Alan de Multon1

M, #19111, d. after 1249
FatherSir Thomas de Multon2
MotherSarah de Flete2
Last Edited13 Sep 2020
     Alan de Multon married Serota de Lancaster, daughter of Gilbert Fitz Roger Fitz Reinfrid 4th Baron Kendal and Hawise (Helwise) de Lancaster Baroness Kendal; his 1st wife.3 Alan de Multon married Alice de Lucy, daughter of Richard de Lucy Lord of Egremont & Copeland and Ada de Morville, before 1219; his 2nd wife, Ravilious cites:
2. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 -
The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain
and the United Kingdom.1,2,3
Alan de Multon died after 1249.2

Family 2

Alice de Lucy d. b 24 Mar 1287
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Berners Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1840] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #2 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #2 23 Nov 2004."
  3. [S2153] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 May 2007: "Re: CP Addition: Elizabeth de Tiliol, wife of Anthony,     Lord Lucy (d. 1343)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 May 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 May 2007."

Alice de Lucy1

F, #19112, d. before 24 March 1287
FatherRichard de Lucy Lord of Egremont & Copeland1,2,3 d. 1213
MotherAda de Morville1,2,3 d. a 1230
Last Edited13 Sep 2020
     Alice de Lucy married Alan de Multon, son of Sir Thomas de Multon and Sarah de Flete, before 1219; his 2nd wife, Ravilious cites:
2. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 -
The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain
and the United Kingdom.1,2,3
Alice de Lucy died before 24 March 1287.2
     ; per Ravilious: coheiress of her father[2], her inheritance included half the lordship of Papcastle (Allerdale below Derwent), Cumberland (Sanders p. 134-5)[1]
Ravilious cites:
1. I. J. Sanders, "English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and
Descent, 1086-1327," Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.
2. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 -
The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain
and the United Kingdom.2

Family

Alan de Multon d. a 1249
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Berners Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1840] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #2 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #2 23 Nov 2004."
  3. [S2153] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 May 2007: "Re: CP Addition: Elizabeth de Tiliol, wife of Anthony,     Lord Lucy (d. 1343)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 May 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 May 2007."

William de Dacre1,2

M, #19113, d. 1258
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited8 Sep 2020
     William de Dacre died in 1258.1
     William de Dacre lived at Dacre, co. Cumberland, England.1 GAV-22 EDV-23.

; WILLIAM de DACRE (i.e., of Dacre, Cumberland); Sheriff Cumberland 1236-48 and 1268 and Yorks 1248-50; d 1258.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Berners Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint og 1883 edition), p. 152. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ranulph de Dacre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139879&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Dacre Family Page.

Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria1,2,3,4

M, #19114, b. circa 927, d. circa 990
FatherRudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria2,1,3,4 b. c 901, d. a 949
MotherSiburgis (?)5 b. c 903
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria was born circa 927.6 He married Ita von Öhningen, daughter of Konrad/Cuno (?) Herzog von Schwaben, Graf von Oenningen and Richlind/Reginlint (?) von Schwaben.2,3,4
Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria was buried circa 990 at Weingarten Abbey, Ravensburg, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
     Early Swabian nobility. Born at an unknown date as the son of Rudolf I. von Altdorf. He married Ita von Öhningen, a granddaughter of Emperor Otto the Great. They've had at least three children, Heinrich, Welf and Richlinde. He died on a March 10th in either 990 or 992.
     Family Members
     Children
          Heinrich von Altdorf
          Richlind von Altdorf unknown–1045
          Welf II Of Altdorf unknown–1030
     BURIAL     Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 10 Sep 2017
     Find A Grave Memorial 183209177.7
Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria died circa 990.4
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.2 GAV-29 EDV-29. Rudolf II (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria was also known as Rudolph II of Bavaria.

Family

Ita von Öhningen b. 974, d. a 16 Oct 1000
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020466&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020468&tree=LEO
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28531
  6. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I28528
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 November 2019), memorial page for Rudolf II von Altdorf (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 183209177, citing Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183209177/rudolf_ii-von_altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richardis von Altdorf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331139&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Richlinddied1045MAdalberoEbersberg. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020470&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020472&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIIAltdorfdied1030

Siburgis (?)1

F, #19115, b. circa 903
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited13 Feb 2003
     Siburgis (?) married Rudolf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, Duke of Bavaria, son of Heinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen' and Atha/Beata von Hohenwart.1 Siburgis (?) was born circa 903.1
     GAV-30 EDV-30.

Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau1,2

M, #19116, b. circa 810, d. 16 February 863
FatherWelf I (?) Graf in Swabia2,1,3,4,5 b. c 775, d. bt 824 - 825
MotherHeilwig/Hedwig/Eigilwich (?) of Saxony6,1,5 b. bt 778 - 780, d. 19 Apr 843
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was born circa 810.7 He married Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours, daughter of Hugues III 'le Méfiant' (?) Comte de Tours and Ava/Bava (?) Countess Sundgau (Upper Alsace), Countess of Tours, between 834 and 838;
Her 1st husband.8,1,2,9,10,11
Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau died on 16 February 863; Find A Grave says d. 876; Wikipedia says d. ca 864; Genealogy.EU says d. aft 862; Med Lands says d. 22 Mar 862/66.1,2,12,9,11
Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was buried after 16 February 963 at Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     800, Bourgogne, France
     DEATH     22 Mar 862 (aged 61–62), Auxerre, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France
[Text copied from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Parents
          Welf I of Bavaria
          Hedwig (Heilwig) von Sachsen 775–843
     Spouse
          Adelaide de Tours de Bourgogne 805–866
     Siblings
          Emma of Bavaria of Altdorf
          Judith of Bavaria 805–843
     Children
          Hugh Welf unknown–886
          Conrad le Jeune de Bourgogne 824–876
     BURIAL     Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France
     Created by: Our Family History
     Added: 1 Jun 2018
     Find a Grave Memorial 190252845.13
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Konrad I was the son of Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf, the oldest known member of the Elder House of Welf. Konrad was the count of several counties, most notably the Aargau and Auxerre, around Lake Constance, as well as Paris from 859 to 863. He was also the lay abbot of Sainte-Germaine in Auxerre.
     "Konrad's sister Judith was the second wife of Emperor Louis 'the Pious'. In 858 Konrad and his family, his wife Aelis de Tours and his sons Hugo and Konrad II, abandoned their sovereign Ludwig II 'the German', king of the East-Franks, and went over to Ludwig's half-brother Charles 'the Bald', Judith's son. They were generously rewarded and Konrad was appointed to many countships. Ludwig II confiscated his Bavarian fiefs and lands. Konrad I died on 16 February 863."1

GAV-31.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Conrad I, Ct of Paris and Auxerre, +after 862; m.Aelis, dau.of Ct Hugo of Tours."2



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Conrad I the Elder (died about 864) was the count of several counties, most notably the Aargau and Auxerre, around Lake Constance, as well as Paris from 859 to 862/4. He was also the lay abbot of Saint-Germaine in Auxerre.[1] Conrad's father was Welf.[2] He was one of the early Welfs, a member of the Bavarian branch, and his sister Judith was the second wife of Louis the Pious.
Marriage
     "Between 834 and 838, Conrad married Adelaide of Tours, daughter of Hugh of Tours.[3] They had:
-- Hugh[1]
-- Conrad the Younger[1]
-- Probably his son was also Welf I count of Alpgau and Linzgau in Swabia[2]
Biography
     "In 858, he and his family, abandoned their sovereign Louis the German and went over to Charles the Bald, Judith's son.[1] They were generously rewarded and Conrad was appointed to many countships. Louis the German confiscated his Bavarian fiefs and lands.[4]
     "The Miracula Sancti Germani calls Conrad Chuonradus princeps (prince, sovereign), when recording his marriage. By some accounts his wife re-married to Robert the Strong after his death.
References
1. Reuter 1992, p. 43.
2. Heidecker 2010, p. 199.
3. Nelson 1996, p. 42.
4. Reuter 1992, p. 45.
Sources
-- Heidecker, Karl Josef (2010). The Divorce of Lothar II: Christian Marriage and Political Power in the Carolingian World. Translated by Guest, Tanis M. Cornell University Press.199
-- Nelson, Janet L. (1996). Frankish World, 750-900. Hambledon Press.
-- Reuter, Timothy, ed. (1992). The Annals of Fulda. Volume II. Manchester University Press."9



; Per Genealogy.EU: "Conrad I, Cte de Paris et Auxerre, +after 862; m.Aelis, dau.of Ct Hugo de Tours."10



;      NB. There seems to be some confusion about which Konrad II was the son of Konrad I Count of Auxerre. Genealogics, Med Lands and Wikipedia seem to agree on a Konrad II, son of Konrad I, and who m. Waldrada. Wikipedia also shows Konrad II as having married both: m1. Judith of Friuli (a daughter of Eberhard of Friuli), and later m2. Waldrada of Worms.
     Genealogics has a Konrad II (c830-bef876) , son of Konrad I, who m. Waldrada/Vaudree. This Konrad I had a son Rudolf I, King of Upper Bourgogne, and a dau. Adelheid d'Auxerre (who m. Richard 'le Justicier', Count of Autun and Duke of Burgundy.
     Med Lands, has a Conrad, son of Conrad (Welf) who m. Waldrada and had a son Rudolf I, King of Upper Burgundy, and a dau. Adelais who m. Richard comte d'Autun.
     Wikipedia (regarding Conrad I and II) shows a Conrad I 'the Elder' who had a son Conrad II 'the Younger' who "married Judith, daughter of Eberhard of Friuli, and later Waldrada of Worms" and who had the same son, Rudolf, and dau., Adelaide.

     The confusion seems to lie when examining the proposals of those who attribute the Adeldunde who m. Ehrenfried I, Graf von Bliesgau, to a "Konrad of Burgundy".
     Wikipedia (regarding Ehrenfried I) says that Ehrenfried m. "Adelgunde of Burgundy (860–902), a daughter of Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy, Count of Auxerre, and Judith de Frioul." However, the Wikipedia page for this Conrad II (see above) does not list a dau. named Adelgunde for that Conrad II.
     Genealogy.EU (Cleves 2) says: "Erenfried I, Gf im Bliesgau und Charmois, fl 866/904; m. Adelgunde, dau. of Konrad of Burgundy, and left issue"
     Wikipedia (regarding Eberhard of Friuli) says that Eberhard had a dau. "Judith of Friuli (died ca. 881), first married Arnulf I of Bavaria, second married Conrad II of Auxerre."

     I have chosen to show Konrad II 'the Younger' as having m1. Judith of Friuli (a daughter of Eberhard of Friuli), and later m2. Waldrada of Worms. I choose to show Adelgunde as the dau. of his first marriage with Judith and Rudolf & Adelheid as the children of his second marriage with Waldrada. GA Vaut.14,15,16,9,17,18,19,20,11



; Per Genealogics: "Konrad I was the son of Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf, the oldest known member of the Elder House of Welf. Konrad was the count of several counties, most notably the Aargau and Auxerre, around Lake Constance, as well as Paris from 859 to 863. He was also the lay abbot of Sainte-Germaine in Auxerre. Konrad's sister Judith was the second wife of Emperor Louis 'the Pious'. In 858 Konrad and his family, his wife Aelis de Tours and his sons Hugo and Konrad II, abandoned their sovereign Ludwig II 'the German', king of the East-Franks, and went over to Ludwig's half-brother Charles 'the Bald', Judith's son. They were generously rewarded and Konrad was appointed to many countships. Ludwig II confiscated his Bavarian fiefs and lands. Konrad I died on 16 February 863."7



Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.7 Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was also known as Conrad I Count of Auxerre.9 Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was also known as Conrad I l'Ancien.12 Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was also known as Conrad I 'the Elder' Count of Paris and Auxerre.2 Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau was also known as Conrad I 'l'Ancien' (?) Comte de Paris, d'Auxerre.

