Sir Edmund de Cornwall of Kynlet, Knt.1,2

M, #4201, b. 1282, d. 22 March 1354
FatherSir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln1,3 b. c 1255, d. 1297
MotherJoan fitz Alan1
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Sir Edmund de Cornwall of Kynlet, Knt. was born in 1282 at Shropshire, England.4 He married Elizabeth de Brampton, daughter of Sir Bryan de Brampton and Emma Corbet, in 1313/14.5,6,1,2
Sir Edmund de Cornwall of Kynlet, Knt. died on 22 March 1354.2,6
     ; van de Pas cites: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: Page 232.2

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cornwall - Baron Fanhope, in the co. Hereford, Baron Milbroke, in the co. Bedford, p. 137. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edmund de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425511&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Richard de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008074&tree=LEO
  4. [S581] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 25 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 2113 (n.p.: Release date: May 6, 1997, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth de Brompton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425512&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-29, pp. 232-233. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S2104] John Higgins, "Higgins email 28 Oct 2006: "RPA additions - Mackworth"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Higgins email 28 Oct 2006."

Elizabeth de Brampton1

F, #4202, b. 1294, d. 1354
FatherSir Bryan de Brampton1 d. 1294
MotherEmma Corbet2
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Elizabeth de Brampton was born in 1294 at Herefordshire, England.3,4,5 She married Sir Edmund de Cornwall of Kynlet, Knt., son of Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln and Joan fitz Alan, in 1313/14.5,4,1,6
Elizabeth de Brampton died in 1354.5,4
     ; van de Pas cites: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: Page 233.5 Elizabeth de Brampton was also known as Elizabeth de Brompton.5

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cornwall - Baron Fanhope, in the co. Hereford, Baron Milbroke, in the co. Bedford, p. 137. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Corbet - Barons Corbet, p. 136.
  3. [S581] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 25 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 2113 (n.p.: Release date: May 6, 1997, unknown publish date).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-29, pp. 232-233. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth de Brompton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425512&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edmund de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00425511&tree=LEO
  7. [S2104] John Higgins, "Higgins email 28 Oct 2006: "RPA additions - Mackworth"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Higgins email 28 Oct 2006."

Sir Bryan de Brampton1

M, #4203, d. 1294
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Sir Bryan de Brampton married Emma Corbet, daughter of Thomas Corbet 5th Baron of Caus, co. Salop and Isabel de Valletort.1,2
Sir Bryan de Brampton died in 1294.3
     Sir Bryan de Brampton lived at Brampton Brian, Herefordshire, England.4

; Leo van de Pas cites: A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 136.2

; Weis [AR7] 258-29.3

Family

Emma Corbet
Children

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Corbet - Barons Corbet, p. 136. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Bryan de Brampton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00221448&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-29, p. 232-233. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cornwall - Baron Fanhope, in the co. Hereford, Baron Milbroke, in the co. Bedford, p. 137.

Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln1,2,3

M, #4204, b. circa 1255, d. 1297
FatherRichard (?) 1st Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou2,4,3,5 b. 5 Jan 1209, d. 2 Apr 1272
MotherJoan Basset
ReferenceGAV22
Last Edited10 Dec 2020
     Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln was born circa 1255.2,3 He married Joan fitz Alan, daughter of John Fitz Alan 6th (?) Earl of Arundel and Maud le Boteler, before 1281.6,7,1,2,3,5
Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln died in 1297 at Siege of Berwick, Berwick, Northumberland, England; killed at the siege of Berwick.3,5
     ; RICHARD de CORNWALL; granted 1283 by his half-bro 2nd EARL OF CORNWALL the Manor of Thunnock, Lincs; k Siege of Berwick 1296, leaving, with an er s (Sir Edmund.)8 GAV-22 GKJ-20.

; RICHARD DE CORNEWALL, received a grant of the manor of Thunnock, Lincs, from Edmund, Earl of Cornwall 1283, and was k at the siege of Berwick 1296, leaving issue.9

; van de Pas cites: 1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1964 499
2. The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the USA, Baltimore, 1993, Roberts, Gary Boyd, Reference: 317
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: Page 232.5 Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln was also known as Sir Richard of Cornwall, Knt., of Ashtall, Oxfordshire.3,5

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cornwall - Baron Fanhope, in the co. Hereford, Baron Milbroke, in the co. Bedford, p. 137. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cornwall 5: p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Cornwall 4: pp. 230-231.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Richard de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008074&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S581] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 25 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 2113 (n.p.: Release date: May 6, 1997, unknown publish date).
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-28, p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page - Richard de Cornwall was the illegitimate son of Richard (Plantagenet) by Jeanne de Valletort. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Hildyard of Winestead Family Page.
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008073&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Cornwall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008073&tree=LEO
  13. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page.
  14. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Legh of High Legh Family Page.

Joan fitz Alan1,2

F, #4205
FatherJohn Fitz Alan 6th (?) Earl of Arundel2 b. 18 Apr 1266, d. b 10 Nov 1267
MotherMaud le Boteler2 d. 27 Nov 1283
ReferenceGAV20 GKJ20
Last Edited10 Dec 2020
     Joan fitz Alan married Sir Richard de Cornwall Lord of Thunnock, co. Lincoln, son of Richard (?) 1st Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou and Joan Basset, before 1281.3,4,5,6,2,7
     GAV-20 GKJ-20. Joan fitz Alan was living on 6 October 1316.2

Citations

  1. Richardson identifies her father and mother.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cornwall 5: p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S581] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 25 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 2113 (n.p.: Release date: May 6, 1997, unknown publish date).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-28, p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Cornwall - Baron Fanhope, in the co. Hereford, Baron Milbroke, in the co. Bedford, p. 137. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Richard de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008074&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Cornwall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008073&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Cornwall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008073&tree=LEO

Joan Basset1

F, #4206
FatherThomas Basset Lord of Headington, Oxford d. 1220
ReferenceGAV21
Last Edited7 Oct 2020
     Joan Basset married Sir Reginald de Vautort.2
     GAV-21 GKJ-21.

Family 1

Sir Reginald de Vautort d. 1246

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 12, BASSET-1:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 258-27, p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S580] Unknown author, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from WFT 10-2501World Family Tree Vol. 10, Ed. 1, Family # 2501 (n.p.: published by: Family Tree Maker, Broderbund Software, Inc., Release date: May 6, 1997, unknown publish date).

Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou1,2,3

F, #4207, b. circa 1124, d. 31 March 1204
FatherGuillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou4,5,6,7,8,9,10 b. 1099, d. 9 Apr 1137
MotherEleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine6,7,8,11,10 b. c 1103, d. a Mar 1129/30
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou was born circa 1124 at Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France; GEnealogics and Richardson say b. ca 1124.7,12,5,13 She married Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France, son of Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France and Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France, on 22 July 1137 at Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France;
His 1st wife.6,4,5,14,15,16,17 Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou and Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France were divorced on 21 March 1152; Genealogy.EU says div. 21 March 1152.1,5,6,14,7,18,17 Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou married Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England, son of Geoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie and Matilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain, on 18 May 1152 at Cathedral de Saint-Pierre, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France.19,12,1,20,4,3,6,7,21
Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou died on 31 March 1204 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France.22,5
Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou was buried after 31 March 1204 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1123, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     DEATH     1 Apr 1204 (aged 80–81), Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     French and English Monarch. Duchess and heiress of Aquitaine and Gascogne, Countess of Poitou. Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine inherited the duchy of Aquitaine from her father in 1137. In the same year, on July 25., she married Louis of France. The couple was very different., Louis had been raised at a monastery and was very calm and she was a woman of independent spirit. In 1147 they both joined the Crusade. During their stay in Antioch she was suspected to have a liaison with her uncle Raymond de Poitiers, who reigned as Prince of Antioch, and she had to return to France alone. She gave birth to two daughters, Marie and Alix, that where later married to two brothers. In March 1152 she got divorced and married again in May the 19 year old Henry Plantagenet, which led to a scandal. With the divorce and remarriage Louis not only lost a wife, that he had apparently loved, but also her inheritance which considered of West and a large part of South France. In 1154 Henry became King and his sphere of influence extended thereby from Scotland to the Pyreneeses. Over the years they had 8 children. In the beginning the marriage seems to have been very happy, but later Henry started to have affairs. With much energy she made politics against her husband. In 1173 she encouraged her three oldest sons to rebel against him and to claim their inheritances early. In 1174 Henry defeated his sons and captured Eleonore. He imprisoned her for most of the following 16 years. She was released when the message of his death reached her prison. While Richard was in on the Crusade she reined the country very skilled. She traveled all her life governing her children's possession in France. In the Winter of 1199/1200 with the high age of 77 she travelled over the Pyreneeses to Castile to visit her daughter Aenor and accompany her granddaughter Blanca to France to marry the dauphin. In later years she more often retired to the Abbey of Fontevraud where she died and was buried beside her husband and two of her children. She had survived her husbands and eight of her ten children. During the Revolution her body was exhumed, her bones scattered and never recovered. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guillaume X of Aquitaine 1099–1137
          Aenor de Châtellerault 1103–1130
     Spouses
          Henry Plantagenet 1133–1189 (m. 1152)
          King Louis VII 1120–1180
     Siblings
          Aelis Petronille de Aquitaine 1125–1151
     Children
          Marie de Champagne 1145–1198
          Alix Capet 1150 – unknown
          William De Poitiers 1153–1156
          Henry Plantagenet 1155–1183
          Mathilda Plantagenet 1156–1189
          Richard I 1157–1199
          Geoffrey II Plantagenet 1158–1186
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
          Joan Plantagenet 1164–1199
          King John I 1166–1216
          King John I 1166–1216
     BURIAL*     Fontevraud Abbey. Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (* This is the original burial site)
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 21 Sep 1999
     Find A Grave Memorial 6437.23
     ; This is the same person as Eleanor of Aquitaine at Wikipedia and Aliénor d'Aquitaine at Wikipédia (Fr.)24,25

; Per Mississippienne: "I've been working on compiling a list of the children and grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine, the wife and queen successively of Louis VII, King of France and Henry II, King of England. She bore at least ten children (and possibly eleven, if Ralph of Diceto is correct). This list is as complete as my knowledge permits, but I know I am unsure of exactly how many children were born to her daughter Eleanor, queen of Castile. Any additions or corrections are, of course, appreciated."
By Louis VII, King of France, Eleanor was mother of:
     MARIE (1145-1198)
She married Henri I, Count of Champagne, in 1164
1. Scholastique of Champagne (died 1219), married William V, Count of Macon
2. Henri II, Count of Champagne (1166-1197), married Queen Isabella of Jerusalem
3. Marie of Champagne (died 1204), married Baldwin I, Emperor of Constantinople
4. Thibault III, Count of Champagne (1179-1201), married Blanca of Navarre

     ALIX (1150-1197/1198)
She married Thibault V, Count of Blois, in 1164
1. Thibault (died 1182)
2. Louis I, Count of Blois (died 1205)
3. Henri (died 1182)
4. Philippe (died 1202)
5. Marguerite of Blois (died after 1230), married (1) Otto II, Count of Burgundy, (2) Gauthier II, Seigneur of Avesnes.
6. Isabelle of Chartres (1180-1247/1248), married (1) Sulpice of Amboise, (2) Jean de Montmirail
7. Alix of Blois, abbess of Fontevrault

By Henry II, King of England, Eleanor was mother of:
     WILLIAM, COUNT OF POITIERS (1153-1156)
     HENRY THE YOUNG KING (1155-1183)
He married Marguerite of France in 1160
1. William (1177)

     MATILDA (1156-1189)
She married Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony & Bavaria, in 1168
1. Heinrich I, Palatine Count of the Rhein (1173-1227)
2. Lothar (1174-1190)
3. Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor (1175-1219), married Beatrice of Swabia
4. William, Duke of Lüneburg (1184-1213), married Helen of Denmark
5. Matilda of Brunswick (died 1213), married Geoffrey III, Count of Perche

     RICHARD I, KING OF ENGLAND (1157-1199)
He married Berengaria of Navarre in 1191
Illegitimate issue:
1. Philip (f.l. 1201), married Amelie of Cognac

     GEOFFREY II, DUKE OF BRITTANY (1158-1186)
He married Constance of Brittany in 1181
1. Eleanor, Fair Maid of Brittany (1184-1241)
2. Maud of Brittany (1185-before May 1189)
3. Arthur I, Duke of Brittany (1187-1203)

     ELEANOR (1161/1162-1214)
She married Alfonso VIII, King of Castile, in 1170
1. Berenguela of Castile (died 1244), married Alfonso IX, King of Leon
2. Urraca of Castile, married Alfonso II, King of Portugal
3. Blanche of Castile (died 1252), married Louis VIII, King of France
4. Leonor of Castile, married Jaume I, King of Aragon
5. Constanza, nun at Las Huelgas (died 1243)
6. Enrique I, King of Castile (died 1217)

     JOAN (1165-1199)
She married (1) William II, King of Sicily, in 1177
She married (2) Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse, in 1196
1. Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse (1197-1249)

     JOHN, KING OF ENGLAND (1166-1216)
He married (1) Hawise of Gloucester in 1189
He married (2) Isabelle of Angoulême in 1200
1. Henry III, King of England (1207-1272), married Eleanor of Provence
2. Richard, Earl of Cornwall (1209-1272), married (1) Isabel Marshall,
(2) Sancia of Provence, (3) Beatrice of Falkenburg
3. Joan (1210-1238), married Alexander II, King of Scotland
4. Isabella (1214-1241), married Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
5. Eleanor (1215-1275), married (1) William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke,
(2) Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester

Illegitimate issue:
1. Joan (died 1236), married Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of Gwyneth
2. Richard Fitzroy, Baron of Chilham (died 1246), married Rose of Dover
3. Oliver Fitzroy (f.l. 1218)
4. Geoffrey Fitzroy (died 1205)
5. John Fitzroy (f.l. 1201)
6. Henry Fitzroy (died 1245)
7. Osbert Giffard (f.l. 1216)
8. Eudes Fitzroy (died 1241)
9. Bartholomew Fitzroy (f.l. 1254)
10. Maud, Abbess of Barking (died 1252)
11. Isabel, married Richard Fitz Ives
12. Philip Fitzroy (f.l. 1263.)26




; Eleanor/Aliénor, Dss of Aquitaine (1137-1204), Css of Poitou, *Bordeaux 1122, +Chateau de Mirebelle, Poitiers 31.3.1204; 1m: Bordeaux 22.7.1137 (div 21.3.1152) King Louis VII of France (*1120 +18.9.1180); 2m: Cathedral de Saint-Pierre, Bordeaux 18.5.1152 King Henry II of England (+1189); Eleonore was the heiress of Aquitaine. Her land holdings would greatly enhance the power of King Henry II of England. In 1173, things began to sour for her as she became outraged and disappointed with her tyranical spouse. She would begin to bring her sons up against their father, motivating them to claim their inheritances early. Her efforts toward that end were in very subtle ways and intrigue supported by Louis VII, King de France, her first husband. Messengers of the Duke of Aquitaine reached King Louis VI in Bethisy with news of their Duke's death on the way to Saint-Jean-de-Compostelle. With his dying breath, the Duke asked the King to look after his daughter, the 15-year old Alienor. King Louis VI immediately arranged for Alienor's marriage to his 17-year old son, Louis VII. A Council of the Archbishops and Bishops of France met in Beaugency on the shores of the Loire, presided by Hughes, Archbishop of Sens. The spouses are in accord and their parents testify that their are cousins, whose consanguinity is prohibited by Canon Law, and that the proper dispensations had not been obtained before the celebration of 1137. The Council dissolves the marriage. Upon the anullment of her marriage to King Louis VII in 1152, Eleonore married Henry, Cound d'Anjou, Duke of Normandy who became King Henry II of England. Thus, the addition of Aquitaine made Henry much more powerful than Louis, and allowed him to be frequently hostile to Louis. When she married Henry, her dowry brought him the Guyenne and Poitou. By fighting Philippe Auguste, King of France, she successfully defended the rights of her son, Richard the Lion Hearted.



; Per Med Lands: "ELEONORE d'Aquitaine (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[599]. “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[600]. She succeeded her father in 1137 as ELEONORE Dss d’Aquitaine, Ctss de Poitou, Ctss de Saintonge, Angoûmois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux et Agen. She left France with her husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[601]. "Helienordis...Francorum regina et Aquitanorum ducissa" confirmed the privileges of Notre-Dame de Saintes, at the request of "Agnetis abbatisse", with the consent of “Ludovici regis Francorum et ducis Aquitanorum collateralis nostri et Aelith sororis nostre”, by charter dated 1151[602]. She was crowned Queen Consort of England with her husband 19 Dec 1154 at Westminster Abbey. She supported the revolt of her sons against their father in 1173, was captured and imprisoned in the château de Chinon, later at Salisbury until 1179. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[603]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the burial of "uxor [regis Henrici] regina Alienordis" in the same abbey as her husband[604]. m firstly (Bordeaux, Cathedral of Saint-André 22 Jul 1137, annulled for reasons of consanguinity Château de Beaugency 21 Mar 1152) as his first wife, LOUIS associate King of France, son of LOUIS VI "le Gros/le Batailleur" King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoy] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau, transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France. He was crowned Duke of Aquitaine, in right of his first wife, 8 Aug 1137 at Bordeaux. m secondly (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) HENRI Duke of Normandy, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et du Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda [Maud] of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). He was recognised as HENRY II King of England after the death of Stephen 25 Oct 1154, he was crowned in Westminster Abbey 19 Dec 1154."
Med Lands cites:
[599] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841.
[600] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[601] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 262.
[602] Saintes Notre-Dame, XXIX, p. 36.
[603] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), Continuatio, p. 166.
[604] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861.8


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady, New York, 2002 , Parsons, John Carmi & Bonnie Wheeler.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. yr 1961.
3. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 194.13


; Per Genealogics:
     "The eldest daughter of Guillaume VIII-X de Poitou, duc d'Aquitaine, and Aénor de Châtellerault, Eleanor was born about 1124. When her brother Guillaume died in 1137 she became her father's heir. She was brought up by her grandfather, the renowned troubadour Guillaume VII-IX d'Aquitaine. When her father also died in 1137 she inherited the duchy of Aquitaine and married the French king, Louis VII. Their son was stillborn, but their two daughters would have progeny. Eleanor accompanied her husband on crusade and was rumoured to have had affaires with Saladin and others. On their return to France, Louis VII had their marriage annulled on 18 March 1152 on grounds of consanguinity.
     "Eleanor, then about 30, wasted no time in seducing the nineteen-year-old Henry, duke of Normandy, marrying him on 18 May 1152 in Bordeaux. Over the next fifteen years five sons and three daughters were born. Eleanor and Henry then grew apart and, when their children had grown up, she supported first one son and then another against Henry. In November 1173 Henry captured Eleanor and imprisoned her and she remained imprisoned until Henry died in 1189. Eleanor lived long enough to outlive her son Richard 'the Lionheart' and see her favourite son John become king before she herself died in 1204 aged about eighty-two, to be buried at Fontevrault."13

;      Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204), renowned for her cultivated intelligence and great beauty, was queen to two kings and mother of two others. She was one of the most powerful and fascinating personalities of feudal Europe.
     Eleanor was a granddaughter of Guillaume (William) IX of Aquitaine (1070-1127), who was one of the first and most famous troubadours. He was a cheerful man and an ardent lover of women, who joined the First Crusade. When he returned from this disastrous crusade early in the century in a very cynical mood, he found his countess, Philippa of Toulouse, taken up with one of those religious movements perennially arising on the soil of Aquitaine. He abandoned his lady and took up with the Countess of Chatellerault to enliven his middle years. The new countess was the mother of a daughter, Anor (Eleanor) by her previous marriage and this young woman the troubadour married to his own heir Guillaume X, born of Philippa. Anor and Guillaume X were the parents of Eleanor, a sister, Petronilla and a brother, Agret who did not survive childhood.
     The court of Guillaume X was the centre of western European culture. Unlike most of her contemporaries, male and especially female, Eleanor was carefully educated and she was an excellent student. Eleanor's happy childhood ended with the subsequent deaths of her mother, her little brother and, in 1137, her father. Heiress of the duchy of Aquitaine, the orphaned Eleanor was married to Louis VII King of France in 1137 at age 15, bringing into the union her vast possessions from the River Loire to the Pyrenees.
     Louis had been brought up for an office in the church, but he had become heir to the French throne after the death of his elder brother. He was a weak, dull, grave and pious man and he and the lively Eleanor were ill matched. Louis never understood his young wife, but he appears to have adored her with a passionate admiration. It wasn't until 1145 that a daughter, Marie, was born.
     A few years after her marriage, at age 19, Eleanor knelt in the cathedral of Vezelay before the celebrated Abbe Bernard of Clairvaux offering him thousands of her vassals for the Second Crusade which included "many other ladies of quality": Sybille, Countess of Flanders, whose half brother was King of Jerusalem, Mamille of Roucy, Florine of Bourgogne, Torqueri of Bouillon, Faydide of Toulouse, and scores of others whom the chroniclers could not afford the parchment to enumerate.
     No one appears to have asked publicly what these female warriors were to inflict upon the Saracens. The historians do not well explain why hordes of women took up the cross, however, most deplore the fact that the queen's example made other ladies intractable and to the Second Crusade went "a good many women who had no business to be included in the army."
     A legend tells us that the queen and her ladies disappeared and presently reappeared on white horses in the guise of Amazons, in gilded buskins, plumed and with banners and that the queen and her cavalcade galloped over the hillside of Vezelay, rallying laggard knights. The tale is in character, and later allusions to Amazons en route, found in Greek histories, give some substance to it.
     While the church may have been pleased to receive her thousand fighting vassals, they were less happy when they learned that Eleanor, attended by 300 of her ladies, also planned to go to help "tend the wounded." The presence of Eleanor, her ladies and wagons of female servants, was criticized by commentators throughout her adventure. Dressed in armor and carrying lances, the women never fought. In the papal bull for the next Crusade, it expressly forbade women of all sorts to join the expedition. All the Christian monarchs, including King Louis, agreed to this.
     When they reached the city of Antioch, Eleanor found herself deep in a renewed friendship with Raymond, her uncle, who had been appointed prince of the city. Raymond, only a few years older than Eleanor, was far more interesting and handsome than Eleanor's husband, Louis. When Raymond decided that the best strategic objective of the Crusade would be to recapture Edessa, thus protecting the Western presence in the Holy Land, Eleanor sided with his view. But Louis VII, fixated on reaching Jerusalem, rejected the plan and a quarrel followed. Louis demanded that Eleanor follow him to Jerusalem. Eleanor, furious, announced to one and all that their marriage was not valid in the eyes of God, for they were distantly related to an extent prohibited by the Church.
     Wounded by her claim, Louis began preparations for his departure and after dark Eleanor was forcibly conducted from Antioch. Soon the crusade became a complete failure and even Louis' brother Robert quickly rushed home. On their way back to France, Louis and Eleanor visited the pope to plead for a divorce. Instead, the pope tried to reconcile them and induced them to sleep in the same bed again.
     On her way home, while resting in Sicily, Eleanor was brought the news that her uncle Raymond had been killed in battle, and that his head delivered to the Caliph of Baghdad.
     Although her marriage to Louis continued for a time, the relationship was over. In 1152 the marriage was annulled and her vast estates reverted to Eleanor's control. Although consanguinity was the official reason for the annulment of their marriage in 1152, basic incompatibility was the real reason. Hardly had her marriage to Louis been dissolved when Eleanor married Henry of Anjou, soon to become (1154) King Henry II of England.
     Eleanor's inheritance passed to the English crown, which, when combined with his English possessions, made Henry much more powerful than Louis, and he was a frequently hostile neighbor. The marriage of Eleanor and Henry was as stormy as her first.
     Although Eleanor's first marriage had resulted in only two daughters born in fifteen year, Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters. As the children grew up and Henry openly took mistresses, the couple grew apart. Eleanor was 44 years old, when she gave birth to their youngest son, John Lackland. By then she had discovered the existence of "Fair" Rosamund Clifford, the most famous of Henry's mistresses. Later Henry even managed to seduce the fiancee of his son Richard, who was a daughter of Louis VII and his second wife.
     In 1169 Henry sent Eleanor to Aquitaine to restore order as its duchess. Her proceedings from the time she resume her residence in Poitou indicate a resolution to cut herself away from feudal kings and to establish a Poutevin domain. She was no mere game piece as were most feudal women, to be moved like a queen in chess. In this, her third important role in history, she was the pawn of neither king, and arrived as her own mistress, equipped with plans to establish her own assize. She was resolved to escape from secondary roles, to assert her independent sovereignty, to dispense her own justice, and her own patronage. Though continuing now and then to cooperate with Henry outside her provinces in the interests of her other sons, she took measures to establish her own heir, son Richard, in Poutou and Aquitaine and to restore throughout her provinces the ancient glories of the native dukes and counts.
     Once more the ducal palace at Poitou became the center of all that was civilized and refined. Troubadours, musicians and scholars were welcomed at Poitiers. There, in 1170 Eleanor reconciled with her first born daughter Marie of France, countess of Champagne. Marie had a "code of love" written down in thirty-one articles. They described feminist ideas far beyond the 12th century cult of chivalry. In addition, Eleanor sponsored the "courts of love" in which men having problems with the code of love could bring their questions before a tribunal of ladies for judgement.
     When in 1173 their sons revolted against their father, Eleanor backed them and was subsequently imprisoned by Henry until his death in 1189. By then three of their sons had already died and Henry's successor was Eleanor's favourite son, Richard I Lionheart (1157-1199), who appreciated his mother's advice. When he went on crusade, Eleanor became regent. Although Richard was reputedly a homosexual, he was supposed to provide England with heirs, so Eleanor escorted his bride-to-be to Sicily. When Richard was killed in 1199, he was succeeded by his youngest brother, John Lackland (1166-1216). Eleanor returned to Aquitaine and retired in the abbey of Fontevraud. She remained busy and active and personally arranged the marriage of her Castilian granddaughter to the grandson of Louis VII. Thus she lived to be about 82, an extraordinary age in the middle ages. GAV-21 EDV-22 GKJ-23.27,28

