Beatrice de Comminges

F, #20071
Father(?) de Comminges
Last Edited2 Dec 2004
     Beatrice de Comminges married Roger d'Anduze.

Bertrand Raimbauld de Simiane

M, #20072
Last Edited2 Dec 2004
     Bertrand Raimbauld de Simiane married Mabel Adhemar de Grignan.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mabile Adhémar de Grignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00401515&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimbaude de Simiane: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00401513&tree=LEO

Mabel Adhemar de Grignan1

F, #20073
Last Edited2 Dec 2004
     Mabel Adhemar de Grignan married Bertrand Raimbauld de Simiane.1
     ; Leo van de Past cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 37.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mabile Adhémar de Grignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00401515&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimbaude de Simiane: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00401513&tree=LEO

Robert d'Albaron (?) Sire de l'Eers

M, #20074
Last Edited2 Dec 2004
     Robert d'Albaron (?) Sire de l'Eers married Guillaumette (?)

Guillaumette (?)

F, #20075
Last Edited2 Dec 2004
     Guillaumette (?) married Robert d'Albaron (?) Sire de l'Eers.

Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox1,2

M, #20076, d. 9 September 1513
FatherJohn Stuart 10th Earl of Lennox, Lord Darnley1,2,3 d. 11 Sep 1495
MotherMargaret Montgomerie1,2,3
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox married Margaret Lyle, daughter of Robert (?) Lord Lyle, before 13 June 1480; His 1st marriage.1,4,3 Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox married Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of Sir James Hamilton 6th of Cadzow, 1st Lord Hamilton and Mary Stewart, on 9 April 1494 at College of Bothwell; His 2nd marriage.5,6,2,3
Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox died on 9 September 1513 at Battle of Flodden Field, Northumberland, England.1,2,7,3
     He was 11th Earl of Lennox.1

; Matthew, 11th Earl of Lennox, who was k at the battle of Flodden, 9 Sept 1513. He m 1st, Margaret, dau of Robert, Ld Lyle (see BURKE's Dormant & Extinct Peerages); and 2nd (contract 9 April 1494), Elizabeth, dau of James, 1st Ld Hamilton (by Mary, sis of KING JAMES III) (see ABERCORN, D), and by her had three daus. and two sons (the yr s, Mungo, was one of the three officers of the King of France's Scots Guard, 1521-22).1

Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. ancestor P 2657
     2. The Royal House of Stuart, London, 1969, 1971, 1976 , Addington, A. C. vol III page 102
     3. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. page 849.
     4. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 7:596.3 Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox was also known as Matthew Stewart 11th Earl of Lennox.3 Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox was also known as Matthew Stewart 2nd Earl of Lennox.5

Family 1

Elizabeth Hamilton d. c Apr 1531
Children

Family 2

Margaret Lyle

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1731] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matthew Stewart, 11th Earl of Lennox: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006020&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Lyle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00311035&tree=LEO
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 557 (Chart 42). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Abercorn Family Page.
  7. [S1969] James Dow Allen, "Allen email 1 Oct 2005: "Diana's ancestors fallen at Flodden Field"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Allen email 1 Oct 2005."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Janet Stewart: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046370&tree=LEO

Eschivat de Chabanais Seigneur de Chabanais et de Confolens1

M, #20077
FatherJourdain VI de Chabanais2
Last Edited12 Apr 2020
     Eschivat de Chabanais Seigneur de Chabanais et de Confolens was buried at Grenord.1

He married Amelie de La Marche, daughter of Adalbert/Aldebert II (?) Comte de La Marche and Ponce/Poncie/Poncia (?);
Her 2nd husband.1,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ESCHIVAT de Chabanais (-bur Grenord). A manuscript genealogy names “Eschivat” as the son of “Jordanum”, son of “Jordanus Exbarrel, qui perrexit Jerosolymis”[33]. "Iordanus Cabanensis" donated "ecclesiam…Petusiam…in…S. Petri honore fundatam" to Bordeaux Saint-Pierre, with the consent of "meus filius Iordanus", by undated charter, subscribed by "…Aimerici de Roca Cauardi", followed by a charter dated 1089 under which "Iordanus cum filio meo eodem nomine dicto" noted that "Engolismorum consule avunculo meo Fulcone" agreed to reconstruct "Barbastam"[34]. Seigneur de Chabanais et de Confolens. "Jourdain de Chabanais et Amélie sa femme" donated "l’église de Saint-Pierre de Cellefrouin" to the abbey of Charroux by undated charter, dated to the early 12th century[35].
     "m [as her second husband,] AMELIE, [widow of ---,] daughter of [AUDEBERT [II] Comte de la Marche & his wife Ponce ---] (-after 1140). "Jourdain de Chabanais et Amélie sa femme" donated "l’église de Saint-Pierre de Cellefrouin" to the abbey of Charroux by undated charter, dated to the early 12th century[36]. A manuscript genealogy records that “Eschivat”, son of “Jordanum”, son of “Jordanus Exbarrel, qui perrexit Jerosolymis”, married “filia comitissæ Marchiæ”[37]. The probable chronology of the Chabanais family suggests that she was Ponce, wife of Audebert [II] Comte de la Marche. It is not clear from the document whether Eschivat’s wife was the daughter of “comitissæ Marchiæ” by her marriage to the comte de la Marche or by another otherwise unrecorded earlier or later marriage. However, the name Amélie strongly suggests that she was descended from the wife of Bernard Comte de la Marche who bore the same name. A charter dated to after 1140 records an agreement between "Amelia de Cabaniaco et Matildis filia mea" and Saint-Pierre d’Angoulême regarding "manso de Sorouma", for the souls of "virorum nostrorum…Jordani de Cabaniaco et Ademari de Rupe et Maentiæ"[38]."
Med Lands cites:
[33] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta Ecclesiæ Lemovicensis, XXXIX, col. 194.
[34] Besly (1647), p. 407.
[35] Charroux, p. 117 footnote 1.
[36] Charroux, p. 117 footnote 1.
[37] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta Ecclesiæ Lemovicensis, XXXIX, col. 194.
[38] Angoulême 76, p. 94.1

Family

Amelie de La Marche d. a 1140
Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#EschivatChabanaisMAmelie. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#JourdainVChabanaisdied1099B
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#AmelieMEschivatChabanais

Margaret Lyle1,2

F, #20078
FatherRobert (?) Lord Lyle3
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     Margaret Lyle married Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox, son of John Stuart 10th Earl of Lennox, Lord Darnley and Margaret Montgomerie, before 13 June 1480; His 1st marriage.1,2,4
     Reference: van de Pas cites:
     1. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques. 849
     2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. VII 596.2

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Lyle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00311035&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page - see BURKE's Dormant & Extinct Peerages.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matthew Stewart, 11th Earl of Lennox: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006020&tree=LEO

Sancha (?) Infta of Castile1,2,3

F, #20079, b. 1100, d. before 10 May 1125
FatherAlfonso VI "the Brave" (?) King of León & Castile1,2,4,3 b. c 1039, d. 30 Jun 1109
MotherZaida/Isabella (?) of Seville2,3
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Sancha (?) Infta of Castile was born in 1100.3 She married Rodrigo Gonzalez de Lara Cde de Liebana, son of Gonzalo Muñoz de Lara Count de Lara and Goda Nunez (?), before July 1122;
His 1st wife.
Issue three daus; Genealogy.EU (Iberia 7 page) says m. 1120.1,5,6,2,3,7
Sancha (?) Infta of Castile died before 10 May 1125.8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "RODRIGO González de Lara (-Jerusalem after 1143). "P[etrus] Gallecie comes…cum fratre meo obtimate R necnon sororibus meis…sanctimonialis Munina atque Visclavara" donated "monasterium Sancti Martini de Juvia" to Cluny by charter 14 Dec 1113 confirmed by "Froyla Vimaraci, Menendo Vimaraic, Menendo Solinizi, Comes Gugues, Comes Munio Pelagis, comes Rudericus Veilazi"[1323]. There are references to "Rodrigo González" as Alférez of Alfonso VI King of Castile between 29 Jan 1078 and 9 Jun 1081, but these must refer to a different person if the estimated birth date of Rodrigo's older brother Pedro is correct as shown above. Señor de Lara y Liébana. Conde in the valley of the Río Miera and in Asturias de Santillana 1104 to 11 Aug 1111[1324]. "Urracha…Ispanie regina, regis Aldefonsi regineque Constantie filia" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 26 Mar 1119, confirmed by "…Petrus Gonsalvi comes, Rodericus Gonsalvi…"[1325]. "Comite domno Roderico Gonzalvus cum uxore mea Sandecia prolis filia regis Adephonsus" donated the monastery of San Mames to Santa María de Piasca by charter dated "mense Iulii, Era 1100" (misdated)[1326]. Conde in the lands beyond the Río Miera, to Aguilar de Campoó by 1125. The dating clause of a charter dated 1125, under which "Maior Ruderici comitissa comitis Ruderici et comitisse Tharasie filia" donated half of the monastery of Santa María de Feleyta and other churches to Sahagún monastery, records “...Comite Domno Ruderico in Campos et in Asturiis Sancte Juliane, Gunzalvo Pelayz in Asturiis Oveti...”[1327]. The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris names "the Castilians Count Pedro de Lara and his brother Count Rodrigo González" as leaders of the opponents of Alfonso VII King of Castile on his accession in 1126[1328]. He rebelled against Alfonso VII King of Castile in 1131, physically attacking the king on the banks of the Pisuerga River[1329]. Restored to King Alfonso's good favour, he was appointed governor of Toledo in 1136. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted various properties to "comiti Roderico Gonzaluez et uxori tue comittisse Stephanie Armengol et…comiti Roderici Martinez et uxori tue comitisse Urraca" by charter dated Jul 1135[1330]. “Comes Rodericus Gonzalvez et...Sancia comitissa Roderici comitis Asturiensis filia” donated property “in villa... Ecclesia Ruina” to Segovia Cathedral by charter dated 3 Feb 1137[1331]. The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that, after disputes arose once more, Rodrigo González was forced to travel to Jerusalem. On his return to Spain in 1139, he stayed at the court of the taifa King of Valencia having been refused entry to Castile, but caught leprosy and left again for Jerusalem where he died[1332]. "Rodericus comes…cum consanguinibus meis: Semeno Enechez et mater eius dompna Maria, Don Garcia, D. Malrico, Gonsalbo de Marañon, Don Nuño, Don Rodrico, Don Alvaro, Don Pedro Garciaz, comitissa Doña Elbira, Domna Milia, Domna Santia Garciaz, Domna Mayor Garciaz, Domna Maria Garciaz" donated "villam…Gormeces" to San Pedro de Arlança, by charter dated 7 Feb 1140[1333].
     "m firstly (1120 or 1122) Infanta doña SANCHA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León & his fifth wife Isabel née Zaïda --- ([1120/16 Mar 1104]-after 10 May 1125). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Sancha the wife of count Rodrigo and Elvira who married Duke Roger of Sicily" as the daughters of King Alfonso and his fourth "legitimate wife…Elisabeth"[1334]. Both daughters are named in a charter dated 16 Mar 1104[1335]. In view of the dates of their marriages, it is unlikely that they were born much before this date. This suggests that their mother may have been King Alfonso's fifth wife, formerly known by her Muslim name Zaïda, although if their estimated birth dates are correct there would have been an interval of several years between their births and the birth of their older brother Sancho, which seems surprising. "Comite domno Roderico Gonzalvus cum uxore mea Sandecia prolis filia regis Adephonsus" donated the monastery of San Mames to Santa María de Piasca by charter dated "mense Iulii, Era 1100" (misdated)[1336].
     "m secondly (before Jul 1135) as her second husband, ESTEFANIA de Urgell, widow of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda, daughter of ARMENGOL [V] Comte de Urgell & his wife María Pérez Señora de Valladolid (-after 15 Feb 1143). "Regina Don Urraka tocius Ispaniæ Ildefonsi magni Inperatoris filia" granted the villa of Cevico de la Torre to "mea cogermana Domna Estefania comitis Ermegodis filia" by charter dated 30 Jun 1119[1337]. The family relationship between Estefania and Queen Urraca has not been established, unless it relates to the possible descent of Estefania´s first husband from the family of the kings of León. "Ferrando Garciez" granted arras to "uxori meæ Estefania Ermegoz comitis Ermegodis filiæ", including over property inherited from "altera muliere Tigridia", by charter dated 12 Nov 1119[1338]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted various properties to "comiti Roderico Gonzaluez et uxori tue comittisse Stephanie Armengol et…comiti Roderici Martinez et uxori tue comitisse Urraca" by charter dated Jul 1135[1339]. "Comes Rudericus Gundisalui" granted arras to "coniugi mee comitissa domna Steuania" by charter dated 6 Sep 1135[1340]. "Stephania…comitissa bonæ memoriæ Armengoldi comitis filiæ" founded the monastery of Santa María de Valbuena by charter dated 15 Feb 1143, witnessed by "domna Urraca Ferrandiz comitissa, Martinus Ferrandiz, domna Sancia Ferrandiz, Petrus Ferrandiz, Gutterius Ferrandiz, Rodericus Ferrandiz…"[1341]."
Med Lands cites:
[1323] Cluny Tome V, 3906, p. 255.
[1324] Reilly (1982) Chapter 10, p. 283.
[1325] Silos 30, p. 43.
[1326] Salazar y Castro (Lara), Pruebas, p. 653.
[1327] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice III, Escritura CLI, p. 516.
[1328] Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris I, 3, p. 164.
[1329] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 22 and 23, pp. 173-4.
[1330] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXX, p. 164.
[1331] Segovia Cathedral, 23, p. 68.
[1332] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 32, p. 178.
[1333] Salazar y Castro (Lara), Pruebas, p. 8.
[1334] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[1335] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 318.
[1336] Salazar y Castro (Lara), Pruebas, p. 653.
[1337] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXVI, p. 125.
[1338] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXVII, p. 141.
[1339] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXX, p. 164.
[1340] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXI, p. 170.
[1341] Salazar y Castro (Lara), Pruebas, p. 656.7

Citations

  1. [S1432] Simon R. Doubleday, The Lara Family: Crown and Nobility in Medieval Spain (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Doubleday [2001] The Lara Family.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  3. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VI 'the Brave': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020895&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1432] Simon R. Doubleday, Doubleday [2001] The Lara Family, p. 143, footnote 84.
  6. [S1434] Simon Barton, The Aristocracy in Twelfth-Century Leon and Castile (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1997), p. 305. Hereinafter cited as Barton [1997] Aristocracy in 12th Cent Leon & Castile.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SPANISH%20NOBILITY%20LATER%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RodrigoGonzalezdiedafter1143. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1434] Simon Barton, Barton [1997] Aristocracy in 12th Cent Leon & Castile, p. 292.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona6.html

