotherHeilwig (?) of Friuli2,3 d. a 895
ReferenceGAV29 EDV30
Last Edited15 Apr 2020
     Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois married Eldegarde (?)1,4 Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois married Adelais/Adelaide (?), daughter of Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor and Frederuna (?) Queen of the West Franks, between 920 and 924.5,6
Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois died between 926 and 943; Burke's Peerage (Sudeley Family Page) says "d 926 or 943"; Med Lands says d. 926.1,5
     GAV-29 EDV-30.

Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois
Per Burke's: "Count RALPH (de Gouy?), probably of Valois but possibly of Amiens, and very possibly of Carolingian male ancestry further back; m Eldegarde and d 926 or 943."1



Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois
Per Med Lands:
     "RAOUL [I] (-926). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified. Flodoard records that Hugues "le Grand" excluded "terra filiorum Balduini, Rodulfi quoque de Gaugeio atque Hilgaudi" from a treaty made with the Normans in 925[1542], which may refer to this Raoul. Vanderkindere suggests that "Gaugeium" was Gouy-sous-Bellone, in the area of Ostrevant, not Gouy-en-Arrouaise which is near Cambrai[1543]. Flodoard records the death of "Rodulfus comes, filius Heilwidis" and "non multo post etiam Rotgarius, vitricus eius, comes Laudunensis pagi" in 926[1544].
     "m ---. The identity of the wife of Raoul [I] is uncertain. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comes Rodulfus" (referring to Raoul [II]) was "nepos…ex sorore" of Louis IV King of France[1545]. It appears chronologically unlikely for any of King Louis's sisters, whose dates of birth can be estimated to [908/17], to have been the mother of Raoul [II] who was killed in battle in 944, presumably when he was already adult. It appears more likely that the family relationship was one generation further back, and that a member of the Unruochingi family, descended from the sister of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and who originated in the same area in northern France, would provide a good match. Nevertheless, the earlier primary source on which Alberic based his information has not been identified and it is possible that the source is inaccurate in its report. However, the poem Raoul de Cambrai states that "Raoul Taillefer" married "Aalais", sister of King Louis IV[1546] which, if correct, would mean that his wife could be identified with Adelais, daughter of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks & his first wife Frederuna ([908/16]-). This would mean that Raoul [II] was an infant when his father died (in fact the poem suggests that he was born posthumously). It would also mean that Raoul [I] and his wife were closely related, as the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also implies that Raoul's mother was the daughter of Adelais's paternal great aunt Gisela who married Eberhard, ancestor of the Marchesi of Friulia (see above). The poem Raoul de Cambrai cannot claim to be historically accurate. Nevertheless, it is not impossible that the detail of Raoul's marriage was not fabricated."
Med Lands cites:
[1542] Flodoard, 925, MGH SS III, p. 376.
[1543] Vanderkindere (1903), Tome I, p. 56.
[1544] Flodoard, 926, MGH SS III, p. 377.
[1545] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 943, MGH SS XXIII, p. 763.
[1546] Meyer & Longnon (1882), discussed in the Introduction, and mentioned i.a. CCXLIX, p. 224.5
Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois was also known as Raoul I Comte de Gouy.6,5

Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois and Adelais/Adelaide (?)
NB: There seems to be some disagreement regarding Raoul I's wife.
     Weis [1992:223] says Raoul I m. "Eldegarde, (dau. or niece of Ermenfroi, Count of Amiens ?, prob. a Carolingian princess), who m. (2) Waleran, a count...)"
     Burke's agrees that Raoul I's wife was named Eldegarde.
     Racines et Histoire says that Raoul I's wife was "Hildegarde d’Amiens (fille d’Ermenfroi, comte d’Amiens)," probably the same person as indicated by Weis and Burke's.
     However, Med Lands says that the name of Raoul I's wife is uncertaint that then shows that she may have been an "Aalais" or "Adelais", possibly dau. of Charles III "le Simple". Med Lands furthermore shows that it was "Liegardis", the wife of Raoul I's son, Raoul II, who m. 2) "Galeran Comte de Meulan."
I have chosen to follow the lineage of Adelaiis, as laid out by Med Lands. GA Vaut.6,5,1,7,4,3



Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois and Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis
     Racines et Histoire reverses the order of Raoul I and Raoul II (called Raoul 1er de Cambrai). It also shows Gauthier I as the son of Raoul 1er de Cambrai.See attached diagram from Racines et Histoire (Vermandois, et al, p. 6)
To further complicate the discussion,
I have chosen to follow the lineage as laid out by Med Lands. GA Vaut.3,4


Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois was a witness to the NB: The Wikipédia (Fr.) re-imagines the lineages of the descendants of Hucbald. Wikipédia states: "La description de sa famille est issue en partie de l'identification d'Heilwis, veuve et se remariant avec Roger Ier de Laon, avec Heilwis, femme d'Hucbald. Or cette identification pose quelques problèmes chronologiques (montrant son improbabilité plutôt que son impossibilité), et une autre construction est proposée. Hucbald et Heilwide de Frioul eurent deux enfants :
** peut-être Guy, comte de Senlis
** Heilwis de Senlis, mariée à Gautier de Laon († 892), puis à Roger Ier de Laon († 926)
** un comte Hucbald, père d'Udalric, évêque d'Augsbourg de 929 à 977

There are several implications of this proposed presentation.
1. One implication is that the Heilwis who m. Roger I de Laon was Heilwis, a dau. of Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli, and not Hubald's widow herself.
2. The second is to present Raoul I as either the grandson and or the son of Hucbald. It also adds two other important sons.
3. A third is to show two additional sons for Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli: 1) Guy comte de Senlis and 2) (a son named) Hucbald, father of Udalric, bishop of Augsburg (d. 977).

The source of this approach are not clearly delineated in the article. I offer it here so that others can examine the article and draw their own conclusions about what the true case might be. The diagram of this presentation is attached with the most significant changes highlighted.
For the present, I have chosen to follow the earlier thinking of Raoul I as the son of Hucbald, but I am studying this alternative.

with Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis and Heilwig (?) of Friuli.8,4

Family 1

Eldegarde (?)

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#HucbaldOstervantMHeilwigFriulia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 15 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Raouldied926
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#Adelaisborn908916
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-17, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hucbald_de_Gouy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#RaoulIValoisdied944

Eldegarde (?)

F, #10151
Last Edited15 Apr 2020
     Eldegarde (?) married Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois, son of Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis and Heilwig (?) of Friuli.1,2 Eldegarde (?) married Waleran (?) Count.3
     Eldegarde (?) was a witness to the NB: There seems to be some disagreement regarding Raoul I's wife.
     Weis [1992:223] says Raoul I m. "Eldegarde, (dau. or niece of Ermenfroi, Count of Amiens ?, prob. a Carolingian princess), who m. (2) Waleran, a count...)"
     Burke's agrees that Raoul I's wife was named Eldegarde.
     Racines et Histoire says that Raoul I's wife was "Hildegarde d’Amiens (fille d’Ermenfroi, comte d’Amiens)," probably the same person as indicated by Weis and Burke's.
     However, Med Lands says that the name of Raoul I's wife is uncertaint that then shows that she may have been an "Aalais" or "Adelais", possibly dau. of Charles III "le Simple". Med Lands furthermore shows that it was "Liegardis", the wife of Raoul I's son, Raoul II, who m. 2) "Galeran Comte de Meulan."
I have chosen to follow the lineage of Adelaiis, as laid out by Med Lands. GA Vaut

with Raoul I de Gouy Count of Ostrevant, Amiens & Valois and Adelais/Adelaide (?)4,5,1,3,2,6

Family 1

Waleran (?) Count

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Sudeley Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 15 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 250-17, p. 223. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#Adelaisborn908916. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Raouldied926
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Sir Pain de Roet Knt.

M, #10153
ReferenceGAV18 EDV18
Last Edited30 Sep 2019
     GAV-18 EDV-18.

Sir Pain de Roet Knt. lived at Hainaut, France.1

Sir Pain de Roet Knt.
Faris (1999, p. 14): "Pain de Roet, Knt., Guienne King of Arms, a Hainaulter, and one of the knights of Queen Philippe's household."2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 14. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-31, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 34. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine Roet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001976&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Sir Hugh Swynford1

M, #10154, b. circa 1340, d. between 1371 and 1372
Last Edited30 Sep 2019
     Sir Hugh Swynford was born circa 1340.1 He married Katherine de Roet Duchess of Lancaster, daughter of Sir Pain de Roet Knt., in May 1366 at St. Clement Danes, Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 1st husband.2,3,1
Sir Hugh Swynford was buried between 1371 and 1372 at Saint Peter and Saint Paul Churchyard, Kettlethorpe, West Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1340, Gainsborough, West Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England
     DEATH     1371 (aged 30–31), Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France
     Hugh de Swynford and Katherine de Roet were married in May 1366 in Westminster St. Clement Danes.
     Family Members
     Spouse
      Katherine de Roet Swynford 1350–1403 (m. 1366)
     Children
      Thomas Swynford 1368–1432
     BURIAL     Saint Peter And Saint Paul Churchyard, Kettlethorpe, West Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England
     Created by: Robert DeVowe
     Added: 17 Nov 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 138898858.4
Sir Hugh Swynford died between 1371 and 1372 at Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France; Weis [1992:3] says d. bef 1397. Genealogics says d. 1371/2 "on the continent".2,1,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 .
     2. The Manor and Rectory of Kettlethorpe in Assoc. Archit. Societies Reports and Papers, vol. 31 pt.1, 1911, Cole, R. E. G.
     3. Foundations. Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. 1:124-5.1

Family

Katherine de Roet Duchess of Lancaster b. 25 Nov 1340, d. 10 May 1403
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Hugh Swynford: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001977&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-31, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 34. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 30 September 2019), memorial page for Hugh Swynford (1340–1371), Find A Grave Memorial no. 138898858, citing Saint Peter And Saint Paul Churchyard, Kettlethorpe, West Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England ; Maintained by Robert DeVowe (contributor 48224154), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/138898858/hugh-swynford. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Darcy 11: p. 256. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Thomas Swynford, of Kettlethorpe: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00314890&tree=LEO

William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex1

M, #10155, d. 12 October 1176
FatherWilliam "Pincerna, the Butler" d'Aubigny Lord of Buckenham, co. Norfolk1 d. 1139
MotherMatilda/Maud le Bigod1 d. c 1129
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited11 Aug 2009
     William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex married an unknown person.2 He married Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant, daughter of Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant and Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine, in 1138; HENRY I's widow ADELIZ married in 1138 William d'Aubigny, who the next year, probably as a result, was created Earl of Lincoln. William's father was a Norman immigrant to England in HENRY I's reign. His son, who by this advantageous marriage came into the former Queen's dowry of Arundel Castle, together with its Honour (feudal administrative unit embodying several knight's fees), has been held thereby to have become Earl of Arundel (see also NORFOLK, D). By 1142 he had been deprived of his Earldom of Lincoln and thereafter, indeed even before, was spoken of sometimes as Earl of Arundel and sometimes as Earl of Chichester or Earl of Sussex (see CHICHESTER, E, for elaboration on this point).3,4,5,6,7,8,9
William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex died on 12 October 1176 at Waverly Abbey, co. Surrey, England.3,10
William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex was buried circa 1177 at Wymondham Priory, co. Norfolk, England.10


     William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex
Boyer (2001, p7): [quote] There is a legend that he was called "the Strong Hand" because in 1137 he was beset by a lion let loose upon him by Adeliz, the Queen Dowager of France, who acted out of jealousy because William had rejected her in favor of Adeliz, the Queen Dowager orf England, and that he ripped out the tongue of the lion ... When Henry landed in 1153 and faced Stephen at Wallingford, William was foremost in proposing and arranging a truce, and was one of the witnesses to their subsequent agreement. When King Henry II succeeded to the throne on the death of Stephen in 1154 William was confirmed in his earldom of Sussex and was give fee title to Arundel. ... In nov. 1164 he was dispatched with other magnates on a diplomatic mission to King Louis VII of France and to the Pope concerning an appeal by Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. [end quote]11

William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex
In 1138 one William d'Aubigny married Adela, widow of HENRY I, and through her acquired Arundel Castle and its demesne. He became known as Earl of Arundel, although in some contemporary sources he is also described as Earl of Chichester, Earl of Lincoln and Earl of Sussex. His mother was Maud (le) Bigod, aunt of the the 1st Earl of Norfolk of the 1140-41 creation (see Norfolk, other creations above ). After his death his son was known as Earl of Arundel from as early as 1189, even though Arundel Castle was retained by the Crown till midsummer 1190.12

William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex
"His lordship left by Adeliza, his wife, widow of King Henry I., four sons and three daughters, the eldest of whom, Alice, m. John, Earl of Eu."1 He was Earl of Arundel, by right of his wife.7 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-25. William d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex was also known as William de Albini Earl of Arundel.7 He was Crusader.13

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 126-29, p. 114. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 1-23, p. 3.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lincoln Family Page.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 2.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 7.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 149-26, p. 132.

Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway1

M, #10156, b. circa 995, d. 12 November 1035
FatherSvend I Haraldsen Tveskæg/Forkbeard' (?) King of Denmark and England2,1,3,4,5,6 b. c 960, d. a 3 Feb 1014
MotherGunhild (?) of the Wends2,1,5,6,4 d. b 1000
Last Edited21 Jul 2020
     Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was born circa 995 at Denmark.7,5,6 He married Aelfgifu (Elfgiva) (?) of Northampton, daughter of Alfhelm (?) Ealdorman of Northampton, circa 1014;
His 1st wife. Med Lands says she was his mistress. Genealogics says she was his wife.8,7,1,5,6 Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway married Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England, daughter of Richard I "The Fearless" (?) 3rd Duke of Normandy and Gunnora (Gunnor, Gonnor) de Crepon Duchess of Normandy, on 2 July 1017;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.9,7,10,1,11,12,13,5
Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway died on 12 November 1035 at Shaftesbury, North Dorset District, Dorsetshire, England.8,7,5,6
Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was buried after 12 November 1035 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     c.995, Denmark
     DEATH     12 Nov 1035 (aged 39–40), Shaftesbury, North Dorset District, Dorset, England
     English Monarch. Reigned from 1016 to 1035 Anno Domini. Remains of his bones are mixed in the chests above the choir of the Cathedral. Identification of the contents of these chests is impossible, however, because during the English civil war in the 17th century, Parliamentarian soldiers threw the original chests down to the ground and smashed them open. The bones were then used to smash the windows of the cathedral. At the restoration of the monarchy, the bones were gathered up and put, mixed up, into the present mortuary chests. Proclaimed king of all England shortly after the death of Edmund II, he also became King of Denmark on the death of his brother Harald in 1018. To avoid dynastic disputes he married Queen Emma, Ethelred the Unready's widow, who bore him a son, Hardicanute. His reign, after the initial conflict, was peaceful and brought stability to the realm.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Sweyn Forkbeard 960–1014
     Spouses
          Aelfgifu of Northampton 990–1040 (m. 1015)
          Emma of Normandy 988–1052
     Children
          Harold Harefoot 1016–1040
          Gunhild of Denmark 1019–1038
          Hardicanute 1019–1042
          Svein Knutsson 1020–1035
     BURIAL     Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, Hampshire, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 4 Mar 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 8722.7,5,6,14
     Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was a witness to the Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA ([985]-Winchester 14 Mar 1052, bur Winchester Cathedral). Guillaume de Poitou names “genitrix Emma filia Ricardi primi, genitor Ædelredus rex Anglorum” as parents of “Edwardus ac Alveradus”[120]. Guillaume of Jumièges names “Emma...secunda Hadvis...tertia Mathildis” as the three daughters of Richard and his wife “Gunnor ex nobilissima Danorum prosapia ortam”, adding that Emma married “Edelredo regi Anglorum” by whom she was mother of “rex Edwardum et Alvredum”[121]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Emma Anglorum regina" as sister of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[122]. Emma was described by Henry of Huntingdon as "Emma Normanorum gemma"[123], although it is not known whether this was a particular indication of her beauty or mere hyperbole. She was known as ÆLFGIFU in England[124]. Her first husband sent her to her brother's court in Normandy in 1013 after the invasion of Svend King of Denmark[125]. She was living in Normandy in 1017 when King Æthelred's successor King Canute proposed marriage to her. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Edelredus rex”, “Emmam reginam” married “rex...Chunutus...Christiano more”, and names their children “Hardechunutum postmodum regem Danorum et filiam...Gunnildem quæ nupsit Henrico Romanorum Imperatori”[126]. Roger of Wendover records the marriage in Jul 1018 of "Cnuto" and "ducem Ricardum…Emmam sororem suam et regis Ethelredi relictam"[127]. After the death of her second husband, she continued to live at Winchester. After the election of her step-son as regent in early 1036, it was recognised that she would continue to live there to look after the interests of her son Harthacnut who had nominally succeeded his father as King of England and Denmark but was still absent in Denmark. It is likely that she encouraged her sons by her first husband, Edward and Alfred, to join her, Alfred being captured and murdered during the visit. After Harold was recognised as king of England in 1037, Queen Emma was expelled and took refuge at Bruges[128]. She commissioned the Encomium Emmæ Reginæ from a Flemish convent at Saint-Omer, maybe St Bertin's, designed to promote her son Harthacnut's claim to the English throne. Harthacnut joined her in Bruges in early 1040, and after the death of King Harold, they returned together to England. After the accession of Edward "the Confessor", her son by her first husband, Emma appears to have supported the rival claim of Magnus King of Norway[129]. Whatever the truth of this, King Edward did confiscate her property in 1043 according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle[130]. She seems to have spent the last years of her life in retirement in Winchester[131]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of "Ælfgifu Emma, the mother of king Edward and of king Harthacnut" in 1052[132].
     "m firstly (betrothed 1000, 1002[133]) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELRED II King of England, son of EDGAR "the Peacable" King of England & his second wife Ælfthryth ([966]-London 23 Apr 1016, bur Old St Paul's Cathedral).
     "m secondly (2 or 31 Jul 1017) CANUTE King of England, son of SVEND I "Tveskæg/Forkbeard" King of Denmark & his first wife Šwi?tos?awa [Gunhild] of Poland ([995]-Shaftesbury, Dorset 12 Nov 1035, bur Winchester Cathedral). King of Denmark 1018, King of Norway 1028."
Med Lands cites:
[120] Gesta a Guillelmo Pictavensi (Du Chesne, 1619), p. 178.
[121] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247.
[122] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1026, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783.
[123] Henry of Huntingdon, II, 2, p. 7.
[124] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, F, 1013 and 1017.
[125] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1013.
[126] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, IX, p. 253.
[127] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 463.
[128] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E and F, 1037.
[129] Barlow (1983), pp. 51-6.
[130] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C and D, 1043, and E, 1042 [1043].
[131] Stafford 'Emma' (1997), p. 6.
[132] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle E, 1052.
[133] Henry of Huntingdon, II, 1 and 2, pp. 6 and 7.
with Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England and Aethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless.13
Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was a witness to the Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “D6. [1m.] Emma, *ca 982, +Winchester 14.3.1052/21.2.1052, bur there; 1m: Winchester Cathedral 5.4.1002 Ethelred II of England (*968 +23.4.1016); 2m: 2.7.1017 Knud II of Denmark (*995 +12.11.1035)” with Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England and Aethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless.15
Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was a witness to the Per Racines et Histoire (Normandie): “2) Emma de Normandie ° ~982/87 + entre 21/02 et 14/03/1052/53 (Winchester)
ép. 1) 05/04/1002 (Winchester) Ethelred II d’Angleterre ° 968 + 23/04/1016 roi d’Angleterre (fils du roi Edgar «Le Pacifique» et d’Elfreda de Devon ; veuf d’Elgiva ; ép. 3) Goda)
ép. 2) 02/07/1017 Knut II «Le Grand» de Danemark ° 995 + 12/11/1035 roi d’Angleterre, Danemark et Norvège (fils de Swend 1er et de Swietoslawa/Gunhild de Pologne)” with Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England and Aethelred II "The UnraedRedeless" (?) The Redeless.16

Reference: Genealogics cites: Nachkommen Gorms des Alten, 1978 , Brenner, S. Otto. 27.5

Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway
This is the same person as ”Cnut the Great” at Wikipedia and as ”Cnut [Canute]” at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.17,18 Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was also known as Knut I "the Great" King of England.7,1 Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was also known as Cnut I "the Great" King of England.2 Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was also known as Knud Svendson (Canute I) (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway.6 Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway was also known as Knud 'den Store' (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway.5

Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway and Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England
Per Genealogy.EU (Denmark 1): “C1. Knud II "the Great", King of England (1016-35) as Canute "the Great", King of Denmark (1018-35), and of Norway (1028-35), *995, +Shaftesbury 12.11.1035; 1m: Alfifa N; 2m: 1017 Emma of Normandy (*ca 985 +1052)”.19

Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway and Aelfgifu (Elfgiva) (?) of Northampton
Per Med Lands:
     "KNUD Svendsen, son of SVEND I "Tveskæg/Forkbeard" King of Denmark & his first wife [Gunhild] --- ([995]-Shaftesbury, Dorset 12 Nov 1035, bur Winchester Cathedral, Old Minster[1970]). The Encomium Emmæ Reginæ names "Cnutone filio suo [=Sueinum] maiore"[1971]. However, the identity of Knud's mother is uncertain. Adam of Bremen names "Chnut" as son of King Svend & his wife "Herici relictam, matrem Olaph"[1972]. The Fagrskinna suggests that Knud was the son of King Svend's first marriage by stating that Astrid, daughter of King Svend and Sigrid Skoglar-Tosta, had the same father as King Knud and the same mother as Olof King of Sweden[1973]. According to Ronay[1974], Knud was taken back to Poland with his mother after her divorce and fostered by Thorkell "the Tall" at the fortress of Jömsborg at the mouth of the River Oder but the author cites no primary source to support this. Knud took part in the invasion of England in 1013 led by his father. After his father's death, Æthelred II King of England counter-attacked the Danes in Lindsey, whereupon the Danish fleet under Knud withdrew to Denmark. In August 1015, Knud invaded England again. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Danamarchæ...regique Sveno” invaded England but died “apud Lundoniam”, was buried “apud Danamarcham”, and succeeded by “filius eius...Chunutus” who launched a new invasion with “Lacman equidem Suauorum et Olavum Noricorum”[1975]. By the end of 1015, he was in control of Wessex, helped by the defection of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor" Ealdorman of Mercia. The Danes controlled Northumbria in early 1016, then turned their attention to London and the south-east. After the death of King Æthelred in Apr 1016, the Witan offered the throne to Knud, to whom a group of nobles and church dignitaries from southern England swore allegiance at Southampton[1976]. Knud's fleet laid siege to London, which was relieved by King Æthelred's son King Edmund "Ironside" who had been proclaimed king by an assembly in London. Knud turned his attention to Mercia, Eadric "Streona" defecting back to King Edmund's forces at Aylesford, only to return to Knud at Ashingdon in Essex where Danish forces finally defeated King Edmund in Oct 1016[1977]. At Alney, near Deerhurst, the king agreed a compromise division of the country with Knud, Edmund taking Wessex and Knud the north, but Edmund died in Nov 1016 before this could be implemented. After the death of King Edmund, Knud was accepted as CANUTE King of England, crowned maybe at Old St Paul’s Cathedral, London 6 Jan 1017. After succeeding in England, he divided the country into four districts for administrative purposes[1978]. He appointed Eadric "Streona" as Ealdorman of Mercia ("slain in London" the same year, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle[1979]), gave East Anglia to Thorkell the tall, confirmed Erik Haakonsson Jarl in Norway as Earl of Northumbria, and kept direct control over Wessex. He held a national assembly at Oxford in 1018 which decided the legal form of his rule, largely following that of King Edgar "the Peaceable". He succeeded his brother in 1018 as KNUD I "den Storre/the Great" King of Denmark, leaving England for Denmark to take possession in 1019. His position in Denmark did not go unchallenged, for he was defeated at the Holy River in [1025] by Olaf King of Norway and Amund King of Sweden[1980]. He expelled Olav King of Norway in 1028, declaring himself KNUD King of Norway. Malcolm II King of Scotland submitted to him in 1031[1981]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Canute at Shaftesbury on 12 Nov 1035 and his burial in the Old Minster, Winchester[1982]. The Libellus de Anniversariis of Ramsey Monastery records the death “Id Nov” of “Knuto rex qui dedit nobis S. Felicem”[1983].
     "m (2 or 31 Jul 1017) as her second husband, EMMA de Normandie, widow of ÆTHELRED II King of England, daughter of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his second wife Gunnora --- ([985]-Winchester 14 Mar 1052, bur Winchester Cathedral, Old Minster[1984]). Guillaume de Jumièges names Emma as one of the three daughters of Duke Richard and Gunnor[1985]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Emma Anglorum regina" as sister of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[1986]. Roger of Wendover records the marriage in Jul 1018 of "Cnuto" and "ducem Ricardum…Emmam sororem suam et regis Ethelredi relictam"[1987]. She was known as ÆLFGIFU in England[1988]. Her first husband sent her to her brother's court in Normandy in 1013 after the invasion of Svend King of Denmark[1989]. She was living in Normandy in 1017 when King Æthelred's successor King Canute proposed marriage to her. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Edelredus rex”, “Emmam reginam” married “rex...Chunutus...Christiano more”, and names their children “Hardechunutum postmodum regem Danorum et filiam...Gunnildem quæ nupsit Henrico Romanorum Imperatori”[1990]. After the death of her second husband, she continued to live at Winchester. After the election of her step-son as regent in early 1036, it was recognised that she would continue to live there to look after the interests of her son Harthacnut who had nominally succeeded his father as King of England and Denmark but was still absent in Denmark. It is likely that she encouraged her sons by her first husband, Edward and Alfred, to join her, Alfred being captured and murdered during the visit. After Harold was recognised as king of England in 1037, Queen Emma was expelled and took refuge at Bruges[1991]. She commissioned the Encomium Emmæ Reginæ from a Flemish convent at Saint-Omer, maybe St Bertin's, designed to promote her son Harthacnut's claim to the English throne. Harthacnut joined her in Bruges in early 1040, and after the death of King Harold, they returned together to England. After the accession of Edward "the Confessor", her son by her first husband, Emma appears to have supported the rival claim of Magnus King of Norway[1992]. Whatever the truth of this, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports that King Edward did confiscate her property in 1043[1993]. She seems to have spent the last years of her life in retirement in Winchester[1994]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of "Ælfgifu Emma, the mother of king Edward and of king Harthacnut" in 1052[1995].
     "Mistress (1): ÆLFGIFU [Alfifa] Ælfhelmsdotter of Northampton, daughter of Ealdorman ÆLFHELM of Deira & his wife Wulfrun[1996] (-after 1036). Roger of Wendover names "Algiva, Elfelmi comitis filia" as first wife of "regis Cnutonis" and mother of "duos…filios Suanum…et Haroldum"[1997]. She was known as ALFIFA in Denmark and Norway. King Knud took her as a "temporary wife"[1998], but the "marriage" was not recognised by the church. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Harold claimed that he was the son of King Canute by "Ælfgifu of Northampton, although it was not true", another passage commenting that "many thought this [claim] quite incredible"[1999]. She continued to behave as Queen in the north of England after King Canute married Emma. King Canute appointed her co-regent in Norway in 1030 for their son Svend. Morkinskinna records that “Álfifa” accompanied her son Svend back to Denmark after he was overthrown as king of Norway (in 1035)[2000]. Morkinskinna records that “Álfifa” tried unsuccessfully to poison Magnus King of Norway but killed “King Hordaknútr” instead (dated to 1042), and that “she vanished instantly so that she could not be punished”, stating that this took place “in the sixth year of King Magnus’s reign”[2001]. Morkinskinna records that “Álfífa” tricked “a powerful duke named Otto south in Saxony”, when visiting “Norway and arrived in Vik”, into thinking that “her daughter…not King Sveinn’s sister by the same father” was Ulfhild, sister of Magnus King of Norway[2002]. The paragraph refers to Ordulf Duke of Saxony who later married Ulfhild, their marriage being dated to Nov 1042. This is the only reference so far identified to this supposed daughter. However, it seems surprising that Ælfgifu would have been present in Norway and have been in a position to welcome foreign visitors, given that her son by King Canute had been overthrown as king of Norway by King Magnus. All passages in Morkinskinna which refer to “Álfífa” treat her with disdain as the archetypal wicked queen figure, suggesting that they should all be treated with caution. Weir gives her date of death as “1044?” without any basis for her conjecture[2003]. Roger of Wendover records that death "Algiva, Elfelmi comitis filia", first wife of "regis Cnutonis", died in 1018[2004], but this date is incompatible with the other sources quoted above."
Med Lands cites:
[1970] Florence of Worcester, 1035, p. 140.
[1971] Encomium Emmæ Reginæ I.3, MGH SS.
[1972] Adami, Gesta Hammenburgensis Ecclesiæ Pontificum II.37, MGH SS VII, p. 319.
[1973] Fagrskinna, Chapter 49, p. 218, quoted by Rafal T. Prinke, at (26 Mar 2005).
[1974] Ronay (1989), p. 55.
[1975] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, VII, VIII, pp. 251-2.
[1976] Ronay (1989), p. 10.
[1977] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, E and F, 1016.
[1978] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, 1017.
[1979] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1017.
[1980] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1025.
[1981] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1031.
[1982] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1035, D, 1035, E, 1036 [1035].
[1983] Dugdale Monasticon II, Ramsey Monastery, Huntingdonshire, XXV, Ex Libello de Anniversariis in Ecclesia Ramesiensi observatis, p. 566.
[1984] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C, 1051.
[1985] WJ IV.18, p. 104.
[1986] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1026, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783.
[1987] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 463.
[1988] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, F, 1013 and 1017.
[1989] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1013.
[1990] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, IX, p. 253.
[1991] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E and F, 1037.
[1992] Barlow (1983), pp. 51-6.
[1993] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C and D, 1043, and E, 1042 [1043].
[1994] Stafford, P. 'Emma: The Powers of the Queen in the Eleventh Century', Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 6.
[1995] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle E, 1052.
[1996] She is called "the noble lady Wulfruna" in Florence of Worcester, 1035, p. 140.
[1997] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 462.
[1998] Stenton (2001), p. 397.
[1999] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, C and D, 1035, E, 1036.
[2000] Andersson, T. M. and Gade, K. E. (trans.) (2000) Morkinskinna (Cornell), 2, p. 100.
[2001] Morkinskinna, 4, p. 111.
[2002] Morkinskinna, 5, p. 116.
[2003] Weir (2002), p. 30.
[2004] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 462.6