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONRAD "l'Ancien" (-22 Mar [862/66]). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Chuonradum et Ruodolfum" as brothers of Empress Judith[1765]. Graf von Linz- und Argengau. Dux. Nithard records that Conrad and his brother Rudolf were forcibly tonsured in [Apr 830] by their sister's stepson, Lothar, then in revolt against his father, and sent to Aquitaine "to be held by Pepin"[1766]. Comte de Paris. The Miraculis Sancti Germani record that "Chuonradus princeps" was cured of an eye problem by the saint, and that he built the church of Saint-Germain at Auxerre in thanks[1767]. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[1768]. "Ludowicus…rex" confirmed an exchange between Grimald abbot of St Gallen and "quidam comis…Chuonratus" relating to property in Linzgau and Argengau, by charter dated 1 Apr 861[1769]. A poem by Walahfridus Strabus records the epitaph of "Chonradum comitem"[1770]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Mar of "Conradus comes"[1771].
     "m ADELAIS [de Tours], daughter of HUGUES Comte [de Tours] & his wife Ava ---. The Miraculis Sancti Germani name "Adheleid" as wife of "Chuonradus princeps"[1772]. A poem by Walahfridus Strabus records the epitaph of "Adelheidam"[1773]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Some secondary works[1774] assert that the second husband of Adelais was Robert "le Fort" [Capet]. If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as his known children were already born by the time Adelais's husband Conrad died. The assertion appears based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[1775]. Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais without providing the basis for this statement[1776]. A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[1777]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven)."
Med Lands Cites:
[1765] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 36, MGH SS II, p. 597.
[1766] Nithard I.3, p. 131.
[1767] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 3, MGH SS XIII, p. 401.
[1768] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469.
[1769] D LD 103, p. 149.
[1770] Walahfridi Strabi Carmen, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, p. 387.
[1771] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre) (“Histoire d´Auxerre”), IV, p. 11.
[1772] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 401, footnote 1 citing v. Dümmler Ostfr. Reich I, p. 422, as stating her origin.
[1773] Walahfridi Strabi Carmen, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, p. 391.
[1774] Including ES II 10.
[1775] Abbé E. Bougaud ( ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109.
[1776] Settipani (1993), p. 400.
[1777] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.21

Family

Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours b. 819, d. a Sep 866
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020396&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_(father_of_Judith). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIdied824B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eigilwich/Heilwig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020393&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020396&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020389&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I,_Count_of_Auxerre.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf I page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#ConradAuxerreMWaldrada
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2019), memorial page for Conrad I l'Ancien the Elder (unknown–876), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147274489, ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147274489/conrad_i-l_ancien-the_elder. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 April 2020), memorial page for Conrad “le Vieux” de Bourgogne, I (800–22 Mar 862), Find a Grave Memorial no. 190252845, citing Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Our Family History (contributor 47719401), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/190252845/conrad-de_bourgogne
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020419&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#ConradAuxerreMWaldrada
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_II,_Duke_of_Transjurane_Burgundy.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erenfried_I
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cleves 2 page (The Ezzon Family - Die Ezzonen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/cleves/cleves2.html
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eberhard_of_Friuli
  20. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 14 Jan 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#ConradIParisdiedafter862
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020418&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020417&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020419&tree=LEO

Atula/Adele/Athalia (?)1,2

F, #19117, b. between 800 and 810, d. before 814
FatherPepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy1,2 b. Apr 773, d. 8 Jul 810
MotherChrothais (?)1
Last Edited3 Nov 2019
     Atula/Adele/Athalia (?) was born between 800 and 810.1
Atula/Adele/Athalia (?) died before 814; Leo van der Pas says d. after 810.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference 67.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Atula/Adele/Athalia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331024&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Heribert (?)1,2

M, #19118
FatherPepin II (?) Cte de Senlis, sn de Valois1,2 d. c 922
Last Edited16 Apr 2020

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Adela (?) de Vermandois1,2

F, #19119
FatherHeribert I (?) Cte de Vermandois, sn de Senlis, de Peronne et de St.Quentin3,4,5,6 b. bt 840 - 850, d. c 902
Last Edited5 Apr 2020
     Adela (?) de Vermandois married Gebhard (?) Graf im Ufgau, son of Eberhard (?) Graf im Niederlahngau, Graf in der Ortenau and Wiltrud (?); Per Med Lands:
     "GEBHARD (-after 15 Jan 947). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Graf im Ufgau 940: "Otto…rex" donated "Meriske [Mörsch] in pago Vfgowe in comitatu Gebehardi" to the church of Speier "Baboni eiusdem comitis Burchardi vassallo in pago Hegouue" by charter dated 12 Feb 940 at the request of "Chuonradi…comitis nostri"[251]. "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[252].
     "m [ADELA], daughter of ---. Graf Gebhard's wife is not named explicitly in the sources so far consulted. However, an "Adela" is named in a name-list in the Reichenau memorial book dated [926/32] which appears to include members of the Konradiner family, Jackman suggesting that she is well placed in the list to be Graf Gebhard's wife[253], although this is not the only possible interpretation. Jackman suggests[254] that she was [Adela] de Vermandois, daughter of Héribert [I] Comte de Vermandois, although based solely only on onomastic grounds."
Med Lands cites:
[251] D O I 23, p. 110.
[252] D O I 85, p. 166.
[253] Jackman (1997), p. 38.
[254] Jackman (1997), pp. 36 and 38.2,3,6,7

     ; Per Med Lands:
     "[daughter [ADELA] . Jackman suggests[194] that the wife of Graf Gebhard [Konradiner] was the daughter of Héribert [I] Comte de Vermandois, although this appears supported only by onomastic indications. The name of Graf Gebhard's wife is not given explicitly in the sources. However, an "Adela" is named in a name-list in the Reichenau memorial book dated [926/32] which appears to include members of the Konradiner family, Jackman suggesting that she is well placed in the list to be Graf Gebhard's wife[195], although this is not the only possible interpretation of the text.
     "m GEBHARD Graf im Ufgau, son of EBERHARD Graf in der Ortenau [Konradiner] & his wife Wiltrud --- (-after 15 Jan 947).]"
Med Lands cites:
[194] Jackman (1997), pp. 36 and 38.
[195] Jackman (1997), p. 38.6


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.1 7,8.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313104&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gebhard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120362&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Adela) de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313104&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heribert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020187&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HeribertIdied900907. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#AdelaMGebhardKonradiner
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Gebharddied947
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120363&tree=LEO

Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech1,2

F, #19120, b. circa 810, d. 31 January 876
FatherWelf I (?) Graf in Swabia1,2,3,4,5 b. c 775, d. bt 824 - 825
MotherHeilwig/Hedwig/Eigilwich (?) of Saxony6,1,7,2,5 b. bt 778 - 780, d. 19 Apr 843
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech was born circa 810 at Saxony, Germany.8 She married Ludwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor, son of Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West and Ermengarde/Irmingard (?) of Hesbaye, Queen of the Franks, Empress, in 827.9,10,2,11,12
Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech died on 31 January 876 at Weingarten, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (now).13,1,9,2,5,14
Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech was buried after 31 January 876 at Gruftkapelle St. Emmeram, Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Weingarten, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     DEATH     unknown, Weingarten, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
     Emma of Altdorf, also known as Hemma was born about 808 and died on January 31, 876. She was the wife of Louis the German, and Queen consort of Eastern Francia. Her father was Welf, Count of Altorf; her mother was Heilwig of Saxony (born c.775, died after 833), the daughter of Count Isanbart. Her sister was Judith (sometimes called of Bavaria), who was the second wife of Emperor Louis the Pious, and by marriage Queen and Empress of the Franks.
In 827 at Regensburg, Emma married Louis the German, son of the Carolingian Emperor Louis, and stepson of Emma's sister. She was thus from 817–843 Queen consort of Bavaria. She was given in 833, by her husband Louis, Obermünster Abbey in Regensburg.
     She is described as having had great qualities: an uncommon courage and talent, deployed on more than one occasion. In particular, she led an army against Adelchis of Benevento, when he revolted against Louis the German; it is said that, frightened by the arrival of the Queen, the traitor fled by boat to seek safety in Corsica. The Annals of Saint-Bertin however reproach Emma for a pride which displeased the people of Italy.
With the Treaty of Verdun in 843, she became Queen Consort of Eastern Francia. She died on January 31, 876, and was buried in St. Emmeram's Abbey, Regensburg.
     By Louis, she had seven children:
** Hildegard (828–856)
** Carloman (829–880)
** Ermengard (died 866)
** Gisela
** Louis the Younger (830–882)
** Bertha (died 877)
** Charles the Fat (839–888)

     Her sons became Kings; three of her daughters became nuns. Her daughter Gisela is said to have married Berthold I of Schwaben.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Welf I of Bavaria
          Hedwig (Heilwig) von Sachsen 775–843
     Spouse
          Ludwig II of East Francia 804–876
     Siblings
          Conrad de Bourgogne 800–862
          Judith of Bavaria 805–843
     Children
          Carloman Carolingian
          Karl III Of Eastfrankonia
          Ludwig III Of Eastfrankonia 835–882
     BURIAL     Gruftkapelle St. Emmeram, Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 31 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91113920.14
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): "B6. [1m.] Louis II "the German", King of Bavaria (826-843), King of East Franks (843-876), King of West Lotharingia (869-876), Emperor (855-875), *ca 802/806, +Frankfurt a.M. 28.8.876; m.827 Hemma Welf (*by 818 +31.1.876.)15"

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengard --- ([806]-Frankfurt-am-Main 28 Aug 876, bur Kloster Lorsch). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" as sons of Emperor Louis and his wife Ermengard[14]. Under the Ordinatio Imperii promulgated by Emperor Louis in 817, Louis received "Baioariam et Carentanos, et Beheimos et Avaros, atque Sclavos qui ab orientali parte Baioariæ sunt…et duas villas…in pago Nortgaoe Luttraof et Ingoldesstat", specifying that he was to be named king[15]. He fought with his father and his brothers, joining the rebellions in 831 and 833. In the settlement of 833, he received Alemannia, Alsace and Rhetia (taken from his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve", as well as Thuringia and Saxony. His father obliged him to leave these additional territories in 839, confining his rule once more to Bavaria. Following the accession of his brother Lothaire as sole emperor after their father's death in 840, Ludwig allied himself with his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve". Together they defeated Emperor Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye, near Auxerre 25 Jun 841. Under the partition of territories agreed under the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, Louis was installed as LUDWIG II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. When Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks was faced with widespread rebellion, King Ludwig II invaded his kingdom in Aug 858 but was defeated 15 Jan 859 in the Laonnais and forced to withdraw. In 865, King Ludwig agreed with King Charles "le Chauve" the future division of the territories of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia, but on the latter's death in 869 King Charles invaded Lotharingia before Ludwig could assert his rights. A settlement was reached at Meerssen in Aug 870 under which Ludwig received Alsace and other territory along the Rhine[16], in effect succeeding as LUDWIG I King of Lotharingia [part]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "876 5 Kal Sep" of "Ludvicus imperator frater Ludvici imperatoris"[17]. The Liber Anniversariorum of Zurich records the death "V Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus rex fundator monasterii"[18].
     "m (827) EMMA, daughter of [WELF [I] Graf [von Altdorf] & his wife Heilwig ---] (-31 Jan 876, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Emma is named as the wife of Ludwig II King of Germany in numerous charters and narrative sources. However, her family origin is only indicated by a single source: the Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 827 of "Ludewicus rex" and "sororem Iudith imperatricis" without naming her[19]. This contrasts with the number of primary sources which specify the parentage of the Empress Judith and her two brothers Rudolf and Conrad. The absence of further references to Emma’s family could indicate a distinction between the status of the two sisters within the Welf dynasty. The term “soror” could include sisters who did not share both parents, but the chronology of the lives of the empress’s parents suggests no time for a second marriage on either side. Judith’s father’s death is dated to [824/25], while her mother is recorded as abbess at Chelles in 833. Emma’s marriage date suggests that she was younger than Judith, but the birth of children soon after the marriage places her birth in [812/15] at the latest. As no indication has been found that Judith’s parents separated and that her father remarried, it is assumed that the sparsity of sources detailing Emma’s parentage results merely from the lack of surviving records. "Ludowicus…rex" made a donation to St Felix & Regula in Zurich naming "filia nostra Bertha…[et] coniugis nostræ Hemmæ" by charter dated 29 Oct 863[20]. The Annales Fuldenses record that "Hemma quoque regina" became paralysed in 874, died at Regensburg in 876 and was buried in the church of St Emmeran[21]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina hic sepulta"[22]. The necrology of Augia Divis records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina"[23]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "2 Kal Jan" of "Hemma imperatrix sor na"[24]."
Med Lands Cites:
[14] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
[15] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum 2 and 3, p. 198.
[16] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), pp. 285-6.
[17] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.
[18] Fragmenta et Excerpta Libri Anniversariorum Abbatiæ Turicensis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 537.
[19] Annales Xantenses 827, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[20] D LD 110, p. 158.
[21] Annales Fuldenses 874 and 876, MGH SS I, pp. 388 and 389.
[22] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[23] Necrologium Augiæ Divitis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 272.
[24] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.12