Zaida/Isabella (?) of Seville1,2

F, #20080
FatherMuhammad al Mutamid (?) King of Seville3 b. 1050, d. 1128
Last Edited9 Dec 2020
     Zaida/Isabella (?) of Seville married Prince Fath Al Mamun (?) of Cordoba; her 1st husband.1,4 Zaida/Isabella (?) of Seville married Alfonso VI "the Brave" (?) King of León & Castile, son of Ferdinand I "The Great" (?) King of Castile and Leon and Sancha (?) Infanta de Leon;
Per van de Pas his 4th wife.5,4,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of FERNANDO I "el Magno" King of Castile and León & his wife Sancha de León (Compostela [1038/40]-Toledo 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names (in order) "Urraca, Sancho, Alfonso, García and Elvira" and the children of King Fernando and Queen Sancha[457]. According to the Chronicle of Sahagún, Alfonso was 72 years old when he died[458], but this must be overstated if he was his parents' fourth child as stated in Historia Silense[459]. It is more likely that he was born in [1038/40]. Ferdinand I King of Castile confirmed the union of the monastery of San Martín del Río with San Pedro de Cardeñas by charter dated 31 Aug 1050, subscribed by "Sanctius prolis regis, Adefonsus filius regis, Garsea filio regis, Urraca filia regis, Tegridia filia regis…"[460]. "Fredernandus…Legionensis rex…cum coniuge mea regina dna Sancia et filiis meis" confirmed the privileges of Santiago de Compostela by charter dated 10 Mar 1065, subscribed by "Sancius filius regis, Adefonsus filius regis, Garsea filius regis, Urraca filia regis, Geloira filia regis…"[461]. Under the partition of lands in his father’s will, he received León and the parias from the Taifa state of Toledo, succeeding in 1065 as ALFONSO VI King of León. Relations between Alfonso and his two brothers were tense. Although Alfonso and Sancho cooperated to deprive their brother García of Galicia, Sancho turned against Alfonso soon afterwards and defeated him at Golpejera Jan 1072. He was exiled to Toledo, seeking refuge with the Dhul-Nunid King[462]. He returned to León after the murder of his brother, arriving [10] Nov 1072, and was accepted before 8 Dec 1072 as ALFONSO VI King of Castile. Pursuing his father's close connections with the monastery of Cluny, he granted the order its first monastic house in Castile at San Isidro de Dueñas 29 May 1073, as well as doubling the annual census payment to Cluny in 1077[463]. The Roman liturgy was adopted in Castile and León in 1076. After the death in Jun 1076 of Sancho IV “él de Peñalén” King of Navarre, King Alfonso succeeded as King of Navarre: a charter dated 1076 records that Alfonso VI King of Castile ("Adefonsus filius Fredinandi regis") succeeded to the kingdom after "impiisima fraude interfecto rege Sancio, Garsie...regis filius"[464]. Pope Gregory VII asserted papal suzerainty over Spain 28 Jun 1077, although King Alfonso's response appears to have been to declare himself "imperator totius hispaniae", the first known use of this title being 17 Oct 1077[465]. King Alfonso VI took advantage of the assassination of Sancho IV King of Navarre in 1076 to invade Navarre, annexing La Rioja, Álava, Vizcaya and Guipúzcoa to Castile. Turning his attention to the reconquest of Moorish territories, Alfonso recaptured Toledo 25 May 1085, besieged Zaragoza in 1086, and also imposed his Government on the kingdom of Valencia, where he installed as ruler the deposed al-Qadir ex-taifa King of Toledo. His ambitions were, however, thwarted by al-Mu'tamid King of Seville who, with the help of Yusuf bin Tashfin Emir of the Almoravids, defeated King Alfonso at Sagrajas near Badajoz 23 Oct 1086. The Almoravids rapidly consolidated their position, absorbing the taifa kingdoms of Granada and Seville and subduing Jaén, Almería, Denia and Murcia. Undeterred, Alfonso recaptured Córdoba in 1091, and persuade Al-Mutawakkil of Badajoz to cede him Lisbon, Santarem and Sintra between 30 Apr and 8 May 1093, although Badajoz itself was captured by the Almoravids in early 1094. Meanwhile Rodrigo Díaz "el Cid" recaptured Valencia, establishing himself there as an autonomous prince. Previously his bitter enemy, Alfonso eventually united with him to fight the Moors. He also spread the call overseas, especially in France, for a general crusade to fight 'the infidel'. "Adefonsus rex Legionis et totius Hispanie imperator atque Fredenandi filius regis" granted privileges to Santiago de Compostela, with the advice of "generis mei comitis domini Raimundi", by charter dated 28 Jan 1090[466]. The end of his reign was marred by a crushing defeat at Uclés 29 May 1108, where his son was killed. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium records that King Alfonso lived for 79 years and reigned for 43 years and six months, died in Toledo 1 Jul "in the era 1147 (1109)" and was buried "in the church of saints Facundus and Primitivus"[467]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death “III Kal Jul” in 1147 (1109) of “Rex D. Alfonsus Regis D. Fernandi filius”[468].
     "Betrothed (by proxy Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity before [1069]) to AGATHE de Normandie, daughter of WILLIAM I King of England Duc de Normandie & his wife Mathilde de Flandres ([1064]-before 1074, bur Bayeux Cathedral). According to William of Malmesbury, an unnamed daughter of King William was "affianced by messengers" to King Alfonso[469]. Orderic Vitalis names her Agatha, identifying her as the daughter who had been betrothed to Harold Godwinson (see above), and says that she was betrothed to "Amfursio regi Galliciæ"[470]. Matthew of Paris places her as the fifth daughter (unnamed) betrothed to "Aldefonso Galiciæ regi" but different from the daughter betrothed to Harold[471]. Orderic says that she died en route to Spain, her body being brought back to Bayeux for burial[472]. The betrothal to Alfonso must have been a short-lived arrangement as he married his first wife in 1069[473].
     "m firstly (betrothed 1069, [late 1073/early 1074], repudiated after 22 May 1077) [as her first husband,] AGNES d’Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his second wife Mathilde --- ([1059]-[6 Jun 1078 or after 1099], bur [Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo]). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that the only daughter of "Goffredus" and his second wife was the wife of "Hildefonsi regis, filii Freelandi et nepotis Garsii", in a later passage recording their marriage in 1069[474]. She was known as INÉS in Castile. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Ines" ("Agnetam") as the first of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[475]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Agnes" as first wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[476]. "Agnes regina" confirmed the donation to Cluny by "Adefonsus…princeps" dated 22 May 1077[477]. No later reference has been found in charters to Queen Inés. Reports of her subsequent history are mutually contradictory. Orderic Vitalis refers to the second marriage of "Agnetem filiam Guillelmi Pictavorum ducis relictam Hildefonsi senioris Galiciae regis" with Hélie Comte du Maine[478]. However, Sandoval records that "la Reyna Doña Ines" died 6 Jun 1078 according to "las memorias del tumbo negro de Santiago"[479]. The accuracy of this statement is uncertain as, in the same passage, Sandoval states that the same source records the death in the same year "II Kal Jun" of "Sancius Rex filius Alfonsi Regis". This latter entry presumably refers to the death of Sancho, son of King Alfonso VI, at the battle of Uclés in 1108, but it casts doubt on the accuracy of the year of the death of Queen Inés. Another date is introduced by the Annales Compostellani which record the death "VIII Id Jun" in 1098 of “Regina Agnes”[480]. This is the same day and month as stated in the tumbo negro, so it is possible that the year is wrongly given, although it is also possible that the Annales Compostelani are referring to the death of the wife of Pedro I King of Aragon (who must have died in 1097 or before). Reilly[481] says that Queen Constanza was buried next to Queen Inés, which implies that the latter predeceased her successor. The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified, although if it is correct it does seem surprising that the repudiated queen remained in Castile until she died and that she was buried in the royal monastery. If Orderic Vitalis is correct, Queen Inés must have been repudiated by her husband and later returned to France where she married secondly (after 1099) as his second wife, Hélie Comte du Maine. Another possibility is that Orderic´s passage misstates the name "Agnetem" for "Beatricem", and that the second wife of Comte Hélie was King Alfonso VI´s widow Beatrix whose family origin is not otherwise recorded and who would therefore have been a younger daughter of Duke Guillaume VIII (see below). According to Kerrebrouck[482], Agnès d'Aquitaine never existed. He says that the first wife of King Alfonso VI was Inés de Guzmán, although he does not name her parents or precise origin.
     "m secondly (Dec 1079) as her second husband, CONSTANCE de Bourgogne, widow of HUGUES [II] Comte de Chalon, daughter of ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his first wife Hélie de Semur ([after 1045]-[25 Jul/25 Oct] 1093, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Trenorciensi records that "Constantiæ…filia Roberti Ducis" married firstly "Hugonis Cabilonensis Comitis" and secondly "Hispaniæ Rex Adefonsus "[483]. Considering the estimated date of her first marriage, it is unlikely that Constance was born before [1045]. A charter dated 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" recalls a donation to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum"[484]. "Infanta donna Urraka Regis domni Adefonsi filia" names her mother "Constantie regina" in her donation to Cluny dated 22 Feb 1117 "Spanish Era"[485], although the date was presumably AD as 1117 Spanish Era was equivalent to 1079 AD. An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "filiam Roberti ducis Bugundionem…Constantiam" married Alfonso VI King of Castile and was mother of a daughter who married "Raymundo comiti"[486]. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Queen Constance" as the second of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[487]. Her second marriage date is estimated based on the likely estimated death date of her first husband in [Nov/early Dec] 1079 and her subscribing a document dated 25 Dec 1079 at Dueñas with her second husband[488]. Queen Constance was instrumental in having the Roman rite replace the Visigothic rite in the churches of Castile. "Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[489]. The date of her death is fixed by her last known mention in a charter dated 25 Jul 1093 and a donation by King Alfonso to the monastery of Sahagún dated 25 Oct 1093, which does not include Queen Constanza's name in the subscription list[490]. The 13th century history of Sahagún monastery records that "la Reyna Doña Constanza" was buried in the monastery[491]. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[492].
     "m thirdly ([Dec] 1094) BERTA, daughter of --- (-early Jan 1100, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Berta, who was of Tuscan descent" as the third of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[493]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berta ex Tusca oriunda" as third wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[494]. Las crónicas anónimas de Sahagún refer to her as "otra mugger de la nacion de Lombardia llamada Berta". The precise origin of Berta is not known. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[495], she was Berta de Bourgogne [Comté], daughter of Guillaume I Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Comte de Vienne et de Macon, which is inconsistent with the "Tuscan descent" reported in the Chronicon Regum Legionensium. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that she was the daughter of Guillaume Comte de Bourgogne[496]. Reilly does not mention this possible Burgundian origin of Berthe, implying that the Castilian king chose his third wife from outside the Burgundian circle in order to diminish the influence of the Burgundians at court. As Berthe de Bourgogne would have been the sister of Raymond de Bourgogne who married Infanta Urraca, oldest legitimate daughter of King Alfonso, around the same time that King Alfonso married Queen Berta, it is surprising that the chronicles do not refer to this relationship if it is correct. The references to "Tuscia" and "Lombardia" in the chronicles could be consistent with the family of Bourgogne [Comté] having originated in northern Italy, their ancestors being Marchesi of Ivrea until 968, although this was nearly 130 years before the date of Queen Berta's marriage. Reilly dates this marriage to "during the Christmas season of 1094", but does not state his source[497]. In a later passage, Reilly states that the first reference to Berta as queen is dated 28 Apr 1095[498]. "Adefonsus…Ispanie imperator" permitted the abbey of Silos to establish outposts near the abbey, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 20 Jan [1096/98], confirmed by "Garcia Ordoniz et comes…Gomiz Gonçalviz armiger regis, Fernando Munoz maiordomus regis, Didago Albariz, Fernando Ansuriz, Gutier Munoz, Ruderico Gonçalviz, Monio Roderiquiz, Didago Bermudez, Petro Gonçalviz…"[499]. "Adefonsus…totius Hispanie imperator" granted rights to the abbey of Silos, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 19 May 1097[500]. "Adefonsus…tocius Ispanie imperator" donated property to the abbey of Silos, with the consent of "uxoris mee Berte regine", by charter dated 30 Sep 1098, confirmed by the same persons as in the earlier charter dated 20 Jan [1096/98][501]. "…Berta…regina…" subscribed the charter dated 14 Mar 1099 under which Alfonso VI King of Castile donated the monastery of Santa María de Algadefe to the monastery of Eslonza[502]. According to Reilly, Queen Berta died shortly after the new year 1100, probably before 16 Jan[503]. In another passage, he notes that the last notice of her is dated 17 Nov 1099[504]. She was dead in 25 Jan 1100, the date of the charter under which "Adefonsus…Toletani imperii rex" donated the churches of "Sancti Facundi et Sancti Primitivi…cum sua villa…Villaverde", ceded by "comitis Monini Fernandis…in vita sua dederam uxori mee Berte regine", to Cluny, confirmed by "Raimundus totius Gallecie comes et gener regis, Urraca soror regis, Urraca regis filia et Raimundi comitis uxor, Enricus Portugalensis comes, uxor ipsius Tarasia filia regis…"[505]. The 13th century history of Sahagún monastery records that "la Reyna Doña Berta" died "apenas cumplidos seis años en el matrimonio" and was buried in the monastery[506]. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[507].
     "[m fourthly ([Burgos] 1100 before 14 May) ISABEL [Elisabeth], daughter of --- (-before Mar 1106, bur Royal Pantheon of San Isidor de León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Elizabeth" as the fourth of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso, stating that she was the mother of "Sancha the wife of count Rodrigo and Elvira who married Duke Roger of Sicily"[508]. According to Reilly, her first documentary mention is dated 14 May 1100, but he does not cite the reference[509]. "Adefonsus…totius Hispanie imperator" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña with the consent of "uxoris mee Helisabeth regine" by charter dated 12 Dec 1075[510], although this date is clearly incorrect. "Aldefonsus rex Yspaniarum…cum…coniuge mee Helisabeth regine" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1086[511], also clearly misdated. "Adefonsus Rex Imperator Ispanie et Regina Elisabeth" protected the grazing rights of Valladolid Santa María by charter dated 1100[512]. "Adefonsus totius Ispanie imperator" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña with the consent of "uxoris mee Helisabet regine" by charter dated 23 Mar 1103[513]. Her origin is not known. Reilly assumes a French origin, speculating that she belonged to a younger branch of the house of Burgundy, but quotes no documentary evidence for this or any other French origin[514]. It used to be widely accepted that she was the daughter of Louis VI King of France, based on a funerary inscription, but this is chronologically impossible. Her existence is questionable and it is possible that she was in fact the same person as Isabel née Zaïda, shown below as King Alfonso's fifth wife. The question of the separate existence of King Alfonso VI's fourth wife would be resolved if we knew there had been two different memorials to "Queen Elisabeth" in the Royal Pantheon, but it appears that a record of these memorials no longer exists. According to Reilly, she is last named in a charter dated 14 May 1107[515], but it is more likely that this document refers to Queen Isabel/Elisabeth née Zaïda (see below).]
