Bertha (?) Princess of Aquitaine

F, #6511, b. circa 827, d. circa 827
FatherPepin I (?) King of Aquitaine b. bt 797 - 803, d. 13 Dec 838
MotherRingart (?) b. bt 805 - 810
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Bertha (?) Princess of Aquitaine died circa 827.1 She was born circa 827 at France.1
     

Citations

  1. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  2. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Charles (?) Archbishop of Mainz1,2

M, #6512, b. circa 825, d. 4 June 863
FatherPepin I (?) King of Aquitaine2,1,3,4 b. bt 797 - 803, d. 13 Dec 838
MotherRingart (?)1,5,4 b. bt 805 - 810
Last Edited30 Nov 2020
     Charles (?) Archbishop of Mainz was born circa 825 at France.2
Charles (?) Archbishop of Mainz died on 4 June 863 at Mainz, Germany.1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 78.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036220&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis "the Pious" (Louis le Pieux, Ludwig der Fromme, Hludowicus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/louis000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#PippinIAquitaine. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ringart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036218&tree=LEO

unknown (?)1

F, #6513, b. circa 831
FatherPepin I (?) King of Aquitaine2 b. bt 797 - 803, d. 13 Dec 838
MotherRingart (?)2 b. bt 805 - 810
Last Edited30 Nov 2020
     Unknown (?) married Rather (?) Count of Limoges.1 Unknown (?) was born circa 831 at France.3
     

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#PippinIAquitaine. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Alpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire1,2,3

F, #6514, b. between 794 and 795, d. 29 May 852
FatherLouis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West1,2,3,4,5 b. 16 Aug 778, d. 20 Jun 840
MotherTheodelinde (?) de Sens6
ReferenceGAV31 EDV34
Last Edited26 Aug 2020
     Alpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire was born between 794 and 795 at Casseneul, Lot-et-Garonne, Aquitaine, France (now).2,3,4 She married Bego/Begue I (?) Comte de Paris, Marquis of Septimanie, son of Gérard I (?) Comte de Paris and Rotrude (?) d'Austrasia, circa 806;
Possibly his 2nd wife wife.2,1,7,3,8,9,4
Alpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire died on 29 May 852 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).2,3
Alpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire was buried after 29 May 852 at Abbey of Ste Pierre, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     795, France
     DEATH     unknown, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Illegitimate daughter of Louis I. Abbesse de Saint Pierre, à Reims. An illegitimate daughter of Louis the Pious, son of Charlemagne, Alpaïs de Paris, abbess of St-Pierre de Reims. She had one brother, Arnulf de Sens.
     Alpaïs de Paris (daughter of Louis I), Abbesse de St-Pierre de Reims Also Known As: "Adelaïde", "Adelheid", "Alpaida", "Alpaïde; Alpais", "Alpheid", "Alpheidis", "Alpis", "Aupais", "Elfride", "Elpheid" Birthdate: circa 797 Birthplace: Casseneul, Lot-et-Garonne, Aquitane, France Death: Died 852 in Paris, Ille-de-France, France Place of Burial: Abbaye Saint-Pierre-les-Dames, Rheims, (Present département de la Marne), (Present Région Champagne-Ardenne), France Immediate Family: Daughter of Louis I, The Pious and Theodelinde of Sens Wife of Bégon, comte de Paris, marquis de Septimanie Mother of Landrée de Paris; Leuthard II, count of Paris; Eberhard I de Paris, comte de Logenahe; Liedrat Eulde; Countess of Fulda; Adelaide and Lisiard, Count of Fezensac « less Sister of Arnoul Half sister of Gisela of Lotharingia, Abbess of Nivelles; Emperor Lothair I; Pépin I, king of Aquitaine; Adelaide De Tours; Berta; Hildegarde d'Aquitaine, Abbesse de Saint-Jean-de-Laon; Louis II, 'The German'; Rotrude, daughter of Louis I the Pious and Ermengard; Gisela of Cysoing, daughter of Louis and Judith and Charles II "the Bald", Western Emperor « less Occupation: Abbesse de Saint Pierre le Bas, à Rheims (Abbess in Reims) Managed by: Sharon Doubell Last Updated: January 18, 2016.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Louis I of the Franks 778–840
      Theodelinde de Sens
     Spouse
      Begue de Paris 760–816
     Siblings
      Arnulf de Sens 794–841
     Half Siblings
      Princess Adelaide Tours
      Princess Carolingian d'Auvergne
      Gisela De France Of Neustria
      Lothair Carolingian 795–855
      Rotrude de Aquitania d'Auvergne 802–860
      Ludwig II of East Francia 804–876
      Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
     Children
      Susanna De Paris Von Argengau
      Landrée de Paris 810 – unknown
     BURIAL     Abbey of Ste Pierre, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 31 May 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 147243444.3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 75.10 GAV-31 EDV-34 GKJ-34. Alpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire was also known as Aupais.11

Family

Bego/Begue I (?) Comte de Paris, Marquis of Septimanie b. bt 755 - 760, d. 28 Oct 816
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alpais de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036200&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Alpaïs de Paris (795–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147243444, citing Abbey of Ste Pierre, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147243444/alpa_s-de_paris. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#AlpaisMBeggoComteParis. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis "the Pious" (Louis le Pieux, Ludwig der Fromme, Hludowicus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/louis000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Theodelinde de Sens (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147277593, citing Abbey de Sainte Colombe de Sens, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147277593/theodelinde-de_sens
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beggo,_Count_of_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bego: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036202&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Beggodied816
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alpais de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036200&tree=LEO
  11. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I11641
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Susanna of Paris: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036207&tree=LEO
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Landrée de Paris (810–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147242726, ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147242726/landr_e-de_paris

Eberhard (?) Count of Paris1

M, #6515, b. circa 806, d. between 861 and 871
FatherBego/Begue I (?) Comte de Paris, Marquis of Septimanie2,3 b. bt 755 - 760, d. 28 Oct 816
MotherAlpaïs/Alpaide (?) Princess of the Holy Roman Empire4,5 b. bt 794 - 795, d. 29 May 852
Last Edited23 Mar 2020
     Eberhard (?) Count of Paris was born circa 806 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France.1
Eberhard (?) Count of Paris died between 861 and 871.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 75.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eberhard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036206&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beggo,_Count_of_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bego: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036202&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alpais de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036200&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Beggodied816. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Isambart "the Saxon" (?) Count in Thurgau1

M, #6516, b. circa 750, d. after 806
FatherWarin I (?) Count of Thurgau1 b. 720, d. 780
MotherAdalindis (?) di Spoleto1 b. 730, d. 787
ReferenceGAV33
Last Edited7 Dec 2020
     Isambart "the Saxon" (?) Count in Thurgau married Thiedrada/Thietrate (?), daughter of Bernhard (?) de Saint Quentin.1 Isambart "the Saxon" (?) Count in Thurgau was born circa 750 at Narbonne, Departement de l'Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France (now).1,2
Isambart "the Saxon" (?) Count in Thurgau was buried after 806 at Kloster Lorsch, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hesse, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     750, Narbonne, Departement de l'Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
     DEATH     807 (aged 56–57), Saxony (Sachsen), Germany
     Duke of Sachsen and Thurgau, Lord of Altdorf - Isanbart (d. after 806), Count in Thurgau, also known as Isambard the Saxon was an 8th-century count (comes) in the Frankish lands of Saxony and Master of the Palace at Altdorf in Alamannia.
     He was born about 750 AD in Narbonne, France the son of Warin I, documented as count in Thurgau, and his wife Adalindis, a daughter of Duke Hildeprand of Spoleto. Isanbart himself was first mentioned as a Thurgau count in 774 and made significant donations to the Abbey of Saint Gall. He was Greve, Comte, of Altorf and Master of the Palace.
     His wife was Thiedrada (Thietrate), of Carolingian origin, and he was the father of:
-- Hedwig (Heilwig; d. after 833), married Count Welf;
-- Adalung, abbot of Lorsch 804–837;
-- Adalindis
-- Hunfrid I of Istria, Guelph of Andechs and the Brother of Bouchard "the Constable", and Alberic I de Narbonne.
He died after 806 AD in Saxony.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Warin (Guerin) Thurgau 720–780
          Adalindis di Spoleto 730–787
     Spouses
          Theodrata St Quentin 774–821
          Ermentrude von Schwaben
     Children
          Guerin (Warin) de Provence unknown–851
          Hedwig (Heilwig) von Sachsen 775–843
     BURIAL     Lorsch Abbey, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hessen, Germany
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 28 May 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 147103137
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.2
Isambart "the Saxon" (?) Count in Thurgau died after 806 at Saxony (Sachsen), Germany (now).1
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Isanbart (d. after 806), Count in Thurgau, also known as Isambard the Saxon was an 8th-century count (comes) in the Frankish lands of Saxony and Master of the Palace at Altdorf in Alamannia.[1]
Life
     "He was born about 750 AD in Narbonne, France the son of Warin I, documented as count in Thurgau, and his wife Adalindis, a daughter of Duke Hildeprand of Spoleto.[2]
     "Isanbart himself was first mentioned as a Thurgau count in 774 and made significant donations to the Abbey of Saint Gall. He was Greve, Comte, of Altorf and Master of the Palace.
     "His wife was Thiedrada (Thietrate), of Carolingian origin, and he was the father of
-- Hedwig (Heilwig; d. after 833), married Count Welf;
-- Adalung, abbot of Lorsch 804–837;
-- Adalindis
     "Hunfrid I of Istria, Guelph of Andechs and the Brother of Bouchard "the Constable", and Alberic I de Narbonne.[citation needed]
     "He died after 806 AD in Saxony.
References
1. Isanbart (Des Franken) Sachsen]. at: https://www.geni.com/people/Isembart-count-in-Thurgau/6000000005912540345
2. Isanbart Biography & Family History. at: https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/isembart-von-thrgau-master-of-the-palace-of-altdor/540744“.1 GAV-33.

Family

Thiedrada/Thietrate (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isambart. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 October 2019), memorial page for Isambart von Sachsen (750–807), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147103137, citing Lorsch Abbey, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hessen, Germany ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147103137/isambart-von_sachsen. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Hildegarde (?) Abbess of Laon1

F, #6517, b. circa 802, d. October 841
FatherLouis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West1,2,3 b. 16 Aug 778, d. 20 Jun 840
MotherErmengarde/Irmingard (?) of Hesbaye, Queen of the Franks, Empress1,2,4 b. c 778, d. 3 Oct 818
Last Edited16 Sep 2020
     Hildegarde (?) Abbess of Laon was born circa 802.1
Hildegarde (?) Abbess of Laon died in October 841.1
     ; Hildegard/Matilda, Abbess of Laon, *ca 802, +X.841; m.Ct Gerard I of Auvergne (*ca 795 +25.6.841.)1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIEmperorB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis "the Pious" (Louis le Pieux, Ludwig der Fromme, Hludowicus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/louis000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ermengarde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen006.htm
  5. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli1,2,3,4

M, #6518, b. between 805 and 815, d. 16 December 866
FatherUnruoch di Friuli Count of Ternois5,6,7,4 d. b 853
MotherEngletrude (?) de Paris8,6,7 b. c 760
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli was born between 805 and 815; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 820; Genealogics says b. ca 815; Med Lands says b. 805/10.1,6,7 He married Gisla (?) de Francia, daughter of Louis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West and Judith (?) von Altdorf, in 836; Weis says m. between 0836 and 0840; Genealogics says d. 836.9,10,6,11,12,4,13
Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli died on 16 December 866; Weis says d. ca 864; Genealogics says d. 16 Dec 866; The Henry Project says d. "865×6 (16 December?)1,9,7,4"
Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli was buried after 16 December 866 at Cysoing Abbey (Abbey of St Calixtus-St. Evrard), Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     815
     DEATH     16 Dec 855 (aged 39–40), Italy
[Text copied directly from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Gisela De France Of Neustria
     BURIAL     Cysoing Abbey, Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: relative
     Added: 26 Oct 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 119345175
     SPONSORED BY Anonymous.1,7,14
     GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Eberhard was born about 815, the son of Unruoch, count of Ternois, and his wife Engeltrude, who may have been a daughter of Beggo of Paris and Alpais. The Frankish duke of Friaul/Friuli from 846, Eberhard was an important political, military and cultural figure in the Carolingian empire during his lifetime. He kept a large library, commissioned works of Latin literature from Lupus Servatus and Sedulius Scottus, and maintained a correspondence with the noted theologians and church leaders Gottschalk, Rabanus Maurus and Hincmar. About 836 Eberhard married Gisla de France, daughter of Emperor Louis I 'the Pious' and his wife Judith. They had at least three children of whom only Berengar I is recorded with progeny. Eberhard died on 16 December 866."6

; This is the same person as:
”Eberhard of Friuli” at Wikipedia, as
”Évrard de Frioul” at Wikipédia (FR.),
and as ”Eberardo del Friuli” at Wikipedia (IT.)


This is the same person as ”Eberhard” at The Henry Project.15,16,17,4

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 81.6 Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli was also known as Eberhard di Friuli.18

; Per Weis [1992:164]: “Eberhard, Margrave of Friuli, d. 864; m. Gisèle (146-15), d. 1 July 874, dau. of the emperor Louis I and Judith of Bavaria. (See Chaume, Les Origins de Duché de Bourgogne, I 542, 551-552, etc., and Moriarty, "The conradins", in NEHGR 99:342 and chart).”.9

; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): “B7. [2m.] Pss Gisele of France, *ca 818/820, +1.7.876; m.836 Mgve Eberhard of Friaul (*ca 820 +Italy 16.12.866, buried in Cysoing)”.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "GISELA ([819/822]-after 1 Jul 874, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Karolum et Gislam" children of "Hludovicus ymperator…ex Iudith ymperatrice"[222]. Her marriage is deduced from a charter in which Gisela states that their eldest son Unruoch brought back the body of Eberhard from Italy[223]. She founded the abbey of St Calixtus at Cysoing, Flanders, where she lived as a widow. "Gisle" granted "le fisc de Somain en Ostrevant" to "filii…Adelarde" by charter dated 14 Apr 869, which names "rex Karolus meus…germanus…senioris mei dulcis memorie Evrardi…tres infantes meos Rodulfum…et Berengarium…et…Adelarde"[224]. The Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis records that “Gisla” donated property to Cysoing abbey for her burial next to “coniugis mei dulcis memoriæ Evrardi”, by charter dated 2 Apr 870 which names “filiæ meæ Ingiltrudis…filius meus Rodulfus”, and by charter dated “Kal Jul anno XXXV regnante Carolo Rege”, naming “filii mei Unroch…filiorum meorum Adalardo atque Rodulfo” and signed by “Odelrici Comitis”[225]. "Gisle" donated property to Cysoing for the anniversaries of "Ludovico imperatore patre meo et…Judith imperatrice matre mea et…rege Karolo…germano et…prole mea…Hengeltrude, Hunroc, Berengario, Adelardo, Rodulpho, Hellwich, Gilla, Judith" by charter dated to [874][226].
     "m ([836]) EBERHARD Marchese di Friulia, son of UNRUOCH Comte [en Ternois] & his wife Engeltrude (-in Italy 16 Dec 866, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus)."
Med Lands cites:
[222] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[223] Coussemaker, I. de (ed.) (1886) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Cysoing et de ses dépendances (Lille) ("Cysoing"), V, p. 10.
[224] Cysoing III, p. 7.
[225] Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis, Spicilegium II, pp. 878 and 879, and Cysoing IV and V, pp. 8 and 10.
[226] Cysoing VI, p. 11.12

Family

Gisla (?) de Francia b. c 819, d. a 1 Aug 874
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eberhard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020513&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 146-15, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eberhard: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eberh000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Unruoch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120739&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eberhard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020513&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#EberhardDukeFriuliadied866. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Engeltrude: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120740&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Line 191-16, p. 164.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020512&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#GiselaMEberhardFriuliadied866
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Gisela: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gisel000.htm
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 July 2020), memorial page for Saint Eberhard of Friuli (815–16 Dec 855), Find a Grave Memorial no. 119345175, citing Cysoing Abbey, Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France; Maintained by relative (contributor 47268827), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/119345175. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eberhard_of_Friuli. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Évrard de Frioul: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89vrard_de_Frioul. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Eberardo del Friuli: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eberardo_del_Friuli. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  18. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I8227
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Hedwigdied903
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#HelwigM1HucbaldDillingenM2RogerILaon
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin & Chaumont-en-Vexin, Ham, Saint-Simon, Sohier-Walincourt,, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020512&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berengar I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036190&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#BerengarioIitalydied924A
  26. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Berengario I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/beren001.htm

