Donald I mac Alpin King of the Scots1,2

M, #16051, d. 862
FatherAlpín mac Echdach (?) King of Dál Riata1,3,4 b. c 780, d. bt Jul 834 - Aug 834
Last Edited27 May 2020
     Donald I mac Alpin King of the Scots died in 862.1
     He was King of the Picts and Scots: [Ashley, p. 384] DONALD (I) Picts and Scots, 858-63. He was the brother (or possibly half-brother) of KENNETH MACALPIN and was probably of a similar age. It has been suggested that his mother may have been Norse. His reign was brief, but he continued the work begun by his brother in cementing the kingdoms of the Picts and the Scots. He imposed the laws of the Scots, developed (or more likely revised) by AED FIND, upon the Picts, and this almost certainly made him unpopular. The Picts might not have been an especially united race but they were bonded by their laws and customs, though there is some evidence that this was breaking down by the early ninth century. .Nevertheless, it is possible that this blatant subordination of the Picts aroused hostilities as there is some suggestion that Donald was murdered at Scone, or that he was killed in battle. He was succeeded by his nephew, CONSTANTINE. between 858 and 863.5

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domnall_mac_Ailp%C3%ADn. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alpin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00022614&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc389122935. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 384. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Giric (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16052
FatherDonald I mac Alpin King of the Scots1 d. 862
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Giric (?) King of the Scots was King of the Picts and Scots: [Ashley, pp. 381, 385] GIRIC (I) Picts and Scots, 878-89. EOCHAID MAP RHUN Strathclyde and Scots, 878-89.
Giric was the son of DONALD I, who defeated his cousin AED to claim the Scottish throne. He was assisted in this by EOCHAID, king of Strathclyde, who seems to have shared the kingship with Giric, though this probably means he retained a vassal kingship in Strathclyde (see page xx). The two formed a strong bond, for they succeeded in ridding Scotland of the stranglehold of the Vikings, and they drove the Angles out of Bernicia, ejecting EGBERT II. Giric was thus the first to rule a kingdom whose borders equated roughly to those of modern-day Scotland. Giric and Eochaid were defeated, however, by their cousin DONALD II and driven from the kingdom. The fate of Giric is not known but he may have fled with Eochaid and other dispossessed Strathclyde Britons into northern Wales. between 878 and 889.2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 385. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Aed "Whitefoot" (?) King of the Picts and Scots1,2

M, #16053, d. 878
FatherCinead (Kenneth) I mac Alpin King of the Picts and Scots1 b. 810, d. Feb 858
Last Edited24 Feb 2003
     Aed "Whitefoot" (?) King of the Picts and Scots died in 878 at Battle of Strathallan, Scotland.1,2
     He was King of the Picts and Scots: [Ashley, p. 385] AED WHITEFOOT Picts and Scots, 877-78. The son of KENNETH I. During his reign the combined kingdom of Picts and Scots was in danger of crumbling under two destructive forces. On the one hand the Vikings had dominated the land and had all but treated Aed's brother, CONSTANTINE, as their puppet ruler. On the other side Aed's cousin GIRIC also claimed the throne. Giric's challenge was successful for he killed Aed at the battle of Strathallan. between 877 and 878.2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 385. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 381.

unknown (?)1,2

F, #16054
FatherCinead (Kenneth) I mac Alpin King of the Picts and Scots1 b. 810, d. Feb 858
Last Edited2 Apr 2002
     Unknown (?) married Rhun (?) King of Strathclyde.2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 381. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Eochaid (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16055, d. 889
FatherRhun (?) King of Strathclyde2
Motherunknown (?)1
Last Edited13 Mar 2004
     Eochaid (?) King of the Scots died in 889.1
     Eochaid (?) King of the Scots was also known as Eocha (?) King of the Scots.3 He was King of the Scots between 878 and 889.3

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 381. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.

Constantine II (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16056, d. 952
FatherAed "Whitefoot" (?) King of the Picts and Scots1 d. 878
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Constantine II (?) King of the Scots died in 952 at Monastery of St. Andrews, Scotland.2
     He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, pp. 386-387] CONSTANTINE II Scotland, 900-43. One of the longest-ruling of Scottish monarchs, the first to rule for more than forty years (it would have been over fifty had he not abdicated to enter the church). The son of AED, he must have been an infant when his father died in 878, although (as he had a younger brother) he was probably at least two years old, so he was probably in his early twenties when he succeeded his cousin DONALD II. The length of Constantine's reign and his strength of character allowed him to establish Scotland as a unified kingdom. His first concerns were against the Norse who, in 902, had been driven out of their kingdom in Dublin. Their ruler in exile, RAGNALL, clearly intended to establish a new kingdom in the area of Strathclyde and Cumbria, and the years 903 and 904 were ones of regular skirmishes between the Scots and the Norse. In 903 the Norse raided as far east as Dunkeld, but at this stage the Norse army seems to have withdrawn, though must always have remained a threat, for in 910 Ragnall succeeded in invading York and establishing himself as ruler. It was against this background that Constantine perceived a need to strengthen his defences around Strathclyde and Cumbria, and he established the sub-kingdom of Strathclyde in 908, with his brother DONALD as its ruler. The Norse threat continued, however. Ragnall, now established in York, sought to expand his kingdom into neighbouring Bernicia and, on the death of EADULF in 913, Ragnall expelled his successor Ealdred who fled to Constantine's court. Constantine fought two major battles against the Norse, in 914 and 918, both at Corbridge. Although the Scots suffered defeat on both occasions, it was not without heavy losses to the Norse. Ragnall was anxious not to lose his links with Dublin, which kingdom he had regained in 917, so in 918 the Norse and Scots entered into a peace treaty. Constantine then allied himself with the Norse against the Saxons of Wessex, resulting in the famous pact with EDWARD THE ELDER in 920. It is very unlikely that on this occasion Constantine regarded Edward as his overlord, despite the record of the ASC. It is more likely that each side acknowledged the other's authority and status. This pact was subsequently renewed with ATHELSTAN at Eamont Bridge near Penrith in July 927, a meeting which followed Athelstan's defeat of Gothfrith of Dublin, who had invaded Northumbria to claim the throne of York. Athelstan gained Constantine's agreement not to support Gothfrith, but Constantine reneged on this in 934 when he supported Gothfrith's son, OLAF, the new king of Dublin, in his claim on the throne of York. The most flagrant sign of Constantine's support was when he gave one of his daughters to Olaf in marriage. This incensed Athelstan, who invaded Scotland as far north as Edinburgh and inflicted losses upon Constantine. He apparently also took one of Constantine's sons (probably Cellach) as hostage. Constantine's support for Olaf, however, remained steadfast and, in 937, Olaf invaded Northumbria. The armies met the Saxons at Brunanburh, where Olaf and Constantine were dealt a crushing defeat by Athelstan, regarded as one of the greatest Saxon victories. Cellach died in the battle, as probably did OWEN of Strathclyde. However, when Athelstan died two years later, Olaf ventured again to claim York and this time succeeded. Olaf's alliance with Constantine increased the latter's power.
In 943, when he must have been about sixty-five, Constantine abdicated. He was clearly still able and active, but he must also have recognized that it was time for new blood. In 943 EDMUND of Wessex had resolved his problems with the Norse kings of York, which weakened Constantine's command of northern Britain. He retired to the monastery at St Andrews. During his reign Constantine had had a mixed relationship with the church. He had allied himself with the pagan Norse, had tolerated the reversion to pagan practices in Galloway and Kyle, and had delayed long in the baptism of his son Indulf. Yet as early as 906 he had agreed, with Bishop Cellach of St Andrews, to uphold the authority of the Scottish church, and he had also been a friend of St Catroe, escorting him on his mission through Scotland in during the 940s. It is possible that his meeting with Catroe provided a good excuse to abdicate.
There is a long-held belief that Constantine came out of retirement in 948 to join with Malcolm in an invasion of England. Since he would have been at least seventy years old by then, it seems very unlikely, though it is possible that Constantine encouraged Malcolm in the enterprise. Constantine died in 952 at the monastery of St Andrews, and was almost certainly buried there. between 900 and 943.2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 386-387. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 381, 388.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 385.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 381.