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI d’Anjou, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et de Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda [Maud] of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault[369]). William of Tyre names him and records his parentage[370]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1133 III Non Mar" of "Henricus"[371]. Comte de Touraine et de Maine 1151. He succeeded his father in 1151 as HENRI Comte d’Anjou, Duke of Normandy. He became Duke of Aquitaine by right of his wife 18 May 1152. He landed in England in Jan 1153 and obliged King Stephen to recognise him as his heir, from which time Henry governed England as Justiciar. He was recognised as HENRY II King of England after the death of King Stephen 25 Oct 1154, crowned in Westminster Abbey 19 Dec 1154[372] and at Worcester end [1158][373]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1189 that “Henricus rex Anglorum” died “aput Chinun” and was buried “aput Fontem Ebraldi”[374]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "II Non Jul" in [1189] of "Heinricus rex filius imperatoris" and his burial "ad Fontem-Ebraldi"[375]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "apud castrum Kinonis versus Cenomannum Non Iul 1189" of "rex Henricus" and his burial "in abbatia Fontis Ebraldi"[376].
     "m (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) as her second husband, ELEONORE Dss d'Aquitaine, divorced wife of LOUIS VII King of France, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou] & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[377]. She succeeded her father 9 Apr 1137 as Dss d’Aquitaine, Ctss de Poitou, Ctss de Saintonge, Angoumois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux et d'Agen. She was crowned Queen Consort of England with her husband 19 Dec 1154 at Westminster Abbey. She supported the revolt of her sons against their father in 1173, was captured and imprisoned in the château de Chinon, later at Salisbury until 1179. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[378]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the burial of "uxor [regis Henrici] regina Alienordis" in the same abbey as her husband[379].
     "Mistress (1): ([1150/51]) IKENAI, daughter of ---. Walter Mapes names "Ykenai" as mother of Geoffrey Bishop of York[380]. She and her son arrived at King Henry's court soon after his accession[381].
     "Mistress (2): ([1168]) ALIX de Porhoët, daughter of EUDES de Porhoët ex-Duke of Brittany & his first wife --- . Given-Wilson & Curteis states that “Eudo de Porhoët, ex-count of Brittany” claimed in 1168 that the English king, while holding his daughter as a hostage for peace, had made her pregnant ‘treacherously, adulterously and incestuously; for the king and Eudo´s wife were the offspring of two sisters’” (referring to two daughters of King Henry I, one legitimate the other illegitimate, named Matilda)[382]. The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified.
     "Mistress (3): ([1173/76]) ROSAMOND Clifford, daughter of WALTER de Clifford & his wife Margaret --- (-[1175/76], bur Godstow nunnery). “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[383]. The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis (as cited by Eyton) records that Rosamond Clifford became "openly and avowedly the paramour of the king" after he imprisoned Queen Eleanor following the rebellion of his sons in 1173[384]. Eyton adds that "for an indefinite time previously she had been secretly domiciled at Woodstock" but he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this statement[385]. It is not known whether he draws the conclusion from the Chronicon Johannis Bromton (the original of which has not yet been consulted). Eyton also suggests that the start of the king´s relationship with Rosamond can be dated to [1154] and that the king´s known illegitimate children Geoffrey Archbishop of York and William Longespee, later Earl of Salisbury, were Rosamond´s sons[386]. However, as can be seen below, Geoffrey´s birth is estimated to [1151] and William´s to [1176], which is inconsistent with their being full brothers. In any case, as noted above, the name of Geoffrey´s mother is reported as Ikenai. The uncertain chronology of the family of Walter [I] de Clifford appears to be the key to resolving the question of when Rosamond´s relationship with the king started. As discussed in the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C in relation to the possible parentage of Walter [I]´s wife Margaret, it appears likely that their children were born after [1140] and, in the case of their son Walter [II], probably considerably later than this date. Rosamond´s appearance, with her brother Walter, as witness to the undated Dore abbey charter quoted above suggests that she was the only remaining unmarried daughter with her parents at the time, which in turn suggests that she was younger than her sisters. If this is correct, her birth could be as late as [1150/60], which would render Eyton´s hypothesis untenable. Further discussion of this problem will have to wait until more indications about the family chronology come to light. The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis states that Rosamond died ("sed illa cito obiit")[387], his wording implying that her death occurred soon after the king´s relationship with her started, suggesting the period [1174/76]. “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter[388]. “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", specifying that they were buried at Godstow, with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[389]. Rosamond´s corpse was removed from its burial place on the orders of Hugh Bishop of Lincoln[390]. She was known as "Fair Rosamond", although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.
     "Mistress (4): IDA, daughter of ---. William Longespee refers to his mother as "comitissa Ida, mater mea" and "Ida comitissa, mater mea" in two charters[391]. She is identified as the wife of Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk. This identification is based on a list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 which includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[392].
     "Mistress (5): NESTA, wife of RALPH Bloet, daughter of ---. Robert de Graystane´s early 14th century History of the Church of Durham records the election as bishop of Durham in 1213 of “Morganus frater Regis Johannis et Galfridi archiepiscopi Eboracensis, præpositusque Beverlacensis”, that his appointment was blocked by Rome because he was born “spurius...Henricus pater eius” to “uxore...militis...Radulphi Bloeth”, and that the Pope offered to confirm the election if he declared that the king was not his father, which he refused to do[393].
     "Mistresses (6) - (9): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
Med Lands cites:
[369] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1189, p. 344.
[370] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 607.
[371] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 33.
[372] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1154, p. 204.
[373] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1158, p. 215, which specifies "in Dominicam Navitatis die", presumably the end of Dec 1157 or early Jan 1158.
[374] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 519.
[375] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 157.
[376] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861.
[377] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841.
[378] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 166.
[379] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861.
[380] Wright (1850), pp. 228 and 235.
[381] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 103.
[382] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 98.
[383] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, VIII, p. 555.
[384] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150, citing Twysden, R. (ed.) (1652) Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X, Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis, col. 725-1283, 1151 (not yet consulted, it is not clear that Eyton’s phrase is taken directly from the Chronicon).
[385] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150.
[386] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 148.
[387] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150, citing Twysden, R. (ed.) (1652) Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X, Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis, col. 725-1283, 1151.
[388] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XV, p. 366.
[389] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XIII, p. 366.
[390] Domesday Descendants, p. 402.
[391] Bradenstoke, 481, 646, p. 9.
[392] Bevan ‘The Durham Liber Vitæ’ (Jul 2005), p. 429, citing Phair, R. ‘William Longespée, Ralph Bigod, and Countess Ida’, The American Genealogist, 77 (2002), pp. 279-81, quoting Baldwin, J. W., Gasparri, F. & Nortier, M. (1992) Les registres de Philippe Auguste [not yet consulted].
[393] Raine (1839) Robert de Graystanes, p. 35.29


; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau[427], transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[428]. He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother in 1131. Consecrated associate-king 25 Oct 1131, Notre-Dame de Reims, he received effective power from his father 28 Oct 1135, due to the latter's ill health. He succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France. Duke of Aquitaine, by right of his first wife, 8 Aug 1137 at Bordeaux. He declared war against Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, who was fighting Raoul Comte de Vermandois, laid siege to and captured Vitry, where he signed a peace treaty in 1143. After the fall of Edessa in 1146, Pope Eugenius III addressed a bull to Louis VII 1 Dec 1145 urging a new crusade[429]. The king assembled his army at Metz 15 Jun 1147 and arrived in Constantinople 4 Oct 1147. He left the government of France in the hands of Suger Abbé de Saint-Denis, his brother Henri Archbishop of Reims and his cousin Raoul Comte de Vermandois. Although the crusade failed in its aim of capturing Damascus end-Jul 1148, Louis VII gained prestige as the first western king to lead a crusading army. After leaving Palestine in Summer 1149, he landed in Calabria where he discussed launching a new crusade with Roger II King of Sicily and Pope Eugenius III aimed at taking vengeance on Byzantium, but the scheme was later dropped for lack of support from Konrad III King of Germany who had entered an alliance with Emperor Manuel I[430]. The king arrived back in Paris end-1149. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1180 that “Ludovicus rex Francorum” was buried “aput abbatiam Barbel quam ædificavit”[431]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "XV Kal Oct" of "rex Ludovicus pius" and his burial "abbatiam Cisterciensis ordinis de Sancto Portu…Barbel"[432]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Oct" of "Ludovicus rex"[433].
     "m firstly (Bordeaux, Cathedral of Saint-André 22 Jul 1137, annulled for reasons of consanguinity Château de Beaugency 21 Mar 1152) as her first husband, ELEONORE Dss of Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou] & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[434]. She succeeded her father 9 Apr 1137 as Dss of Aquitaine Ctss de Saintonge, Angoûmois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux & Agen. She left France with her husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[435]. She married secondly (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) Henri Comte d'Anjou et du Maine Duke of Normandy, who succeeded in 1153 as Henry II King of England. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[436].
     "m secondly (Cathedral of Sainte Croix, Orléans ([Jan/Jul] 1154) Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VII King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona ([1138]-6 Oct 1160, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). This second marriage of King Louis is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who calls her father "Aldefonsi regis Hispaniæ cuius regni caput civitas est Tholetum"[437]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam", specifying that "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia) married "Ludovico Regi Francorum"[438]. She was consecrated queen in 1154 at Orléans, église Sainte-Croix. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter[439]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1160 the death of “regina Francorum” in childbirth[440]. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “regina Francorum filia Athelfunsi imperatoris Hispaniarum” died while giving birth to a daughter who survived (“incolumi filia”)[441]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Oct" of "Constantia regina filia regis Hispanie"[442].
     "m thirdly (Paris, Cathedral of Notre-Dame 13 Nov 1160) ALIX de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT IV “le Grand” Comte de Blois, Comte de Troyes/Champagne & his wife Mathilde von Sponheim [Carinthia] ([1140]-Paris 4 or 13 Jun 1206, bur Pontigny, Yonne, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne). William of Tyre names her as "Ala filia Theobaldi senioris" when recording her marriage[443]. The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Alam sororem…Henrici comitis Campanensis" as the wife of "Ludovicus rex"[444]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Adela Francorum regina" as the youngest of the six daughters of "comes Campanie Theobaldus", and in a later passage names "filia comitis Theobaldi…Adala" as mother of the wife of Alexios Komnenos[445]. She was anointed queen after her marriage in Notre-Dame de Paris. Regent of France for her son King Philippe II Jun-Dec 1191, during his absence abroad. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1206…Non Iun" of "Adela regina Francorum mater regis Philippi"[446]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Jun" of "Ala Francorum regina, mater Philippi regis"[447]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1206 of "la reine Adèle, mère de Philippe roi de France" at Paris and her burial "en Bourgogne, à Pontion"[448].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of the mistress of King Louis VII is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[427] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1180, p. 315.
[428] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[429] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 248.
[430] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 286-7.
[431] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 517.
[432] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 857.
[433] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 326.
[434] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841.
[435] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 262.
[436] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 166.
[437] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1155, p. 210.
[438] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[439] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329.
[440] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[441] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532.
[442] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.
[443] William of Tyre XXII.IV, p. 1068.
[444] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 515.
[445] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152 and 1164, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 841 and 848.
[446] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1206, MGH SS XXIII, p. 886.
[447] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 319.
[448] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis, Collection des Mémoires relatifs à l'histoire de France (Paris) (“Guillaume de Nangis”), p. 94.17


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 4): “F3. [2m.] King LOUIS VII "le Jeune" of France (1137-80) cr 1131, Duc de Aquitaine (1137-80), *1120, +Paris 18.9.1180, bur Notre Dame, Barbeaux nr Fontainebleau; 1m: Bordeaux 22.7.1137 (div 1152) Aliénor d'Aquitaine (*1122 +31.3.1204); 2m: Orleans 1153/54 Constance of Castile (*1140 +4.10.1160); 3m: 13.11.1160 Alix de Blois (*1140 +4.6.1206)”.30

Family 1

Louis VII "the Young/le Jeune" (?) King of France b. 1120, d. 18 Sep 1180
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.3. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Eleonoredied1204. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeXAquitainedied1137
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aénor de Châtellerault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020885&tree=LEO
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 277. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002952&tree=LEO
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000211&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_VII_of_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIIdied1180B
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-26, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  20. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 518-523. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO
  22. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  23. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 November 2019), memorial page for Eleanor de Aquitaine (1123–1 Apr 1204), Find A Grave Memorial no. 6437, citing Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6437/eleanor-de_aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Aquitaine
  25. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Aliénor d'Aquitaine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali%C3%A9nor_d%27Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  26. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  27. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  28. [S585] Unknown author, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #2765 (n.p.: published by: Family Tree Maker, Broderbund Software, Inc., Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189B.
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7.
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Mariedied1198
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Alixdiedafter1195
  34. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  35. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.4.
  36. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.5.
  37. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005975&tree=LEO
  38. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Matildadied1189.
  39. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.6.
  40. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8.
  41. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.7.
  42. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Castile 3: p. 190.
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  44. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Eleanordied1214.
  45. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 139-24, p. 122.
  46. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000807&tree=LEO

Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England1,2

F, #4208, b. between 1186 and 1187, d. circa 4 June 1246
FatherAymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence3,4,1,5,6 b. c 1160, d. 16 Jun 1202
MotherAliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme3,1,2,7,8 b. c 1160, d. 12 Sep 1218
ReferenceGAV20 EDV20
Last Edited10 Dec 2020
     Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England was born between 1186 and 1187 at Angoulême, Departement de la Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France; Genealogy.EU (Lusignan 2 page) says b. 1186.9,10,11,12,13,1,2 She married John I "Lackland" (?) King of England, son of Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England and Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou, on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Castle, Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France;
His 1st wife.14,10,15,12,3,4,1,2,16 Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England married Hugues X "Le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême, son of Hugues IX de Lusignan seigneur de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche and Agatha (?) de Preuilly, on 10 May 1220;
Her 2nd husband; Leo van de Pas says m. 217; Wikipedia says m. 10 May 1220; Med Lands says m. 10 Mar/22 May] 1220.9,17,11,4,18,13,19,2,20,21
Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England died circa 4 June 1246 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France; Genealogy.EU (Lusignan 2 page) says d. 31 May 1246.14,13,15,19
     Reference: Weis [1992"106] Line 117-27.22 GAV-20 EDV-20 GKJ-22.

Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England lived at Angoulême, Departement de la Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "AYMAR TALAFER d’Angoulême ([1160]-Limoges 16 Jun 1202). "Vuillelmus Talafers comes Engolismensis Vulgrini filius et Margarita uxor mea et filii nostri Vulgrinus scilicet primogenitus noster, Vuillelmus Talafers, Ademarus, Grisetus, Fulco et Almodis filia nostra uxor Amanei de Lebret" transferred rights to Saint-Amant-de-Boixe by charter dated 1171[685]. The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis records the death "Natali Apostolorum Petri et Pauli" of "Wlgrinus Comes Engolismensis" leaving an only daughter, recording that she was disinherited by "Guillermus…et Ademarus defuncto…fratri" (in 1181 from the context)[686]. He succeeded his brother in [1186] as Comte d’Angoulême. "Ademarus…comes Engolismensis, filius Wi Cædentis Ferrum et frater Wlgrini comitis" issued an undated charter concerning the abbey of La Couronne[687]. "Ademarus Engolismensis comes" donated property to Saint-Amant-de-Boixe by charter dated to [1186/91] naming "fratres quidam mei Vulgrinus et Vuillelmus Talafers" who were counts before him[688]. Comte de la Marche 1200. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins commemorates "Haymardus comes Angolismensis mariti quondam Aales comitisse Angolismensis" on "XV Kal Jan"[689].
     "m ([1186]) as her second husband, ALIX de Courtenay, divorced wife of GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Joigny, daughter of PIERRE de France Seigneur de Courtenay & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[690]. "Ademarus comes Engolismensis et uxor mea Alaidis de Cortenai" renounced rights relating to Vindelle by charter dated to [1186/91][691]. “Alix Engolismensis comitissa" swore homage to Philippe II King of France by charter dated 1204[692]. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[693]. A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between “dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “dominus Petrus de Cortaniaco” was father of “dominam Adalmues comitissam Engolismensem”, who was mother of “dominam Ysabellem, uxorem…comitis Marchie”[694]."
Med Lands cites:
[685] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 302, p. 270.
[686] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 72, RHGF XII, p. 448.
[687] Documents historiques sur l'Angoûmois, Tome I (Paris, 1869), p. 129.
[688] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 253, p. 237.
[689] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[690] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[691] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 256, p. 240.
[692] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 741, p. 272.
[693] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[694] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 3367, p. 574.8
She was Crowned Queen of England 1200, Daughter of Count Aymer Taillefer de Angouleme and Alice de Courtenay, Daughter of Peter of France, Son of Louis VI of France. on 8 October 1200.24,1

Family 1

John I "Lackland" (?) King of England b. 24 Dec 1167, d. 19 Oct 1216
Children

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.9. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 139-24, p. 122. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adhémar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007615&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’ Angoulême, p.6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix|Alice de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007616&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#AymarIdied1202. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 117-27, p. 106.
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 279-280. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 137, de LUSIGNAN 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  12. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 521 (Chart 38), 527-530. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 1-26, p. 3.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 200, PLANTAGENET 8.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000807&tree=LEO
  17. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 11-5.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008715&tree=LEO
  19. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.10.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_X_of_Lusignan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#HuguesIXLusignandied1219
  22. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Line 117-27, p.109.
  23. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  24. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 279/280.
  25. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  26. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.11.
  27. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.13.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005961&tree=LEO
  29. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Cornwall 4: pp. 230-231.
  30. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 397, 407-408.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005963&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#IsabellaEnglanddied1241.
  33. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Leicester 4: pp. 444-445.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005962&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EleanorEnglanddied1275.
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroi de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064444&tree=LEO
  37. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues XI 'le Brun' de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013427&tree=LEO
  39. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html#R1
  40. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix (Alfais) de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015386&tree=LEO
  41. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de Lusignan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064439&tree=LEO
  42. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#IsabelleLusignandied1300
  43. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Lusignan, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Lusignan.pdf
  44. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064438&tree=LEO
  45. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#MargueriteLusignandied1288

Aymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence1,2,3,4

M, #4209, b. circa 1160, d. 16 June 1202
FatherGuillaume VI Taillefer (?) Comte d'Angoulême1,3,5,6,7 b. c 1115, d. 7 Aug 1179
MotherMarguerite de Turenne1,5,3,6,8 b. bt 1120 - 1130, d. a 1201
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited24 Jun 2020
     Aymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence was born circa 1160 at Angoulême, Departement de la Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France.9,10,6 He married AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme, daughter of Pierre I Constantinople (?) Seigneur de Courtenay, de Tanlay, de Champignelles, etc. and Elizabeth de Courtenay, in April 1186;
Her 2nd husband.11,3,5,2,6,12,13
Aymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence died on 16 June 1202 at Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France (now).2,3,5,6
     ; This is the same person as:
"Aymer of Angoulême" at Wikipedia and as
"Aymar Taillefer" at Wikipédia (Fr.)4,14

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 65.
3. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 10.
4. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:818.5


; Per Genealogics:
     "Adhémar was a younger son of Guillaume VI Taillefer, comte d'Angoulême, and Marguerite de Turenne. His older brothers Vulgrin III and Guillaume VII Taillefer ruled Angoulême before him. About 1186 he married Alix/Alice de Courtenay, daughter of Pierre I de France, sire de Courtenay, and Elisabeth de Courtenay, who had recently been divorced from Guillaume I, comte de Joigny. Their daughter Isabella would play an important role in the history of England and France, and would have progeny with both her husbands, John, king of England, and Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan, comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême.
     "After the death of their brother Vulgrin III in 1181, Guillaume VII and Adhémar came into conflict with Richard 'the Lionheart', the duke of Aquitaine and hence their liege lord. Richard claimed the guardianship over Mathilde, the daughter of Vulgrin III, and thereby the power over Angoulême. Adhémar and his brother denied this and made their own inheritance claim, in the meantime fleeing to their half-brother Boson 'Adémar V', vicomte de Limoges.
     "Guillaume VII died about 1186, and Adhémar revolted against Richard in 1188 in alliance with Geoffroy I de Lusignan, the future count of Jaffa and Caesarea, and Geoffroy IV de Rancon, sire de Taillebourg, prince de Marsillac, but Richard soon gained the upper hand by the conquest of Taillebourg. The rebels made their submission, and their offer to participate in the Third Crusade relieved them from prosecution.
     "The capture of Richard the Lionheart in 1192 in Germany favoured the position of the Aquitanian nobles, and Adhémar was now able to take up his rule in Angoulême. With the approval of King Philippe II August, in 1193 he began to devastate Poitou. In 1194 Richard was released and defeated the French at the battle of Fréteval. Adhémar and his allies had to submit to Richard, advancing on Aquitaine, who was able to move unhindered into Angoulême. Adhémar was involved in the truce negotiated in July 1194 at Tillières between Richard and Philippe II August, and so he was able to keep his possessions. The peace did not last long and Adhémar soon joined his half-brother Boson 'Adémar V', vicomte de Limoges, in reuniting with Philippe II. After Philippe was beaten again in 1198 at the Battle of Gisors, they stood alone against the seemingly invincible king of England. After his victory Richard again advanced into Aquitaine, intending to subdue the viscount of Limoges, and besieged the castle of Châlus. In April 1199 he was seriously wounded and died totally unexpectedly.
     "Adhémar and Adémar of Limoges immediately took advantage of the opportunity this presented and that month they declared their loyalty to Philippe II August and took back their sovereignty over their domains from King John, Richard's brother and heir. Adémar of Limoges died only a few months later, according to Roger of Hovenden murdered by Philippe de Cognac, King Richard's bastard son.
     "About 1186 Adhémar married Alix de Courtenay, the daughter of Pierre I de France, sire de Courtenay, and Elisabeth de Courtenay. Their only child and heiress was their daughter Isabella. A conflict arose with the house of Lusignan over the county of La Marche, which since 1177 had been in the immediate possession of the house of Plantagenet as English kings and dukes of Aquitaine, but both Adhémar and Hugues IX 'le Brun' de Lusignan raised a claim on the inheritance. When Adhémar swore loyalty to Philippe II after the death of Richard the Lionheart, Philippe promised him a hearing over the inheritance of La Marche before the Royal Court, where his claim would be considered favourably. However Hugues de Lusignan found his own way to enforce his claim. He swore loyalty to King John as the new duke of Aquitaine, but took his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine into captivity and so was able to force his investiture with La Marche in January 1200.
     "The engagement of Adhémar's heiress with Hugues IX's son Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan, probably in the spring of 1200, should be seen against this background. Through the marriage of the heiress to Angoulême with a Lusignan the inheritance dispute would be settled and the claims of both families resolved. However in the subsequent Treaty of Le Goulet (22 May 1200) King Philippe II August reached an agreement with King John that the count of Angoulême and the viscount of Limoges were to return to the suzerainty of John as duke of Aquitaine, and that he in turn should recognise their claims, including Adhémar's to La Marche. Shortly after the agreement, John was to go to Aquitaine and reach a contractual reconciliation with Adhémar of Angoulême and Guy V of Limoges.
     "However, with the provisions of Le Goulet that favoured Adhémar's claim, John had brought into question his investiture of the Lusignans with La Marche a few months earlier. On 24 August 1200 in Bordeaux John married Isabella of Angoulême, according to Roger of Hoveden with the consent of Adhémar, putting aside her engagement to Hugues IX de Lusignan. Obviously this marriage was politically motivated by the personal rapprochement between John and Adhémar. Thereby John could assert a future inheritance claim to both Angoulême and La Marche on behalf of Isabella against the claims of the Lusignans, a family which had previously made exercise of power in Aquitaine very difficult for the house of Plantagenet. Their response followed promptly: they turned to King Philippe II August and before his court accused King John of bride theft. Hugues IX de Lusignan also married Mathilde d'Angoulême, Adhémar's eldest brother Vulgrin III's daughter, whom Adhémar had passed over in the inheritance of Angoulême. Through her he intended to put John and Isabella's inheritance rights into question.
     "Adhémar died in Limoges on 16 June 1202. Isabella succeeded him as the ruler of the county of Angoulême. Her title, however, was largely empty since her husband John, king of England, denied Isabella control of her inheritance as well as her marriage dowry and dower. John's appointed governor, Bartholomew le Puy, ran most of the administrative affairs of Angoulême until John's death in 1216. In 1217 Isabella returned and seized her inheritance from le Puy, who appealed unsuccessfully to the English king for help."5

Reference: Weis [1992:134] Line 153-27.1 GAV-21 EDV-21 GKJ-23. Aymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence was also known as Adhémar Comte d'Angoulême.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "AYMAR TALAFER d’Angoulême ([1160]-Limoges 16 Jun 1202). "Vuillelmus Talafers comes Engolismensis Vulgrini filius et Margarita uxor mea et filii nostri Vulgrinus scilicet primogenitus noster, Vuillelmus Talafers, Ademarus, Grisetus, Fulco et Almodis filia nostra uxor Amanei de Lebret" transferred rights to Saint-Amant-de-Boixe by charter dated 1171[685]. The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis records the death "Natali Apostolorum Petri et Pauli" of "Wlgrinus Comes Engolismensis" leaving an only daughter, recording that she was disinherited by "Guillermus…et Ademarus defuncto…fratri" (in 1181 from the context)[686]. He succeeded his brother in [1186] as Comte d’Angoulême. "Ademarus…comes Engolismensis, filius Wi Cædentis Ferrum et frater Wlgrini comitis" issued an undated charter concerning the abbey of La Couronne[687]. "Ademarus Engolismensis comes" donated property to Saint-Amant-de-Boixe by charter dated to [1186/91] naming "fratres quidam mei Vulgrinus et Vuillelmus Talafers" who were counts before him[688]. Comte de la Marche 1200. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins commemorates "Haymardus comes Angolismensis mariti quondam Aales comitisse Angolismensis" on "XV Kal Jan"[689].
     "m ([1186]) as her second husband, ALIX de Courtenay, divorced wife of GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Joigny, daughter of PIERRE de France Seigneur de Courtenay & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[690]. "Ademarus comes Engolismensis et uxor mea Alaidis de Cortenai" renounced rights relating to Vindelle by charter dated to [1186/91][691]. “Alix Engolismensis comitissa" swore homage to Philippe II King of France by charter dated 1204[692]. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[693]. A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between “dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “dominus Petrus de Cortaniaco” was father of “dominam Adalmues comitissam Engolismensem”, who was mother of “dominam Ysabellem, uxorem…comitis Marchie”[694]."
Med Lands cites:
[685] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 302, p. 270.
[686] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 72, RHGF XII, p. 448.
[687] Documents historiques sur l'Angoûmois, Tome I (Paris, 1869), p. 129.
[688] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 253, p. 237.
[689] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[690] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[691] Saint-Amand-de-Boixe 256, p. 240.
[692] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 741, p. 272.
[693] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[694] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 3367, p. 574.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Angoulême): “2) Aymar «Taillefer» d’Angoulême ° 1160 + 16/06/1202 (Limoges) comte d’Angoulême (1186) et de la Marche (1200) (cité dans des chartes de 1171 & 1186/91)
ép. 1186 Alix de Courtenay ° 1160 + 12/02/1218 (fille de Pierre de France, seigneur de Courtenay, et d’Elisabeth de Courtenay ; divorcée de Guillaume 1er, comte de Joigny) (citée dans une charte à Vindelle entre 1186 & 1191) ”.3