Gisla (?) de Francia1,2,3,4

F, #6519, b. circa 819, d. after 1 August 874
FatherLouis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West2,5,4,6,7,8 b. 16 Aug 778, d. 20 Jun 840
MotherJudith (?) von Altdorf1,2,5,4,6,7 b. bt 800 - 805, d. 19 Apr 843
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Gisla (?) de Francia was born circa 819 at France; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says b. 818/820; Med Lands and The Henry Project say b. 819/822.2,4,6,7 She married Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli, son of Unruoch di Friuli Count of Ternois and Engletrude (?) de Paris, in 836; Weis says m. between 0836 and 0840; Genealogics says d. 836.9,10,11,4,6,12,7
Gisla (?) de Francia was buried after 1 August 874 at Cysoing Abbey (Abbey of St Calixtus-St. Evrard), Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
     Gisela of Neustria was the elder daughter of the Emperor Louis I the Pious (816 – 840) and his second wife Judith of Altdorf, the daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, and was full sister to the Emperor Charles II the Bald (875 – 877). The Emperor Louis caused Gisela to be married (c836) to Count Eberhard (c810 – 866) the son of Unruoch, a count of the empire. The marriage was designed to gain the support of the powerful Unruoching family for the weakening power of the Imperial crown. In consequence of this marriage with an imperial princess, Eberhard was given the government of the region of Friuli, north of Venice, and was created the first hereditary duke. At Eberhard's death Duchess Gisela inherited his entire private library, and three of their daughters inherited legacies of specific books. Gisela of Friuli made her will (July 1, 874) and died soon afterwards, being interred with Eberhard within the Abbey of St Calixtus at Cysoing.
     Through her daughter Heiliwich of Ostrevant Gisela was the direct ancestress of Aethelred II, King of England (978 – 1016), and of the noble English family, the Tracys of Toddington, whose coat of arms proudly displays their descent from the Emperor Charlemagne (800 – 814). Her children were,
** Eberhard of Friuli (c837 – before June 2, 840). He died in infancy.
** Ingeltrude of Friuli (c839 – after 874). She became the wife of Henry of Saalgau and Grabfeldgau (c830 – 886), Duke of Austrasia and left descendants.
** Unruoch II (c840 – 874). He succeeded his father as Duke of Friuli (866 – 874) and was married to Ava of Alsace, the daughter of Luitfrid II of Alsace, Count of Sundgau and left issue.
** Judith of Friuli (Waldrada) (c842 – c902). She married firstly to Konrad II of Auxerre, Margrave of Burgundy, and secondly to Adalbert II (c837 – c905), Count of Thurgau and left descendants from both marriages.
** Berengar I of Friuli (c843 – 924). He became Holy Roman Emperor (905 – 924) and was married three times and left issue.
** Bertha of Friuli (c844 – after 874). She became the second wife of Sigisbert (died c885), Count of Razes and left issue.
** Adalhard of Friuli (c845 – after 874). He became Marquis of Friuli and was lay Abbot of St Amand. He was married and left issue.
** Gisela of Friuli (c847 – after 863). No husband is recorded for her and she may have died unmarried.
** Rudolf of Friuli (Raoul, Ralph) (c850 – 892). He took holy orders and became the Abbot of the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin.
** Heiliwich of Friuli (c857 – 936). She was married firstly to Count Hucbald of Ostrevant (died c891) and secondly to Count Roger I of Laon (died 898), and left issue from both marriages. From: A      Bit of History
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis I of the Franks 778–840
          Judith of Bavaria 805–843
     Spouse
          Saint Eberhard of Friuli 815–855
     Siblings
          Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
     Half Siblings
          Arnulf de Sens 794–841
          Lothair Carolingian 795–855
          Alpaïs de Paris 795 – unknown
          Rotrude de Aquitania d'Auvergne 802–860
          Ludwig II of East Francia 804–876
     BURIAL     Cysoing Abbey, Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: relative
     Added: 26 Oct 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 119345228.13
Gisla (?) de Francia died after 1 August 874; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says d. 01 Jul 0876; Weis (AR7, line 191-16) says d. 01 Jul 0874; Med Lands and The Henry Project say d. aft 1 Jul 874.2,9,4,6,7
     ; Per Weis [1992:164]: “Eberhard, Margrave of Friuli, d. 864; m. Gisèle (146-15), d. 1 July 874, dau. of the emperor Louis I and Judith of Bavaria. (See Chaume, Les Origins de Duché de Bourgogne, I 542, 551-552, etc., and Moriarty, "The conradins", in NEHGR 99:342 and chart).”.9 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

; This is the same person as: ”Gisela, daughter of Louis the Pious” at Wikipedia, as ”Gisèle (fille de Louis le Pieux)” at Wikipédia (FR.), and as ”Gisella (figlia di Ludovico il Pio)” at Wikipedia (IT.)


This is also the same person as ”Gisela” at The Henry Project.14,15,16,7

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 81.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): “B7. [2m.] Pss Gisele of France, *ca 818/820, +1.7.876; m.836 Mgve Eberhard of Friaul (*ca 820 +Italy 16.12.866, buried in Cysoing)”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "GISELA ([819/822]-after 1 Jul 874, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Karolum et Gislam" children of "Hludovicus ymperator…ex Iudith ymperatrice"[222]. Her marriage is deduced from a charter in which Gisela states that their eldest son Unruoch brought back the body of Eberhard from Italy[223]. She founded the abbey of St Calixtus at Cysoing, Flanders, where she lived as a widow. "Gisle" granted "le fisc de Somain en Ostrevant" to "filii…Adelarde" by charter dated 14 Apr 869, which names "rex Karolus meus…germanus…senioris mei dulcis memorie Evrardi…tres infantes meos Rodulfum…et Berengarium…et…Adelarde"[224]. The Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis records that “Gisla” donated property to Cysoing abbey for her burial next to “coniugis mei dulcis memoriæ Evrardi”, by charter dated 2 Apr 870 which names “filiæ meæ Ingiltrudis…filius meus Rodulfus”, and by charter dated “Kal Jul anno XXXV regnante Carolo Rege”, naming “filii mei Unroch…filiorum meorum Adalardo atque Rodulfo” and signed by “Odelrici Comitis”[225]. "Gisle" donated property to Cysoing for the anniversaries of "Ludovico imperatore patre meo et…Judith imperatrice matre mea et…rege Karolo…germano et…prole mea…Hengeltrude, Hunroc, Berengario, Adelardo, Rodulpho, Hellwich, Gilla, Judith" by charter dated to [874][226].
     "m ([836]) EBERHARD Marchese di Friulia, son of UNRUOCH Comte [en Ternois] & his wife Engeltrude (-in Italy 16 Dec 866, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus)."
Med Lands cites:
[222] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[223] Coussemaker, I. de (ed.) (1886) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Cysoing et de ses dépendances (Lille) ("Cysoing"), V, p. 10.
[224] Cysoing III, p. 7.
[225] Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis, Spicilegium II, pp. 878 and 879, and Cysoing IV and V, pp. 8 and 10.
[226] Cysoing VI, p. 11.6

Family

Eberhard I (?) Margrave of Friuli b. bt 805 - 815, d. 16 Dec 866
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020394&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 146-15, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020512&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIEmperorB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#GiselaMEberhardFriuliadied866
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Gisela: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gisel000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis "the Pious" (Louis le Pieux, Ludwig der Fromme, Hludowicus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/louis000.htm
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Line 191-16, p. 164.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eberhard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020513&tree=LEO
  12. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eberhard: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eberh000.htm
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 July 2020), memorial page for Gisela De France Of Neustria (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 119345228, citing Cysoing Abbey, Cysoing, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France; Maintained by relative (contributor 47268827), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/119345228. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gisela,_daughter_of_Louis_the_Pious. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gisèle (fille de Louis le Pieux): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gis%C3%A8le_(fille_de_Louis_le_Pieux). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Gisella (figlia di Ludovico il Pio): https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gisella_(figlia_di_Ludovico_il_Pio). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Hedwigdied903
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#HelwigM1HucbaldDillingenM2RogerILaon
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020512&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berengar I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036190&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#BerengarioIitalydied924A
  23. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Berengario I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/beren001.htm

Ludwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4

M, #6520, b. circa 806, d. 28 August 876
FatherLouis I "The Pious, The Fair, le Debonnaire" (?) King of Aquitaine, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West2,1,5,6 b. 16 Aug 778, d. 20 Jun 840
MotherErmengarde/Irmingard (?) of Hesbaye, Queen of the Franks, Empress1,5,7,8 b. c 778, d. 3 Oct 818
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Ludwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor was born circa 806.1,2,9 He married Emma/Hemma (?) of Andech, daughter of Welf I (?) Graf in Swabia and Heilwig/Hedwig/Eigilwich (?) of Saxony, in 827.1,2,3,10,9
Ludwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor died on 28 August 876 at Frankfurt, Brandenburg, Germany (now).2,1,9
Ludwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 28 August 876 at Kloster Lorsch, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hesse, Germany,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     804
     DEATH     28 Aug 876 (aged 71–72)
     Nobility, third son of Louis the Pious (son of Charlemagne) and Irmingard. He married Hemma of Bavaria in 827 who bore him seven children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Louis I of the Franks 778–840
          Ermengarde of Hesbaye unknown–818
     Spouse
          Emma of Bavaria of Altdorf
     Siblings
          Princess Adelaide Tours
          Princess Carolingian d'Auvergne
          Lothair Carolingian 795–855
          Rotrude de Aquitania d'Auvergne 802–860
     Half Siblings
          Gisela De France Of Neustria
          Arnulf de Sens 794–841
          Alpaïs de Paris 795 – unknown
          Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
     Children
          Carloman Carolingian
          Karl III Of Eastfrankonia
          Ludwig III Of Eastfrankonia 835–882
     BURIAL     Kloster Lorsch, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hessen, Germany
     PLOT     Ecclesia varia
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 2 Jul 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 92941529.2,11,9
     GAV-31.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Ludwig II 'the German' was born about 806, the son of Louis 'the Pious' and his wife Irmingard/Ermengard. He spent his early years at the court of his grandfather, Charlemagne. Although he received Bavaria in 817, he waited until 825 before going to live there. In his territory were Carinthians, Bohemians, Avars and Slavs. In 827 he married Emma, sister of his stepmother, Judith. From this marriage only three sons survived him. Emma was recorded as beautiful, intelligent and of dignified manners. At Regensburg they set up their court which was a smaller version of the imperial court at Aachen.
     "The machinations of his step-mother caused great perturbation and, in 830, his brothers, Lothar and Pippin, deposed their father. In October 830 Louis the Pious was restored as Emperor but only after giving additional territories to Lothar and Pippin.
     "In 832 it was Ludwig's turn to revolt and invade Suabia; however, his father forced him to submit to superior forces and was allowed to return to Bavaria. About May 833 Ludwig joined forces with his brothers, Lothar and Pippin, as well as with Pope Gregory IV. Their united strength caused defections in the imperial army and they were victorious without a battle. Lothar then became Emperor while Ludwig gained Suabia, Alsace and Franconia.
     "However, ill feelings resulted between Emperor Lothar and his brothers because of Lothar's treatment of their father and his attempts of re-uniting the Empire. In February 834 Ludwig and Pippin freed their father and forced Lothar to withdraw to Italy.
     "In 837 the restored Emperor Louis the Pious gave most of today's Belgium to his youngest son, Charles the Bald. This was the true reason why Ludwig and Lothar met, but which Louis the Pious regarded as plotting and so stripped Ludwig of all his lands except Bavaria. In November 838 Ludwig rebelled, trying to recover his lands; but when, in December 838, Pippin, his brother, died, Pippin's lands were divided only between Lothar and Charles the Bald. Negotiations between Ludwig and his father remained without results and so the rebellion continued.
     "However, this struggle ended in 840 with the death of Louis the Pious and the civil war which followed ended in 843 with the treaty of Verdun. From then on Ludwig's territories were secure but he still campaigned against the Slavs, Moravians, Bulgars and others. The Danes raided and plundered Hamburg in 845; however, even more serious was the severe famine of 850 which hit hardest near the Rhine.
     "In 853 intrigues between the brothers resumed when envoys came from Aquitaine requesting Ludwig to release them from their lord, Charles the Bald, his half-brother. Ludwig sent his own son, Ludwig the Younger, to check their complaints which brought Emperor Lothar and Charles the Bald together. They then encouraged raids by Bulgars and Slavs into Ludwig's territories. In 854 Ludwig the Younger returned and Charles the Bald resumed his control over Aquitaine. Emperor Lothar died in 855 and in 856 troubles again flared up in Aquitaine. By the end of 858, Ludwig the German had won over most of the nobles of Aquitaine, with Charles the Bald fleeing to Burgundy. On 7 December 858 Ludwig assumed rule over Aquitaine, even though the clergy was not willing to accept him. This weakened his position and by now it was his turn to have his own sons rebel against their father, first Karlmann in 861 and, after being suppressed, again in 863 and Ludwig III in 866.
     "Emperor Lothar's son, Lothar II, King of Lorraine, was forbidden by Pope Nicholas I to remarry; however, ignoring the Pope, he married in 862 and fathered a son and three daughters. As a result, in 865 Ludwig the German and Charles the Bald were ready to divide Lothar II's territories; but floods, famine and plague afflicted both Germany and France for a two-year period. When Lothar II died in 869, Charles the Bald took Lorraine while Ludwig the German, seriously ill, remained inactive. However, upon his recovery he made his claim and was granted an equal part of Lorraine.
     "In 871 two of his younger sons, Ludwig the Younger and Karl, rebelled, claiming their brother, Karlmann, had been given favourable treatment. The last years of Ludwig the German's life were spent intriguing in Italy. With the support of the childless Empress Engelberga, he formed an alliance against Charles the Bald and tried to have his own son, Karlmann, named as Emperor Louis II's successor. In 875 Emperor Louis II died still Karlmann was named successor, yet Charles the Bald was crowned Emperor. While mobilising an army against Charles the Bald, Ludwig the German died at Frankfurt on 28 August 876."2,12

; This is the same person as ”Louis the German I, Duke of Bohemia” at Wikipedia and as ”Ludwig der Deutsche" at Wikipedia (DE).4,13

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 80.
2. The Holy Roman Empire, A Dictionary Handbook , Zophy, Reference: biography.14,12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): "B6. [1m.] Louis II "the German", King of Bavaria (826-843), King of East Franks (843-876), King of West Lotharingia (869-876), Emperor (855-875), *ca 802/806, +Frankfurt a.M. 28.8.876; m.827 Hemma Welf (*by 818 +31.1.876.)15"