Indulf (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16057, d. 962
FatherConstantine II (?) King of the Scots1,2 d. 952
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Indulf (?) King of the Scots died in 962.1,2
     He was King of Strathclyde between 945 and 954.2 He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, p. 388] INDULF Strathclyde, 945-54; Scotland, 954-62. Indulf was the son of the long ruling CONSTANTINE II and thus may already have been in his forties when MALCOLM II made him ruler of the newly enlarged kingdom of Strathclyde and Cumbria. This kingdom was usually ruled by the heir to the throne, but it also brought with it the demands of defending the realm against the Vikings. Indulf's reign in Strathclyde would have been especially difficult because of the intense action in the neighbouring kingdom of York (see under ERIK BLOODAXE, OLAF SITRICSSON and EADRED of Wessex for details). This did not cease when Indulf took over as king of Scotland following the death of Malcolm. In the same year Erik was expelled from York and murdered on his way back to Orkney by the treachery of Osulf, high-reeve of Bamburgh. With the fall of the Norse kingdom a vacuum opened up in the territories of Northumbria, which allowed Indulf to press to reclaim his lands around Edinburgh and Lothian which had long been in English hands. Indulf almost certainly pushed his borders down at least as far as the Tweed, which is where the modern boundary of Scotland lies. These lands were incorporated into the kingdom of Strathclyde. Indulf was a religious man and, in 962, when he was probably around sixty, he abdicated and retired to a monastery (probably St Andrews, where he was later buried). He was soon forced out of retirement to meet his death in battle against the Danes at Findochty on the northern coast of Banff in the heart of Moray. Indulf was presumably fighting alongside the men of Moray against the Danes, but it is an unlikely alliance, and the reason for Indulf fighting so far north must be questionable. He was succeeded by DUFF. between 954 and 962.2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 388. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 381, 389.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 381.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 381, 390.

Melisendis/Mélissande (?)1,2

F, #16058
FatherHugues I (?) Comte de Maine3 b. c 890, d. bt 939 - 955
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited9 May 2020
     Melisendis/Mélissande (?) married Guy Raoul de Brosse Vicomte de Brosse in 930.4,5,3

     ; Per Wikipédia (Fr.): "Les vicomtes de Brosse sont issus de Rothilde de Brosse (dès la première moitié du Xe siècle, apparaissent des seigneurs, ou châtelains, ou vicomtes de Brosse : Raoul, puis son fils Guy (Guy Raoul) qui semble le père de notre Rothilde ; la mère de cette dernière pourrait être une fille du comte Hugues du Maine, dont la mère était la princesse carolingienne Rothilde fille de Charles le Chauve ; en plus de Géraud de Limoges qui suit, Rothilde de Brosse aurait aussi épousé Archambaud de Comborn et Archambaud Ier de Bourbon), mariée vers 957 à Géraud Ier, vicomte de Limoges (v.900-v.986) (liste des vicomtes de Limoges), qui eut une nombreuse descendance par ses deux fils : - Gui, vicomte de Limoges après son père ; - et Aimeri « Ostefranc » (à l'origine de la branche des vicomtes de Rochechouart)."3 GAV-29.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 773.4

Family

Guy Raoul de Brosse Vicomte de Brosse b. c 920
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Melisendis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196986&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hugues Ier du Maine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_du_Maine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  3. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des vicomtes de Brosse: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_vicomtes_de_Brosse
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Melisendis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196986&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adémar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196985&tree=LEO

Adémar I (?) Vicomte de Limoges et de Ségur1

M, #16059, b. circa 989, d. 12 August 1036
FatherGui I (?) Vicomte de Limoges1 b. c 949, d. 27 Oct 1025
MotherEmma de Segur Heiress of Ségur1 d. a 1025
Last Edited6 Mar 2004
     Adémar I (?) Vicomte de Limoges et de Ségur married Senegundis d'Aunay.2,1
Adémar I (?) Vicomte de Limoges et de Ségur was born circa 989.1
Adémar I (?) Vicomte de Limoges et de Ségur died on 12 August 1036; As a crusader he went to the Holy land where he died on 12 August of an unknown year, but which was probably 1036.1
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 773.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adémar I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196994&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Senegundis (d'Aunay): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196995&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adémar II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196976&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard I de Brosse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00208033&tree=LEO

Duff (Dubh) (?) King of the Scots1,2

M, #16060, d. 996
FatherMael-Coluim (Malcolm) I mac Domnaill (?) King of the Scots1,3,4,5 b. c 895, d. c 954
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Duff (Dubh) (?) King of the Scots died in 996.1
     He was King of Strathclyde between 954 and 962.2 He was King of Scotland: Ashley [1998, pp. 388-389] DUFF or DUB Strathclyde, 954-62; Scotland, 962-6/7. The son of MALCOLM I. When he was nominated as king of Strathclyde, he inherited a kingdom much enlarged by the victories of INDULF over the English in Lothian. Duff thus ruled a kingdom which stretched from the Clyde to the Forth, south to the Tweed on the east coast and the Ribble on the west. He held this land as heir to the throne of Scotland, and not in his own right, but it still formed a substantial kingdom. When Indulf retired to a monastery in 962 Duff inherited the throne of Scotland and he passed on the kingdom of Strathclyde to his cousin, DONALD MAC OWEN. This enraged CUILEAN, the son of Indulf, who expected to be the next heir, and led to a civil war between Cuilean and Duff. Duff was initially victorious, but in 966, perhaps in league with the men of Moray, Cuilean succeeded in driving Duff out of the kingdom. He was slain in Moray by the governor of Forres Castle. Somehow his body was collected by his kin and conveyed all the way to Iona for burial, a remarkable journey considering the troubled times. between 962 and 966.6

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 387-388. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Máel Coluim mac Domnaill (Malclom I): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/malco000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Máel Coluim mac Domnaill: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00022619&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#MalcolmIdied954B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 381, 388-389.
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 381.

Kenneth III (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16061, d. 1005
FatherDuff (Dubh) (?) King of the Scots1 d. 996
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Kenneth III (?) King of the Scots died in 1005.1
     He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, pp. 381, 390] KENNETH III Scotland, 997-1005. [FC53] GIRIC II Scotland, 997-1005. Kenneth was the son of DUFF and may already have been in his forties or fifties when he wrested the throne from CONSTANTINE III. It is possible that because of his age Kenneth agreed that his son GIRIC rule jointly with him, though he also recognized his cousin, MALCOLM, as king of Strathclyde and Cumbria, the title usually held for heirs to the throne. So, although Kenneth evidently sought to secure the future kingship for his son, there was already built-in tension. In 1005 both Kenneth and Giric were killed at Monzievaird, near Loch Earn, by Malcolm. between 997 and 1005.2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 390. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 381.

Findlaech (?) mórmaer of Moray1,2,3

M, #16062
FatherRuairaidh (?) mórmaer of Moray4
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Findlaech (?) mórmaer of Moray married NN of Scotland, daughter of Máel Coluim (Malcolm) mac Cináeda II (?) King Of Scotland and Ælfgifu “Edith of Ossory” Sigurdsdóttir (?).5,3