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 7): "A5. Alix de Courtenay, *1160, +14.9.1218; 1m: ca 1178 (div 1180) Cte Guillaume I de Joigny (+1220); 2m: 1186 Cte Aymar III d'Angouleme (*ca 1160 +16.6.1202.)2"
; Per Racines et Histoire (Courtenay): “Alix de Courtenay ° ~1160 + 12/02/1218
ép. 1) avant 1179 (1178 ?, div. 1186) Guillaume 1er,comte de Joigny + 15/02/1220 (fils de Renard IV, comte de Joigny, et d’Adélaïde de Nevers)
ép. 2) 1186 Aymar 1er ou III, comte d’Angoulême ° ~1160 + 16/06/1202 (Limoges) (fils de Guillaume VI «Taillefer» et de Marguerite de Turenne)”.15
; Per Med Lands:
     "ALIX de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[258]. "Willermus comes Joviniaci" donated property to the abbey of Pontigny by charter dated 1180 with the consent of "uxor mea Aaleit et frater meus Gaucherius"[259]. “Alix Engolismensis comitissa" swore homage to Philippe II King of France by charter dated 1204[260]. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[261]. A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between “dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “dominus Petrus de Cortaniaco” was father of “dominam Adalmues comitissam Engolismensem”, who was mother of “dominam Ysabellem, uxorem…comitis Marchie”[262].
     "m firstly ([1178], divorced 1186) as his first wife, GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Joigny, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-15 Feb 1220).
     "m secondly (1186) AYMAR I Comte d'Angoulême, son of GUILLAUME VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême & his second wife Marguerite de Turenne ([1160]-Limoges 16 Jun 1202)."
Med Lands cites:
[258] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[259] Yonne 295, p. 314.
[260] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 741, p. 272.
[261] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[262] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 3367, p. 574.13
He was Comte d'Angoulême between 1186 and 1202.10,4 He was comte de La Marche in 1200.10

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 153-27, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’ Angoulême, p.6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aymer_of_Angoul%C3%AAme. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adhémar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007615&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#AymarIdied1202. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI Taillefer: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033522&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Turenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033523&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.6.
  11. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix|Alice de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007616&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#Alixdied1218
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Aymar Taillefer: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aymar_Taillefer. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Courtenay, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Courtenay.pdf
  16. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 139-24, p. 122.
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.9. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme1,2,3

F, #4210, b. circa 1160, d. 12 September 1218
FatherPierre I Constantinople (?) Seigneur de Courtenay, de Tanlay, de Champignelles, etc.4,1,2,3,5,6 b. c 1125, d. b 1183
MotherElizabeth de Courtenay1,2,3,5,6 b. c 1135, d. a 14 Sep 1205
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited7 Jun 2020
     AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme was born circa 1160 at Courtenay, Galinois, France.7,8,9,2,3,5,6 She married Andre de Montmirail Sire de la Ferte-Gaucher, seigneur de Montmirail, son of Hélie de Montmirail Vicomte de la Ferte-Gaucher and Adelaide de Mareuil Dame de Bussy-Lettree, after 1169;
Her 1st husband
Per Stewart email [2004]:
     "In a post of 22 October last year, in the thread 'Re: Isabel of Angouleme's mother, "Adalmues" de Courtenay' I wrote:
     "By an account that I can't place at present, the lady married secondly André de la Ferté-Gaucher, before marrying thirdly Aimar III Taillefer, count of Angoulême."
     "The information I failed to remember was in volume 7 of _Histoire des ducs et des comtes de Champagne_ by Henri d'Arbois de Jubainville with Léon Pigeotte, 8 vols (Paris, 1859-1869). I no longer have access to this, but have found the details on p 176 of Nicolas Vincent's 'Isabella of Angoulême: John's Jezebel', _King John: New Interpretations_, edited by S.D. Church (Woodbridge, 1999).
     "Alix was married first (not secondly as I wrote before) to André of La Ferté-Gaucher, seigneur of Montmirail. Vincent places this "some time after 1169", but it was perhaps a very brief marriage from ca 1177/8 - ES XIII Tafel 139 (where Alix is not mentioned) states that his first wife Hildiarde d'Oisy, viscountess of Meaux, died shortly before 1177, and André himself was certainly dead by 1180.
     "Evidence for this marriage is in the obituary of the Hôtel-Dieu at Provins, written ca 1270, see _Obituaires de la province de Sens_, tome I, Diocèses de Sens et de Paris, edited by Auguste Molinier (Paris, 1902), part 2, p 967: "XV kal. [Januarii] Ob. Andreas de Firmitate Gaucheri, et Haymardus, comes Angolismensis, mariti quondam Aales, comitisse Angolismensis, que nobis multa bona contulit" (18 December, André of La Ferté-Gaucher and Aimar, count of Angoulême, former husbands of Alix, countess of Angoulême, who conveyed many endowments to us). Obits of deceased spouses were often commemorated together, regardless of their actual dates of death.
     "Vincent (loc cit, note 35) cites various charters of Alix, including two that she gave for the Hôtel-Dieu, one of which names her as lady of La Ferté-Gaucher - this lordship was apparently retained as her dower.
     "As discussed previously, Alix then married Guillaume, count of Joigny, by whom she had a son. This marriage ended in divorce, and she married thirdly Aimar of Angoulême."10,11,5 AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme married Guillaume I (?) Cte de Joigny, son of Renaud II/IV de Joigny Comte de Joigny and Adèle/Adélaïde de Nevers, circa 1178;
His 1st wife; her 2nd husband.12,2,13,3,5,6 AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme and Guillaume I (?) Cte de Joigny were divorced in 1186; Genealogy.EU (Capet 7 page) says div. 1180.2,13,3,6 AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme married Aymer/Adhémar III Taillefer (?) Cte Angoulême et de La Marche, de Valence, son of Guillaume VI Taillefer (?) Comte d'Angoulême and Marguerite de Turenne, in April 1186;
Her 2nd husband.8,14,15,16,17,5,6
AliceAlix de Courtenay Countess of Angouleme died on 12 September 1218 at France.2,3,5,6
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Angoulême): “2) Aymar «Taillefer» d’Angoulême ° 1160 + 16/06/1202 (Limoges) comte d’Angoulême (1186) et de la Marche (1200) (cité dans des chartes de 1171 & 1186/91)
ép. 1186 Alix de Courtenay ° 1160 + 12/02/1218 (fille de Pierre de France, seigneur de Courtenay, et d’Elisabeth de Courtenay ; divorcée de Guillaume 1er, comte de Joigny) (citée dans une charte à Vindelle entre 1186 & 1191) ”.14

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 14.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 57:14.5
GAV-21 EDV-21 GKJ-23.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Alix was born about 1160, the daughter of Pierre I de France, sire de Courtenay, and Elisabeth de Courtenay. She married three times. About 1177 she became the second wife of André de Montmirail, sire de la Ferté-Gaucher, son of Hélie de Montmirail, sire de la Ferté-Gaucher, and Adelaide de Mareuil, dame de Bussy-Lettrée. About 1178 she married Guillaume I, comte de Joigny, son of Renaud II, comte de Joigny, and Adèle de Nevers. The marriage ended in divorce about 1186. Soon after she married Adhémar, comte d'Angoulême, son of Guillaume VI Taillefer, comte d'Angoulême, and Marguerite de Turenne. Their daughter Isabella would have progeny with both her husbands, John, king of England, and Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan, comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême.
     “When Adhémar died on 16 June 1202, Isabella was his heiress. On 24 August 1200 she had married King John in defiance of a previous betrothal to Hugues IX de Lusignan, and Philippe II August, king of France filed a lawsuit against King John. When Isabella stayed in England as John's queen, Alix took over the rule in Angoulême. After all King John's possessions and rights in France were declared to be forfeited in 1204, Alix hastened to pay homage to King Philippe II for Angoulême on behalf of her daughter. She was thereby able to preserve the inheritance of her daughter from expropriation.
     “Alix died on 12 February 1218.”.5

; This is the same person as:
”Alice of Courtenay” at Wikipedia and as
”Alice de Courtenay” at Wikipédia (Fr.)18,19

Reference: Weis [1992"106] Line 117-26.1

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 7): "A5. Alix de Courtenay, *1160, +14.9.1218; 1m: ca 1178 (div 1180) Cte Guillaume I de Joigny (+1220); 2m: 1186 Cte Aymar III d'Angouleme (*ca 1160 +16.6.1202.)16"

; Per Med Lands:
     "ALIX de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[258]. "Willermus comes Joviniaci" donated property to the abbey of Pontigny by charter dated 1180 with the consent of "uxor mea Aaleit et frater meus Gaucherius"[259]. “Alix Engolismensis comitissa" swore homage to Philippe II King of France by charter dated 1204[260]. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[261]. A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between “dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “dominus Petrus de Cortaniaco” was father of “dominam Adalmues comitissam Engolismensem”, who was mother of “dominam Ysabellem, uxorem…comitis Marchie”[262].
     "m firstly ([1178], divorced 1186) as his first wife, GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Joigny, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-15 Feb 1220).
     "m secondly (1186) AYMAR I Comte d'Angoulême, son of GUILLAUME VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême & his second wife Marguerite de Turenne ([1160]-Limoges 16 Jun 1202)."
Med Lands cites:
[258] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874.
[259] Yonne 295, p. 314.
[260] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 741, p. 272.
[261] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928.
[262] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 3367, p. 574.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Courtenay): “Alix de Courtenay ° ~1160 + 12/02/1218
ép. 1) avant 1179 (1178 ?, div. 1186) Guillaume 1er,comte de Joigny + 15/02/1220 (fils de Renard IV, comte de Joigny, et d’Adélaïde de Nevers)
ép. 2) 1186 Aymar 1er ou III, comte d’Angoulême ° ~1160 + 16/06/1202 (Limoges) (fils de Guillaume VI «Taillefer» et de Marguerite de Turenne)”.20

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 117-26, p. 106. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix|Alice de Courtenay: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007616&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/chamsensjoi.htm#Alixdied1218. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  8. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  9. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1599] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 3 March 2004 "Marriages of Isabelle of Angoulême's mother Alix de Courtenay"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 March 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 3 March 2004."
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Cambrai.pdf, p. 5.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106064&tree=LEO
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’ Angoulême, p.6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adhémar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007615&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet7.html
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANGOULEME.htm#AymarIdied1202
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Alice de Courtenay: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_de_Courtenay. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Alice of Courtenay. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Courtenay, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Courtenay.pdf
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.9. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France1,2,3,4

M, #4211, b. 1081, d. 1 August 1137
FatherPhilippe I (?) King of France2,5,4,6,7 b. b 23 May 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108
MotherBertha (?) van Holland2,5,4,8,7 b. bt 1054 - 1055, d. 15 Oct 1094
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited3 Oct 2020
     Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France was born in 1081 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now).9,10,5,4,11,12 He married Lucienne (?) de Rochefort, daughter of Guy II "le Rouge" de Montlhéry Comte de Rochefort-en-Yvelines and Adelaide de Crecy Dame de Gournay-sur-Marne, in 1104; her 1st husband.4,13,11,14,15,12 Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France and Lucienne (?) de Rochefort were divorced on 25 May 1107; Per Wikipedia: "the marriage was annulled on 23 May 1107 at the Council of Troyes by Pope Paschal II.[17]"
Wikipedia cites:
[17] Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: kings of France, 987-1328, 132.
Per Med Lands: "annulled Council of Troyes 23 May 1107 on grounds of consanguinity."13,4,11,15,12 Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France married Adelaide de Maurienne Countess of Savoy, Queen of France, daughter of Umberto II "il Rinforzato" (?) Count of Maurienne, Aosta & Savoy, Margrave of Turin and Gisela (?) Countess of Burgundy-Ivrea, circa April 1115 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France (now); her 1st husband, his 2nd wife; Leo van de Pas says m. April 1115.10,16,5,4,17,18,11,12
Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France died on 1 August 1137 at Château Bethizy, Bethisy-Saint-Pierre, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France (now).4,10,5,11,15,12
Louis VI "le Gros" (?) King of France was buried after 1 August 1137 at Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 Dec 1081, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     1 Aug 1137 (aged 55), Bethisy-Saint-Pierre, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
     French Royalty. Born in Paris, Louis was the only son and heir of King Philip I and his wife Bertha of Holland. He was called "The Fat" (Le Gros) for obvious reasons. Due to his father's failing health, Louis held the reigns of power long before Philip's death on 29 July 1108. Much of his 29-year reign was spent fighting French barons over the crown lands, or the English King Henry I over the possession of Normandy. Louis married Lucienne de Rochefort in 1104, and they had one daughter, Isabelle. Louis had the marriage annulled three years later. He then married Adelaide de Maurienne, a princess of Savoy, on 3 August 1115. They had eight children. Louis was the first of the Capetian dynasty rulers to make lasting inroads toward centralizing royal power in France. He died of dysentery at the castle of Bethisy-Saint-Pierre at the age of 55. He was succeeded by his son Louis (the Young), who was better suited to, and intended for, a monastic life rather than the throne. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Philip I of France 1052–1108
          Bertha of Holland 1055–1093
     Spouse
          Adelaide of Savoy 1092–1154
     Siblings
          Constance of France, Princess of Antioch 1078–1126
     Children
          Philippe de France 1116–1131
          King Louis VII 1120–1180
          Henry of France 1121–1175
          Robert I de Dreux 1123–1188
          Peter I of France 1126–1183
          Philippe de France 1133–1161
     BURIAL     Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 2 Apr 2001
     Find A Grave Memorial 21089.4,19
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Louis VI 'the Fat' was born in Paris in 1081, the son of Philippe I, king of France, and Bertha of Holland. He was designated his father's successor in 1100. He was as gross and gluttonous as his father and has gone down in history as 'the Fat'. More is known about him than his predecessors thanks to the writings of his friend and mentor Suger, abbot of St. Denis, who from 1127 served both Louis VI and Louis VII as an adviser on the government of France and the administration of royal lands.
     "In 1104 Louis married Lucienne, daughter of Guy I, sire de Rochefort, but repudiated her in 1107. In 1108 he succeeded his father and was crowned king on 3 August 1108 at Orléans. In spite of his size, Louis was an energetic king and in the course of a long reign of twenty-nine years he did much to curb the growing power of the feudal nobles, many of whom had become semi-independent of the French crown. He was also skilful in his foreign policy and a deeply religious man.
     "In April 1115 in Paris, he married Adèle de Savoie, daughter of Umberto II, comte de Savoie and Gisela de Bourgogne, and they had seven sons and one daughter, of whom three sons and their daughter Constance would have progeny. In 1129 Abbé Suger started to build the abbey church of St. Denis, the first Gothic church with flying buttresses.
     "Louis' eldest son Philippe was designated successor in the customary way, but was killed while boar hunting in 1131, so the next son Louis took his place. In 1137 Louis VI arranged a splendid marriage for his son with the heiress of the duchy of Aquitaine, Eleanor de Poitou, and the marriage took place at Bordeaux on 22 July. During the festivities the king was taken seriously ill with dysentery, which had long plagued him. He returned to Paris as speedily as possible and there he had himself laid on a bed of cinders in the form of a cross, on which he died at the age of fifty-six on 1 August 1137, at the château of Bethizy. He was buried at St. Denis."11

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
2. Kwartierstatenboek, 1983 . 66 and biographical details.
3. Debrett's Kings and Queens of Europe, London, 1988 , Williamson, David. biographical details.11,2
He was Cte de Vexin et de Vermandois.4 GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-25.

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS THIBAUT de France, son of PHILIPPE I King of France & his first wife Bertha of Holland (Paris end 1081-Château Bethizy, near Paris 1 Aug 1137, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[366]. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis"[367]. The difficulty of dating Louis´s birth is discussed fully by Luchaire, who opts for end 1081 as the most likely possibility[368]. Louis´s birth would be dated to [1077/78] if Suger is correct in recording that he was about sixty years old when he died[369]. The early 12th century Vita Sancti Arnulfi Bishop of Soissons by Hariulf records Louis´s birth in 1081[370]. This date is corroborated by the Chronicon S. Petri Catalaunensis which records that Louis was 26 years old when his father died in 1108[371]. His father installed him as Comte du Vexin, de Mantes et de Pontoise in 1092. He lived away from court after the repudiation of his mother. Associate-king 1098/1100, elected rex designatus by an assembly of nobles and bishops but not crowned[372]. His father transferred effective governing power to him in 1101, investing him as Comte de Vermandois between 1101 and 1105. He succeeded his father in 1108 as LOUIS VI "le Gros" King of France. According to Luchaire, the nickname "le Gros", while not contemporary, was first applied to him as early as the 12th century, including in a fragmentary manuscript which records that "Rex Francorum Ludovicus Grossus" built several churches in 1112[373]. He was consecrated 3 Aug 1108, at the Cathedral of Sainte-Croix, Orléans. Suger's Vita Ludovici records his coronation at Orléans by "Senonensis archiepiscopus Daimbertus"[374]. In 1119, Louis VI took Cluny and all its dependent priories under his protection, acquiring in return the right to build castles on their lands with the permission of the abbot of Cluny[375]. He transferred effective power to his son at Châteauneuf-sur-Loire 28 Oct 1135, due to ill health. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the death of King Louis VI "Kal Aug" aged about sixty years old and his burial "ad ecclesiam sanctorum Martyrum"[376]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus rex Francorum"[377]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus…Francorum rex"[378].
     "Betrothed (1104, annulled Council of Troyes 23 May 1107 on grounds of consanguinity) to LUCIENNE de Rochefort, daughter of GUY [II] "le Rouge" de Rochefort Seigneur de Rochefort-en-Yvelines & his second wife Adelais de Crécy dame de Gournay-sur-Marne ([1090/95]-6 May, 1138 or after). This betrothal is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who calls her "Luciana", names her father and specifies that she later married "Guiscardo de Bello Loco"[379]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the betrothal of "filius dominus Ludovicus" and "filiam Guidonis [comitis de Rupe Forti]" and their separation on grounds of consanguinity[380]. She married (after 23 May 1107) Guichard [IV] Seigneur de Beaujeu. "Luciana soror Hugonis de Creciaco" donated "terrae sue…apud Agglias et Buxiacum" to Notre-Dame de Longpont, with the consent of Louis VII King of France, by charter dated to [1140], signed by "Hugone de Creciaco…Radulfo comite, Manasse de Turnomio…et Beatrix uxor eius"[381].
     "m (Paris [25/30] Mar 1115) as her first husband, ADELAIDE de Maurienne, daughter of HUMBERT III "le Renforcé" Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie & his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1092]-Montmartre 18 Nov 1154, bur Montmartre, église abbatiale de Saint-Pierre). Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and her four oldest sons[382]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses records "filiam Humberti comitis Morienne" as wife of "Ludovicum regem Grossum"[383]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "regina Alaydis…soror Amadei comitis Sabaudie" as wife of "Ludovici Grossi"[384]. She exercised considerable influence over her husband, playing an active part in the downfall of Etienne de Garlande, Chancellier de France. After her son Louis succeeded in 1137, she conspired against Suger, Abbé de Saint-Denis, triggering a quarrel with her son. She married secondly ([1138]) as his second wife, Mathieu Seigneur de Montmorency, Connétable of France under King Louis VII, and retired to her lands at Compiègne. Her second marriage is confirmed by an undated charter which records a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicolas d´Acy, near Senlis made in the presence of "dominæ Adelæ reginæ et domini Mathei mariti eius"[385]. She retired to the church of the Abbaye de Saint-Pierre at Montmartre, which she had founded, in 1153[386]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Dec" of "Adelaidis regina"[387].
     "Mistress (1): MARIE de Breuillet, daughter of [RENAUD de Breuillet & his wife ---]. Kerrebrouck names Marie de Breuillet as the mother of King Louis´s daughter Isabelle, citing an article by Dufour and adding that according to Depoin "Renaud de Breuillet pourrait bien être le grand-père maternel d´Isabelle"[388]. A charter dated to [1115/1118] records a donation of land "apud Soliniacum" made to Longpont Notre-Dame made by "Bernardus de Cabrosa", with the consent of "Ivisia uxore sua, Bernardo amborum filio, Helizabeth et Cecilia filiabus", and the later confirmation by "Maria…Reinaldi de Braiolo filia" in the presence of "Florentia uxore Rainaldi, Godefrido de Braiolo…"[389]. "Maria filia Rainaldi de Brayolo" confirmed the donation of "medietatem terre de Soliniaco" made by "Bernardus de Cabrosia", adding that "pater…eius" donated property with the consent of "eadem Maria…cum filiis suis Aymone et Nanterio", by undated charter, in the presence of "Florencia uxore Rainaldi, Maria filia eius, et filiis eius Aymone et Nanterio, Godefrido de Braiolo…", the document also recording the subsequent confirmation by "Rainaldus filius eiusdem Rainaldi"[390]."
Med Lands cites:
[366] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.
[367] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.
[368] Luchaire, A. (1890) Louis VI le Gros, Annales de sa vie et de son règne (Paris), pp. 285-9.
[369] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXXII, pp. 147-8.
[370] Luchaire (1890), p. 285, citing Vita Sancti Arnulfi.
[371] Ex Chronico S. Petri Catalaunensis 1108, RHGF XII, p. 276.
[372] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 79.
[373] Fragmentum ex Viteri membrana, RHGF XII, p. 63, cited and dated in Luchaire (1890), p. 284, which cites several other sources to justify the statement.
[374] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XIII, p. 48.
[375] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 103.
[376] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXXII, pp. 147-8.
[377] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.
[378] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.
[379] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 157.
[380] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis VIII, p. 26.
[381] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCXCII, p. 235.
[382] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.
[383] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 258.
[384] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846.
[385] Duchesne, A. (1624) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Montmorency et de Laval (Paris), Preuves, p. 43.
[386] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 81.
[387] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 331.
[388] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 83 and 91, footnote 91, citing Dufour, J. ´Un faux de Louis VI relatif à Liancourt (Oise)´, Bibliothèque de l´Ecole des Chartes, Tome 144 (1986), appendice, pp. 66-7, and Depoin, J. (1900) Bulletin historique et philologique du Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques, p. 144 (not yet consulted).
[389] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCLVI, p. 213.
[390] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCLXXIV, p. 224.12