     "m fifthly (Mar 1106) as her second husband, ZAÏDA, widow of ABU NASIR al Fatah al Ma'Mun Emir of Córdoba, daughter of --- (-13 Sep 1107, bur Royal Pantheon of San Isidor at León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Zaida, the daughter of King Abenabeth of Seville, who was baptised…Elisabeth" as the second of two concubines of King Alfonso, and their son "Sancho who died at the battle of Ucles"[516]. The Chronicon de Cardeña records that King Alfonso married “Mora, que decien la Cayda, sobrina de Abenafanle” who was mother of his son Sancho[517]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the Bayan al Mugrib of Ibn Idari which names "le fils d´Alphonse, Sancho, qu´il avait eu de l´épouse d´Al Mamun ibn Abbad" when recording the battle of Uclés[518]. Salazar y Acha attempts to explain these three apparently contradictory sources by suggesting that Zaida could have been the daughter of "un hermano mayor…Ismail ibn Abbad" of Mohammed al-Mutamid, noting particularly the practice of endogamous marriages in the Muslim dynasties[519]. As noted above, Ismail is recorded as the brother of al-Mutatid and so would have been the paternal uncle of al-Mutamid. From a chronological point of view therefore Salazar y Acha´s suggestion appears untenible, although Zaida could have been another relative, maybe the daughter of an otherwise unrecorded brother of al-Mutamid. Alberto Montaner Frutos also discusses Zaïda, in particular relating to legends which have developed in connection with her history[520]. Reilly[521] dates the start of her relationship with King Alfonso to late 1091 or 1092, suggesting its diplomatic importance would have been greatest after the fall of Córdoba in Mar 1091 but before the fall of Badajoz in early 1094. This seems supported by the likelihood that their son Sancho was at least 15 years old when he was killed at the battle of Uclés in May 1108. Zaïda was christened ISABEL[522], date not known. Reilly cites a document of Galician origin dated 27 Mar 1106 which indicates that King Alfonso had married "Helisabet" shortly before[523]. Reilly[524] quotes a charter granted at Oviedo 19 Mar 1106 which lists members of the royal family, naming "Elisabeth" directly before "Sancho", which presumably refer to Zaïda and her son. "…Helisabet Regina, Reimundus comes, Urraca regis filia, Sancius filius regis…" subscribed the charter dated 14 May 1107 under which "Adefonsus…Toletani imperii rex…cum…uxore mea Helisabet regina" approved the mint of Santiago de Compostela[525]. Reilly assumes that the reference is to King Alfonso´s presumed fourth wife Isabel (Elizabeth)[526], but it appears more likely that the document refers to Zaïda. Reilly says that her sepulchral inscription (presumably now lost) reportedly stated that she had died in childbirth on 13 Sep, without giving the year, and in a later passage that the inscription stated that this was the "second ferial day", which he interprets as meaning a Monday or Thursday[527]. If the charters dated 1106 and 1107 correctly refer to Zaida, the year must have been 1107 assuming that King Alfonso married his sixth wife in 1108. Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that Queen Isabel was buried "en la Capilla mayor" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[528].
     "m sixthly ([Apr] 1108) [as her first husband,] BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-after 1109). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Beatrice" as the fifth of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[529]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Beatrix ex partibus Gallicanis" as fifth wife of "rex Aldefonsus"[530]. According to the Chronicon Regum Legionensium, she "returned to her own country" after the king died[531]. No primary source has been identified which indicates her family origin. Orderic Vitalis refers to the second marriage of "Agnetem filiam Guillelmi Pictavorum ducis relictam Hildefonsi senioris Galiciae regis" with Hélie Comte du Maine[532]. As noted above, it appears unlikely that this passage could refer to King Alfonso´s first wife named Agnes, whose death before the king´s second marriage is indicated (although not conclusively) by primary sources. It is therefore possible that the entry relates to the king´s sixth wife, the name "Agnetem" being an error for "Beatricem". If this was correct, she would have been Beatrix, daughter of Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet], this parentage being the most probable from a chronological point of view if she was the daughter of one of the dukes of Aquitaine. In this case, she would have married secondly (after Jun 1109) as his second wife, Hélie Comte du Maine.
     "[533]Mistress (1): ([1080]) JIMENA Muñoz, daughter of [MUNIO Muñoz & his wife Velasquita ---] (-Espinareda del Bierzo 1128, after 25 May, maybe 23 Jul, bur San Andres de Espinareda). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Jimena Muñoz" as the first of two concubines of King Alfonso, and their daughters "Elvira the wife of count Raymond of Toulouse…and Teresa the wife of Count Henry"[534]. The Chronicon de Cardeña names “Ximena Nuñez” as mother of the king´s daughters “la Infant Doña Elvira è la Infant Doña Teresa”[535]. The precise parentage of Jimena Muñoz has been the subject of considerable debate over recent years. The common connection with Ulver, where she was recorded, appears conclusive in determining that she was closely related to Munio Muñoz who was also recorded in the same castle (see the document GALICIA NOBILITY). Her birth date, estimated from her having given birth to two children in the early 1080s, suggests that she was his daughter rather than his sister (assuming that Munio´s parents are correctly identified as Munio Rodríguez and Jimena Ordóñez). Kerrebrouck states that Jimena Múñoz was King Alfonso VI's second wife, married before the end of 1078 (marriage annulled), but this is chronologically difficult to maintain. King Alfonso's relationship with Jimena lasted long enough to produce two children. As noted above, the last documentary reference to Queen Inés was dated 22 May 1077 while King Alfonso's marriage to Queen Constance took place in late 1079. This leaves insufficient time for the king to have married and had two legitimate children by Jimena. The reference in Kerrebrouck to the annulment of King Alfonso's alleged marriage to Jimena is presumably based on Pope Gregory VII's letter of 27 Jun 1080 which, among other things, objected to King Alfonso's "marriage" on the grounds of consanguinity. The letter does not name the wife whose marriage was objected to, but Reilly appears correct in concluding that "it can be no other than Queen Constance herself", given the likely date of her marriage and the likely date of birth of her daughter Urraca[536]. Reilly suggests that King Alfonso VI's relationship with Jimena started in [1081/82][537]. "Monnio Moniz, uxor sua Velasquita, Xemena Moniz, Petro Velaz, Sol Sancxiz…" subscribed the charter dated 1 Oct 1085 under which "Gelvira Petriz…cum viro meo…Godino Citiz" donated property in Priaranza to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes[538]. The dating clause of a charter dated 7 Feb 1093, under which "Petro Quizaz" sold property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "Scemena Monniz in Ulver"[539]. "Garcia Monnuiz…cum uxor mea Fronille Annalaz cognomento Sol et Pelayo Monniuz et Auro Villito et Monniuz" donated property in Jagoaza to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, and "Xemeno Monniuz" sold "mea porcione quam habui inter fratres meos" of the sam[e property, by charter dated 26 Sep [1095][540]. It is possible that "Xemeno Monniuz" in this document is an error for "Xemena Monniuz". However, the dating clause which names "Comes Froyla Didaz imperante in ipsa terra de Iorres" suggests that the property was in a different area from "Ulver" and therefore that the two families were unrelated.] The dating clause of a charter dated 17 Dec 1096, under which "Vellite Ferrudiz et uxor mea Falella" sold property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "…Xemena Munniz in Ulver"[541]. The dating clause of a charter dated 21 Mar 1097, under which "Maria" donated property in Rimor to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes, names "Donna Xemena Monniz imperante ipsa terra de Ulver"[542]. "Xemena Munniz" donated property in Salas de los Barrios to the monastery of San Pedro de Montes by charter dated 26 Apr 1101[543]. "Potestas in illa terra donna Xemena" and "Xemena Monnuz imperante terra de Ulver" is named in dating clauses of other charters which record donations to San Pedro de Montes, dated 1099, 29 Jun 1100, 26 Aug [1103], 19 Apr [1104], 19 Jan [1107][544]. The dating clause of charters dated between [1115] and 15 May 1118 name "Johanne Petriz potestate in Ulver", and from 6 Mar 1126 "Ramiro Froilaz"[545], suggesting that the Muñoz family moved from the castle in [1107/15]. "Ximena Munniz" donated property in "Trebalio et Turres" to "nepotis mei…Garcie Fernandiz" by charter dated 18 Apr 1127[546]. Jimena Muñoz donated property in "la villa de Torres, discurrente rivulo Orbico, territorio Astoricensis" to the Order of St John by charter dated 18 Sep 1127[547]. "Jimena Muñiz" donated property "en Villar de Salas en el Bierzo" to Astorga Cathedral by charter dated 25 May 1128[548]. Doña Jimena retired to the Benedictine convent of Esinareda del Bierzo. The necrology of León Cathedral records the death “X Kal Aug” of “Xemena Moniz”[549]. Sandoval records that "Ximena Nuñez" was buried in "San Andres de Espinareda"[550]. An inscription in the monastery of Espinareda records the death in 1128 of "Semena Alphonsi vidui regis amica", although Rodríguez González highlights the opinion that the monument is a later forgery[551]. Sandoval records that "Ximena Nuñez" was buried in "San Andres de Espinareda"[552]."
Med Lands cites:
[457] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 81.
[458] Chronicle of Sahagún, cited in Barton and Fletcher The World of El Cid.
[459] Historia Silense, Chapter 81, p. 45.
[460] Berganza (1721) Secunda parte, Appendice XCIV, p. 428.
[461] López Ferreiro (1899), Tomo II, Apéndice, XCVI, p. 242.
[462] Kennedy (1996), p.. 151.
[463] Reilly (1988), Chapter 5, p. 95.
[464] San Millán de la Cogolla II, 1, p. 7.
[465] Reilly (1988), Chapter 5, p. 104.
[466] López Ferreiro (1900), Tomo III, Apéndice, V, p. 31.
[467] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[468] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, p. 420.
[469] Malmesbury, III.276, p. 256.
[470] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 115, the editor in footnote 1 highlighting that elsewhere Orderic referred to King Alfonso as "Hildefonsus" and the possibility that the king of Galicia in question was in fact Alfonso's brother Garcia.
[471] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1086, p. 22.
[472] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 115.
[473] Reilly (1988) Chapter 3, p. 47.
[474] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 400 and 405.
[475] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[476] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[477] Cluny Tome IV, 3508, p. 625.
[478] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 307.
[479] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 212.
[480] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 321.
[481] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 241.
[482] Kerrebrouck, p. 557 footnote 30.
[483] Ex Chronico Trenorciensi, RHGF XI, p. 112.
[484] Chifflet, P. F. (1644) Histoire de l´abbaye royale et de la ville de Tournus (Dijon), Preuves, p. 331.
[485] Cluny Tome IV, 3533, p. 654, dated 1117 "Spanish Era".
[486] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596.
[487] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[488] Referred to by Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, footnote 58.
[489] San Salvador de Oña I, 99, p. 127.
[490] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 240.
[491] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice I, Historia del monasterio de Sahagun, Cap. VII, p. 300.
[492] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72.
[493] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[494] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[495] ES II 57.
[496] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Bourgogne, Lorraine et Espagne', pp. 233-4, n. 1, cited in Bouchard, p. 273.
[497] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 247.
[498] Chapter 12, p. 247 footnote 68.
[499] Silos 24, p. 30.
[500] Silos 25, p. 31.
[501] Silos 26, p. 33.
[502] Eslonza, Part I, VI, p. 10.
[503] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 296.
[504] Reilly (1988), Chapter 1, p. 32 footnote 68.
[505] Cluny, Tome V, 3735, p. 83.
[506] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice I, Historia del monasterio de Sahagun, Cap. VIII, p. 300.
[507] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72.
[508] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[509] Reilly (1982) Chapter 1, p. 33.
[510] San Salvador de Oña I, 71, p. 107.
[511] San Salvador de Oña I, 86, p. 121.
[512] Mañueco Villalobos, M. & Zurita Nieto, J. (1917) Documentos de la Iglesia Colegial de Santa María la Mayor de Valladolid (Valladolid) ("Valladolid Santa María"), Tome I, X, p. 62.
[513] San Salvador de Oña I, 116, p. 149.
[514] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 297.
[515] Reilly (1988), Chapter 15, p. 325.
[516] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[517] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[518] Salazar y Acha, J. de ´Política matrimonial de Alfonso VI de Castilla´, Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Héraldica y Genealogía, Vol. II (1992-93, Madrid), p. 319, quoting in translation an extract quoted in Levi Provençal, E. ´La mora Zaida, femme d´Alphonse VI de Castille, et leur fils l´infant don Sancho´, Hesperis 18 (1934), pp. 1-8 and 200-1.
[519] Salazar y Acha ´Política matrimonial de Alfonso VI de Castilla´, p. 320.
[520] Montaner Frutos, A. ‘La mora Zaida, entre historia y leyenda’, Taylor, B. & West, G. (eds.) (2005) Historicist Essays on Hispano-Medieval Narrative: In Memory of Roger M. Walker (Leeds), p. 272, available in Google Book “Limited Preview”.
[521] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 234.
[522] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 88.
[523] Reilly (1988), Chapter 16, p. 339.
[524] Reilly (1988), p. 339.
[525] López Ferreiro (1900), Tomo III, Apéndice, XXIII, p. 70.
[526] Reilly (1988), Chapter 15, p. 325.
[527] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 234, and Chapter 16, p. 339 footnote 46. .
[528] Sahagún (Pérez), Lib. II, cap. V.3, p. 73.
[529] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[530] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VI, 11, RHGF XII, p. 381.
[531] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[532] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 307.
[533] Jimena is discussed in José M. Canal Sánchez-Pagín 'Jimena Muñoz, amiga de Alfonso VI' Anuario de estudios medievales 21 (1991), pp. 11-40.
[534] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87.
[535] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[536] Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, p. 109.
[537] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 192.
[538] Quintana Prieto, A. (ed.) (1971) Tumbo Viejo de San Pedro de Montes (León) ("San Pedro de Montes"), 42, p. 127.
[539] San Pedro de Montes, 63, p. 149.
[540] San Pedro de Montes, 79, p. 166.
[541] San Pedro de Montes, 94, p. 181.
[542] San Pedro de Montes, 97, p. 184.
[543] San Pedro de Montes, 110, p. 198.
[544] San Pedro de Montes, 106, 107, 113, 117, and 121, pp. 194, 195, 202, 208, and 213.
[545] San Pedro de Montes, 127, 131, 132, and 135, p. 221, 225, 226, and 230.
[546] Rodríguez González, M. C. ´Concubina o esposa. Reflexiones sobre la unión de Jimena Muñiz con Alfonso VI´, Studia Historica, Historia Medieval No. 25 (2007), p. 164, citing Ayala Martínez, C. (1995) Libro de privilegios de la Orden de San Juan de Jerusalén en Castilla y León (siglos XII-XV) (Madrid), doc. 21.
[547] Rodríguez González ´Concubina…Jimena Muñiz´, p. 164, citing Ayala Martínez (1995), doc. 22.
[548] Cavero Domínguez, G. & Martín López, E. (eds.) (2000) Colección documental de la Catedral de Astorga (León) ("Astorga Cathedral"), Vol. II, 642, p. 61.
[549] Herrero Jiménez, M. (ed.) (1994) Colección documental del archivo de la catedral de León, Vol. X, Obituarios medievales (León) (“León Cathedral Necrology”).
[550] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 347.
[551] Rodríguez González ´Concubina…Jimena Muñiz´, p. 166, quoting text of inscription now in Museo de San Marcos de León.
[552] Sandoval, P. de (1792) Historia de los reyes de Castilla y de León, Vol. I, p. 347.7