     Findlaech (?) mórmaer of Moray was also known as Finlay (?) mórmaer of Moray.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "FINDLAECH MacRory (-[1018/20]). Thane of Angus, Mormaer of Moray. Orkneyinga Saga records that Sigurd Jarl of Orkney defeated “a Scottish earl called Finnleik”[500]. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Findlaech mac Ruaidhrí mormaer Moreb” was killed “a filiis fratris sui MaelBrighdi” in [1018/20][501]. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1020 of "Finnlaech son of Ruadrí king of Alba…killed by his own people"[502].
     "m ---. The name of Findlaech’s wife is not known. Many secondary sources name the wife of Findlaech as Donada of Scotland, daughter of Malcolm II King of Scotland & his wife ---, adding that she was the mother of King Macbeth. It seems that the proof for this connection is slim. The only source so far identified which refers to Macbeth’s maternal origin is the Chronicle of Huntingdon which names "Maket Regem [=King Macbeth] nepotem dicti Malcolmi" when recording that he was expelled from Scotland after ruling 15 years[503]. The word "nepos" is of course treacherous, and could indicate a variety of relationships in addition to grandson. However, it appears that early historians assumed that "grandson" was the correct translation. For example, Ralph Holinshed’s 1577 Chronicle of Scotland names "Doada" as second daughter of Malcolm II King of Scotland and adds that she married "Sinell the thane of Glammis, by whom she had issue one Makbeth"[504]. Another variation is provided by the Cronykil of Andrew of Wyntoun, which records that "Makbeth-Fynlak, his systyr sowne" murdered King Duncan[505]. From a chronological point of view, it is unlikely that Macbeth could have been a nephew of King Duncan, but it is possible that the passage represents an interpretation of "nepos" from an earlier source and has confused the king with whom Macbeth enjoyed this relationship. No source earlier than Holinshed has been found which names her Donada."
Med Lands cites:
[500] Orkneyinga Saga 11, pp 36-7.
[501] Stokes, W. (trans.) (1993) The Annals of Tigernach (Llanerch), Vol. II, p. 251.
[502] Annals of Ulster, 1020.6, p. 458.
[503] Skene (1867), XXXIII, Chronicle of Huntingdon, Cronica Canonicorum Beate Marie Huntingdonie, p. 210.
[504] The Historie of Macbeth, from Ralph Holinshed’s Chronicle of Scotland 1577, in Macbeth by William Shakespeare with the Historie of Macbeth (Cassell, 1899), p. 151.
[505] Andrew of Wyntoun, Vol. II, Book VI, Chap. XVI, line 1645, p. 120.3
He was mórmaer of Moray, [Ashley, pp. 413-415] FINDLAECH or FINLAY Moray, 990?-1020. The mórmaers of Moray regarded themselves as having equal title to the kingship of Dál Riata which, by the turn of the millenium, was starting to emerge as the dominant power in northern Britain and was taking the shape of Alba or Scotland. Their power meant that the kings of Scotland sought whatever means they could to subjugate them and, during the rule of MALCOLM II, this included developing a stronger bond with the Norse earl of Orkney, SIGURD THE STOUT. The mórmaer whose power concerned Malcolm was Findlaech, who had already showed much
strength of character by challenging Sigurd to battle about the year 995. Although Sigurd won, it was not without significant loss. Findlaech was able to exercise considerable authority across northern Britain, disputing the borders of Orkney in the territory around Caithness and encroaching into Malcolm's territory around Ross and northern Atholl. Presumably as some form of peace arrangement, Findlaech married Malcolm's daughter Donada, possibly as early as the year 1000 when Malcolm was sub-king of Strathclyde. By this marriage Findlaech became the father of MACBETH. However, soon after Macbeth's birth a strange situation developed. Findlaech's and Malcolm's relationship must have become more tense because Findlaech seems to have rejected Donada. We do not know the circumstances but by about the year 1006 Donada had been remarried to Sigurd of Orkney. Some records suggest that these were two different ladies of the same name and that Findlaech's wife was the daughter of KENNETH II and thus the aunt of the later Donada. Another interpretation has been that Sigurd's wife was another daughter of Malcolm's, not Donada. Either way, the improved relationship between Sigurd and Malcolm was a threat to Findlaech. Findlaech's power was further reduced when, during 1009 and 1010, Viking raids under SWEIN FORKBEARD began to intensify along the eastern coastline of Scotland and Moray. Findlaech found that he needed to call upon Malcolm's aid to rebuff the Viking menace.
In 1014 Sigurd was killed at the battle of Clontarf. This was an opportunity for Findlaech to increase his power across northern Britain. Although Malcolm was into his sixties he continued to scheme, and was looking after the fortunes of his grandson, the future THORFINN THE MIGHTY, whom he created earl of Caithness, territory which was only tenuously Malcolm's to bestow. The years after Clontarf saw the Orkney earls in some disarray and if any moment was ripe to attack Malcolm's power base it was then. For some reason Findlaech did not do so, and this doubtless caused a rift within the Moray hierarchy. In 1020 Findlaech was murdered by his nephews MALCOLM and GILLECOMGAIN. between 990 and 1020.2

Family

NN of Scotland
Child
  • Macbeth (?) King of the Scots b. c 1005, d. 15 Aug 1057; Source 801 "British Monarchy" gives MacBeth's father as Finlay, Mormaer of Moray. Dunnett states that MacBeth was the son of Bethoc's earlier husband, Sigurd, and step-son of Findlaech.1,6,3

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 413-415. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#FindlaechMacRorayMoray. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 415.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#DonadaM1FindlaechMcRoryM2SigurdDigri
  6. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.

Macbeth (?) King of the Scots1

M, #16063, b. circa 1005, d. 15 August 1057
FatherFindlaech (?) mórmaer of Moray; Source 801 "British Monarchy" gives MacBeth's father as Finlay, Mormaer of Moray. Dunnett states that MacBeth was the son of Bethoc's earlier husband, Sigurd, and step-son of Findlaech.1,2,3
MotherNN of Scotland1,3
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Macbeth (?) King of the Scots was born circa 1005.1,4 He married Gruoch (?), daughter of Boite (?), circa 1033.1,4

Macbeth (?) King of the Scots died on 15 August 1057 at Lumphanen; died in battle.1,4
     He was mórmaer of Moray.5

; Dorothy Dunnett's historical novel King Hereafter presents a sweeping overview of the life of Macbeth and the history, politics and events of northern England, Scotland, Denmark and Norway. I recommend it as a good read to anyone interested in this period. Greg Vaut.6 He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, pp. 393-395] MACBETH Moray, 1032-57; Scotland, 15 August 1040-15 August 1057. Born: c1005; Died (killed in battle): Lumphanen, 15 August 1057, aged 52. Buried: Iona. Married: c1033, Gruoch, widow of Gillecomgain, mórmaer of Moray: no children. The Macbeth of history was rather different from the tragic character portrayed by Shakespeare. He was the son of FINDLAECH, the mórmaer of Moray of the line of Loarn, a collateral branch of the rulers of Dál Riata who now ruled much of what was soon to become Scotland. His mother, Donada, was the daughter of MALCOLM H of Scotland. Not much is known about his youth. His father was murdered when Macbeth was fifteen or so, and the mórmaership was taken by Macbeth's cousins MALCOLM and subsequently GILLECOMGAIN. It was after the latter's murder in 1032 that Macbeth, now twenty-seven, inherited the title. Whilst his predecessors had been hostile to Malcolm II and had actively sought to usurp the throne, Macbeth was less belligerent. Malcolm's successor, DUNCAN, Macbeth's cousin, however, was a far less competent king. He bungled his first attempts at invading Northumbria to the south and Caithness to the north at the same time in 1040, and so concentrated all his forces on the north, against the earl of Orkney, THORFINN. Duncan's forces were outmanoeuvred at every turn. Thorfinn's forces were supplemented by those of Macbeth as Duncan retreated, so that it was Macbeth who encountered Duncan at Pitgaveny in August 1040, where Duncan was killed. Later accounts that Macbeth murdered Duncan are total fabrication. Duncan's eldest son, MALCOLM (III) was only nine and he and his brother were hurried away to the English court for safety. Macbeth was the next in line to the throne and he was elected to the kingship apparently without contest or opposition.
Macbeth ruled strongly and wisely for the next fourteen years without any major mishap. Because of his close relationship with his half-brother Thorfinn, there was no conflict with the Norse of Orkney. If anything, Thorfinn knew he could rely on Macbeth's support when Thorfinn went on a punitive raid as far south as Man and North Wales in 1042. The only challenge to his rule came from his uncle Crinan, the father of Duncan and the mórmaer of Atholl. Crinan probably sought to place his second son, MALDRED, on the throne and in 1045 Crinan, then aged about seventy, staged a rebellion. The two factions met at Dunkeld where Crinan and Maldred were killed. For the next nine years there seems to have been no instability in Macbeth's reign. He was apparently a generous and pious ruler. He is described as a tall man with a ruddy complexion and fair hair. In 1050, he undertook a pilgrimage to Rome where it is recorded that he scattered gifts and money "like seed". This indicates that he must have had a sufficiently secure kingdom at that time, and by all accounts he was much loved by his subjects.
In 1054, however, Macbeth's world crumbled. By then Duncan's son Malcolm was twenty-three and regarded himself as the true heir to the throne of Scotland. He was supported in his efforts to regain the throne by EDWARD THE CONFESSOR, who placed Siward of Northumbria in charge of the invasion. Siward's forces advanced far into Scotland. Perhaps Macbeth sought to play the same tactics as BRUDE MAC BILI had against EGFRITH of Northumbria nearly four centuries earlier. But Siward had also learned not to venture too far into enemy territory without backup and he brought his fleet into the Firth of Tay. The two armies, both of considerable size, met at Dunsinnan on 27 July 1054. This is the battle commemorated in Shakespeare's play where Macbeth had been assured by the witches that he was safe until Birnam Wood came against him. Since the battle took place on an open field (and not with Macbeth hiding in his castle as portrayed by Shakespeare), it is unlikely that Siward's troops camouflaged themselves with greenery, though one cannot discount that such tactics may have been used in part of the battle. What is more likely is that Malcolm's troops, who were essentially the men of Atholl, wore sprigs of rowan in their caps as emblems, or carried branches of rowan as cudgels. It has also been suggested that the battle site was not Dunsinnan, just north of Scone, but a few miles further east at Dundee. It is worth reflecting upon the forces involved in the battle. Although it was essentially a Northumbrian (i.e. English) army versus a Scots, Siward's forces represented the Scottish heir Malcolm. The battle was, therefore, an internal Scottish conflict. Yet most of Siward's army was made up of Scandinavian troops, whilst Macbeth's army included many Norman soldiers. Normans had settled in England during the reign of Edward the Confessor, who had been raised in Normandy and had strong Norman sympathies. However his conflict with Earl Godwin had led him to expel many Normans from England in 1051 and some had taken refuge in Scotland. Although it is not stated that Thorfinn of Orkney assisted Macbeth, it is likely that Macbeth's army included levies from across northern Scotland and thus included soldiers from Caithness and Sutherland who would have been Norse. Thus the battle that decided Macbeth's fate was essentially fought between Scandinavian factions, primarily the old enemies of Danes versus Norse. Although Macbeth was overwhelmingly defeated he was not deposed, and there were sufficient casualties amongst Siward's forces for his army to retire. Malcolm laid claim to the southern kingdom of Strathclyde and used this as his base for further incursions into Scotland. There followed three years of civil war. Malcolm's strength grew and Macbeth was driven back further into his Moray base. However, during one such retreat Macbeth found himself cut off from his main army, and he was ambushed by Malcolm's forces at Lumphanan, west of Aberdeen. Tradition states that he made his last stand in the stone circle known as the Peel Ring where he and his bodyguard were butchered. Support for Macbeth remained strong for it was not Malcolm who was chosen to succeed him but his stepson LULACH.
Macbeth's reputation as a strong, wise and generous king has been overtaken by the image portrayed by Shakespeare. Shakespeare did not invent this, however. He drew his facts from the historical records available to him which had already been distorted mostly by Hector Boece, whose History of Scotland, published in 1527, contained many inventions, including the characters of Banquo, the three witches, and the image we have of Lady Macbeth. The real Macbeth was revered and given a royal burial on Iona. Apart from the brief reign of Lulach, Macbeth was the last truly Gaelic ruler of the Scots. With the subsequent succession of Malcolm (III), Scotland shifted toward a more Anglo-Norman outlook. between 1040 and 1057.1,4