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Louis VI (c.1081 – 1 August 1137), called the Fat (French: le Gros) or the Fighter (French: le Batailleur), was King of France from 1108 to 1137. Chronicles called him "roi de Saint-Denis".
     "Louis was the first member of the house of Capet to make a lasting contribution to centralizing the institutions of royal power.[1] He spent almost all of his twenty-nine-year reign fighting either the "robber barons" who plagued Paris[2] or the Norman kings of England for their continental possession of Normandy. Nonetheless, Louis VI managed to reinforce his power considerably and became one of the first strong kings of France since the death of Charlemagne in 814.
     "Louis was a warrior-king, but by his forties his weight had become so great that it was increasingly difficult for him to lead in the field. A biography – The Deeds of Louis the Fat, prepared by his loyal advisor Abbot Suger of Saint Denis – offers a fully developed portrait of his character, in contrast to what little historians know about most of his predecessors.
Early life
     "Louis was born around 1081 in Paris, the son of Philip I and Bertha of Holland.[3]
     "Suger tells us: "In his youth, growing courage matured his spirit with youthful vigour, making him bored with hunting and the boyish games with which others of his age used to enjoy themselves and forget the pursuit of arms." And..."How valiant he was in youth, and with what energy he repelled the king of the English, William Rufus, when he attacked Louis' inherited kingdom."[4]
     "Louis married Lucienne de Rochefort, the daughter of his father's seneschal, in 1104, but repudiated her three years later. They had no children.
     "On 3 August 1115 Louis married Adelaide of Maurienne, daughter of Humbert II of Savoy and of Gisela of Burgundy, and niece of Pope Callixtus II. They had eight children. Adelaide was one of the most politically active of all France's medieval queens. Her name appears on 45 royal charters from the reign of Louis VI. During her time as queen (1115-1137), royal charters were dated with both her regnal year and that of the king.
     "Suger became Louis's adviser even before he succeeded his father as king at the age of 26 on 29 July 1108. Louis's half-brother prevented him from reaching Rheims, and so Daimbert, Archbishop of Sens, crowned him in the cathedral of Orléans on 3 August.[5] Ralph the Green, Archbishop of Rheims, sent envoys to challenge the validity of the coronation and anointing, but to no avail.[5]
Challenges to royal authority
     "When Louis ascended the throne the Kingdom of France was a collection of feudal principalities. Beyond the Isle de France the French Kings had little authority over the great Dukes and Counts of the realm but slowly Louis began to change this and assert Capetian rights. This process would take two centuries to complete but began in the reign of Louis VI.
     "The second great challenge facing Louis was to counter the rising power of the Anglo-Normans under their capable new King, Henry I of England.
Struggles with the robber barons
     "From early in his reign (and during his father's reign) Louis faced the problem of the robber barons who resisted the King's authority and engaged in brigandry, making the area around Paris unsafe.
     "From their castles, such as Le Puiset, Chateaufort, and Montlhery, these barons would charge tolls, waylay merchants and pilgrims, terrorize the peasantry and loot churches and abbeys, the latter deeds drawing the ire of the writers of the day, who were mostly clerics.
     "In 1108, soon after he ascended the throne, Louis engaged in war with Hugh of Crecy, who was plaguing the countryside and had captured Eudes, Count of Corbeil, and imprisoned him at La Ferte-Alais. Louis besieged that fortress to free Eudes.[6]
     "In early 1109, Louis besieged his half-brother, Philip, the son of Bertrade de Montfort, who was involved in brigandry and conspiracies against the King, at Mantes-la-Jolie.[6] Philip's plots included the lords of Montfort-l'Amaury. Amaury III de Montfort held many castles which, when linked together, formed a continuous barrier between Louis and vast swathes of his domains, threatening all communication south of Paris.[6]
     "In 1108-1109 a seigneur named Aymon Vaire-Vache seized the lordship of Bourbon from his nephew, Archambaud, a minor. Louis demanded the boy be restored to his rights but Aymon refused the summons. Louis raised his army and besieged Aymon at his castle at Germigny-sur-l'Aubois, forcing its surrender and enforcing the rights of Archambaud.[7]
     "In 1121, Louis established the marchands de l'eau, to regulate trade along the Seine.[8]
     "In 1122, Aimeri, Bishop of Clermont, appealed to Louis after William VI, Count of Auvergne, had driven him from his episcopal town. When William refused Louis' summons, Louis raised an army at Bourges, and marched into Auvergne, supported by some of his leading vassals, such as the Counts of Anjou, Brittany, and Nevers. Louis seized the fortress of Pont-du-Chateau on the Allier, then attacked Clermont, which William was forced to abandon. Aimeri was restored. Four years later William rebelled again and Louis, though his increasing weight made campaigning difficult, marched again. He burned Montferrand and seized Clermont a second time, captured William, and brought him before the court at Orleans to answer for his crimes.[7]
     "Some of the outlaws became notorious for their cruelty, the most notable being Thomas, Lord of Coucy, who was reputed to indulge in torture of his victims, including hanging men by their testicles, cutting out eyes, and chopping off feet. Guibert of Nogent noted of him, "No one can imagine the number of those who perished in his dungeons, from starvation, from torture, from filth."[9]
     "Another notable brigand was Hugh, Lord of Le Puiset, who was ravaging the lands around Chartres. In March 1111,[10] Louis heard charges against Hugh at his court at Melun from Theobald II, Count of Champagne, the Archbishop of Sens, and also from bishops and abbots. Louis commanded Hugh to appear before him to answer these charges, but Hugh evaded the summons. Louis stripped him of his lands and titles and laid siege to Le Puiset. After a fierce struggle, Louis took the castle and burned it to the ground, taking Hugh prisoner.
     "Rashly, Louis released Hugh, and while Louis was engaged in war with Henry I of England and Theobald, Hugh raised another band of brigands and began ravaging the country again. When Louis returned his attention to Hugh, he found Le Puiset rebuilt and Hugh receiving aid from Theobald. Hugh held out against the King until Theobald abandoned him. Once again Louis razed Le Puiset and Hugh, who had sworn never to return to his brigandage, rebuilt the castle and resumed terrorizing his neighbours. At the third attempt, Louis finally defeated Hugh and stripped him of his possessions for the last time. Hugh later died on an expiatory pilgrimage to the Holy Land.[11]
     "These were just some of the recalcitrant nobles Louis was forced to contend with. There were many more, and Louis was in constant motion against them, leading his army from castle to castle, bringing law and order to his domains. The result was increased recognition of the King's authority and the Crown's ability to impose its will, so that all sectors of French society began to see the King as their protector.
War with Henry I over Gisors
     "After seizing the English Crown, Henry I of England deprived his brother, Robert Curthose, of the Duchy of Normandy and quickly took possession of the castle at Gisors, a fortress of strategic importance on the right bank of the Epte, commanding the road between Rouen and Paris. This violated an earlier agreement between Henry and the French King that Gisors should remain in the hands of a neutral castellan, or else be demolished.
     "This move threatened the Capetian domain and Louis was outraged, demanding Henry, as his vassal, appear before him to account for his actions. The two kings met, in force, in March 1109[12] at the borders of their respective territories at the bridge of Neauphle on the Epte.[12] Henry refused to relinquish Gisors. Louis challenged the English King to single combat to settle the issue. When Henry refused, war was inevitable, a war which would last, on and off, for twenty years.
     "The first years of the war went well for Louis until the influential Theobald II, Count of Champagne, switched to Henry's side. By early 1112[12] Theobald had succeeded in bringing together a coalition of barons with grievances against Louis: Lancelin of Bulles,[12] Ralph of Beaugency,[12] Milo of Bray-sur-Seine,[12] Hugh of Crecy,[12] Guy of Rochfort,[12] Hugh of Le Puiset[12] and Hugh, Count of Troyes.[12]
     "Louis defeated Theobald's coalition but the additional effort meant he could not defeat the English monarch as well or force him to abandon Gisors, and in March 1113[12] Louis was forced to sign a treaty recognizing Henry I as suzerain of Brittany and Maine. Peace of sorts lasted three years until April 1116[12] when hostilities renewed in the French and Norman Vexins, with each king making gains from his rival.
     "By 1119, buoyed by several successes and the capture (through treachery) of Les Andelys, Louis felt ready for a final encounter to end the war. In the fierce Battle of Bremule, in August 1119,[12] Louis's troops broke and were routed, abandoning the royal banner and sweeping the King along with them in retreat to Les Andelys. A counterattack through Évreux to seize Breteuil failed, and Louis, his health failing, looked for peace.
     "He appealed to Pope Calixtus II, who agreed to help and met with Henry at Gisors in November 1120.[12] The terms of the peace included Henry's heir, William Adelin, doing homage to Louis for Normandy, a return of all territories captured by both kings with the painful exception of Gisors itself, which Louis was forced to concede to Henry.
Intervention in Flanders
     "On 2 March 1127, the Count of Flanders, Charles the Good, was assassinated in St. Donatian's Cathedral at Bruges. It was a scandal in itself but made worse because Charles had no heir.
     "Soon a variety of claimants were abroad, including William of Ypres, son of Charles's uncle and popularly thought to be complicit in the murder, Thierry of Alsace, the son of Gertrude of Flanders, Duchess of Lorraine, Arnold of Denmark, nephew of Charles the Good, who seized Saint-Omer. Baldwin, Count of Hainault, who seized Oudenarde, and Godfrey I, Count of Louvain and Duke of Brabant.[13]
     "Louis had his own candidate in mind and marched into Flanders with an army and urged the barons to elect William Clito, son of Robert Curthose, who had been disinherited of Normandy by his uncle Henry I of England, as their new Count. He had no better claim to Flanders than being the King's candidate but on 23 March 1127 he was elected Count by the Flemings.[13]
     "Louis then moved decisively to secure Flanders, apprehending the murderers of Charles the Good and ousting the rival claimants. On 2 April he took Ghent, on 5 April Bruges, on 26 April he took Ypres, capturing William of Ypres and imprisoning him at Lille. He then quickly took Aire, Cassel and all the towns still loyal to William of Ypres.[13]
     "Louis's final act before leaving for France was to witness the execution of Charles the Good's murderers. They were hurled from the roof of the church of Saint Donatian where they had committed their crime.[13]
     "It was a triumph for Louis and demonstrated how far the Crown had come under his leadership, but it was a brief triumph. The new young Count William Clito fared badly, relying on heavy handed feudal ways not suited to the more socially advanced and mercantile Flemings. William's knights ran amok and the Flemings rebelled against Louis's candidate. Ghent and Bruge appealed to Thierry of Alsace and Saint-Omer to Arnold of Denmark.[13]
     "Louis attempted to intervene again but the moment was gone. The people of Bruge rejected him and recognized Thierry of Alsace as their Count, and he quickly moved to enforce his claim. Louis called a great assembly at Arras and had Thierry excommunicated but it was a gesture. Louis abandoned William of Clito, who died during a siege at Alost on 27 July 1128, and after the whole country finally submitted to Thierry, Louis was obliged to confirm his claim.[13]
Invasion of Henry V
     "On 25 November 1120, Louis' fortunes against Henry I of England were raised when Henry's heir, William Ætheling, drunkenly perished aboard the White Ship en route from Normandy to England, putting the future of Henry's dynasty and his position in doubt.
     "By 1123 Louis was involved with a coalition of Norman and French seigneurs opposed to Henry. The plan was to drive the English King from Normandy and replace him with William Clito. Henry, however, easily defeated this coalition then instigated his son-in-law, Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, to invade France.[14]
     "Henry V had married the Empress Matilda, the English King's daughter and the future mother of Henry II of England, 9 years earlier, in hopes of creating an Anglo-German empire, though the couple remained childless. Like Louis, Henry V had designs on the Low Countries and an invasion of Northern France would enable him to strengthen his ambitions in Flanders, as well as support his father-in-law.
     "Thus in 1124, Henry V assembled an army to march on Rheims.[14] It never arrived. In testament to how far Louis had risen as national protector, all of France rose to his appeal against the threat. Henry V was unwilling to see the French barons united behind their King, who now identified himself as the vassal of St Denis, the patron saint of Paris, whose banner he now carried,[15] and the proposed invasion was abandoned.
     "Henry V died a year after the aborted campaign.
Alliance of the Anglo-Normans and Anjou
     "In 1128 Henry I married his sole surviving legitimate child, the dowager Empress Matilda, to Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou. This was a very dangerous alliance for Louis and would prove so during the reign of his successor, Louis VII of France.
Final years
     "As Louis VI approached his end, there seemed to be reasons for optimism. Henry I of England had died on 1 December 1135 and Stephen of Blois had seized the English crown, reneging on the oath he had sworn to Henry I to support Matilda. Stephen was thus in no position to bring the combined Anglo-Norman might against the French crown.
     "Louis had also made great strides in exercising his royal authority over his barons, and even Theobald II had finally rallied to the Capetian cause.[14]
     "Finally, on 9 April 1137, a dying William X, Duke of Aquitaine appointed Louis VI guardian of his fifteen-year-old daughter and heiress, Eleanor of Aquitaine.[16] Eleanor was suddenly the most eligible heiress in Europe, and Louis wasted no time in marrying her to his own heir, the future Louis VII, at the Cathedral of Saint-André in Bordeaux on 25 July 1137.[16] At a stroke Louis had added one of the most powerful duchies in France to the Capetian domains.
     "Louis died of dysentry 7 days later, on 1 August 1137. Despite his achievements, it would be the growing power of the soon to be Angevin Empire that would come to overshadow his successor, its seeds sown in the marriage between the Empress Matilda and Geoffrey Plantagenet and realised through their son, Henry II of England.
     "Louis VI was interred in the Basilica of St Denis in Paris.
Marriages and children
     "He married in 1104: 1) Lucienne de Rochefort — the marriage was annulled on 23 May 1107 at the Council of Troyes by Pope Paschal II.[17]
     "He married in 1115: 2) Adélaide de Maurienne (1092–1154)[17] Their children:
1. Philip (29 August 1116 – 13 October 1131), King of France (1129–31), not to be confused with his brother of the same name; he died as a result of a fall from a horse.
2. Louis VII (1120 – 18 September 1180), King of France.
3. Henry (1121 – 13 November 1175), Archbishop of Reims.[18]
4. Hugues (ca 1122 – died young).
5. Robert (ca 1123 – 11 October 1188), count of Dreux.[19]
6. Peter[20] (September 1126 – 10 April 1183), married Elizabeth, Lady of Courtenay.[21]
7. Constance (ca 1128 – 16 August 1176), married first Eustace IV, count of Boulogne, and then Raymond V of Toulouse.
8. Philip (c.1132 -1160), Archdeacon of Paris[22]
     "With Marie de Breuillet, daughter of Renaud de Breuillet de Dourdan,[23] Louis VI was the father of a daughter:
9. Isabelle (ca 1105 – before 1175), married (ca. 1119) Guillaume I of Chaumont in 1117.[24]
Notes
1. Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages 1993, p 410.
2. "Government, law and society", R. van Caenegem, The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450, ed. J. H. Burns, (Cambridge University Press, 1988), 188.
33 "The Kingdom of the Frank to 1108", Constance Brittain Bouchard, The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 4, Part II, ed. David Luscombe, Jonathan Riley-Smith, (Cambridge University Press, 2004), 126. "Probably in 1072, Philip married Bertha, daughter of the late count of Holland, Florent I, and stepdaughter of Robert of Frisia, count of Flanders. [...] For some years Philip and Bertha were troubled by their failure to have a son. The birth of the future Louis VI in 1081 was striking enough for a miracle story to grow up around the event [...]."
4. Abbot Suger: Life of King Louis the Fat, Chapter 1.
5. "The Historia Iherosolimitana of Robert the Monk and the Coronation of Louis VI", James Naus, Writing the Early Crusades: Text, Transmission and Memory, ed. Marcus Bull, Damien Kempf, (Boydell Press, 2014), 112.
6. "France: Louis VI and Louis VII (1108-1180)", Louis Halphen, The Cambridge Medieval History: Contest of Empire and Papacy, Volume V, ed. J.R. Tanner, C.W. Previte-Orton, and Z.N. Brooke. The Macmillan Company, 1926. p. 596.
7. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V, p598
8. Bailey W. Diffie, Prelude to Empire: Portugal Overseas before Henry the Navigator. The University of Nebraska Press, 1060. p 12
9. The Cambridge Medieval History, p594
10. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V, p594
11. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V, p595
12. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V p601
13. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V, p599
14. The Cambridge Medieval History Volume V, p604
15. Encyclopædia Britannica
16. Robert Fawtier, The Capetian Kings of France, transl. Lionel Butler and R.J. Adam, (Macmillan, 1989), 21.
17. Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: kings of France, 987-1328, 132.
18. Gislebertus of Mons, Chronicle of Hainaut, transl. Laura Napran, (The Boydell Press, 2005), 68 n288.
19. Fourteen Charters of Robert I of Dreux (1152–1188), Andrew W. Lewis, "Traditio", Vol. 41 (1985), 145.
20. Ann Marie Rasmussen, Mothers and Daughters in Medieval German Literature, (Syracuse University Press, 1997), 9.
21. Isabella of Angouleme: John's Jezebel, Nicholas Vincent, King John: New Interpretations, ed. S. D. Church, (The Boydell Press, 1999), 202.
22. The Career of Philip the Cleric, younger Brother of Louis VII: Apropos of an Unpublished Charter, Andrew W. Lewis, "Traditio", Vol. 50, (Cambridge University Press, 1995), 111,113,116.
23. (FR) Jean Dufour, "Un Faux de Louis VI Relatif a Liancourt (Oise)", Bibliotheque de L'Ecole des Chartes Revue D'Erudition, January–June 1986: 46.
24. Robert Fawtier, The Capetian Kings of France:Monarchy and Nation 987-1328, transl. Lionel Butler and R.J. Adam, (Macmillan Education Ltd, 1989), 19.
References
** Suger, Abbot of Saint Denis. The Deeds of Louis the Fat. Translated with introduction and notes by Richard Cusimano and John Moorhead. Washington, DC : Catholic University of America Press,1992. (ISBN 0-8132-0758-4)
** Suger, Abbot of Saint Denis. The Deeds of Louis the Fat. Translated by Jean Dunbabin (this version is free, but has no annotations.)15"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Lucienne de Rochefort, *ca 1088, +after 1137; 1m: King Louis VI of France (*1081 +1.8.1137); 2m: after 23.5.1107 Sire Guichard de Beaujeu (+1137.)20" He was King of the Franks between 1108 and 1137.9,21,5,4,11,15

; Per Enc. of World History:
     "LOUIS VI (the Fat). A brave soldier of tremendous physique, intelligent, affable; liked by the peasantry, commercial class, and clergy; the first popular Capetian. Consolidation of his Norman frontier (wars with Henry I of England: 1109-12; 1116-20), and steady reduction of his lesser vassals as far as the Loire. His charters to colonizers (hôtes) of waste lands, and frequent if inconsistent support of the communes, especially on the lands of the Church and the baronage, began the long alliance of the Capetians with bourgeois interests; Louis's charter of Lorris, widely copied in town charters, was a significant sign of the great urban development setting in all over Europe in this period. As protector of the Church, Louis gained a foothold in the lands of his vassals. Careers at court were opened to talented clergy and bourgeois. Louis's compromise with the Church over feudal patronage and investiture initiated the king of France's effective role as eldest son of the Church. He was the first Capetian to intervene effectively outside his own feudal lands. He defeated the alliance of Henry I of England with the Emperor Henry V, and stopped a German invasion (1124). The marriage (1137) of his son Louis to Eleanor, heiress of William X of Aquitaine (i.e., Guienne [Aquitania Secunda] and Gascony), marked the Capetian effort to balance the Anglo-Norman menace in the north with additions of territory south of the Loire. The Anglo-Norman danger had appeared in aggravated form when, in 1129, Geoffrey became count of Anjou, Maine, and Touraine. He had married Matilda (daughter of Henry I of England) in 1128 and proceeded (1135) to conquer Normandy.
     "Development of royal administration under the early Capetians. The court of the king, usually known as the curia regis, consisting as it did of magnates, royal vassals, and court officials (mainly chosen from the baronage), was essentially feudal in spirit and tradition. Meeting on royal summons and relatively frequently, its early duties were undifferentiated, its functions judicial, advisory, legislative. The royal administration was in control of the great officers of the crown, whose aim was to concentrate power in their own hands, a process that culminated in a virtual monopoly of such power by the Garlande family early in the 12th century. Louis VI, after a struggle (1128-30), terminated their dominance, and thenceforth the Capetians relied increasingly on lesser and more docile nobles, clerics, and bourgeois men of affairs. These career men were devoted to the crown rather than to feudal ambitions, and their presence in the curia regis began the differentiation of its functions and its subjection to royal rather than feudal influences. Most notable of these careerists was Suger, Louis's old tutor, a cleric of peasant origin, who became abbot of St. Denis (1122). An able statesman, his influence was decisive in the reigns of Louis and his son Louis VII. Suger began (c. 1136) the new abbey church of St. Denis, the first edifice Gothic in design."22

Family 1

Lucienne (?) de Rochefort b. c 1088, d. a 6 May 1137

Family 2

Marie de Breuillet
Child

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 64. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 101-24, p. 96. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#CP1
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippe I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha van Holland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007649&tree=LEO
  9. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, lin 101-24, p. 97.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VT 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIdied1137B
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucienne de Rochefort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013793&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucienne_de_Rochefort. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_VI_of_France
  16. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I, p. 64: says marriage "about 1120."
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de Savoie: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000214&tree=LEO
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 November 2019), memorial page for Louis VI (1 Dec 1081–1 Aug 1137), Find A Grave Memorial no. 21089, citing Saint Denis Basilique, Saint-Denis, Departement de Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21089/louis_vi. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Monthlery page ("Family de Monthléry"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/mtlery.html#M2
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-24, p. 97.
  22. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 199. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  23. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 101-25, p. 97.
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VI 'the Fat': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000213&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000211&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#LouisVIIdied1180B
  28. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., pp. 200-201.
  29. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baudément.pdf, p. 2.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013794&tree=LEO
  31. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 135-26, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#RobertIDreuxdied1188B
  33. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.
  34. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Geoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie1,2,3,4

M, #4212, b. 24 August 1113, d. 7 September 1151
FatherFoulques V "le Jeune" (?) Cte d'Anjou et de Maine, King of Jerusalem1,2,5,6,7,8,4 b. 1092, d. bt 10 Nov 1143 - 13 Nov 1143
MotherEremburge de Baugency Comtesse Heritiere du Maine et du Mans, dame de La Flèche1,2,6,8,9,4 b. bt 1091 - 1096, d. 14 Jan 1126
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited30 Sep 2020
     Geoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie was born on 24 August 1113 at Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now); Genealogy.EU says b 23 Aug 1113; Genealogics abd THe Henry Project say b. 24 Aug 1113; Find A Grave says b. 24 Aug 1113.10,11,1,2,6,12,13,14,4 He married Matilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain, daughter of Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland, on 17 June 1128 at Le Mans Cathedral, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France;
Her 2nd husband. Leo van de Pas says m. 17 June 1128 and also states 1127 (in note.)15,16,17,18,19,1,2,6,7,3,20,4
Geoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie died on 7 September 1151 at Château-du-Loir, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France (now), at age 38.21,10,11,1,2,12,13,14,4
Geoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie was buried after 7 September 1151 at Cathedrale St-Julien du Mans, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Lorraine, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     24 Aug 1113, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     7 Sep 1151 (aged 38), Chateau-du-Loir, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France
     French Noble. The Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy from the house Gatinais, his habit of wearing a sprig of broom plant (planta genesta in Latin) on his hat is the origin of the name "Plantagenet." He succeeded his father Fulk V "the young" as Count of Anjou, Maine and Touraine in 1128, when Fulk went to the Holy Land to marry Melisende, daughter of King Baldwin II. of Jerusalem. Geoffrey married Empress Maude, the widow of Emperor Heinrich V. and daughter of Henry I. of England two years later. The marriage was unhappy, partly because Maude felt humiliated that she, a empress, was married to a mere count. Their first son, Henry, was born five years after the wedding. Two more sons, Geoffrey and Guillaume followed in the next three years. He fought against King Stephen and conquered the Normandy from him and was from 1144 on Duke of Normandy. Geoffrey and Henry went to Paris to pledge their alliance to their liege King Louis VII. in 1151. There, Henry met the Queen Eleonore for the first time, and apparently fell in love, which would later result in one of the biggest scandals of their time. During the return to his county he became sick, with high fever and died 25 miles southeast of Le Mans. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
      Fulk of Anjou 1092–1143
      Eremburge De Beaugency 1096–1126
     Spouse
      Matilda of England 1102–1167 (m. 1127)
     Siblings
      Mathilde d'Anjou 1110–1154
      Sibylle d'Anjou 1112–1165
     Half Siblings
      Baldwin of Anjou 1130–1163
      Amalric I of Anjou 1136–1174
     Children
      Henry Plantagenet 1133–1189
      Hamelin De Warenne 1135–1202
      William 'Count of Poitou' Longespee 1136–1164
     BURIAL     Cathedrale St-Julien du Mans, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 1 Dec 2003
     Find A Grave Memorial 8143822.1,7,12
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 194.2

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Geoffroy V Plantagenet, Cte d'Anjou, Touraine et Maine (1129-51), Duke of Normandy (1144-51), *Anjon 23.8.1113, +Château du Loir 7.9.1151, bur Le Mans Cathedral; m.Le Mans 3.4./26.8.1127 Empress Matilda of England (*II.1102, +10.9.1167/69.)1"
GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

; This is the same person as ”Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet"” at The Henry Project.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Geoffrey V (24 August 1113 – 7 September 1151)—called the Handsome or the Fair (French: le Bel) and Plantagenet—was the Count of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne as King Henry II (1154–1189) and was the first of the Plantagenet dynasty to rule England; the name "Plantagenet" was taken from Geoffrey's epithet. His ancestral domain of Anjou gave rise to the name Angevin for three kings of England (Henry II his son and heir, and Henry's sons Richard and John), and what became known as the Angevin Empire in the 12th century.
Biography
Early life
     "Geoffrey was the elder son of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine. Geoffrey received his nickname from the yellow sprig of broom blossom (genêt is the French name for the planta genista, or broom shrub) he wore in his hat.[1]:9[2]:1[3] Geoffrey was described by the chronicler John of Marmoutier as handsome, red haired, jovial, and a great warrior.[4] King Henry I of England, having heard good reports on Geoffrey's talents and prowess, sent his royal legates to Anjou to negotiate a marriage between Geoffrey and his own daughter, Empress Matilda. Consent was obtained from both parties, and on 10 June 1128 the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey was knighted in Rouen by King Henry in preparation for the wedding.
Marriage
     "Geoffrey and Matilda's marriage took place in 1128. The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, and very proud of her status as Empress (as opposed to being a mere countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations but she bore him three sons and survived him.[1]:14–18
Count of Anjou
     "The year after the marriage Geoffrey's father left for Jerusalem (where he was to become king), leaving Geoffrey behind as count of Anjou.
     "When King Henry I died in 1135, Matilda at once entered Normandy to claim her inheritance. The border districts submitted to her, but England chose her cousin Stephen of Blois for its king, and Normandy soon followed suit. The following year, Geoffrey gave Ambrieres, Gorron, and Chatilon-sur-Colmont to Juhel de Mayenne, on condition that he help obtain the inheritance of Geoffrey's wife.[5]
     "In 1139 Matilda landed in England with 140 knights, where she was besieged at Arundel Castle by King Stephen. In the "Anarchy" which ensued, Stephen was captured at Lincoln in February 1141, and imprisoned at Bristol.[6] A legatine council of the English church held at Winchester in April 1141 declared Stephen deposed and proclaimed Matilda "Lady of the English".[6]
     "During 1142 and 1143, Geoffrey secured all of Normandy west and south of the Seine, and, on 14 January 1144, he crossed the Seine and entered Rouen. He assumed the title of Duke of Normandy in the summer of 1144. In 1144, he founded an Augustine priory at Château-l'Hermitage in Anjou.[7] Geoffrey held the duchy until 1149, when he and Matilda conjointly ceded it to their son, Henry, which cession was formally ratified by King Louis VII of France the following year.[8]
     "Geoffrey also put down three baronial rebellions in Anjou, in 1129, 1135, and 1145–1151.[9] He was often at odds with his younger brother, Elias, whom he had imprisoned until Elias died in 1151. The threat of rebellion slowed his progress in Normandy, and is one reason he could not intervene in England. Geoffrey died later the same year, aged just 38, and Henry took his father’s place as Head of the Plantagenet House. In 1153, the Treaty of Wallingford stipulated that Stephen should remain King of England for life and that Henry, the son of Geoffrey and Matilda should succeed him, beginning the Plantagenet era in England.[10]
Death
     "Geoffrey died suddenly on 7 September 1151. According to John of Marmoutier, Geoffrey was returning from a royal council when he was stricken with fever. He arrived at Château-du-Loir, collapsed on a couch, made bequests of gifts and charities, and died. His wife and sons outlived him. He was buried at St. Julien's Cathedral in Le Mans France, and Henry succeeded him as Duke of Normandy.[10]
Legacy
Children
     "Geoffrey and Matilda's children were:
1. Henry II, King of England (1133–1189), succeeded his father as head of Angevin Dynasty, had 8 children with Eleanor of Aquitaine, who became rulers of the Angevin Dynasty after their father.
2. Geoffrey, Count of Nantes (1 June 1134 Rouen – 26 July 1158 Nantes) died unmarried and was buried in Nantes
3. William, Viscount of Dieppe (1136–1164) died unmarried