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengard --- ([806]-Frankfurt-am-Main 28 Aug 876, bur Kloster Lorsch). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" as sons of Emperor Louis and his wife Ermengard[14]. Under the Ordinatio Imperii promulgated by Emperor Louis in 817, Louis received "Baioariam et Carentanos, et Beheimos et Avaros, atque Sclavos qui ab orientali parte Baioariæ sunt…et duas villas…in pago Nortgaoe Luttraof et Ingoldesstat", specifying that he was to be named king[15]. He fought with his father and his brothers, joining the rebellions in 831 and 833. In the settlement of 833, he received Alemannia, Alsace and Rhetia (taken from his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve", as well as Thuringia and Saxony. His father obliged him to leave these additional territories in 839, confining his rule once more to Bavaria. Following the accession of his brother Lothaire as sole emperor after their father's death in 840, Ludwig allied himself with his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve". Together they defeated Emperor Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye, near Auxerre 25 Jun 841. Under the partition of territories agreed under the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, Louis was installed as LUDWIG II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. When Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks was faced with widespread rebellion, King Ludwig II invaded his kingdom in Aug 858 but was defeated 15 Jan 859 in the Laonnais and forced to withdraw. In 865, King Ludwig agreed with King Charles "le Chauve" the future division of the territories of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia, but on the latter's death in 869 King Charles invaded Lotharingia before Ludwig could assert his rights. A settlement was reached at Meerssen in Aug 870 under which Ludwig received Alsace and other territory along the Rhine[16], in effect succeeding as LUDWIG I King of Lotharingia [part]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "876 5 Kal Sep" of "Ludvicus imperator frater Ludvici imperatoris"[17]. The Liber Anniversariorum of Zurich records the death "V Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus rex fundator monasterii"[18].
     "m (827) EMMA, daughter of [WELF [I] Graf [von Altdorf] & his wife Heilwig ---] (-31 Jan 876, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Emma is named as the wife of Ludwig II King of Germany in numerous charters and narrative sources. However, her family origin is only indicated by a single source: the Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 827 of "Ludewicus rex" and "sororem Iudith imperatricis" without naming her[19]. This contrasts with the number of primary sources which specify the parentage of the Empress Judith and her two brothers Rudolf and Conrad. The absence of further references to Emma’s family could indicate a distinction between the status of the two sisters within the Welf dynasty. The term “soror” could include sisters who did not share both parents, but the chronology of the lives of the empress’s parents suggests no time for a second marriage on either side. Judith’s father’s death is dated to [824/25], while her mother is recorded as abbess at Chelles in 833. Emma’s marriage date suggests that she was younger than Judith, but the birth of children soon after the marriage places her birth in [812/15] at the latest. As no indication has been found that Judith’s parents separated and that her father remarried, it is assumed that the sparsity of sources detailing Emma’s parentage results merely from the lack of surviving records. "Ludowicus…rex" made a donation to St Felix & Regula in Zurich naming "filia nostra Bertha…[et] coniugis nostræ Hemmæ" by charter dated 29 Oct 863[20]. The Annales Fuldenses record that "Hemma quoque regina" became paralysed in 874, died at Regensburg in 876 and was buried in the church of St Emmeran[21]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina hic sepulta"[22]. The necrology of Augia Divis records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina"[23]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "2 Kal Jan" of "Hemma imperatrix sor na"[24]."
Med Lands Cites:
[14] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
[15] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum 2 and 3, p. 198.
[16] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), pp. 285-6.
[17] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.
[18] Fragmenta et Excerpta Libri Anniversariorum Abbatiæ Turicensis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 537.
[19] Annales Xantenses 827, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[20] D LD 110, p. 158.
[21] Annales Fuldenses 874 and 876, MGH SS I, pp. 388 and 389.
[22] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[23] Necrologium Augiæ Divitis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 272.
[24] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA [Hemma] (-31 Jan 876, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Emma is named as the wife of Ludwig II King of Germany in numerous charters and narrative sources. However, her family origin is only indicated by a single source: the Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 827 of "Ludewicus rex" and "sororem Iudith imperatricis" without naming her[1797]. This contrasts with the number of primary sources which specify the parentage of the Empress Judith and her two brothers Rudolf and Conrad. The absence of further references to Emma’s family could indicate a distinction between the status of the two sisters within the Welf dynasty. The term “soror” could include sisters who did not share both parents, but the chronology of the lives of the empress’s parents suggests no time for a second marriage on either side. Judith’s father’s death is dated to [824/25], while her mother is recorded as abbess at Chelles in 833. Emma’s marriage date suggests that she was younger than Judith, but the birth of children soon after the marriage places her birth in [812/15] at the latest. As no indication has been found that Judith’s parents separated and that her father remarried, it is assumed that the sparsity of sources detailing Emma’s parentage results merely from the lack of surviving records. "Ludowicus…rex" made a donation to St Felix & Regula in Zurich naming "filia nostra Bertha…[et] coniugis nostræ Hemmæ" by charter dated 29 Oct 863[1798]. The Gesta Francorum records that "Hemma quoque regina" became paralysed in 874, died at Regensburg in 876 and was buried in the church of St Emmeran[1799]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina hic sepulta"[1800]. The necrology of Augia Divis records the death "II Kal Feb" of "Hemma regina"[1801]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "2 Kal Jan" of "Hemma imperatrix sor na"[1802].
     "m (827) LOUIS King of Bavaria and Carinthia, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengardis [de Hesbaye] ([806]-Frankfurt-am-Main 28 Aug 876, bur Kloster Lorsch). He was installed in 843 as LUDWIG II "le Germanique" King of the East Franks."
Med Lands Cites:
[1797] Annales Xantenses 827, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[1798] D LD 110, p. 158.
[1799] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 874 and 876, MGH SS I, pp. 388 and 389.
[1800] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[1801] Necrologium Augiæ Divitis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 272.
[1802] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.16
He was Duke of Maine between 811 and 817.4 He was King of Bavaria between 817 and 843.1,2,4 He was King of the East Franks (of East Francia). See attached map from Wikipedia (By Great Politburo - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=76109041) between 843 and 876.1,4 He was Holy Roman Emperor between 855 and 875.17,1,2 He was King of West Lotharingia between 869 and 876.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_German. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIEmperorB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis "the Pious" (Louis le Pieux, Ludwig der Fromme, Hludowicus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/louis000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard/Ermengard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020398&tree=LEO
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ermengarde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen006.htm
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 January 2020), memorial page for Ludwig II “the German” of East Francia (804–28 Aug 876), Find A Grave Memorial no. 92941529, citing Kloster Lorsch, Lorsch, Kreis Bergstraße, Hessen, Germany ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92941529/ludwig_ii-of_east_francia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  13. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Ludwig der Deutsche: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_der_Deutsche. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  14. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#L2
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#WelfIdied824B
  17. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020403&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020404&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020402&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karlmann: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020406&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020411&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl III 'the Fat': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020413&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020405&tree=LEO

Ellinrat (?)1

F, #6521, d. after 24 May 914
Last Edited14 Nov 2003
     Ellinrat (?) married Arnulf (?) von Karnten, Duke of Carinthia, Emperor of Germany, son of Karlmann/Carloman (?) King of Bavaria and Italy and Liutswind/Litwinde (?), in 870.1
Ellinrat (?) died after 24 May 914.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 112.1

Family

Arnulf (?) von Karnten, Duke of Carinthia, Emperor of Germany b. c 850, d. 8 Dec 899
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ellinrat: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331011&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ellinrat von Kärnten: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331013&tree=LEO

Ellinrat (?) von Karnten1

F, #6522, b. circa 875, d. after 24 May 914
FatherArnulf (?) von Karnten, Duke of Carinthia, Emperor of Germany1 b. c 850, d. 8 Dec 899
MotherEllinrat (?)1 d. a 24 May 914
Last Edited14 Nov 2003
     Ellinrat (?) von Karnten was born circa 875.1
Ellinrat (?) von Karnten died after 24 May 914.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 112.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ellinrat von Kärnten: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331013&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Karl/Charles III "the Fat" (?) King of East Franks, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3

M, #6523, b. 839, d. 13 January 888
FatherLudwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor3,2,4,5 b. c 806, d. 28 Aug 876
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Andech2,3,6,5 b. c 810, d. 31 Jan 876
Last Edited14 Jan 2020
     Karl/Charles III "the Fat" (?) King of East Franks, Holy Roman Emperor was born in 839 at Germany.3,2 He married Richardis (?), daughter of Cte Erchanger (?), in 862.3
Karl/Charles III "the Fat" (?) King of East Franks, Holy Roman Emperor died on 13 January 888 at Neudingen, Germany (now).2,3
      He was King of the East Franks. (See attached map of the Carolingian Empire in 880 By Niconaike - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39615802.) between 876 and 887.1,2 He was King of Italy between 879 and 888.2 He was Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire between 881 and 887.1,2,3

Family 1

Richardis (?)
Child

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karl III 'the Fat': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020413&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  7. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Ludwig/Lewis III "Younger" (?) King of Saxony, Thuringia and Franconia1,2

M, #6524, b. circa 835, d. 20 January 882
FatherLudwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3,4 b. c 806, d. 28 Aug 876
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Andech2,1,5,4 b. c 810, d. 31 Jan 876
Last Edited14 Jan 2020
     Ludwig/Lewis III "Younger" (?) King of Saxony, Thuringia and Franconia was born circa 835; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says b. ca 830.2,1 He married Liutgard von Sachsen, daughter of Liudolf I "the Great" (?) Margrave of East Saxony and Oda (?) von Billung, Margravine of East Saxony, in 876.6,7
Ludwig/Lewis III "Younger" (?) King of Saxony, Thuringia and Franconia died on 20 January 882.1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 95.2

Family

Liutgard von Sachsen d. 30 Nov 885

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020411&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgard of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020412&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html

Hildegard (?)1,2

F, #6525, b. 828, d. 23 December 856
FatherLudwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor2,1,3,4 b. c 806, d. 28 Aug 876
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Andech1,2,5,6,4 b. c 810, d. 31 Jan 876
Last Edited14 Jan 2020
     Hildegard (?) was born in 828.2,1
Hildegard (?) died on 23 December 856 at Zurich, Switzerland (now).7,1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 80.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020402&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II 'the German': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  7. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Gisla/Gisele (?) of Westfranken1,2,3,4

F, #6526, b. circa 868, d. before November 884
FatherLouis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks1,4,3,2,5 b. 1 Nov 846, d. 10 Apr 879
MotherAnsgarde (?) de Bourgogne1,2,3,4
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Gisla/Gisele (?) of Westfranken married Robert (?) Count of Troyes, son of Eudes/Odo I (?) Comte de Châteaudun, de Troyes et de Blois and Wandilmonde (?) of Worms.6 Gisla/Gisele (?) of Westfranken was born circa 868.1
Gisla/Gisele (?) of Westfranken died before November 884.1,2
     Reference: Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 100.1 Gisla/Gisele (?) of Westfranken was also known as Gisela (?)6

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331023&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II 'the Stammerer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020060&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansgard de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120930&tree=LEO
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis II le Bègue (the Stammerer): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/louis001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Troyes. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Rudolf (?) Bishop of Würzburg1

M, #6527, d. 3 August 908
FatherUdo (?) Graf im Lahngau1,2 b. c 835, d. 879
MotherJudith (?)1
Last Edited15 Jan 2020
     Rudolf (?) Bishop of Würzburg died on 3 August 908 at Thüringen, Germany (now); Died in battle.1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 1.1 8.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00409805&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Udo860879. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Berta (?) Abbess of Zur1,2,3

F, #6528, b. circa 840, d. 26 March 877
FatherLudwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor3,1,2,4 b. c 806, d. 28 Aug 876
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Andech2,1,3,5,4 b. c 810, d. 31 Jan 876
Last Edited14 Jan 2020
     Berta (?) Abbess of Zur was born circa 840 at Germany.6
Berta (?) Abbess of Zur died on 26 March 877 at Zurich, Switzerland (now).3,1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 80.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020405&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO
  6. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Ermengarde/Irmgard (?)1,2

F, #6529, d. 16 July 866
FatherLudwig/Louis II 'the German' (?) Holy Roman Emperor2,1,3,4 b. c 806, d. 28 Aug 876
MotherEmma/Hemma (?) of Andech3,1,2,5,4 b. c 810, d. 31 Jan 876
Last Edited14 Jan 2020
     Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) died on 16 July 866 at Buchau, Germany (now).2,3
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 80.2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ludwig II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020400&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020403&tree=LEO
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#LudwigIIleGermaniqueB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma/Hemma: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020401&tree=LEO

Mathilde (?)1

F, #6530
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Mathilde (?) married Anselme Candavène (?) Comte de St. Pol, son of Hugues III dit Candavène de St. Pol Comte de St. Pol, Comte de Hesdin and Beatrix (?) de Rollancourt;
His 3rd wife.1,2,3
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: "1) Anselme (Anseau) 1er + 1174/75 ou peu après seigneur d’Encre (80, cité 12/11/1164) et de Lucheux (62, cité 1162) (partie méridionale du comté au sud de la Canche, à lui confiée par son frère aîné, en 1145 ; réside le plus souvent à Acheux-en-Amiénois) Lord de Tarentefort (1169) et Dartford (1169, Kent, GB), reçoit en outre 3 anciens fiefs des Mandeville en Essex (~1166) enfin comte de Saint-Pol (dès fin 1164)
ép. ?1) ~1135 ?
ép. 2) Eustachie Gouet + dès 12/11/1164 (fille de Guillaume III Gouet du Perche et de Mabille (alias Richilde), Bâtarde d’Angleterre, fille d’Henry 1er ; séparée en 1158 de Geoffroi III de Mandeville, earl of Essex + 02/10/1166)
ép. 3) 1164 Mathilde + après 1202 (ép. 2) Hugues de Chaumont.)4"
; Per Med Lands:
     "ANSELME de Saint-Pol "Candavène", son of HUGUES [III] "Candavène" Comte de Saint-Pol & his [first wife ---/second wife Marguerite de Clermont] (-1175 or after). "Hugo Candavene" founded the abbey of Cercamp, with the consent of "filii eius Engelrandus et Hugo, Anselmus, Radulfus et Wido", by charter dated 1137[1774]. The identity of Anselme’s mother is discussed above under his brother Enguerrand. A charter dated 1145 records that “Ansellus de Hosden et Aiglina uxor eius” donated property “qui leur apartenoit du chef de ladite dame au village de Courcelles le Comte” to Eaucourt abbey, Artois, with the consent of “Robert fils dudit Ansellus de Hosden et de Ingerannus comes Ternensis et de Anselm frère dudit Ingelrannus...Adelais seur de ladite Aiglina”, by charter dated 1145[1775]. "Ingelrannus…de Sancto Paulo comes" donated property to the church of Thérouanne with the consent of "Anselmo fratre meo" by charter dated 1153[1776]. Seigneur de Lucheux 1162. Seigneur de Tarentefirt 1169. Comte de Saint-Pol 1170.
     "[m firstly ---. Europäische Stammtafeln states that Anselme married firstly an unnamed wife who was mother of five children[1777]. Insufficient information is known about the chronology of Anselme’s children to be able to decide the point definitely.]
     "m [secondly] EUSTACHIE, divorced wife of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of --- (-[1164]). The Chronicle of Walden records that King Henry II arranged the marriage of “[Galfredo]” and “uxorem generis nobilitate sibi consanguineam”, that her husband refused to live with her and that the couple was divorced, that she received “duobus maneriis Waledena...et Walteham” and was married to “Anselmo...de Campdavene” with the two manors[1778]. Charles Evans speculated that she was the illegitimate daughter of Eustache IV Comte de Boulogne, based only on onomastic reasons[1779], but other families besides the counts of Boulogne used this name at the time[1780]. If correct, this would also mean that Eustachie was little more than a child, even at the time of her second marriage, as her alleged father was himself born in [1127/31], which makes the report of Earl Geoffrey refusing to cohabit rather unlikely. Geoffrey Earl of Essex confirmed grants of lands in Sawbridgworth by Warin FitzGerold camerarius regis and by his brother Henry to Robert Blund of London by charter dated to [1157/58], witnessed by "Roesia com matre mea, Eust[achia] com[itissa], Ernulfo de Mannavilla fratre meo, Willelmo filio Otuwel patruo meo…"[1781]. Du Chesne says that this wife of Anselme “nommée Eustache vivoit encore avecques luy l’an 1164” but does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[1782].
     "m [thirdly] as her first husband, MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-after 1202). Europäische Stammtafeln states that Anselme married thirdly “Mathilde 1202” and that she married secondly Hugues de Chaumont[1783] (who has not been identified). The primary sources on which this information is based have not been identified. "
Med Lands cites:
[1774] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 495.
[1775] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 28.
[1776] Thérouanne 29, p. 25.
[1777] ES III 622.
[1778] Chronicle of Walden C, quoted in CP V 117 footnote f, the latter also stating that she is called "de Champagne" in L'Art de Vérifier les Dates.
[1779] Evans 'Eustachie Countess of Essex and Saint-Pol' (1966, 2003), p. 89.
[1780] For example, Eustache Seigneur de Pacy, illegitimate son of Guillaume de Breteuil. The first wife of Gilbert de Pinkeny [Pecquigny] was also called Eustachie although her ancestry is not known, see Domesday Descendants, p. 635, as was the wife of Everard de Ros, ancestry also unknown, see Domesday Descendants, p. 670.
[1781] Round (1892), p. 229, quoting Sloane Cartulary, xxxii, 64.
[1782] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 53.
[1783] ES III 622.3


; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 622.1 Mathilde (?) was living in 1202.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120725&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anselme Candavène: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120724&tree=LEO
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#AnselmeSaintPoldied1175. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Saint-Pol Campdavène (1067-1240) Comtes de Saint-Pol, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Saint-Pol-Campdavene.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues IV Candavène: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120714&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#HuguesIVSaintPoldied1205

Eustachie Gouët1,2

F, #6531, b. 1090, d. before 12 November 1164
FatherGuillaume III Gouët « Le Jeune» d’Alluyes Seigneur de Montmirail3 b. b 1080, d. b 1140
MotherMabel (?) of England3 b. c 1105
ReferenceGAV24
Last Edited4 Jun 2020
     Eustachie Gouët was born in 1090.4 She married Geoffrey de Mandeville 2nd Earl of Essex, son of Geoffrey II de Mandeville 1st Earl of Essex and Rohese/Rohesia de Vere, circa 1158;
Her 1st husband.5,6,1 Eustachie Gouët and Geoffrey de Mandeville 2nd Earl of Essex were divorced.5,6,1 Eustachie Gouët married Anselme Candavène (?) Comte de St. Pol, son of Hugues III dit Candavène de St. Pol Comte de St. Pol, Comte de Hesdin and Beatrix (?) de Rollancourt;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.5,7,8,1
Eustachie Gouët died before 12 November 1164.1,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 622.1 GAV-24.