Family

Gruoch (?)

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#FindlaechMacRorayMoray. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 381, 393-395. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 415, 416.
  6. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.

Gruoch (?)1

F, #16064
FatherBoite (?)2
Last Edited13 Nov 2005
     Gruoch (?) married Gillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray, son of Maelbrigte (?), in 1029.3
Gruoch (?) married Macbeth (?) King of the Scots, son of Findlaech (?) mórmaer of Moray and NN of Scotland, circa 1033.1,4

Family 2

Macbeth (?) King of the Scots b. c 1005, d. 15 Aug 1057

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 381. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 415, 416.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 381, 393-395.

Gillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray1

M, #16065, d. 1032
FatherMaelbrigte (?)2
Last Edited3 Dec 2020
     Gillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray married Ingibiorg Finnsdottir av Austraat og Halland (?), daughter of Finn Arnesson (?) of Vrjar, Jarl of Halland and Thorberg/Bergliot Halvdansdottir (?) av Ringerike,
;
Possibly her 1st husband. Dunnett mentions this marriage. None of my other sources show it. Specifically, Genealogics, Med Lands, Genealogy.EU, The Henry Project, Wikipedia and Wikipedia (NO), all only mention her marriages m1 to Thorfinn and m2 to Malcolm III.3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Gillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray married Gruoch (?), daughter of Boite (?), in 1029.2

Gillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray died in 1032.2
     He was mórmaer of Moray, [Ashley, p. 416] GILLECOMGAIN Moray, 1029-32. Son of Maelbrigte and brother of MALCOLM, with whom he was implicated in the death of their uncle FINDLAECH. Gillecomgain continued the raids against the Scots started by his brother, but in addition sought to work his way into the Scottish royal family. He married Gruoch, the granddaughter of KENNETH III, probably in 1029, when she was about fifteen. They had one son, LULACH, who would briefly rule Scotland. Gillecomgain continued to frustrate MALCOLM II of Scotland until, in 1032, Malcolm ordered a lightning raid on Gillecomgain's headquarters, which were set on fire. Gillecomgain and many of his household were killed, although Gruoch and her son escaped. Gruoch would soon marry Gillecomgain's successor, MACBETH. between 1029 and 1032.2

Family 1

Gruoch (?)

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 415, 416. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Rulers of Orkney, Norway, Normandy and England. Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ingibiorg Finnsdottir av Austraat og Halland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00022597&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWEGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#IngborgFinnsdM1ThorfinIIM2MalcolmIIIScot. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, The House of MacAlpine: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/macalpine.html
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/malco002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingibiorg_Finnsdottir. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4784] Wikipedia - Det frie oppslagsverket, online https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hovudside, Ingebjørg Finnsdatter: https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingebj%C3%B8rg_Finnsdatter. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NO).

Lulach Fatuus "the Fool" (?) King of the Scots1,2

M, #16066, b. circa 1031, d. 17 March 1058
FatherGillecomgain (?) mórmaer of Moray1 d. 1032
MotherIngibiorg Finnsdottir av Austraat og Halland (?)1,3 b. c 1030
Last Edited13 Nov 2005
     Lulach Fatuus "the Fool" (?) King of the Scots married Finnghuala (?), daughter of Sinhill (?) mórmaer of Angus.4
Lulach Fatuus "the Fool" (?) King of the Scots was born circa 1031.1,4
Lulach Fatuus "the Fool" (?) King of the Scots died on 17 March 1058.1
     He was King of Scotland: [Ashley, p. 395] LULACH FATUUS (the FOOL) King of Scotland, 15 August 1057-1 7 March 1058. Crowned: Scone, November (?) 1057. Born: c1031; Died (slain): Essie, 17 March 1058, aged 27. Buried: Iona. Married: Finnghuala, dau. Sinhill, mórmaer of Angus: 2 children. Lulach was the son of GILLECOMGAIN, mórmaer of Moray, and Gruoch, the granddaughter of KENNETH III. After his father's death, Lulach's mother married MACBETH and, after Macbeth's death at the hand of MALCOLM CANMORE, Lulach was elected king. There was evidently strong support in Scotland at this time for the Gaelic household which had descended through the mórmaers or stewards of Moray rather than the more anglicised faction which had been encouraged by MALCOLM II and was now actively promoted by Malcolm Canmore. Malcolm pursued his right to the throne and Lulach's short reign was almost entirely filled with their conflict. Malcolm eventually succeeded, ambushing Lulach at Essie, in Strathbogie, in March 1058. Lulach was subsequently remembered as Lulach the Fool or even the Simple, suggesting that he did not have all of his faculties. This is most unlikely. The later chroniclers must have believed he acted unwisely in his campaign against Malcolm, making foolish decisions that not only lost him his life, but lost Scotland its Gaelic inheritance. After Lulach, Malcolm III closed a door on Scotland's past and looked ahead into the Anglo-Norman world. Lulach's son, MAEL SNECHTA, however remained a rebel leader amongst the men of Moray. between 1057 and 1058.4

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 395, 415, 416. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Rulers of Orkney, Norway, Normandy and England. Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 395.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 415, 416.

Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland1,2,3,4

F, #16067, b. between 1220 and 1225
FatherEnguerrand III de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Cte de Roucy et de Perche5,6,2,7,3,8 d. 1243
MotherMarie de Montmirail9,4,3
Last Edited14 Oct 2019
     Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland died; dsp.10 She was born between 1220 and 1225.3 She married Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland, son of William I "The Lion" (?) Earl of Northumberland, King of Scotland and Ermengarde de Beaumont, on 15 May 1239 at Roxburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland,
; her 1st husband; Genealogy.EU (Coucy 1 page) says m. 12 May 1239.1,5,6,4,3,11,12,8 Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland married Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir, son of Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople and Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople, in June 1257
;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.2,4,3,13,14
Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland died after 6 June 1257.3
      ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 315.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: vol VII page 80.
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: page 174.4

Family 1

Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland b. 24 Aug 1198, d. 8 Jul 1249
Child

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002876&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 407-408. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand III de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164622&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.11. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Montmirail: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164623&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), Line 120-30, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alexander II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002874&tree=LEO
  13. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Brienne 6: p. 155.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II_of_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.15.