     "Geoffrey also had illegitimate children by an unknown mistress (or mistresses): Hamelin who married Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess of Surrey; Emme, who married Dafydd Ab Owain Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales; and Mary, who became a nun and Abbess of Shaftesbury and who may be the poet Marie de France. Adelaide of Angers is sometimes sourced as being the mother of Hamelin.[10]
Early heraldry
     "An enamel effigy (funerary plaque) commissioned by his widow to decorate the tomb of Geoffrey of Anjou is one of the earliest examples of European heraldry. Jean de Marmentier, a late-12th-century chronicler, reported that in 1128 Henry I of England knighted his son-in-law Geoffrey and granted him a badge of gold lions.[11] A gold lion may already have been Henry's own badge, and different lion motifs would later be used by many of his descendants. The enamel shows Geoffrey with a blue shield depicting gold lions, apparently the same motif later used by a grandson of Geoffrey, William Longespee.[12] In addition to being one of the first authentic representations of a coat of arms,[13] according to British historian Jim Bradbury it "suggests possible evidence for the early use of what became the English royal arms".[14]
References
1. Costain, Thomas B (1962). The Conquering Family. New York: Popular Library.
2. Jones, Dan (2013). The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England. Viking. ISBN 9780670026654.
3. J. Bernard Burke The Heraldic Register, p. 65, at Google Books
4. Norgate, Kate (1887). England Under the Angevin Kings. General Books LLC. pp. 261–262. ISBN 978-1421259840.
5. Bradbury, Jim. 1990. "Geoffrey V of Anjou, Count and Knight", in The Ideals and Practice of Medieval Knighthood III, ed. Christopher Harper-Bill and Ruth Harvey. Rochester: Boydell Press.
6. King, Edmund (2008). King Stephen's Reign. London: Woodbridge. pp. 58–79.
7. Dutton, Kathryn (2014). The Haskins Society Journal. London: Boydell. pp. 125–154.
8. Warren, W.L. (1977). Henry II. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 38. ISBN 978-0520034945.
9. Halphen, L (ed.); Poupardin, R (ed.); Marmoutier, John of (1913). Chroniques des comtes. Paris.
10. Haskins, Charles H. 1912. "Normandy Under Geoffrey Plantagenet", The English Historical Review, volume 27 (July): 417–444.
11. Woodcock, Thomas and John Martin Robinson (1988), The Oxford Guide to Heraldry, Oxford University Press, pg 10.
12. Ailes, Adrian (1982). The Origins of The Royal Arms of England. Reading: Graduate Center for Medieval Studies, University of Reading. pp. 52–53.
13. Gage, John (1999), Color and Culture: Practice and Meaning from Antiquity to Abstraction, pg ??.
14. Bradbury, Jim (2004), The Routledge Companion to Medieval Warfare, p. 273."13


; Per Genealogics:
     "Son of Foulques V, count of Anjou and Eremburge, countess of Maine, Geoffrey V was born 24 August 1113. Geoffrey's father had married the daughter and heir of the count of Maine, so the two counties were united. The year 1127 was an important one for fourteen-year-old Geoffrey 'the Fair' as he was married to the widowed Empress Matilda, heir to the king of England. In 1128 a deputation from the Holy Land came to Paris to ask King Louis VII for a nobleman to marry Melisende, daughter and heir of King Baudouin II. Foulques V, a widower, was chosen and left Anjou and Maine to Geoffrey. He married Melisende in 1129 and then became king of Jerusalem in 1131.
     "Although Geoffrey and the much older Matilda disliked each other, they had three sons. He was confronted by unruly vassals including his own younger brother Helie, who was eventually captured and imprisoned at Tours. When released, Helie died of a disease contracted in prison.
     "King Henry I of England died in 1135 and his wife's cousin, Stephen de Blois, seized the crown. Geoffrey campaigned in Normandy on Matilda's behalf but even his fourth campaign in 1138 brought no success. In 1139 Matilda invaded England and in 1141 imprisoned Stephen, after which many castles in Normandy surrendered to Geoffrey. After the fall of Rouen in 1144 Geoffrey was invested as duke of Normandy.
     "From 1147 until 1149 he went on crusade with King Louis VII of France. In 1150 he passed the duchy of Normandy to his eldest son, Henry. Geoffrey died 7 September 1151 in château du Loir and was buried in the cathedral of Le Mans."22


; Per Faris [1999:277]: "GEOFFROI (or GEOFFREY) PLANTAGENET D'ANJOU le Bel [the Fair], Comte d'Anjou (1129), Duc de Normandie (1144), son of Foulques V d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou (descendant of Charlemagne), by Eremburge, Comtesse Héritière du Maine, daughter and heiress of Hélie de Baugency, Comte du Maine (descendant of Charlemagne), was born on 24 Nov. 1113. He was married on 22 May 1127 to MAUD OF ENGLAND [the Empress Maud], childless widow of Heinrich V Deutscher König, Römischer Kaiser (died 23 May 1125), and daughter of Henry I King of England (descendant of Charlemagne), daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scots. She was born on 7 Feb. 1102. They had three children. On Henry's death in 1136, he claimed the duchy of Normandie, conquering it in 1144. He held the duchy, with that of Anjou, until granting them to his son Henry. GEOFFROI D'ANJOU died at Le Mans, Maine, on 7 Sept. 1151. His widow died on 10 Sep. 1167.      Paget (1977), p. 14. Schwennicke (1984) 2:81.23,24,25


; Per Med Lands:
     "GEOFFROY d’Anjou, son of FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Eremburge Ctss du Maine (24 Aug 1113-Château du Loire 7 Sep 1151, bur Le Mans Cathedral). His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[334]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1113 IX Kal Sep" of "Gaufridus comes"[335]. He succeeded in 1129, when his father abdicated and left for Jerusalem, as GEOFFROY V “le Bel/Plantagenet” Comte d’Anjou. He invaded Normandy in 1137 in support of his wife's claim to succeed her father[336]. He was proclaimed Duke of Normandy 19 Jan 1144[337], but resigned the dukedom to his eldest son in 1150. Robert of Torigny records the death "1151 VII Id Sep" of "dux Henricus…pater eius" at "apud Castrum Ledi" and his burial in "civitatis Cinomannicæ…in ecclesia sancti Juliani"[338]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "VII Id Sep 1151" of "Andegavorum comes Gaufridus tertius Martellus gener Henrici…regis Anglorum"[339].
     "m (Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou 17 Jun 1128) as her second husband, MATILDA of England, widow of Emperor HEINRICH V, daughter of HENRY I King of England & his wife Matilda of Scotland (Winchester or London Feb/Aug 1102-Abbaye de Notre-Dame des Près, near Rouen 10 Sep 1167, bur Abbaye de Bec, Normandy, later moved to Rouen Cathedral). Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum Adelinum, et Mathildem imperatricem” as the children of King Henry I and his wife Matilda[340]. Her second marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[341]. The Chronicle of Gervase records the second marriage of "filiam suam…viduam" to "Gaufrido comiti Andegaviæ"[342]. "Goffridus comes filius Fulconis regis Jerusalem" renounced rights to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico et Goffrido" by charter dated [1136/1140] which also names "uxori meæ Mathildi"[343]. Robert of Torigny records the death "1167…IV Id Sep Rothomagi" of "matris suæ [Henrici regis] Mathildis imperatricis" and her burial "Becci"[344]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "II Id Sep" of "Mathildis imperatrix filia Henrici regis uxor Goffredi comitis"[345].
     "Mistresses (1) to (3): ---. The names of the mistresses of Comte Geoffroy are not known.
Med Lands cites:
[334] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229.
[335] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 32.
[336] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 483.
[337] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1143, p. 177.
[338] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1151, p. 256.
[339] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.
[340] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[341] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 391.
[342] Gervase, p. 92.
[343] Angers 138, p. 225.
[344] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1167, p. 367.
[345] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.14
He was Count of Anjou, Touriane, and Maine between 1129 and 1151.4 He was Cte d'Anjou, Touraine et Maine between 1129 and 1151.26,10,1 He was Duke of Normandy between 1144 and 1151.26,10,1,4 He was Crusader between 1147 and 1149.2

Family 1

Matilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain b. 7 Feb 1102, d. 10 Sep 1167
Children

Family 3

Concubine 2 (?) b. c 1113, d. WFT Est. 1138-1207
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff005.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques V 'the Young': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004069&tree=LEO
  6. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesVdied1144B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Éremburge de la Flèche: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/eremb000.htm
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 277. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 198, PLANTAGENET 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 October 2019), memorial page for Geoffrey Plantagenet IV (24 Aug 1113–7 Sep 1151), Find A Grave Memorial no. 8143822, citing Cathedrale St-Julien du Mans, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8143822/geoffrey-plantagenet_iv. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Plantagenet,_Count_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#GeoffroyVdied1151B.
  15. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 161-10, p. 189. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  16. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, de Baugency.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:vii.
  18. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 517-518. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm.
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-24, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO
  23. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  24. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  25. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  26. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  27. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.3.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO
  29. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Henry II of England: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/henry002.htm
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.2.
  31. [S1704] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 17 Dec 2004 "A Plantagenet Descent: FitzWilliam of Woodhall to William Farrar"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/xCbd-kLQN30/m/PPe2A57bjJAJ) to e-mail address, 17 Dec 2004, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/xCbd-kLQN30/m/PPe2A57bjJAJ. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 17 Dec 2004."
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hameline: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015369&tree=LEO
  33. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#dW
  34. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Hamelindied1202B

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England1,2,3

M, #4213, b. September 1068, d. 1 December 1135
FatherWilliam I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England2,4,5,6,3 b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
MotherMathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England2,7,8,6,3 b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
ReferenceGAV26 EDV25
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England was born in September 1068 at Selby, Yorkshire, England.9,1,10,3 He married Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland, daughter of Máel-Coluim (Malcolm III) mac Donnchada "Canmore") (?) King of Scotland (Alba) and Saint Margaret (?) Queen of Scotland, on 11 November 1100 at Westminster, London, City of London, Greater London, England;
His 1st wife.9,11,10,12,13,14,15,3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England married Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant, daughter of Godefroi/Godfrey I (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine, Count of Brabant and Ida de Chiny Duchess of Lower Lorraine, on 29 January 1121 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband.1,10,16,3,17,18,19,20
Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England died on 1 December 1135 at St. Denis-Le-Fermont, near Gisors (Rouen), Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France, at age 67.9,1,10,3
Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England was buried circa 1136 at Reading Abbey (Ruins), Reading, Reading Borough, Berkshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     21 Sep 1068, Selby, Selby District, North Yorkshire, England
     DEATH     2 Dec 1135 (aged 67), Saint-Denis-le-Ferment, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     English Monarch. Born in Yorkshire, he was the youngest son of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders, and their only child to be born on English soil. Originally destined for the clergy, Henry received an outstanding education at Abingdon Abbey, studying languages, English law, and natural history. This earned him the epithet Beauclerc, meaning "fine scholar," of which he was very proud. William left the crown of England to his second son, William Rufus, but Rufus was killed by an arrow while hunting in 1100. His eldest brother Robert was away on crusade, so Henry rushed to London, seized the keys to the royal treasury, and was declared king. He was crowned at Westminster Abbey on August 5. He married Princess Edith, daughter of King Malcolm Ceann-Mor of Scotland on November 11, 1100 and the new queen changed her name to Matilda in honor of Henry's mother. Henry's eldest brother Robert, who had been left Normandy, returned from crusade to claim the throne of England as well. But Henry retaliated, invaded Normandy, and imprisoned Robert. His reign was also beset with strife from the church. Henry wanted the rights of the monarchy over the church, while the church wanted self-government and self-reform. Threatened with excommunication by the pope, Henry finally reached an unstable agreement with the church. Queen Matilda died in 1118, having given him only two children, Matilda and William. But Henry is credited with being the king with the largest number of illegitimate children: anywhere from 18 to 25. In a devastating blow to Henry and the succession, his son and heir William was killed in a fire at sea, along with two of his illegitimate children, in 1120. In a desperate attempt to provide heirs, he married a second time to the young Adelicia of Brabant in 1121. The marriage remained childless. Henry was forced to make his barons swear to accept his daughter Matilda as his heir. The king died after eating bad lampreys at St. Denis le Fermont in Normandy at the age of 67. His throne was awarded to his nephew, Stephen of Blois, resulting in a period of civil war and anarchy. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          William the Conqueror 1028–1087
          Matilda of Flanders 1031–1083
     Spouses
          Matilda Dunkeld 1079–1118 (m. 1100)
          Adeliza Louvain of Brabant 1094–1151
          Nesta ferch Rhys 1073–1163
     Siblings
          Constance de Normandie de Bretagne unknown–1090
          Robert de Normandie 1054–1135
          Richard de Normandie 1054–1081
          King William de Normandie 1056–1100
          Cecilia Of Holy Trinity Princess Of England 1056–1126
          Agatha de Normandie 1064–1080
          Adele of Normandy 1066–1138
     Children
          Matilda of Perche 1086–1120
          Robert de Caen 1090–1147
          Sybilla of Normandy 1092–1122
          Richard of Lincoln 1094–1120
          Elizabeth FitzRoy 1095–1166
          Matilda of England 1102–1167
          William Aetheling de Normandie 1103–1120
          Reginald de Dunstanville 1105–1175
     BURIAL     Reading Abbey Ruins, Reading, Reading Borough, Berkshire, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 1949.10,21
     ; Discussion 4 of illegitimate children of Henry I:
On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 08:09:33 -0000, "Chris Phillips"
wrote:
>>Would I be right in assuming that Thompson doesn't make any further additions to the list on her own account?
Oops. That was the intent in my posting, but I hit the "send" without realizing that I had forgotten to include one claimed daughter that Thompson adds to the list (number 13 on her list):
Adeliza, the king's daughter, appearing as "Adeliza filia Reg'" in the Eynsham Cartulary, I, no. 64. Thompson remarks that "Although this is translated by the editor as Adeliza daughter of Reginald, no Reginald appears in the act."
Since the existence of this daughter depends on an ambiguous expansion of an abbreviated form in a document, it seems that she ought to be placed in the uncertain category. Stewart Baldwin.22


; Per Baldwin: "Bastards of Henry I, part 1: Introduction and Bibliography
     "This preliminary account of the bastards of Henry I is primarily based on the accounts of Geoffrey White in CP and Kathleen Thompson in the Journal of Medieval History. I have checked the references in those cases where I had easy access to the primary sources, and have offered my tentative opinions as to which of the alleged bastards do or do not belong on the list. I have made no attempt to provide a complete list of citations (see White and Thompson for a start on this), but only to outline those sources which are sufficient to document each case.
     "In addition to this introduction, Part 1 gives a list of abbreviations for the citations. Parts 2 through 4 list the children, and Part 5 the known mothers. The children have been separated into three lists, the proven sons in Part 2, proven daughters in Part 3, and possible and/or disproven children in Part 4. For purposes of this tentative list I have listed the sons with capital letters, the daughters with lowecase letters, and the uncertain cases with numbers in parentheses. (In each case, W# and T# show the numbers given in the enumerations of White and Thompson, respectively.) In two cases (Henry and Adeliza), I included them on the "proven" list because I think that the cases are sufficient despite some small lingering doubt.
     "For those playing the "counting" game, I have included 8 sons and 10 daughters on the "proven" list, which would seem to produce a bare minimum of 16 if you remove the two for whom a bit of doubt has been expressed. If "probable" is the desired criterion, then I would put the number at 19 (the 18 in Parts 2 and 3 plus the wife of Fergus of Galloway). If one assumes that the two possible duplications in fact represent distinct children, and include the others who have not been clearly disproven, we get an apparent maximum of 24 candidates, but with no good reason to believe that all of the doubtful cases would turn out to be children of Henry.
Bibliographical Abbreviations:
     "The following abbreviations are used in my citations. In cases where I did not have easy access to a source, I have sometimes given them in the form "[source A], citing [source B]" (meaning that I have not examined source B and that I am only reporting what source A says about source B's statements).
** AC = Annales Cambriae
** Angot = A. Angot, "Génenalogies féodale mayennaises du xi au xiii siècle".
** de Broussilon = Bertrand de Broussillon, "La Maison de Laval", 5 vols. (Paris, 1895-1903).
** Chr. Mon. Abington = Joseph Stevenson, ed., "Chronicon Monasterii de Abington", 2 vols. (Roll Series 2, London, 1858).
** Dugdale = Caley, Ellis, Bandinel, eds., [William Dugdale's] "Monasticon Anglicanum", 6 vols. (London, 1830).
** EHR = English Historical Review.
** Giraldus Cambrensis = J. S. Brewer, ed., "Giraldi Cambrensis Opera", 8 vols. (Rolls Series 21, London, 1861).
** GND = Guillaume de Jumièges, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, as edited in Elisabeth van Houts, ed. & trans., The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni, 2 vols., (Oxford, 1992).
** GND(RT) = Robert de Torigny's additions to GND.
** PL = Migne, Patrologiae (Latin).
** Simeon of Durham = Thomas Arnold, ed., "Symeonis Monachi Opera Omnia", 2 vols., (Rolls Series 75, London, 1882).
** Thompson = Kathlenn Thompson, "Affairs of State: the illegitimate children of Henry I", Journal of Medieval History 29 (2003), 129-151.
** White = Geoffrey H. White, "Henry I's Illegitimate children", CP, xi, Appendix D, 105-121.“.23

; Discussion 2 of illegitimate children of Henry I:
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 23:06:19 -0000, "Chris Phillips" wrote:
>>Perhaps it would be useful to post the lists of Henry I's illegitimate children given by the Complete Peerage and by Given-Wilson and Curteis, "Royal Bastards of Medieval England" (1984). (Unfortunately I haven't yet seen Kathleen Thompson's article, referred to by Stewart Baldwin as discounting daughter (10) and expressing doubts about sons (7) and (9) and daughter (11) below.)

Here is an outline of some of the major differences discussed in the Thompson article (but I have not included remarks she makes on the possible mothers of some of the children)
>>(7) Henry, son of Nest

Thompson's reason for offering some doubt about him are the entry of his death under the year 1158 in the "B" manuscript of Annales Cambriae: "... Henricus filius Geraldi ocissus est, velut alii volunt, filius fuit Henrici regis ..." (Henry son of Gerald fell, as others would wish, the son of King Henry I). She does not go so far as to say that he should be removed from the list, and I would also be inclined to leave him there, but with perhaps less certainty than before.
>>(9) William, brother of Sibyl, Queen of Scotland

Thompson states that "The possibilities that Queen Sibyl's brother was not the son of her father, King Henry, or that the attestation is that of her half-brother, William de Tracy, should not be overlooked." (William de Tracy is number 6 on the list.)
>>(11) Rohese, married Henry de la Pomerai

She was described as a sister of earl Reginald of Cornwall, but never as a daughter of Henry, so it cannot be ruled out that she was a sister of Reginald only through their mother.
>>(12) A daughter, intended to have married William de Warenne (unknown whether one of the previous 11)

I think that it might be useful to confine such children to a separate list unless there is significant evidence that they are distinct from the already known children.
>>Also in the "possible" column, G.-W. and C. add 4 more:
>>(1) A daughter, to be betrothed to Hugh Fitz Gervais [seigneur of Chateauneuf-en-Thimerais, but the marriage was dropped because the bishop of Chartres proved that they were related in the 6th degree (p. 70)]

Thompson would place her in the same category as William de Warenne's intended, with no data as to whether she was a distinct daughter or the same as one of the known daughters.
>>(2) A daughter married to Fergus of Galloway [assumed on the evidence of >>Fergus's son Uhtred being described as a relation of Henry II (p. 71); as >>discussed here previously (a lot)]

As someone who has argued that Fergus's wife was probably a daughter of Henry I, I would still agree that she does not belong on the list of solidly proven children.
>>(3) Sybil of Falaise [on the basis of being described as Henry's "niece", >>sometimes a euphemism for an illegitimate daughter (p. 71). But Keats-Rohan >>identifies her as the daughter of the Domesday tenant William de Falaise, >>and repeats a suggestion that William's grandfather was a brother of William >>the Conqueror's mother, so that "niece" could be explained in the looser >>sense of a younger female cousin.]

Not accepted by Thompson, who suggests the alternate possibility that she may have been an illegitimate daughter of Henry's brother Duke Robert of Normandy.
>>(4) Emma, wife of Guy de Laval [can't see this discussed in the text, but >>Keats-Rohan, "Domesday Descendants", p. 543, gives the same. However, there >>is evidence that an Emma, daughter of Reynald, Earl of Cornwall, married a >>Guy de Laval in the next generation - could Emma, wife of Guy de Laval, >>really be a granddaughter of Henry?]

Has anybody checked Keats-Rohan's citation of "Pipe Roll 31 Henry I, 29-ynb" to see if it offers confirmation? Stewart Baldwin“.24

; Per Richardson:
Discussion 3 of illegitimate children of Henry I:
     "Thank you for posting the list of King Henry I's bastards from Complete Peerage and the expanded list from Given-Wilson and Curteis. It's very much apreciated.
     "Without delving into my files, I would immediately remove Sibyl de Falaise as a bastard daughter of King Henry I. She was styled "neptis" of King Henry I in a Curia Regis Roll. As we have seen in other recent posts here on the newsgroup, "neptis" in this period can mean niece, granddaughter, or near kinswoman. I believe the latter meaning applies in this case. For what it is worth, I've never seen the word "neptis" used as a euphemism for a bastard daughter as claimed by Given-Wilson and Curteis. All bastard children I've encountered in medieval records are called "filius" (son) or "filia" (daughter).
     "I would immediately remove Emme, wife of Guy de Laval. Emme de Laval is specifically identified in a charter to Evron Abbey as "daughter of Reynold, Earl of Cornwall" which Reynold was an illegitimate son of Henry I, King of England [see Abbé A. Angot, Généalogies Féodales Mayennaises du XI au XIII Siècle (1942), pp. 292-295; NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102; 120 (1966): 230].
     "I likewise would remove the unknown wife of Fergus, lord of Galloway, as a bastard daughter. While it is possible that Fergus' wife was a bastard daughter of King Henry I, I think it is more likely that she was a granddaughter of Malcolm Canmore, King of Scotland. Whatever the case, Fergus' wife's name was not Elizabeth, as often claimed in print. Her given name is not known.
     "Robert, Earl of Gloucester, and Reynold, Earl of Cornwall, are well documented bastard sons of King Henry I. Both were known as "filius Regis" in their lifetimes, that is, son of the King. To the best of my knowledge, Earl Robert never used "de Caen" as part of his name, nor was Earl Reynold ever known as "de Dunstanville." Reynold was, however, known infrequently as Reynold de Mortain.
     "Little is known of William de Tracy. He is stated to have died soon after his father, King Henry I. Historians have assumed that he is the same individual who held a barony in Devonshire, but there is no evidence that I know of which links the Devonshire man to William de Tracy who was the bastard son of King Henry I. I have seen no contemporary record, by the way, in which William de Tracy is styled "king's son." He is probably a bastard son, but I know of no direct contemporary evidence to prove it.
     "I believe Richard son of Ansfrid is a well documented bastard son. I believe Robert son of Ede/Edith is a well documented bastard son.
     "Henry son of Nest is alleged to have been a bastard son of King Henry I. However, I have never found any evidence to prove or disprove it. He evidently was not known as "filius Regis." As such, I believe he should be considered in the "possible" category.
     "Queen Sibyl of Scotland is a well documented bastard daughter. However, her brother, William, was almost certainly a uterine half-brother and not a bastard son of King Henry I.
     "I believe Constance de Beaumont is a well documented bastard daughter, as is Maud, wife of Conan III, Duke of Brittany. I believe Maud, wife of Rotrou, Count of Perche, is a documented daughter but I haven't reviewed the evidence for her parentage in recent time.
     "Gundred, sister of Reynold de Dunstanville, has been discussed elsewhere. She clearly was not a bastard daughter of King Henry I.
     "Rohese de Pomeroy was almost certainly a uterine half-sister of Reynold, Earl of Cornwall, and not a bastard daughter of King Henry I.
     "In review, we have four documented and one probable sons, four documented daughters, and one possible son (Henry son of Nest). I have removed Sibyl de Falaise, Emme de Laval, the unknown wife of Fergus of Galloway, William (brother of Queen Sibyl), Gundred de Dunstanville, and Rohese de Pomeroy. I'll reserve my comments on the other bastards until later when I have more time to study the matter.
Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com."25


; Per Baldwin: "Bastards of Henry I, part 2: sons (See Part 1 for Introduction and Explanation)
Proven sons:
     "A. Robert "filius Regis", d. 1147, earl of Gloucester [W1, T1]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9), and many other sources] He is called the eldest by RT. His mother was evidently a relative of Philip Gai and of Nigel son of William, both of whom appear in the sources as relatives of Robert. [Thompson 142-3]
     "B. Richard, d. in the White Ship, 25 November 1120 [W2, T2]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)] Son of Ansfrid [Chr. Mon. Abington ii, 37, 122-3]
     "C. Reginald, earl of Cornwall, d. 1175 [W3, T3]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)] Son of a woman [Sibyl in later sources] who later married Herbert Fitz Herbert. (see the part on the mothers for more)
     "D. Robert "filius Regis", d. 1172 [W4, T4]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)] Son of Eda/Edith, later wife of Robert de Oilli [Simeon of Durham ii, 310; Dugdale vi, 251; White 109, citing the cartulary of Oseney Abbey.]
     "E. Gilbert [W5, T5]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)] Thompson speculates that his mother may have been an unnamed sister of Walter de Gand whom Henry took as a mistress according to thirteenth century evidence, by the only "evidence" is onomastic (Walter's father being named Gilbert), a weak argument.
     "F. William de Tracy, d. shortly after his father [W6, T6]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1)]
     "G. Henry, d. 1157 [W7, T7 (some doubt indicated)]. [Giraldus Cambrensis i, 58-9] Son of Nest ferch Tewdwr, wife of Gerald of Windsor. The B manuscript of AC, in the account of his death, calls him son of Gerald, stating that some would wish him to be a son of Henry I, suggesting that the author of the annal did not believe the connection to Henry, but this is the only known indication of doubt in the early sources. The Welsh vernacular annals call him a son of Henry I with no indication of doubt. Since Giraldus was a relative, his word has greater weight, and it seems highly probable that he was Henry's son.
     "H. Fulk "filius Regis" [W8, T8]. [Chr. Mon. Abingdon ii, 122-3] White would make him a son of Ansfrid, based on the fact that he appears in the same document as her and her son Richard (B. above). Thompson considers it unlikely that he was Ansfrid's son, since the source does not explicitly say that Fulk was her son.“.26

; Per Baldwin: Bastards of Henry I, part 5: mothers (See Part 1 for Introduction and Explanation)
Mothers:
     "The known mothers of Henry I's bastards are listed as follows. In most cases, you should refer back to the previous parts listing the children for the documentation.
     "NN, evidently a relative of Philip Gai and Nigel son of William.
Mother of:
A. Robert, earl of Gloucester
     "Ansfrid, widow of Anskill.
Mother of:
B. Richard, d. 1120.
     "Conjectured by White (without solid evidence) to also be mother of:
H. Fulk.
c. Juliana, m. Eustace de Pacy (de Breteuil).
     "[Sibyl Corbet?], later married to Herbert Fitz Herbert.
Mother of:
C. Reginald de Dunstanville, earl of Cornwall.
     "Generally named as Sibyl Corbet, the first name from a lawsuit of her grandson in the early 13th century, the surname because earl Reginald referred to an Alice Corbet as his maternal aunt. Thompon 143-5 suggests that Robert Corbet was only Sibyl's stepfather, and that Sibyl's father was an earlier Reginald de Dunstanville. Although Thompson's scenario is conjectural, based on circumstantial evidence, her comments do serve to emphasize that the name of Sibyl Corbet that has often been assigned to Reginald's mother is based on indirect evidence.
     "Four other children appeared on White's list of her children, but three of these were probably not children of Henry, and the case for Sibyl as her daughter is poor:
(5) William (her son, but probably not by Henry).
(7) Gundred (neither her nor Henry's daughter).
(6) Rohese (her daughter, but probably not by Henry).
h. Sibyl, Queen of Scotland (included on White's list of the children of "Sibyl Corbet" with a "?").
     "Eda/Edith, later wife of Robert de Oilli (not same as the Edith who was mother of Matilda, wife of Rotrou). Possibly daughter of Forne [Dugdale vi, 251].
Mother of:
D. Robert "filius Regis", d. 1172.
Possibly mother of:
j. Adeliza.
     "Nest ferch Tewdwr, wife of Gerald of Windsor.
Mother of:
G. Henry, d. 1157.
     "Edith (not same as Edith wife of Robert de Oilli)
Mother of:
a. Matilda, m. Rotrou, count of Perche.
     "Isabel, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, count of Meulan and earl of Leicester; m. Gilbert de Clare, earl of Pembroke. [see CP]
Mother of:
g. Isabel [W7, T7].
Uncertain:
     "NN, sister of Wlater de Gand, and a mistress of Henry I according to unidentified thirteenth century evidence, conjectured (without good evidence) by Thompson to have been mother of:
E. Gilbert [Thompson 146].“.27


; This is the same person as ”Henry I of England” at Wikipedia.