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Eustachie Gouët (d’Alluyes) ° 1130 + 12/11/1164
ép. 1) (sép. dès 1158) Geoffroi de Mandeville, earl of Essex + après 1202
ép. 2) Anselme (Anseau) 1er de Saint-Pol seigneur d’Encre (80, cité 12/11/1164) et de Lucheux (62, cité 1162) (partie méridionale du comté au sud de la Canche, à lui confiée par son frère aîné, en 1145 ; réside le plus souvent à Acheux-en-Amiénois), Lord de Tarentefort (1169) et Dartford (1169,Kent, GB), reçoit en outre 3 anciens fiefs des Mandeville en Essex (~1166) enfin comte de Saint-Pol (dès fin 1164) + 1174/75 ou peu après (fils d’Hugues III et de Béatrix ; ép. 3) ~1164 Mathilde + après 1202.)3"

; Per Med Lands:
     "GEOFFREY (-Chester 21 Oct 1166, bur Walden Abbey). He received a grant of his father's lands from Empress Matilda at Devizes before 1147, and he was created Earl of Essex [Jan 1156][706]. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfridus de Mondeville iii m i militem et dimidium" in Somerset in [1160/61][707]. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1166 of "Galfridus junior de Mandavilla"[708]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1165 XII Kal Nov” of “Galfridus de Mandavill comes Essexiæ”[709].
     "m (1158 or before, divorced) as her first husband, EUSTACHIE, [relative of HENRY II King of England], daughter of --- (-[1164]). Geoffrey Earl of Essex confirmed grants of lands in Sawbridgworth by Warin FitzGerold camerarius regis and by his brother Henry to Robert Blund of London by charter dated to [1157/58], witnessed by "Roesia com matre mea, Eust[achia] com[itissa], Ernulfo de Mannavilla fratre meo, Willelmo filio Otuwel patruo meo…"[710]. The Chronicle of Walden records that King Henry II arranged the marriage of “[Galfredo]” and “uxorem generis nobilitate sibi consanguineam”, that her husband refused to live with her and that the couple was divorced, that she received “duobus maneriis Waledena...et Walteham” and was married to “Anselmo...de Campdavene” with the two manors[711]. Charles Evans speculated that she was the illegitimate daughter of Eustache IV Comte de Boulogne, based only on onomastic reasons[712], but other families besides the counts of Boulogne used this name at the time[713]. If correct, this would also mean that Eustachie was little more than a child, even at the time of her second marriage, as her alleged father was himself born in [1127/31], which makes the report of Earl Geoffrey refusing to cohabit rather unlikely. She married secondly as his second wife, Anselme "Candavène" Comte de Saint-Pol (-1174). Du Chesne says that this wife of Anselme “nommée Eustache vivoit encore avecques luy l’an 1164” but does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[714]."
Med Lands cites:
[706] CP V 116-7.
[707] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 27.
[708] Radulphi de Coggeshall, Chronicon Anglicanum, p. 16.
[709] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 140.
[710] Round (1892), p. 229, quoting Sloane Cartulary, xxxii, 64.
[711] Chronicle of Walden C, quoted in CP V 117 footnote f, the latter also stating that she is called "de Champagne" in L'Art de Vérifier les Dates.
[712] Evans 'Eustachie Countess of Essex and Saint-Pol' (1966), Vol. 15, pp. 186-7, in Evans (2003), p. 89.
[713] For example, Eustache Seigneur de Pacy, illegitimate son of Guillaume de Breteuil. The first wife of Gilbert de Pinkeny [Pecquigny] was also called Eustachie although her ancestry is not known, see Domesday Descendants, p. 635, as was the wife of Everard de Ros, ancestry also unknown, see Domesday Descendants, p. 670.
[714] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 53.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "ANSELME de Saint-Pol "Candavène", son of HUGUES [III] "Candavène" Comte de Saint-Pol & his [first wife ---/second wife Marguerite de Clermont] (-1175 or after). "Hugo Candavene" founded the abbey of Cercamp, with the consent of "filii eius Engelrandus et Hugo, Anselmus, Radulfus et Wido", by charter dated 1137[1774]. The identity of Anselme’s mother is discussed above under his brother Enguerrand. A charter dated 1145 records that “Ansellus de Hosden et Aiglina uxor eius” donated property “qui leur apartenoit du chef de ladite dame au village de Courcelles le Comte” to Eaucourt abbey, Artois, with the consent of “Robert fils dudit Ansellus de Hosden et de Ingerannus comes Ternensis et de Anselm frère dudit Ingelrannus...Adelais seur de ladite Aiglina”, by charter dated 1145[1775]. "Ingelrannus…de Sancto Paulo comes" donated property to the church of Thérouanne with the consent of "Anselmo fratre meo" by charter dated 1153[1776]. Seigneur de Lucheux 1162. Seigneur de Tarentefirt 1169. Comte de Saint-Pol 1170.
     "[m firstly ---. Europäische Stammtafeln states that Anselme married firstly an unnamed wife who was mother of five children[1777]. Insufficient information is known about the chronology of Anselme’s children to be able to decide the point definitely.]
     "m [secondly] EUSTACHIE, divorced wife of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of --- (-[1164]). The Chronicle of Walden records that King Henry II arranged the marriage of “[Galfredo]” and “uxorem generis nobilitate sibi consanguineam”, that her husband refused to live with her and that the couple was divorced, that she received “duobus maneriis Waledena...et Walteham” and was married to “Anselmo...de Campdavene” with the two manors[1778]. Charles Evans speculated that she was the illegitimate daughter of Eustache IV Comte de Boulogne, based only on onomastic reasons[1779], but other families besides the counts of Boulogne used this name at the time[1780]. If correct, this would also mean that Eustachie was little more than a child, even at the time of her second marriage, as her alleged father was himself born in [1127/31], which makes the report of Earl Geoffrey refusing to cohabit rather unlikely. Geoffrey Earl of Essex confirmed grants of lands in Sawbridgworth by Warin FitzGerold camerarius regis and by his brother Henry to Robert Blund of London by charter dated to [1157/58], witnessed by "Roesia com matre mea, Eust[achia] com[itissa], Ernulfo de Mannavilla fratre meo, Willelmo filio Otuwel patruo meo…"[1781]. Du Chesne says that this wife of Anselme “nommée Eustache vivoit encore avecques luy l’an 1164” but does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[1782].
     "m [thirdly] as her first husband, MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-after 1202). Europäische Stammtafeln states that Anselme married thirdly “Mathilde 1202” and that she married secondly Hugues de Chaumont[1783] (who has not been identified). The primary sources on which this information is based have not been identified. "
Med Lands cites:
[1774] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 495.
[1775] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 28.
[1776] Thérouanne 29, p. 25.
[1777] ES III 622.
[1778] Chronicle of Walden C, quoted in CP V 117 footnote f, the latter also stating that she is called "de Champagne" in L'Art de Vérifier les Dates.
[1779] Evans 'Eustachie Countess of Essex and Saint-Pol' (1966, 2003), p. 89.
[1780] For example, Eustache Seigneur de Pacy, illegitimate son of Guillaume de Breteuil. The first wife of Gilbert de Pinkeny [Pecquigny] was also called Eustachie although her ancestry is not known, see Domesday Descendants, p. 635, as was the wife of Everard de Ros, ancestry also unknown, see Domesday Descendants, p. 670.
[1781] Round (1892), p. 229, quoting Sloane Cartulary, xxxii, 64.
[1782] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 53.
[1783] ES III 622.8

; Per Racines et Histoire: "1) Anselme (Anseau) 1er + 1174/75 ou peu après seigneur d’Encre (80, cité 12/11/1164) et de Lucheux (62, cité 1162) (partie méridionale du comté au sud de la Canche, à lui confiée par son frère aîné, en 1145 ; réside le plus souvent à Acheux-en-Amiénois) Lord de Tarentefort (1169) et Dartford (1169, Kent, GB), reçoit en outre 3 anciens fiefs des Mandeville en Essex (~1166) enfin comte de Saint-Pol (dès fin 1164)
ép. ?1) ~1135 ?
ép. 2) Eustachie Gouet + dès 12/11/1164 (fille de Guillaume III Gouet du Perche et de Mabille (alias Richilde), Bâtarde d’Angleterre, fille d’Henry 1er ; séparée en 1158 de Geoffroi III de Mandeville, earl of Essex + 02/10/1166)
ép. 3) 1164 Mathilde + après 1202 (ép. 2) Hugues de Chaumont.)2"

Family 1

Geoffrey de Mandeville 2nd Earl of Essex b. c 1124, d. 21 Oct 1166

Family 2

Anselme Candavène (?) Comte de St. Pol b. 1090, d. 1174
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eustachie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00325055&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Saint-Pol Campdavène (1067-1240) Comtes de Saint-Pol, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Saint-Pol-Campdavene.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montmirail (Gouët), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montmirail-Gouet.pdf
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 146-147 de MANDEVILLE 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#GeoffreyMandevilleEssexdied1166. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anselme Candavène: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120724&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#AnselmeSaintPoldied1175
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrix de St.Pol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164903&tree=LEO
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montmirail (Gouët), p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montmirail-Gouet.pdf
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#BeatrixSaintPolMJeanIPonthieu

Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes1,2

M, #6532, b. circa 1056, d. after 8 May 1130
FatherRoger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois3,4 b. 1005, d. 27 Jul 1094
MotherMabile de Bellême3,4 b. 1015, d. 2 Dec 1079
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited20 Sep 2020
     Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes was born circa 1056 at Wareham Castle, Wareham, Dorsetshire, England; Genealogics says b. ca 1056; Med Lands says b. 1052/56.3,4 He married Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu, daughter of Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil and Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon, before 9 September 1087; Genealogics says m. 1082/87.5,1,6,3,4,7
Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes was buried after 8 May 1130 at Wareham Castle, Wareham, Dorsetshire, England.4


Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes died after 8 May 1130 at Wareham Castle, Wareham, Dorsetshire, England.5,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême", son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury & his first wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [after 1129], bur [Wareham Castle]). Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri”[592]. He witnessed a charter for Saint Martin de Sées with his brother Roger, and a charter for Saint Aubin of Angers in [1060/62] without Roger[593], suggesting that the latter had died by then. He succeeded his mother in 1079 as Seigneur de Bellême et d'Alençon. He rebelled against William II King of England in 1088, crossed to England but was besieged at Rochester Castle and in Jun 1088 forced to surrender[594]. "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[595]. Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Rodbertus...filius eius” obtained “totum feudum eius in Normannia”, adding that he was “crudelis et superbus” and committed “innumeras iniquitates”[596]. He succeeded his younger brother in 1098 as Earl of Shrewsbury after a payment of £3000[597]. He succeeded his father-in-law in Oct 1100 as Comte de Ponthieu. He rebelled against Henry I King of England in 1102, was deprived of all his honours and estates in England, and retired to Normandy. The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo”[598]. He was arrested in 1112, imprisoned at Cherbourg and all his lands and honours were forfeited. He was imprisoned at Wareham Castle, Dorset from Jul 1113[599]. The Annals of Margan record the death “Kal Mai” in 1118 of “Robertus comes de Belesme”[600]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records payments made "in libatione Robti de Belismo" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[601]. This suggests a pension or maintenance in some form, although it is not certain that it relates to Robert de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury.
     "m (before 9 Sep 1087) AGNES de Ponthieu, daughter of GUY [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Ada --- (-after 6 Oct 1100). Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum Belesmensem” married “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem”[602]. Orderic Vitalis records that she was treated cruelly by her husband and imprisoned in the castle of Bellême, from where she escaped, took refuge with Adela Ctss de Blois, and retired to Ponthieu[603]. "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "… his father Robert de Belesmo and his mother Agnes…" by charter dated 1127[604]."
Med Lands cites:
[592] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XIII, p. 274.
[593] CP XI 690.
[594] CP XI 690.
[595] Marmoutier-Perche, 13, p. 23.
[596] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIV, p. 422.
[597] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, p. 32, cited in CP XI 692.
[598] Annales de Margan, p. 7.
[599] CP XI 693-4.
[600] Annales de Margan, p. 10.
[601] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Dorsetshire, Wiltshire, p. 12.
[602] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300.
[603] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 424.
[604] Round (1899) 970, p. 346.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "Robert was born about 1056, the son of Roger II de Montgommery, 1st earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury, and Mabile de Bellême, dame d'Alençon. He was one of the most prominent figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy between the sons of William the Conqueror.
     "Robert's first notable act as a young man was to take part in the 1077 revolt of the young Robert II Curthose against his father William the Conqueror, an act he shared with many other Norman nobles of his generation. The rebellion was put down and the participants pardoned. William did require that ducal garrisons be placed in the important baronial castles, to make future rebellion more difficult.
     "Robert's mother Mabile was murdered in December 1082, and Robert inherited her estate of Bellême which stretched across the hilly border region between Normandy and Maine. Between 1082 and 1087 he married Agnès de Ponthieu, daughter of Gui I, comte de Ponthieu. They had a son Guillaume who would have progeny.
     "William the Conqueror died in 1087, and Robert's first act on hearing the news was to expel the ducal garrisons from his castles. Robert Curthose was the new duke of Normandy, but he was unable to keep order, and Robert de Bellême had a free hand to make war against his less powerful neighbours. In 1088 Eudes, bishop of Bayeux, earl of Kent, the half-brother of William the Conqueror, rebelled in an attempt to place Robert Curthose on the English throne in place of William Rufus. At Curthose's request Robert went to England, where he joined in the rebels' defence of Rochester Castle. The rebels were permitted to leave after the surrender of the castle and the failure of the rebellion. Robert returned to Normandy. Eudes had preceded him, had obtained the confidence of the duke, and convinced Curthose that Robert was a danger to the security of the duchy. Robert was arrested and imprisoned upon his disembarkation. The duke's younger brother Henry (the future King Henry I), who was on the same ship, was also arrested.
     "Robert's father Roger de Montgommery came over from England, and, taking over his son's castles, defied Robert Curthose. The duke captured several of the castles, but he soon tired of the matter and released Robert. Once released, Robert returned to his wars and depredations against his neighbours in southern Normandy. He did help Curthose in putting down a revolt by the citizens of Rouen, but his motive seems to have been in large part to seize as many wealthy townspeople and their goods as possible. Curthose in turn subsequently helped Robert in some of his fights against his neighbours.
     "In 1094 one of Robert's most important castles, Domfront, was taken over by the duke's brother Henry, who never relinquished it and was to be an enemy of Robert for the rest of his life. Later that year Robert's father died. Robert's younger brother Hugh de Montgommery inherited the English lands and titles, becoming the 2nd earl of Shrewsbury, while Robert inherited his father's Norman properties, which included a good part of central and southern Normandy, in part adjacent to the Bellême territories he had already inherited from his mother. In 1098 Hugh died, and Robert inherited the English properties that had been their father's, including the rape of Arundel and the earldom of Shrewsbury.
     "Robert was one of the great magnates who joined Robert Curthose's 1101 invasion of England, along with his brothers Roger 'Poictevin' and Arnoul/Arnulf de Montgommery and his nephew Guillaume de Mortain, earl of Cornwall, comte de Mortain. This invasion, which aimed to depose Henry I, ended in the Treaty of Alton. The treaty called for amnesty for the participants but allowed traitors to be punished. Henry had a series of charges drawn up against Robert in 1102, and when Robert refused to answer to them, Henry besieged and captured Robert's English castles. Robert lost his English lands and titles, as did his brothers. He was banished from England, and returned to Normandy.
     "Robert was one of Robert Curthose's commanders at the Battle of Tinchebray on 28 September 1106, and by flight from the field he avoided being captured as Curthose was. With Normandy now under Henry's rule, he submitted and was allowed to retain his Norman fiefs. However, after various conspiracies and plans to free Curthose, Robert was seized and imprisoned in 1112. He spent the rest of his life a prisoner in Wareham Castle. The exact date of his death is not known, but it was after 1130."3

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:637/638.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.3