; per Farmerie email: [quote] Zaida, baptized as Isabella, was the mother of Sancho, illegitimate son of King Alfonso, born during his marriage to Bertha, as you have indicated. Sancha and Elvira, however, are reported as legitimate daughters of Alfonso, born by his wife Queen Isabella (by the same source that names Zaida - it names his wives and thir children including Isabella having Elvira and Sancha, and it then names his mistresses and their children, including Zaida/Isabella having Sancho, without giving any indication that the two were the same woman). It is only if Queen Isabella was identical to Zaida/Isabella that these Infantas are full siblings of Sancho. [end quote]8 Zaida/Isabella (?) of Seville was also known as Maria Isabel Ximena Ziada (?)3

; widow of Pr.Al Mamun of Seville.1

; Per Farmerie email [2007]:
     "Thanks to Nat Taylor, I have recently read through a new article on the subject of Zaida, royal mistress and (as some would have it) queen of Alfonso VI of Leon and Castile.
     "To review, Alfonso had a complex marriage history. The early-12th century Bishop Pelayo of Oviedo wrote that Alfonso married Agnes of Aquitaine, Constance of Burgundy, Bertha of Tuscany, Isabel, and Beatrice, and further had children by mistresses Jimena and Zaida, a moorish princess who was baptized as Isabel. Several questions remain about these women, their parentage and identities. Agnes can be definitively placed as daughter of Guy-Geoffrey alias William VIII of Aquitaine by his second wife, and Constance has always been clearly identified as daughter of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy. Zaida is said by the Bishop to be daughter of the deposed ruler of Seville, but muslim sources make it clear that she was actually his daughter-in-law. At various times, various theories have been proposed regarding the others, while the fate of Agnes has also been subject to debate.
     "The problem with Agnes is that Orderic has her marrying Helias, Count of Maine, 30 years after she is last recorded as Alfonso's wife (22 May 1077). This would require a divorce followed by a long seclusion, or else an intermediate marriage that has escaped notice. As further evidence for divorce, authors have cited an undated papal latter thought to be from the late 1070s or earliest 1080s that condemns Alfonso for continuing in an incestuous so-called marriage. Presumably, it is argued, Alfonso divorced Agnes to satisfy the pope. The alternative explanation is that Orderic was mistaken, and that Helias married someone else. These authors would argue that the papal letter refers not to his old marriage, but to his new one to Constance, contracted prior to 8 May 1080. At least this latter part does seem to be the case, as the letter decries the behavior of a certain Clunaic monk who is known to have been instrumental in arranging the marriage to Constance, and Constance was a near relative of Agnes (and if it was the relationship of Constance to Agnes that was the problem, it would suggest that Alfonso's marriage to Agnes was never annulled). It hasn't helped that Agnes had a half-sister who was also an Iberian queen, and the death date of the latter has been erroneously given to the former by some authors.
     "Constance last appears 2 Sep. 1093, and is absent by 25 October of that year.
     "With regard to Bertha, Szabolcs de Vajay wrote an article dedicated to her identification, but I have been unable to get hold of a copy to see what he concludes. I have seen nothing else, other than some vague speculation. Bertha first appears 28 Apr. 1095 (as Alberta) and last on 17 Nov. 1099 (Berta), being dead by 15 Jan. 1100.
     "By 14 May 1100, Alfonso is married to Isabel/Elizabeth - the names were not distinct at the time), and he continues to appear with a queen of that name through 1107. She is called daughter of Luis, King of France, by Lucas de Tuy, writing a century after bishop Pelayo, but at the time she would have been born, no Louis had reigned in France since the last of the Carolingians, nor was the name Isabel used for a royal daughter until after she was married. While this identification also appears on a tomb memorial, it was clearly carved in a later hand, and both accounts giving her this parentage are generally dismissed. Reilly hypothesized that she was daughter of WIlliam, Count of Burgundy (but on nothing more than that it would be consistent with the pattern of political alliances Alfonso operated in). Most intriguing, because she was mother of a daughter with known descent, some modern authors have identified her with mistress Zaida, even though bishop Pelayo makes no indication that this is the case.
     "As to Beatrice, she likewise has been subject to unsupported speculation, most notably by Reilly, who suggested she was niece of Agnes. (One does wonder that if a pope went apoplectic over Alfonso marrying a distant cousin of Agnes in Constance, it would not raise a stink to marry her neice, but this does allow one to suggest that Orderic's only mistake was in the name of Alfonso's wife marrying Helias.)
     "Jimena has drawn much more attention, there being abounding theories regarding her. Traditionally she has been called daughter of count Nuno Rodriguez by a granddaughter of one of Vermudo II's bastards. However, she was actually Jimena Munoz, daughter of a Munio (on the other hand, Nuno Rodriguez was actually named Munio Rodriguez), and it is clear that her identification with this family is of late origin. Quintana Prieto suggested that she was daughter of an otherwise obscure Munio Munoz, yet this doesn't seem to match with her description as being of a most-noble family. Canal Sanchez-Pagin looked at the 'most noble' Munios in the prior generation and found three who could be so described. By process of elimination (one, Munio Munoz, names all of his children in a charter, while another seems not fo fit for chronological reasons), he concludes that she was daughter of count Munio Gonzalez, who he also makes grandfather of counts Pedro and Rodrigo Gonzalez de Lara (this last appears not to be the case - their father is clearly called Gonzalo Nunez, not Munoz). There are also two works that I have been unable to access, one by Mello Vaz de Sao Payo, which concludes that she was daughter of a Count Munio Munoz (although I do not know the basis, or precisely which man of this name is being suggested), and secondly, Salazar y Acha published a paper in the same publication as the Vajay article on Bertha, and I have yet to see it as well. However, recently a new article by Canal clarified Vajay's conclusion. While not specifically naming Jimena, he cites Salazar as indicating that count Rodrigo Munoz, thought by Canal to be brother of Jimena, was son of Munio Rodriguez and descendant of Vermudo II. Thus, it looks like Salazar has returned to the traditional descent, although his reasoning remains to be seen.
     "This brings us back to Zaida and the subject of the newly acquired Salazar y Acha work. In the same article that he discussed Jimena, he also concluded that Zaida and Queen Isabel were one and the same. His arguments had to do with chronology, family politics, and one particularly interesting document (although I have not seen the original, his new article reviews his arguments from the old). Sancho is absent from royal documents prior to the marriage to Isabel, and then immediately appears. This coincidence of timing suggests to Salazar that the two are related - that the marriage to Isabel legitimated Sancho, allowing him to become the heir. That he did become the heir is beyond dispute, and Salazar also questions whether an unlinked queen Isabel would have permitted her own potential children to be superseded (I have to wonder if Alfonso would have cared what his wife thought of the matter). Finally, there is a donation charter found in the Tumbo de Lorenzana, which is confirmed by Alfonso, "eiusdemque Helisabeth regina sub maritali copula legaliter aderente". This suggests that Isabel was once Alfonso's mistress, which points directly to Zaida/Isabel. However, this is somewhat odd, as by this time (1106) Alfonso and Isabel had been married for 6 years, leading Reilly to conclude that there were two queens Isabel in succession, and that only shortly before this 1106 confirmation did he marry Zaida.
     "In his new article, Salazar adds several novel points, and then drops a bombshell for the very end. To refute Reilly's 'two Isabels' theory, he cites a charter of Urraca, which names her step-mothers Berta, Isabel, and Beatrix, meaning that both she and Bishop Pelayo would have had to leave out one Isabel. He also points to the chronology between marriages, taking las and first appearance as an indication. We see three years between Agnes and Constance, and one and a half between Constance and Bertha, but less than six months between Bertha and Isabel. He concludes that this left insufficient time for the arranging of a political union, but is perfectly consistent with Alfonso simply marrying his mistress. Finally, he draws attention to a previously overlooked charter in which a grant is made by Alfonso, "cum uxore mea Elisabet et filio nostro Sancio". It is clear that he is not using the 'royal we', as he does not call Isabel "our wife" but "my wife". This would seem prima facie evidence that Sancho, known to be son of Zaida, was son of queen Isabel, meaning that she and Zaida were one and the same. (It would, however, be useful to see how he refers to Urraca, Elvira and Teresa under similar contexts).
     "If one accepts that Salazar had 1) refuted Reilly's suggestion, and 2) shown that Sancho was son of Queen Isabel, it would indicate that the Infantas Elvira, wife of Roger, King of Sicily, and Sancha, known daughters of Queen Isabel, are daughters of the moor Zaida. This is of particular interest with regard to Elvira, as she has numerous documented descendants (while lines from Sancha are found across the internet, none of them are factual). taf
Refs:
** Canal Sanchez-Pagin, Jose Maria. Jimena Munoz, Amiga de Alfonso VI.
** Anuario de Estudios Medievales. 21:11-40 (1991).
** Canal Sanchez-Pagin, Jose Maria. El conde Gómez González de
** Candespina: su historia y su familia.Anuario de estudios medievales. Nº 33:37-68 (2003)
** Mello Vaz de Sao Payo, Luiz. A Ascendencia de D. Afonso Henriques.
** Raizes & Memorias, vols. 2 through 8, various pages. (relevant part not seen)
** Quintana Prieto, Augusto. Jimena Muñiz, madre de Doña Teresa dePortugal. Revista Portuguesa de Historia. 12:223-80 (1969).
** Salazar y Acha, Jaime de. De nuevo sobre la mora Zaida. Hidalguía: la revista de genealogía, nobleza y armas. Nº. 321:225-242 (2007).
** Salazar y Acha, Jaime de. Contribución al estudio del reinado de Alfonso VI de Castilla: algunas aclaraciones sobre su política matrimonial. Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Heráldica y Genealogía. Nº. 2:299-336 (1992-3) (not seen)
** Vajay, Szabolcs de. Reflexiones en torno a Berta, tercera mujer de Alfonso VI. Anales de la Real Academia Matritense de Heráldica y Genealogía. Nº. 2:337-344 (1992-3) (not seen.)5"

She was living in 1107.4

Family 1

Prince Fath Al Mamun (?) of Cordoba

Family 2

Alfonso VI "the Brave" (?) King of León & Castile b. c 1039, d. 30 Jun 1109
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  2. [S2043] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie email 21 Feb 2006: "Re: Spanish Moor marriages to Catholics"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/x6oNoeSXL04/m/Rg_UjKlRVBIJ) to e-mail address, 21 Feb 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 21 Feb 2006."
  3. [S2042] W. David Samuelson, "Samuelson email 21 Feb 2006: "Spanish Moor marriages to Catholics"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Feb 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Samuelson email 21 Feb 2006."
  4. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  5. [S2183] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie email 22 Sept 2007: "Zaida (& Isabel, Jimena and the others)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/m6k-8wSZxSs/m/dxuh84rN86QJ) to e-mail address, 22 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 22 Sept 2007."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VI 'the Brave': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020895&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIdied1109B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1935] Todd A. Farmerie, "Farmerie email 22 Aug 2005: "Re: Sancha - daughter of Alfonso VI of Castilla"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Farmerie email 22 Aug 2005."