Isabella de Warenne1,2,3,4

F, #16068, b. 1253, d. after 1296
FatherJohn de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey5,6,2,7,4,3 b. c Aug 1231, d. c 29 Sep 1304
MotherAlice (Alfais) de Lusignan2,8,3,4 b. c 1224, d. 9 Feb 1256
Last Edited26 Apr 2009
     Isabella de Warenne was born in 1253.3 She married John "Toom Tabard" de Baliol King of Scots, 8th Baron of Bywel, son of Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland and Devorguilla (?) of Galloway, before 7 February 1281.1,5,6,9,2,3,4,10

Isabella de Warenne died after 1296.2,3
      ; van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: vol III/2 page 355.4 Isabella de Warenne was also known as Isobel de Warenne.11

Family

John "Toom Tabard" de Baliol King of Scots, 8th Baron of Bywel b. c 1250, d. Apr 1313
Children

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015430&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 409, 412. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015385&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix (Alfais) de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015386&tree=LEO
  9. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Baliol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015431&tree=LEO
  11. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.

Edward Balliol King of Scots1,2,3

M, #16069, b. circa 1280, d. circa 1364
FatherJohn "Toom Tabard" de Baliol King of Scots, 8th Baron of Bywel1,4,3,5 b. c 1250, d. Apr 1313
MotherIsabella de Warenne1,4,3,6 b. 1253, d. a 1296
Last Edited26 Apr 2009
     Edward Balliol King of Scots was born circa 1280.1 He and Jeanne/Joanna/Joan de Valois were engaged on 23 October 1295.7 Edward Balliol King of Scots married Margareta (?) of Tarento, Empress of Constantinople, daughter of Philippe I (?) d'Anjou, Prince of Tarento, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, Pr of Achaia, titular Emperor of Constantinople and Catherine II (?) de Valois, titular Empress of Constantinople, Pss of Achaia, before 1344.8
Edward Balliol King of Scots and Margareta (?) of Tarento, Empress of Constantinople were divorced in 1344.8
Edward Balliol King of Scots died circa 1364; dsp.1,9
     He was King of Scotland, deposed between 12 August 1332 and 16 December 1332.10 He was King of Scotland between March 1333 and 1336.10

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Baliol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015431&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015430&tree=LEO
  7. [S2031] Eric Francois, "Francois email 26 Jan 2006: "Re: Isabelle de Valois, duchesse de Bourbon (d.1386)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Jan 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Francois email 26 Jan 2006."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079812&tree=LEO
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 411 (Chart 23). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 548 (Chart 41), 552.

Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort1

F, #16070, b. 1263, d. 1323
FatherRobert IV de Dreux Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Montfort2,3,4 b. 1241, d. 14 Nov 1284
MotherBeatrix de Montfort Comtesse de Montfort-L'Amaury5,4 d. 9 Mar 1311
Last Edited27 Dec 2013
     Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort was born in 1263.5 She married Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots, son of Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland and Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland, on 14 October 1285 at Jedburgh Abbey, Jedburgh, Scotland,
; her 1st husband.1,6,3,7,8,4 Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort married Arthur II de Dreux Duc de Bretagne, Comte de Richemont et Montfort, son of Jean II de Dreux Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond and Beatrice (?) of England, Countess of Richmond, in 1292
; her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.9,3,10,7,11
Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort died in 1323; Genealogy EU says d. 1322.6,5
      ; Cts Yolande de Montfort, *1263, +1322; 1m: Jedburgh 1285 King Alexander III of Scots (+1286); 2m: 1292 Duc Arthur I de Bretagne (*1262 +1312.)5 Yolande de Dreux Comtesse de Montfort was also known as Jolanta de Monteforte.10

Family 1

Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots b. 4 Sep 1241, d. 19 Mar 1286

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 196, Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 521 (Chart 38).
  10. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bretagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005722&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 16. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html#A1
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Bretagne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005721&tree=LEO
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beynes.pdf, p. 3.

Robert IV de Dreux Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Montfort1,2,3

M, #16071, b. 1241, d. 14 November 1284
FatherJean I de Dreux Comte de Dreux et de Braine3 b. 1215, d. 1249
MotherMarie de Dampierre de Bourbon3,4 b. c 1220, d. 24 Aug 1274
Last Edited15 May 2009
     Robert IV de Dreux Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Montfort was born in 1241.3 He married Beatrix de Montfort Comtesse de Montfort-L'Amaury, daughter of Jean I de Montfort Comte de Montfort and Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire, in 1259
; Genealogy.EU (Capet 6 page) says m. 1260.3,5
Robert IV de Dreux Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Montfort died on 14 November 1284; http://perso.club-internet.fr/jfcampio/64.HTM; Genealogy EU says d. 1282.3
      ; Cte Robert IV de Dreux, de Braine, et de Montfort, *1241, +1282; bur Braine; m.1260 Beatrix, Cts de Montfort (+1311), dau.of Cte Jean I de Montfort.3

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 196. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html#P1
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Dampierre-Bourbon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028324&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026902&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet6.html
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  9. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Margaret (?) of Scotland1,2

F, #16072, b. 28 February 1261, d. 9 April 1283
FatherAlexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots1,3,2 b. 4 Sep 1241, d. 19 Mar 1286
MotherMargaret (?) Princess of England1,3,2,4 b. 29 Oct 1240, d. Feb 1275
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Margaret (?) of Scotland was born on 28 February 1261.3,2 She married Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway, son of Magnus VI (?) King of Norway and Ingeborg (?) of Denmark, on 31 August 1281 at Bergen, Norway,
; his 1st wife.1,3,2,5
Margaret (?) of Scotland died on 9 April 1283 at Tonsberg, Norway, at age 22; died in childbirth.1,6,3,2

Family

Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway b. 1268, d. 15 Jul 1299
Child

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1290. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway1,2

M, #16073, b. 1268, d. 15 July 1299
FatherMagnus VI (?) King of Norway3,2 b. 1238, d. 9 May 1280
MotherIngeborg (?) of Denmark4,2 b. 1244, d. 1287
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway was born in 1268.2 He married Margaret (?) of Scotland, daughter of Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots and Margaret (?) Princess of England, on 31 August 1281 at Bergen, Norway,
; his 1st wife.1,5,6,2 Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway married Isabella de Brus, daughter of Sir Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick and Marjorie (Margaret) (?) Countess of Carrick, before 25 September 1293
; his 2nd wife.7,2
Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway died on 15 July 1299 at Bergen, Norway.1,2
Erik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway was buried after 15 July 1299 at Kristkirche, Bergen, Norway.2
      ; Eirik Magnusson, King of Norway (1280-99), *1268, +Bergen 13/15.7.1299, bur Kristkirche, Bergen; 1m: Bergen ca 31.8.1281 Margaret of Scotland (*28.2.1261 +9.4.1283); 2m: before 25.9.1293 Isabella Bruce (+1358.)2 He was King of Norway, Erik II (the Priest Hater), whose reign was marked by a war with the Hansa towns, in which he suffered a reverse. As a result he was obliged to grant the towns full privileges in Norway and to join the Hanseatic League. between 1280 and 1299.3

Family 1

Margaret (?) of Scotland b. 28 Feb 1261, d. 9 Apr 1283
Child

Family 2

Isabella de Brus d. 1358
Child

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html
  3. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 267. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 24. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 411 (Chart 23). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1290. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots1,2,3