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert de Bellême (c.?1056– after 1130), seigneur de Bellême (or Belèsme), seigneur de Montgomery, viscount of the Hiémois, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury and Count of Ponthieu, was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, and one of the most prominent figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy between the sons of William the Conqueror. He was a member of the powerful House of Bellême.
     "Robert became notorious for his alleged cruelty. The chronicler Orderic Vitalis calls him "Grasping and cruel, an implacable persecutor of the Church of God and the poor ... unequalled for his iniquity in the whole Christian era." The stories of his brutality may have inspired the legend of Robert the Devil.
Early life
     "Robert was the oldest surviving son of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel de Bellême, born probably between 1052 and 1056.[1] In 1070 after the death of his great-uncle Yves Bishop of Sées his parents brought him to Bellême, which at that time became his mother's inheritance, and as the oldest surviving son it would eventually be his. at an unknown age [2]
     "In 1073 when the Conqueror invaded Maine, Robert was knighted by William at the siege of Fresnai castle.[3] By now probably of age and independent of his father he took part in the 1077 revolt of the young Robert Curthose against Duke William.[b][2] When Robert's mother, Mabel, was killed c.?1079, Robert inherited her vast estates.[4] But at this point Duke William took the added precaution of garrisoning the Bellême castles with his own soldiers, which was his ducal right.[5] On hearing the news of William the Conqueror's death in 1087, Robert's first act was to expel the ducal garrisons from all his castles.[5]
Rebellion of 1088
     "At the end of 1087 Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy was told of a plot to place him on the throne of England in his brother William II's place, a plot that Duke Robert enthusiastically approved and supported.[6] Robert de Bellême, his brother Hugh de Montgomery and a third brother, either Roger or Arnulf, participated in this rebellion.[7] The main conspirators, however, were Odo of Bayeux, Eustace III, Count of Boulogne, Robert de Mowbray, Geoffrey de Montbray, Earl Roger de Montgomery and other disaffected Magnates.[6] The next year in the Rebellion of 1088, beginning at Easter the rebels burned and wasted the king's properties and those of his followers.[8] At some point Roger of Montgomery detached himself from supporting Robert Curthose through negotiations with the king.[9] Finally Robert de Bellême was among the rebels who found themselves defending Rochester Castle.[10] When William Rufus blockaded the town and built two counter-castles, the garrison began negotiating for surrender under honourable terms, being allowed to keep their lands and serve the king.[10] This Rufus refused; he was furious and had initially wanted the traitors hanged 'or by some other form of execution utterly removed from the face of the earth.'[11] Roger of Montgomery and other great barons interceded with the King, Earl Roger on behalf of his sons, until finally in July a semi-honorable surrender was negotiated between the king and the rebels.[10] Rufus, albeit reluctantly, guaranteed the rebels life and limb and gave them safe conduct.[12]
Return to Normandy
     "Coincidentally Robert sailed back to Normandy in the company of Count Henry (later king Henry I), who had not been part of the conspiracy against his brother William Rufus.[13] However well they got along on the voyage, they were destined to become bitter enemies.[13] One thing more they shared in common was the extreme resentment by Odo, Bishop of Bayeux who, banished from England, had returned to Normandy ahead of Henry and Robert.[5] Henry at just 20 years of age was now Odo's overlord, which Odo strongly resented, and Robert de Bellême was a powerful and dangerous disruptive force in Normandy now free to do as he would.[5] Odo, who held great sway over Duke Robert, convinced him that both Henry and his travel companion Robert de Bellême were now conspiring with William Rufus against the duke.[5] Both Henry and Robert were seized as they disembarked and, both placed in the Bishop's custody, were imprisoned; Henry at Bayeux and Robert at Neuilly-ll'Evêque, now Neuilly-la-Forêt.[5]
     "On hearing his son was imprisoned Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury immediately went to Normandy and put all his castles in a state of readiness against the duke.[14] At this point the Montgomery family was in a state of rebellion against Robert Curthose.[15] Bishop Odo now instigated Duke Robert to take all the castles of Robert de Bellême by force and the duke gathered an army and proceeded against them. Duke Robert first attacked Ballon and after losses on both sides, the castle surrendered.[16] Moving on to the castle of Saint-Céneri where the family of Robert de Bellême was residing, Robert Quarrel had been told by Earl Roger to resist the duke at all costs and this was done until the provisions eventually failed.[17] Duke Robert was so enraged at such resistance he blinded Robert Quarrel and mutilated the castle defenders.[17] At this point the duke lost interest in attempting to capture any more of Robert de Bellême's castles, he dissolved the forces and returned to Rouen.[17] Earl Roger sent peace envoys to the duke and convinced him to release his son Robert which the fickle duke finally did.[18] The price of his son's release, however, was the castle of Saint-Céneri which Duke Robert gave to Robert Giroie as castellan. The Giroies had long held the castle until, as punishment for their rebellion in the 1060s, William the Conqueror gave this castle and other Giroie lands to Roger de Montgomery, who as a member of the Bellême family was also considered their nemesis.[15]
     "By 1090 Robert was back in Robert Curthose's good graces, Orderic Vitalis calling him a "principal councilor" to duke Robert.[19] He supported Curthose in putting down a revolt by the citizens of Rouen, in 1090,[20] and took considerable numbers of the citizens captive throwing them into dungeons.[21] According to Robert of Torigni in 1092 the inhabitants of Domfront, long a Bellême-Montgomery stronghold, invited Henry, the duke's younger brother to take possession of Domfront.[22] Apparently they had grown weary of Robert's oppressive and abusive style of lordship.[22] No explanation was offered for what happened to Robert de Bellême's garrison contingent or who exactly facilitated the bloodless takeover.[22] In addition Robert de Bellême had requested that same year to hold Bellême of the French crown instead of the Duke of Normandy.[20]
     "In 1094 Robert's father, earl Roger, died.[23] Robert's younger brother Hugh of Montgomery, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury inherited the English lands and titles, while Robert inherited his father's Norman properties, which included good part of central and southern Normandy, in part adjacent to the Bellême territories he had already inherited from his mother.[24]
William Rufus (1096–1100)
     "In 1096, Duke Robert took up the cross on the First Crusade and left the custody of the duchy to his brother William Rufus, King of England. Robert Bellême regained the favour of Rufus and both he and his brothers were in his service on several occasions.[20] In 1098 he captured Elias I, Count of Maine for Rufus, a significant feat.[25]
     "In 1098 Robert's younger brother Hugh died, and Robert inherited, on payment of £3,000 in relief, the English properties that had been their father's, including the Rape of Arundel and the Earldom of Shrewsbury.[26] Robert had also acquired the countship of Ponthieu jure uxoris and the honour of Tickhill; all of which combined made him the wealthiest magnate in both England and Normandy.[26]
     "In August 1100 at the death of Rufus, Henry I seized the English throne before his brother Robert Curthose could claim it.[27] While Robert rushed to England to pay homage to Henry, he and his brothers must have seen this as the end of royal favour for the Montgomery's.[28]
Anglo-Norman Civil War 1101
     "Duke Robert returned from the First Crusade in triumph.[29] According to Orderic, Curthose was being encouraged to attack Henry by his barons but he remained indecisive until Ranulf Flambard, having escaped from the Tower of London, fled to Normandy where he appears to have influenced Duke Robert to go ahead with his invasion of England and depose his brother Henry.[30] Robert de Bellême was one of the great magnates who joined Robert Curthose's 1101 invasion of England, along with his brothers Roger the Poitevin and Arnulf of Montgomery and his nephew William, Count of Mortain.[31] This invasion, however, which aimed to depose Henry I, ended bloodlessly in the Treaty of Alton which called for amnesty for the participants but allowed traitors to be punished.[32] It quickly became evident that Henry I had no intentions of abiding by the treaty of Alton; 'Soothe them with promises' advised Robert Count of Meulan just before the battle, then they can be 'driven into exile'.[33]
     "Henry I took a year compiling charges against Robert and his brothers and Robert's unlicensed castle building and specifically Bridgnorth Castle may have been the last straw for Henry.[34] Henry had a series of charges drawn up against Robert in 1102, and when Robert refused to answer for them, gathered his forces and besieged and captured Robert's English castles.[35] Robert lost his English lands and titles (as did his brothers), was banished from England, and returned to Normandy.[36]
     "In 1105 he was warring with Rotrou III, Count of Perche over a large portion of his Bellême lands and lost.[36] That same year he attacked a force of Henry's supporters, then went to England before Christmas to attempt make peace with King Henry but he returned to Normandy empty handed.[36]
Battle of Tinchebrai and after
     "In 1106 Robert was one of Curthose's commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai commanding the rear division and, when the battle turned in Henry's favour, he and most of those with him avoided capture by fleeing the field.[36] With Normandy now under Henry's rule, Robert de Bellême submitted and was allowed to retain his Norman fiefs and his office as viscount of the Hiémois.[37]
     "But Henry was still wary of Robert and placed his followers in key positions in Normandy.[38] In the rebellion of 1110–12 barons on the frontier of Normandy were disgruntled over Henry's policies and especially his attempt to take custody of William Clito, son of Robert Curthose.[38] According to Orderic, Robert played a central role in this rebellion after the death of Elias I, Count of Maine in July 1110.[38] In 1112 Robert was sent as an envoy of the French king to Henry I at his court at Bonneville to negotiate the release of Robert Curthose, whereas Henry seized Robert and imprisoned him.[39] Apparently Henry had charges already prepared; failing to attend Henry at his court after being summoned three times, of failing to render accounts, and of acting against his lord's interests.[40] Technically Robert may have been guilty but arguably it was not safe for him to attend Henry, he may have regarded the revenues as gifts and it is also arguable whether the charge of acting against Henry's interests warranted the severity of the punishment.[40] In addition Robert was under the king's protection as an emissary sent to negotiate Robert Curthose's release.[41] This gave the act international implications but at the time Louis VI of France and Henry I were intriguing against each other so the breach of protocol went unpunished.[41] But with Robert's imprisonment the rebellion against Henry collapsed.[38] Robert spent the rest of his life as a prisoner; the exact date of his death is not known.[42]
Historical portrayal
     "Orderic Vitalis portrays Robert de Bellême as a villain, especially when compared to Henry I, whose misdemeanours the chronicler felt were excusable. Orderic calls Robert "Grasping and cruel, an implacable persecutor of the Church of God and the poor... unequalled for his iniquity in the whole Christian era."[43] To quote David C. Douglas "Ordericus, if credulous, was neither malicious nor a liar; and these accounts concerned people of whom he had special knowledge" [referring to the Bellême-Montgomery family].[44] But, he may have been strongly biased against Robert de Bellême and his treatment of that magnate belies a moral interpretation of his actions.[43] The basis for Orderic's animosity towards Robert and his de Bellême predecessors was the longstanding and bitter feud between the Giroie family, patrons of Orderic's Abbey of Saint-Evroul, and the de Bellême family.[43]William Talvas (de Bellême), Robert's grandfather, had blinded and mutilated William fitz Giroie (for more on the feud between the Bellêmes and the Giroies see the article William I Talvas).[45] He did at times appropriate church properties and was not a major donor to any ecclesiastical house. But Robert's attitudes toward the church are typical of many of his contemporaries; certainly no worse than the secular rulers and other magnates of his day.[46] The assessment of William II Rufus by R.W. Southern could well apply to Robert de Bellême as well: "His life was given over to military designs, and to the raising of money to make them possible; for everything that did not minister to those ends he showed a supreme contempt".[46]
     "According to William Hunt in the Dictionary of National Biography, various stories of his brutality were circulated after his death, possibly inspiring the legend of Robert the Devil, a sadistically cruel Norman knight fathered by Satan himself. In Maine "his abiding works are pointed to as the works of Robert the Devil, a surname that has been transferred from him to the father of the Conqueror."[47]
Family and children
     "Robert married Agnes of Ponthieu, before 9 Sep 1087, and they had one child:[48]
** William III of Ponthieu, who via his mother inherited the county of Ponthieu.[23]

Fictional references
     "Robert appears as the principal antagonist throughout George Shipway's The Palladin (1973), a fictionalized account of the life of Walter Tirel.
     "Robert appears as the primary antagonist "Robert of Belesme" in the period romance novels Lady of Fire (1987) and Fire and Steel (1988) by Anita Mills, which take place during the rise of Henry I of England and the events during and after the Battle of Tinchebray, respectively.
     "He is also portrayed in The Wild Hunt (1990) by Elizabeth Chadwick.
Notes
a. His older brother Roger died young, before 1060–62 when Robert attested a charter for St. Aubin of Angers. See: Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol XI (1949), p. 690 & note (b). This placed Robert in line to obtain his parents' inheritances in Normandy, where the law distinguished between acquisitions and inheritances. Acquisitions were those lands obtained by conquest or purchase while a parent's (typically father's) Norman ancestral lands were heritable by the eldest son. This was later codified in the Leges Henrici Primi which stated: "The Ancestral fee of the father is to go to the first-born son; but he may give his purchases or later acquisitions to whomsoever he prefers". For a time after the Conquest this took the form of the eldest son, now Robert, inheriting the Norman lands of his ancestors while the second son, Hugh, was given the English honors his father had acquired. See: James Clarke Holt, Colonial England, 1066–1215 (London: The Hambledon Press, 1997) pp. 116–121 (& notes); also C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2003), p. 47 & n.
b. Robert de Bellême was typical of his generation, the sons of William's companions who had earned their great honors and titles at the battle of Hastings in 1066. This newer generation did not share the values and attitudes of their fathers but rather had different experiences altogether. They had inherited their wealth and status, not earned it. Yet this next generation expected royal favor and patronage without attending court or serving the king in any capacity. They often rebelled when they felt they were not being treated with the dignity and respect they deserved. See: Charlotte A. Newman, The Anglo-Norman Nobility in the Reign of Henry I, The Second Generation (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1988), pp. 17–18; also: William M. Aird, Robert `Curthose', Duke of Normandy (C. 1050–1134) (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011), pp. 69–70, 83.
References
1. George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol XI, ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1949), p. 689
2. George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol XI, ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1949), p. 690
3. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 75
4. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) p. 13
5. C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2003), p. 65
6. William M. Aird, Robert 'Curthose', Duke of Normandy (C. 1050–1134) (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2008), p. 110
7. Victoria Chandler, 'The Last of the Montgomerys: Roger the Poitevin and Arnulf', Historical Research, Vol. 62, No. 147 (February 1989), p. 3 & n. 7
8. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, trans. James Ingram (Middlesex: Echo Library, 2007), p. 137
9. Neil Strevett, 'The Antlo-Norman Civil War of 1101 Reconsidered', Anglo-Norman Studies, XXVL, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2004), p. 160
10. Frank Barlow, William Rufus (Berkeley; Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1983), p. 81
11. Karen Bosnos, 'Treason and Pilitics in Anglo-Norman Histories', Feud, Violence and Practice: Essays in Medieval Studies in Honor of Stephen D. White ed. Belle S. Tuten (Burlington, VT; Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, 2010), p. 299
12. William M. Aird, Robert 'Curthose', Duke of Normandy (C. 1050–1134) (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2008), p. 115
13. C. Warren Hollister, Henry I ( New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2003), pp. 62–3
14. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 452
15. Kathleen Thompson, 'Robert of Bellême Reconsidered', Anglo-Norman Studies XIII; Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1990, ed. Marjorie Chibnall (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1991), p. 270
16. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 455
17. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 456
18. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 457
19. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 476
20. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) p. 19
21. Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), pp. 502–3
22. C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2003), pp. 86–7 & n. 250
23. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1989), Tafel 637
24. George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol XI, ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1949), pp. 688, 689–91
25. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) p. 20
26. C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2003), p. 155
27. Neil Strevett, 'The Antlo-Norman Civil War of 1101 Reconsidered', Anglo-Norman Studies, XXVL. Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2004), p. 161
28. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) pp. 20–21
29. Steven Runciman, The First Crusade (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000), p. 190
30. David Crouch, The Normans; The History of a Dynasty (London; New York: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), p. 170
31. C. Warren Hollister, 'The Anglo-Norman Civil War: 1101', The English Historical Review, Vol. 88, No. 347 (Apr. 1973), pp. 317–8
32. C. Warren Hollister, 'The Anglo-Norman Civil War: 1101', The English Historical Review, Vol. 88, No. 347 (Apr. 1973), pp. 331,
33. C. Warren Hollister, 'The Anglo-Norman Civil War: 1101', The English Historical Review, Vol. 88, No. 347 (Apr. 1973), pp. 332,
34. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) p. 22
35. David Crouch, The Normans; The History of a Dynasty (London; New York: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), p. 175
36. George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol XI, ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1949), p. 693
37. Kathleen Thompson, 'Robert of Bellême Reconsidered', Anglo-Norman Studies XIII; Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1990, Ed. Marjorie Chibnall (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1991), p. 277
38. Kathleen Thompson, 'Robert of Bellême Reconsidered', Anglo-Norman Studies XIII; Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1990, Ed. Marjorie Chibnall (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1991), p. 278
39. Kathleen Thompson, 'Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Bellême', Journal of Medieval History, Vol. 20 (1994), p. 138
40. Judith A. Green, Henry I: King of England and Duke of Normandy (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2006), p. 125
41. C.W, Hollister, 'War and diplomacy in the Anglo-norman world; The reign of Henry I', Anglo-Norman Studies VI: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1983, Ed. R. Allen Brown (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1984), p. 81.
42. J. F. A. Mason, 'Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067–1102)', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) p. 24
43. Thompson, Kathleen (1994). "Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Bellmen". Journal of Medieval History. 20: 133–134.
44. Douglas, David C. (1964). William the Conqueror. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles. p. 414.
45. White, Geoffrey H. (1940). "The First House of Bellême". Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. 4. 22: 84.
46. Thompson, Kathleen (1991). Marjorie Chibnall (ed.) "Robert of Bellême Reconsidered". Anglo-Norman Studies XIII: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1990. The Boydell Press, Woodbridge: 280.
47. Freesman, D (1885). "William Rufus". Dictionary of National Biography. 4: 181–182.
48. George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, A History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol XI, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1949), p. 695."8

; Racines et Histoire Montgomery) mentions a second marriage for Robert to an Adélaïde de Breteuil. I have not found this marriage anywhere else, so have excluded it here. GA Vaut.9,10