Almodis de Toulouse1,2,3

F, #20081, b. between 1045 and 1052, d. after 1123
FatherPons II Guillaume (?) comte de Toulouse, Albi & Dijon1,4,2,3 b. bt 995 - 997, d. c 1060
MotherAlmodis de La Marche1,2,3,5 b. c 1010, d. 10 Oct 1071
Last Edited8 Nov 2020
     Almodis de Toulouse was born between 1045 and 1052.2 She married Pierre de Melgueil Comte de Melgueil, son of Raymond I de Melgueil Comte de Melgueil and Beatrix (?) de Poitou/d'Aquitaine, in 1065.1,6,2,7,3
Almodis de Toulouse died after 1123; Genealogy.EU says d. aft 1123; Med Ladns says d. aft 1132.2,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "PIERRE de Melgueil (-after 27 Apr 1085). Comte de Melgueil. "Petrus comes…filius Raymundo comite, genetrice…mea Beatrice" donated property to the church of Maguelone by charter dated 23 Jul 1079, signed by "uxore sua Adalmudis"[480]. A charter dated to [1080] records an agreement between "Petrus comes" and "Guillelmo de Montepessulano et…Guillelmo-Aimono et…infantibus suis" to settle disputes and includes the betrothal of "filiam suam" and "Guillelmum suprascriptum"[481]. "Comes Petrus et uxor sua Almodis" restored rights over "Castellum novum et…taverna de Sustancione" to the church of Maguelone by charter dated to [1183][482]. "Petrus Substantionis comes filius Beatricis et uxor mea Almodis" donated property to the church of Maguelone by charter dated Jan 1083[483]. "Petrus…comes Melguoriensis…cum uxore mea Almodis et filiis meis" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated 26 Feb 1083[484]. "Petrus comes Melgoriensis" donated "comitatum Substantionem Quam episcopatum Magalonensem" to Pope Gregory VII, who regranted him the counties for life, by charter dated 27 Apr 1085, subscribed by "Adalmodis comitissa, Raymundus comes filius eius"[485].
     "m ([1065]) ALMODIS de Toulouse, daughter of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Almodis de la Marche (-after 1132). "Petrus comes…filius Raymundo comite, genetrice…mea Beatrice" donated property to the church of Maguelone by charter dated 23 Jul 1079, signed by "uxore sua Adalmudis"[486]. "Petrus Substantionis comes filius Beatricis et uxor mea Almodis" donated property to the church of Maguelone by charter dated Jan 1083[487]. "Petrus…comes Melguoriensis…cum uxore mea Almodis et filiis meis" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated 26 Feb 1083[488]. "Petrus comes Melgoriensis" donated "comitatum Substantionem Quam episcopatum Magalonensem" to Pope Gregory VII, who regranted him the counties for life, by charter dated 27 Apr 1085, subscribed by "Adalmodis comitissa, Raymundus comes filius eius"[489]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. The testament of “Bernardus comes Melgorii” dated 1132 was made in the presence of “…comitissa avia mea…”[490], although this could possibly refer to the testator´s maternal grandmother who has not otherwise been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[480] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 334, col. 644.
[481] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 346, col. 667.
[482] Montpellier Guillems, Fascicule I, LVII, p. 98.
[483] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.I, col. 677.
[484] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.II, col. 678.
[485] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 365, col. 695.
[486] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 334, col. 644.
[487] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.I, col. 677.
[488] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.II, col. 678.
[489] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 365, col. 695.
[490] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, LXXXVIII, p. 413.7


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Almodis, *1045-52, +after 1123; m.ca 1065 Cte Pierre de Melgueil, son of Raymond I, Count de Melgueil and Beatrix de Poitou."2

Almodis de Toulouse was also known as Almodis (?) de Toulouse.8

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 763.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALMODIS de Toulouse (-[after 1132]). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Petrus comes…filius Raymundo comite, genetrice…mea Beatrice" donated property to the church of Maguelonne by charter dated 23 Jul 1079, signed by "uxore sua Adalmudis"[430]. "Petrus Substantionis comes filius Beatricis et uxor mea Almodis" donated property to the church of Maguelonne by charter dated Jan 1083[431]. "Petrus…comes Melguoriensis…cum uxore mea Almodis et filiis meis" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated 26 Feb 1083[432]. "Petrus comes Melgoriensis" donated "comitatum Substantionem Quam episcopatum Magalonensem" to Pope Gregory VII, who regranted him the counties for life, by charter dated 27 Apr 1085, subscribed by "Adalmodis comitissa, Raymundus comes filius eius"[433]. The testament of “Bernardus comes Melgorii” dated 1132 was made in the presence of “…comitissa avia mea…”[434], although this could possibly refer to the testator´s maternal grandmother who has not otherwise been identified.
     "m ([1065]) PIERRE Comte de Melgueil, son of RAYMOND [I] Comte de Melgueil & his wife Beatrix [de Poitou] (-after 1085)."
Med Lands cites:
[430] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 334, col. 644.
[431] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.I, col. 677.
[432] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 353.II, col. 678.
[433] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 365, col. 695.
[434] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, LXXXVIII, p. 413.3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174769&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#AlmodisMPierreMelgueil. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pons II Guillaume: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106197&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de La Marche: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106196&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pierre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120691&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE%20NOBILITY.htm#PierreMelgueildied1085
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE%20NOBILITY.htm#BeatrixMelgueildied1190
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de Toulouse: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174769&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermessens de Melgueil: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120690&tree=LEO

Robert (?) Lord Lyle1

M, #20082
Last Edited25 Nov 2002

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page - see BURKE's Dormant & Extinct Peerages. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

John Stuart PC, 12th Earl of Lennox1,2

M, #20083
FatherMatthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox1,2,3 d. 9 Sep 1513
MotherElizabeth Hamilton1,2 d. c Apr 1531
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     John Stuart PC, 12th Earl of Lennox married Lady Elizabeth Stewart of Atholl, daughter of Sir John Stewart of Balveny, 1st Earl of Atholl and Lady Eleanor Sinclair, between 29 January 1511 and 1512; Her 1st marriage; Date of dispensation.1,2,4
     ; John, 12th Earl of Lennox, PC, Ld Warden of the Erst Marches, one of the Lords of the Regency 1524, was captured at the battle of Manuel, while trying to rescue the young King from the Douglas power, and was murdered in cold blood while a prisoner by Sir James Hamilton of Finnart, "the Bastard of Arran'', as he was a potential rival to the Hamiltons as eventual heir presumptive to the throne. He m (Papal dispensation, 29 Jan 1511/12) Elizabeth Stewart, dau of John, 1st Earl of Atholl (see above), and had issue.1 John Stuart PC, 12th Earl of Lennox was 12th Earl of Lennox.1

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1731] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matthew Stewart, 11th Earl of Lennox: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006020&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Elizabeth Stewart, of Atholl: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006018&tree=LEO
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Erroll Family Page.

Lady Elizabeth Stewart of Atholl1,2,3

F, #20084
FatherSir John Stewart of Balveny, 1st Earl of Atholl1,4,3 b. c 1440, d. 15 Sep 1512
MotherLady Eleanor Sinclair1,3 d. 21 Mar 1518
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     Lady Elizabeth Stewart of Atholl married John Stuart PC, 12th Earl of Lennox, son of Matthew Stuart 11th Earl of Lennox and Elizabeth Hamilton, between 29 January 1511 and 1512; Her 1st marriage; Date of dispensation.1,2,3 Lady Elizabeth Stewart of Atholl married Ninian Ross 3rd Lord Ross of Halkhead on 9 December 1529 at Scotland; His 3rd marriage; her 2nd marriage. Date is of contract or similar.3,5

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1731] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #3 17 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Elizabeth Stewart, of Atholl: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006018&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001647&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ninian Ross, 3rd Lord Ross of Halkhead: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046352&tree=LEO

Elizabeth Cavendish1,2,3

F, #20085, b. 1555, d. circa 21 January 1582
FatherSir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth1,6,4,7,2 b. c 1505, d. 25 Oct 1557
MotherElizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury1,4,3,5,2 b. c 1517, d. 13 Feb 1607/8
Last Edited11 Nov 2008
     Elizabeth Cavendish was born in 1555.2 She married Charles Stewart 1st (last) Earl of Lennox, son of Matthew Stuart 13th Earl of Lennox, Regent of Scotland and Margaret Douglas, in 1574.1,8,6,2
Elizabeth Cavendish died circa 21 January 1582 at Sheffield Castle.1,6,2
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VII 601
2. Portrait of a Cavalier, William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle London, 1979, Trease, Geoffrey
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: 217.2

Family

Charles Stewart 1st (last) Earl of Lennox b. c 1556, d. 1576
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052619&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Hardwick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007956&tree=LEO
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 14: Scotland: Stuart Kings until the accession to the English throne. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO
  8. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 7: England - Tudors and Stuarts.

Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury1,2,3

F, #20086, b. circa 1517, d. 13 February 1607/8
FatherJohn Hardwick Esq., of Hardwick, co. Derby1,4,5,6 b. c 1495, d. 24 Jan 1527
MotherElizabeth Leake5
Last Edited25 Aug 2017
     Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury was born circa 1517.5 She married Robert Barlow of Barlow, Derbys in 1532; her 1st husband.1,5,3,7 Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury married Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth, son of Thomas Cavendish of Cavendish Overhall and Alice Smith of Podbrook Hall, on 20 August 1547 at Bradgate, Leicestershire, England; his 3rd wife; her 2nd husband.1,2,8,5,9,3 Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury married Sir William St. Loe Knt., of Tomarton, Gloucestershire in 1559; her 3rd husband; William St. Lo, captain of the Guard to Queen Elizabeth [she was then Lady of the Bedchamber and confidante to Queen Elizabeth].1,5,7,3 Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury married George Talbot KG, KB, PC, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford, son of Francis Talbot KG, PC, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford and Mary Dacre, between 9 February 1567 and 1568; his 2nd wife, her 4th husband.1,5,7,3
Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury was buried after 13 February 1608 at Allhallows, Derby, Derbyshire, England.5,3


Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury died on 13 February 1607/8 at Hardwick Hall, Hardwick, Derbyshire, England.5,7,3
     ; Birth: ca 1521[17]
Death: 13 Feb 1607, Hardwick Hall, co. Derby[17]
Burial: Allhallows, co. Derby[17]
Occ: Countess of Shrewsbury

the famed "Bess of Hardwick"
fourth daughter and coheiress;

married 1stly Robert Barlow;
2ndly Sir William Cavendish,
3rdly William St. Lo, captain of the Guard to Queen
Elizabeth [she was then Lady of the Bedchamber and confidante to Queen Elizabeth]
4thly George Talbot, 9th Earl of Shrewsbury
[Countess of Shrewsbury by this marriage][17]

disinherited her eldest son Henry Cavendish by a resettlement of her
estate, largely on her younger sons:
' 25 Oct. 1594 [1613]
' Reciting settlement of manor of Blackwall and Merston, and premises
there and in Asheford, Topcliffe, Kingsternedale, Cowdall, Stenden
alias Staden, Fayrefeilde, Bradwall, Buxton, Chappell en le Frithe,
Shalcrosse, Haselbache, Monyashe, Hollington, Gryndlowe and
Yolgrave (Db.) to use of her for life as inheritance of late husband
Sir Wm. Cavendish, then to Hen. Cavendish; now revokes this re.
Topcliffe and others to and including Monyashe, which are to her for
life, then to Sir Chas. Cavendish, with entail; in default in turn to
Wm. and Hen. Cavendish with entails, then jointly to Arabella Steward
(d. of Earl of Lennox and wife Eliz. Cavendish, Mary (Cavendish), wife
of Gilbert, Earl of Shrewsbury, and Frances (Cavendish), wife of Hen.
Pierrepont; in default to right heirs of Sir Chas. Cavendish.' - PRO,
Nottinghamshire Archives: Portland of Welbeck (4th Deposit):
Estate Papers [DD/4P/46/2][18]

Spouse: William Cavendish [20087]
Birth: ca 1505
Death: 25 Oct 1557[17]
Father: Thomas Cavendish (-1524)
Mother: Alice Smith (-1515)
Marr: 20 Aug 1547[17]

Children: Henry (1550-1616)
William (ca1552-1625)
Elizabeth
Sir Charles (-1617)
Mary
Frances.5

; per van de Pas: [quote]Born in 1520, she soon became acquainted with sorrow and the harsh realities of life. Her father, though lord of the manor, was a hard-working yeoman farmer but died when she was only seven years old. Her mother had to struggle single-handed to manage the estate and bring up her five children.

However, the English were tough, vigorous and unsentimental. A foreigner described them: 'The want of affection in the English is strongly manifested towards their children.' They kept their children at home until, between seven and nine, they were put out to serve in other people's homes, both boys and girls.

Bess Hardwicke may have been fortunate as she was twelve when she left for the home of Lady Zouche. She had already been taught to read and write but her main education was in the practical arts of housewifery. By the time she left home she would have known how to bake and brew, to spin and weave, and many other household chores. While in the household of Lady Zouche, she found her first husband, Robert Barley. Robert Barley was seriously ill and, being acquainted with him, Lady Zouche accompanied with Bess went to visit him. Bess nursed him and ordered his diet, and they fell in love. When they married, Robert Barley settled a large inheritance in lands upon her and her heirs. However, the marriage did not last for long as the sickly Robert Barley died in February 1533, a few months after their marriage.

Young, attractive and well provided for, she probably had several suitors but waited another fourteen years before marrying again. Sir William Cavendish was fifteen years older and had already fathered eight children by previous marriages. They married on 20 August 1547 at Bradgate at two o'clock in the morning. Their marriage was happy and produced eight children, of which six survived childhood.

Being Protestant, they remained in the country during Queen Mary Tudor's reign. During this time she started to indulge her passion for building. In 1549 Sir William and Bess had acquired the house and estate of Chatsworth. Bess made the renovations her business, occupying her throughout her following two marriages. However, all her plans were interrupted in August 1557 when Sir William became ill while in London. Bess left immediately, her journey taking four days and three nights, to nurse him with as much devotion as she had Robert Barley. However, her nursing was to no avail; Sir William Cavendish died 25 October 1557.

Their marriage had been happy and she mourned him sincerely; but this time, having to care for six children, her mourning and widowhood was much shorter. In 1559 she married Sir William St. Loe, another widower much older and again with children of his own. He too was a wealthy landowner and this marriage brought Bess to the Court of the new Queen, Elizabeth I. St. Loe was the Queen's Captain of the Guard and Bess became one of the Ladies of the Privy Chamber.

However, even Protestant Courts were not always safe. Lady Catherine Grey---sister of the unfortunate Jane Grey and, according to the will of Henry VIII, heiress presumptive to the throne---confessed to Bess that she had secretly married the Earl of Hertford and was with child. She begged Lady St. Loe to break the news to the Queen, but Bess hastily dissociated herself from the unfortunate young woman. Lady Catherine and her husband were confined in the Tower. But so was Bess, Lady St. Loe, as she was imprisoned for seven months when Queen Elizabeth suspected that there was more to this hasty marriage. It was an unnerving experience and a warning never to meddle in affairs of state.

Three years later she became a widow for the third time and was left all St. Loe's property. However, the St. Loe family then accused her of poisoning and witchcraft. She was now forty-four, still handsome and very wealthy. Several suitors were mentioned but she waited until 1568 before marrying George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury.

George Talbot was yet another widower with children of his own and, before accepting him, she insisted that her children, Henry and Mary Cavendish, marry his eldest daughter and second son. However, the problems of her life were still ahead of her. Mary, Queen of Scots had arrived in England hoping to find support for her restoration but found herself imprisoned. Bess was ordered to make Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire ready for Mary, Queen of Scots to be given a suite of three rooms.

Mary, Queen of Scots had driven her first guardian, Francis Knollys, to desperation by her tantrums; now she soon made it clear that she hated Tutbury. However, Bess was at first befriended by Mary and, still with an unmarried daughter, was aware of Mary's cousin and brother-in-law, Charles Stuart, who also lived in England.