F, #16074, b. before 9 April 1283, d. 26 September 1290
FatherErik II Magnusson (?) King of Norway1,3,4 b. 1268, d. 15 Jul 1299
MotherMargaret (?) of Scotland1,3,4 b. 28 Feb 1261, d. 9 Apr 1283
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots was born before 9 April 1283 at Tönsberg, Norway.1,5,3,4 She and Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England were engaged in July 1290; Per Med Lands "m. Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290."6,7,4
Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots died on 26 September 1290; died onboard ship off Orkney enroute from Norway to Scotland.1,3,4
Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots was buried after 26 September 1290 at Christ Kirk, Bergen, Norway.3,4
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "EDWARD "of Caernarvon", son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "die S Marci Evangelistæ" 25 Apr [1284] at Caernarvon of "domini regi Angliæ filius…Eadwardus"[826]. He succeeded his mother in 1290 as Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil. Created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester 7 Feb 1301. Created Duke of Aquitaine in May 1306. He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England. Crowned in Westminster Abbey 24/25 Feb 1308. The barons, weakened by the strong rule of Edward's father, took the opportunity to regain their position under the new king of weaker character. A crisis was triggered immediately after his accession due to the unpopularity of his favourite Piers Gaveston. Edward was obliged to accept a committee of Lords Ordainers to control his excesses, remove his own advisers and impose reforms. Gaveston was captured, tried and beheaded near Warwick 19 Jun 1312. Edward's first cousin Thomas Earl of Lancaster led the discontented barons, but lacked the ability to push through the reforms which were needed. Political confusion increased, but the various baronial factions found common cause in opposition to the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the younger. The Earl of Lancaster, by now in open rebellion, was captured and beheaded at his castle in Pontefract. The other rebellious barons were defeated at Boroughbridge in 1322. But Edward lacked the leadership to push his advantage. Matters came to a head with the queen's affair with Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. The couple attracted baronial support to overthrow the king, who fled to Wales Oct 1326. His son Edward was appointed "Keeper of the Realm" by an extraordinary council at Bristol 26 Oct 1326. He was deposed 20 Jan 1327 by a Parliament convened without his authority, and he formally abdicated in favour of his son 25 Jan 1327. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records in graphic detail the king´s privations while imprisoned and the brutality of his murder[827].
     "Betrothed (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290) to MARGARET Queen of Scotland "the Maid of Norway", daughter of ERIK II King of Norway & his wife Margaret of Scotland (Tönsberg before 9 Apr 1283-on board ship off Orkney [26 Sep] 1290, bur Bergen, Christ's Church). The dispensation for the marriage of “Edwardo nato...Edvardi regis Angliæ” and “Margareta nata...Erici Norwegiæ regis, neptis...regis Scotiæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 3o consanguinity between the parties[828]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records the betrothal between "Edward I king of England…Edward his son and heir" and "Margaret the daughter of the king of Norway…the true heiress of Scotland" in 1290[829]. This betrothal was agreed under the Treaty of Birgham in Jul 1290 which confirmed that Scotland would retain its independence after the marriage took place[830]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester confirms the betrothal of "Margareta filia Irici regis Norwegiæ…" and "Eadwardo regis Eadwardi filio" when recording her death[831].
     "Betrothed (31 Jul 1291) to BLANCHE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France & his second wife Marie de Brabant ([1278/85]-Vienna 14 Mar 1306, bur Vienna, Minoritenkirche).
     "Betrothed (contract 7 Jan 1297) to PHILIPPINE de Flandre, daughter of GUY Count of Flanders & his second wife Isabelle de Luxembourg Ctss of Namur (-Paris 1304). The Annals of Worcester record the betrothal of “Edwardum filium regis” and “filiam comitis Flandriæ” as part of the treaty agreed between England and Flanders “die Purificationis beatæ Mariæ” (2 Feb) in 1296[832]. The Chronique Normande names "Philippe" as the daughter of "conte en Flandres…Guy de Dampierre" by his second wife "fille au conte de Luxembourg", adding that she was betrothed to "le roy d´Angleterre…Edouart son filz"[833]. The marriage contract between “Edward...Edward nostre...fiuz” and “Guy conte de Flandres et marchis de Namur...Phelippe fille au dit conte” is dated 7 Jan 1296 (O.S.)[834]. Philippe IV King of France obliged her father to abandon the betrothal after summoning him to Paris and imprisoning him for four months with two of his sons. Philippine was sent to Paris for her education[835].
     "m (contract 12 May 1299, betrothed 20 May 1303, Boulogne-sur-Mer 22 Jan 1308) ISABELLE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France & his wife doña Juana I Queen of Navarre (Paris [1291/92]-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). Père Anselme states that Isabelle was born in 1292 but does not cite the primary source on which he bases this date[836]. The chronology of the births of Philippe IV’s children is tight and would fit better if Isabelle was born in 1291. Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[837]. The betrothal contract between “Ed. filz du roi d´Angleterre” and “Isabel fille du roi de France” is dated 20 May 1303[838]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "apud Boloniam…in festo Conversionis Sancti Pauli" in 1308 of "rex Edwardus" and "Isabellam filiam regis Franciæ Philippi"[839]. The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1308 "apud Boloniam supra mare" of "Eduardus Angliæ rex" and "filiam unicam regis Franciæ Philippi...Isabellam"[840]. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the marriage “apud Boloniam...V Kal Feb” of “rex Edwardus” and “Isabellam filiam...regis Francie”[841]. She was crowned Queen of England with her husband [23/25] Feb 1308. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the return of the couple to England 5 Feb and their coronation “VII Kal Mar...apud Westmonasterium”[842]. Her relationship with her husband steadily deteriorated over the years, culminating in her flight to France to seek the protection of her brother Philippe V King of France. In 1325, Roger [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer became her lover, and together they plotted her husband's overthrow. She was declared head of the Council of Regency by Parliament on the deposition of her husband. However, her rule was unpopular. She signed an unfavourable treaty with France and recognised Robert Bruce as king of Scotland for the first time. In addition, Mortimer alienated the barons with his territorial ambitions. Her son seized power, had Mortimer arrested after a Great Council meeting at Nottingham 19 Oct 1330 and condemned him to death. Isabelle thereafter lived in retirement. Froissart records that Isabelle went to "Ostrevant en Haynau en un chastel…Buignicourt dont messires Nicoles d´Aubrecicourt estoit sires"[843]. The Chronicon Angliæ records the death “die Sancti Rufi martyris” of “domina mater regis Edwardi domina Ysabella” and her burial “in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum Londoniis”, dated to 1357 from the context[844].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Edward's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[826] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 232.
[827] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, pp. 28-33.
[828] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[829] John of Fordun, Annals, LXXXIII, p. 313.
[830] Young (1998), pp. 104-5.
[831] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.
[832] Annales de Wigornia, p. 529.
[833] Chronique Normande (14th century), p. 1.
[834] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 170.
[835] Nicholas (1992), pp. 187-8.
[836] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 91.
[837] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206.
[838] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 26.
[839] Annales Londonienses, p. 152.
[840] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597.
[841] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3.
[842] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3.
[843] Froissart, Tome I, Livre 1, 8, pp. 20-1.
[844] Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (1874), p. 38.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Norway 3): “H1. [1m.] MARGARET "the Fair Maid of Norway", Queen of Scotland (1286-90), *before 9.4.1283, +on a ship nr the Orkneys before 26.9.1290, bur Bergen”.8