This is also the same person as ”Henry I” at The Henry Project.28,29

; Per Baldwin: "Bastards of Henry I, part 3: daughters (See Part 1 for Introduction and Explanation)
Proven daughters:
     "a. Matilda, d. on the White Ship, 25 Nov. 1120, m. Rotrou, count of Perche [W1, T1]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1)] Her mother was Edith [White 112, citing Pipe Roll 31 Hen. I, p. 155]
     "b. Matilda, m. Conan III, duke of Brittany [W2, T2]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1)]
     "c. Juliana, m. Eustace de Pacy (de Breteuil) [W3, T3]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1)] White 114 states that it is "not unlikely" that her mother was Ansfrid, but the evidence offered for this is weak.
     "d. Mabel, m. Guillaume Gouet III [W4, T4]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1), which does not give her name; Thompson 148 mentions charter evidence giving her name (which was not Eustacie).]
     "e. Constance/Maud, m. Roscelin de Beaumont [W5, T5]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1), which does not give her name; Chr. RT (Maud); White states that Delisle cites a charter giving her name as Constance.]
     "f. Alice/Aline, m. Mathieu de Montmorency [W6, T6]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1), which does not give her name; Neither White nor Thompson states explicitly which of their cited sources provides her name.]
     "g. Isabel [W7, T7]. [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1), which does not give her name; White states that charter evidence proves her name to be Isabel] Her mother was Isabel, sister of Waleran, count of Meulan [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 250-1)], and daughter of Robert de Beaumont, count of Meulan and earl of Leicester, who m. Gilbert de Clare, earl of Pembroke.
     "h. Sibyl, m. Alexander I, king of Scotland. [W8, T8] [Simeon of Durham ii, 265] White attributes her as a daughter of Sibyl Corbet, but as Thompson points out, without sufficient evidence.
     "i. Matilda, abbess of Montvilliers. [W9, T9] [White 118, citing "Chron. Valassense, ed. Somménhill, p. 20"] Was confused with Henry's daughter by Isabel de Beaumont [see g. above, White 118]
     "j. Adeliza [T13]. [Thompson 150, citing a charter from Eynsham Cartulary, I, no. 64, in which she appears as "Adeliza filia Reg'".] "Reg'" could be an abbreviation of either "Regis" ("of the King") or "Reginaldi", and Thompson points out that no Reginald appears in the charter. As was pointed out in postings (in the "Bastards of Henry I" thread) of 15 November by John P. Ravilious and Rosie Bevan, the charter in question involved several Oilli relatives, and the following charter also involving the Oilli's was witnessed by the king's illegitimate son Robert (whose mother Eda/Edith married Robert de Oilli) suggesting not only that Adeliza was in fact the king's daughter, but that Eda/Edith would make a good candidate for her mother.“.30

; Per Baldwin: "Bastards of Henry I, part 4: probable, possible, etc. (See Part 1 for Introduction and Explanation)
Probable:
     "(1) NN, wife of Fergus of Galloway [T14]. This one has been discussed on the group so much that it seems likely that some are tired of seeing it, but here is the basic outline (again): Descendants of Fergus are mentioned on quite a few occasions as relatives of various English monarchs (but never as relatives of Scottish monarchs). Although the possibility that Fergus married a member of the Scottish dynasty is consistent (barely) with the known evidence, by far the best explanation of this evidence is the scenario in which Fergus's wife was an illegitimate daughter of Henry I. Although Fergus's wife is called "Elizabeth" in some secondary sources, there is no known primary evidence to support that name.
Possible, but unlikely:
     "(2) Emma, m. Guy IV de Laval [T12]. [de Broussilon 79, Angot 292-4] This case, which has been discussed in this group recently (to which postings the reader is referred), depends on an epitaph calling her a daughter of the king (of whom Henry I seems the only plausible choice for chronological reasons): EMMA ANGLORUM REGIS FILIA DOMINAQUE LAVALLENSIS. The case is complicated by the fact that Guy IV's son Guy V was married to another Emma, daughter of earl Reginald of Cornwall, and thus granddaughter of Henry I, suggesting that the claimed parentage of Emma is a result of confusion.
Possible duplications:
     "While there seems to be no reason to doubt that the following two notices involve well documented daughters of Henry, it does not seem possible to determine, based on known evidence, whether or not they were the same person(s) as daughters already appearing on the list, or distinct from those already listed.
     "(3) NN, potential wife of William de Warenne [W12, T15] [Letters of St. Anselm, iv, 84, in PL clix, 243]
     "(4) NN, potential wife of Hugh of Châteauheuf-en-Thymerais [T 15] [Thompson, citing Ivo of Chartres, Epistola cclxi, RHF, XV, 167]
Possible duplication or other confusion:
     "(5.1) William, sister of Queen Sibyl of Scotland [W9, T9] [White 111, citing charter evidence], AND:
     "(5.2) William de Marisco, brother of earl Reginald [H. P. R. Finberg, "Some Early Tavistock Charters", EHR 62 (1948), 352-377, at p. 365]. White's account is based on the assumption that indiviuals described as siblings of bastards of Henry I were probably children of Henry by the same mother (rather than just being siblings with the same mother), and also assumes that the William mentioned as a brother of Reginald was the same as William, brother of Sibyl. As Thompson points out, there are chronological problems with identifying the two, and in addition to the possibility that the individual(s) in question was/were sibling(s) only through the mother, there is the additional possibility that the queens brother may have been William de Tracy, already listed as a son of Henry (above, part 2, F.)
Improbable:
     "(6) Rohese, m. Henry de la Pomerai. [W11, T11]. She was mentioned as a sister of earl Reginald of Cornwall, and White assumed that they had the same father, but I believe that Thompson is correct in stating that it is more likley that Rohese was a daughter of Reginald's mother by Herbert fitz Herbert, since no known record calls her a daughter of the king.
Disproven:
     "(7) Gundred, sister of Reginald de Dunstanville, [W10, T10]. Gundred and her brother Reginald de Dunstanville are mentioned in a Pipe Roll of 1130 [see White 108, 119]. She was included by White on the assumptions that her brother was the same as the earl of Cornwall and that they were siblings by the same father. However, Thompson pointed out that the future earl was still described as a young man in the lates 1130's [GND(RT) viii, 29 (v. 2, pp. 248-9)], and was therefore not the same man as the Reginald on the 1130 Pipe Roll. (Thompson's conjecture would place the Reginald and Gundred of 1130 as siblings of earl Reginald's mother.)
     "(8) Sibyl of Falaise [T16]. Described only as a "neptis" (acc. "neptem") of Henry, Thompson is correct in stating that she does not belong the list [Thompson 150].“.31 GAV-26 EDV-25 GKJ-24.

; Per Phillips: Discussion 1 of illegitimate children of Henry I:
     "Perhaps it would be useful to post the lists of Henry I's illegitimate children given by the Complete Peerage and by Given-Wilson and Curteis, "Royal Bastards of Medieval England" (1984). (Unfortunately I haven't yet seen Kathleen Thompson's article, referred to by Stewart Baldwin as discounting daughter (10) and expressing doubts about sons (7) and (9) and daughter (11) below.)
Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White, gives the following (notes in [...] are mine):
Sons:
(1) Robert "de Caen", Earl of Gloucester
(2) Richard, son of Ansfride
(3) Rainald "de Dunstanville", Earl of Cornwall
(4) Robert, son of Ede/Edith
(5) Gilbert
(6) William de Tracy
(7) Henry, son of Nest
(8) Fulk
(9) William, brother of Sibyl, Queen of Scotland

Daughters:
(1) Maud, married Rotrou, Count of Perche
(2) Maud, married Conan III, Duke of Brittany
(3) Juliane, married Eustace de Pacy
(4) ... [?Mabel], married William Gouet
(5) Constance, married Roscelin de Beaumont
(6) Alice, married Matthew de Montmorenci
(7) Isabel, daughter of Isabel "de Beaumont"
(8) Sibyl, married Alexander I, King of Scotland
(9) Maud, abbess of Montivilliers
(10) Gundred, sister of Rainald de Dunstanville [very doubtful]
(11) Rohese, married Henry de la Pomerai
(12) A daughter, intended to have married William de Warenne (unknown whether one of the previous 11)

     "Given-Wilson and Curteis essentially accept all these, except that number 12 is put into the "possible" column. I presume this is because of the possibility that she is identical with one of the others.
     "Also in the "possible" column, G.-W. and C. add 4 more:
(1) A daughter, to be betrothed to Hugh Fitz Gervais [seigneur of Chateauneuf-en-Thimerais, but the marriage was dropped because the bishop of Chartres proved that they were related in the 6th degree (p. 70)]
(2) A daughter married to Fergus of Galloway [assumed on the evidence of Fergus's son Uhtred being described as a relation of Henry II (p. 71); as discussed here previously (a lot)]
(3) Sybil of Falaise [on the basis of being described as Henry's "niece", sometimes a euphemism for an illegitimate daughter (p. 71). But Keats-Rohan identifies her as the daughter of the Domesday tenant William de Falaise, and repeats a suggestion that William's grandfather was a brother of William the Conqueror's mother, so that "niece" could be explained in the looser sense of a younger female cousin.]
(4) Emma, wife of Guy de Laval [can't see this discussed in the text, but Keats-Rohan, "Domesday Descendants", p. 543, gives the same. However, there is evidence that an Emma, daughter of Reynald, Earl of Cornwall, married a Guy de Laval in the next generation - could Emma, wife of Guy de Laval, really be a granddaughter of Henry?]

Chris Phillips“.32

; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.3


; Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “G4. HENRY I "Beauclerc", King of England (1100-35) -cr 5.8.1000, *Selby, Yorkshire IX.1068, +St.Denis-le-Fermont, nr Rouen 1.12.1135, bur Reading Abbey; 1m: Westminster Abbey 6.8.1100 Matilda of Scotland (*1080 +1.5.1118); 2m: Westminster Abbey 29.1.1122 Adelize de Louvain (*ca 1105 +after 1157)”.33 He and Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont were associated; Mistress.3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales were associated; Mistress.3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Sibylla Corbet of Alcester were associated; Mistress.3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Ansfride (?) were associated; Mistress.3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Edith (Eda) Sigulfson de Greystoke were associated; Mistress.3 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England and Edith (?) were associated; Mistress.3

; Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “C10. [2m.] Edith later Matilda upon her marriage, *autumn 1080, +Palace of Westminster, 1.5.1118, bur Westminster Abbey; m.Westminster Abbey 6.8./11.11.1100 King Henry I of England (*IX.1068, +1/2.12.1135)”.34

; Per Med Lands:
     "EADGYTH (1079-1 May 1118). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by their maternal aunt Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[398]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[399]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[400]. Crowned Queen Consort of England 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[401]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[402].
     "m (11 Nov 1100) as his first wife, HENRY I "Beauclerc" King of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Saint-Denis le Ferment, Forêt d’Angers near Rouen 1/2 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire)."
Med Lands cites:
[398] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[399] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[400] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[401] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[402] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.15

; Per Richardson email: "I likewise would remove the unknown wife of Fergus, lord of Galloway, as a bastard daughter. While it is possible that Fergus' wife was a bastard daughter of King Henry I, I think it is more likely that she was a granddaughter of Malcolm Canmore, King of Scotland. Whatever the case, Fergus' wife's name was not Elizabeth, as often claimed in print. Her given name is not known.”.35

; Per Genealogy.EU (Brabant 2): “C3. [1m.] Adela of Louvain, +1151; 1m: Westminster Abbey 29.1.1121 King Henry I of England (*1070 +1.12.1135); 2m: William Earl of Arundel (+1157)”.36

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELISA de Louvain ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[124]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[125]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[126]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[127]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121, died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[128]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[129]. She became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in [1149/50]. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[130]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[131]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[132].
     "m firstly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) as his second wife, HENRY I King of England, son of WILLIAM I King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1168]-Saint-Denis le Ferment, Forêt d’Angers near Rouen 1/2 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire).
     "m secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) WILLIAM d’Aubigny [de Albini], son of WILLIAM d’Aubigny Lord of the manor of Buckenham, Norfolk & his wife Maud le Bigod (-Waverley Abbey, Surrey 12 Oct 1176, bur Wymondham Priory, Norfolk). He was created Earl of Arundel [1142]."
Med Lands cites:
[124] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[125] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[126] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), Continuatio, p. 75.
[127] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[128] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[129] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen) Tome II, p. 19.
[130] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1864) Annales Monastici Vol. I, Annales de Margan, Annales de Theokesberia, Annales de Burton (London), Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[131] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[132] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.20


; Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): “1) Adel(is)a (Adélaïde) de Louvain ° 1103/06 + 23-24/03 ou 23/04/1151 (Afflighem, s’y fait religieuse 1149/50)
     ép. 1) 29/01 ou 02/02/1121 (Windsor Castle ou Westminster Abbey) Henry 1er «Beau Clerc» roi d’Angleterre (05/08/1100) ° 09/1068 (Selby, Yorkshire) + 01-02/12/1135 (Saint-Denis-Le-Fermont, forêt d’Angers près Rouen) (fils de William 1er et de Mathilde de Flandres ; veuf de Mathilde d’Ecosse)
     ép. 2) 1136 et 09/1139 William II d’Aubigny créé earl of Arundel (1142) + 12/10/1176 (ou 1157 ?) (Waverley Abbey, Surrey) (fils de William d’Aubigny of Buckenham, Norfolk, et de Maud Le Bigod)”.18 Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England was King of England: [Ashley, pp. 508-512] HENRY (I) BEAUCLERC King of England 3 August 1100-1 December 1135. Crowned Westminster, 6 August 1100. Titles: King of England, Duke of Normandy (from 1106) and Lord of Domfront (from 1092). Born: Selby, Yorkshire, September 1068; Died: St Denis-le-Fermont, near Rouen, 1 December 1135, aged 67. Buried: Reading Abbey. Married: (1) 11 November 1100, Matilda (formerly Edith), dau. of Malcolm III of Scotland; 4 children; (2) 29 January 1121, Adeliza, dau. of Geoffrey VII, Count of Louvain; no children. Henry had at least 25 illegitimate children by eight or more other women. Henry was the fourth and youngest son of WILLIAM the Conqueror, and possibly the most ambitious. Although he was less quarrelsome than his elder brothers Robert, who inherited the duchy of Normandy, and WILLIAM, who became William II of England, he clearly had his eyes on ruling either England or Normandy or both as early as 1091. In that year, while Robert and William were fighting each other, Henry took control of several castles and made a bid for power. Realising that he had left his back unguarded William soon quelled his upstart brother, and did not take his eyes off him after that, keeping him always close at hand. William and Robert agreed that if either of them died childless, then the survivor would succeed. This effectively disinherited Henry who had long grudged the fact that he had not been able to inherit his mother's estates in England that she had bequeathed him upon her death in 1083. Instead his father believed that, as the youngest son, Henry would be destined for the church. As a result he had a good education, hence his nickname Beauclerc, meaning "fine scholar", since he was the first Norman king (and there had not been that many Saxon ones) who could read and write.
Henry was not satisfied with his lot and it has been conjectured that it was he who masterminded the death of William II, making it look like he was killed as the result of a hunting accident. If this is true then its timing was critical. In 1096 Robert of Normandy had joined the Crusade to the Holy Land and had pledged the duchy to William. By the summer of 1100 news reached England that Robert was returning, along with a new bride. Immediately upon the death of William a hastily convened council elected Henry as his successor. This despite the support that many barons had for Robert, who was on a crest of popularity following his victories in the Holy Land, even though his past record showed him as a weak ruler of Normandy. By the first week of September, when Robert had returned to Normandy, Henry had been elected and crowned. One of his first acts was to recall Anselm from his exile to the archbishopric of Canterbury, and with Anselm's support Henry's position was inviolable. He further cemented it by a political marriage to Edith, the daughter of MALCOLM III of Scotland and the niece of EDGAR the Atheling, thus establishing alliances with the elder Saxon aristocracy and with the Scots.
Robert raised a considerable army and invaded England in June 1101, cleverly misleading Henry whose army waited at Arundel while Robert landed at Portsmouth. It is possible that had Robert pressed home his advantage he could have defeated Henry's army. He might easily have captured Winchester, where the Treasury was held, but his army passed by that town. It stopped short of invading London, though this too was within his grasp. Instead the two armies met at Alton where Robert asked for negotiations. Clearly Robert lacked the opportunism that marked the success of his father and younger brother. Even worse, he was prepared to trust Henry. The result was that Henry agreed to pay Robert 3,000 marks annually and recognize him as the legal claimant to the throne in exchange for Henry remaining king while he lived. In the eyes of Henry and the barons possession was nine-tenths of the law, and Robert was the loser. A few years later, in 1106, Henry took control of the matter, invading Normandy and capturing his brother at Tinchebrai. Robert was brought to England and imprisoned for the rest of his life, which lasted another twenty-eight years: he was certainly over 80 when he died in 1134. Had he succeeded to the English throne in 1087, on the death of his father, he would have ruled for 47 years, one of the longest reigns of an adult monarch. However his weak nature suggests that he would have been overthrown by someone long before his death, and in all likelihood that would still have been his scheming brother Henry.
Whilst Henry was endeavouring to regain Normandy he had troubles at home with the church. Although he had recalled Anselm as archbishop of Canterbury, the relations between the two rapidly deteriorated. Anselm had fallen out with William Rufus because the latter had refused to acknowledge the authority of Rome and Anselm's rights in the reorganization of the church. Anselm reminded Henry of the papal authority in appointing clergy, since the pope had decreed as far back as 1059 that lay investiture was unlawful in the eyes of the Church. Henry would have none of this, and with other matters more pressing refused to consider it. By 1103 Anselm found his position untenable and he again went into exile. The pope threatened to excommunicate Henry and, fearful of how this would undermine his authority as king, Henry recalled Anselm and sought to negotiate a compromise. The result was that in 1106 Henry accepted clerical authority in investiture on the understanding that the clergy still recognized secular authority over the lands owned by the church. In this way Henry kept his revenues (which Anselm had maintained belonged to the church and thus to Rome) and it meant he could still agree who had possession of the property. (It was this loophole that allowed HENRY II to challenge Thomas Becket sixty years later.) Nevertheless when Anselm died in 1109 Henry succeeded in keeping the see of Canterbury vacant for five years.
Once Henry had secured the dukedom of Normandy he had his hands full in keeping it. Since England was now relatively safe, he found he had to spend more time in Normandy. His queen Matilda officially served as regent during these absences, but increasingly the administration came under the capable control of Roger, bishop of Salisbury. Since Henry drew heavily upon the English revenues to finance his army in Normandy as well as his extensive building projects across England, Roger developed a system for controlling the exchequer. In effect he established the basis for what would evolve into the civil service.
Although Henry would enter into battle if necessary, he sought to pave the way by treaty or diplomacy first, and in this he was admirably skilled. One such act was the marriage in January 1114 of his eldest daughter Adelaide (who adopted the name MATILDA upon her marriage) to Heinrich V, Emperor of Germany, and she was crowned Empress on the same day. She was eleven years old; the Emperor was 32. Henry held Normandy against all opposition. His ultimate victory was the defeat of Louis VI of France in 1119. When peace was agreed with the pope's blessing, Henry was accepted unchallenged as duke of Normandy. Henry cemented this advance by marrying his eldest son William to Alice (who also changed her name to Matilda), the daughter of Fulk V, count of Anjou and Maine. William was only fifteen, Alice less than twelve. In 1120, as Henry's eldest son William came of age, he was made duke of Normandy, and stood in succession to the throne of England, even though Henry's eldest brother Robert and his son William were both still alive.
In the summer of 1120 Henry could be proud of his achievements. Through his own marriage and those of his children he had alliances with the strongest neighbouring royal families of Europe; others he had dominated by conquest or treaty. He had reached a satisfactory arrangement with the papacy and all looked well for the future. And then everything fell about him. In November 1120 his two eldest legitimate sons William and Richard drowned when the White Ship foundered off Barfleur while sailing from Normandy to England. He was left without a male heir, although his eldest illegitimate son, Robert Fitzroy, earl of Gloucester, now turned an eye to the throne. Henry's first wife, Matilda had died in May 1118, an event over which Henry did not seem especially concerned. He arranged a quick marriage of convenience to Adeliza, daughter of Geoffrey VII, count of Louvain. That marriage was childless, although Henry had several more illegitimate children, and Adeliza bore seven children to her second husband, William d'Albini, earl of Arundel, after Henry's death.
In 1125 Henry's daughter, Matilda, became a widow when the Emperor Heinrich died. She was twenty-three but had no children. In 1126, fearing he would have no further children, Henry made the barons swear an oath of fealty to Matilda as the heir-presumptive to the throne. The barons agreed, though the idea of being ruled by a queen was anathema to them. The position was further aggravated when, in May 1127, Henry arranged a second marriage for Matilda, this time with Geoffrey of Anjou, who was then only fourteen. The Normans had little affection for the Angevins and did not like to consider that Geoffrey might become their King. They began to turn their allegiance to Henry's nephew, William, the son of Duke Robert, who was known as William Clito. At this time, April 1127, he was supported by the French king, who had just made him count of Flanders. In January 1128 he married Giovanna, the daughter of the count of Burgundy. William was gradually rising in power and his right to the English throne was becoming increasingly recognized by the Norman aristocracy. Unfortunately William was wounded in a skirmish near St Omer in July 1128 and died five days later.
The barons now realised that there was little alternative but to Matilda becoming their queen, but they increasingly showed their opposition. Geoffrey, who became count of Anjou in 1129, recognized this and though he never seems to have considered himself having any claim on the throne of England, he did consider the duchy of Normandy and asked Henry if he would give him custody of the castles along the French coast. Henry refused, with the result that the relationship between Henry and Geoffrey deteriorated rapidly. It had not been helped by Matilda deciding she could not abide Geoffrey and deserting him to return to England. Henry, still with an eye on Matilda producing a grandson, sought to reconcile the two with some degree of success. Nevertheless, by 1135 Henry and Geoffrey were openly at war. Henry sailed to Normandy but soon after his arrival he became ill, apparently after eating some lampreys. The result was ptomaine poisoning and six days later Henry died. Despite having declared Matilda his heir, neither she nor the barons took up that position, and the throne was claimed by Henry's nephew, STEPHEN.
Henry was a highly capable king. Although he was frequently involved in warfare, either direct or diplomatic, most of this was over his lands in Normandy. For all of his long reign, after the first year, he maintained peace throughout England, though it was a peace at the cost of exacting taxes needed to maintain his army. This led to him establishing the crown exchequer, the basis of the future Treasury. With his many campaigns and international affairs, Henry had little time for anything other than pleasures of the flesh, although he did establish a royal menagerie at his manor at Woodstock, near Oxford, which is regarded as the first English zoo. It is ironic that, despite having fathered at least twenty-nine children, he was only able to leave one legitimate heir to the throne, and she was not seriously considered by Henry's barons until it became convenient to do so. For all of Henry's schemes and plans during his thirty-five year reign, the longest of any king of England since ATHELRED II, it all came to nought. Perhaps he schemed too much, for his efforts in his final years to find a successor meant that he found one too many, and within four years of his death, England was plunged into civil war. between 3 August 1100 and 1 December 1135.37,10 He was Duke of Normandy between 1106 and 1135.37 He witnessed the beginning of military service of Walter de Graham of Abercorn between 10 November 1118 and 16 November 1118 at Siege of Laigle, L'Aigle, Normandy, France (now); one source places him with the forces of Henry I, king of England at Laigle in 1116.38