; Per Genealogics:
     "Emma/Hemma was born about 808, daughter of Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf, and his wife Eigilwich/Heilwig. In 827 Emma married Ludwig II 'the German', king of the East-Franks, son of the Holy Roman Emperor Louis I 'the Pious' and his wife Irmingard and stepson of Emma's sister Judith. From this marriage only three sons survived her.
     "Emma was a woman of uncommon courage who once led an army against the traitor Adelchis of Benevento who had revolted against Ludwig. It is said, that frightened by the arrival of the queen, the traitor fled by boat to seek safety in Corsica.
     "She was also a very generous to the Church. In 833 Ludwig gave her Obermünster Abbey in Regensburg, whose patroness she became. With the Treaty of Verdun in 843, Emma became Queen Consort of Eastern Francia. She died on 31 January 876, the same year as Ludwig. She is buried in Regensburg in St. Emmeran's Abbey."11

; This is the same person as ”Hemma” at Wikipedia, as ”Emma de Bavière” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Hemma (Ostfrankenreich)” at Wikipedia (DE).16,17,18 GAV-31. Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech was also known as Emma (?) Queen of Germany.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 80.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA [Hemma] (-31 Jan 876, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Emma is named as the wife of Ludwig II King of Germany in numerous charters and narrative sources. However, her family origin is only indicated by a single source: the Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 827 of "Ludewicus rex" and "sororem Iudith imperatricis" without naming her[1797]. This contrasts with the number of primary sources which specify the parentage of the Empress Judith and her two brothers Rudolf and Conrad. The absence of further references to Emma’s family could indicate a distinction between the status of the two sisters within the Welf dynasty. The term “soror” could include sisters who did not share both parents, but the chronology of the lives of the empress’s parents suggests no time for a second marriage on either side. Judith’s father’s death is dated to [824/25], while her mother is recorded as abbess at Chelles in 833. Emma’s marriage date suggests that she was younger than Judith, but the birth of children soon after the marriage places her birth in [812/15] at the latest. As no indication has been found that Judith’s parents separated and that her father remarried, it is assumed that the sparsity of sources detailing Emma’s parentage results merely from the lack of surviving records. "Ludowicus…rex" made a donation to St Felix & Regula in Zurich naming "filia nostra Bertha…[et] coniugis nostræ Hemmæ" by charter dated 29 Oct 863[1798]. The Gesta Francorum records that "Hemma quoque regina" became paralysed in 874, died at Regensburg in 876 and was buried in the church of St Emmeran[1799]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina hic sepulta"[1800]. The necrology of Augia Divis records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina"[1801]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "2 Kal Jan" of "Hemma imperatrix sor na"[1802].
     "m (827) LOUIS King of Bavaria and Carinthia, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengardis [de Hesbaye] ([806]-Frankfurt-am-Main 28 Aug 876, bur Kloster Lorsch). He was installed in 843 as LUDWIG II "le Germanique" King of the East Franks."
Med Lands Cites:
[1797] Annales Xantenses 827, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[1798] D LD 110, p. 158.
[1799] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 874 and 876, MGH SS I, pp. 388 and 389.
[1800] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[1801] Necrologium Augiæ Divitis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 272.
[1802] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.5
She was Queen consort of Bavaria between 827 and 843.16 She was Queen consort of East Francia (Germany) between 843 and 876.16

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_(father_of_Judith). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIdied824B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eigilwich/Heilwig: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020393&tree=LEO
  8. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB.
  13. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 124. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 January 2020), memorial page for Emma “Hemma” of Bavaria of Altdorf (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91113920, citing Gruftkapelle St. Emmeram, Regensburg, Stadtkreis Regensburg, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91113920/emma-of_altdorf. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#L2
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemma
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Emma de Bavière: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_de_Bavi%C3%A8re. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Hemma (Ostfrankenreich): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemma_(Ostfrankenreich). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020403&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020404&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020402&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karlmann: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020406&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020411&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl III 'the Fat': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020413&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020405&tree=LEO

Randolph/Ralph de Dacre 3rd Lord Dacre, Baron Multon of Gillesland1,2

M, #19121, b. circa October 1322, d. between 17 August 1375 and 18 August 1375
FatherSir Randolf/Ranulph de Dacre 1st Lord Dacre1,2 b. c 1290, d. b 20 Apr 1339
MotherMargaret de Multon1,2 b. 20 Jul 1300, d. 10 Dec 1361
Last Edited25 Mar 2003
     Randolph/Ralph de Dacre 3rd Lord Dacre, Baron Multon of Gillesland was born circa October 1322.1
Randolph/Ralph de Dacre 3rd Lord Dacre, Baron Multon of Gillesland died between 17 August 1375 and 18 August 1375; dsp.1,2
     ; RANDOLF de DACRE, 3rd Lord (Baron) Dacre; b c Oct 1322; in holy orders as priest of Prescot, Lancs; Warden W Marches 1366-71 and Feb 1371/2; murdered in his bed (possibly by or at the instigation of his bro the 4th Lord, who was certainly imprisoned in the Tower of London as a suspect) 17 or 18 Aug 1375.1

; Ralph, successor to his brother in the baronies, d. also s. p. in 1375.2 He was 3rd Lord (Baron) Dacre.1

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Dacre Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint og 1883 edition), p. 152. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.

John Maxwell of Caerlaverock1

M, #19122
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited22 Mar 2003
     EDV-19.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Dacre Family Page (see MAXWELL, Bt). Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Sir Robert Fiennes Knt.1,2

M, #19123
FatherSir Roger Fiennes Knt., of Herstmonceaux, Sussex1,2 b. b 14 Sep 1384, d. Nov 1449
MotherElizabeth Holand1,2 d. a Apr 1441
Last Edited22 Dec 2012
     Sir Robert Fiennes Knt. married Philippa Dacre, daughter of Sir Thomas Dacre Knt. and Elizabeth Bowet.1,3

Family

Philippa Dacre d. b 1458

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Dacre Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Say 12: p. 642. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Say 13: pp. 642-3.

Heinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen'1,2,3

M, #19124, d. circa 975
FatherEticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau3,4,5,6,7 b. c 850, d. a 911
MotherEgila (?)3
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Heinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen' married Atha/Beata von Hohenwart.3,7,8
Heinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen' died circa 975; Genealogics says d. ca 975; Med Lands says d. aft 934; Genealogy.EU says d. aft 975.6,7,9
     GAV-31 EDV-31.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.6

; Per Wikipedia (DE): (Die schwäbischen Welfen) "Heinrich mit dem goldenen Wagen,[1] um 900 bezeugt, Stifter des Klosters Altdorf (aus dem die Abtei Weingarten hervorging), Beata von Hohenwart."10

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH "mit dem goldenen Wagen/cum aureo curru" (-after 934). The Historia Welforum names "Heinricum I" as son of "Eticho"[1804]. The Genealogia Welforum names "filium Heinricum et filiam Hiltigardam" as children of "Eticho", specifying that Hildegard married "Ludowicus Balbus imperator"[1805] although the latter is clearly incorrect. This is repeated in the Urspergensium Chronicon[1806]. According to legend, Heinrich was offered as a fief by the emperor as much land as he could plough at noon-day. Using a golden plough drawn by a relay of saddle horses, he encircled a large area while the emperor slept, hence his nickname[1807]. He founded Kloster Altdorf in 935 at the foot of the family's main castle at Altdorf[1808]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1809].
     "m ATA von Hohenwart, daughter of --- (-after 975). The Genealogia Welforum names "Atham" as wife of "Heinricum", but does not give her origin[1810]. The Historia Welforum names "de Hohunwarthe in Baioaria, Beatem" as wife of "Heinricus"[1811]. A member of a noble family in the Weltheim area, she brought territory in Bavaria to her husband[1812]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1813]."
Med Lands cites:
[1804] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 4, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1805] Genealogia Welforum 1, MGH SS XIII, p. 733.
[1806] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 340.
[1807] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1808] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1809] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1810] Genealogia Welforum 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1811] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 5, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1812] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1813] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “D1. Heinrich Gf "with the Golden Wagon"; m.Atha von Hohenwart (+after 975)”.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "ATA von Hohenwart (-after 975). The Genealogia Welforum names "Atham" as wife of "Heinricum", but does not give her origin[1276]. The Historia Welforum names "de Hohunwarthe in Baioaria, Beatem" as wife of "Heinricus"[1277]. A member of a noble family in the Weltheim area, she brought territory in Bavaria to her husband[1278]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1279].
     "m HEINRICH Graf von Altdorf, son of [ETICHO Graf im Ammergau] [Welf] & his wife --- (-after 934)."
Med Lands cites:
[1276] Genealogia Welforum 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1277] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 5, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1278] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1279] Wirtembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV (Stuttgart, 1883) ("Württembergisches Urkundenbuch"), Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.8

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eticho: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020462&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich von Hohenwart: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020463&tree=LEO
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Etichodiedafter911B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eticho: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020462&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich von Hohenwart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020463&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Heinrichdied934MAtaHohenwart
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#AtaHohenwartdiedafter975
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  10. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Stammliste der Welfen: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stammliste_der_Welfen#Die_schw%C3%A4bischen_Welfen. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eitcho: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020464&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad "der Heilige": http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020465&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020466&tree=LEO