In the autumn of 1574, the Countess of Lennox (Charles's mother), the Dowager Duchess of Suffolk, and Bess, Countess of Shrewsbury, got together and shortly afterwards the Countess of Lennox and her son came to visit Rufford, one of the Shrewbury's estates. They had hardly arrived when the Countess of Lennox became ill. As a good hostess and a notable nurse, Bess spent her time with the patient and so it was left to her nineteen-year-old daughter, Elizabeth Cavendish, to entertain Charles Stuart.

The illness lasted only five days but was long enough for Elizabeth and Charles to fall in love. That autumn they were married very quietly, so quietly in fact that it took a month before Queen Elizabeth knew about it and, as was to be expected, she was furious. The newly-weds and their mothers were ordered to London. Lady Lennox knew she was in trouble and asked the Earl of Leicester to speak for her to the Queen. Despite bad weather and any excuse for delay, they arrived in London on 12 December 1574. The Earl of Shrewsbury, as custodian of Mary, Queen of Scots, was unable to leave and Bess made no appeals or apologies, probably hoping Queen Elizabeth would not press charges against the wife of Mary's custodian. On 27 December Queen Elizabeth sent both countesses to the Tower while investigations were made.

It was not so much the romance that concerned Queen Elizabeth but a possible plot in favour of Mary Stuart. After all, Lady Lennox was in line to the throne and also the mother of Henry Darnley, the murdered second husband of Mary Stuart. However, when the Government came to know as well of the enmity between Lady Lennox and Mary Stuart and no trace of conspiracy was found, Bess was released in time to attend the birth of a grandchild. While Lady Lennox was kept in the Tower a little longer.

The baby, Lady Arabella Stuart, was baptised with much pomp and ceremony. Bess had gambled with her daughter into the royal family and won. The Countess of Shrewsbury was now fifty-five and had a new purpose in life: preparing her grandchild to succeed Queen Elizabeth on the throne of England. However, Arabella's father, the young Charles Stuart, died before she was a year old and her mother, Elizabeth Cavendish, died when she was six years old. And when Lady Lennox died, only Bess was in charge of Arabella. The best education---including French, Italian and Latin---was for Arabella. As well, Queen Elizabeth allowed her 200 pounds sterling a year.

By 1584, after fifteen years of imprisonment, the friendship between Mary, Queen of Scots and Bess had turned into enmity and Bess accused the Scottish Queen of having an affaire with her husband. The Queen of Scots then tried to ruin Bess by telling the French Ambassador that Bess had been willing to assist in her escape. The unfortunate Earl of Shrewsbury was caught between them and could only hope that Mary would be removed from his care. The scandal that followed did rid him of Mary but he was left a broken man, mentally and physically, and permanently estranged from his wife.

In September 1584, Mary, Queen of Scots left and would meet her death three years later, but the quarrel between the Shrewburys dragged on for another five years. Even orders from Queen Elizabeth could not mend the rift between them. The Earl's mind and body started to fail and his last years were spent with a mistress who robbed him. When he died in November 1590, he prophesised that, through his wife's devices, Lady Arabella Stuart would bring much trouble to their families.

At seventy years of age Bess had become a widow for the fourth time. A month after Shrewbury's death she started to build Hardwick Hall (still standing today). It would take seven years to complete. Sadly, she quarrelled with the new Earl, her stepson and son-in-law, who earlier had tried so much to mend her marriage to his father. However, William Cavendish, always his mother's favourite, spent a lot of time at Hardwick.

At one stage Lady Arabella Stuart had been mentioned as a possible spouse for King James VI of Scotland as this would merge the two claims to the English crown, but nothing came of it. To prevent her from marrying a powerful foreign prince, James VI suggested as husband Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Lennox. Others proposed the Duke of Parma's son and even the Archduke Matthias as well as the Prince de Condé. As the latter were Catholic, these claims could not be taken seriously. Queen Elizabeth refused to announce whom she regarded as her heir which kept both King James VI and his first cousin, Lady Arabella Stuart in uncertainty. The Queen did not allow her to come to Court, even though by now she was over twenty-one. Sadly, Arabella had none of the Cavendish common-sense but took after the Stuarts. Late in 1602 it was Lady Arabella who became desperate; she was past normal marriageable age and would soon be beyond child-bearing age as well. Arabella had an intermediary approach the Earl of Hertford to discuss a marriage between her and the Earl's grandson, who was fourteen years younger than Arabella and whom she had never met. However, this would have to be done without the knowledge of Bess, her grandmother.

On 3 January 1603, an important visitor arrived at Hardwick Hall and demanded to see Lady Shrewsbury. Sir Henry Brouncker had brought a letter from the Queen which expressed displeasure with Arabella, at which Sir Henry was to make full investigations. As Arabella's intermediary, John Dodderidge, had already made a written confession, Arabella was obliged to confess. Sir Henry Brouncker then returned to Robert Cecil, the Queen's secretary, who, wanting to avoid scandal, admonished Arabella 'to content herself to live in good sort with so dear a parent and so worthy a matron as the Dowager Countess of Shrewsbury.' But from then on there was no peace at Hardwick Hall. After Sir Henry Brouncker's third visit to Hardwick Hall, Arabella was removed from Bess's care. On 24 March 1603, Queen Elizabeth I died and was succeeded by James VI. Bess survived the Queen until 13 February 1608 when she died, aged eighty-eight at Hardwick Hall.[end quote]7

; van de Pas cites: 1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: M 7282
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XI page 713.7

Family 2

Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth b. c 1505, d. 25 Oct 1557
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cavendish - Baron Ogle and Viscounts Mansfield, Earls of Newcstle-upon-Tyne, &c., Marquesses of Newcastle, Dukes of Newcastle, p. 109. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Hardwick, of Hardwick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105379&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Hardwick 16: pp. 378-379.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Hardwick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007956&tree=LEO
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Frances Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052294&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052619&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007953&tree=LEO

Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth1,2,3,4

M, #20087, b. circa 1505, d. 25 October 1557
FatherThomas Cavendish of Cavendish Overhall5,3,6,4 d. 1524
MotherAlice Smith of Podbrook Hall5,3,7,4 d. 12 Jul 1515
Last Edited25 Aug 2017
     Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth was born circa 1505.5 He married Margaret Bostock, daughter of Edward Bostock Esq., of Whatcross, Cheshire, in 1532; his 1st wife.8,3,4 Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth married Elizabeth Parker, daughter of Thomas Parker Esq., of Poslingford, Suffolk, on 3 November 1542; his 2nd wife.3,4 Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth married Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury, daughter of John Hardwick Esq., of Hardwick, co. Derby and Elizabeth Leake, on 20 August 1547 at Bradgate, Leicestershire, England; his 3rd wife; her 2nd husband.1,2,9,5,3,4
Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth died on 25 October 1557.5,3,4
Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth was buried after 25 October 1557 at Allhallows, Derby, Derbyshire, England.3


     Reference: van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: page 807
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XI page 713
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: ancestor M 7281.3

; per van de Pas: He had been one of the Royal Commissioners employed in the business of dissolving the monasteries and profited rather well for himself. He had been granted some church lands as reward for his services and bought others cheaply. In 1541 he was sent to Ireland to make a survey of monastic property there. Five years later he was knighted and made Treasurer of the King's Chamber.3

Family 1

Margaret Bostock d. 16 Jun 1540
Child

Family 2

Elizabeth Parker d. 1545

Family 3

Elizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury b. c 1517, d. 13 Feb 1607/8
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cavendish - Baron Ogle and Viscounts Mansfield, Earls of Newcstle-upon-Tyne, &c., Marquesses of Newcastle, Dukes of Newcastle, p. 109. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00107554&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice Smith, of Podbrook Hall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00107555&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Bostock: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008552&tree=LEO
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anne Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00241070&tree=LEO
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 69.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Frances Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052294&tree=LEO
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 14: Scotland: Stuart Kings until the accession to the English throne. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052619&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007953&tree=LEO

William Cavendish 1st Earl of Devonshire1

M, #20088, b. 27 December 1552, d. 3 March 1626
FatherSir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth1,2,3,4 b. c 1505, d. 25 Oct 1557
MotherElizabeth "Bess of Hardwick" Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury1,2,4,5 b. c 1517, d. 13 Feb 1607/8
Last Edited11 Nov 2008
     William Cavendish 1st Earl of Devonshire was born on 27 December 1552.6
William Cavendish 1st Earl of Devonshire died on 3 March 1626 at Hardwicke, Gloucestershire, England, at age 73.6
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: ancestor M 7297.
2. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: page 807.
3. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol IV page 339.6 He was 1st Earl of Devonshire.7

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Hardwick: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007956&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003508&tree=LEO
  7. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cavendish - Baron Ogle and Viscounts Mansfield, Earls of Newcstle-upon-Tyne, &c., Marquesses of Newcastle, Dukes of Newcastle, p. 109. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.

Robert Stuart Bishop of Caithness1

M, #20089, d. 29 August 1586
FatherJohn Stuart PC, 12th Earl of Lennox1
MotherLady Elizabeth Stewart of Atholl1,2
Last Edited27 Apr 2018
     Robert Stuart Bishop of Caithness married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of John Stewart PC, 4th Earl of Atholl and Elizabeth Gordon, on 6 December 1578.1
Robert Stuart Bishop of Caithness died on 29 August 1586.1
     ; Robert, Bp Caithness from 1543, was forfeited with his elder bro and exiled for 20 years, never obtaining priest's orders, was restored to the revenues of his bishopric 1563 and became a Protestant, was Earl of Lennox 1578-1579, but resigned that earldom and was cr. instead Earl of March 1579-80; m 6 Dec 1578, Elizabeth Stewart (who m 3rd, 6 July 1581, James Stuart, Earl of Arran, and d Sept 1595), widow of Hugh, 5th Ld Lovat and dau of John, 4th Earl of Atholl (see above), but she divorced him for impotency, 19 May 1581, and he returned to his mistress but dsp legit. 29 Aug 1586.1 He was Earl of Lennox between 1578 and 1579.1 He was Earl of March between 1579 and 1580.1

Family

Elizabeth Stewart d. Sep 1595

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stuart Earls of Moray Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Elizabeth Stewart, of Atholl: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00006018&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

(?) de Comminges

M, #20090
FatherBernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan b. c 1150, d. 22 Feb 1225
MotherComtors de la Barthe
Last Edited2 Dec 2004

Family

Child

Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan1,2,3

M, #20091, b. circa 1150, d. 22 February 1225
FatherDodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan1,4,2,3 d. c 1176
MotherLaurence (?) de Toulouse1,5,4,2,3
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan was born circa 1150.2 He married Stephanie dite Beatrix III (?) comtesse de Bigorre, vicomtesse de, daughter of Centulle III (?) Vcte de Marsan, Cte de Bigorre and Matelle de Baux, circa 1180; his 1st wife.1,4,2,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan and Stephanie dite Beatrix III (?) comtesse de Bigorre, vicomtesse de were divorced after 1192.1,2,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan married Comtors de la Barthe, daughter of Arnoud Guillaume de la Barthe, circa 1195; his 2nd wife.1,2,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan and Comtors de la Barthe were divorced in 1197.1,2,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan married Maria de Montpellier Dame de Montpellier, Dame de Muret, Queen of Aragón, daughter of Guillaume VIII de Montpellier Count of Montpellier and Eudoxia Comnena, on 7 December 1197;
His 3rd wife, her 2nd husband.1,6,7,2,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan and Maria de Montpellier Dame de Montpellier, Dame de Muret, Queen of Aragón were divorced in 1201.1,8,7,3 Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan married Comtors de la Barthe, daughter of Arnoud Guillaume de la Barthe, in April 1202; Remarried his 2nd wife.1
Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan died on 22 February 1225.1,2,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIE de Montpellier (-Rome 21 Apr 1213). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Maria Guilelmi Montepessulano filia" as wife of "rege Petro Arragonum"[881]. The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified. "Guillelmus…Montispessulani, filius quondam Mathildis ducisse" agreed the marriage of "filiam meam Mariam" and "Bernardo, comitis Convenarum" by charter dated Dec 1197, under which Marie also agreed to renounce her rights to Montpellier in favour of "Guillelmo Montispessulani patri meo, et tibi Guillelmo filio ejus et domine Agnetis, fratri meo"[882]. However, after a revolt of the citizens of Montpellier against young Guillaume [IX], Marie recovered her inheritance 15 Jun 1204[883]. Pope Innocent III addressed the bishops of Narbonne and Comminges by bull dated 29 Dec 1201 concerning the repudiation by "comes Convenarum" of his wife "Guillelmo domino Montispesulani…filiam"[884]. In his testament dated 4 Nov 1202, her father bequeathed money to "filiæ meæ Mariæ…et comes Convenarum maritus eius"[885]. The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon married "la filla del noble princep Don Guillem de Montpeller…Maria, nieta del Emperador de Costantin noble"[886]. The marriage contract between "Maria filia quondam domini Montispessulani" and "Petro Regi Aragoniæ, et comiti Barchinonis" is dated 1204, and names "comes Santius…Ildefunsus comes Provinciæ frater domini regis, Guillelmus de Balcio, Hugo de Balcio frater eius, Rocelinus vicecomes et dominus Massiliæ, Guido de Cabilione…"[887]. "Maria filia quondam domini Montispessulani…Regina Aragoniæ, comitissa Barchinonis" granted Montpellier to "Petro…Regi Aragoniæ, comiti Barchinonis marito meo" by charter dated Sep 1205, witnessed by "…Domina Clementia…"[888]. A charter dated Jan 1208 declared the validity of the marriage of “regis Aragonum” and “Mariam Montispessulani”, considering that “comite Convenarum” [Marie’s second husband] had “priorem uxorem...filia Centuli quondam comitis Bigorrensis”[889]. A charter dated 22 Nov 1211 includes testimonies relating to the lawsuit for the annulment of Marie’s third marriage[890]. A charter dated 8 Jan 1211 (O.S.) records witness statements relating to the consanguinity and affinity between Marie and her second and third husbands, relating to the action for nullity of her third marriage[891]. Under her first testament of 1209, Marie designated the Templars as guardians of her son, Infante don Jaime de Aragon, who succeeded his father in 1213 as don Jaime I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon. Under her last testament of 1213, she designated the Pope as his guardian: the testament of "Maria regina Aragonum et domina Montispessulani" is dated 20 Apr 1213, naming "Jacobum filium Regis Aragonum et meum…duæ filiæ meæ Mathildis…et Perona" and "dominæ Clementiæ amitæ meæ"[892]. The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death "xviii jorns dins abril" in 1213 at Rome of "madona Maria de Montpellier molher del rei dAragon"[893]. Montpellier eventually became part of the kingdom of Mallorca, and was transferred to France in 1349.
     "m firstly as his second wife, RAYMOND GEOFFROY "Barral" Vicomte de Marseille, son of HUGUES GEOFFROY Vicomte de Marseille & his wife Cécile d'Aurons (-13 Dec 1192).
     "m secondly (contract Dec 1197, divorced 1201) as his third wife, BERNARD [IV] Comte de Comminges, son of BERNARD [III] Comte de Comminges & his wife --- de Toulouse (-22 Feb 1225).
     "m thirdly (Montpellier 15 Jun 1204) PEDRO II "el Católico" King of Aragon, son of ALFONSO II "el Casto" King of Aragon & his wife Infanta doña Sancha de Castilla ([1174/76]-killed in battle Muret 14 Sep 1213, bur priory of San Juan de Sijena). "
Med Lands cites:
[881] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898.
[882] Liber Montpellier, CCIV, p. 349 [J.-C. Chuat] and Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 558.
[883] Baumel, J. (1980), p. 231 ff. [J.-C. Chuat]
[884] Montpellier Guillems, Fascicule I, XXXVII, p. 67.
[885] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 561.
[886] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 136.
[887] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 565.
[888] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 566.
[889] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo II, 745, p. 826.
[890] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo III, 1215, p. 1282.
[891] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo III, 1229, p. 1298.
[892] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 577.
[893] Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts.7