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montgomery): "1) Robert II «Le Diable» de Montgomery dit «de Bellême» ° 1052/56 + peu après 08/05/1131 (Wareham) comte d’Hiesmes et d’Alençon (1079), seigneur de Bellême (1079), Sées et Bernay, comte de Montgomery, earl of Arundel, 3ème earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury (1098, succède à son père et à son frère, contre 3.000 £), comte de Ponthieu (10/1100, succède à son beau-père), rebelle contre Guillaume II (1088), assiégé dans Rochester, se rend (06/1088), rebelle contre Henry 1er (1102), déchu de ses biens & honneurs, retiré en Normandie, partisan du duc Robert, s’enfuit après Tinchebrai (1106), aide Hélias de Saint-Sens à sauver Guillaume, le fils du duc Courte-Heuse, arrêté (1112), emprisonné à Cherbourg puis à Wareham (Dorset, de 07/1113 à au moins 11/1130), toutes ses terres saisies (charte à Saint-Martin de Sées ; charte à Saint-Aubin d’Angers 1060/62)
     ép. 1) 08/09/1087 Agnès de Ponthieu ° ~1075 + dès 1103 (Abbeville où elle s’était retirée, maltraitée par son mari) (fille de Gui 1er, comte de Ponthieu + 1100 et d’Ade de Valois + 1066)
     ép. 2) Adélaïde de Breteuil."9

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Robert II de Bellême (de Montgommery) (vers 1052 – château de Wareham, après 1113[réf. nécessaire]), fut comte de Ponthieu, vicomte d'Hiémois dans le duché de Normandie, seigneur de Bellême en France, et 3e comte de Shrewsbury en Angleterre. Il fut l'un des principaux protagonistes de l'anarchie qui succéda à la mort en 1087 de Guillaume le Conquérant, duc de Normandie et roi d'Angleterre. Alors que les trois fils de ce dernier se disputaient l'héritage paternel, il tenta de conserver l'intégralité de ses biens, mais finit par tout perdre. Après lui avoir retiré son comté anglais en 1102, Henri Beauclerc, le benjamin du Conquérant, le fit prisonnier dix ans plus tard et l'emprisonna jusqu'à sa mort.
     "L'Historia ecclesiastica du chroniqueur Orderic Vital, travail de commande, est à l'origine de la mauvaise réputation du personnage. Mais depuis 19201, plusieurs historiens dont Kathleen Thompson ont reconsidéré le seigneur de Bellême.
Un baron au statut particulier
     "Robert II de Bellême est le fils aîné de Mabile de Bellême et de Roger II de Montgommery, compagnon de Guillaume le Conquérant. La mort de ses parents (respectivement en 1077 et 1094) lui offre un héritage important - un ensemble de territoires à cheval sur le Maine et la Normandie. Ces possessions le placent dans la vassalité de trois maîtres différents : le duc de Normandie, le comte du Maine et le roi de France. Trente-quatre châteaux défendent son territoire - ce qui lui assure une place de toute première importance dans le duché. Mais pas seulement. En 1099, il succède à son frère cadet Hugues de Montgommery à la tête du comté de Shrewsbury en Angleterre. Enfin, grâce à son mariage avec Agnès de Ponthieu2, il devient vers 1100, le nouveau comte de Ponthieu au décès de son beau-père.
     "La puissance de Robert de Bellême s'appuie sur un réseau castral dense. D'après Orderic Vital, le baron commande 34 châteaux sur les marches normanno-mancelles3. Citons parmi ces forteresses : Bellême bien sûr, Alençon, Domfront, Argentan, Ballon, Ceton, Lurson, Fourches, Boitron, Almenêches. Le moine-historien raconte (invente) comment Robert construit des places fortes en usurpant des terres dans des secteurs stratégiques, par exemple à La Courbenote 1 dans le pays d'Houlme. Cet ensemble de fortifications est en lien avec la politique belliqueuse du seigneur de Bellême. Dans les années 1090, la faible autorité du duc de Normandie Robert Courteheuse favorise la renaissance des conflits locaux dans le duché et les régions bordières. Le seigneur de Bellême y est très impliqué. Il rallume la vieille guerre familiale contre les Giroie et du coup s'accroche avec leurs alliés, les sires de l'Aigle. Dans le Hiémois, il essaie de s'imposer face aux autres grandes familles de la région : les seigneurs de Courcy et de Grandmesnil4. Plusieurs voisins du duché de Normandie lui sont hostiles. Les comtes de Mortagne, Geoffroy puis Rotrou revendiquent une partie des territoires de la famille de Montgommery. Le comte du Maine Élie de la Flèche et plusieurs seigneurs manceaux cherchent à affaiblir leur dangereux voisin.
     "Les opérations militaires et les travaux de fortifications coûtent tellement que le seigneur de Bellême doit s'en prendre parfois aux terres d'Église. D'où les exactions contre les propriétés de l'abbaye d'Ouche et l'évêché de Sées, écrit le moine. Mais si Orderic Vital cite de nombreuses exactions des adversaires, il ne peut en nommer aucune de Robert de Bellême. Au contraire, il cite involontairement tous ses bienfaits envers l'église. Il est très facile de prouver le parti-pris très net du moine contre les Montgommery, pour lesquels travaillait son père qui l'a "placé" à l'abbaye de Saint-Evroult à 10 ans et qu'il n'a jamais revu. Ceci explique sans doute cela. Dès lors, toute description des actes de cette famille par Orderic Vital est à prendre avec une grande circonspection et à croiser avec celle d'autres auteurs.
Robert de Bellême et Robert Courteheuse (1077-1096) : une alliance chancelante
Sous Guillaume le Conquérant (vers 1077-1087)
     "Le premier coup d'éclat de Robert de Bellême se situe en 1077 quand il décide de soutenir la rébellion du fils aîné de Guillaume le Conquérant, Robert Courteheuse, contre son père. Ensemble, ils quittent la Normandie et trouvent refuge chez le comte de Flandre Robert le Frison puis à la cour du roi de France Philippe Ier. Robert Courteheuse finit par faire la paix avec son père en 10785.
     "Dans les années 1080, alors que sa mère est morte, Robert contrôle les possessions familiales en France. Son père, qui est encore vivant, s'implique davantage dans les affaires anglaises6. Robert préside la cour baronniale et accumule ainsi une certaine expérience du pouvoir et de l'administration.
     "Mais quand en 1087, Robert de Bellême apprend sur la route de Rouen la mort du duc, il rebrousse chemin, revient sur ses terres et y chasse toutes les garnisons ducales de ses châteaux, notamment à Alençon et Bellême. Le turbulent seigneur entend être le seul maître en son domaine. L'anarchie qui règne en Normandie après Guillaume le Conquérant lui laisse espérer plus. Le duché est miné par la rivalité entre les trois fils du défunt duc, Robert Courteheuse, Guillaume le Roux et Henri Beauclerc. Robert de Bellême va tenter de tirer profit de la confusion.
La rébellion et l'emprisonnement en 1088
     "En 1088, le seigneur de Bellême trempe dans le complot ourdi par les plus hauts barons anglo-normands contre Guillaume le Roux, roi d'Angleterre. Le but était d'obtenir la déposition de ce dernier et d'offrir la couronne à son frère aîné Robert Courteheuse, duc de Normandie. Robert de Bellême figure dans l'avant-garde des troupes de Courteheuse à Rochester. Le trône de Guillaume est très menacé mais ce dernier réussit à désolidariser le vieux Roger II de Montgommery, le père de Robert de Bellême, des autres conjurés. Finalement le roi triomphe de la rébellion. Robert de Bellême est pardonné, sûrement grâce à l'appui paternel. Il quitte l'Angleterre pour rejoindre la Normandie.
     "À peine débarqué sur le sol normand, il est arrêté en compagnie d'Henri Beauclerc car Robert Courteheuse les soupçonne de conspirer. L'arrestation favorise surtout les desseins militaires du duc de Normandie qui se prépare à mener une campagne militaire dans le Maine pour soumettre la noblesse locale. Or, Robert de Bellême est l'un des plus importants seigneurs de cette région. Emprisonné à Neuilly-l'Évêque, il ne pourra pas s'opposer à cette reprise en main ducale7. L'arrestation provoque la colère de Roger II de Montgommery. Quittant l'Angleterre, il rejoint la Normandie et met en défense la seigneurie de Bellême et l'Hiémois. Après avoir rétabli son pouvoir sur le Maine, le duc de Normandie assiège plusieurs châteaux de la famille de Montgommery. Saint-Céneri-le-Gérei est pris à l'automne 1088. C'est après cette victoire qu'il accepte de traiter avec Roger de Montgommery. Robert de Bellême est libéré mais il ne retrouve pas son château de Saint-Céneri qui est confié par le duc à un ennemi de la famille, Robert Giroie.
Le bref revirement de 1094
     "Après ces événements de 1088, Robert de Bellême choisit pourtant de servir fidèlement Robert Courteheuse pendant plusieurs années. Il figure parmi ses principaux conseillers et lui apporte son aide lors de la rébellion de Rouen en 1090. À l'inverse, en 1092, Robert Courteheuse appuie son vassal lorsque ce dernier assiège le château de son ennemi Richard de Courcy.
     "Toutefois, certains actes du duc ne favorisent pas Robert de Bellême. Robert Courteheuse remet par exemple la forteresse d'Exmes à Gilbert de l'Aigle alors que le seigneur de Bellême espérait légitimement que cette place lui revienne de par sa position en Hiémois. En 1093, Robert Giroie se révolte contre le duc. Ce dernier saisit le château de Saint-Céneri puis traite avec le rebelle. Robert de Bellême s'attend à ce que la place lui revienne ou au moins, à ce qu'elle reste dans les mains ducales. Or, au terme d'un accord généreux, le duc choisit de rendre le château aux Giroie8.
     "En 1094, sûrement déçu, Robert de Bellême se tourne vers le frère de Robert Courteheuse, Guillaume le Roux. Il ouvre aux hommes du roi d'Angleterre plusieurs forteresses dont celle d'Argentan. Cependant, Robert Courteheuse réagit aussitôt et, à la tête de son armée, recouvre les châteaux avec l'aide du roi de France. Robert de Bellême retourne alors dans la fidélité au duc.
Robert de Bellême et Guillaume le Roux (1096-1100)
     "En 1096, le duc Robert Courteheuse part pour la première Croisade et laisse la garde du duché à son frère Guillaume le Roux, roi d'Angleterre. Robert de Bellême change donc de maître mais ce bouleversement se révèle profitable pour lui.
     "Lors de la campagne en Vexin en 1097, le roi d'Angleterre en fait son chef des armées (sénéchal). Ses talents d'ingénieur militaire sont appréciés. Il sait aussi bien construire des engins de siège que des forteresses. Guillaume le Roux lui confie l'édification du château de Gisors, sur la frontière orientale du duché. En avril 1098, Robert de Bellême réalise un bel exploit en capturant le comte du Maine, Élie de la Flèche que le roi cherchait à soumettre9.
     "Les services du seigneur de Bellême sont récompensés. En 1098, son frère Hugues de Montgommery, comte de Shrewsbury, est tué lors d'un combat au Pays de Galles. Guillaume accepte que Robert hérite du comté contre le paiement de 3000 £. Le baron réussit donc à rassembler entre ses mains le patrimoine paternel (le comté de Shrewsbury, une partie du pays de Galles, le Hiémois) et maternel (la seigneurie de Bellême). De surcroît, il reçoit probablement la garde du château de Tickhill dans le sud du Yorkshire10.
     "En 1100, un nouveau décès favorise Robert de Bellême. Guy Ier de Ponthieu meurt et Robert, en tant que gendre, hérite du comté. Maître du Ponthieu et du comté de Shrewsbury, seigneurs de nombreux fiefs dans le Maine et en Normandie, il est alors à l'apogée de sa puissance.
Robert de Bellême contre Henri Ier d'Angleterre (1100-ap.1130)
La rébellion de 1101-1102
     "La fidélité de Robert de Bellême est remise en cause par l'assassinat de Guillaume le Roux et son remplacement sur le trône d'Angleterre par son frère cadet, Henri Beauclerc (1100). Les deux hommes sont désormais ennemis. Quelques années plus tôt, le fils benjamin de Guillaume le Conquérant avait enlevé à Robert la ville de Domfront.
     "Robert Courteheuse revient de la croisade un mois après le couronnement d'Henri. Il ne compte pas abandonner ses droits sur le trône anglais et, pour les affirmer, débarque en Angleterre (1101). Certains barons anglo-normands, notamment Yves de Grandmesnil, Guillaume II de Warenne et Robert de Bellême, accueillent favorablement ce débarquement car ils espèrent ainsi l'éviction d'Henri et la réunion de la Normandie et de l'Angleterre au profit d'un seul maître. Le fait d'être soumis à deux seigneurs rivaux rendait en effet leur situation délicate.
     "La menace de son frère oblige Henri à négocier puis à faire d'importantes concessions au traité d'Alton. Mais l'essentiel est acquis pour lui : il garde le Royaume d'Angleterre. Libéré du problème posé par Robert Courteheuse, le roi peut alors s'attaquer aux barons qui l'avaient trahis quelques mois plus tôt. Robert de Bellême est sur la liste. Assigné à la cour royale pour répondre de 45 chargesnote 2, il refuse de comparaître et se précipite mettre en défense ses châteaux anglais et gallois. En conséquence, Henri Ier Beauclerc rassemble une armée puis se lance dans le siège de toutes les forteresses comtales : Arundel, Tickhill, Bridgnorth et Shrewsbury tombent successivement au cours de l'année 1102. Robert de Bellême est contraint de négocier. Il n'obtient la liberté qu'à condition de renoncer à tous ses biens anglais11. Ses frères Arnoul de Montgommery et Roger le Poitevin doivent se soumettre aux mêmes conditions. Robert de Bellême part donc se réfugier en Normandie où la situation n'est pas meilleure car Henri Ier a réussi à convaincre Robert Courteheuse de punir le vassal rebelle. Ce dernier se retrouve donc aux abois. Il est même contraint pour s'en sortir d'incendier l'abbaye familiale d'Almenêches où l'armée ducale était rassemblée12. Les hommes de Robert de Bellême résistent toutefois avec succès. Incapable de faire tomber la seigneurie de Bellême, le duc de Normandie choisit de se réconcilier avec Robert.
     "En 1103 et 1104, les deux frères, Henri Beauclerc et Robert Courteheuse, se rencontrent. Le premier reproche au second d'avoir fait la paix avec Robert de Bellême et d'avoir rétabli ce baron dans la faveur ducale. En manque d'allié, le duc de Normandie ne répond pas à la demande de son frère de châtier son vassal. Robert de Bellême profite de cette protection pour attaquer les terres des fidèles d'Henri sur le continent.
La chute de Robert de Bellême (1105-après 1130)
     "En 1105, à l'appel de plusieurs barons normands, le roi d'Angleterre Henri Ier Beauclerc débarque en Normandie afin de renverser Robert Courteheuse. La bataille décisive a lieu à Tinchebray en 1106. Aux côtés du duc de Normandie, figure Robert de Bellême. Il commande l'un des trois corps. Le combat tourne à l'avantage du roi d'Angleterre. Constatant la déconfiture de son maître, Robert de Bellême s'enfuit avant la fin de la bataille. Henri Ier remporte la victoire, capture son frère et lui succède comme duc de Normandie. C'est peut-être pour consolider cette nouvelle position qu'avant la fin de l'année 1106 le vainqueur fait la paix avec Robert de Bellême. Il est confirmé vicomte d'Hiémois tandis qu'en échange, il rend toutes les terres qu'il a usurpées dont Argentan13.
     "En dépit de cette paix, la suspicion se développe entre les deux personnages. Henri isole diplomatiquement Robert en s'alliant avec des familles traditionnellement proches des Bellême. Il marie deux de ses filles naturelles au vicomte du Maine Roscelin de Beaumont et au seigneur de Laval. Le roi installe à la Courbe (un château construit puis rendu par Robert) un de ses hommes les plus fidèles, Néel d'Aubigny14. D'un autre côté, la soumission de Robert de Bellême est toute relative. Il ne présente pas régulièrement ses comptes à l'autorité ducale comme un vicomte doit le faire. Surtout, il complote avec le comte d'Anjou Foulque V et le roi de France Louis VI pour mettre sur pied une nouvelle rébellion contre Henri. Les conjurés forment donc une redoutable coalition qui rapidement s'évanouit. Robert se retrouve seul contre le roi d'Angleterre. Ce dernier réagit de la même manière qu'en 1101-1102. En novembre 1112, il cite le rebelle à comparaître devant sa cour à Bonneville-la-Louvet. Il doit répondre de plusieurs charges : agissement contre les intérêts de son seigneur, absences répétées à la cour, refus de présenter ses comptes au roi pour les vicomtés d'Exmes, de Falaise et d'Argentan. Cette fois, Robert de Bellême ne se dérobe pas. Rassuré par son statut d'ambassadeur du roi de France, qui lui assure l'immunité, il se présente à Bonneville-la-Louvet. Henri Ier ne se laisse pas impressionner et l'arrête, contre toutes les lois de la guerre. Robert est condamné puis envoyé captif en Angleterre au château royal de Wareham en Angleterre15. Dès la fin de l'année 1112, le roi entreprend la conquête de la seigneurie de Bellême qui tombe entièrement avant l'été 111316. C'est une grande victoire pour Henri puisqu'en quelques mois, il s'est débarrassé d'un des plus puissants barons normands et a soumis un territoire longtemps fidèle à l'autorité ducale, mais rebelle à l'autorité royale.
     "Comme son ancien allié Robert Courteheuse, Robert de Bellême finit ses jours en prison. Il meurt peu après 1130.
Robert le Diable ?
     "Les historiens connaissent assez bien Robert de Bellême car dans son Historia ecclesisatica, le chroniqueur anglo-normand Orderic Vital parle abondamment de lui. Il détaille ses nombreux méfaits (en citer un ?) et brosse un portrait diabolique du personnage. Quelques auteurs des siècles passés ont par conséquent surnommé le seigneur de Bellême Robert le Diable17.
     "Aujourd'hui, les historiens de la Normandie soupçonnent Orderic Vital d'avoir noirci le portrait et analysent avec prudence le récit du chroniqueur. Ce dernier avait en effet de bonnes raisons pour lui en vouloir. Robert de Bellême s'était à plusieurs reprises attaqué aux biens et aux paysans de l'abbaye d'Ouche, où Vital était moine. Qui plus est, le lignage de Bellême entretenait une haine farouche contre les Grandmesnil et les Giroie, familles fondatrices du monastère[réf. nécessaire].
Robert de Bellême et l'Église
     "Pour Orderic Vital, Robert de Bellême fut un « implacable persécuteur de l'Église »18. En effet, ses actes ne plaident pas en sa faveur : le baron ne fut jamais un grand bienfaiteur pour les établissements religieux et au contraire, pilla ou s'appropria leurs biensnote 3. Ces exactions poussèrent d'ailleurs en 1104 l'évêque de Sées Serlon puis l'abbé de Sées Raoul à quitter la région. Ils rejoignirent le roi Henri en Angleterre. Ce dernier apparaissait comme un protecteur pour l'Église alors que Robert fut excommunié par l'évêque.
     "Selon l'historien Kathleen Thompson19, l'attitude de Robert procède surtout d'un chef militaire qui cherche par tous les moyens à trouver des subsides, quitte à s'en prendre aux possessions cléricales. Sa conduite n'est en rien exceptionnelle à son époque. Guillaume le Roux se comportait de la même manière.
Un homme cruel ?
     "Orderic Vital raconte comment Robert de Bellême avait coutume de saisir les honneurs de ses ennemis (en citer un ?), de brûler leurs châteaux (en citer un ?), ou de mutiler ses prisonniers (en citer un). Il l'appelle « le boucher sans pitié »20. L'hagiographe Geoffroi Grossus confirme dans sa Vita Bernardi les tortures qu'infligeait le baron. En 1092, le fils de Robert Giroie mourut comme otage chez le seigneur de Bellême (faux, mort vers 1124). Cette cruauté n'est pas sans rappeler celle de son grand-père, le terrible Guillaume II Talvas (préciser et prouver).
     "Kathleen Thompson se demande si tous ces témoignages ne sont pas exagérés. Elle en tient pour preuve que lorsque Vital évoque les exactions de Robert contre les Gallois, les sources galloises n'en disent mot et accusent plutôt son père Roger et son frère Hugues.
     "Toujours selon le moine de Saint-Évroult, Robert de Bellême aurait retenu sa femme Agnès de Ponthieu prisonnière dans le château de Bellême avant qu'elle ne réussisse à s'enfuir. Kathleen Thompson propose une autre lecture. Peu après la première année de son fils, Agnès quitta Bellême avec l'accord de son mari afin d'aider son vieux père à administrer le Ponthieu. Deux documents suggèrent en effet une bonne entente entre Robert de Bellême et son beau-père21.
Les talents de Robert
     "Il ne fait pas de doute que Robert était reconnu pour ses qualités d'homme militaire. Même Orderic Vital l'admet. Robert de Bellême maîtrisait notamment la poliorcétique. Guillaume le Roux utilisa les compétences de son baron pour la construction du château de Gisors. Robert éleva aussi des forteresses pour son compte (Château-Gonthier à la Courbe, Bridgnorth en Angleterre). Il savait aussi construire des engins de siège. La capitulation de Bréval en 1092 lui doit beaucoup22.
     "Comme ses contemporains, Robert évita les batailles rangées sauf celle de Tinchebray. Mais dans les engagements d'échelle moins importante, il fit preuve d'habileté. La capture d'Hélie de la Flèche en 1098 le prouve.
     "L'historien Lucien Musset a révélé les capacités d'administration chez le seigneur de Bellême. Ce dernier s'évertua à jouer son rôle d'arbitre lors des conflits au sein de sa seigneurie. Sa justice montre quelques éléments de modernité23.
     "En conclusion, alors qu'Orderic Vital montre Robert comme un homme sadique, violent et turbulent, l'historienne britannique Kathleen Thompson offre un portrait plus nuancé. À travers l'étude de sa carrière, elle le définit comme un personnage de caractère, un soldat compétent, un administrateur capable mais un homme politique peu inspiré24.
Famille et descendance
     "Il était le fils aîné de Roger II de Montgommery, vicomte d'Hiémois, comte de Shrewsbury, et Mabile de Bellême.
     "Il épousa Agnès de Ponthieu, fille du comte Guy Ier de Ponthieu. Ils eurent pour descendance connue :
** Guillaume III Talvas (v. 1095-1171), comte de Ponthieu et seigneur d'Alençon
** André