Atha/Beata von Hohenwart1,2,3

F, #19125, d. after 975
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited23 Aug 2020
     Atha/Beata von Hohenwart married Heinrich (?) von Hohenwart, 'mit dem goldenen Wagen', son of Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau and Egila (?).1,4,3
Atha/Beata von Hohenwart died after 975.1,3
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “D1. Heinrich Gf "with the Golden Wagon"; m.Atha von Hohenwart (+after 975)”.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEINRICH "mit dem goldenen Wagen/cum aureo curru" (-after 934). The Historia Welforum names "Heinricum I" as son of "Eticho"[1804]. The Genealogia Welforum names "filium Heinricum et filiam Hiltigardam" as children of "Eticho", specifying that Hildegard married "Ludowicus Balbus imperator"[1805] although the latter is clearly incorrect. This is repeated in the Urspergensium Chronicon[1806]. According to legend, Heinrich was offered as a fief by the emperor as much land as he could plough at noon-day. Using a golden plough drawn by a relay of saddle horses, he encircled a large area while the emperor slept, hence his nickname[1807]. He founded Kloster Altdorf in 935 at the foot of the family's main castle at Altdorf[1808]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1809].
     "m ATA von Hohenwart, daughter of --- (-after 975). The Genealogia Welforum names "Atham" as wife of "Heinricum", but does not give her origin[1810]. The Historia Welforum names "de Hohunwarthe in Baioaria, Beatem" as wife of "Heinricus"[1811]. A member of a noble family in the Weltheim area, she brought territory in Bavaria to her husband[1812]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1813]."
Med Lands cites:
[1804] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 4, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1805] Genealogia Welforum 1, MGH SS XIII, p. 733.
[1806] Burchardi et Cuonradi Urspergensium Chronicon, MGH SS XXIII, p. 340.
[1807] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1808] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1809] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.
[1810] Genealogia Welforum 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1811] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 5, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1812] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1813] Württembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV, Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.4


; Per Wikipedia (DE): (Die schwäbischen Welfen) "Heinrich mit dem goldenen Wagen,[1] um 900 bezeugt, Stifter des Klosters Altdorf (aus dem die Abtei Weingarten hervorging), Beata von Hohenwart."2 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ATA von Hohenwart (-after 975). The Genealogia Welforum names "Atham" as wife of "Heinricum", but does not give her origin[1276]. The Historia Welforum names "de Hohunwarthe in Baioaria, Beatem" as wife of "Heinricus"[1277]. A member of a noble family in the Weltheim area, she brought territory in Bavaria to her husband[1278]. A codex of Kloster Weingarten records that "Henricus…pater…sancti Cunradi episcopi cum uxore sua Beata et filiis sui Ethichone et Rudolfo" constructed Kloster Altorf, adding that "Beata cum filio suo Rudolfo" were buried there[1279].
     "m HEINRICH Graf von Altdorf, son of [ETICHO Graf im Ammergau] [Welf] & his wife --- (-after 934)."
Med Lands cites:
[1276] Genealogia Welforum 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
[1277] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 5, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.
[1278] Jordan (1986), p. 3.
[1279] Wirtembergisches Urkundenbuch, Band IV (Stuttgart, 1883) ("Württembergisches Urkundenbuch"), Anhang, Zwei Weingartner Codices, II, B, p. XLIX.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  2. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Stammliste der Welfen: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stammliste_der_Welfen#Die_schw%C3%A4bischen_Welfen. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CARINTHIA.htm#AtaHohenwartdiedafter975. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Heinrichdied934MAtaHohenwart
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html

Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau1,2

M, #19126, b. circa 850, d. after 911
FatherWelf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, von der Linzgau und Argengau1,3,4,5 d. b 876
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau married Egila (?)2 Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau was born circa 850.
Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau died after 911.2,5
     GAV-32 EDV-32.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "ETICHO, son of [WELF [I] Graf im Linz- und Alpgau & his wife ---] (-after 911, bur Ammergau). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. The Historia Welforum names "Eticho…Iuditæ frater"[1803] but this is chronologically impossible. Graf im Ammergau.
     "m ---. The name of Eticho's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[1803] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 4, MGH SS XXI, p. 459.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “C2. Eticho Gf im Ammergau, +after 911; m.Egila N”.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eticho: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020462&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020418&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Etichodiedafter911B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eticho: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020462&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich von Hohenwart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020463&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#Heinrichdied934MAtaHohenwart

Egila (?)1

F, #19127
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Egila (?) married Eticho II (?) Graf im Ammergau, son of Welf I (?) Graf von Altdorf, von der Linzgau und Argengau.1
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Welf 1): “C2. Eticho Gf im Ammergau, +after 911; m.Egila N”.2 GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-33.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html

Rudolph II (?)

M, #19128, b. circa 827, d. 903
FatherEticho I (?) b. 795, d. c 840
MotherJudith (?)
Last Edited11 Jan 2004
     Rudolph II (?) was born circa 827.
Rudolph II (?) died in 903.

Eticho I (?)

M, #19129, b. 795, d. circa 840
FatherWelf I (?) Graf in Swabia b. c 775, d. bt 824 - 825
MotherHeilwig/Hedwig/Eigilwich (?) of Saxony b. bt 778 - 780, d. 19 Apr 843
Last Edited27 Mar 2004
     Eticho I (?) married Judith (?) Eticho I (?) was born in 795.
Eticho I (?) died circa 840.

Family

Judith (?)
Child

Judith (?)

F, #19130
Last Edited27 Mar 2004

Family

Eticho I (?) b. 795, d. c 840
Child

Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace

M, #19131, b. before 662, d. 20 February 690
FatherLeudesius (?) Major Domo1,2,3 b. 620, d. 676
ReferenceGAV35 EDV35
Last Edited23 Jul 2020
     Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace married Bereswinde (?) of France.4,5,2 Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace was born before 662.4
Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace died on 20 February 690; Weis [1992:156] says d. 20 Feb 690; Med Lands says d. "after 4 Sep 677, maybe after 25 Jun 692."4,2
Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace was buried after 20 February 690 at Hohenburg Abbey (Mont St. Odile), Ottrott, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     12 May, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France
     DEATH     5 Dec, Alsace, France
[Text copied from Wikipedia]
     BURIAL     Hohenburg Abbey, Ottrott, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France
     Maintained by: Plantagenet Princess
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 24 Jan 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 83927920.6
     GAV-35 EDV-35 GKJ-36.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adalrich (Latin: Adalricus; reconstructed Frankish: *Adalrik; died after c. 683 AD), also known as Eticho, at an unknown age was the Duke of Alsace, the founder of the family of the Etichonids and of the Habsburg, and an important and influential figure in the power politic of late seventh-century Austrasia.
     "Adalrich's family originated in the pagus Attoariensis[1] around Dijon in northern Burgundy. In the mid-seventh century they began to be major founders and patrons of monasteries in the region under a duke named Amalgar and his wife Aquilina.[2] They founded a convent at Brégille and an abbey for men at Bèze, installing children in both abbacies. They were succeeded by their third child, Adalrich,[3] who was the father of Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.
Civil war of 675–679
     "Adalrich first enters history as a member of the faction of nobles which invited Childeric II to take the kingship of Neustria and Burgundy in 673 after the death of Chlothar III. He married Berswinda, a relative of Leodegar, the famous Bishop of Autun, whose party he supported in the civil war which followed Childeric's assassination two years later (675). Adalrich was duke by March 675, when Childeric had granted him honores in Alsace with the title of dux and asked him to transfer some land to the recently founded (c. 662) abbey at Gregoriental[4] on behalf of Abbot Valedio. This grant was most probably the result of his support for Childeric in Burgundy, which had often disputed possession of Alsace with Austrasia. Later writers saw Adalrich as the successor in Alsace of Duke Boniface. After Childeric's assassination, Adalrich threw his support behind Dagobert II for the Austrasian throne.
     "Adalrich abandoned Leodegar and went over to Ebroin, the mayor of the palace of Neustria, sometime before 677, when he appears as an ally of Theuderic, who granted him the monastery of Bèze.[5] Taking advantage of the assassination of Hector of Provence in 679 to bid for power in Provence, he marched on Lyon but failed to take it and, returning to Alsace, switched his support to the Austrasians once more, only to find himself dispossessed of his lands in Alsace by King Theuderic III, an ally (and puppet) of Ebroin's who had opposed Dagobert in Austrasia since 675, who gave them to the Abbey of Bèze that year (679).
Power in Alsace
     "Adalrich maintained his power in a restricted dukedom which did not encompass land west of the Vosges as it had under Boniface and his predecessors. This land was a part of the kingdoms of Neustria and Burgundy, and only the land between the Vosges and the Rhine south to the Sornegau, later Alsace proper, remained with Austrasia under Adalrich. The west of Vosges was under duke Theotchar.
     "In Alsace, however, the civil war had resulted in a curtailed royal power and Adalrich's influence and authority, though restricted in territory, was augmented in practical scope. After the war, parts of the Frankish kingdom saw a more powerful viceregal hand under the exercise of the mayors of the palaces, while other regions were even less directly affected by the royal prerogative. The Merovingian palace at Marlenheim in Alsace was never visited by a royal figure again in Adalrich's lifetime. While southern Austrasia had been the centre of Wulfoald's power, the Arnulflings were a north Austrasian family, who took scarce interest in Alsatian affairs until the 730s and 740s.
     "Adalrich had initially made his allies counts, but in 683 he granted the comital office to his son and eventual successor Adalbert. By controlling monasteries and counties in the family, Adalrich built up a powerful regional duchy to pass on to his Etichonid heirs.
Relationship with monasteries
     "Adalrich had a rocky relationship with the monasteries of his realm, upon which he relied for his power. He is infamous for the suppression of that of Moutier-Grandval, and for lording it over monasteries, including his own foundations. According to the Life of Germanus of Grandval, Adalrich "wickedly began oppressing the people in the vicinity [Sornegau] of the monastery and to allege that they had always been rebels against his predecessors." He removed the centenarius ruling in the region and replaced him with his own man, Count Ericho. He exiled the people of the Sornegau, who denied being rebels against previous dukes. Many of the people exiled from the valley were attached to Grandval and could not thus be exiled. Adalrich marched into the valley of the Sornegau with a large army of Alemanni at one end while his lieutenant Adalmund entered with a host by the other. The abbot, Germanus himself, and his provost Randoald met Adalrich with books and relics in order to persuade him not to make violence. The duke granted a wadium,[6] a device of recompense or promise, and offered thus to spare the valley devastation, but for unknown reasons Germanus refused it. The region was ravaged.
     "Perhaps as penance for his relationship to the deaths of two future saints, Leodegar and Germanus of Grandval, or perhaps out of a secret desire — disclosed it is said to his intimate friends — to found a place to the service of God and take up the religious life, Adalrich founded two monasteries in north central Alsace between 680 and 700: Ebersheim in honour of Saint Maurice and Hohenburg on the site of an old Roman fort (of the emperor Maximian) discovered by his huntsmen and which he appropriated for his own military uses. Adalrich's daughter Odilia served as Hohenburg's first abbess and was later named patron saint of Alsace by Pope Pius VII in 1807.
Veneration as a saint
     "His daughter Odilia was reputedly born blind, which Adalrich took as a punishment for some offence done to God. In order to save face with his retainers, he tried to persuade his wife to kill the infant child in secret. Bereswinda instead sent the child into hiding with a maid at the monastery of Palma. According to the Life of Odilia, a bishop named Erhard baptised the adolescent girl and smeared a chrism on her eyes, which miraculously restored her sight.
     "The bishop tried to restore the duke's relationship with his daughter, but Adalrich, fearing the effect of admitting to having a daughter hiding in poverty in a monastery would have on his subjects, refused. A son of his, ignoring Adalrich's orders, brought his sister back to Hohenburg, where Adalrich was holding court. When Odilia arrived, Adalrich, in a rage, struck a blow with his sceptre to his son's head, accidentally killing him. Disgraced, he reluctantly allowed Odilia to live in the monastery, which had no abbess, with a minimal wage under a British nun.
     "Towards the end of his life he was reconciled to her and made her the first abbess of his foundation, handing the abbey over as if it were private property.[7] Through his daughter Adalrich was reconciled to God and as early as the twelfth century was regarded as a saint with a local cult. His burial garments were displayed to pilgrims in his foundation at Hohenburg and a feast day was celebrated annually by the nuns. The portrayal of Adalrich as a nobleman who became holy while retaining his noble status and rank was very popular in the Rhineland and as far away as Bavaria in the Middle Ages. The Life probably sought to show how by simply maltreating a blind daughter in order to save face, Adalrich ended up far more dishonoured than he otherwise would have.
Notes
a. His name is also given as Adalricus, Chadelricho, Hetticho, Etichon, Cathicus, Cathic, or Athich.
References
1. The placename survived in the ninth-century title of Isembard, comte d'Attuyer/Atuyer son of Adalard, comte de Chalon. ("Les comtes de Chalon-sur-Saône").
2. The duke Amalgar and his wife Aquilina, said to be the daughter of Waldelenus, dux in the region between the Alps and the Jura, and Flavia, feature in a reconstructed genealogy linking the Etichonids of Alsace with a Gallo-Roman ancestry through Flavia, were noted in Christian Settipani, "La transition entre mythe et réalité", Archivum 37 (1992:27-67); Settipani speculates on Flavia's connections with Felix Ennodius and Syagria.
3. He is referred to as Liutheric, a mayor of the palace, in the Life of Odilia.
4. For this Münster im St. Gregoriental, still at this time under its original Rule of St. Columbanus, see Marmoutiers Abbey, Alsace.
5. According to its chronicler Johannes of Bèze, the monastery of Fons Besua had been founded on a royal grant of land from Dagobert I (628) by Amalgar: see Waldalenus
6. "Vadium"
7. Hans Hummer, "Reform and lordship in Alsace at the turn of the millennium," in Warren Brown and Piotr Górecki, eds. Conflict in Medieval Europe: Changing Perspectives on Society and Culture (Ashgate) 2003:76.
Sources
** Hummer, Hans J. Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm 600 – 1000. Cambridge University Press: 2005. See mainly pp 46–55.
** Lewis, Archibald Ross. "The Dukes in the Regnum Francorum, A.D. 550-751." Speculum, Vol. LI, No. 3. July, 1976. pp 381–410."7



; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace1 (dont les noms apparaissent dans les textes sous les formes Eticho, Aticus, Attich, Etih, Chadalricus2), né vers 635 dans le pagus Attoariensis (sur le plateau de Langres), mort le 20 février 6903,4,5 au château d'Hohenbourg, duc d'Alsace de 662 à 6906, est le membre le plus connu de la famille des Étichonides.
     "Etichon-Adalric est le fondateur de la dynastie des Étichonides et le père de sainte Odile, patronne de l'Alsace. Il est peut-être aussi l'ancêtre de la famille des Habsbourg7, de la famille des Eguisheim-Dabo, de la Maison de Bade, de la Maison de Lorraine ainsi que des comtes de Flandres6.
Sa famille
     "L'ascendance8 d'Etichon-Adalric est du domaine de la spéculation : il serait le fils d'Adalric, duc du pagus Attoariensis et le descendant de Waldelène et Aelia Flavia9. Sa mère est peut-être Hultrude de Burgondie, la fille de Guillebaud, patrice, descendant de plusieurs rois burgondes et des Ferréol. Ils ont des ancêtres parmi les Alamans, Romains, Francs, Gaulois et Burgondes, parfois illustres. Son grand-père, le duc Amalgarde de Dijon et son épouse Aquilina du Jura sont déjà les fondateurs de plusieurs monastères et abbayes. Ses parents sont tous des proches des rois francs, grands serviteurs des différents royaumes. Jean de Turckheim, dans ses Tablettes Généalogiques des illustres Maisons des Ducs de Zaeringen10 montre toutefois que les hypothèses sur ses origines sont multiples et que la descendance de ses enfants hormis Adalbert et Etichon II est un mystère.
     "D'autres sources le citent fils de Leudesius, maire de palais de Neustrie assassiné en 676, qui est lui-même l'arrière-petit-fils du roi Clotaire Ier et d'Ingonde (parents de Bilichilde, mère par Ansbert d'Erchinoald, père de Leudesius par Leutsinde) : les étichonides descendraient alors des rois mérovingiens.
Biographie
     "Les historiens du temps le représentent comme un homme droit, sincère, libéral, ferme dans ses résolutions et véritablement chrétien, même s’il a parfois un comportement dur et cruel. L'histoire l'accuse d'avoir fait assassiner par ses soudards l'abbé Germain de Moutier-Grandval et certains auteurs pensent même qu'il participa à la mort violente de saint Léger, évêque d'Autun ainsi qu'à celle de saint Colomban11
Ses débuts et son mariage (vers 655)
     "Au milieu du viie siècle, Adalric, originaire du pagus Attoariensis est un riche propriétaire installé dans la villa royale d'Obernai12. C'est un personnage influent au niveau politique et militaire en Austrasie.
     "Vers 655, il épouse Berswinde 13, qui, selon la Chronicon Ebersheimense, est la fille d'une sœur de saint Léger, évêque d'Autun et la sœur d'une reine des Francs14. La seule reine qui peut correspondre est Chimnéchilde15, femme de Sigebert III, roi d'Austrasie. Sur la base de l'onomastique, certains en font une sœur du sénéchal Hugobert16.
     "Berswinde est très pieuse et ne profite de ses richesses que pour les répandre dans le sein des pauvres. Chaque jour elle se retire dans la partie la plus isolée de son palais, pour consacrer ses loisirs à la lecture des livres saints et aux exercices de la piété.
     "Ce n’est qu’au bout de plusieurs années, en 662, que naît leur première fille, Odile, qui est aveugle.
Duc d'Alsace (662)
     "En 662, Etichon-Adalric est nommé duc d'Alsace par le roi Childéric II, succédant au duc Boniface.
     "Le territoire que tient Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace est plus réduit que celui du duc Boniface, son prédécesseur. Il est situé à l’est des crêtes des Vosges, de l’abbaye de Surbourg, au sud de la Sauer (rivière), jusqu’au sud de l’abbaye de Moutier-Grandval, située dans le nord du Jura. Il inclut le Brisgau et une partie de la plaine rhénane de l’autre côté du Rhin.
     "Le roi lui adresse en 663, un second diplôme de donation pour l’abbaye de Munster3.
Les guerres civiles (675-687)
     "Ambitieux, Etichon-Adalric est l’un des acteurs principaux des guerres qui suivent l'assassinat du roi Childéric II (675). profite des désordres du royaume pour affirmer son pouvoir et joue des rivalités entre les grands.
     "Il soutient d’abord Dagobert II, puis Ébroïn, le maire du palais de Neustrie. Mais ce dernier a pour ennemi l'évêque d'Autun saint Léger, l'oncle de la femme d’Adalric. L'ayant fait prisonnier, il lui fait crever les yeux, puis décapiter à Sarcinium) en Artois, vers 678.
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace se rapproche alors de Pépin de Herstal, maire du palais d’Austrasie. Cette alliance lui permet de faire face aux menaces d'Ébroïn et d’agrandir son influence vers le sud, vers le Jura17. Il participe aussi aux luttes en Bourgogne.
     "Alors qu'elle est enceinte, la nièce de Berswinde, la reine Bilichilde, épouse de Childéric II est assassinée en même temps que son mari dans la forêt de Lognes, la lauconia silva, vaste étendue boisée qui englobe à l'époque les forêts de Bondy et de Livry18.
     "Profitant de l'assassinat d'Hector, prince de Provence, en 67519 ou en 679[réf. souhaitée], Etichon-Adalric envahit la Provence. Il essaie de prendre Lyon, mais en vain. De retour en Alsace, il constate que le roi de Neustrie, Thierry III, a confié ses terres[réf. nécessaire] à un de ses fidèles originaire de Bourgogne.
     "Après la mort d'Ébroïn en 681, Adalric participe à la lutte entre Neustrie et Austrasie aux côtés de Pépin de Herstal, en particulier à la bataille de Tertry, en juin 687. Il est alors au faîte de sa puissance.
Le château et l'abbaye de Hohenbourg
     "Adalric désirant posséder une nouvelle résidence, son choix se porte sur le sommet du Hohenbourg, l'actuel mont Sainte-Odile, où se trouvent des ruines d'anciens édifices.
     "Le duc y fait construire un palais, où il réside pendant la saison d'été, puis, après la naissance de sa fille Odile et de ses cinq autres enfants, de plus en plus fréquemment.
     "Odile, rentrée au château construit par son père, y donne de la nourriture à des personnes malades et soulage les pauvres. La renommée de ses qualités éminentes y attire aussi les personnes les plus distinguées.
     "Adalric cède à Odile le château même avec toutes ses dépendances, et cette antique forteresse, qui accueille une cour, va devenir, entre les mains de la future sainte, un asile ouvert à ceux qui veulent fuir le contact du monde. C’est entre 680 et 690 que sont réalisés les travaux nécessaires pour rendre la demeure appropriée à sa nouvelle destination. Le duc pourvoit à toutes les dépenses et préside souvent lui-même à l'ouvrage. Quand les bâtiments sont terminés, Odile en prend possession, à la tête d'une communauté de cent trente religieuses issues de la noblesse rhénane.
Les fondations monastiques d'Etichon-Adalric
L'épisode de Germain de Moutier-Grandval
     "Pour affirmer sa puissance, Etichon-Adalric fait assassiner Germain, l'abbé de l’abbaye de Moutier-Grandval, descendant d’une famille sénatoriale gallo-romaine20.
     "Le moine lui reproche d’opprimer les populations et de vexer de toutes les façons les moines de Moutier-Grandval en les traitant de rebelles à l’autorité de son prédécesseur et à la sienne. À la tête d'une bande d’Alamans, Etichon-Adalric s'approche du monastère. Germain, accompagné du bibliothécaire de la communauté, va au-devant de l’ennemi. À la vue des maisons incendiées et de ses pauvres voisins poursuivis et égorgés par les soldats, il éclate en larmes et en reproches :
« Ennemi de Dieu et de la vérité, est-ce ainsi que vous traitez un pays chrétien et comment ne craignez-vous pas de ruiner ce monastère que j’ai moi même bâti. »

     "Le duc l’écoute sans s’irriter et lui promet la paix. Mais, en revenant à Moutier-Grandval, Germain rencontre sur son chemin des soldats, qu'il entreprend également de prêcher :
« Chers fils ne commettez donc pas tant de crimes contre le peuple de Dieu ! »