Canute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway
Per Enc. of World History:
     “King Canute (Cnut), elected by the witan, a heterogeneous body of prelates, magnates, and officials without precise status. Canute ruled on the model of Charlemagne, over a northern empire that included Denmark, Norway, and England. His reign was marked by conciliation and fusion. The Church was under Anglo-Saxon clergy. Canute maintained a good navy, and his standing army included the famous housecarls, who soon had an Anglo-Saxon contingent. Four great earldoms, Wessex, East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, and seven lesser earldoms can be distinguished in this period. The greatest of the earls was Godwin of Wessex. Canute's sons were incompetent, and his line ended (1042).
     “Canute II, the Great (Knut), Sven's son, was king of Denmark, Norway (1028), and England (1016-35), the first “northern empire.” Canute's conversion meant the conversion of his people. He imported priests, architects, and artisans from his English realm, and new influences spread from Denmark to Norway and Sweden. On his death, Norway broke away; England passed to Edward the Confessor. By the late 12th century, Arhurs and Copenhagen were sizable trading centers, exporting great amounts of fish, especially herring.” between 1016 and 1035.20 He was King of England: [Ashley, pp. 486-487] CANUTE, CNUT or KNUT England, 30 November 1016-12 November 1035. Crowned: London (Old St Paul's) 6 January 1017. Canute was also king of Denmark from 1018 and of Norway from 1028. Born: Denmark, c995. Died: Shaftesbury, Dorset, 12 November 1035, aged about 40. Buried: Winchester Cathedral. Married: (1) c1014, Elfgiva (c996-cl044), dau. Alfhelm, ealdorman of Northampton: 2 children; (2) 2 July 1017, Emma, widow of Athelred II: 3 children. The first Dane to be crowned as king of England. His subsequent rulership of Denmark and Norway made him, the most powerful king of northern Europe. Canute had accompanied his father, SWEIN, on his conquest of England in 1013, when he was left in control of the Danish fleet in the north. Once his father had been elected king of England, Canute saw fit to entrench his position in the north and it was probably early in 1014 that he claimed marriage to Elfgiva, the daughter of Alfhelm, who had been ealdorman of Northumbria until his murder in 1006. Swein died early in 1014 and although the Danes elected Canute as their new king, the witan chose the return of ATHELRED whose forces drove Canute from the north. Canute was also concerned about establishing himself on the throne of Denmark, but by the time he had returned to his homeland his elder brother Harald was already ensconced as king. Canute returned to England late in 1015 and the next twelve months saw a wasting conflict between the Danes and the Saxons under EDMUND IRONSIDE. Neither side was the complete victor and in October 1016 Edmund and Canute divided England between them, with Canute taking Mercia and Northumbria. The following month Edmund died, many believed by the treachery of ealdorman Eadric. Canute was elected king of all England and was crowned early the following year.
The records of Canute's early reign are limited and often prejudiced against him, as are most annals of a conqueror by the conquered. He comes across as a tyrannical king who systematically murdered or exiled most of the leading Saxon nobles, including those who had crossed to his side. The traitorous Eadric he had executed. However, he did not eradicate the Saxon nobility as this would serve him little purpose. England was by now a well established kingdom, whereas Denmark had only recently been united and Canute was young and untested in kingship, especially in a foreign land. He needed the support and help of those who understood England and the English. Initially he divided the land into four, granting territory to three of his earls by way of military commands, and keeping Wessex for himself. However, from 1018 he appointed Godwin as earl of Wessex and it was under Canute that Godwin became the most powerful earl in England. Canute also realised he needed to be on good terms with the church and went to great lengths to establish relationships with Wulfstan, the archbishop of York, and Lyfing, archbishop of Canterbury. It was with Wulfstan that Canute later issued his law codes, based heavily on those already promulgated by the Saxon kings. Canute was able to adapt these codes for use in Denmark. Finally Canute married Athelred's widow, Emma, in order to strengthen his right to the throne. By all accounts he was still married to Elfgiva, which has caused some commentators to presume she was his mistress. She was certainly more than that, some treating her as his "handfast" or common-law wife according to Scandinavian custom, whilst Emma was his formal wife and queen. By this arrangement it meant that the children of Emma were heirs to the English throne, whilst the children of Elfgiva had right of succession to the throne of Denmark. In 1018 Canute returned to Denmark where, after the death of his brother, he was accepted as king. He did not return to England until 1020, but even then required regular trips to Denmark to sustain the throne, particularly during the period 1022-3. In 1020 Canute held a major council at Cirencester. There seems to have been some unrest during his absence, and Canute dealt with this by banishing Athelweard, the ealdorman of the western provinces (the former Dumnonia). The reason for his exile is unrecorded, but we can imagine he had been plotting against Canute, perhaps to restore one of Athelred's sons to the throne, the likeliest one being Edwy. Some records suggest that Edwy had been murdered by order of Canute in 1017, but William of Malmesbury records that he survived and lived in the south-west of England, perhaps under the protection of Athelweard. It may be that Edwy was murdered after Athelweard's expulsion. The next year we find Canute at odds with Thorkell the Tall, another Danish earl who had sold his services to Athelred in 1013, but who had accepted Canute's overlordship and been made earl of East Anglia. Thorkell must have challenged Canute's authority, perhaps in his treatment of the Saxons. Thorkell, for all his early devastation of England, had married a Saxon and seems to have established a friendship. He possibly had more scruples than Canute and they disagreed over Canute's policy of government. Thorkell was banished. The two became reconciled in 1023 when Canute made Thorkell the regent of Denmark and the foster-father of his son HARTHACANUTE.
Canute's reign has all the hallmarks of a powerful king who was initially uncertain in his authority. The harsh measures at the start of his reign arose through his feeling of insecurity, though he was in fact more stable in England than in Denmark. The English had suffered nearly thirty years of privations under Danish raids, and all they wanted was a restoration of peace and prosperity. The degree of support that he had in England gave him the strong base from which to consolidate his rule of Denmark and, from 1028, to conquer Norway. From 1030 he installed his eldest son, Swein (then about sixteen), as king of Norway, with his mother Elfgiva, as regent. By the mid-1020s Canute had mellowed from his earlier tyrannical rule (which was probably exaggerated in any case by the chroniclers) to one of piety. He made considerable gifts to the church in the hoping of buying salvation for his soul. The famous (much later) story of Canute sitting in his throne on the beach and commanding the tide to turn may have an element of truth. Although the legend suggests that Canute wanted to demonstrate his authority over the waves - and by implication his power over the northern seas - the fact is that Canute was giving a demonstration of piety by proving that he did not have power over them. The event is traditionally sited at Bosham on the English south coast, but an earlier record, by Geoffrey Gaimar, does not refer to Canute's throne and places the episode in the Thames estuary. In 1027 Canute visited Rome and attended the coronation of the Emperor Conrad II whose son, Heinrich, would marry Canute's daughter Gunhilda in 1036. Canute visited Rome again in 1031.
Nevertheless, despite his piety, Canute sought to impose his authority not just over England but Scotland and Wales. He visited Scotland in 1031, probably not with an army of conquest, but in order to form a peace alliance with MALCOLM II who had taken advantage of unrest in England during Athelred's reign to impose his authority over Bernicia and parts of Northumbria. The agreement reached between Canute and Malcolm saw Bernicia restored to England and the English-Scottish border established more or less as it is today. The ASC records that three kings submitted to Canute in the north. In addition to Malcolm these were Mælbæth, who was almost certainly MACBETH, and Iehmarc, who was probably MARGAD RAGNALLSON, the Norse king of Dublin who had authority over Man and the Isles. THORFINN THE MIGHTY, earl of Orkney, was already subject to Canute as his Norse overlord. Canute's authority over Wales was more tenuous. There is some suggestion that RHYDDERCH AP IESTYN recognized Canute's authority, but that may have been an administrative convenience, judging from Rhydderch's love of power, and it is unlikely that Canute exerted any power in Wales.
The records and later folklore suggest that Canute came to love England, possibly more than his homeland. He was a monarch who had conquered and established the most powerful of all Scandinavian empires, and through his power and authority was recognized as one of the most important rulers of his day. He died remarkably young, aged about forty. There is evidence that he knew he was dying and had a terminal illness that lasted for many months. Yet his death must have come suddenly as Harthacanute, who should have been his successor, was in Denmark and unable to stake his claim on England. Canute was therefore succeeded by his younger (and possibility illegitimate) son HAROLD (I). between 30 November 1016 and 12 November 1035.21,1 He was King of Denmark between 1018 and 1035.1 He was King of Norway between 1028 and 1035.20,1

Family 2

Emma (?) of Normandy Queen of England b. c 985, d. 6 Mar 1051/52
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1 page (Denmark family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html
  2. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svend II 'Forkbeard': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079502&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/DENMARK.htm#SvendIdied1014B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Knud 'den Store': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027249&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Canutedied1035B.
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 489 (Chart 33), 486-487. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  8. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-19, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  11. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020115&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#EmmadieNormandied1052
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 18 July 2020), memorial page for King Canute (c.995–12 Nov 1035), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8722, citing Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, Hampshire, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8722. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S1493] Doug Thompson: "The de Braose Web", online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/family/home.html, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnut_the_Great. Hereinafter cited as The de Braose Web.
  18. [S2286] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-4579. Hereinafter cited as ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html#K2
  20. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 181-2. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  21. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 182.
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Gunhilddied1038.

Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England1,2

M, #10157, b. circa 1018, d. 8 June 1042
FatherCanute I "The Great" (?) King of England, Denmark and Norway2,3,4 b. c 995, d. 12 Nov 1035
MotherEmma (?) of Normandy Queen of England2,5 b. c 985, d. 6 Mar 1051/52
Last Edited18 Jul 2020
     Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England was born circa 1018.1
Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England was buried in 1042 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England.6


Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England died on 8 June 1042 at Lambeth, co. Surrey, England.7,1,6,2
     Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England
Weis [AR7] 1-19.8 Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England was also known as Knut III "the Hardy" (?) King of Denmark and England.2 Harthacanute (?) King of Denmark and England was also known as Hardicanute (?) King of England.9 He was King of Denmark between 1035 and 1042.2 He was King of England: [Ashley, pp. 490-491] HARTHACANUTE or HARDICANUTE King of England, 12 November 1035-March(?) 1037, deposed; restored, 17 March 1040-8 June 1042. Also king of Denmark 1035-42. Crowned: 18 June 1040 at Canterbury Cathedral Born: c1018. Died: 8 June 1042 at Lambeth. Buried: Winchester Cathedral. Harthacanute was Canute's eldest son by his second wife Emma and was the designated heir in both Denmark and England. On Canute's death, however, Harthacanute was in Denmark and was forced to protect his kingdom from Magnus I of Norway who was fighting to reclaim the Norwegian crown. Harthacanute thus appointed his half-brother HAROLD (I) as his regent along with his mother Emma. The protection of Denmark kept Harthacanute busy for longer than anticipated and in 1037, Harold was crowned king in England. It is likely that there was some political coup, as Earl Godwin, originally appointed as regent alongside Emma and Harold, switched sides and supported Harold in his claim to the throne. Godwin may also have been the murderer of Prince Alfred, by order of Harold. Harold died three years later, and foul play cannot be entirely ruled out. At that time Harthacanute had established his authority in Denmark and was in fact on his way to England to recover his throne. He was staying with Emma, who was in exile in Bruges. With Harold's death Harthacanute sailed on England with a large fleet and was immediately accepted as king. Harthacanute was especially vindictive to his half-brother. He had his body exhumed, beheaded and thrown into the marshes around Westminster. He was a harsh and intolerant king. Determined to defend his kingdom in Denmark, he raised an excessive tax in England to support his fleet at four times the rate of his father's. This led to rebellion in Worcester in 1041 which Harthacanute suppressed with vicious rage, almost destroying the town. It is to this period that the legend of Lady Godiva, or Godgifu, belongs. She was the wife of Leofric, earl of Mercia, who was forced to impose Harthacanute's tax across his domain. The people of Coventry could not afford it and Godiva therefore rode naked through the town to persuade Leofric to reduce the tax. Although this is wholly folklore, it does demonstrate the strength of opposition among the Saxon nobility to Harthacanute's taxes. This was further aggravated when Harthacanute ordered the murder of Eadulf, the ealdorman of Bamburgh. EDWARD (THE CONFESSOR) was recalled from exile and sworn in as Harthacanute's heir. Some records even suggest that he was anointed king. No one mourned when, in June 1042, Harthacanute died whilst drinking at a wedding party. Apparently he had a fit, but the possibility of poison cannot be ignored. He was an unpopular and much hated king. He had never married and with his death the kingdom passed back to the Saxons. between 17 March 1040 and 8 June 1042.1,6

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Denmark 1 page (Denmark family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/denmark/denmark1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Knud 'den Store': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027249&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Canutedied1035B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020115&tree=LEO
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 489 (Chart 33), 490-491. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  7. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-19, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/continen.pdf "The Continental Dynasties: 1066-1216". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.

Eadburh (?)