     "Robert avait quatre frères :
** Hugues de Montgommery, comte de Shrewsbury
** Arnoul de Montgommery, seigneur d'Holderness en Angleterre
** Roger le Poitevin
** Philippe de Montgommery, mort en Croisade.

Notes et références
Notes
1. Le château est appelé Château-Gonthier
2. Il est notamment accusé d'avoir construit le château de Brigdnorth sans autorisation royale
3. Robert Courteheuse l'aida aussi dans ces accaparations. Vers 1100-1105, il lui abandonna les revenus de l'évêché de Sées
Références
1. Henri Renault Du Motey (1858-1932), Origines de la Normandie et du duché d'Alençon : Histoire des quatre premiers ducs de Normandie et des Talvas, princes de Bellême, seigneurs d'Alençon, de Sées, de Domfront, du Passais et du Saosnois ; précédée d'une Etude sur le diocèse de Sées au IXe siècle -de l'an 850 à l'an 1085, Paris, A. Picard, 1920 (lire en ligne [archive]), https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k111618x/f6.item.r=ord%C3%A9ric [archive]
2. La date du mariage n'est pas connue. On sait simplement qu'il fut imaginé par Guillaume le Conquérant et célébré entre 1087 et 1092. Kathleen Thompson, « Robert of Belleme reconsidered », Anglo-Norman Studies, vol. XIII, p. 269
3. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 273
4. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 271-273
5. François Neveux, ibid, p. 431
6. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 268
7. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 270
8. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 274
9. François Neveux, ibid, p. 459-460
10. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 275-276
11. Judith A. Green, Henry I. King of England and Duke of Normandy, Cambridge University Press, 2006, p. 70-71
12. François Neveux, ibid, p. 463
13. Judith A. Green, ibid, p. 99
14. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 278
15. Judith A. Green, ibid, p. 125
16. François Neveux, ibid, p. 475
17. Par exemple dans L. Joseph Fret, Antiquités et chroniques percheronnes : ou recherches sur l'histoire civile, religieuse, monumentale, politique et littéraire de l'ancienne province du Perche, et pays limitrophes, Impr. de Glaçon, 1840 ou dans Auguste Voisin, Les Cénomans anciens et modernes, histoire du département de la Sarthe, 1852
18. cité dans Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 280
19. Kathleen Thompson, ibidem
20. cité dans Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 281
21. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 282
22. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 283
23. Lucien Musset, « Administration et justice dans une grande baronnie normande au xie siècle : les terres des Bellême sous Roger II et Robert », dans Lucien Musset, Jean-Michel Bouvris, Jean-Marie Maillefer, Autour du pouvoir ducal normand Xe-XIIe siècles, Cahiers des Annales de Normandie n°17, Caen, 1985, p.129-149
24. Kathleen Thompson, ibid, p. 266
Voir aussi
Autres articles
** Famille de Bellême: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famille_de_Bell%C3%AAme
** Seigneurie de Bellême: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigneurie_de_Bell%C3%AAme
** Liste des comtes de Ponthieu: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_de_Ponthieu
Bibliographie
** André M. J. Roux, " Du nouveau en Normandie au temps du Conquérant", éditions Laurence Olivier Four, Caen, 1980.
** Gérard Louise, « la seigneurie de Bellême (Xe-XIIe siècle) », le Pays-Bas-Normand, no 199 à 202, 1990-1991, 2 volumes, 429 et 351 pages.
** François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, xe?–?xiie siècle, Rennes, Ouest-France, 1998, 611 p. (ISBN 2-7373-0985-9, présentation en ligne [archive]).
** Kathleen Thompson, « Robert of Belleme reconsidered », Anglo-Norman Studies, vol. XIII, 1991, p. 263-285.
** Judith A. Green, Henry I. King of England and Duke of Normandy, Cambridge University Press, 2006."11 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-25. He was Seigneur of Belleme, Domfront & Alencon.12

; Per Burke's: "He rebelled against HENRY I and in 1102 was deprived of the Earldom of Shrewsbury/Shropshire, together with his English and Welsh estates."13

; Per Racines et Histoire (Boubers): "2) Agnès de Ponthieu (d’Abbeville) ° ~1075 + après 06/10/1100 (avant 1103, peut-être 1126 ou 1140?) héritière, comtesse du Ponthieu (1101)
     ép. avant 09/09/1087 (mariage arrangé par le Roi Guillaume II d’Angleterre ; emprisonnée par son mari au château de Bellême, elle s’enfuit auprès d’Adèle, comtesse de Blois ; citée dans une charte de son fils Guillaume à l’Abbaye de Saint-Sauveur-Le-Vicomte en 1127) Robert II Talvas de BellêmeMontgomery «Le Diable», comte d’Alençon (1079, y succède à sa mère) et de Bellême (1101), Hiesmes et Sées (1094, succède à son père dans ses fiefs normands), seigneur de Montgomery et Domfront, earl of Shropshire, 3ème earl de Shrewsbury (1098, succède à son plus jeune frère, en payant 3.000 £) et d’Arundel, comte de Ponthieu (10/1100, succède à son beau-père) [rebelle au Roi William II (1088), assiégé à Riochester où il se rend (06/1088), rebelle au Roi Henry 1er (1102), dépouillé de tous ses biens anglais et normands, retiré en Normandie, arrêté (1112), emprisonné à Cherbourg, déchu de ses titres, emprisonné à Wareham Castle (07/1113-après 11/1130)] ° ~1052/56 + un 08/05 ~1131 ou peu après (Wareham Castle) (fils de Roger II, seigneur d’Alençon, earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury, et de Mabile d’Alençon-Bellême) (témoin d’une charte à Saint-Martin de Sées avec son frère Roger ; & d’une autre à Saint-Aubin d’Angers ~1060/62.)14" He was Earl of Shrewsbury between 1098 and 1102.8

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bellême.pdf, p. 3.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bellême: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177486&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#RobertMontgommerydied1131. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 163-164, de MONTGOMERY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf, p. 2.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177487&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_of_Bell%C3%AAme,_3rd_Earl_of_Shrewsbury. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Montgomery, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montgomery.pdf
  10. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 29 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Robert II de Bellême: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II_de_Bell%C3%AAme. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 108-25, p. 101. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de Boubers, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I Talvas: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140289&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de BOUBERS, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GuillaumeIPonthieudied1171B
  18. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Guillaume Talvas de Ponthieu: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14686&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.

Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu1,2,3

F, #6533, d. between 1100 and 1103
FatherGuy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil4,5,6,7 b. c 1050, d. 31 Oct 1101
MotherAde d'Amiens dame de Camon4,7 b. 1006, d. 1076
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited20 Sep 2020
     Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu married Robert II de Bellême de Montgomery 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur d’Alençon, vicomte d’Hiesmes, son of Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois and Mabile de Bellême, before 9 September 1087; Genealogics says m. 1082/87.1,2,3,8,9,6
Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu died between 1100 and 1103 at Ponthieu, France; Genealogics says d. 1103; Med Lands says d. aft 6 Oct 1100.6,10
     GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:637.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES de Ponthieu (-after 6 Oct 1100). Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum Belesmensem” married “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem”[586]. "Wido…Pontivi regionis comes" issued a charter dated 1101 relating to the church of Montreuil witnessed by "Agnetis mee filie…"[587]. This marriage was arranged by William II King of England, according to Orderic Vitalis, who also specifies her father's name[588]. A charter dated 1100 records the foundation of the priory of St-Pierre d’Abbeville by "Guy comte de Ponthieu et Adèle sa femme", sealed by "Guy comte, de Agnèz sa fille, de Mahaut sa fille…"[589]. Orderic Vitalis records that she was treated cruelly by her husband and imprisoned in the castle of Bellême, from where she escaped, took refuge with Adela Ctss de Blois, and retired to Ponthieu[590].
     "m (before 9 Sep 1087) ROBERT de Montgommery, son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Seigneur d'Alençon, Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury & his wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [1131 or later], bur [Wareham Castle]). Comte de Bellême 1101. Seigneur d'Alençon."
Med Lands cites:
[586] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300.
[587] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), III, p. 6.
[588] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV VIII, p. 159.
[589] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 35.
[590] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 424.7
Agnès de Ponthieu d’Abbeville, héritière du Ponthieu was also known as Agnes of Ponthieu.11

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Agnes of Ponthieu (c. 1080 – aft. 1105) was ruling Countess of Ponthieu from 1100.
     "She was the daughter of Count Guy I of Ponthieu. Enguerrand, the son of Count Guy, died at a youthful age. Guy then made his brother Hugh heir presumptive, but he also died before Guy (died 1100). Agnes became count Guy's heiress, and was married to Robert of Bellême. Their son William III of Ponthieu succeeded to the county of Ponthieu after the death of Agnes (between 1105 and 1111), and the imprisonment of his father in 1112.
Sources
** The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni, edited and translated by Elisabeth M. C. Van Houts, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995."10

; Per Racines et Histoire (Boubers): "2) Agnès de Ponthieu (d’Abbeville) ° ~1075 + après 06/10/1100 (avant 1103, peut-être 1126 ou 1140?) héritière, comtesse du Ponthieu (1101)
     ép. avant 09/09/1087 (mariage arrangé par le Roi Guillaume II d’Angleterre ; emprisonnée par son mari au château de Bellême, elle s’enfuit auprès d’Adèle, comtesse de Blois ; citée dans une charte de son fils Guillaume à l’Abbaye de Saint-Sauveur-Le-Vicomte en 1127) Robert II Talvas de BellêmeMontgomery «Le Diable», comte d’Alençon (1079, y succède à sa mère) et de Bellême (1101), Hiesmes et Sées (1094, succède à son père dans ses fiefs normands), seigneur de Montgomery et Domfront, earl of Shropshire, 3ème earl de Shrewsbury (1098, succède à son plus jeune frère, en payant 3.000 £) et d’Arundel, comte de Ponthieu (10/1100, succède à son beau-père) [rebelle au Roi William II (1088), assiégé à Riochester où il se rend (06/1088), rebelle au Roi Henry 1er (1102), dépouillé de tous ses biens anglais et normands, retiré en Normandie, arrêté (1112), emprisonné à Cherbourg, déchu de ses titres, emprisonné à Wareham Castle (07/1113-après 11/1130)] ° ~1052/56 + un 08/05 ~1131 ou peu après (Wareham Castle) (fils de Roger II, seigneur d’Alençon, earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury, et de Mabile d’Alençon-Bellême) (témoin d’une charte à Saint-Martin de Sées avec son frère Roger ; & d’une autre à Saint-Aubin d’Angers ~1060/62.)12" She was Countess of Ponthieu between 1100 and 1105.10

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 163-164, de MONTGOMERY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf, p. 2.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Boubers Tuncq & Bernâtre, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Ponthieu, & Montreuil, Saint-Pol, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ponthieu.pdf
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177487&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#AgnesPonthieudied1100. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bellême: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177486&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#RobertMontgommerydied1131
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes,_Countess_of_Ponthieu. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I3012
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de Boubers, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de BOUBERS, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I Talvas: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140289&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#GuillaumeIPonthieudied1171B
  16. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Guillaume Talvas de Ponthieu: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14686&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.

Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil1,2,3

M, #6534, b. circa 1050, d. 31 October 1101
FatherEnguerrand II de Ponthieu comte de Ponthieu, Montruil et Aumale2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1033, d. 25 Oct 1053
MotherAdélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale3,2,4,7,6 b. b 1030, d. bt 1081 - 1084
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited29 Apr 2020
     Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil married Adila/Adda (?);
His 2nd wife.8 Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil was born circa 1050; Racines et Histoire (Boubers1 and Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq) say b. ca 1040; Genealogics says b. ca 1050.9,3,4 He married Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon in 1061;
His 1st wife.9,3,10
Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil died on 31 October 1101.8
     GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26. He was abbé de Forest-Montier.9 Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil was also known as Guy I Count of Ponthieu.11 Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil was also known as Guy I de Montreuil.6

; Per Racines et Histoire (Boubers): "Gui 1er de Montreuil (Ponthieu) dit «d’Abbeville» + 13/11/1100 (inh. à St-Pierre, Abbeville) chevalier, comte de Ponthieu et Montreuil (dès 02/1054), finit Abbé de Forest-Montier (accorde en 1100 des droits de pêche dans une charte du cartulaire de Saint-Josse ; fonde l’Abbaye de Saint-Pierre à Abbeville 1075 ; don à Saint-Martin-des-Champs avant 1090 pour l’âme de son fils) X avec Raoul de Montdidier dans l’ost royal d’Henri 1er (02/1054), capturé par Guillaume II, duc de Normandie, (prisonnier 2 ans, finit par prêter hommage à la Normandie)
     ép. 1) Ade (Ada) d’Amiens-Valois ° ~1050 + un 05/03 avant 1066
     ép. 2) Adila (Ad(d)a) (citée en 1090.)12,8"

; Per Racines et Histoire (Amiens): "Ade d’Amiens ° 1046 (Amiens) + 1076 dame de Camon
ép. 1061 Gui 1er de Ponthieu ° 1035 + 13/01/1101 chevalier, comte de Montreuil et de Ponthieu (finit moine & Abbé de Forest-Montiers, 80.)10"

Family 1

Adila/Adda (?)

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 163-164, de MONTGOMERY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf, p. 2.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gui I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177488&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177490&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#EnguerrandMontreuildied1053. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108319&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de Boubers, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 5.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Premiers comtes & Châtelains d’Amiens, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Amiens.pdf
  11. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I3010
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Boubers Tuncq & Bernâtre, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Ponthieu, & Montreuil, Saint-Pol, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ponthieu.pdf
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Ponthieu: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177487&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#AgnesPonthieudied1100

Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon1,2

F, #6535, b. 1006, d. 1076
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited29 Apr 2020
     Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon was born in 1006.3 She was born circa 1030.4 She was born circa 1046 at Amiens.2 She married Guy I dit d’Abbeville de Ponthieu Count of Ponthieu & Montreuil, son of Enguerrand II de Ponthieu comte de Ponthieu, Montruil et Aumale and Adélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale, in 1061;
His 1st wife.1,5,2
Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon died in 1076.6,2
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Boubers): "Gui 1er de Montreuil (Ponthieu) dit «d’Abbeville» + 13/11/1100 (inh. à St-Pierre, Abbeville) chevalier, comte de Ponthieu et Montreuil (dès 02/1054), finit Abbé de Forest-Montier (accorde en 1100 des droits de pêche dans une charte du cartulaire de Saint-Josse ; fonde l’Abbaye de Saint-Pierre à Abbeville 1075 ; don à Saint-Martin-des-Champs avant 1090 pour l’âme de son fils) X avec Raoul de Montdidier dans l’ost royal d’Henri 1er (02/1054), capturé par Guillaume II, duc de Normandie, (prisonnier 2 ans, finit par prêter hommage à la Normandie)
     ép. 1) Ade (Ada) d’Amiens-Valois ° ~1050 + un 05/03 avant 1066
     ép. 2) Adila (Ad(d)a) (citée en 1090.)7,6" GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26. Ade d'Amiens dame de Camon was also known as Ada of Amiens.4

; Per Racines et Histoire (Amiens): "Ade d’Amiens ° 1046 (Amiens) + 1076 dame de Camon
ép. 1061 Gui 1er de Ponthieu ° 1035 + 13/01/1101 chevalier, comte de Montreuil et de Ponthieu (finit moine & Abbé de Forest-Montiers, 80.)2"

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Premiers comtes & Châtelains d’Amiens, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Amiens.pdf
  3. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I3011
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf, p. 2.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & Seigneurs de Boubers, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers1.pdf
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Boubers Tuncq & Bernâtre, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boubers-Abbeville-Tuncq.pdf
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#AgnesPonthieudied1100. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 163-164, de MONTGOMERY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.

Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois1,2

M, #6536, b. 1005, d. 27 July 1094
FatherHugues de Montgommery vicomte d’Hiémois3,2,4 d. b 1048
MotherJosceline de Bolbec5 b. c 1000, d. a 1068
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited29 Jul 2020
     Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois married Adelaide de Puiset (de Breuteuil), daughter of Erard I de Breteuil Comte de Breteuil, Vicomte de Chartres and Humberge de Broyes (?).6,7 Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois was born in 1005 at Normandy, France.8,9 He married Mabile de Bellême, daughter of Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon and Hildeburge (?), between 1050 and 1054.6,2
Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois died on 27 July 1094 at Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.6,1
     GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; Per Burke's: "In early December 1074 Roger de Montgomery was created Earl of Shropshire or Shrewsbury. As with other medieval earldoms (see WINCHESTER, M, preliminary remarks, for a discussion of this point), little distinction was then made between the county town and county proper when designating a specific name for a title, chiefly because an earl, who was then more or less an official, albeit often hereditary, was inconceivable except as earl of a county."3

; Per Burke's: "It is in any case an open question whether the original Earls of Arundel were not Earls of a wider territory. (See CHICHESTER, E, preliminary remarks.) For instance Roger de Montgomery (see SHREWSBURY and WATERFORD, E, preliminary remarks) was at Christmastide 1067 granted among other tracts of land the portion of Sussex that included both Arundel Castle (which he in fact built) and Chichester. Yet although he is often referred to in contemporary sources as Earl of Arundel he is from time to time called Earl of Chichester and by later sources Earl of Sussex. He seems definitely to have been an Earl, but of what or where it is harder to say, not least because an Earl at that time was primarily an official rather than possessor of a personal title of honour, and as such was not in the designation he bore tied to one particular place. Any Earldom of Arundel held by Roger de Montgomery's family ceased with the disgrace and exile of his elder son, another Roger, in 1102. Arundel Castle and the feudal territorial holding of which it was chief place accordingly reverted to the Crown."10

Reference: Weis AR7 [1992:112. 159].11,12

; NB: Genealogics, Boyer and Med Lands disagree on whether Roger II was the son of Roger I (brother of Hughues) or the son of Hugues:
1. Genealogics places Roger II as the son of Hugues and his wife Josceline de Bolbec.
2. Med Lands states that Roger II was the "son of ROGER [I] Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline."
3. Boyer states also that Roger II was the son of Roger I.
I have chosed to follow Genealogics. GA Vaut.13,14,15,6,16 He was Earl of Shropshire or Shrewsbury in December 1074.3

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bellême.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140012&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Josceline de Bolbec: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140013&tree=LEO
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:ii.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#AdelaideBreteuilMRogerIIMontgommeryBelle. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  9. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I24807
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 185-1, p. 159. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 124-26, p. 112.
  13. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 8 march 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger II de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140016&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RogerMontgommeryShrewsburydied1094
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger I de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140011&tree=LEO
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 163, de MONTGOMERY 2:xii.
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 163, de MONTGOMERY 2:xi.
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:i.
  20. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:iii.
  21. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:v.
  22. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:vi.
  23. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:vii.
  24. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:ix.
  25. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, pp. 88-89. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bellême: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177486&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#RobertMontgommerydied1131
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger 'Poictevin' de Montgommery: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140018&tree=LEO
  29. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.3.

Mabile de Bellême1,2,3

F, #6537, b. 1015, d. 2 December 1079
FatherGuillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon3 b. 995, d. bt 1060 - 1062
MotherHildeburge (?)3 b. c 1000
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited29 Apr 2020
     Mabile de Bellême was born in 1015.4 She married Roger II de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, seigneur de Montgomery, vicomte of the Hiesmois, son of Hugues de Montgommery vicomte d’Hiémois and Josceline de Bolbec, between 1050 and 1054.5,3
Mabile de Bellême died on 2 December 1079; murdered at Bures-sur-Dives by Hugh Bunel, son of Robert de "Jalgeio" 2 Dec. 1079.6,1,3
Mabile de Bellême was buried on 5 December 1079 at Troarn.1


     GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-25.

; While Orderic treated her as "a poisoner and a monster of iniquity," and her wickedness has been accepted in history there is no proof she was so, for Orderic arrived at St. Evroul five years after her death.1 Mabile de Bellême was also known as Mabel Talvas d'Alencon.7

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bellême.pdf, p. 3.
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:ii.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:ii ..."murdered at Bures by Hugh de la Roche d'Ige (whom she had deprived of a castle), who burst into her chamber while she was lying in bed after a bath, and cut off her head with his sword.
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30591
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:i.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:iii.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:v.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:vi.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:vii.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 162-163, de MONTGOMERY 2:ix.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bellême: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177486&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  15. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfraamp.htm#RobertMontgommerydied1131. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger 'Poictevin' de Montgommery: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140018&tree=LEO

Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon1,2

M, #6538, b. 995, d. between 1060 and 1062
FatherGuillaume de Bellême seigneur of Bellême et d’Alençon3,2 b. c 963, d. c 1028
MotherMathilde/Maud de Ganelon dame de Condé-sur-Noireau3,2
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited9 Aug 2009
     Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon married Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine, daughter of Raoul/Ralph V (?) Vicomte de Beaumont-sur-Sarthe et du Maine and Emma de Montrevault Dame de Lude; his 2nd wife.2,4 Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon married (?) de Beaumont, daughter of Ralf de Beaumont vicomte de Beaumont de Le Mans.1 Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon was born in 995.5,2 He married Hildeburge (?), daughter of Arnoul (?), circa 1020; his 1st wife.2
Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon died between 1060 and 1062; Racines et Histoire says d. "après 1050 avant 1054."1,2
     GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-26.

; Boyer (2001, p. 22): "He was given the nickname Talvas, which was a kind of a chield, perhaps because he was accustomed to carrying one, or because his father, as lord of the southern marches, was metaphorically the shield of Normandy. He was never lord of Belleme, but White believed it was possible that his brother Yves allowed him to hold the Norman lands and castles and regain possession of family estates which were in alien hands, which he did with the aid of William Fitz Gere. Orderic described William Talvas as perfidious, cruel and wicked, saying that he caused two of his minions to strangle his first wife because she loved God and would have nothing to do with William's misdeeds. At some point he captured a great baron, Geoffrey de Mayenne, refusing to release his prisoner unless the castle of Montainu in Maine, which belonged to William Fitz Gere, was destroyed. The castle was demolished to obtain Geoffrey's release, and in gratitude Geoffrey built a replacement castle at St. Cenery on the river Sarthe. Following this show of faithfulness to Geoffrey on the part of William Fitz Gere, William Talvas invited Fitz Gere to attend his second wedding, and threw his guest into prison. Finally William Talvas was forced into exile by his son Arnulf, and took refuge with Roger de Montgomery, who accepted the offer of William's daughter Mabel as a bride, with all the lands William Talvas had lost.6,1

Family 1

(?) de Beaumont

Family 2

Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine b. 995, d. bt 1019 - 1089

Family 3

Hildeburge (?) b. c 1000
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 22, de BELLEME-4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bellême.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 21, de BELLEME-3.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont4.html
  5. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 185-1, p. 159. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:i.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:iii.

Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine1,2,3

F, #6539, b. 995, d. between 1019 and 1089
FatherRaoul/Ralph V (?) Vicomte de Beaumont-sur-Sarthe et du Maine2,3 b. c 1010, d. b 1062
MotherEmma de Montrevault Dame de Lude3 b. c 1010, d. 12 Sep 1058
Last Edited18 Jan 2014
     Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine married Guillaume (William) II Talvas seigneur de Bellême, comte d’Alençon, son of Guillaume de Bellême seigneur of Bellême et d’Alençon and Mathilde/Maud de Ganelon dame de Condé-sur-Noireau; his 2nd wife.3,2 Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine married Tesselin (?) Sire de Montevrault; her 1st husband.2 Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine was born in 995.4
Haberge (Godehilde) de Beaumont-au-Maine died between 1019 and 1089; WFT Est.4

Family 1

Tesselin (?) Sire de Montevrault

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 22, de BELLEME-4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont4.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bellême.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).

Roger I de Montgommery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois1,2

M, #6540, b. circa 985, d. circa 1040
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Roger I de Montgommery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois married Josceline (?), daughter of "the Forester" (?) and Sainsfrida (Senfrie) de Crépon.3,4,1,5 Roger I de Montgommery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois was born circa 985.2
Roger I de Montgommery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois died circa 1040.2
     ; NB: Genealogics, Boyer and Med Lands disagree on whether Roger II was the son of Roger I (brother of Hughues) or the son of Hugues:
1. Genealogics places Roger II as the son of Hugues and his wife Josceline de Bolbec.
2. Med Lands states that Roger II was the "son of ROGER [I] Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline."
3. Boyer states also that Roger II was the son of Roger I.
I have chosed to follow Genealogics. GA Vaut.6,7,8,9,2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROGER [I] de Montgommery, son of --- (-[before 1048]). Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois. He witnessed a charter of Robert I Duke of Normandy for the abbey of Saint Wandrille dated [1031/32]. In [1028/35] he restored to the Abbey of Jumièges the market at Vimoutiers which he had taken from the monks[440]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“ had been exiled to Paris “pro perfidia sua” when [his son] “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio” murdered “Osbernus...Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius”[441].
     "m JOSCELINE, daughter of --- & his wife Sainsfrida [Senfrie][442] . Josceline, her husband and her mother are named in a letter of Ives Bishop of Chartres to Henry I King of England dated 1114 which explains the consanguinity between the king and Hugues de Châteauneuf, who wanted to marry one of the king's illegitimate daughters[443].
     "Roger & his wife had [six] children."
Med Lands cites:
[440] Jumièges, Tome I, p. 43, cited in CP XI 682 footnote d.
[441] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, II, p. 268.
[442] Sister of Gunnora, mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy.
[443] Receuil des Histoires de France, Vol. XV, p. 167, cited in CP XI 683 footnote c.1


Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:637.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "Roger was a Norman baron in the 11th century. He is the progenitor of the family of Montgommery that played a prominent role in Normandy, England and Scotland.
     "Roger held land in central Normandy and was one of the young nobles attached to the count of Hiémois, later Duke Robert 'the Devil'. In 1027 when Robert became duke of Normandy he appointed Roger as Vicomte d'Hiémois.
     "Like his duke, Roger also enriched himself to the detriment of the Church. He attempted, for example, to take over the market of Vimoutiers, to which the abbey of Jumièges had rights, by forcibly replacing it with one in Montgommery (today's Saint-Germain-de-Montgommery and Sainte-Foy-de-Montgommery), that was located in his county. The duke responded to pressure from his uncle Robert of Normandy, comte d'Evreux, archbishop of Rouen; he had Roger's market destroyed and that of the abbey rebuilt, but he later allowed Roger to operate his desired market on his land.
     "Roger founded the abbey in Troarn, whose inhabitants, twelve canons whose discipline was lax, would be driven out in 1059 by his grandson Roger II de Montgommery, 1st earl of Shropshire/Shrewsbury, and replaced with monks.
     "After the death of Duke Robert in 1035, Roger seems to have fallen out of favour. The chronicler Guillaume de Jumièges relates that he was compelled to go into exile (the reasons are not recorded), and that he joined the court of Henri I, king of France. It is believed that he was opposed to the underage Duke William. Roger died in Paris, probably in the year 1040.
     "His five sons lived in Normandy. One of them, Guillaume, murdered Osbern de Crépon, steward of Normandy, seneschal to the young Duke William, in 1040. Another son Hugues would be the father of Roger II de Montgommery, 1st earl of Shropshire/Shrewsbury."2

; Per Burke's: "Roger de Montgomery, seigneur of the Norman places (St Germain-de-Montgomery and Ste-Foy-de-Montgomery) of that name in the Calvados region. He was a prominent member of the nobles grouped around WILLIAM (later WILLIAM I of England, THE CONQUEROR) OF NORMANDY well before the 1066 invasion of England but stayed behind in Normandy during the actual enterprise. The year after Hastings he went to England and received land grants in Sussex. He is thought to have constructed the Castle at Montgomery (now in Powys, but formerly named Montgomeryshire after his family), doing so shortly before the Domesday Survey."10 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-27. Roger I de Montgommery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois was also known as Roger I de Montgomery seigneur de Montgomery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois.3,4,1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RogerIMontgommery. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger I de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140011&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 162, de MONTGOMERY 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Crépon.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#JoscelineMRogerIMontgommery
  6. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 8 march 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger II de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140016&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RogerMontgommeryShrewsburydied1094
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 23, de BELLEME-4:ii.
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 162, de MONTGOMERY 1:i.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 162, de MONTGOMERY 1:iii.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 162, de MONTGOMERY 1:iv.
  14. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I24906
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#HuguesMontgommerydiedbefore1048
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Montgommery: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140012&tree=LEO