     "Au lieu de les fléchir ses paroles les exaspèrent, ils le dépouillent de ses vêtements et l’égorgent ainsi que son compagnon.
Hohenbourg et Ebersmunster
     "À partir de ce crime, Adalric change d’attitude envers les moines qui essaient de christianiser, défricher et peupler les forêts de son duché, pleines de brigands et de bêtes féroces.
     "Il fait appel aux bénédictins et fonde en Alsace plusieurs établissements religieux, garants de sa puissance, dont Ebersheim et Gregoriental21.
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace crée plus particulièrement l’abbaye d’Hohenbourg, qu’il donne à sa fille Odile, et celle d’Ebersmunster, où vers 675, l'abbé irlandais Déodat (le futur saint Dié) fonde une communauté de moines sur le domaine donné par Adalric. La marche de Soultz est donnée en 667 à l'abbaye d'Ebersmunster par ce duc d'Alsace.
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace donne à l’abbaye d’Hohenbourg naissante plusieurs de ses domaines situés dans la Haute-Alsace et ainsi que les dîmes d'un grand nombre de villages de la Basse-Alsace et du Brisgau. Il en fait faire un acte de donation qu'il met sur l’autel de saint Maurice22.
Moyen-Moutier
     "Adalric donne également à son monastère de Moyen-Moutier, la terre de Feldkirch. Un des monastères les plus favorisés fut celui de Moyenmoutier, dont le fondateur saint Hydulphe, avait rendu la vue à sainte Odile. En reconnaissance de ce miracle, Etichon donna à Moyenmoutier de grands biens en Alsace, entre autres, des terres autour de Thanvillé23. En 667 d'autres biens également situés près de Thanvillé furent donnés à l'abbaye d'Ebersmunster. Ces biens comprenaient des prés, champs et bois24.
Le duché héréditaire
     "La guerre civile a comme conséquence un duché d’Alsace réduit en taille à l’est des Vosges. Mais la fonction de duc prend un réel sens et l’Alsace dépend moins des maires du palais que d’autres régions du royaume. Le palais mérovingien à Marlenheim, en Alsace, ne voit plus le séjour d’un nouveau roi à partir de la fin de la vie d’Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace. Ses descendants n’ont pas de rivaux pendant cinquante ans ce qui leur permet de conserver le pouvoir.
     "Au début de son règne, Adalric d'Alsace avait besoin d’alliés et donc des comtes, mais en 683 dans une assemblée régionale, il désigne son successeur, son fils Adalbert. En contrôlant les monastères et les comtes, qui deviennent des parents, Adalric crée un puissant duché qui commence à prendre le nom d’Alsace et le transmet à ses héritiers Étichonides. Il brise aussi une tradition de partage des pouvoirs entre l’Église et les seigneurs locaux, au profit d’un seul dirigeant, le duc.
La fin de sa vie
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace meurt le 20 février 690 dans son château du Mont Sainte-Odile, où il est inhumé.
     "L’Alsace est en paix. Des moines, et leurs serfs défrichent les forêts. Un pouvoir fort succède à une certaine instabilité. Le vieux duc a dû lutter pour prendre le pouvoir et le transmettre. Certains[Qui ?] disent que sa foi chrétienne a changé son caractère. Mais n’est-ce pas plutôt la noblesse rhénane et l’Église locale qui ont changé. Les comtes et les dignitaires sont, du fait du jeu des alliances, ses proches. Odile, devenue sainte tout en conservant son statut de grande Dame et son rang, va devenir un modèle pour la noblesse rhénane et même occidentale au Moyen Âge.
     "En 1785, dans une des chapelles de l’église de Hohenbourg, le tombeau de ce fameux duc d’Alsace était encore visible. C’est un monument respectable puisqu’il renferme le corps de celui qui a donné tant d’empereurs à l’Allemagne tant de souverains à l’Autriche et à la Lorraine et tant de héros à l’Europe3. Il faut cependant garder à l'esprit que les prétentions des maisons de Habsbourg et Lorraine à descendre ne sont que des prétentions non confirmées par des documents contemporains.
     "Certains historiens et écrivains lui ont donné le nom de saint25.
Descendance
     "Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace et Bereswinde (653-700) ont six enfants :
** Sainte Odile est née vers 662 à Obernai et décédée vers 720 au monastère d’Hohenbourg. Aldaric songe en vain à marier Odile à quelque puissant seigneur de ses amis. Elle sera canonisée au xie siècle par le pape Léon IX, et proclamée patronne de l'Alsace par le pape Pie XII en 1946.
** Adalbert d'Alsace (vers 665 région d'Obernai-† 722) qui succède à Adalric comme duc d'Alsace après sa mort. Il est également comte de Sundgau. Adalbert construit la résidence royale de Koenigshoffen et les abbayes de Honau et de Saint-Étienne de Strasbourg. L’Alsace est alors un duché très puissant au sein de l’Austrasie. Il épouse Gerlinde, fille d'Odon.
** Hugues d'Alsace est comte. Il épouse Hermentrude et laisse trois enfants en bas-âge, car il est peut-être tué par son père. Il est à l'origine du monastère d'Honau21.
** Etichon II de Nordgau (vers 670-723), comte de Nordgau, possible ancêtre des maisons de Lorraine et d’Eguisheim, ainsi que du pape Léon IX, mais sans que cela soit une certitude. Il est à l'origine du monastère d'Honau21.
** Bathicon d'Alsace (ou « Baducon »), comte d'Alsace, mort en 725. Il est à l'origine du monastère d'Honau et de celui de Wissembourg21. L'abbaye Saints-Pierre-et-Paul est fondée sur le site au viie siècle par saint Pirmin, sur une île de la Lauter (rivière).
** Sainte Roswinde, est la dernière des filles du duc Adalric. Elle imite sa pieuse sœur en se consacrant à Dieu dans le même monastère d’Hohenbourg.
Voir aussi
Bibliographie
** Guy Perny, Adalric, duc d'Alsace, ascendants et descendants, J.Do Bentzinger, 2004
** Pierre Riché Les Carolingiens, Hachette, coll. « Pluriel », 1997 généalogie XIII « Etichonides ».
Articles connexes
** Étichonides: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tichonides
** Liste des comtes puis ducs d'Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_et_ducs_d%27Alsace
** Liste des comtes de Nordgau: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_de_Nordgau
** Adalbert d'Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adalbert_d%27Alsace
** Eugénie d'Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eug%C3%A9nie_d%27Alsace
** Hugues III de Tours et de la Haute Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_de_Tours
Notes et références
1. Dans une Vie de sainte Odile, il est appelé Princeps Eticho, mais il est appelé "Adalric" dans le testament d’Odile, sa fille, et dans les diplômes de Carloman et de Charlemagne concernant l'abbaye d’Obersmunster, datés de 770 et 810. Histoire de l’église de Strasbourg, tome 1, p. xlij, tome II, p. cij et cliv.
2. Eticho, Aticus et Chaldaricus sont des formes latines, Attich et Etih des formes germaniques.
3. L'art de vérifier les dates ... par David Baillie Warden, Jean Baptiste Pierre Jullien Courcelles, Nicolas Vigton de Saint-Allais, p.463 [archive]
4. Hoefer, Nouvelle biographie générale depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'à nos ...
5. mais 689 d'après Stuart, 695 d'après Dollinger et Oberlé, ou encore vers 700, selon l'hagiographie de sainte Odile.
6. Nouvelle biographie générale depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'à nos ..., par Hoefer (Jean Chrétien Ferdinand), p.662.
7. Les biens des Étichonides, maîtres absolus de l’Alsace du haut Moyen Âge, se retrouveront en effet, aux mains des Habsbourg quelques siècles plus tard.
8. Sa généalogie sur le site FMG [archive]
9. Christian Settipani, La transition entre mythe et réalité, Archivum 37 (1992:27-67); Settipani speculates on Flavia's connections with Felix Ennodius and Syagria. Idem pour Dupraz et The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, de Arnold Hugh Martin Jones, John Robert, p.309.
10. Jean de Turckheim, Tablettes Généalogiques des illustres Maisons des Ducs de Zaeringen, Nabu Press, 2010, (ISBN 1143835565), p.10
11. Georges J.Uhry, Le mont Sainte-Odile au Moyen Âge, 1967, p. 12
12. Chronicon Novientense ( 1130 )
13. ou Bérhésinde
14. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy [archive]
15. Du point de vue chronologique, il pourrait aussi y avoir Bathilde, la femme de Clovis II, mais on sait qu'elle est d'origine serve.
16. Voir l'article Hugobertides.
17. Bernard Vogler, Nouvelle histoire de l’Alsace, p.62.
18. Jean Lebeuf, Histoire de la ville et de tout le diocèse de Paris [archive], tome 15, 1758, p. 140
19. Georges de Manteyer- La Provence du premier au douzième siècle, p.28 : Saint Prix, évêque d'Auvergne, fut massacré à Volvic, le 25 janvier 676 ; il était allé célébrer avec Childéric II, roi d'Austrasie, les fêtes de Pâques à Autun l'année précédente. Son assassinat fut une vengeance provenant de ce que Childéric, peut-être sur l'avis de l’évêque, avait mis à mort Hector, son patrice de Provence.
20. Jean Baptiste Pitra, Histoire de saint Léger ... et de l'Église des Francs au septième siècle, p.231.
21. Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe Alsace and the Frankish Realm ..., par Hans J. Hummer, p.53.
22. Histoire des saints d'Alsace; par l'abbé Hunckler, par Théodore François X. Hunkler, p.204.
23. Tous ces détails relatif à Moyenmoutier sont tirés de deux notices écrites au xviiie siècle par des religieux de l'abbaye. L'une de ces notice se trouve à la Bibliothèque Nationale, manuscrits, collection de Lorraine, Moyenmoutier l'autre est dans les archives du château de Thanvillé et fut écrite par Dom Alliot, abbé de Moyenmoutier et aujourd'hui situées aux Archives départementales du Bas Rhin
24. Charte de 994. Jean-Daniel Schoepflin, Alsatia diplomatica, t.1, p. 127
Encyclopédie moderne, avec Atlas, par Eustache-Marie Courtin, p. 280."8



; Per Weis: “Adalric (or Ethic), obtained the Duchy of Alsace 662, d. 20 Feb. 690, head of the Alsatian House of the Ethicondes, Duke of Alsace 662-690; m. Berswinde.”.9 Eticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace was also known as Adalric/Ethic (?) Duc d'Alsace.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ETICHO [Chadicho/Adalrico], son of LEUDESIUS maior domus & his wife --- (-after 4 Sep 677, maybe after 25 Jun 692). "Childericus rex Francorum, Chadicho duce, Rodeberto comite" donated property to the monastery of St Gregory in Alsace by charter dated 4 Mar 673, the editor of the compilation identifying "Chadicho duce" with Eticho Duke in Alsace, commenting that he had succeed Boniface as duke in 666[9]. Wilsdorf explains the etymological connection between the names “Eticho” and “Chadich/Adalrico”[10]. Duke in Alsace. The Vita Germani records that "Chatalrichus sive Chaticus" succeeded on the deaths of "Gundoinus dux et Bonifacius dux", commenting in the next paragraph that he "cum Ericho comite" was responsible for the martyrdom of Germanus "in basilica sancti Mauricii"[11]. The Passio Leudegarii records that "Desideratus…cognomento Deidoni…cum Bobone et cum Chadalrico duce" campaigned against Lyon[12], presumably dated to the late 660s or early 670s. "Dagobertus rex Francorum" donated property confiscated from "Adalricus dux" to the monastery of "Fontis Besuæ" by charter dated 4 Sep 677[13]. "Chlodovius rex Francorum" with "Aerico duci et Charievio comiti" confirmed a donation to the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy by charter dated 25 Jun 692[14]. It is assumed that "Aerico duci" in this last charter refers to Eticho although this is not certain.
     "m BERSWINDA, daughter of ---. The Cronica Hohenburgensis records the marriage of "Athicum seu Adalricum" and "Berswindam…filiam sororis sancti Leodegarii, sororem videlicet regina"[15]. The Chronicon Ebersheimense names "Berswindam, filiam sororis Leodegarii episcopi…et Garini comitis Pictavensis, sororem videlicet regina" as the wife of Athicus[16]."
Med Lands cites:
[9] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 30, p. 29, footnote 42.
[10] Wilsdorf ‘Les Etichonides’ 1964, p. 1.
[11] Vita Germani Abbati Grandivallensis 10 and 11, MGH SS rer Merov V, pp. 37-8.
[12] Passio Leudegarii Episcopi Augustodunensis I, 26, MGH SS rer Merov V, p. 307.
[13] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 46, p. 43.
[14] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 62, p. 55.
[15] Cronica Hohenburgensis 664, Annales Marbacenses, MGH SS in Usum Scholarum [9], p. 3.
[16] Chronicon Ebersheimense 6, MGH SS XXIII, p. 434.2
He was Duc d'Alsace between 662 and 690.