F, #10158
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited5 Sep 2020
     Eadburh (?) married Aethelred Mucil/Mucel (?) Ealdorman of the Gaini.1,2
     GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-31.

Family

Aethelred Mucil/Mucel (?) Ealdorman of the Gaini
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-15, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Æthelred Mucil/Mucel: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aethe003.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ealhswith: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/ealhs000.htm
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ealhswith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018647&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Ealhswithdied904. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche1,2,3,4

M, #10159, b. 1163, d. circa 5 November 1219
FatherHugues VIII bis de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan5,6,3,4 b. c 1141, d. b 11 Apr 1169
MotherOrengarde (?)3,4
ReferenceGAV22 EDV21
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche was born in 1163.3 He married Mahaut/Mathilde (?) d'Angoulême, daughter of Vulgrin/Wulgram III Taillefer (?) Comte d'Angoulême & La Marche and Elisabeth d'Amboise, circa 1189; Racines et Histoire says m. after 1194.3,4 Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche and Agatha (?) de Preuilly were divorced in 1189.3 Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche married Agatha (?) de Preuilly, daughter of Pierre II (?) de Montrabel, seigneur de Preuilly and Aenor de Mauleon, circa 1194; his 2nd wife.2,7,3
Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche died circa 5 November 1219 at Damietta, Egypt.2,3
     Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche
Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES [X] "le Brun" de Lusignan, son of HUGUES de Lusignan & his [first] wife Orengarde --- (-Damietta 5 Nov 1219). His parentage is confirmed indirectly by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Radulfum de Esselduno qui fuit comes Augi" as "Hugo Brunus fratrem natu maiorem" (presumably an error for "minorem"), adding that "horum pater Hugo de Lisegnen" had "fratres…Gaufridum, Henricum regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum"[706]. He succeeded his grandfather in 1173 as Seigneur de Lusignan, de Couhé et de Château-Larcher. Comte de la Marche 1199: the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that, after the death of Richard I King of England, "Hugo…Brunus" captured "regina…Alienordis" and held her until she granted him "comitatum de Marchia Pictavie"[707]. The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records that "Hugo de Lezina" seized "comitatum de Marcha" in 1199, noted in events after the record of the death of King Richard[708]. "Hugo Brun com March et Rad com Augi" swore homage to John King of England, dated 28 Jan 1200[709]. "Hugo Brunus comes Marchie, dominus Lezignaci et Coiaci" renounced rights over income belonging to Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, claimed by "avus meus…dominus Hugo de Lezigniaco" but relinquished by him before leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of "filio meo Hugone Bruno quem tunc unicum habebam", by charter dated 23 Feb 1200[710]. "Hugo Brunus comes Marchie", on leaving for Jerusalem, recommended "R. comiti Augi et Hugoni filio meo" to take the abbey of Châtelliers under their protection by charter dated to [1200][711]. Ralph of Coggeshall records that in 1202 John King of England made war against "comitem de Marchis…Hugonem cognomento Brun et fratrem eius comitem de Eu" who had rebelled against him "pro filia comitis Engolismi, quam Hugo prædictus prius affidaverat"[712]. Ralph of Coggeshall records that "…Gaufridum de Lucinan et Hugonem Brunum et Andream de Caveni et vicecomitem de Castro-Eraldi et Reimundum Tuarz et Savarium de Mauleun et Hugonem Baugii" were captured, together with "Arturum nepotem nostrum" [Arthur Duke of Brittany] after they rebelled and attempted to capture "castellum de Mirabel" where "regina Alienor avia Arturi" was living, dated to 1202[713]. "Comes Augi" pledged his lands for his homage to Philippe II King of France, and that of "fratres sui comes Marchie et vicecomes Castri Eraudi" dated (by Delisle) to [1209][714]. He made peace with the king of England, as confirmed by the betrothal of King John’s daughter to his son Hugues [XI], confirmed in a charter dated 29 Sep 1214 (see below). "Hugo Bruni dominus Lezigniaci et comes Marchie", on leaving on crusade, and "Hugo de Lezigniaco filius suus" donated half "molendino de Pooillet" to Saint-Maixent by charter dated 27 Jun 1218[715]. "Hugo Brunus comes Marchie", on leaving for Jerusalem, confirmed the grant of rights to the abbey of Châtelliers made "in 1171" by "Hugo Lezenniaci castelli" by charter dated 1218[716]. The Historia Damiatina by Oliverus Scholasticus records the deaths in 1218 at Damieta of "comes de Marcha et comes de Bar et filius eius, frater Guillelmus de Carnoto magister militiæ templi, Herveus de Virsione, Iterius de Tacci, Oliverus filius regis Anglie"[717].
     "m firstly ---. The name of Hugues’s first wife is not known. Europäische Stammtafeln names Agathe de Preuilly "daughter of Pierre [II] Sire de Preuilly dit de Montrabel" as the second wife of Bernard [III] Vicomte de Brosse, and also records that she married secondly, as his first wife, Hugues [X][718]. The mother of Gérard [II] Vicomte de Brosse was Agathe de Preuilly, as confirmed by his charter dated 1198 (after Sep) under which "Giraudus vicecomes Brucie, filius domne Agathe de Prullet" abandoned rights in favour of Saint-Benoît-du-Sault[719]. However, there is no indication that Gérard was the son of Vicomte Bernard [III]. In addition, the chronology of the known marriage of Vicomte Bernard [III] appears to exclude the possibility of a second marriage which would be consistent with that second wife’s own second marriage to Hugues [X]. It is assumed, therefore, that the (first) husband of Agathe de Preuilly and father of Vicomte Gérard [II], was another --- de Brosse. The primary source which confirms her supposed second marriage has not yet been identified.
     "Betrothed ([1199]) to ISABELLE d’Angoulême, daughter of AYMAR “Taillefer” Comte d’Angoulême & his wife Alix de Courtenay ([1187]-Fontevrault Abbey 31 May 1246, bur Fontevrault Abbey). This betrothal is confirmed by Ralph of Coggeshall who records that in 1202 John King of England made war against "comitem de Marchis…Hugonem cognomento Brun et fratrem eius comitem de Eu" who had rebelled against him "pro filia comitis Engolismi, quam Hugo prædictus prius affidaverat"[720]. She succeeded her father in 1202 as Ctss d’Angoulême, and later married Hugues [XI] de Lusignan, son of Hugues [X].
     "m secondly ([1200/01]) MATHILDE d'Angoulême, daughter of VULGRIN III Comte d'Angoulême & his wife Elisabeth d'Amboise (-after 29 Aug 1233). Painter cites a charter dated 29 Aug 1233 under which Juhel Archbishop of Tours confirmed an agreement between "Matilda daughter of Vulgrin once count of Angoulême and widow of Hugh once count of La Marche" and "Isabelle queen of England, countess of La Marche and Angoulême", the former abandoning to "Isabelle and her husband Hugh de Lusignan…her rights in the county of Angoulême and her dower rights in the county of La Marche" in return for an annuity[721]. Painter highlights that the document in question makes no mention of any blood relationship between Mathilde and Hugues [XI] de Lusignan, which strongly suggests that the latter was born from an earlier marriage of his father.
Med Lands cites:
[706] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876.
[707] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876.
[708] Chronicon Bernardi Iterii, p. 66.
[709] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 58.
[710] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, CLXXXIV, p. 214.
[711] Duval, L. (ed.) (1872) Cartulaire de l’abbaye royale de Notre-Dame des Châtelliers (Niort) ("Notre-Dame des Châtelliers"), X, p. 14.
[712] Ralph of Coggeshall, p. 135.
[713] Ralph of Coggeshall, p. 138.
[714] Delisle, L. (1856) Catalogue des actes de Philippe Auguste (Paris), Appendix, 1182, p. 515, and Delisle, L. ‘Les vicomtes de Châtellerault’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Vol. XXXIII (1872), pp. 317-9.
[715] Richard, A. (ed.) (1887) Chartes et documents pour servir à l'histoire de l'abbaye de Saint-Maixent, Archives historiques du Poitou Tome XVIII (Poitiers) ("Saint-Maixent") Vol. II, CCCCXVI, p. 38.
[716] Notre-Dame des Châtelliers, IV and XX, pp. 6 and 25.
[717] Toulgoët-Treanna, E. de (1884) Histoire de Vierzon et de l’abbaye de Saint-Pierre (Paris), p. 114 footnote 4, quoting the extract in full, without citation reference, incorrectly attributed to Jacobus de Vitriaco Historia Orientalis.
[718] ES III.4 816.
[719] Prou, M. & Vidier, A. (eds.) (1907-12) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire (Paris) ("Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire"), Vol. II, CCLXXVIII, p. 166.
[720] Ralph of Coggeshall, p. 135.
[721] Painter ‘Lusignan and Châtellerault’, p. 80, citing Thomas, G. (1934) Cartulaire des comtes de la Marche (Angoulême), pp. 40-3 (not yet consulted).8
GAV-22 EDV-21.

Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche
Per Genealogy.EU: "Hugues IX "le Brun", Seigneur de Lusignan 1172, Seigneur de Couhe et de Chateau-Larcher 1190/1200, Comte de la Marche 1203, *1163, +Damietta, Egypt 5.11.1219, bur there; 1m: (annuled 1189) Agathe de Preuilly; 2m: ca 1189 Mathilde d'Angoulême (*1181 +1233), dau.of Vulgrin III Taillefer, Comte d'Angouleme et de La Marche."3

Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche and Hugues X "Le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême
c@windsong.u-net.com (Cristopher Nash) wrote in message news:...
>> Louise Staley wrote --
>>> >[SNIP]
>>> >10. Hugh De Lusignan Comte de la Marche et d'Angouleme
>>> >11. Queen Isabella d'Angouleme
>>> >12.
>>> >20. Hugh de Lusignan Comte de la Marche (descendant of Louis VI &
>>> >Adele de Savoie)
>>> >21. Marie d'Angouleme
>> I wonder if you could say a bit more about 20's descent from Louis VI &
>> Adele de Savoie, and the identity of Marie d'Angouleme? I can't
>> quite figure the first (20 would not be comte de la Marche, BTW), and
>> so far as I know the mo. of 10 (Hugh who d. 1219) -- most widely
>> claimed to be Mathilde ('Taillefer', living 1181 & 1233, da. of
>> Wulgrin III, comte d'Angoulême) -- has been seriously disputed (e.g.
>> by Painter) or otherwise (more recently) left uncertain.
     The elder Hugh (#20 above) was indeed count of La Marche - you may have his & his son's details confused as the genealogy of Lusignans was awry by one generation from the presently accepted system until the 1890s, and both men happened to die at Damietta in Egypt (nearly 30 years apart).
     Hugh #20 possessed La Marche from 1199, soon after the death of King Richard Lionheart. He declared against King John in 1200 and styled himself "Hugo [Brunus] comes Marchiae" from then on. (Apart from charter evidence, the events are covered in the chronicles of Alberic de Troisfontaines and Bernard Itier.) He left for Palestine in 1218 and died at Damietta around 5 November 1219. This Hugh had married at least twice and more probably three times - his widow was Mathilde (not "Marie) of Angoulême, whose first cousin Isabelle (#11) had been affianced to his son Hugh (#10: this arrangment was "gazumped" by King John, until eventually accomplished, after his death, in 1220).
     The recorded wives of this elder Hugh (#20) are Agatha de Preuilly (married perhaps ca 1194, apparently as the widow of Bernard III, viscount of Brosse, who died in 1193) and later Mathilde of Angoulême who survived him.
     The younger Hugh (#10) was probably born ca 1190 from an unknown first marriage, and died of wounds received at the capture of Damietta after Pentecost (6 June) 1249. I have speculated here before that his mother _might_ have been a daughter of Raoul III, seigneur of Mauléon, but I haven't studied the matter any further.
Peter Stewart.2 Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche was Seigneur de Lusignan in 1172.3 He was Comte de La Marche: "Hugh #20 possessed La Marche from 1199, soon after the death of King Richard Lionheart. He declared against King John in 1200 and styled himself "Hugo [Brunus] comes Marchiae" from then on. (Apart from charter evidence, the events are covered in the chronicles of Alberic de Troisfontaines and Bernard Itier.) " between 1199 and 1219.2

Family 2

Mahaut/Mathilde (?) d'Angoulême b. b 1181, d. a 29 Aug 1233

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 136, de LUSIGNAN 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1460] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email "1st Lusignan count of La Marche (was Re: Grandison & Warenne...)," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 August 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 26 August 2003."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 136, de LUSIGNAN 2.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues IX de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064434&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agathe de Preuilly: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00208040&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#HuguesIXLusignandied1219. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008715&tree=LEO
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.10. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk1

M, #10160, d. before 1154
FatherHarscoit de St. Hilaire Seigneur de St.James et St.Hilaire du Harscouet2 d. a 1121
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited15 Dec 2003
     James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk married Aveline (?)3
James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk died before 1154.1
     James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk
Leo van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: V 124-125.1 GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24. James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk was also known as James de St. Hilaire Seigneur de St.Hilaire du Harcouet.1

James de St. Hilary Lord of Field Dalling, Norfolk
Weis AR 63-27.4

Family

Aveline (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James de St.Hilaire: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00415837&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Harscoit de St.Hilaire: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00415839&tree=LEO
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 246B-26, p. 213. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 63-27, p. 67.

Robert Fitz Hamon Lord of Tewkesbury, Seigneur of Creully in Calvados1,2

M, #10161, d. 1107
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited14 Feb 2003
     Robert Fitz Hamon Lord of Tewkesbury, Seigneur of Creully in Calvados married Sybil de Montgomery, daughter of Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois and Mabile de Bellême.3,2
Robert Fitz Hamon Lord of Tewkesbury, Seigneur of Creully in Calvados died in 1107.3,2
     He was Seigneur of Creully at Calvados, Normandy, France.3 GAV-25 EDV-25.

Robert Fitz Hamon Lord of Tewkesbury, Seigneur of Creully in Calvados
(an unknown value.)4,3 He was made hereditary Governor of Caen about 1105 by King Henry 1 in 1105.2

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 125. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 91-92, Fitz HAMON 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 124-26, p. 112. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 63-26, p. 66: "...grandson of King Henry I of England."