Family 1

Edith (Eda) Sigulfson de Greystoke b. c 1071, d. WFT Est. 1087-1165
Child

Family 2

Edith (?)
Child

Family 3

Ansfride (?) b. c 1069, d. WFT Est. 1105-1164
Children
  • Juliane (?) b. c 1090, d. 1136; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White40,3
  • Richard (?) of Lincoln b. b 1101, d. 25 Nov 1120; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White40,3
  • Fulk (?) Prince of England b. c 1102; Phillips cites: Complete Peerage, in Appendix D of volume 11 (1949), by Geoffrey H. White40,2,3

Family 4

Nesta ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr Princess of Wales b. c 1073, d. 1163
Children

Family 5

Sibylla Corbet of Alcester b. c 1075, d. a 1157
Children

Family 6

Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland b. bt 1079 - 1080, d. 1 May 1118
Children

Family 7

Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont b. c 1096, d. a 1172
Children

Family 8

Adelicia (Adeliza) (?) de Louvain, of Brabant b. c 1104, d. 23 Apr 1151

Family 9

Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 183-184, NORMANDY 8. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-23, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 508-512. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 226, SCOTLAND 23:ix.
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda (Edith) of Scotland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002867&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Edithdied1118
  16. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#AG1
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adeliza de Louvain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007057&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#AdelisaLouvaindied1151.
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 26 October 2020), memorial page for Henry I of England (21 Sep 1068–2 Dec 1135), Find a Grave Memorial no. 1949, citing Reading Abbey Ruins, Reading, Reading Borough, Berkshire, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1949. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S1516] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email 15 November 2003."
  23. [S1536] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin 27 November 2003 email "Bastards of Henry I, part 1: Introduction and Bibliography"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/yTTgtRZ87j4/m/uRyJPbrIYksJ) to e-mail address, 27 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/yTTgtRZ87j4/m/uRyJPbrIYksJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email #1 27 November 2003."
  24. [S1514] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email 14 November 2003."
  25. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson 15 Nov email "Re: Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003."
  26. [S1537] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin 27 November 2003 email "Bastards of Henry I, part 2: sons"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/sosRxsz79Ag/m/jNT28df13wwJ) to e-mail address, 27 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/sosRxsz79Ag/m/jNT28df13wwJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email #2 27 November 2003."
  27. [S1540] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin 27 November 2003 email "Bastards of Henry I, part 5: mothers"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/JMuM7R8F_gE/m/NhzyYDcolkYJ) to e-mail address, 27 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/JMuM7R8F_gE/m/NhzyYDcolkYJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email #5 27 November 2003."
  28. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  29. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Henry I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/henry001.htm
  30. [S1538] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin 27 November 2003 email "Bastards of Henry I, part 3: daughters"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/4eAiRFBJ4_A/m/kh954g3PRaIJ) to e-mail address, 27 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/4eAiRFBJ4_A/m/kh954g3PRaIJ. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email #3 27 November 2003."
  31. [S1539] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin 27 November 2003 email "Bastards of Henry I, part 4: probable, possible, etc."," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/JDscAx4oYYM/m/ZAAT71p31p4J) to e-mail address, 27 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/JDscAx4oYYM/m/ZAAT71p31p4J. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email #4 27 November 2003."
  32. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email "Bastards of Henry I"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ) to e-mail address, 14 November 2003, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/RkKZnaKJH3k/m/uC7N0kFlCwAJ. Hereinafter cited as "Phillips email 14 November 2003."
  33. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#H1
  34. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#EM3
  35. [S1515] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 15 Nov 2003," e-mail to e-mail address, 15 Nov 2003.
  36. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant2.html#AG1
  37. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Graham, of Abercorn: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00127771&tree=LEO
  39. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xvii.
  40. [S1513] Chris Phillips, "Phillips email 14 November 2003," e-mail to e-mail address, 14 November 2003.
  41. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes d’Avranches, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Avranches.pdf
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert FitzEdith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076156&tree=LEO
  43. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#RobertFitzEdithdied1172.
  44. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 6.
  45. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda bastarddaughter of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005942&tree=LEO
  46. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Mahautdied1120.
  47. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xiv.
  48. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:vii.
  49. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  50. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.
  51. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xxiv.
  52. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eustacia/Richilde of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005954&tree=LEO
  53. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs d’ Alluyes, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Alluyes.pdf
  54. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#dauHenryIMGuillameGouetMontmirail.
  55. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#ConstanceMRoscelinBeaumont.
  56. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xxiii.
  57. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-184, NORMANDY 8:ii.
  58. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  59. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  60. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda bastarddaughter of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005944&tree=LEO
  61. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#MaudMConanIIIBretagne.
  62. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:vi.

Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland1,2,3,4

F, #4214, b. between 1079 and 1080, d. 1 May 1118
FatherMáel-Coluim (Malcolm III) mac Donnchada "Canmore") (?) King of Scotland (Alba)5,6,7,3,4 b. 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093
MotherSaint Margaret (?) Queen of Scotland5,8,9,10,3,4 b. c 1045, d. 16 Nov 1093
ReferenceGAV26 EDV25
Last Edited20 Dec 2020
     Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland was born between 1079 and 1080 at Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland.11,1,5,3,4 She married Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England, son of William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England and Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England, on 11 November 1100 at Westminster, London, City of London, Greater London, England;
His 1st wife.11,1,2,5,6,3,4,12
Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland died on 1 May 1118 at Westminster Palace, London, City of London, Greater London, England.11,1,13,5,6,3,4
Matilda (Maud) Edith "Atheling" (?) of Scotland was buried after 1 May 1118 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 Jun 1079, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland
     DEATH     1 May 1118 (aged 38), Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     English Monarch. Queen consort of King Henry I. Daughter of King Malcolm III Canmore of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland. She married Henry on November 11, 1100. She was born Edith, but changed her name to Matilda upon her marriage, in honor of her mother-in-law, Matilda of Flanders. They had four children; Euphemia, William, Matilda, and Richard. She died at Westminster at the age of 39. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Malcolm III 1031–1093
          Saint Margaret of Scotland 1045–1093
     Spouse
          Henry I of England 1068–1135 (m. 1100)
     Siblings
          Donnchadh Duncan II 1060–1094
          Edward Prince of Scotland 1068–1093
          Edmund of Scotland 1070–1105
          Aethelred of Scotland 1072–1093
          Edgar, King of Scots 1074–1107
          Alexander I, King of Scots 1077–1124
          David I, King of Scots 1080–1153
          Mary Canmore 1082–1116
     Children
          Matilda of England 1102–1167
          William Aetheling de Normandie 1103–1120
     BURIAL     Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 22 Feb 2004
     Find a Grave Memorial 8428202.6,14
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRY of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire[123]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rotbertum...et Ricardum, Willermum et Henricum” as the sons of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[124]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume and his wife “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde” had “filios quatuor Robertum...Willelmum...Richardum...et Henricum”, adding that Henry succeeded his brothers “tam Regi, quam Duci”[125]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” gave birth to “filium...Henricum” within one year of her coronation in May 1068[126]. Comte de Coutances: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Clito Constantiniensis comes” visited England to request “terram matris suæ” from his brother King William II, dated to [1088][127]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Henricus” reconquered “comitatum Constantiniensem”, which had been taken from him, with the help of “Richardi de Revers et Rogerii de Magna-villa...Hugo comes Cestrensis”[128]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus clito” governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray][129]. Seigneur de Domfront 1092: Orderic Vitalis records that “Henricus Guillelmi regis filius” captured “Danfrontem oppidum” in 1092[130]. He succeeded his brother 3 Aug 1100 as HENRY I “Beauclerc” King of England, taking prompt action to ensure his succession by taking control of the royal treasure at Winchester. Florence of Worcester records that "iunior frater suus Heinricus" succeeded King William II and was crowned "Non Aug" in Westminster Abbey[131]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was crowned at Westminster Abbey 5 Aug 1100[132]. He married the niece of the last Saxon claimant to the throne of England to appease the English. After consolidating his position in England, he crossed the Channel to subdue Normandy in 1105[133]. He defeated his brother Robert at Tinchebrai and declared himself Duke of Normandy 28 Sep 1106. Henry turned his attention to strengthening the position of the crown in the newly united country, creating the Exchequer to improve control over finances, and ensuring that his own supporters filled the potentially powerful positions of county sheriffs. However, tensions increased with the barons, setting the scene for the civil war which followed Henry's death, his male heir having drowned in the White Ship disaster in 1120. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1135 III Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Angliæ"[134]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Dec" in [1135] and his burial at Reading[135]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Dec" of "Henricus rex Anglorum"[136]. William of Newburgh records the burial of King Henry I "apud Radingam in monasterio"[137].
     "m firstly (Westminster Abbey 11 Nov 1100) EADGYTH of Scotland, daughter of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England (1079-Palace of Westminster 1 May 1118, bur Westminster Abbey[138]). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by her sister Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[139]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[140]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[141]. Crowned Queen Consort 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[142]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[143].
     "m secondly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) ADELISA de Louvain, daughter of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & his first wife Ida de Chiny Ctss de Namur ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[144]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[145]. William of Newburgh records the second marriage of King Henry I and "filiam ducis Lotharingie", noting that the marriage was childless[146]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[147]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[148]. She was crowned Queen Consort at Westminster Abbey 30 Jan or 3 Feb 1121. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121[149]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. She married secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) William d’Aubigny [de Albini], who was created Earl of Arundel soon after his marriage. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[150]. Adelisa became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in 1149/50. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[151]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[152]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[153].
     "Mistress (1): ---, a woman from Caen. The name of King Henry's first mistress is not known. Her origin is assumed because her son is styled "Robertus de Cadomo " by Orderic Vitalis. A possible family connection of hers is suggested by the undated charter, arranged with charters dated 1127/28 in the compilation, under which Henry I King of England confirmed an exchange of property between the abbot of Fécamp and "Nigello filio Willelmi, nepote Roberti comitis Gloecestrie filii mei", "Nigellus" donating property "in villa Fiscanni habuit et avus et pater eius"[154]. The wording of the document is incompatible with "Willelmi" being another son of King Henry I. The relationship with Robert Earl of Gloucester must presumably therefore be established through Robert´s mother. The alternatives appear to be that William, father of Nigel, was the son of Robert´s mother by a later marriage (and therefore uterine half-brother of Earl Robert), that William´s wife was her daughter by a later marriage (uterine half-sister of Earl Robert), or that the word nepos denotes a more remote blood relationship and that Nigel was the first or second cousin of Earl Robert. Another relative of Robert Earl of Gloucester was Christiana, who married, as his first wife, William FitzAlan. Orderic Vitalis records that "William fitz Alan castellan and vicecomes of Shrewsbury" married "a niece of Robert Earl of Gloucester"[155]. "William Fitz Alan" donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter his brother, Christiana his wife…"[156].
     "Mistress (2): EDITH, daughter of ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walterus de tribus Minetis" holding land of "Edith matris comitisse de Ptico" in Devonshire[157].
     "Mistress (3): ANSFRIDE, widow of ANSKILL, daughter of --- (-bur Abingdon Abbey). The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Anskillus" and "uxore Anskilli iam defuncti…filio eius…Willelmo" adding that "fratrem regis Henricum" was father of her son "Ricardum", in a later passage naming her "Ansfrida" when recording her death and the donation of the mill at Langford by "Willelmus filius eiusdem…de Anskillo marito suo" for her burial at Abingdon[158]. Her husband was a knight, tenant of Abingdon Abbey, who died following a few days of harsh treatment after being imprisoned by King William II.
     "[Mistress (4): ---. The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland was Sibyl Corbet[159], who is shown below as Mistress (5). As explained more fully below under her daughter Queen Sibyl, this suggestion is not ideal from a chronological point of view. In summary, Sibyl Corbet´s son, Renaud Earl of Cornwall, was probably not born before [1110] considering that his marriage is dated to [1141]. If that is correct, the only way in which he could have had the same mother as the queen of Scotland would be if the latter was a young girl at the time of her marriage. In addition, the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K), which appears incompatible with Sibyl also having been the mother of Queen Sibyl. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). If Robert Corbet had been Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time.]
     "Mistress (5): SIBYL Corbet, daughter of ROBERT Corbet of Alcester, co Warwick & his [first] wife --- ([1090/95]-after 1157). The Complete Peerage deduces her parentage, relationship with King Henry, and her marriage from a charter, dated to [1163/75], under which her son "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…Hugone de Dunstanvill…"[160]. She married ([1115/25]) Herbert FitzHerbert. The [1125/35] birth date range estimated for her son Herbert, born from this marriage, indicates that she married after her relationship with the king. The Pipe Roll of 1157 records a payment to "the mother of Earl Reginald" from an estate at Mienes, Sussex[161].
     "Mistress (6): EDITH, daughter of ---. Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[162]. The Complete Peerage[163] identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland. If this is correct, she married Robert de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of Nigel [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142). The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei”[164]. However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari”[165]. If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named her son Robert in this charter.
     "Mistresses (7) - (12): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
     "Mistress (13): NESTA of South Wales, wife of GERALD FitzWalter of Windsor custodian of Pembroke Castle, daughter of RHYS ap Tewdwr Prince of South Wales & his wife Gwladus ---. Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[166]. She was abducted by Owain son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn from castle Ceanrth Bychan in 1109.
     "Mistresses (14): ---. The name of this mistress of King Henry is not known.
     "Mistress (15): ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Isabelle de Vermandois ([1102/07]-). Guillaume de Jumièges records one illegitimate daughter of King Henry I as daughter of "Elizabeth sorore Waleranni comitis Mellenti"[167]. She married Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare Earl of Pembroke. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Giselbertus filius Gisleberti" married “sororem Waleranni comitis Mellenti...Elizabeth” by whom he had “filium primogenitum...Richardum”[168]. Henry II King of England confirmed the donations to the nuns of Saint-Saens by "Isabel comitissa qui fuit uxor Gilleberti comitis" by charter dated to [1172/1182][169]."
Med Lands cites:
[123] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, pp. 449-51.
[124] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[125] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 182.
[127] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IV, p. 291.
[128] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, IV, p. 294.
[129] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[130] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIX, p. 384.
[131] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 46.
[132] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 295.
[133] Florence of Worcester, 1105, p. 213.
[134] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 34.
[135] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 95.
[136] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.
[137] William of Newburgh, I.III, p. 30.
[138] Florence of Worcester (Continuation), 1118, p. 229.
[139] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[140] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[141] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[142] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[143] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.
[144] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 75.
[145] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309.
[146] William of Newburgh I.III, p. 29.
[147] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 6, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[148] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1121, MGH SS XXV, p. 527.
[149] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[150] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 19.
[151] Annales de Margan, p. 14.
[152] Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis, Spicilegium II, p. 777.
[153] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 471.
[154] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CCXI, p. 362.
[155] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 233.
[156] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 285, citing Haughmond Chartulary, fo. 168, Tit. Preston.
[157] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155.
[158] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, pp. 37 and 122.
[159] CP XI Appendix D, p. 118.
[160] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote a citing Cartæ Antiquæ, P. R. S., no. 38, the charter quoted in full in Eyton, R. W. (1858) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. VII, p. 157.
[161] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 146.
[162] Simeon of Durham, Vol. II, p. 310, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 108 footnote f.
[163] CP XI Appendix D, p. 108.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, VI, p. 253.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thame Abbey, Oxfordshire, III, p. 404.
[166] Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Kambriæ, Rolls Series, p. 130, quoted in CP XI Appendix D, p. 110 footnote a.
[167] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXIX, p. 307.
[168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[169] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXVI, p. 161.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “G4. HENRY I "Beauclerc", King of England (1100-35) -cr 5.8.1000, *Selby, Yorkshire IX.1068, +St.Denis-le-Fermont, nr Rouen 1.12.1135, bur Reading Abbey; 1m: Westminster Abbey 6.8.1100 Matilda of Scotland (*1080 +1.5.1118); 2m: Westminster Abbey 29.1.1122 Adelize de Louvain (*ca 1105 +after 1157)”.15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 193.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 3.3


; Per Genealogics: "Edith was born in Dunfirmline about 1079, the daughter of Malcolm III Canmore, king of Scots, and St. Margaret of Wessex. She was destined to become a nun, and went to Romsey where her aunt Christina was the abbess. However in 1100 Henry I, the new king of England, demanded her hand in marriage and on 11 November 1100 at Westminster she became his queen. She adopted the name Matilda in honour of the king's mother. They had two, possibly three children. Queen Matilda built a leper hospital at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, London, and founded the Augustinian Priory at Aldgate. She was aged only about 38 when she died on 1 May 1118.”.3

; This is the same person as ”Matilda of Scotland” at Wikipedia.

This is also the same person as ”Eadgyth/Matilda of Scotland” at The Henry Project.16,17 GAV-26 EDV-25 GKJ-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "EADGYTH (1079-1 May 1118). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by their maternal aunt Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[398]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[399]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married “Mathildem quæ prius dicta est Edith”[400]. Crowned Queen Consort of England 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[401]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[402].
     "m (11 Nov 1100) as his first wife, HENRY I "Beauclerc" King of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre ([Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068]-Saint-Denis le Ferment, Forêt d’Angers near Rouen 1/2 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire)."
Med Lands cites:
[398] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 273.
[399] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 47.
[400] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 400.
[401] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 316.
[402] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “C10. [2m.] Edith later Matilda upon her marriage, *autumn 1080, +Palace of Westminster, 1.5.1118, bur Westminster Abbey; m.Westminster Abbey 6.8./11.11.1100 King Henry I of England (*IX.1068, +1/2.12.1135)”.18

Family

Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England b. Sep 1068, d. 1 Dec 1135
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 226, SCOTLAND 23:ix. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 508-512. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda (Edith) of Scotland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002867&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Edithdied1118. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Máel Coluim mac Donnchada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002904&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Malcolm III Canmore: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002904&tree=LEO&PHPSESSID=4a6f1218fb877cf1c08e71441357136e
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#MalcolmIIIdied1093B
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Margaret of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002905&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-23, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-184, NORMANDY 8.
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 26 October 2020), memorial page for Matilda Dunkeld (1 Jun 1079–1 May 1118), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8428202, citing Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8428202. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#H1
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Scotland. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadgyth/Matilda of Scotland: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#EM3
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:vii.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.1. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.

William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England1,2,3,4

M, #4215, b. 1028, d. 9 September 1087
FatherRobert I "The Magnificent" (?) Duke of Normandy2,5,3,4 b. c 999, d. 2 Jul 1035
MotherHerleveArlette (?) de Falaise2,6,3,4 b. c 1000, d. c 1050
ReferenceGAV27 EDV26
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England was born in 1028 at Château de Falaise, Falaise, Normandy, France; British Monarchy says b. 1028; Genealogy.EU (Normandy) says b. 1027.7,2,3,4 He married Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England, daughter of Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen and Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance, circa 1051 at Cathedral of Norta Dame D'Eu, Eu, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France (now); per Henry Project: "[See, e.g., GND; WP i, 22 (p. 33)]. The marriage is known to have occurred after 1049 (when Pope Leo IX, for uncertain reasons, prhobited the suggested marriage) and 1053 (when William and Matilda appear as husband and wife in a charter), as discussed by Douglas, who preferred a date of 1050 or 1051 [Douglas 391-2]." Genealogics says m. ca 1051; Med Lands says m. 1050/52.8,1,9,10,2,11,12,13,14,15,3,4
William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England died on 9 September 1087 at St. Gervais, near Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.16,9,3,4
William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England was buried after 9 September 1087 at Abbey of St. Stephen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     ORIGINAL NAME     de Normandie
     BIRTH     c.Sep 1028, Falaise, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     DEATH     9 Sep 1087 (aged 58–59), Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     British Monarch. William I, the first Norman King of England, ascended to the throne in 1066 shortly after the death of his second cousin, Edward the Confessor. Edward had no heir, but requested William to be his heir apparent to the throne. William was the son of the Norman Duke Robert the Magnificent and the unnamed daughter of a tanner. At age seven he became the Duke of Normandy. He married Matilia, daughter of the Count of Flanders, and to the union four sons and five daughters were born. Since the English Witan did not make him their first choice for King, he invaded England along with other armies, conquering the newly appointed King Harold Godwinson and his Saxon army at the Battle of Hastings, thus winning the throne and the name of William the Conqueror. He was crowned on Christmas Day 1066 in Westminster Abbey. The English government of became much more stable during his 21-year reign. England adopted the culture of West European countries instead of those of the northern Scandinavian countries, feudal tenure of land was introduced, landowners started paying taxes to the king, and the English church was reorganized. He was considered a fair man, with only one man being executed during his time in power, but he strongly enforced the hunting-gaming laws and mutilated many for breaking them. William was injured at the siege of Mantes while fighting against his feudal overlord, the King of France. He died at Convent of St. Gervais near Rouen in Normandy. His third son Rufus was his heir becoming William II of England. His disappointed first son Robert became the heir of Normandy. Bio by: Linda Davis
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert I of Normandy 1000–1035
          Herleva de Falaise 1003–1050
     Spouse
          Matilda of Flanders 1031–1083
     Siblings
          Adelaide of Normandy 1030–1090
     Half Siblings
          Robert de Mortain 1031–1095
          Odo Eudes de Conteville 1036–1086
     Children
          Constance de Normandie de Bretagne unknown–1090
          Richard de Normandie 1054–1081
          Robert de Normandie 1054–1135
          King William de Normandie 1056–1100
          Cecilia Of Holy Trinity Princess Of England 1056–1126
          Agatha de Normandie 1064–1080
          Adele of Normandy 1066–1138
          Henry I of England 1068–1135
     BURIAL     Abbey of Saint Stephen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 1948.9,2,17
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 193, 310 ; art of the bio Freeman, Norman Conquest.3

; Per The Henry Project: "Children: The names of the four sons, given by a number of sources [e.g., GND vii, 9(21) (vol. 2, pp. 130-1); OV iii (vol. 2, pp. 104-5), iv (vol. 2, pp. 224-5), v, 11 (vol. 3, pp. 114-7); Will. Malmes. iii, 274 (p. 503)], and generally in the same order (e.g., Robert, Richard, William, Henry, GND vii, 9(21) (vol. 2, pp. 130-1) being the exception, switching Richard and William) pose no problem. The sources have quite a few contradictory statement about the betrothals (including offered or requested betrothals) of daughters of William the Conqueror, and these contradictions have been discussed by Freeman [3: 666-670], Douglas [393-5], and Barlow [441-5]. However, if one sets aside these betrothals for the moment, and considers only the daughters and their known marriages, then the only major conflict is whether or not Agatha (mentioned only by Orderic Vitalis) existed as a separate daughter, or was just a mistake made by Orderic in confusion with Adelaide/Adeliza. Agatha and the various contradictions involving the betrothals are discussed in the commentary section. The children are listed here in the order suggested by Barlow [445], but for the most part there is little evidence for birthdates or the order of the daughters."18

; Per HBC:
     "Duke William of Normandy was only 17 when his jester warned that he was about to be assassinated. Norman nobles were furious that the illegitimate boy whom they called "William the Bastard" was sitting on the throne of one of the most powerful kingdoms in medieval Europe. Several of them wanted the throne for themselves. Had their conspiracy succeeded, it would have thwarted one of history's most significant reigns.
     "William's jester, Gollet, was in Bayeux in northern France when he overheard one of the conspirators discussing the imminent kidnapping and murder of the Duke. Gollet immediately set off on foot to Valognes, where the Duke was staying, deep within the conspirators' territory. Not knowing in which room William was staying, Gollet pounded on doors in the middle of the night until he at last found William. The alerted Duke got on his horse at once and rode through the night, stopping only to pray at a church along the way. He emerged from the church just in time to see a troop of his would-be executioners pass by, riding furiously for Valognes.
     "Finally, William reached King Henry I of France and begged for his aid. Their subsequent alliance was decisive. In 1047, they defeated the rebel nobles in battle, and over the next several years they aided each other's attempts to put down various other uprisings in both France and Normandy. Yet when Henry realized that William was plotting to increase his power by gaining control of England, he attacked his former ally. William fought off the attack, and captured new territories in the process.
     "The constant warfare and intrigue of William's early life hardened him and made him into a ruthless and crafty leader. His talent for survival and military victories placed the once-derided "Bastard" in a position of such strength that by 1066, he could invade England and claim his new title: William the Conqueror.“.19

; This is the same person as ”William the Conqueror” at Wikipedia and as ”Guillaume le Conquérant” at Wikipédia (FR).20,21

; This is the same person as ”William "the Conqueror" (Guillaume "le Conquérant")” at The Henry Project.18