; Per Genealogics:
     “Bernard was the son of Dodo dit Bernardo III de Comminges, comte de Comminges, seigneur de Samatan, and an illegitimate daughter of Alfonse Jordain, comte de Toulouse, duc de Narbonne. He was count of Comminges from 1176 to his death. On the death of his father in May 1176, he shared his father's estate with his brother Roger, who received the viscounty of Couserans.
     “About 1180 Bernard married Stéphanie dite Béatrix, comtesse de Bigorre, vicomtesse de Marsan, widow of Pierre, vicomte de Dax, and only child of Centulle III, comte de Bigorre, vicomte de Marsan, and Matelle de Baux. Their daughter Pétronille would have progeny.
     “From 1180 to 1195 he held the city of St. Lizier and drove out three successive bishops, until the pope intervened and designated Navarre, bishop of Couserans, as his legate in charge of the fight against the Cathars.
     “In 1192, having raided Bigorre he separated from Stéphanie, and in 1195 he married Comters de La Barthe, daughter of Arnaud-Guilhem I de La Barthe and his wife Navarre. They had a son Bernard V who would have progeny.
     “In 1197 Bernard divorced Comters on grounds of consanguinity, and on 7 December that year he married Marie de Montpellier, dame de Montpellier, dame de Muret, daughter of Guillem VIII de Montpellier, seigneur de Montpellier, Castries and Castelnau, and Eudokia Komnena. They had two daughters, Mathilde and Pétronille, who did not have progeny.
     “In 1201 Bernard and Marie separated. According to some sources, Marie left him to marry Pedro II, king of Aragón. According to others the king asked him to give up Marie in exchange for the cession to Bernard of the Val d'Aran, either because Pedro II had fallen in love with Marie, or more prosaically because he wished to seize the lordship of Montpellier and strengthen his presence in the Languedoc. Bernard then resumed married life with Comters de La Barthe and by her fathered another son Arnaud-Roger who would become bishop of Comminges.
     “Bernard also fathered two other daughters, Delphine who would be abbess of Esclache, and Mascarosse. The identity of the mother is unclear.
     “From a cautious neutrality in the Albigensian Crusade during the sieges of Beziers and Carcassonne, Bernard allied with Raymond VII, comte de Toulouse when he was attacked by the crusade's leader Simon V de Montfort. He took part in the fighting at Castelnaudary and Muret. In 1212 Simon de Montfort occupied Comminges, but the Lateran Council returned his county to Bernard in 1216, provided that he give his daughter Pétronille in marriage to Guy de Montfort, the youngest son of Simon V de Montfort. During the revolt of Occitania against de Montfort, he took part with his troops in the defence of Toulouse, then that of Marmande. At the request of the pope he ceased fighting in September 1220.
     “Bernard died on 22 February 1225.”.2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 405.2

; This is the same person as ”Bernard IV de Comminges” at Wikipédia (FR).9

; Per Genealogy.EU (Foix 4): “A1. Cte Bernardo IV de Comminges et de Bigorre, +22.2.1225; 1m: ca 1180 (div after 1192) Stephanie, Cts de Bigorre, dau.of Centullo III, Cte de Bigorre by Matelle de Baux; 2m: ca 1195 (div 1197) Comtors, dau.of Arnaldo Guillen, Vcte de la Barthe; 3m: ca 1197 (div 1201) Marie, Dame de Montpellier (+Rome 21.4.1213) dau.of Guillaume VIII de Montpellier by Eudoxia Komnena; 4m: IV.1202 his 2d wife.”.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERNARD [IV] de Comminges, son of BERNARD [III] [Dodon] Comte de Comminges & his wife --- de Toulouse (-22 Feb 1225). A charter dated 1197 records the 4o consanguinity between "B. Convenarum comes filius sororis comitis Tolosani" and "uxorem, filiam Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta" which provided the grounds for their divorce: "domina Bruna et Rogerius de Convenis fuerant fratres", adding the descent "Rogerio de Convenis" to "B. comes...Bernardo" to "Dodo comes" to "iste B. comes"[72]. A charter dated Nov 1197 names "Bernardus comes Convenarum filius sororis comitis Tolosani[73], and a charter dated 1202 names "B. lo comte de Comenge lo cal fo filh de la filha N Anfos"[74]. He succeeded in May 1176 as Comte de Comminges, under the guardianship of Guillaume d'Aure, for a few months only, as in April 1177 a document names "Bernardo comite Convenarum" without naming a guardian[75]. "Bernardus comes de Cominge, filius sororis comitis Tolosæ" and "Jordano domino de Isla, et Jordanus de Isla cum eo" agreed peace by charter dated Jan 1191[76]. "Bernardus comes Convenarum et Bigore et vicecomes de Marchan" donated property to Gimont by charter dated Aug 1192, witnessed by "Arnaldus Willelmus de la Barta…"[77]. A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death "VII die al issit de Fevrier en Disapte" in 1225 of "lo coms de Cumenge"[78]. The Chronicle of Toulouse Saint-Saturnin records the death in 1223 of "dominus Bernardus comes Convenarum"[79].
     "m firstly (1180, divorced after 1192) [as her second husband,] BEATRIX [III] Comtesse de Bigorre, [widow of PIERRE [II] Vicomte de Dax,] daughter of CENTULE [III] Comte de Bigorre and his wife Matelle de Baux. Her supposed first marriage is deduced from Roger of Hoveden who names her supposed husband "Petrus vicecomes Akensis et comes Bigorniæ" when recording the capitulation of the town of Dax in 1177[80]. The only explanation for Pierre being accorded the title Comte de Bigorre is if he had married the heiress of Bigorre. However, the possibility that Roger of Hoveden was mistaken in recording this title cannot be excluded. Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by the following document: a charter dated Jan 1208 declared the validity of the marriage of “regis Aragonum” and “Mariam Montispessulani”, considering that “comite Convenarum” [Marie’s second husband] had “priorem uxorem...filia Centuli quondam comitis Bigorrensis”[81].
     "m secondly ([1195], divorced [1197]) COMTORS de la Barthe, daughter of ARNAUD GUILLAUME Vicomte de la Barthe and his wife Navarra de Pontis (-after 1234). A charter dated Nov 1197 records the 4o consanguinity between "B. Convenarum comes" and "uxorem, filiam Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta" which provided the grounds for their divorce: "domina Bruna et Rogerius de Convenis fuerant fratres", adding the descent from "Bruna" to "Ademarus de Pontiis" to "Navarra" to "Comtors filia Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta", and from "Rogerio de Convenis" to "B. comes...Bernardo" to "Dodo comes" to "iste B. comes"[82]. A charter dated 22 Nov 1211 includes testimonies relating to the lawsuit for the annulment of Marie’s third marriage, including in relation to the terms of the divorce between “Bernardum comitem Convenarum” and “dominam Condors sororem Sancii de Barta”[83].
     "m thirdly (contract Dec 1197, divorced 1201) as her second husband, MARIE de Montpellier, widow of RAYMOND GEOFFROY "Barral" Vicomte de Marseille, daughter of GUILLAUME [VIII] Seigneur de Montpellier & his wife Eudokia Comnene (-Rome 21 Apr 1213). "Guillelmus…Montispessulani, filius quondam Mathildis ducisse" agreed the marriage of "filiam meam Mariam" and "Bernardo, comitis Convenarum" by charter dated Dec 1197, under which Marie also agreed to renounce her rights to Montpellier in favour of "Guillelmo Montispessulani patri meo, et tibi Guillelmo filio ejus et domine Agnetis, fratri meo"[84]. However, after a revolt of the citizens of Montpellier against young Guillaume [IX], Marie recovered her inheritance 15 Jun 1204[85]. Pope Innocent III addressed the bishops of Narbonne and Comminges by bull dated 29 Dec 1201 concerning the repudiation by "comes Convenarum" of his wife "Guillelmo domino Montispesulani…filiam"[86]. She married thirdly (Montpellier 15 Jun 1204) Pedro II "el Católico" King of Aragon. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Maria Guilelmi Montepessulano filia" as wife of "rege Petro Arragonum"[87]."
Med Lands cites:
[72] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XXXI, p. 551.
[73] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XIII, p. 540.
[74] Higounet (1949), I, p. 71, n. 7, quoting La Grande Charte de Saint-Gaudens, p. 14, 1202. [J.-C. Chuat]
[75] Higounet (1949) I, p. 70, quoting Arch. dép. Gers, I 536. [J.-C. Chuat]
[76] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XIII, p. 540.
[77] Gimont, CXXXVIII, p. 452.
[78] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 679, and 3rd Edn., Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, 7, col. 35.
[79] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, Chronicon Sancti Saturnini Tolosæ, col. 52.
[80] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. II, p. 117.
[81] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo II, 745, p. 826.
[82] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XXXI, p. 551.
[83] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo III, 1215, p. 1282.
[84] Liber Montpellier, CCIV, p. 349 [J.-C. Chuat] and Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 558.
[85] Baumel (1980), p. 231 ff. [J.-C. Chuat]
[86] Montpellier Guillems, Fascicule I, XXXVII, p. 67.
[87] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122148&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulcofo.htm#BernardIVCommingesdied1225B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00316247&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Montpellier: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007101&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE%20NOBILITY.htm#MarieMontpellierdied1213
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Montpellier: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007101&tree=LEO
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bernard IV de Comminges: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_IV_de_Comminges. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126928&tree=LEO

Comtors de la Barthe1

F, #20092
FatherArnoud Guillaume de la Barthe1
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Comtors de la Barthe married Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan, son of Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan and Laurence (?) de Toulouse, circa 1195; his 2nd wife.1,2,3 Comtors de la Barthe and Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan were divorced in 1197.1,2,3 Comtors de la Barthe married Bernard IV (?) Comte de Comminges, Sire de Muret et de Samatan, son of Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan and Laurence (?) de Toulouse, in April 1202; Remarried his 2nd wife.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BERNARD [IV] de Comminges, son of BERNARD [III] [Dodon] Comte de Comminges & his wife --- de Toulouse (-22 Feb 1225). A charter dated 1197 records the 4o consanguinity between "B. Convenarum comes filius sororis comitis Tolosani" and "uxorem, filiam Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta" which provided the grounds for their divorce: "domina Bruna et Rogerius de Convenis fuerant fratres", adding the descent "Rogerio de Convenis" to "B. comes...Bernardo" to "Dodo comes" to "iste B. comes"[72]. A charter dated Nov 1197 names "Bernardus comes Convenarum filius sororis comitis Tolosani[73], and a charter dated 1202 names "B. lo comte de Comenge lo cal fo filh de la filha N Anfos"[74]. He succeeded in May 1176 as Comte de Comminges, under the guardianship of Guillaume d'Aure, for a few months only, as in April 1177 a document names "Bernardo comite Convenarum" without naming a guardian[75]. "Bernardus comes de Cominge, filius sororis comitis Tolosæ" and "Jordano domino de Isla, et Jordanus de Isla cum eo" agreed peace by charter dated Jan 1191[76]. "Bernardus comes Convenarum et Bigore et vicecomes de Marchan" donated property to Gimont by charter dated Aug 1192, witnessed by "Arnaldus Willelmus de la Barta…"[77]. A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death "VII die al issit de Fevrier en Disapte" in 1225 of "lo coms de Cumenge"[78]. The Chronicle of Toulouse Saint-Saturnin records the death in 1223 of "dominus Bernardus comes Convenarum"[79].
     "m firstly (1180, divorced after 1192) [as her second husband,] BEATRIX [III] Comtesse de Bigorre, [widow of PIERRE [II] Vicomte de Dax,] daughter of CENTULE [III] Comte de Bigorre and his wife Matelle de Baux. Her supposed first marriage is deduced from Roger of Hoveden who names her supposed husband "Petrus vicecomes Akensis et comes Bigorniæ" when recording the capitulation of the town of Dax in 1177[80]. The only explanation for Pierre being accorded the title Comte de Bigorre is if he had married the heiress of Bigorre. However, the possibility that Roger of Hoveden was mistaken in recording this title cannot be excluded. Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by the following document: a charter dated Jan 1208 declared the validity of the marriage of “regis Aragonum” and “Mariam Montispessulani”, considering that “comite Convenarum” [Marie’s second husband] had “priorem uxorem...filia Centuli quondam comitis Bigorrensis”[81].
     "m secondly ([1195], divorced [1197]) COMTORS de la Barthe, daughter of ARNAUD GUILLAUME Vicomte de la Barthe and his wife Navarra de Pontis (-after 1234). A charter dated Nov 1197 records the 4o consanguinity between "B. Convenarum comes" and "uxorem, filiam Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta" which provided the grounds for their divorce: "domina Bruna et Rogerius de Convenis fuerant fratres", adding the descent from "Bruna" to "Ademarus de Pontiis" to "Navarra" to "Comtors filia Arnaldi Willelmi de Barta", and from "Rogerio de Convenis" to "B. comes...Bernardo" to "Dodo comes" to "iste B. comes"[82]. A charter dated 22 Nov 1211 includes testimonies relating to the lawsuit for the annulment of Marie’s third marriage, including in relation to the terms of the divorce between “Bernardum comitem Convenarum” and “dominam Condors sororem Sancii de Barta”[83].
     "m thirdly (contract Dec 1197, divorced 1201) as her second husband, MARIE de Montpellier, widow of RAYMOND GEOFFROY "Barral" Vicomte de Marseille, daughter of GUILLAUME [VIII] Seigneur de Montpellier & his wife Eudokia Comnene (-Rome 21 Apr 1213). "Guillelmus…Montispessulani, filius quondam Mathildis ducisse" agreed the marriage of "filiam meam Mariam" and "Bernardo, comitis Convenarum" by charter dated Dec 1197, under which Marie also agreed to renounce her rights to Montpellier in favour of "Guillelmo Montispessulani patri meo, et tibi Guillelmo filio ejus et domine Agnetis, fratri meo"[84]. However, after a revolt of the citizens of Montpellier against young Guillaume [IX], Marie recovered her inheritance 15 Jun 1204[85]. Pope Innocent III addressed the bishops of Narbonne and Comminges by bull dated 29 Dec 1201 concerning the repudiation by "comes Convenarum" of his wife "Guillelmo domino Montispesulani…filiam"[86]. She married thirdly (Montpellier 15 Jun 1204) Pedro II "el Católico" King of Aragon. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Maria Guilelmi Montepessulano filia" as wife of "rege Petro Arragonum"[87]."
Med Lands cites:
[72] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XXXI, p. 551.
[73] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XIII, p. 540.
[74] Higounet (1949), I, p. 71, n. 7, quoting La Grande Charte de Saint-Gaudens, p. 14, 1202. [J.-C. Chuat]
[75] Higounet (1949) I, p. 70, quoting Arch. dép. Gers, I 536. [J.-C. Chuat]
[76] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XIII, p. 540.
[77] Gimont, CXXXVIII, p. 452.
[78] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 679, and 3rd Edn., Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, 7, col. 35.
[79] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, Chronicon Sancti Saturnini Tolosæ, col. 52.
[80] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. II, p. 117.
[81] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo II, 745, p. 826.
[82] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XXXI, p. 551.
[83] Alvira Cabrer (1210), Tomo III, 1215, p. 1282.
[84] Liber Montpellier, CCIV, p. 349 [J.-C. Chuat] and Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 558.
[85] Baumel (1980), p. 231 ff. [J.-C. Chuat]
[86] Montpellier Guillems, Fascicule I, XXXVII, p. 67.
[87] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898.3