Raoul/Ralph II de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-Gael et de Brecilien1,2,3,4

M, #10162
FatherRaoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne b. b 1040, d. c 1096
MotherEmma (?) de Breteuil
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited1 Oct 2006
     Raoul/Ralph II de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-Gael et de Brecilien married Havoise (?) dame de Hede et de Montauban circa 1095.4
     GAV-24 EDV-25. Raoul/Ralph II de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-Gael et de Brecilien was Seigneur of Montford de Gael at Bretagne, France.5

Raoul/Ralph II de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-Gael et de Brecilien
(an unknown value.)5

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 80, de EWYAS 2:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 3.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  4. [S1968] J Bunot, "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005: "Re: Correction to Genealogics"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005."
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 53-25, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Raoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne1,2,3

M, #10163, b. before 1040, d. circa 1096
FatherRalph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford1 b. bt 1025 - 1026, d. 21 Dec 1057
MotherGetha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham1
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited16 May 2009
     Raoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne was born before 1040.2 He married Emma (?) de Breteuil, daughter of Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford and Adelise (Alice) de Toeni, in 1075 at Exning, Cambridgeshire, England.4,2,3,5
Raoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne died circa 1096; died in the Crusades.2
     He was Seigneur of Montford de Gael at Bretagne, France.4,1 GAV-25 EDV-26. Raoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne was also known as Ralph de Waiet (de Gael).1 He was 1st Earl of Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridge.4

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 80, de EWYAS 2:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2.
  3. [S1968] J Bunot, "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005: "Re: Correction to Genealogics"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005."
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 53-25, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2:i.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2:iii.

Emma (?) de Breteuil1,2

F, #10164
FatherGuillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford2 b. 1016, d. 20 Feb 1070
MotherAdelise (Alice) de Toeni2 b. 1035, d. c 5 Oct 1070
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited16 May 2009
     Emma (?) de Breteuil died; died in the Crusades.3 She married Raoul/Ralph I de Montfort de Gael 1st Earl Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, seigneur de Gael et de Montfort en Bretagne, son of Ralph "the Timid" de Sudeley Earl of Hereford and Getha (Gethe, Gytha) (?) of Buckingham, in 1075 at Exning, Cambridgeshire, England.4,3,5,2
     GAV-25 EDV-25.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 95, Fitz OSBERN 2:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 53-25, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1968] J Bunot, "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005: "Re: Correction to Genealogics"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 21 Oct 2005."
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2:i.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 161, de MONTFORT of Norfolk 2:iii.

Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford1,2

M, #10165, b. 1016, d. 20 February 1070
FatherOsbern de Crépon Steward of Normandy3,1
MotherEmma (ou Alberade, Aubrée) (?) d'Ivry4,1
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited11 Jun 2020
     Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford was born in 1016 at Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France (now).5 He married Adelise (Alice) de Toeni, daughter of Roger I de Toeni Lord of Guerny and Godehilde (?), say 1051.6,7,8,1 Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford married Richilde (?) de Mons, comtesse de Hainaut, daughter of Rainier de Hasnon marggrave, after 1070;
Her 3rd husband.6,9,10,11,12,13,14
Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford died on 20 February 1070 at Cassel, Flanders, Belgium (now); killed in the battle of Flanders; Leo van de Pas says d. 22 Feb 1071.6,11,2
Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford was buried after 20 February 1070 at Cormeilles Abbey, Cormeilles, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1016, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     DEATH     22 Feb 1071 (aged 54–55), Denain, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Lord of Breteuil, Normandy, Earl of Hereford, Gloucester, Worcester and Oxfordshire. William FitzOsbern was the son of Osbern de Crepon, the Steward, and Albreda de Bayeau. Grandson of Herfast. He was also the nephew of Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy, second wife of Richard I of Normandy. Brother of Osbern, Bishop of Exeter.
     William married Adeliza de Toeni, the daughter of Roger de Toeni and Adelaide of Barcelona. They had the following children, and she died before 1066:
* William, Lord of Breteuil
* Roger de Breteuil
* Emma FitzOsborne, wife of Ralph de Guarder

     It is said William married Richilde, Countess of Hainhaut, before his death, but had no issue.
     William FitzOsbern became one of the great magnates of early Norman England, created Earl of Hereford before 22 February 1067, one of the first peerage titles, and was known to be one the greatest castle builders.
     His father was the steward of his cousin Duke Robert I of Normandy. When Robert gave his duchy to his young son, William (the Conqueror), Osbern was one of Duke William's guardians. Osbern was killed in William's bedroom, defending the boy against an assassination attempt around 1040. Osbern's properties in Normandy, including the honors of Pacy and Breteuil, inherited through his wife, the daughter of the half brother of Duke Richard I of Normandy, was passed on to his son, William FitzOsbern.
     William FitzOsbern, like his father, became a the ducal stewards, one of the first and adamant supporter to the invasion, known to have convinced the skeptical barons the invasion was truly possible.
     During the invasion, it was recorded that "William FitzOsber" interrupted the Duke's lecturing his troops with, "Sire, we tarry here too long, let us all arm ourselves. Allons! Allons!" and his horse was said to have been covered in iron, which would not have been normal for that time.
     After the invasion, and the Duke became William I, FitzOsbern was given the charge of the Idle of Wight, and made Earl of Hereford, Gloucester, Worcester and Oxfordshire. He was appointed Mayor of York after Edgar Ætheling's defeat. The King returned to Normandy in 1067, leaving the control, and further conquests of England to FitzOsbern and Odo de Bayeaux.
     FitzOsbern would accompany the King after his return to the conquests of south western England, attended the King's Whitsunday in May of 1068, receive the charges of the new castle at York in 1069, and attend the King's Easter court in April before the conquest of Gwent in Wales.
     FitzOsbern was one of the major Norman castle builders, having the castles of Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight, Chepstow or Striguil, Wigmore, Clifford Castle and Monmouth Castle attributed to him, along with fortifications in Hereford and Shrewsbury.
     Meanwhile, King William's wife's brother, Baldwin, Count of Flanders, died, leaving Flanders to his son with his wife, Richilde, as regent. Her husband's brother, Robert the Frisian, disputed the boy's claim to Flanders. Richilde offered her hand in marriage to the now powerful William FitzOsbern, eager to accept and become Count of a rich empire next door to Normandy. William and his army met the forces of Robert the Frison at Ravenchoven in the Battle of Cassel on 22 February 1071. He fought alongside armies sent by Philip I, King of France to support Richilde and her son, Arunulf, who was killed in the battle as well. Richilde and Robert were both taken captive, later exchanged, and Robert ruled Flanders as Robert I.
     According to Meier, one of William's own knights, Gerbod, unhorsed William before killing him, but no motive is known. William's body was carried by his men to the Abbey of Cormeilles, in Normandy, of which he was the founder in 1060, and buried there "amid much sorrow."
     His eldest son, William, Lord of Breteuil succeeded him in Normandy, while his younger son, Roger, inherited Clifford Castle and all William's English holdings.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Adeliza De Toeni FitzOsbern 1035–1066
     Children
          William de Breteuil unknown–1104
          Adeliza FitzOsbern 1057 – unknown
     BURIAL     Cormeilles Abbey, Cormeilles, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 28 Jan 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 84136497.5
     He was 1st Earl of Hereford - After the Conquest the Earldom was granted to William Fitz Osbern (see also MILFORD-HAVEN, M), a great-nephew by marriage of RICHARD I DUKE OF NORMANDY and a companion in arms of WILLIAM I THE CONQUEROR at Hastings. Fitz Osbern's son, the 2nd and last Earl of this creation, had his lands and Earldom confiscated for rebellion.15,16 GAV-26, EDV-27. He was Seigneur de Breteuil.6 Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford was also known as William Fitz Osbern 1st Earl of Hereford.6,1 Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford was also known as Guillaume de Crepon.11

Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford
Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 5.11
Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford was a witness to the Per Racines et Histoire (Herman de Hainaut dit «de Mons» + 03/07/1049 ou ~1050/51 ? comte de Hainaut, Mons, Valenciennes et partie du Brabant (cité charte de Rainier V de donation de Lietgarde à l’Abbaye de Saint-Ghislain entre 1024 et 1039)
ép. ~1040 (contestation pour consanguinité mais approuvé par l’Evêque de Cambrai) Richilde dite «de Hainaut» ° ~1027 + 15/03/1087 (Messine, Sicile) comtesse de Hainaut, etc. (fille de Rainier de Hasnon (fils d’un autre Rainier), marggrave de Valenciennes entre 1045 et 1048/49 ; elle
ép. 2) ~1051 (disp. pap de Léon IX Baudouin VI, comte de Flandres (1067) dit «de Mons» et de Hainaut (1055, Baudouin 1er) + 17/07/1070 > autre postérité : cf Flandres ;
ép. 3) 1070 William FitzOsbern (Guillaume Crespin), seigneur de Breteuil (Normandie), earl of Hereford and Essex, comte de Hainaut +X 20/02/1071 (Mont Cassel) > sans postérité de 3 ) (citée cartulaire de Saint-Bertin) (la prosopographie note l’apparatition du prénom Roger pour l’un de ses fils, inusité chez les Hainaut mais chez les seigneurs de Laon, comtes de Porcien et de Saint-Pol ; une mention la dit parente d’Ade (de Rumigny ?), épouse d’Hugues, Châtelain de Cambrai) )“” with Hermann (?) Count of Hainault and Richilde (?) de Mons, comtesse de Hainaut.17

Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford
a companion of WIlliam the Conqueror at Hastings in 1066 in 1066.18

Guillaume 1 er «FitzOsbern» de Crépon de Breteuil, comte de Breteuil et d’Hereford
He was an intimate friend of William the Conqueror and a major figure in the conquest of England in 1066, having urged the Duke to action on the accession of Harold to the throne, taken the lead in urging the Norman barons to support William, offered sixty ships to the cause, and fighting in the right wing during the invasion. During William's absence from England in 1067 he was joint viceroy, defending the English border against the south Welsh, and during his short tenure as Earl of Hereford he overthrew Maredudd ab Owain, a prince of South Wales. He had a reputation as a despoiler of the Church and for severe treatment of people, including the laborers he forced to build castles while guarding the northern and western borders from his bases in Hereford and Norwich. In 1070 William assigned him the deed of searching the monasteries and confiscating all treasures in them. Eadric "the Wild" was successful in rebelling against him. When Baldwin, Count of Flanders, died, leaving him the guardian of son Arnulf, the count's widow, Richilde, offered him her hand if he would come to her aid. Upon doing this he was slain in battle. between 1066 and 1070.6

Family 2

Richilde (?) de Mons, comtesse de Hainaut b. c 1031, d. 15 Mar 1086

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crépon.pdf, p. 2.
  3. [S96] Unknown author, birthdate per death certificate (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), p. 94, Fitz OSBERN 1.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 181-182, NORMANDY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 March 2020), memorial page for William FitzOsbern (1016–22 Feb 1071), Find A Grave Memorial no. 84136497, citing Cormeilles Abbey, Cormeilles, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/84136497/william-fitzosbern. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 94-95, Fitz OSBERN 2.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 240-241, de TOENI 4:viii.
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120771&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume de Crepon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120772&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVIdied1070. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120771&tree=LEO
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 53-25, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  16. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Hereford Family Page.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Hainaut Hennegau, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hainaut.pdf
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 53-25, p. 58: "...companion of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, Earl of Hereford."
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 95, Fitz OSBERN 2:i.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GuillaumeMontreuildied1103
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00426936&tree=LEO
  22. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 95, Fitz OSBERN 2:ii.
  23. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Courtenay- Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon, p. 140. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 6.

Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany1,2

F, #10166, b. circa 1200, d. 21 October 1221
FatherGuy de Thouars Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond (jure uxoris)1,2,3,4 d. 13 Apr 1213
MotherConstance de Penthievre Duchess of Brittany1,2,3,4 b. c 1162, d. 5 Sep 1201
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited14 Aug 2020
     Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany was born circa 1200.2,4,5 She married Pierre I Mauclerc de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, son of Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy and Yolande de Coucy, between 1212 and 1213;
His 1st wife.6,1,7,3,8,4
Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany died on 21 October 1221; Genealogics says d. 21 Nov 1221; Wikipedia says d. 21 Oct 1221; Med Lands says d. 21 Oct 1221.6,4,5,9
Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany was buried on 24 November 1225 at Abbaye Notre-Dame de Villeneuve, Les Sorinieres, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     5 Sep 1201
     DEATH     21 Oct 1221 (aged 20)
     Alix was the daughter of Constance, Duchess of Brittany and her third husband, Guy of Thouars. Alix was born on or shortly before the 5th of September 1201.
     She was the twin sister of Katherine, Dame de Vitrem, and half sister to Arthur and Eleanor of Brittany, pawns in the political upheaval during King John's reign, held at Corfe Castle until their deaths.
     The Breton barons recognized Alix as Duchess of Brittany after the death of Arthur, instead of her older sister, Eleanor, still captive at Corfe. Her father became regent for Alix until 1206, when King Philip II of France made himself the regent of the duchy in Alix's name.
     In 1213, King Phillip arranged her marriage to his cousin Peter of Dreux, who became the regent. Alix and Peter had three children:
** John, Duke of Brittany
** Yolande, wife of Hugh XI of Lusignan
** Arthur, died at three years