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#_Toc508299218. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#Etichodiedafter677
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#AdalricusAthicus
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 181-1, 156. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I03869
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 April 2020), memorial page for Adalric Duke Of Alsace (12 May–5 Dec), Find a Grave Memorial no. 83927920, citing Hohenburg Abbey, Ottrott, Departement du Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France ; Maintained by Plantagenet Princess (contributor 49922906), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/83927920/adalric-duke_of_alsace. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adalrich,_Duke_of_Alsace. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etichon-Adalric_d%27Alsace. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 181-2, 156.
  10. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Odilia at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11207b.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#AdalbertsonEtichoB
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 156, Line 181-2.
  13. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I32124

Philippa Dacre1

F, #19132, d. before 1458
FatherSir Thomas Dacre Knt.1,2,3 d. b 5 Jan 1458
MotherElizabeth Bowet1
Last Edited22 Dec 2012
     Philippa Dacre married Sir Robert Fiennes Knt., son of Sir Roger Fiennes Knt., of Herstmonceaux, Sussex and Elizabeth Holand.1,4
Philippa Dacre died before 1458; Burkes says d. dsp 20 Jul 1499; bu Richardson says her sister Joan was her heiress "sometime before 1458."1,4

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Dacre Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Dacre 11: p. 250. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Dacre 11.i: pp. 250-251.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Say 13: pp. 642-3.

Batticho/Bathicon (?) d'Alsace1,2

M, #19133, d. 725
FatherEticho I (?) Duc d'Alsace1 b. b 662, d. 20 Feb 690
MotherBereswinde (?) of France1 b. 650
Last Edited14 Apr 2020
     Batticho/Bathicon (?) d'Alsace died in 725.2
     ; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Bathicon d'Alsace (ou « Baducon »), comte d'Alsace, mort en 725. Il est à l'origine du monastère d'Honau et de celui de Wissembourg21. L'abbaye Saints-Pierre-et-Paul est fondée sur le site au viie siècle par saint Pirmin, sur une île de la Lauter (rivière).
Notes et références
21. Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe Alsace and the Frankish Realm ..., par Hans J. Hummer, p.53."1,2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#Etichodiedafter677. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Etichon-Adalric d'Alsace: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etichon-Adalric_d%27Alsace. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).

Leudesius (?) Major Domo1

M, #19134, b. 620, d. 676
FatherErchembaldus (?) Duke of Alsace2,3,4 b. 590, d. bt 657 - 658
MotherLeudefindis (?)2 b. 594, d. 688
ReferenceGAV36 EDV36
Last Edited14 Apr 2020
     Leudesius (?) Major Domo was born in 620.2
Leudesius (?) Major Domo died in 676; Per Med Lands:
     "LEUDESIUS (-murdered [676]). A charter dated to [659] issued by "Chlothacharius rex Francorum" records a dispute between the church of Rouen and the abbey of St Denis about property previously belonging to "Erchenoaldo quondam maiorum domus…filius eius Leudesius"[307]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Leudesio filio Erchonoldo" when recording his appointment as maior domus after the murder of King Childeric II (in 675)[308]. The Chronicon Ebersheimense names "Leudesius, quem Germani Leudericum vocant" as son of "Erchonaldus"[309]. He was expelled in [676] by Ebroin, who returned to Neustria, "decamping with the royal treasure" although this was recaptured at the villa Baizieux by Ebroin who later murdered Leudesius[310]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that Leudesius fled with King Theoderic III, captured by Ebroin at "Bacivo villa" and murdered[311].
     "m ---. The Cronica Hohenburgensis records the marriage of "Leudesius" and "uxorem de prosapia sancti Sygismundi regis Burgundie"[312]. The Chronicon Ebersheimense refers to her as "de prosapia Sigismundi et Gothmari regum Burgundie"[313]."
Med Lands cites:
[307] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 37, p. 34.
[308] Liber Historiæ Francorum 45, MGH SS rer Merov, Tome II, p. 318.
[309] Chronicon Ebersheimense 4, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 433-4.
[310] Fredegar (Continuator), 2, MGH SS rer Merov, Tome II, p. 169.
[311] Liber Historiæ Francorum 45, MGH SS rer Merov, Tome II, p. 319.
[312] Cronica Hohenburgensis 664, Annales Marbacenses, MGH SS in Usum Scholarum [9], p. 3.
[313] Chronicon Ebersheimense 5, MGH SS XXIII, p. 434.3

     GAV-36 EDV-36 GKJ-37. Leudesius (?) Major Domo was also known as Lendisius Duke of Alsace.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#_Toc508299218. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#AdalricusAthicus
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#Erchinoalddied657B
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#Etichodiedafter677

Heilwig (?) of Friuli1

F, #19135, d. after 895
FatherEberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli1,2,3 b. bt 805 - 815, d. 16 Dec 866
MotherGisla (?) de Francia1,4 b. c 819, d. a 1 Aug 874
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited26 Aug 2020
     Heilwig (?) of Friuli married Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis, son of NN d'Ostrevant;
Her 1st husband.5,1,2 Heilwig (?) of Friuli married Roger I (?) Comte de Laon;
Possibly her 2nd husband.6,1,2
Heilwig (?) of Friuli died after 895.1
     GAV-30.

; Per Med Lands:
     "HEILWIG (-after 895). The Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis records the testament of “Evrardus comes cum coniuge mea Gisla”, which bequeathes property to “filiabus…nostris…Heilvinch…Hattrenheim et Luisinga et Wendesse et unum manum in Engerestheim”[298]. Her first marriage is confirmed by Flodoard´s Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ which names “Hucboldus...sororis...Rodulfi maritus”[299]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hucbaldus de Hainacq" as "huius [=abbas Rodulfus] sororius"[300]. The marriage appears to be corroborated by a later passage in the same source which records that "comes Rodulfus" (referring to Heilwig's grandson) was "nepos…ex sorore" of Louis IV King of France[301]. It appears chronologically unlikely for any of King Louis's sisters, whose dates of birth can be estimated to [908/17], to have been the mother of Raoul [II] who was killed in battle in 944, presumably when he was already adult. It appears more likely that the family relationship was one generation further back, and that a member of the Unruochingi family, descended from the sister of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and who originated in the same area in northern France, would provide a good match. Her supposed second marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[302]. The primary source on which this is based has not been identified and from a chronological point of view it seems unlikely to be correct. Another table in Europäische Stammtafeln only names the wife of Comte Roger as "Helvide" but does not give her origin[303]. "Gisle" donated property to Cysoing for the anniversaries of "Ludovico imperatore patre meo et…Judith imperatrice matre mea et…rege Karolo…germano et…prole mea…Hengeltrude, Hunroc, Berengario, Adelardo, Rodulpho, Hellwich, Gilla, Judith" by charter dated to [874][304].
     "m [firstly] (before 874) HUCBALD Comte [d'Ostrevant], son of --- (-after 890). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hucbaldus de Hainacq" as "huius [=abbas Rodulfus] sororius"[305].
     "[m secondly (after 890) ROGER [I] Comte de Laon, son of --- (-926).]"
Med Lands cites:
[298] Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis, Spicilegium II, p. 876.
[299] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, Liber IV, I, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 371.
[300] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 893, MGH SS XXIII, p. 748.
[301] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 943, MGH SS XXIII, p. 763.
[302] ES II 188B.
[303] ES III 729 B.
[304] Cysoing VI, p. 11.
[305] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 893, MGH SS XXIII, p. 748.1


; NB: The Wikipédia (Fr.) re-imagines the lineages of the descendants of Hucbald. Wikipédia states: "La description de sa famille est issue en partie de l'identification d'Heilwis, veuve et se remariant avec Roger Ier de Laon, avec Heilwis, femme d'Hucbald. Or cette identification pose quelques problèmes chronologiques (montrant son improbabilité plutôt que son impossibilité), et une autre construction est proposée. Hucbald et Heilwide de Frioul eurent deux enfants :
** peut-être Guy, comte de Senlis
** Heilwis de Senlis, mariée à Gautier de Laon († 892), puis à Roger Ier de Laon († 926)
** un comte Hucbald, père d'Udalric, évêque d'Augsbourg de 929 à 977

There are several implications of this proposed presentation.
1. One implication is that the Heilwis who m. Roger I de Laon was Heilwis, a dau. of Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli, and not Hubald's widow herself.
2. The second is to present Raoul I as either the grandson and or the son of Hucbald. It also adds two other important sons.
3. A third is to show two additional sons for Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli: 1) Guy comte de Senlis and 2) (a son named) Hucbald, father of Udalric, bishop of Augsburg (d. 977).

The source of this approach are not clearly delineated in the article. I offer it here so that others can examine the article and draw their own conclusions about what the true case might be. The diagram of this presentation is attached with the most significant changes highlighted.
For the present, I have chosen to follow the earlier thinking of Raoul I as the son of Hucbald, but I am studying this alternative.7,8



; Per Racines et Histoire: "Hucbald + ~895 comte d’Ostrevant et de Senlis
     ép. Heilwise (Hedwige, Heilwig) de Frioul (fille d’Eberhard, marquis de Frioul + 16/12/866 et de Gisèle, Princesse carolingienne ;
     ép. 2 Roger 1er, comte de Laon + 926.)2"

Family 1

Roger I (?) Comte de Laon d. 926

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#HelwigM1HucbaldDillingenM2RogerILaon. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eberhard: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eberh000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Gisela: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gisel000.htm
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#HucbaldOstervantMHeilwigFriulia
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#RogerILaondied926
  7. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hucbald_de_Gouy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  8. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 15 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."

Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis1,2,3

M, #19136, d. after 890
FatherNN d'Ostrevant4
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited15 Apr 2020
     Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis married Heilwig (?) of Friuli, daughter of Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli and Gisla (?) de Francia;
Her 1st husband.1,5,3
Hucbald (?) Comte d'Ostrevant et de Senlis died after 890; Med Lands says d. aft 890; Racines et Histoire says d. ca 895.1,3
     ; Per Med Lands: "COMTES d’OSTREVANT: The county of Ostrevant originally formed part of the pagus Atrebatensis. It was bound to the north by the river Scarpe, and to the east and south by the rivers Escaut and Sensée[1536]. It lay east of Douai and west of Valenciennes, within the territory of the west Frankish kingdom. It is not known who governed the county after the death of Raoul [II] in 944 until the late 11th century when it was held by the seigneurs de Ribemont, who were also châtelains de Valenciennes (see HAINAUT)."5 GAV-30.