; Per Genealogy.EU (Foix 4): “A1. Cte Bernardo IV de Comminges et de Bigorre, +22.2.1225; 1m: ca 1180 (div after 1192) Stephanie, Cts de Bigorre, dau.of Centullo III, Cte de Bigorre by Matelle de Baux; 2m: ca 1195 (div 1197) Comtors, dau.of Arnaldo Guillen, Vcte de la Barthe; 3m: ca 1197 (div 1201) Marie, Dame de Montpellier (+Rome 21.4.1213) dau.of Guillaume VIII de Montpellier by Eudoxia Komnena; 4m: IV.1202 his 2d wife.”.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122148&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulcofo.htm#BernardIVCommingesdied1225B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126928&tree=LEO

Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan1,2,3

M, #20093, d. circa 1176
FatherBernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges1,4,3 d. 1145
MotherDias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan1,3
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan married Laurence (?) de Toulouse, daughter of Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de and Faydiva/Faydide (?) d'Uzes, circa 1150; per Steward: "She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134."1,2,5,6
Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan died circa 1176.1,2,3
     ; per Stewart: [quote]I don't think enough is known about Alphonse Jourdain's family to say for certain which of his known offspring were illegitimate.

Pere Anselme named the wife of Bernard III of Comminges as Laurence, while making her a legitimate daughter of Alphonse Jourdain's son Raymond of Saint-Gilles. This misplacement within the family was most probably due to the wrong interpretation of a marginal note in a manuscript of the chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens, but where the alleged given name came from is unknown.

The marginal note was correctly aligned by the authors of _Histoire generale de Languedoc_, making her the daughter of Alphonse Jourdain and consequently making sense of other sources describing Bernard IV of Comminges as nephew (by a sister) of Raymond of Saint-Gilles, count of Toulouse, but the lady's name and legitimacy or otherwise have not been settled definitively as far as I know.

She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134. Bernard III was not count of Comminges at the time - he was named Dodo, seigneur of Samatan under the lordship of Alphonse Jourdain. But he was the heir to his brother Bernard II of Comminges, who died childless a few years later, and as such the marriage was important in the rivalry between Toulouse and Barcelona. There is reason to suppose that Alphonse Jourdain would have given Dodo/Bernard III a legitimate bride, if one was available.[end quote]7 Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan was also known as Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan.7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  3. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00269281&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00316247&tree=LEO
  6. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  7. [S2208] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008: "Re: Daughter of Alphonse Jourdain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122148&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulcofo.htm#BernardIVCommingesdied1225B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Laurence (?) de Toulouse1,2,3,4

F, #20094
FatherAlfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de b. 1102, d. 16 Apr 1148; per Stewart: [quote]I don't think enough is known about Alphonse Jourdain's family to say for
certain which of his known offspring were illegitimate.

Pere Anselme named the wife of Bernard III of Comminges as Laurence, while
making her a legitimate daughter of Alphonse Jourdain's son Raymond of
Saint-Gilles. This misplacement within the family was most probably due to
the wrong interpretation of a marginal note in a manuscript of the chronicle
of Guillaume de Puylaurens, but where the alleged given name came from is
unknown.

The marginal note was correctly aligned by the authors of _Histoire generale
de Languedoc_, making her the daughter of Alphonse Jourdain and consequently
making sense of other sources describing Bernard IV of Comminges as nephew
(by a sister) of Raymond of Saint-Gilles, count of Toulouse, but the lady's
name and legitimacy or otherwise have not been settled definitively as far
as I know.

She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the
same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134.
Bernard III was not count of Comminges at the time - he was named Dodo,
seigneur of Samatan under the lordship of Alphonse Jourdain. But he was the
heir to his brother Bernard II of Comminges, who died childless a few years
later, and as such the marriage was important in the rivalry between
Toulouse and Barcelona. There is reason to suppose that Alphonse Jourdain
would have given Dodo/Bernard III a legitimate bride, if one was available.[end quote]5,6,7,1,3,4,8
MotherFaydiva/Faydide (?) d'Uzes; per Bunot: [quote]I have 2 contemporary sources stating Bernard III de Comminges married indeed a a daughter of Alphonse Jourdain. Certainly nothing indicating she was illegitimate. from Claude Higounet, Le comté de Comminges de son origine a son annexion par la couronne (ed. 1984)

"Bernardus comes de Comenge filius sororis comitis tolosani" = Bernand (IV), count of Comminges, son of the sister of the count of Toulouse

and this one in occitan language

"B. lo comte de commenge lo cal fo filh de la filha n'Anfos" = B(ernard) the count of Comminges which was the son of the daughter of noble Alphonse

(ps : in Occitan "n'" is the mark higher nobility)[end quote]9
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Laurence (?) de Toulouse married Dodon dit Bernardo III (?) Comte de Comminges, seigneur de Muret et de Samatan, son of Bernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges and Dias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan, circa 1150; per Steward: "She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134."5,6,2,4
     ; [illegitimate] Laurence, *Toulouse before 1147; m.before 1169 Cte Bernardo III de Comminges.1

; per Stewart: [quote]I don't think enough is known about Alphonse Jourdain's family to say for certain which of his known offspring were illegitimate.

Pere Anselme named the wife of Bernard III of Comminges as Laurence, while making her a legitimate daughter of Alphonse Jourdain's son Raymond of Saint-Gilles. This misplacement within the family was most probably due to the wrong interpretation of a marginal note in a manuscript of the chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens, but where the alleged given name came from is unknown.

The marginal note was correctly aligned by the authors of _Histoire generale de Languedoc_, making her the daughter of Alphonse Jourdain and consequently making sense of other sources describing Bernard IV of Comminges as nephew (by a sister) of Raymond of Saint-Gilles, count of Toulouse, but the lady's name and legitimacy or otherwise have not been settled definitively as far as I know.

She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134. Bernard III was not count of Comminges at the time - he was named Dodo, seigneur of Samatan under the lordship of Alphonse Jourdain. But he was the heir to his brother Bernard II of Comminges, who died childless a few years later, and as such the marriage was important in the rivalry between Toulouse and Barcelona. There is reason to suppose that Alphonse Jourdain would have given Dodo/Bernard III a legitimate bride, if one was available.[end quote]8

; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 764, 404a.2

; an illegimate dau.of Alphons Jourdain, Cte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne.5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00316247&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  4. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonse Jourdain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065049&tree=LEO
  8. [S2208] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008: "Re: Daughter of Alphonse Jourdain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008."
  9. [S2209] Jean Bunot, "Bunot email 5 Jan 2008: "Re: Daughter of Alphonse Jourdain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 5 Jan 2008."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122148&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulcofo.htm#BernardIVCommingesdied1225B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Arnoud Guillaume de la Barthe

M, #20095
Last Edited2 Dec 2004

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html

Garsinde de Toulouse

F, #20096
FatherPons II Guillaume (?) comte de Toulouse, Albi & Dijon b. bt 995 - 997, d. c 1060
MotherAlmodis de La Marche b. c 1010, d. 10 Oct 1071
Last Edited6 Nov 2001
     Garsinde de Toulouse married an unknown person.
     Reference: 2151865601.

Bernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges1,2,3

M, #20097, d. 1145
FatherRoger II (?) Comte de Comminges1,3 d. c 1105
MotherSerena (?)3
Last Edited15 May 2005
     Bernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges married Dias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan, daughter of Godofredo (?) de Samatan et de Muret.1,2,3
Bernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges died in 1145; killed in battle.1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: X 72.2 He was comte de Comminges between 1114 and 1144.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00269281&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."

Dias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan1,2

F, #20098
FatherGodofredo (?) de Samatan et de Muret1,2
Last Edited2 Jul 2005
     Dias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan married Bernardo I (?) Comte de Comminges, son of Roger II (?) Comte de Comminges and Serena (?).1,3,2
     Dias (?) dame de Muret et de Samatan was living in 1125.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  2. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00269281&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Roger II (?) Comte de Comminges1,2

M, #20099, d. circa 1105
FatherArnaldo/Arnaud II (?) Comte de Comminges1,2 d. c 1070
Last Edited15 May 2005
     Roger II (?) Comte de Comminges married Serena (?)2
Roger II (?) Comte de Comminges died circa 1105; J Bunot says d. 1114.1,2
     He was Comte de Comminges.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  2. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."

Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de1,2,3,4

M, #20100, b. 1102, d. 16 April 1148
FatherRaimond IV de Toulouse Cte de Toulouse, de St. Gilles et de Tripoli, Duc de Narbonne5,2,3,6 b. bt 1046 - 1052, d. 28 Feb 1105
MotherElvira (?) of Castile and Leon2,7,3,6 b. c 1072, d. a 1151
Last Edited14 Dec 2019
     Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de was born in 1102 at Mont-Pelerin, Tripoli, Holy Land.2,3 He married Faydiva/Faydide (?) d'Uzes, daughter of Raymond II Decan (?) seigneur d’Uzes et de Posquieres and Roscie (?) dame d'Uzes, on 16 September 1125; J Bunot says m. 1133.2,3,4,6
Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de died on 16 April 1148 at Caesarea, Palestine; murdered.2,3
     ; Leo van de Past cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 41.2

; [3m.] Cte Alfonso I Jourdain de Toulouse (1112-48), Duc de Narbonne, *Mont-Pelerin, Tripoli 1102, +murdered at Caesarea 16.4.1148; m.before 16.9.1125 Faydiva d'Uzes/ Faydide de Rodes, dau.of Gerbert=Gilbert III, Vicomte de Carlat and Tiburge=Gerberge, Countess de Provence.3 Alfonse 1er Jourdain (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, marquis de was also known as Alphons-Jourdan (?) Cte de Toulouse.8 He was Comte de Toulouse between 1112 and 1148.3

; In 1146 he went as a crusader to the Holy Land but, on 16 April 1148, was murdered in Caesarea.2

Family 1

Faydiva/Faydide (?) d'Uzes
Children
  • Laurence (?) de Toulouse+; per Stewart: [quote]I don't think enough is known about Alphonse Jourdain's family to say for
    certain which of his known offspring were illegitimate.

    Pere Anselme named the wife of Bernard III of Comminges as Laurence, while
    making her a legitimate daughter of Alphonse Jourdain's son Raymond of
    Saint-Gilles. This misplacement within the family was most probably due to
    the wrong interpretation of a marginal note in a manuscript of the chronicle
    of Guillaume de Puylaurens, but where the alleged given name came from is
    unknown.

    The marginal note was correctly aligned by the authors of _Histoire generale
    de Languedoc_, making her the daughter of Alphonse Jourdain and consequently
    making sense of other sources describing Bernard IV of Comminges as nephew
    (by a sister) of Raymond of Saint-Gilles, count of Toulouse, but the lady's
    name and legitimacy or otherwise have not been settled definitively as far
    as I know.

    She was evidently married to Bernard III ca 1150, making her roughly the
    same age as Raymond of Saint-Gilles who was most likely born in 1134.
    Bernard III was not count of Comminges at the time - he was named Dodo,
    seigneur of Samatan under the lordship of Alphonse Jourdain. But he was the
    heir to his brother Bernard II of Comminges, who died childless a few years
    later, and as such the marriage was important in the rivalry between
    Toulouse and Barcelona. There is reason to suppose that Alphonse Jourdain
    would have given Dodo/Bernard III a legitimate bride, if one was available.[end quote]1,9,2,3,4,6,10
  • Faidiva (?) de Toulouse8,3,6,11 d. c 1154
  • Alphons (?) de Toulouse3,6
  • Raimund VII (?) Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Margrave of Provence+12,2,3,6 b. 1134, d. 1194

Family 2

Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Foix 1 page (The House of Foix): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonse Jourdain: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065049&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  4. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimond IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065047&tree=LEO
  6. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando Fernández: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00065048&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Foix 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/foix/foix4.html
  10. [S2208] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008: "Re: Daughter of Alphonse Jourdain"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 3 Jan 2008."
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Faydivedied1154. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106025&tree=LEO