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGARET "the Maid of Norway" (Tönsberg before 9 Apr 1283-on board ship off Orkney [26 Sep] 1290, bur Bergen, Christ's Church). John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death "V Id Apr" in 1283 of "domina Margareta Noricorum regina" leaving "unicam filiam…Margaretam"[651]. Acknowledged as heir to the throne by the magnates of Scotland in Feb 1284, she succeeded her grandfather in 1286 as MARGARET Queen of Scotland, although her succession was, according to John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator), considered provisional depending whether her grandfather's widow was pregnant[652]. The Liber Pluscardensis records that "domino episcopo Sanctiandreæ, domino Willelmo Frasier, domino comite de Fife Duncano cum domino Duncano de Cumyn comite de Buchan…ex parte boriali aquæ de Forth" and "ex parte…australi…Robertus episcopus Glasquensis cum domino Johanne Cumyn et Jacobo senescallo Scociæ" were appointed guardians of the realm after the death of King Alexander[653]. Negotiations for her return from Norway were preceded by the Treaty of Salisbury 9 Nov 1289 under which Edward I King of England confirmed that the government of the guardians in Scotland should be obeyed. The dispensation for the marriage of “Edwardo nato...Edvardi regis Angliæ” and “Margareta nata...Erici Norwegiæ regis, neptis...regis Scotiæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 3o consanguinity between the parties[654]. The Treaty of Birgham Jul 1290 confirmed the Queen's betrothal and that Scotland would retain its independence after the marriage took place[655]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records the betrothal between "Edward I king of England…Edward his son and heir" and "Margaret the daughter of the king of Norway…the true heiress of Scotland" in 1290[656]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in Orkney of "Margareta filia Irici regis Norwegiæ et Margaretæ filiæ Alexandri regis Scotiæ et Margaretæ reginæ filiæ Henrici regis Anglorum", adding that she was betrothed to "Eadwardo regis Eadwardi filio"[657]. The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1290 of "virgo Margareta filia Erici regis Norvegiæ"[658]. Queen Margaret's premature death plunged Scotland into a succession crisis, during which thirteen rival claimants to the throne emerged. King Edward I intervened more forcibly in Scottish affairs, acquiring the right to reappoint the guardians 11 Jun 1291 after which he became effective direct ruler of Scotland[659]. The choice of the new ruler was submitted in Aug 1291 to a specially appointed court, Robert Bruce and John Balliol emerging as leading candidates, the final judgment 17 Nov 1292 favouring the latter.
     "Betrothed (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290) to EDWARD Prince of Wales, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England."
Med Lands cites:
[651] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. X, Cap. XXXVII, p. 125.
[652] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. XI, Cap. III, p. 138.
[653] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VIII, CI, p. 118.
[654] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[655] Young (1998), pp. 104-5.
[656] John of Fordun (Skene), Annals, LXXXIII, p. 313.
[657] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.
[658] Annales Islandici, 1290, p. 165.
[659] Young (1998), pp. 112 and 130.4
She was Queen of Scotland, [Ashley, p. 409] MARGARET, MAID OF NORWAY queen of Scotland, 19 March 1286-26 September 1290. Margaret was the eldest surviving child of Margaret, the daughter of ALEXANDER III, who had married Erik II, king of Norway in 1281. The infant Margaret was born in April 1283, so was less than three years old when her grandfather died in an accident. The child was then living at Bergen in Norway. The Scottish royal line was in crisis. The rule of primogeniture, which had been introduced by MALCOLM III, was still too new and untested by the Scots to know how it worked in circumstances like these. They turned to the English king, EDWARD I, for help. Edward decreed that Margaret was the rightful queen and that she would be married to his son, Edward. Although he maintained that Scotland would retain its independence, he was ensuring that the clerks inserted minor clauses that allowed him loopholes. It was one such that caused him to take possession of Man in the summer of 1290. In September 1290, Margaret sailed to Scotland, but the rough crossing proved too much for her weak constitution and she died on board ship in a storm off Orkney. There followed the first Interregnum, during which period a court under the direction of Edward I, decided the succession. It was to fall to JOHN Balliol. between 19 March 1286 and 26 September 1290.9

Family

Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England b. 25 Apr 1284, d. 21 Sep 1327

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1290. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIIdied1327B.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 198. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.

Alexander Dunkeld (?) of Scotland1,2,3,4

M, #16075, b. 21 January 1264, d. 28 August 1284
FatherAlexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots1,5,2,6,4 b. 4 Sep 1241, d. 19 Mar 1286
MotherMargaret (?) Princess of England1,5,2,7,6,4 b. 29 Oct 1240, d. Feb 1275
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Alexander Dunkeld (?) of Scotland was born on 21 January 1264 at Jedburgh Abbey, Jedburgh, Scotland; Ashley (p 197) says b. ca 1259.8,5,2,6 He married Marguerite (?) de Flandre, daughter of Guy II de Dampierre Graaf van Vlaanderen, Graaf van Namen and Isabelle (?) de Luxemburg, Heiress of Namur, on 15 November 1282 at Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland,
;
Her 1st husband.9,5,10,2,11,3,12,6
Alexander Dunkeld (?) of Scotland died on 28 August 1284 at Lindores Abbey, Lindores (near) Newburgh, co. Fife, Scotland, at age 20.1,8,5,2,6
Alexander Dunkeld (?) of Scotland was buried after 28 August 1284 at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     21 Jan 1264
     DEATH     28 Jan 1284 (aged 20)
     Scottish Royalty. The son of Alexander III, King of Scots and his queen, Margaret Plantagenet. He married Margaret Dampierre, daughter of Guy, Count of Flanders, on November 15, 1282. They had no children. Alexander died two years later at Lindores Abbey at the age of 20. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alexander III, King of Scots 1241–1286
          Margaret Plantagenet 1240–1275
     Spouse
          Marguerite de Flandre-Dampierre unknown–1331 (m. 1282)
     Siblings
          Margaret Dunkeld Sverre 1261–1283
          David Dunkeld 1273–1281
     BURIAL     Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 9 Mar 2005
     Find A Grave Memorial 10590843.2,6,4
      ; Per Med Lands:
     "ALEXANDER (Jedburgh, Roxburghshire 21 Jun 1264-Lindores Abbey, Fife 28 Jan 1283, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the birth "apud Jedword XII Kal Jan" in 1264 of "regi Alexandro filius, paterno nomine vocatus"[660]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the death "apud Lundoris" in 1283 of "Alexander filius Alexandri tercii et…Margaretæ sororis Edwardi Langschankiæ regis Angliæ" aged 20 and his burial "apud Dunfermlyng cum fratre"[661]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the death "in festo Sancte Agnetis secundo" in 1283 of "Alexander filius regis Alexandri" aged 20 and his burial "in Dunfermling"[662].
     "m (Roxburgh 15 Nov 1282) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, daughter of GUY de Dampierre Count of Flanders & his second wife Isabelle de Luxembourg (-after 17 Oct 1327, maybe 1331). The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage at Roxburgh in 1279 of "Alexander filius Alexandri tercii et…Margaretæ sororis Edwardi Langschankiæ regis Angliæ" and "filiam comitis Flandreæ"[663]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the marriage "apud Roxburgh…dominica proxima post festum Martini" of "Alexander filius regis Alexandri" and "filiam comitis Flandrie" and the celebration which lasted 15 days, adding that she returned to Flanders after her husband died[664]. She married secondly (Namur 3 Jul 1286) as his second wife, Reinald I Graaf van Gelre. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Rennolt…grave van Gelre" married secondly "dye dochter van dye grave van Flanderen", naming her "Mergreta" in a later passage[665]. The contract of marriage between "Renauls cuens de Ghelre et dus de Lemburgh" and "Guyon conte de Flandre et marchis de Namur et…dame Ysabel se feme…et noble damoisel Margherite fille dou conte et delle contesse devant ditte" is dated 21 Apr 1286[666]. Pope John XXII permitted "nobili mulieri Margarete relicte quondam Raynaldi comitis Gelrensis" to choose her own confessor, dated 17 Oct 1327[667]. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "dye gravinne van Gelre, Mergreta dochter van Flanderen" died in 1321 [incorrect date, should be 1331?] and was buried "toe Groenendaell"[668]."
Med Lands cites:
[660] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. X, Cap. XVIII, p. 101.
[661] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CXXX, p. 108.
[662] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 114.
[663] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CXXX, p. 108.
[664] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 114.
[665] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, pp. 188 and 190.
[666] Ernst, S. P. (1847) Histoire de Limbourg, Tome VI (Liège), CCLXIX, p. 331.
[667] Sauerland, H. V. (1903) Urkunden und Regesten zur Geschichte der Rheinlande aus dem vatikanischen Archiv (Bonn) (“Rheinlande Vatikanischen”), Band II, 1309, p. 85.
[668] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 190.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de Flandre (-after 17 Oct 1327, maybe 1331?). The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage at Roxburgh in 1279 of "Alexander filius Alexandri tercii et…Margaretæ sororis Edwardi Langschankiæ regis Angliæ" and "filiam comitis Flandreæ"[721]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the marriage "apud Roxburgh…dominica proxima post festum Martini" of "Alexander filius regis Alexandri" and "filiam comitis Flandrie" and the celebration which lasted 15 days, adding that she returned to Flanders after her husband died[722]. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Rennolt…grave van Gelre" married secondly "dye dochter van dye grave van Flanderen", naming her "Mergreta" in a later passage[723]. The contract of marriage between "Renauls cuens de Ghelre et dus de Lemburgh" and "Guyon conte de Flandre et marchis de Namur et…dame Ysabel se feme…et noble damoisel Margherite fille dou conte et delle contesse devant ditte" is dated 21 Apr 1286[724]. Pope John XXII permitted "nobili mulieri Margarete relicte quondam Raynaldi comitis Gelrensis" to choose her own confessor, dated 17 Oct 1327[725]. The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "dye gravinne van Gelre, Mergreta dochter van Flanderen" died in 1321 [incorrect date, should be 1331?] and was buried "toe Groenendaell"[726].
     "m firstly (Roxburgh 1279 or 15 Nov 1282) ALEXANDER Prince of Scotland, son of ALEXANDER III "the Glorious" King of Scotland & his first wife Margaret of England (Jedburgh, Roxburghshire 21 Jun 1264-Lindores Abbey, Fife 28 Jan 1283, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife).
     "m secondly (Namur 3 Jul 1286) as his second wife, REINALD I Graaf van Gelre, son of OTTO II Graaf van Gelre & his second wife Philippa de Dammartin (-9 Oct 1326)."
Med Lands cites:
[721] Skene, F. J. H. (ed.) (1877) Liber Pluscardensis, Historians of Scotland Vol. VII (Edinburgh) Vol. I, Liber VII, CXXX, p. 108.
[722] Turnbull, W. B. (1842) Extracta e Variis Cronicis Scocie, from the Ancient Manuscript in the Advocates Library at Edinburgh (Edinburgh) ("Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie"), p. 114.
[723] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, pp. 188 and 190.
[724] Ernst, S. P. (1847) Histoire de Limbourg, Tome VI (Liège), CCLXIX, p. 331.
[725] Sauerland, H. V. (1903) Urkunden und Regesten zur Geschichte der Rheinlande aus dem vatikanischen Archiv (Bonn) (“Rheinlande Vatikanischen”), Band II, 1309, p. 85.
[726] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 190.12