     Alix died in childbirth, succeeded in the duchy by her son John I, but Peter remained the de facto ruler of Brittany until 1237.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guy de Thouars 1160–1214
          Constance Penthièvre Plantagenet-de Bretagne 1161–1201
     Spouse
          Pierre de Dreux 1191–1250
     Siblings
          Catherine de Thouars 1201–1254
     Half Siblings
          Arthur Plantagenet 1187–1203
     Children
          Jean de Bretagne 1217–1286
          Yolande de Bretagne 1218–1272
     BURIAL     Abbaye Notre-Dame de Villeneuve, Les Sorinieres, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 5 Dec 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 62575711.10
     Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany and Pierre I Mauclerc de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond
Per Med Lands:
     "PIERRE de Dreux, son of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux et de Braine & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1187]-at sea off Damietta end-May 1250, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Henricum archiepiscopum Remensem et tres comites, Robertum de Brana, Petrum de Britannia, Iohannem Masticonesem et eorum sorores numero septem" as children of "comiti de Brana Roberto" and his wife Yolande[343]. He swore allegiance at Paris 27 Jan 1213 to Philippe II "Auguste" King of France as PIERRE I "Mauclerc" Duke of Brittany. Comte de Penthièvre by annexation 1214. He was created Earl of Richmond by Henry III King of England 16 Jan 1219 (confiscated Nov 1224, restored Oct 1229, confiscated again Jan 1235). “Johannes comes Matisconensis” names “frater meus P. comes Britannie” in a charter dated Aug 1234[344]. He surrendered the duchy of Brittany to his son in 1237, after which he is sometimes referred to as PIERRE de Braine. William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Pierre de Drues cuens de Bretaigne" among those who took part in the crusade from France which landed at Acre in 1239[345]. He accompanied King Louis IX on crusade in 1249 and was captured at Faraskur 6 Apr 1250, after being wounded at the battle of Mansurah. He died at sea on his return to western Europe.
     "m firstly ([Mar 1213/Oct 1214]) ALIX de Thouars Dss of Brittany, daughter of GUY de Thouars & his second wife Constance Dss of Brittany ([1200]-21 Oct 1221, bur 24 Nov 1225 Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame). The Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ names "Adelicia" as the daughter of "Constantia filia Conani" and her third husband "Guidoni de Thoarcio", stating that she married "domno Petro Mauclerc"[346]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "unam filiam Mabiliam" as the child of "Constantiam comitis Conani filia" and her [third] husband "Guido frater vicecomitem de Tuart"[347]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records that daughter of Guy de Thouars and Constance de Bretagne married "Pierre Mauclerc, fils de Robert comte de Dreux"[348]. A Chronicon Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum names "Alipsam et Catherinam" as the two daughters of "Wido…comes de Thoarcio" and "Constantiam Gaufridi Ducis Britanniæ relictam", stating that Alix married "Petro Comiti Drocarum"[349]. The Chronicon Britannicum records the death "XII Kal Nov" in 1221 of "Aalis Ducissa Britanniæ"[350].
     "Betrothed (before 21 Jul 1229) to [MARIE] de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Alix of Jerusalem Ctss of Jaffa ([before 1215]-[1251/53]). A Papal prohibition on the marriage between "comes Britannie" and "filiam reginam Cypri", by reason of 4o consanguinity, is dated at Pérouse 21 Jul 1229[351]. It is not known which daughter was betrothed to the Duke of Brittany, but it is a reasonable assumption that it was Marie who was the older of the queen’s two daughters.
     "m secondly ([1230]) NICOLE, daughter of --- (-Feb 1232, bur Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame). Her marriage is confirmed by an epitaph at Villeneuve which records the burial of "Nicolle, la mère monsour Olivier de Machecou"[352], read together with the charter dated 10 Mar 1258 under which "Jehan duc de Bretaigne conte de Richemont" confirmed an agreement between "Morice de Belle Ville, par raison de Jehanne sa femme, dame de la Roche sur Yon et de Luçon" and "Olivier nostre frère" concerning "la terre de Machecoul et de Saint Philbert"[353]. No indication has been found of Nicole’s parentage.
     "m thirdly (before Jan 1236) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Montaigu Dame de Montaigu et de La Garnache [en Poitou], widow of HUGUES de Thouars Seigneur de Montaigu, daughter of --- ([1188/90]-after 27 Nov 1241). "Petrus dux Britanie, comes Richemundie, dominus Gasnapie et Margarita uxor eius" confirmed donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1236[354]. The difficulties connected with identifying Marguerite’s correct parentage are discussed in the section showing the seigneurs de Montaigu in the document POITOU -WESTERN. "Margarita uxor…Petri de Brana, Montis Acuti et Gasnapie domina" confirmed the same donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1239[355]. "Margarita domina Gasnapie, Montis Acuti et Machecolii" confirmed the donation of a marsh made to Buzay by "le curé de Bouin" by charter dated Jul 1239[356]. "Margarita Montis Acuti et Guasnapiæ domina et hæres" donated property to the abbey of Geneston, with the consent of "viro nostro Petro de Brana", by charter dated 27 Nov 1241[357]. A charter dated 27 Nov 1241, contained in a vidimus dated 6 May 1644, records that “Margarita Montis Acuti et Ganachiæ domina et heres” donated property to the hospital at Montaigu, with the consent of “viro nostro Petro de Brana”[358].
Med Lands cites:
[343] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[344] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome II, 2303, p. 269.
[345] William of Tyre Continuator, XXXIII.XLIV, p. 413.
[346] Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ post conquestum Angliæ, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 569.
[347] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859.
[348] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 89.
[349] Ex Fragmentis Chronicorum Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 243.
[350] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 331.
[351] Le Mans Evêché, no. 263, pp. 35-6.
[352] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxxi, quoting Bibl. nat. ms. fr. 22329, p. 717, and Du Paz (1619), p. 237.
[353] Rays, Vol. II, CCXX, p. 254.
[354] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Mor Pr, I, 901.
[355] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Fontenau, I, 365, and extract D. Mor Pr, I, 860 (latter with incorrect date 1229).
[356] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxix, quoting Archives L-Inf., H 24, copy Bibl. nat. ms. lat. 17092, p. 89.
[357] La Borderie (1888), CXVII, p. 191.
[358] Montaigu Aumônerie-Hôpital, II, p. 12.11


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 29.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:810.4


Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany
Per Genealogics:
     "Alix de Thouars was born about 1200, the daughter of Guy de Thouars and Constance, duchesse de Bretagne. Alix's older half-brother was Arthur I, duke of Brittany and her half-sister Eleanor, 'Fair Maid of Brittany', children of her mother Constance and her first husband Geoffrey. Upon the death of Geoffrey's brother Richard I, king of England, a power struggle commenced between her brother Arthur and King John of England. At the Battle of Mirebeau in 1202, Arthur and Eleanor were captured. Eleanor was imprisoned at Corfe Castle and her brother Arthur disappeared, probably murdered.
     "The Breton barons recognised Alix as duchess of Brittany after the death of her brother Arthur, instead of her older half-sister Eleanor, perhaps fearing King John's claims to rule Brittany in representation of the imprisoned Eleanor's rights. Her father Guy became regent for Alix until 1206, when King Philippe II August of France made himself the regent of the duchy in Alix's name.
     "In 1213 the king arranged her marriage to his cousin Pierre, comte de Dreux, son of Robert II, comte de Dreux, and Yolande de Coucy. Pierre then became regent. Alix and Pierre had three children of whom Jean and Yolande would have progeny. Alix died in childbirth on 21 November 1221, without having exercised much control over her own inheritance. She was succeeded in the duchy by her son Jean I, but Pierre remained the de facto ruler of Brittany until 1237 when he was succeeded by his son Jean I."4

Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany
Per Med Lands: " ALIX de Thouars ([1200]-21 Oct 1221, bur 24 Nov 1225 Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame). The Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ names "Adelicia" as the daughter of "Constantia filia Conani" and her third husband "Guidoni de Thoarcio", stating that she married "domno Petro Mauclerc"[320]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "unam filiam Mabiliam" as the child of "Constantiam comitis Conani filia" and her [third] husband "Guido frater vicecomitem de Tuart"[321]. A Chronicon Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum names "Alipsam et Catherinam" as the two daughters of "Wido…comes de Thoarcio" and "Constantiam Gaufridi Ducis Britanniæ relictam", stating that Alix married "Petro Comiti Drocarum"[322]. She succeeded her half-brother in 1203 as ALIX Dss of Brittany, Ctss of Richmond. The marriage contract between "G. de Thoarco comes Britannie...A filia mea quam habeo de comitissa Britannie Constancia" and "Alanus filius comitis...Henricus filius predicti Alani primogenitus" is dated 1209[323]. Her first betrothal is confirmed by the charter dated 1209 under which "Alanus comes, Henrici comitis filius" granted letters of assurance to "domino Andreæ de Vitreio", with the consent of "Henrico filio meo et Alici uxori eius"[324]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records that daughter of Guy de Thouars and Constance de Bretagne married "Pierre Mauclerc, fils de Robert comte de Dreux"[325]. The Chronicon Britannicum records the death "XII Kal Nov" in 1221 of "Aalis Ducissa Britanniæ"[326]. Betrothed (contract Paris 7 Dec 1209, broken) to HENRI d'Avaugour, son of ALAIN de Bretagne Comte de Penthièvre & his second wife Adélaïde --- ([1205]-6 Oct 1281, bur Dinan). He succeeded his father in 1212 as Comte de Penthièvre. m ([Mar 1213/Oct 1214]) as his first wife, PIERRE de Dreux, son of ROBERT II Comte de Dreux et de Braine & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1187]-at sea off Damietta end-May 1250, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). He swore allegiance at Paris 27 Jan 1213 to Philippe II "Auguste" King of France as PIERRE I "Mauclerc" Duke of Brittany. Comte de Penthièvre by annexation 1214. Created Earl of Richmond by Henry III King of England 16 Jan 1218/19 (confiscated Nov 1224, restored Oct 1229, confiscated again Jan 1235). He surrendered the Duchy of Brittany to his son in 1237, after which he called himself PIERRE de Braine. He accompanied King Louis IX on crusade in 1249 and was captured at Faraskur 6 Apr 1250, after being wounded at the battle of Mansourah. He died at sea on his way back to western Europe."
Med Lands cites:
[320] Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ post conquestum Angliæ, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 569.
[321] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859.
[322] Ex Fragmentis Chronicorum Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 243.
[323] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 812.
[324] La Borderie (1888), LXXIX, p. 151.
[325] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 89.
[326] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 331.9


Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany
Per Wikipedia:
     "Alix of Thouars at an unknown age (1200 – 21 October 1221) (in Breton Alis) ruled as Duchess of Brittany from 1203 until her death. She was also Countess of Richmond in the peerage of England.[b][1][2]
Life
     "Alix was born in 1200. She was the daughter of Constance, Duchess of Brittany and Guy of Thouars.[3] According to several French historians, Constance died after giving birth to Alix's sisters Catherine and Margaret.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Alix's older half-brother was Arthur I, Duke of Brittany and her half-sister was Eleanor, Fair Maid of Brittany, the children of Constance and Geoffrey Plantagenet. Upon the death of Richard I of England, a power struggle commenced between her half-brother Arthur and John, King of England. At the Battle of Mirebeau in 1202, Arthur and Eleanor were captured. Arthur was imprisoned at the Château de Falaise and in 1203 disappeared. Eleanor was imprisoned at Corfe Castle.
     "The Breton barons recognized Alix as Duchess of Brittany after the death of Arthur, instead of Eleanor. This was due to fears that John might claim to rule Brittany as regent for the imprisoned Eleanor. Alix's father Guy became regent for Alix until 1206, when Philip II of France made himself the regent of the duchy in Alix's name. King Philip II broke off the betrothal of Alix and the Breton prince Henry of Penthièvre, [c] and turned to his French cousin Peter of Dreux, as Alix's husband.[11][12] Pierre married Alix on 27 January 1213, and paid homage to the French king for Brittany.
     "In 1218 Pierre and Alix were recognized by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke regent of England as Earl and Countess of Richmond in place of Eleanor, who would never be released from imprisonment.
     "Alix died on 21 October 1221, without having exercised much control over her own inheritance. She was succeeded in the duchy by her son John I, but Peter remained the de facto ruler of Brittany as John I's regent until 1237.
Children
1. John I, Duke of Brittany (ca. 1217-1286)[13]
2. Yolande of Brittany, (1218 - 1272), married Hugh XI of Lusignan, Count of Angoulême and Count of Marche
3. Arthur of Brittany (1220–1224), betrothed to Jeanne de Craon, daughter of Amaury I de Craon and Jeanne des Roches

References
1. Chronicon Britannicum
2. Judith Everard and Michael Jones, The Charters of Duchess Constance of Brittany and her Family (1171-1221)
3. John W. Baldwin, The Government of Philip Augustus: Foundations of French Royal Power in the Middle Ages, (University of California Press, 1986), 239.
4. According to historians Dom Morice, Dom Charles Taillandiers, Prudence-Guillaume de Roujoux and Arthur Le Moyne de La Borderie, Constance and Guy had a third daughter, Margaret.
5. Pierre-Hyacinthe Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome premier, p. 129 and 150
6. Charles Taillandier, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome second, p. IX
7. Prudence Guillaume de Roujoux, Histoire des rois et des ducs de Bretagne, Tome second, p. 231
8. According to historians Pierre Daru and François Manet, Constance and Guy had three daughters.
9. Pierre Daru, Histoire de Bretagne, Tome premier, p. 407
10. François Manet, Histoire de la Petite-Bretagne, ou Bretagne Armorique, depuis ses premiers habitans connus, Tome second, p. 308
11. Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis
12. Brittany, Julia M.H. Smith, Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, Ed. William W. Kibler, (Garland Publishing Inc., 1995 ), 148.
13. Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii
Notes
a. Her name is sometimes spelt Alice (See Everard and Jones, The Charters of Duchess Constance of Brittany and her Family (1171-1221))
b. Although Eleanor of Brittany was styled Countess of Richmond as well as titular Duchess of Brittany from 1203 to 1219 by her uncle John, this was only a titular title, as Alix herself was styled Countess of Richmond and even made charters about this estate (See Everard and Jones, The Charters of Duchess Constance of Brittany and her Family (1171-1221), p 169).
c. Henry and his family would later become dispossessed of the Countship of Penthièvre by Pierre Mauclerc, who would then bestow the title on Alix's daughter Yolande of Brittany
See also
Dukes of Brittany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kings_and_dukes_of_Brittany_family_tree.5 " GAV-22 EDV-22.

Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany
Per Genealogy.EU: "[1m.] Alix, Dss de Bretagne, *1201, +1221; m.1213 Pierre de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne (+1250.)12" She was Countess of Richmond between 1203 and 1221.5 She was Duchess of Brittany between 1203 and 1221.5

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Thouars 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/thouars2.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.6. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Thouars: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005247&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alix,_Duchess_of_Brittany. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), lin 135-29, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005246&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#AlixDssBretagnedied1221MPierreIA. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 November 2019), memorial page for Alix de Thouars (5 Sep 1201–21 Oct 1221), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62575711, citing Abbaye Notre-Dame de Villeneuve, Les Sorinieres, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62575711/alix_de-thouars. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#PierreIdied1250MAlixDssBretagneB
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Thouars 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/thouars2.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I 'le Roux': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005252&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#JeanIdied1286B
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
    Pierre I Mauclerc.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#Arthurdiedafter1223
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arthur de Bretagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005251&tree=LEO

Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul1

F, #10167, b. between 1188 and 1190, d. 27 November 1241
FatherMaurice II de Commequiers1
Last Edited24 Nov 2019
     Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul was born between 1188 and 1190.1,2 She married Hugues I de Thouars Vicomte de Thouars, son of Geoffrey V de Thouars Vicomte de Thouars and Aénor/Aimee de Lusignan, before 1203;
Her 1st husband.3,2 Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul married Pierre I Mauclerc de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, son of Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy and Yolande de Coucy, in 1235;
His 3rd wife; her 2nd husband.4,1,5
Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul died on 27 November 1241.1,2,3
     Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul was a witness to the Per Med Lands:
     "PIERRE de Dreux, son of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux et de Braine & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1187]-at sea off Damietta end-May 1250, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Henricum archiepiscopum Remensem et tres comites, Robertum de Brana, Petrum de Britannia, Iohannem Masticonesem et eorum sorores numero septem" as children of "comiti de Brana Roberto" and his wife Yolande[343]. He swore allegiance at Paris 27 Jan 1213 to Philippe II "Auguste" King of France as PIERRE I "Mauclerc" Duke of Brittany. Comte de Penthièvre by annexation 1214. He was created Earl of Richmond by Henry III King of England 16 Jan 1219 (confiscated Nov 1224, restored Oct 1229, confiscated again Jan 1235). “Johannes comes Matisconensis” names “frater meus P. comes Britannie” in a charter dated Aug 1234[344]. He surrendered the duchy of Brittany to his son in 1237, after which he is sometimes referred to as PIERRE de Braine. William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Pierre de Drues cuens de Bretaigne" among those who took part in the crusade from France which landed at Acre in 1239[345]. He accompanied King Louis IX on crusade in 1249 and was captured at Faraskur 6 Apr 1250, after being wounded at the battle of Mansurah. He died at sea on his return to western Europe.
     "m firstly ([Mar 1213/Oct 1214]) ALIX de Thouars Dss of Brittany, daughter of GUY de Thouars & his second wife Constance Dss of Brittany ([1200]-21 Oct 1221, bur 24 Nov 1225 Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame). The Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ names "Adelicia" as the daughter of "Constantia filia Conani" and her third husband "Guidoni de Thoarcio", stating that she married "domno Petro Mauclerc"[346]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "unam filiam Mabiliam" as the child of "Constantiam comitis Conani filia" and her [third] husband "Guido frater vicecomitem de Tuart"[347]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records that daughter of Guy de Thouars and Constance de Bretagne married "Pierre Mauclerc, fils de Robert comte de Dreux"[348]. A Chronicon Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum names "Alipsam et Catherinam" as the two daughters of "Wido…comes de Thoarcio" and "Constantiam Gaufridi Ducis Britanniæ relictam", stating that Alix married "Petro Comiti Drocarum"[349]. The Chronicon Britannicum records the death "XII Kal Nov" in 1221 of "Aalis Ducissa Britanniæ"[350].
     "Betrothed (before 21 Jul 1229) to [MARIE] de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Alix of Jerusalem Ctss of Jaffa ([before 1215]-[1251/53]). A Papal prohibition on the marriage between "comes Britannie" and "filiam reginam Cypri", by reason of 4o consanguinity, is dated at Pérouse 21 Jul 1229[351]. It is not known which daughter was betrothed to the Duke of Brittany, but it is a reasonable assumption that it was Marie who was the older of the queen’s two daughters.
     "m secondly ([1230]) NICOLE, daughter of --- (-Feb 1232, bur Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame). Her marriage is confirmed by an epitaph at Villeneuve which records the burial of "Nicolle, la mère monsour Olivier de Machecou"[352], read together with the charter dated 10 Mar 1258 under which "Jehan duc de Bretaigne conte de Richemont" confirmed an agreement between "Morice de Belle Ville, par raison de Jehanne sa femme, dame de la Roche sur Yon et de Luçon" and "Olivier nostre frère" concerning "la terre de Machecoul et de Saint Philbert"[353]. No indication has been found of Nicole’s parentage.
     "m thirdly (before Jan 1236) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Montaigu Dame de Montaigu et de La Garnache [en Poitou], widow of HUGUES de Thouars Seigneur de Montaigu, daughter of --- ([1188/90]-after 27 Nov 1241). "Petrus dux Britanie, comes Richemundie, dominus Gasnapie et Margarita uxor eius" confirmed donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1236[354]. The difficulties connected with identifying Marguerite’s correct parentage are discussed in the section showing the seigneurs de Montaigu in the document POITOU -WESTERN. "Margarita uxor…Petri de Brana, Montis Acuti et Gasnapie domina" confirmed the same donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1239[355]. "Margarita domina Gasnapie, Montis Acuti et Machecolii" confirmed the donation of a marsh made to Buzay by "le curé de Bouin" by charter dated Jul 1239[356]. "Margarita Montis Acuti et Guasnapiæ domina et hæres" donated property to the abbey of Geneston, with the consent of "viro nostro Petro de Brana", by charter dated 27 Nov 1241[357]. A charter dated 27 Nov 1241, contained in a vidimus dated 6 May 1644, records that “Margarita Montis Acuti et Ganachiæ domina et heres” donated property to the hospital at Montaigu, with the consent of “viro nostro Petro de Brana”[358].
Med Lands cites:
[343] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[344] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome II, 2303, p. 269.
[345] William of Tyre Continuator, XXXIII.XLIV, p. 413.
[346] Genealogia Comitum Richemundiæ post conquestum Angliæ, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 569.
[347] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859.
[348] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 89.
[349] Ex Fragmentis Chronicorum Comitum Pictaviæ et Aquitaniæ Ducum, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 243.
[350] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 331.
[351] Le Mans Evêché, no. 263, pp. 35-6.
[352] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxxi, quoting Bibl. nat. ms. fr. 22329, p. 717, and Du Paz (1619), p. 237.
[353] Rays, Vol. II, CCXX, p. 254.
[354] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Mor Pr, I, 901.
[355] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Fontenau, I, 365, and extract D. Mor Pr, I, 860 (latter with incorrect date 1229).
[356] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxix, quoting Archives L-Inf., H 24, copy Bibl. nat. ms. lat. 17092, p. 89.
[357] La Borderie (1888), CXVII, p. 191.
[358] Montaigu Aumônerie-Hôpital, II, p. 12.
with Pierre I Mauclerc de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond and Alix de Thouars Duchess of Brittany.6

Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul
Marguerite de Montaigu, Dame de Machecoul (*1188/90 +1241) dau.of Maurice II de Commequiers.1

Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul
Per Wikipedia: "[Pierre's] third wife was Marguerite de Montaigu, Lady of Montaigu, Commequiers, La Garnache[b] then Machecoul,[c] and widow of Hugh I de Thouars (died 1230), a brother to Guy of Thouars; this made Marguerite a paternal line aunt of Alix. They married by 1236, and had no issue."7

Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul
Per Med Lands: "MARGUERITE de Montaigu ([1188/90]-after 27 Nov 1241). Dame de Montaigu et de La Garnache [en Poitou]Blanchard cites various sources which confirm her first marriage. “Hugo de Thoarcio dominus Montis Acuti et Margarita uxor mea” donated “Petrum ferrarium” to Coudrie by charter dated 1207[1550]. “Hugo de Thoarcio dominus Gasnapie...et Margarita uxor mea” donated “querebam super gentes pacis...in tota terra que pertinet domino Gasnapie” to Coudrie by charter dated 3 Sep 1213[1551]. Dame de Palluau. “Hugo de Thoarcio dominus Gasnapie et Paludelli et...M. uxor eius domina eorundem castrorum” donated “P. Fabri de Paludello” to Coudrie by charter dated 1218[1552]. “Hugo de Thoarcio et domina Margarita uxor eius, Montis Acuti et Guasnapie domini” donated property to “monachis de Salartena” by charter dated 1225[1553]. "Petrus dux Britanie, comes Richemundie, dominus Gasnapie et Margarita uxor eius" confirmed donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1236[1554]. "Margarita uxor…Petri de Brana, Montis Acuti et Gasnapie domina" confirmed the same donations to the abbey Blanche de Noirmoutier by charter dated 1239[1555]. "Margarita domina Gasnapie, Montis Acuti et Machecolii" confirmed the donation of a marsh made to Buzay by "le curé de Bouin" by charter dated Jul 1239[1556]. "Margarita Montis Acuti et Guasnapiæ domina et hæres" donated property to the abbey of Geneston, with the consent of "viro nostro Petro de Brana", by charter dated 27 Nov 1241[1557]. A charter dated 27 Nov 1241, contained in a vidimus dated 6 May 1644, records that “Margarita Montis Acuti et Ganachiæ domina et heres” donated property to the hospital at Montaigu, with the consent of “viro nostro Petro de Brana”[1558]. m firstly (before 1203) HUGUES de Thouars Seigneur de Montaigu, son of GEOFFROY [IV] Vicomte de Thouars & his wife Aumou --- (-[1229/30]). m secondly (before Jan 1236) as his third wife, PIERRE [I] "Mauclerc" Duke of Brittany, son of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux et de Braine & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1187]-at sea off Damietta end-May 1250, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived).]"
Med Lands cites:
[1550] Coudrie, XVIII, p. 171.
[1551] Coudrie, XXXIII, p. 186.
[1552] Coudrie, XLVIII, p. 198.
[1553] Bas-Poitou (1877), XV, p. 192.
[1554] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Mor Pr, I, 901.
[1555] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxviii, quoting D. Fontenau, I, 365, and extract D. Mor Pr, I, 860 (latter with incorrect date 1229).
[1556] Rays, Vol. I, Introduction, p. cxxix, quoting Archives L-Inf., H 24, copy Bibl. nat. ms. lat. 17092, p. 89.
[1557] La Borderie (1888), CXVII, p. 191.
[1558] Montaigu Aumônerie-Hôpital, II, p. 12.8
Marguerite de Montagu Dame de Machecoul was also known as Marguerite (?) Dame de Montaigu.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Commequiers: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00485762&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Thouars 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/thouars2.html
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), lin 135-29, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005246&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#PierreIdied1250MAlixDssBretagneB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_I,_Duke_of_Brittany. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/poitwest.htm#MargueriteMontaiguM1HuguesThouars

Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy1,2

M, #10168, b. circa 1154, d. 28 December 1218
FatherRobert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle3,4 b. c 1123, d. 11 Oct 1188
MotherAgnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy3,4 b. 1130, d. bt Jul 1204 - 1218
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy was born circa 1154.5,1,4 He married Matilda/Mahaut (?) de Bourgogne, Dame de Montpensier, Comtesse de Grignon, Dame de Vitteaux, daughter of Raimond (?) Comte de Grignon, seigneur de Montpensier and Agnes de Thiern Dame de Montpensier-en-Auvergne, circa 1178;
Her 4th husband (per Genealogy.EU Capet 9 page); his 1st wife.6,1,7,8,9,4,10 Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy and Matilda/Mahaut (?) de Bourgogne, Dame de Montpensier, Comtesse de Grignon, Dame de Vitteaux were divorced in 1181.6,1,8,10 Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy married Yolande de Coucy, daughter of Raoul I de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy, Marle and le Fère and Agnes "la Boiteuse" (?) de Hainaut, in 1184;
His 2nd wife.5,3,11,12,4,10,13
Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy died on 28 December 1218.5,1,4
Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy was buried after 28 December 1218 at L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1154
     DEATH     28 Dec 1218 (aged 63–64)
     Robert II of Dreux, was the Count of Dreux and Braine, he was the eldest surviving son of Robert I, Count of Dreux, and Agnes de Baudemont, countess of Braine, and a grandson of King Louis VI of France.
     He participated in the Third Crusade, at the Siege of Acre and the Battle of Arsuf. He took part in the war in Normandy against the Angevin Kings between 1193 and 1204. Count Robert had seized the castle of Nonancourt from Richard I of England while he was imprisoned in Germany in late-1193. The count also participated in the Albigensian Crusade in 1210. In 1214 he fought alongside King Philip Augustus at the Battle of Bouvines.
His first marriage with Mahaut of Burgundy in 1178 ended with separation in 1181 and produced no children. The excuse for the annulment was consanguinity. Mahaut and Robert were both great-great grandchildren William I, Count of Burgundy and his wife Etiennete and they were both Capetian descendants of Robert II of France
     His second marriage to Yolande de Coucy produced several children:
Robert III (c. 1185–1234), Count of Dreux and Braine,
Peter (c. 1190–1250), Duke of Brittany.
Henry of Dreux (c. 1193–1240) Archbishop of Reims and
John of Dreux (c. 1198–1239), Count of Vienne and Mâcon.
Philippa (1192–1242), who married Henry II of Bar.
Alix of Dreux, married Walter IV of Vienne, Lord of Salins, then married Renard II of Choiseul.
     Count Robert's tomb bore the following inscription: "Born from the race of kings, and a devoted guardian of the laws, Robert, Count of Braine, here rests covered, and lies buried by the remains of his mother Agnes."
     It is also dated Anno Gracie M. CC. XVIII. die innocentum, that is, "In the Year of Grace 1218, on the Feast of the Holy Innocents."
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert I de Dreux 1123–1188
          Agnes de Baudemont 1130–1204
     Spouse
          Yolande de Coucy de Dreux 1170–1222
     Siblings
          Philippe de Dreux, de Beauvais 1158–1217
          Jean I de Dreux 1164–1208
     Half Siblings
          Adèle de Dreux de Châtillon, de Nesle 1145–1210
     Children
          Alix de Dreux de Vienne unknown–1258
          Robert III de Dreux 1185–1234
          Pierre de Dreux 1191–1250
          Jeanne de Dreux 1199–1275
     BURIAL     L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 9 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91657764.3,14
     GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy
Per Genealogics:
     "Robert II was born about 1154, the eldest surviving son of Robert I, comte de Dreux, du Perche, de Braine-sur-Vesle, and his third wife Agnès de Baudement, dame de Braine, de Fère-en-Tardenois, et de Nesle.
     "Robert participated in the Third Crusade, at the Siege of Acre and the Battle of Arsuf. He took part in the war in Normandy against the Angevin kings between 1193 and 1204. Robert had seized the castle of Nonancourt from Richard I of England while he was imprisoned in Germany in late 1193. He also participated in the Albigensian Crusade in 1210. In 1214 he fought alongside King Philippe II August at the Battle of Bouvines.
     "About 1178 Robert married Mahaud de Bourgogne, comtesse de Grignon, dame de Vitteaux, widow of Gui I, comte de Nevers et de Tonnerre, and of Guy I (Peter), comte de Nevers, and the daughter of Raymond de Bourgogne, comte de Grignon, seigneur de Vitteaux, and Agnès de Thiern, dame de Montpensier. The marriage ended with separation in 1181 and produced no children. About 1184 Robert married Yolande de Coucy, daughter of Raoul de Coucy, sire de Coucy et Marle, and his first wife Agnes de Hainault. They had five sons and seven daughters, of whom two sons and four daughters would have progeny. Robert died on 28 December 1218, and like his father he was buried in the abbey church of Saint-Yved de Braine."4

Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy
Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT [II] de Dreux, son of ROBERT [I] "le Grand" Seigneur de Dreux & his second wife Agnès de Baudemont dame de Braine ([1153]-28 Dec 1218, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "duos episcopos et comitem Robertum II de Brana et sorores duas eorum" as children of "comitem de Brana Robertum domnum" & his second wife[66]. "Robertus…comes Drocarum et Brane et…et uxor mea Agnes comitissa Brane" donated revenue from property "apud Qualliacum" to Paris Hôtel-Dieu, with the consent of "Roberti filii nostri", by charter dated 1178[67]. "Robertus comes frater…regis Francorum Ludovici et…uxor mea Agnes comitissa Brenensis et filii nostri Robertus dominus Drocarum, Willelmus et Iohannes" donated property to Sainte Geneviève by charter dated 1184[68]. "R comes dominus Droc et Bran" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe naming "R pater meus comes…frater Ludovici…regis Francie" by charter dated Jul 1212[69]. Seigneur de Nesles 1170. Having married the widow of the Comte de Nevers, he administered the counties of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre during the minority of his stepson Comte Guillaume V. He succeeded his father 1184 as Comte de Dreux, and in 1188 as Comte de Braine. "Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum" donated property "in…Rupis Fortis" to Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, with the consent of "uxoris mee Yolendis", by charter dated to [1184/1200][70]. “Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum et Braye, et Yolendis comitissa uxor mea” donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris, with the consent of “Roberti filii nostri”, by charter dated 1208[71]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1218 of "comes Robertus" in the same week as the marriage of his daughter Philippa[72]. The Chronicon Fiscannensis Cœnobii records the death in 1218 of "Robertus Comes Drocensis et Branæ, filius Agnetis Comitissæ"[73].
     "m firstly (1177, separated for consanguinity 1181) as her fourth husband, MATHILDE de Bourgogne Ctss de Grignon, widow firstly of EUDES [II] Seigneur d'Issoudun, secondly of GUY [I] Comte de Nevers Comte d'Auxerre et Comte de Tonnerre, and thirdly of PIERRE de Flandre, daughter of RAIMOND de Bourgogne [Capet] Comte de Grignon & his wife Agnès de Thiers dame de Montpensier (1150-Fontevrault 1192, bur there). The Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorenses records that, after the death of "Guido comes", his wife "Mathildis" married "Petro Flandrensis" and after his death "Roberto", stating that they were separated for consanguinity soon after their marriage[74].
     "m secondly (1184) YOLANDE de Coucy, daughter of RAOUL [I] de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy & his first wife Agnès de Hainaut ([1164]-Braine, Aisne 18 Mar 1222, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Iolandem…Agnetis…tercia…Ada" as the three daughters of "Radulphus de Cocy" & his wife, specifying that Yolande married "Roberto comiti de Drecis et de Braina, filioque Roberti comitis fratris Ludovici regis Francorum"[75]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the two daughters of "Rodulfo de Marla" & his wife Agnes as "mater…comitis de Grandiprato, altera Hyolenz [uxor] comiti de Brana Roberto"[76]. "Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum" donated property "in…Rupis Fortis" to Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, with the consent of "uxoris mee Yolendis", by charter dated to [1184/1200][77]. “Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum et Braye, et Yolendis comitissa uxor mea” donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris, with the consent of “Roberti filii nostri”, by charter dated 1208[78]. "R comes dominus Droc et Bran" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "Agnetis uxoris eius [R patris meis]…comitisse matris mee…et Yolande comitisse uxore mee et liberorum meorum" by charter dated Jul 1212[79]. The necrology of Reims [Saint-Rémi] records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Ioles Brane comitissa"[80]."
Med Lands cites:
[66] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846.
[67] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 13, p. 6.
[68] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 238, quoting Extrait du cartulaire de l’abbaye de S. Genevieve de Paris.
[69] Notre-Dame de la Trappe II, p. 2.
[70] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, LXXII, p. 88.
[71] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XVII, p. 299.
[72] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 909.
[73] Ex Chronico Fiscannensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 350.
[74] Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorensis, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 249.
[75] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 509.
[76] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[77] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, LXXII, p. 88.
[78] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XVII, p. 299.
[79] Notre-Dame de la Trappe Tome II, p. 2.
[80] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 274.15


Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy
Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert II of Dreux (1154 – 28 December 1218), Count of Dreux and Braine, was the eldest surviving son of Robert I, Count of Dreux, and Agnes de Baudemont, countess of Braine, and a grandson of King Louis VI of France.[1]
     "He participated in the Third Crusade, at the Siege of Acre[2] and the Battle of Arsuf. He took part in the war in Normandy against the Angevin Kings between 1193 and 1204. Count Robert had seized the castle of Nonancourt from Richard I of England while he was imprisoned in Germany in late 1193.[3] The count also participated in the Albigensian Crusade in 1210.[4] In 1214 he fought alongside King Philip Augustus at the Battle of Bouvines.[5]
Marriages and Children
     "His first marriage with Mahaut of Burgundy (1150–1192) in 1178 ended with separation in 1181 and produced no children. The excuse for the annulment was consanguinity. Mahaut and Robert were both great-great grandchildren of William I, Count of Burgundy and his wife Etiennete and they were both Capetian descendants of Robert II of France.[6]
     "His second marriage to Yolande de Coucy (1164–1222), the daughter of Raoul I, seigneur de Coucy and Agnès de Hainaut,[7] produced several children:[8]
** Robert III (c. 1185–1234), Count of Dreux and Braine.[9]
** Peter ? (c. 1190–1250), Duke of Brittany.[10]
** Henry of Dreux (c. 1193–1240), Archbishop of Reims.[11]
** John of Dreux (c. 1198–1239), Count of Vienne and Mâcon.[12]
** Philippa of Dreux (1192–1242), who married Henry II of Bar.[13]
** Alix of Dreux, married Walter IV of Vienne, Lord of Salins,[9] then married Renard II of Choiseul.[14]
** Agnes of Dreux (1195-1258), married Stephen III of Auxonne.[13]
** Yolande of Dreux, married Raoul II of Lusignan.[7]

Tomb
     "Count Robert's tomb bore the following inscription, in Medieval Latin hexameters with internal rhyme:
Stirpe satus r?gum, pius et cust?dia l?gum,
Brann? R?bertus comes h?c requiescit opertus,
Et jacet Agn?tis situs ad vest?gia m?tris.

     "Of which the translation is: "Born from the race of kings, and a devoted guardian of the laws, Robert, Count of Braine, here rests covered, and lies buried by the remains of his mother Agnes."
     "It is also dated Anno Graci? M. CC. XVIII. die innocentum, that is, "In the Year of Grace 1218, on the Feast of the Holy Innocents."
Notes
1. Gislebertus of Mons 2005, p. 110.
2. Nicholson 1973, p. 184.
3. Power 2008, p. 271.
4. Sumption 1999, p. 122.
5. Fedorenko 2013, p. 170-171.
6. Petit 1889, p. 32.
7. Pollock 2015, p. 145.
8. Pollock 2015, p. 92.
9. Evergates 2007, p. 229.
10. Setton, Wolff & Hazard 1969, p. 855.
11. Setton, Wolff & Hazard 1969, p. 836.
12. Setton, Wolff & Hazard 1969, p. 841.
13. Richard 1983, p. xxviii.
14. Evergates 1999, p. 102.
References
** Evergates, Theodore (1999). Aristocratic women in medieval France. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Evergates, Theodore (2007). The Aristocracy in the County of Champagne, 1100-1300. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Fedorenko, Gregory (2013). "The Thirteenth-Century "Chronique de Normandie"". In Bates, David (ed.) Anglo-Norman Studies XXXV: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2012. The Boydell Press.
** Gislebertus of Mons (2005). Chronicle of Hainaut. Translated by Napran, Laura. Boydell Press.
** Mémoires de la Société des lettres, sciences et arts de Bar-le-Duc, Vol.2, Ed. Société des lettres, sciences et arts de Bar-le-Duc, Contant Laguerre Imprimeur Editeur, 1903.
** Nicholson, Robert Lawrence (1973). Joscelyn III and the fall of the crusader states 1134-1199. Brill.
** Petit, Ernest, ed. (1889). Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race Capétienne. Vol.3. Imprimerie Darantiere.
** Pollock, M. A. (2015). Scotland, England and France After the Loss of Normandy, 1204-1296: Auld Amitie. Boydell & Brewer.
** Power, Daniel (2008). The Norman Frontier in the Twelfth and Early Thirteenth Centuries. Cambridge University Press.
** Richard, Jean (1983). Lloyd, Simon (ed.) Saint Louis, Crusader King of France. Translated by Birrell, Jean. Cambridge University Press.
** Setton, Kenneth M; Wolff, Robert Lee; Hazard, Harry W., eds. (1969). A History of the Crusades. Vol. 2. University of Wisconsin Press.
** Sumption, Jonathan (1999). The Albigensian Crusade. Faber and Faber."10

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. page 29.0
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. page 244.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4
He was Count of Dreux between 1184 and 1218.10

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  2. [S1967] J Bunot, "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005: "Le Bouteiller/Breaute (Baillon)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 27 Sept 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005."
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013796&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), lin 135-28, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html#MRM
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaud de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013797&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Dreux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028229&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Coucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013798&tree=LEO
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 November 2019), memorial page for Robert II de Dreux (1154–28 Dec 1218), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91657764, citing L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91657764/robert_ii-de_dreux. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#RobertIIDreuxdied1218B
  16. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I10809
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Dreux, Dame de Traves, de Scey-sur-Saône et de Frotey: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046880&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 5.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#PhilippaDreuxdied1242

Yolande de Coucy1,2

F, #10169, b. circa 1164, d. 18 March 1222
FatherRaoul I de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy, Marle and le Fère1,2,3,4,5 b. 1134, d. Nov 1191
MotherAgnes "la Boiteuse" (?) de Hainaut1,6,2,3 b. c 1142
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited13 May 2020
     Yolande de Coucy was born circa 1164.1 She married Robert II le Jeune de Dreux comte de Dreux et de Braine, seigneur de Torcy, de Brie-Comte-Robert, de Chilly, de Longjumeau, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy, son of Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle and Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy, in 1184;
His 2nd wife.7,8,1,9,10,11,12
Yolande de Coucy died on 18 March 1222 at Braine, Aisne, France (now).7,1,2
Yolande de Coucy was buried after 18 March 1222 at L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1170, Coucy, Departement des Ardennes, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     DEATH     18 Mar 1222 (aged 51–52), Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Family Members
     Parents
          Raoul de Coucy unknown–1191
     Spouse
          Robert II de Dreux 1154–1218
     Siblings
          Enguerrand de Coucy unknown–1243
          Thomas de Coucy unknown–1253
     Children
          Alix de Dreux de Vienne unknown–1258
          Pierre de Dreux 1191–1250
          Jeanne de Dreux 1199–1275
     BURIAL     L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     Created by: Jerry D. Ferren
     Added: 9 Jul 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 113587399.1,2,13
     GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 29.
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966., Docteur Gaston Sirjean, Reference: page 245.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: VII 80.12


Yolande de Coucy
Per Med Lands: "YOLANDE de Coucy ([1164]-Braine, Aisne 18 Mar 1222, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Iolandem…Agnetis…tercia…Ada" as the three daughters of "Radulphus de Cocy" & his wife, specifying that Yolande married "Roberto comiti de Drecis et de Braina, filioque Roberti comitis fratris Ludovici regis Francorum"[92]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the two daughters of "Rodulfo de Marla" & his wife Agnes as "mater…comitis de Grandiprato, altera Hyolenz [uxor] comiti de Brana Roberto"[93]. Moret de la Fayole records that Raoul Seigneur de Coucy donated property to Laon Saint-Martin, with the consent of “sa femme Agnes et de ses filles Yoland et Milesonde”, by charter dated 1170[94]. "Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum" donated property "in…Rupis Fortis" to Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, with the consent of "uxoris mee Yolendis", by charter dated to [1184/1200][95]. “Robertus comes, dominus Drocarum et Braye, et Yolendis comitissa uxor mea” donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris, with the consent of “Roberti filii nostri”, by charter dated 1208[96]. "R comes dominus Droc et Bran" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "Agnetis uxoris eius [R patris meis]…comitisse matris mee…et Yolande comitisse uxore mee et liberorum meorum" by charter dated Jul 1212[97]. The necrology of Reims [Saint-Rémi] records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Ioles Brane comitissa"[98]. m (1184) as his second wife, ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux, son of ROBERT [I] "le Grand" Seigneur de Dreux & his second wife Agnès de Baudemont dame de Braine ([1153]-28 Dec 1218, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived)"
Med Lands cites:
[92] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 509.
[93] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852.
[94] Moret de la Fayole (1675), p. 34.
[95] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, LXXII, p. 88.
[96] Paris Notre-Dame I, XVII, p. 299.
[97] Notre-Dame de la Trappe Tome II, p. 2.
[98] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 274.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013798&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#YolandeCoucydied1222. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul de Coucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028229&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#RaoulICoucydied1191
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Hainault: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028251&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), lin 135-28, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028229&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013796&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Dreux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Coucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013798&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 November 2019), memorial page for Yolande de Coucy de Dreux (1170–18 Mar 1222), Find A Grave Memorial no. 113587399, citing L'église abbatiale Saint-Yved de Braine, Braine, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Jerry D. Ferren (contributor 48024221), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/113587399/yolande-de_dreux. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Dreux, Dame de Traves, de Scey-sur-Saône et de Frotey: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046880&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#PhilippaDreuxdied1242

Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy1,2,3,4,5

F, #10170, b. 1130, d. between July 1204 and 1218
FatherGui de Baudément seigneur de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Quincy, de Longueville, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Fere-en-Tardenois et de Pontarcy6,1,3,4 b. c 1100, d. 1144
MotherAlix (?) dame de Braine7,4
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited13 May 2020
     Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy was born in 1130.6,4,5 She married Milon III de Brienne Comte de Bar-sur-Seine, son of Guy II de Brienne Comte de Bar-sur-Saone and Petronille/Elizabeth (?) de Chacenay; her 1st husband.4 Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy married Robert I "le Grand" de Dreux Cmte de Dreux, du Perche et de Braine-sur-Vesle, son of Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France and Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France, in 1152.8,6,1,4
Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy died between July 1204 and 1218.8,4,5
     GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24. Agnes de Baudément dame de Baudement, de Braine-sur-Vesle, de Fere-en-Tardenois, de Nesle-en-Tardenois, de Quincy, de Longueville et de Pontarcy was also known as Agnes de Vaudemont Cts de Braine.6,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Dreux: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028230&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1967] J Bunot, "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005: "Le Bouteiller/Breaute (Baillon)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 27 Sept 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baudément.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Comtes d'Eu, p. 2.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I31977
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), lin 135-27, p. 119. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013796&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Dreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028230&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#AlixAdeleDreuxdied1217. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.