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "La chronique d'Alberic de Trois-Fontaines le nomme également 'Hucbaldus de Hainacq. On ne sait pas grand-chose de ses origines et de sa vie. Il épousa Heilwis de Frioul (v. 855 † v. 895), fille d'Évrard ou Eberhard, marquis de Frioul, et de la carolingienne Gisèle, elle-même fille de l'empereur Louis le Pieux et de Judith de Bavière. De ce mariage, il aurait eu deux fils :
** Raoul, qui fut comte d'Ostrevant, puis de Vexin, d'Amiens et de Valois
** un fils dont le nom n'est pas connu, qui pourrait être Guy, comte de Senlis, marié à une femme issue des comtes de Vermandois et père d'un Bernard, comte de Senlis, cité en 945
** un comte Hucbald, père d'Udalric, évêque d'Augsbourg de 929 à 977

     "Il aurait également eu une sœur, mère de Herivé († 922), archevêque de Reims de 900 à 922, et d'Eudes.
     "Sa veuve se remaria avec Roger Ier (vers 867-† 926), comte de Laon.
     "La description de sa famille est issue en partie de l'identification d'Heilwis, veuve et se remariant avec Roger Ier de Laon, avec Heilwis, femme d'Hucbald. Or cette identification pose quelques problèmes chronologiques (montrant son improbabilité plutôt que son impossibilité), et une autre construction est proposée. Hucbald et Heilwide de Frioul eurent deux enfants :
** peut-être Guy, comte de Senlis
** Heilwis de Senlis, mariée à Gautier de Laon († 892), puis à Roger Ier de Laon († 926)
** un comte Hucbald, père d'Udalric, évêque d'Augsbourg de 929 à 977

Sources
** Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval, Oxford, Linacre College, Unit for Prosopographical Research, coll. « Prosopographica et Genealogica / 3 », 2000, 310 p. (ISBN 1-900934-01-9) : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9f%C3%A9rence:Onomastique_et_Parent%C3%A9_dans_l%27Occident_m%C3%A9di%C3%A9val
** Katharine S. B. Keats-Rohan, « Poppa de Bayeux et sa famille »
** Édouard de Saint Phalle, « Les comtes de Gâtinais aux Xe et XIe siècles »
** Donald C. Jackman, « Cousins of the German Carolingians »

** Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), Villeneuve-d'Ascq, éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993, 545 p. (ISBN 978-2-95015-093-6): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9f%C3%A9rence:Nouvelle_histoire_g%C3%A9n%C3%A9alogique_de_l%27auguste_maison_de_France
** Foundation for medieval genealogy [archive]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc499712509."2



; Per Med Lands:
     "HUCBALD, son of --- (-after 890). Comte [d'Ostrevant].
     "m [as her first husband,] HEILWIG [of Friulia], daughter of EBERHARD Duke of the March of Friulia [Unruochingi] & his wife Gisela [Carolingian]. The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified. This marriage is confirmed by Flodoard’s Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ which names “Hucboldus...sororis...Rodulfi maritus”[1537]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hucbaldus de Hainacq" as "huius [=abbas Rodulfus] sororius"[1538]. The information appears to be corroborated by a later passage in the same source which records that "comes Rodulfus" (referring to Heilwig's grandson) was "nepos…ex sorore" of Louis IV King of France[1539]. It appears chronologically unlikely for any of King Louis's sisters, whose dates of birth can be estimated to [908/17], to have been the mother of Raoul [II] who was killed in battle in 944, presumably when he was already adult. It appears more likely that the family relationship was one generation further back, and that a member of the Unruochingi family, descended from the sister of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and who originated in the same area in northern France, would provide a good match. She maybe married secondly (after 890) Roger [I] Comte de Laon. Her supposed second marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[1540]. The primary source on which this is based has not been identified and from a chronological point of view it seems unlikely to be correct. Another table in Europäische Stammtafeln only names the wife of Comte Roger as "Helvide" but does not give her origin[1541]."
Med Lands cites:
[1537] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, Liber IV, I, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 371.
[1538] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 893, MGH SS XXIII, p. 748.
[1539] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 943, MGH SS XXIII, p. 763.
[1540] ES II 188B.
[1541] ES III 729 B.1


;      Racines et Histoire reverses the order of Raoul I and Raoul II (called Raoul 1er de Cambrai). It also shows Gauthier I as the son of Raoul 1er de Cambrai.See attached diagram from Racines et Histoire (Vermandois, et al, p. 6)
To further complicate the discussion,
I have chosen to follow the lineage as laid out by Med Lands. GA Vaut.3,6



; Per Racines et Histoire: "Hucbald + ~895 comte d’Ostrevant et de Senlis
     ép. Heilwise (Hedwige, Heilwig) de Frioul (fille d’Eberhard, marquis de Frioul + 16/12/866 et de Gisèle, Princesse carolingienne ;
     ép. 2 Roger 1er, comte de Laon + 926.)3"



; NB: The Wikipédia (Fr.) re-imagines the lineages of the descendants of Hucbald. Wikipédia states: "La description de sa famille est issue en partie de l'identification d'Heilwis, veuve et se remariant avec Roger Ier de Laon, avec Heilwis, femme d'Hucbald. Or cette identification pose quelques problèmes chronologiques (montrant son improbabilité plutôt que son impossibilité), et une autre construction est proposée. Hucbald et Heilwide de Frioul eurent deux enfants :
** peut-être Guy, comte de Senlis
** Heilwis de Senlis, mariée à Gautier de Laon († 892), puis à Roger Ier de Laon († 926)
** un comte Hucbald, père d'Udalric, évêque d'Augsbourg de 929 à 977

There are several implications of this proposed presentation.
1. One implication is that the Heilwis who m. Roger I de Laon was Heilwis, a dau. of Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli, and not Hubald's widow herself.
2. The second is to present Raoul I as either the grandson and or the son of Hucbald. It also adds two other important sons.
3. A third is to show two additional sons for Hucbald de Gouy and his wife Heilwis/Heilwig de Friuli: 1) Guy comte de Senlis and 2) (a son named) Hucbald, father of Udalric, bishop of Augsburg (d. 977).

The source of this approach are not clearly delineated in the article. I offer it here so that others can examine the article and draw their own conclusions about what the true case might be. The diagram of this presentation is attached with the most significant changes highlighted.
For the present, I have chosen to follow the earlier thinking of Raoul I as the son of Hucbald, but I am studying this alternative.2,6

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#HucbaldOstervantMHeilwigFriulia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hucbald_de_Gouy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc29367224
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#HelwigM1HucbaldDillingenM2RogerILaon
  6. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 15 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."

NN d'Ostrevant1

M, #19137
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited21 Apr 2020
     GAV-31.

; Per Med Lands, Hucbald, Comte d'Ostrevant, and Berthe d'Ostrevant, were siblings of unknown parents.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc29367224. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau1

M, #19138, d. after 9 December 771
FatherHadrad (?)2
ReferenceGAV33
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau married Hermenlindis/Haildis (?), daughter of Berthold (?);
His 1st wife.2 Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau married Ermenane (?) before 9 December 771;
His 2nd wife.2
Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau died after 9 December 771.2
     GAV-33.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1968.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 11.
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: I 221.3
Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau was also known as Chrothard (?) Count in the Argengau.2 Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau was also known as Rothard (?) Count in the Argengau.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROTHARD [Chrothard] (-after 9 Dec 771). Settipani names Rothard as son of Hardrad[659] but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. Graf. With estates in Alsace and Lorraine, he was a member of the high aristocracy under Pépin I King of the Franks and became one of the king's main helpers in the incorporation of Alemannia into the Frankish realm[660]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to Fulrad Abbot of Saint-Denis by charter dated 1 Mar 752 which names "fidelibus nostris…Milone, Rotgario, Cheimgaudo, Crothardo, Gerichardo, Autgario et Wiberto comite palatii nostri"[661]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed rights to market customs duties of the abbey of Saint-Denis by charter dated 8 Jul 753 which names "fidelibus…Milone, Helmgaudo, Hildegario, [C]hrothardo, Drogone, Baugulfo, [G]islehario, Leuthfredo, Rauhone, Theuderico, Maganario, Nithado, Uualthario, Uulfario et Uuicberti comite palatii nostro"[662]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Saint-Denis by "Gerardum comitem" by charter dated 30 Oct 759 which names as present "Uuidone, Raulcone, Milone, Helmgaudo, Rothardo, Gislehario…et Uuicberto comite palatii nostro"[663]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" donated property to found Kloster Prüm by charter dated 13 Aug 762 which names "coniux mea Bertrada…genitor suus Heribertus" and was subscribed by (first column) "Droconi comitis, Warini comitis, Baugulfi comitis, Troanie comitis, Herloini comitis, Rachulfi comitis" and (second column) "Chrodardi comitis, Welenti comitis, Gerhardi comitis, Waltarii comitis, Gunberti comitis, Warini comitis"[664]. He is mentioned in 769 as Graf in Argen, north of Lake Constance[665]. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[666].
     "m firstly HAILDIS, daughter of ---. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[667].
     "m secondly (before 9 Dec 771) ERMENANE, daughter of ---. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[668]."
Med Lands Cites:
[659] Settipani (1993), p. 254 footnote 433.
[660] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 1.
[661] DD Kar. 1, 1, p. 3.
[662] DD Kar. 1, 6, p. 9.
[663] DD Kar. 1, 12, p. 17.
[664] DD Kar. 1, 16, p. 21.
[665] Jordan, p. 2.
[666] D’Herbomez, A. (ed.) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Gorze, Mettensia II (1898) (Paris) 14, p. 35.
[667] Gorze 14, p. 35.
[668] Gorze 14, p. 35.2

Family 1

Hermenlindis/Haildis (?) b. c 715, d. a 757

Family 2

Ermenane (?)

Family 3

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruthardus: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020395&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#WelfIdied824A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ruthardus: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020395&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf, Graf in Bayern und Schwaben, Graf von Altdorf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020392&tree=LEO

Hermenlindis/Haildis (?)1

F, #19139, b. circa 715, d. after 757
FatherBerthold (?) b. c 685
Last Edited25 Jul 2020
     Hermenlindis/Haildis (?) married Ruthardus (?) Count in the Argengau, son of Hadrad (?);
His 1st wife.1 Hermenlindis/Haildis (?) was born circa 715.
Hermenlindis/Haildis (?) died after 757.
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ROTHARD [Chrothard] (-after 9 Dec 771). Settipani names Rothard as son of Hardrad[659] but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. Graf. With estates in Alsace and Lorraine, he was a member of the high aristocracy under Pépin I King of the Franks and became one of the king's main helpers in the incorporation of Alemannia into the Frankish realm[660]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to Fulrad Abbot of Saint-Denis by charter dated 1 Mar 752 which names "fidelibus nostris…Milone, Rotgario, Cheimgaudo, Crothardo, Gerichardo, Autgario et Wiberto comite palatii nostri"[661]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed rights to market customs duties of the abbey of Saint-Denis by charter dated 8 Jul 753 which names "fidelibus…Milone, Helmgaudo, Hildegario, [C]hrothardo, Drogone, Baugulfo, [G]islehario, Leuthfredo, Rauhone, Theuderico, Maganario, Nithado, Uualthario, Uulfario et Uuicberti comite palatii nostro"[662]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Saint-Denis by "Gerardum comitem" by charter dated 30 Oct 759 which names as present "Uuidone, Raulcone, Milone, Helmgaudo, Rothardo, Gislehario…et Uuicberto comite palatii nostro"[663]. "Pippinus rex Francorum" donated property to found Kloster Prüm by charter dated 13 Aug 762 which names "coniux mea Bertrada…genitor suus Heribertus" and was subscribed by (first column) "Droconi comitis, Warini comitis, Baugulfi comitis, Troanie comitis, Herloini comitis, Rachulfi comitis" and (second column) "Chrodardi comitis, Welenti comitis, Gerhardi comitis, Waltarii comitis, Gunberti comitis, Warini comitis"[664]. He is mentioned in 769 as Graf in Argen, north of Lake Constance[665]. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[666].
     "m firstly HAILDIS, daughter of ---. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[667].
     "m secondly (before 9 Dec 771) ERMENANE, daughter of ---. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[668]."
Med Lands Cites:
[659] Settipani (1993), p. 254 footnote 433.
[660] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 1.
[661] DD Kar. 1, 1, p. 3.
[662] DD Kar. 1, 6, p. 9.
[663] DD Kar. 1, 12, p. 17.
[664] DD Kar. 1, 16, p. 21.
[665] Jordan, p. 2.
[666] D’Herbomez, A. (ed.) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Gorze, Mettensia II (1898) (Paris) 14, p. 35.
[667] Gorze 14, p. 35.
[668] Gorze 14, p. 35.1


; Per Med Lands:
     "m firstly HAILDIS, daughter of ---. “Ratardus filius Hardrardi quondam” donated property at “Mandris” to the abbey of Gorze, for the soul of “Haildis quondam coniugis mee”, except for part which was “dotis coniugis mee Ermenane”, by charter dated 9 Dec 771[667]."
Med Lands Cites: [667] Gorze 14, p. 35.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#WelfIdied824A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.