Family

Marguerite (?) de Flandre b. bt 1268 - 1270, d. 1330

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 15. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 February 2020), memorial page for Alexander Dunkeld (21 Jan 1264–28 Jan 1284), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10590843, citing Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10590843/alexander-dunkeld. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Alexanderdied1283. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 397.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013723&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 5 page (Dampierre family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders5.html
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Margueritedied1331.

David (?) of Scotland1,2

M, #16076, b. 20 March 1273, d. 1284
FatherAlexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots1,2 b. 4 Sep 1241, d. 19 Mar 1286
MotherMargaret (?) Princess of England1,2,3 b. 29 Oct 1240, d. Feb 1275
Last Edited3 May 2008
     David (?) of Scotland was born on 20 March 1273; Ashley (p 197) says b. ca 1276.4,2
David (?) of Scotland died in 1284 at Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland; Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld page) says d. end of June 1281.1,2

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Margaret Drummond1

F, #16077, d. circa 1375
FatherSir Malcolm Drummond2,3,4 b. c 1270, d. c 1346
MotherAnnabel? Graham5,6
Last Edited26 Aug 2019
     Margaret Drummond married Sir John Logie.7,3
Margaret Drummond married David II Le Brus (?) King of Scots, son of Robert I de Bruce King of Scots and Lady Elizabeth de Burgh, circa 13 February 1364 at Inchmahome Priory, Aberfoyle, Scotland.1,8,3
Margaret Drummond and David II Le Brus (?) King of Scots were divorced on 20 March 1370.8,3
Margaret Drummond died circa 1375.1
      ; MARGARET DRUMMOND; m 1st, Sir John Logie, and 2nd, April 1363, DAVID II in the chapel of the Priory of Inchmahome. Against a sentence of divorce from David, pronounced in 1370, Margaret appealed to the Pope, and so great, it is said, was her interest at Avignon, that Scotland was saved from an interdict only by her opportune decease.7

Family 1

Sir John Logie

Family 2

David II Le Brus (?) King of Scots b. 5 Mar 1324, d. 22 Feb 1371

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 548 (Chart 41). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 13: Scotland: Houses of Bruce and Stuart. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Malcolm Drummond: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108355&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN Graham: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108356&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN Graham, (Annabel) inghen Dabidh a Graem: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108356&tree=LEO
  7. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Drummond, Earls of Perth Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 548 (Chart 41), 550-551.

David Stewart Earl Palatine of Strathearn, Earl of Caithness1,2,3

M, #16078, b. 1356, d. before 5 March 1389
FatherRobert II Stewart King of the Scots1,3,4 b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390
MotherEuphemia Ross Countess of Moray and of Strathearn1,3,4 b. c 1330, d. 1387
Last Edited3 Sep 2019
     David Stewart Earl Palatine of Strathearn, Earl of Caithness married (?) Lindsay, daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay Knt., of Glenesk and Catherine Sterling of Glenesk.5
David Stewart Earl Palatine of Strathearn, Earl of Caithness was born in 1356.6
David Stewart Earl Palatine of Strathearn, Earl of Caithness died before 5 March 1389.1,3
      ; David, Earl Palatine of Strathearn, was granted that earldom 1371, became also Earl of Caithness, 1375, and d before 5 March 1389/90, leaving a dau.3 He was Earl of Caithness.6 He was Earl Palatine of Strathearn.7

Family 1

(?) Lindsay

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 548 (Chart 41). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S4719] John P. Ravilious, "The Earls of Menteith", The Scottish Genealogist LXIV:49-52 (June 2017): p. 51. Hereinafter cited as "The Earls of Menteith."
  5. [S2022] Stirnet Genealogy, online http://www.stirnet.com/, Lindsay 01 (Families covered: Lindsay of Craigie, Lindsay of Crawford, Lindsay of Dunrod, Lindsay of Ercildum, Lindsay of Glenesk, Lindsay of Lamberton, Lindsay of Luffness):
    http://www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/ll/lindsay01.htm. Hereinafter cited as Stirnet Genealogy.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 13: Scotland: Houses of Bruce and Stuart. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Graham, Dukes of Montrose Family Page.

Walter Stewart Earl of Athol and Caithness1,2,3,4

M, #16079, b. circa 1358, d. 26 March 1437
FatherRobert II Stewart King of the Scots1,5,6 b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390
MotherEuphemia Ross Countess of Moray and of Strathearn1,5,6 b. c 1330, d. 1387
Last Edited3 Sep 2019
     Walter Stewart Earl of Athol and Caithness was born circa 1358.4 He married Margaret Barclay Lady of Brechin, daughter of Sir David Barclay of Brechin and Janet Keith, before 19 October 1378.5,3,7

Walter Stewart Earl of Athol and Caithness died on 26 March 1437 at Edinburgh, Scotland; executed.1,5,3,4
     He was Earl Palatine of Strathearn.4

; Walter, Earl of Atholl and Caithness, Justiciar of Scotland, was implicated in the plot that led to JAMES I's assassination, and was publicly tortured to death in Edinburgh, his head being crowned with a red-hot iron crown inscribed "the king of traitors'', 26 March 1437. He m before 19 Oct 1378, Margaret, Lady of Brechin (who d before 1 Aug 1404), dau and heiress of Sir David Barclay, Ld of Brechin, and by her had two sons.5

; van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: vol I page 160.4

Family

Margaret Barclay Lady of Brechin d. b 1 Aug 1404
Children

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 548 (Chart 41). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 13: Scotland: Houses of Bruce and Stuart. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter Stewart: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006080&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S4719] John P. Ravilious, "The Earls of Menteith", The Scottish Genealogist LXIV:49-52 (June 2017): p. 51. Hereinafter cited as "The Earls of Menteith."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Barclay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00324660&tree=LEO

Elizabeth (Jean or Catherine) Stewart1,2

F, #16080
FatherRobert II Stewart King of the Scots1,2,3 b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390
MotherEuphemia Ross Countess of Moray and of Strathearn1,2,3 b. c 1330, d. 1387
Last Edited3 Sep 2019
     Elizabeth (Jean or Catherine) Stewart married Sir David Lindsay 1st Earl of Crawford, son of Sir Alexander Lindsay Knt., of Glenesk and Catherine Sterling of Glenesk, circa 22 February 1375
; Burke's Peerage says "m about 1384."1,4,2,5,6,3
     Elizabeth (Jean or Catherine) Stewart was also known as Jean Stewart.7

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S4719] John P. Ravilious, "The Earls of Menteith", The Scottish Genealogist LXIV:49-52 (June 2017): p. 51. Hereinafter cited as "The Earls of Menteith."
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 43-8, p. 59. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Crawford & Balcarres Family Page.
  6. [S2022] Stirnet Genealogy, online http://www.stirnet.com/, Lindsay 01 (Families covered: Lindsay of Craigie, Lindsay of Crawford, Lindsay of Dunrod, Lindsay of Ercildum, Lindsay of Glenesk, Lindsay of Lamberton, Lindsay of Luffness):
    http://www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/ll/lindsay01.htm. Hereinafter cited as Stirnet Genealogy.
  7. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  8. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 43E-9, p. 63.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David Lindsay: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116925&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 43-9, p. 59.