; Per Genealogics:
     “William was born at Falaise, the bastard son of Robert, duke of Normandy, by Herleve/Harlette, a tanner's daughter. On his father's death in 1035, the nobles accepted him as duke, but his youth was passed in difficulty and danger. When in 1047 the lords of the western part of the duchy rebelled, Henri I of France came to his help and the rebels were defeated at Val-des-Dunes.
     “In 1051 he visited his cousin, the English king Edward 'the Confessor', and received the promise of the English succession. He married Matilda, daughter of Baudouin V, Count of Flanders, in 1053. In the next ten years William repulsed two French invasions, and in 1063 he conquered Maine. Although he was never keen on capital punishment, William 'the Bastard' could get touchy about jokes too near the bone; when he captured the town of Alençon that had displayed flayed skins on its walls in allusion to the tanner's trade (his maternal grandfather Fulbert had been a tanner), he chopped the right hand and left foot off each citizen to teach them a lesson about laughing last. It is likely that in 1064 Harold was at his court and swore to help him gain the English crown on Edward's death. However when Edward died in 1066, Harold became king. William laid his claim, and on 14 October he defeated Harold at the Battle of Hastings (fought at Senlac near Hastings). Harold was slain and William was crowned on 25 December. The west and north of England were subdued in 1068; but next year the north revolted, and William devastated the country between York and Durham.
     “The constitution under William assumed a feudal aspect, the old national assembly becoming a council of the king's tenants-in-chief, and all title to land was derived from his grant. The Domesday Book of 1086 contains the land settlement. He also brought the English Church into closer relations with Rome.
     “William built the original keep of the Tower of London, which became one of the most haunted sites in England. His rule was stern and orderly. In 1070 there was a rebellion in the Fen Country and, under the leadership of Hereward the Wake, the rebels held out for some time on the Isle of Ely. The Scottish king Malcolm, who plundered the northern shires, sheltered English exiles. However in 1072 William compelled Malcolm to do him homage at Abernethy. In 1073 he reconquered Maine. He also made a successful expedition into South Wales.
     “His eldest son Robert rebelled against him in Normandy in 1079. Having entered on a war with Philippe I of France in 1087, William burned Mantes. As he rode through the burning town, his horse stumbled and William was injured when thrown against the iron pommel of his saddle. He was carried to the priory of St. Gervase near Rouen where he confessed his sins. On 9 September 1087 he died there, commending his soul to the Virgin Mary, 'that by her holy prayers she may reconcile me to her Son, my Lord Jesus Christ'. The Saxon chronicler summed up William's character well when he wrote: 'He was mild to good men who loved God, and stark beyond all bounds to those who withsaid his will'.
     “All his sons except Henry deserted his deathbed to fight for the succession; his officers and servants fled with what spoils they could take. A vassal bore his remains to the Abbaye aux Hommes at Caen.”.3 GAV-27 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Normandie, illegitimate son of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress Herlève --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/28]-Rouen, Prioré de Saint-Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbé de Saint-Etienne). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Roberto Duce...Willelmum filium suum” was born “apud Falesiam”[1]. His birth date is estimated from William of Malmesbury, according to whom Guillaume was born of a concubine and was seven years old when his father left for Jerusalem[2], and Orderic Vitalis, who states that he was eight years old at the time[3]. Deville suggests that Guillaume´s birthdate can be fixed more precisely to [mid-1027], taking into account that his father Robert occupied Falaise immediately after the death of his father Duke Richard II (23 Aug 1026), not wishing to accept the authority of his older brother Duke Richard III, but that Robert´s stay was short as the two brothers were reconciled soon after, it being reasonable to suppose that Robert´s relationship with Guillaume´s mother occurred soon after his arrival at Falaise[4]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Alain III Duke of Brittany was appointed his guardian during his father's absence in 1035[5]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy. He helped Henri I King of France defeat Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou at Mouliherne in [1045/55][6]. It appears that Edward "the Confessor" King of England acknowledged Guillaume as successor to the English throne on several occasions, maybe for the first time during his visit to England in 1051 which is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle[7]. Comte de Maine in 1063, after he conquered the county. In [1064/65], Duke Guillaume interceded with Guy de Ponthieu Comte d'Abbeville to secure the release of Harold, son of Godwin, from captivity in Normandy, in return for Harold's acknowledgement of Guillaume as successor to the English crown (according to the portrayal of the event in the Bayeux tapestry). Harold's visit to Normandy, and swearing allegiance to Duke William, is recorded by William of Jumièges[8]. According to Eadmer of Canterbury, the reason for his visit was to negotiate the release of his brother Wulfnoth and nephew Haakon, both of whom had been hostages in Normandy since 1051. On his deathbed, King Edward "the Confessor" bequeathed the kingdom of England to Harold. Duke Guillaume branded Harold a perjurer and appealed to Pope Alexander II for support. After receiving a papal banner in response to his request, William gathered a sizable army during summer 1066 in preparation for invasion. After some delay due to unfavourable weather conditions, the army set sail for England from Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme 28 Sep 1066[9]. William defeated and killed King Harold at Hastings 14 Oct 1066[10], marched north to Canterbury, then west to Winchester where he captured the royal treasury. He proceeded to London where he was crowned 25 Dec 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England at Westminster Abbey, possibly by Ealdred Archbishop of York who may have officiated because of doubts concerning the validity of the appointment of Stigand as Archbishop of Canterbury. The latter had received his pallium in 1058 from Pope Benedict X, later regarded as anti-Pope, an appointment which had not been regularised by Pope Alexander II. Orderic Vitalis records that King William was crowned again at Winchester by “cardinales Romanæ ecclesiæ...Alexander papa...vicarious: Ermenfredum pontificem Sedunorum et duos canonicos cardinales”, dated to 1070[11]. After taking several years to subdue the whole country, he imposed the Norman feudal structure and rule everywhere with methodical and harsh persistence. The minute description of the country contained in the Domesday Book, completed in 1086, enabled King William to create an effective tax base Orderic Vitalis records the death “V Id Sep Rotomagi” 1087 of “Guillelmus Nothus rex Anglorum” and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Stephani...Cadomi”[12]. He died from wounds received at the siege of Mantes, having been injured internally after being thrown against the pommel of his saddle[13], leaving Normandy to his eldest son Robert and England to his second surviving son William. Florence of Worcester records the death "Id Sep V" of King William and his burial "Cadomi in ecclesia S Stephani Protomartyris"[14]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Willelmus…Roberti filius" was buried "Cadomi in ecclesia beati Stephani" which he had built[15].
     "m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) MATHILDE de Flandre, daughter of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Rodbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[16]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume married “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde”[17]. Orderic Vitalis records the marriage of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[18]. She founded the abbey of la Trinité at Caen, as confirmed by an undated manuscript which records the death "pridie nonas julias" of "abbatissam Mathildem" in the 54th year in which she held the position and names "Mathildem Anglorum reginam, nostri cœnobii fondatricem, Adilidem, Mathildem, Constantiam, filias eius" heading the list of the names of nuns at the abbey[19]. Her husband appointed Mathilde as his regent in Normandy when he left to invade England, and again after he returned to England after visiting Normandy in 1067: Orderic Vitalis records that, when King William returned to England, 6 Dec 1067, he appointed “Mathildi conjugi suæ filioque suo Rodberto adolescenti” to govern Normandy (“principatum Neustriæ”), adding that the king took with him “Rogerium de Monte-Gomerici” whom he had appointed as “tutorem Normanniæ...cum sua conjuge” when he had left for England for the first time[20]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "die Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York[21]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” came to England in 1068 and was crowned queen “die Pentecostes anno II regni præfati regis” by the archbishop of York[22]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William sent “Mathildem” back to Normandy in light of the rebellions in England and to preserve intact “provinciæ...cum Rodberto puero” [referring to their eldest son], dated to 1069[23]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[24]. Orderic Vitalis records the death “III Non Nov” [1083] of “Mathildis regina Anglorum” and her burial “cœnobium Sanctæ Trinitatis...apud Cadomum”[25]. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen[26]."
Med Lands cites:
[1] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VI, XII, p. 266.
[2] William of Malmesbury, III, 229, p. 217.
[3] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 87, and Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[4] Deville ‘Observations sur l’époque de la naissance de Guillaume le Conquérant’ (1837-39), p. 183.
[5] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 87.
[6] William of Poitiers, Book I, c. 11.
[7] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, 1051.
[8] William of Jumièges VII.13, discussed in Houts (2000), p. 114.
[9] Houts (2000), p. 105.
[10] William's campaign is commemorated in an anonymous poem The Carmen de Hastingae Proelio of Guy Bishop of Amiens, F. Barlow (ed. and trans.) (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1999).
[11] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 199.
[12] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, I, p. 256.
[13] Malmesbury, II, pp. 336-7, cited in Chibnall, Vol. IV, p. 79.
[14] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 20.
[15] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[16] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[17] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[18] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[19] Delisle (1866), pp. 181-2.
[20] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 177.
[21] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 2.
[22] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, pp. 181-2.
[23] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, V, p. 188.
[24] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 330.
[25] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, IX, pp. 192-3.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Mathilde de Flandres ° ~1032 + 02/11/1083 (Caen) duchesse de Normandie, duchesse-régente, Reine d’Angleterre (cour. 11/05/1068, Westminster ou Winchester)
     ép. 1050/52 (Eu, Notre-Dame) Guillaume II «Le Bâtard» duc de Normandie (William 1er roi d’Angleterre) ° 1027/28 + 09/09/1087 (Prieuré Saint-Gervais de Rouen) (fils de Robert «Le Diable», duc de Normandie,et d’Herleue dite «de Falaise») ”.14

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “G3. Matilda, *ca 1032, +Caen 2.11.1083; m.1053 King William I of England, Duke of Normandy (*1027 +7.9.1087)”

Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “F1. WILLIAM I "The Conqueror" Duke of Normandy, King of England (1066-87) cr Westminster Cathedral 24.12.1066, *Falaise 1027, +nr Rouen 7.9.1087, bur St.Stephen Abbey, Caen; m.1053 Mathilde of Flanders (*1032 +2.11.1083”.22,23

; Per Weis: “Maud (or Matilda) of Flanders, b. 1032, d. 3 Nov. 1083; m. 1053, William I, the Conqueror (121-24), Duke of Normandy, King o England. (Gens. 16-23; ES II/5. See also: Crispin, Falaise Rolle, (1938). 186-187; Bonston Evening Transcript, 26 Sept. 1927, Note 2257, D.L.J., Part VI (Flanders)."

Per Weis: “William I, the Conqueror (natural son by Herleve), b. Falaise, 1027, d. Rouen, 9 sept. 1087, Duke of Normandy, King of England 1066-1067. (CNN, 494; Moriarty; ES II/81).”.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATHILDE de Flandre ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Rodbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[257]. Orderic Vitalis records the marriage of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[258]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "die Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York[259]. Orderic Vitalis also records that she was crowned queen of England 11 May 1068[260], presumably at Westminster Abbey or Winchester Cathedral although this appears to be unrecorded. Queen Matilda acted as regent in Normandy during her husband's absences in England. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[261]. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen[262].
     "m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy, illegitimate son of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress Herlève --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/28]-Rouen, Priory of St Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbey of St Etienne). He succeeded in 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England."
Med Lands cites:
[257] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[258] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[259] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), p. 2.
[260] "On Whit Sunday in the second year of King William's reign", Orderic Vitalis, Vol. 2, Book IV, p. 215.
[261] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 330.
[262] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 17.13
He was Duke of Normandy between 1035 and 1087.25,26 He was King of England, [Ashley, pp. 498-505] WILLIAM I THE CONQUEROR, also called THE BASTARD King of England, late November/early December 1066-9 September 1087. Crowned: Westminster Abbey, 25 December 1066. Titles: king of England, duke of Normandy and count of Maine. Born: Falaise, Normandy, autumn 1028. Died: St Gervais, Rouen, 9 September 1087, aged 59. Buried: Abbey of St Stephen, Caen. Married: c1053 (at Eu), Matilda (c1031-83), dau. Baldwin V of Flanders, 10 children. William the Conqueror, or William the Bastard as he was known in his day (though out of his hearing), was the illegitimate son of Robert I, duke of Normandy. The Normans were Vikings who had settled in northern France and had taken on the lifestyle of the French aristocracy, without losing that passion for conquest. William was descended from RAGNALD, the ancestor of the earls of Orkney.
Many histories would have you believe that Britain's royal history began with William, although his claim on the English throne was tenuous. He maintained that EDWARD THE CONFESSOR had promised him the succession as far back as 1051 during a period when Edward's relationship with Earl Godwin was low and Edward was looking for support. The connections between the Saxon and Norman royal families extended back to ATHELRED THE UNREADY who had married Emma the sister of William's grandfather, Richard II of Normandy. William was the son of Edward the Confessor's first cousin. Researchers have been unable to find any evidence of Edward's promise, at least amongst English documents, and its only provenance is amongst the Norman chronicles. William was later able to exact support for the claim from HAROLD Godwinson, earl of Wessex, who was at William's court in 1065, and the Bayeux Tapestry shows Harold offering fealty to William. Hence when Edward died in 1066 and Harold was crowned as king, William regarded him as a usurper and prepared to invade.
William had already demonstrated his strength as a commander and soldier. His life was one of almost constant warfare as he carved out for himself a position as one of the most powerful and, when necessary, ruthless rulers of his day. He had succeeded to the duchy of Normandy in 1035 when just seven or eight years old. His father had died while on a pilgrimage when only 27. His mother, Herleva or Arletta, was Robert's mistress. She was the daughter of a local tanner and, legend says, Robert spied upon her while she washed clothes at the river. During William's minority there was much rivalry at the Norman court as the aristocracy struggled for power. Three of William's guardians were assassinated and the young duke knew he needed to assert his authority as soon as he was able. That opportunity came in 1047 when his cousin, Guy of Brionne, rebelled and claimed the duchy. Guy had considerable support and William needed the help of Henri I of France to win the day after a tightly fought battle. This gave William his authority but it also imprinted upon him a streak of ruthlessness which caused him to retaliate viciously against anyone who challenged him.
William's authority increased when he married Matilda, the daughter of Baldwin V, count of Flanders, a powerful ruler whose acceptance of William as a suitable son-in-law showed that William had risen above the trials of his youth. William may also have seen in Matilda a further link with his claim on the throne of England as she was seventh in line from ALFRED the Great. The pope apparently opposed this marriage for some years on grounds of an earlier betrothal by Matilda, but it finally received his blessing in 1059.
During the decade of the 1050s William continued to consolidate his power, even to the point of incurring the enmity of his former ally, Henri I of France. William succeeded in rebuffing all attempts to invade Normandy and by 1062 had himself invaded Maine, on almost the same pretext as he would invade England four years later - that Herbert, count of Maine, had promised William the county if he died without heirs. William became count of Maine in 1063. William's other conquests meant that he had support from the surrounding powers of Anjou and Brittany, whilst the new king of France, Philippe I, was under the protection of William's father-in-law, Baldwin. This meant that when William prepared to invade England in September 1066 he was able to draw not only upon his own resources within Normandy, but upon those of his allies.
Nevertheless, this did not make William's conquest of England a certainty. He was up against one of the most aggressive armies of Europe under the command of Harold Godwinson. Harold's misfortune was that he had to face two invasions within one month. Harold's men already weakened by defeating the army of Harold Hardraada of Norway at Stamford Bridge on 25 September, faced a quick march back to fight William who had landed at Pevensey on 28 September. William took advantage of Harold's absence to develop his defences near Hastings and by pillaging the local farmsteads and hamlets. By so doing William succeeded in drawing Harold toward him, whereas Harold's opportunity for success lay in drawing William away from his fleet and its supplies. The two armies met at Senlac Hill (now Battle), near Hastings, on 14 October 1066. Had Harold's army not been weakened he may well have won, but they were overpowered by William's cavalry. The Saxon army submitted after the death of Harold and his brothers.
For the next two months William's army moved strategically around the Kentish coast taking a circular route to London and seeking the submission of the English en route. They burned Dover, and laid waste to much of Surrey. The English, in the meantime, had elected EDGAR the Atheling as their new king, but he was only a boy of thirteen or fourteen, and unable to muster any forces to retaliate against William. The citizens of London prevented William crossing the Thames, so he sacked Southwark and moved west, crossing the Thames at Wallingford. Edgar submitted at Berkhamstead and the Normans then approached London from the north. Lud Gate was opened to the invader by a collaborator and, in the Battle of Ludgate Hill, countless Londoners were slain. William was crowned in Westminster Abbey on 25 December 1066, the ceremony conducted by Ealdred, archbishop of York. Cries of support from the Normans present were interpreted as an English rebellion and the guards promptly attacked the Saxons and set fire to nearby houses. William himself had to quell the panic. His reign began with terror and would remain a reign of terror for twenty years.
Although William was to style himself as king of England not all of England had accepted him as king. His dominion was primarily in the south, covering all of the old kingdoms of Wessex, Kent, Sussex and Essex, and stretching someway into Mercia. The powerful earls of Mercia and Northumbria, the brothers Edwin and Morcar, believed that William's design was only to conquer Wessex and accepted him as king within that domain, pleased that he had overthrown the Godwin family. They even hoped they would be accepted as kings in their territories. This short-sightedness sealed the fate of England, for had the brothers united their armies with those elsewhere in England and faced William before he became established, he might still have been defeated, but the old rivalries between Saxon families became their downfall and isolated rebellions were soon put down with the viciousness with which William became renowned.
William remained in England for three months after his coronation, during which time he appointed a wide range of Norman officials, and despatched the army to plunder the churches in order to pay his army. When he returned to Normandy in late February 1067 he took with him the most likely candidates to lead any rebellion in England, Edgar the Atheling, Stigand, the archbishop of Canterbury, and the earls Edwin and Morcar. During his absence in Normandy, where William displayed the spoils of his conquest and made most of his fame, his half-brother Bishop Odo endeavoured to impose Norman rule in England, but with minimal success. An attempted invasion by Eustace, count of Bolougne, who was Edward the Confessor's brother-in-law, was soon repelled, but the general unrest in England, especially in the north and west, continued to grow. William returned in December 1067 and began his systematic conquest of England in earnest. He turned his attention first to the west, at Exeter, where Harold's mother had taken refuge. The town submitted after a siege of eighteen days. William was comparatively lenient to the townsfolk, though he exacted payment. He also ordered the building of a castle and established a Norman noble, Baldwin of Brionne, as the local custodian. This became William's approach over the next few years. As he advanced upon his conquests he would build a castle from which a Norman duke or earl would maintain the peace in that territory. Initially the castles were hasty constructions of wood upon a motte-and-bailey site. It was only later that he and his successors began the construction of massive stone castles at key sites. These castles became the image of Norman power created not to defend England but to dominate it. In total 78 castles were constructed by William's order, the most famous being the Tower of London. By March 1068 William felt sufficiently secure in the south to bring his wife, Matilda, over to England where she was crowned queen. She remained in England for a year, accompanying William on his tour of conquest. Their last son, the future HENRY I was born at Selby in September 1068. She returned to Normandy in 1069 and remained there until her death in 1083.
It was during 1068 that William faced his first major opposition. Earls Morcar and Edwin rebelled, and Edgar the Atheling took refuge with MALCOLM III of Scotland - Malcolm married Edgar's sister Margaret the following year. The Saxons sought the support of the Welsh though clearly were not acting with any coherent plan for William was soon able to quash the rebellion by advancing on Warwick. William continued north, establishing castles at Nottingham and York. His original plans to govern northern England through the Saxon aristocracy now changed, as he believed Edwin and Morcar had forfeited their rights. From then on William redistributed the lands of the Saxons amongst the Norman and French aristocracy. The native English were not simply conquered, they were dispossessed. William was hated and despised by the English, but any attempt to display this feeling was countered by ruthless retaliation. When William returned briefly to Normandy in early 1069, faced with a revolt in Maine, the English attacked the Normans at Durham, killing many of them. They moved on to besiege the castle at York, but by then William had returned and he not only defeated the English but sacked the city.
The English resistance was far from over. Edgar the Atheling's followers joined forces with King Swein of Denmark. Swein had as much claim to the English throne as William, if not more. He was the nephew of CANUTE and maintained, like William, that Edward had named him as his successor. The English had learned to co-exist with the Danes. There had been Danish kings ruling parts of England for two centuries before Canute. The armies of Swein and Edgar, along with other northern rebels, recaptured York in September 1069. Again William marched on the north, this time destroying everything in his path. This harrying of the north was the most extreme example of despoiling and genocide that England has ever seen, and for which William was never forgiven by the English. He may have conquered them, but he never ruled them.
William succeeded in buying off the Danish force and they retreated in late 1070, after briefly returning for a second attempt. Pockets of resistance remained throughout the north, the west and especially in the Fenland of East Anglia, where the Saxon thane Hereward the Wake, perhaps the best known of the Saxon rebels, maintained the most ordered resistance to William. Hereward was joined by Earl Morcar whose brother, Edwin, had been treacherously murdered by his own men. William brought all his forces to bear upon the Isle of Ely where Hereward made the last major Saxon stand against the Norman might. William's power proved irresistible. Hereward escaped, but Morcar was captured and imprisoned, and other rebels were tortured and mutilated before their release.
The last to resist William was Edgar the Atheling who had fled back to the court of King Malcolm. In the summer of 1072 William marched into Scotland to demand that Malcolm cease aiding Edgar's insurrection. Malcolm agreed and, with the Peace of Abernethy, recognized William as his overlord. He also expelled Edgar from his court. Edgar, however, did not submit to William until 1074. By the end of 1072 William believed that his conquest of England was complete. Already he had replaced many of the Saxon officials with Normans, and these included the officials of the church. Probably his most significant appointment was of Lanfranc as archbishop of Canterbury. The Norman aristocracy were installed in lands across the length and breadth of England and their dominion established a feudal system in which all Saxons were increasingly treated as peasants. Although William had despoiled the land in order to subjugate the English, he had never intended to plunder it. Indeed, once he had established his authority he was keen for England to prosper so that he could benefit from the revenues. William returned to Normandy in 1072 and remained there for much of the next twelve years, needing to maintain his duchy against the opposition of the French and his former allies who were now fearful of his power. The administration of England was left in the hands of Richard Fitzgilbert and William de Warenne, two of William's most powerful barons.
William did not return to England for any significant period until 1085, when he brought over a massive army to defend the island against a planned invasion under Canute IV of Denmark. Canute, however, was murdered before the invasion began. William's restless army caused considerable hardship to the Saxons during this period. In addition William had to raise the land taxes in order to pay his sizeable army and this caused further disgruntlement. The problems that William had in knowing who owned what land and what its value was, so that he could levy the taxes, led to him ordering a major survey of England. The record of this survey, carried out with remarkable accuracy and speed during 1086, became known as the Domesday Book, and though its purpose was for William to ensure he had control over his taxes in England, the result is a rare and indispensable historical document. William, however, made little use of the document himself. He returned to Normandy at the end of 1086 where he became preoccupied with a local rebellion. In July 1087 William besieged the town of Mantes. As his horse jumped over a ditch William received an injury from the pommel of his saddle which ripped into his stomach. The wound became poisoned leading to peritonitis. William was carried back to Rouen in considerable pain. He lingered on for five weeks, and died in September. His body was returned to Caen for burial but apparently the tomb was not big enough the king was a tall man, at least five feet ten inches. As a result, as the attendants forced the body into the tomb, the already decaying and swollen body burst open, letting out an intense smell of putrefaction that caused most to flee the site. Only a hardy few completed the burial.
William changed England irrevocably. His total domination had, within less than a generation, almost eradicated the Saxon aristocracy and imposed a feudal society run by a small handful of Normans. The language difficulties added further to the alienation, but perhaps the most significant difference was in the lifestyle. Although the Normans were descended from the Vikings, they no longer looked to the north as their ancestral home, unlike the Saxons whose inheritance was from northern Europe. The Normans had taken on the more sophisticated lifestyle of the French, which brought with it the power, grandeur and aloofness of an upper-class existence. William used England as his playground, establishing the New Forest in Hampshire for his hunting. He had no liking for the English or, for that matter, for England, seeing it only as a rich source of revenues. Although his harsh rule brought peace to England, where man was apparently able to travel without fear of crime, this was only because the English lived in much greater fear of revenge and retribution from their Norman overlords. It created a rift between the nobility and the common man which remained in Britain for centuries.
William was devoted to his wife Matilda, and was much saddened at her death. They had ten children. The eldest, Robert, succeeded William as duke of Normandy and count of Maine even though he had been in open rebellion against his father in his latter years. The second son, Richard, died in his twenties in 1081 while hunting in the New Forest. Two other sons, WILLIAM and HENRY, succeeded William as kings of England. Of his six daughters, Adela became the mother of the future king STEPHEN. between November 1066 and 9 September 1087.26,9

; crowned King of England.2

Family

Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 183, NORMANDY 7. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/richa001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Herleve|Harlette: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002955&tree=LEO
  7. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 169-23, p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 498-505. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Mathildedied1083.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  16. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 26.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 19 December 2020), memorial page for William the Conqueror (c.Sep 1028–9 Sep 1087), Find a Grave Memorial no. 1948, citing Abbey of Saint Stephen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1948. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, William "the Conqueror" (Guillaume "le Conquérant"): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi001.htm
  19. [S1575] History Book Club FYI, "History Book Club FYI Ancient & Medieval History Newsletter: "William the Conqueror: The Bastard Who Became King"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to Greg Vaut, 10 Feb 2004, Friedrich I 'der Freidige': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013468&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as "HBC FYI 10 Feb 2004."
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_the_Conqueror. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Guillaume le Conquérant: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_le_Conqu%C3%A9rant. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#W1
  24. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 162-23, p. 156.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  25. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  26. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  27. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Adelisadied1066.
  29. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015364&tree=LEO
  31. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page ("Normandy family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#MR1
  32. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012366&tree=LEO
  34. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B.

Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #4216, b. between 1031 and 1032, d. 2 November 1083
FatherBaudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen8,9,10,11,5,6,4,7 b. c 1012, d. 1 Sep 1067
MotherAdèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance8,9,12,11,13,5,6,4,7 b. c 1009, d. 8 Jan 1079
ReferenceGAV27 EDV25
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England was born between 1031 and 1032 at Flanders, Belgium (now); Genealogics says b. ca 1031; Med Lands says b. 1032; Racines et Histoire (Flandres) says b. ca 1032.14,9,3,5,6,4 She married William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England, son of Robert I "The Magnificent" (?) Duke of Normandy and HerleveArlette (?) de Falaise, circa 1051 at Cathedral of Norta Dame D'Eu, Eu, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France (now); per Henry Project: "[See, e.g., GND; WP i, 22 (p. 33)]. The marriage is known to have occurred after 1049 (when Pope Leo IX, for uncertain reasons, prhobited the suggested marriage) and 1053 (when William and Matilda appear as husband and wife in a charter), as discussed by Douglas, who preferred a date of 1050 or 1051 [Douglas 391-2]." Genealogics says m. ca 1051; Med Lands says m. 1050/52.15,14,16,9,3,17,5,6,4,7,18,19
Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England died on 2 November 1083 at Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France.14,20,21,9,3,5,6,4,7
Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England was buried after 2 November 1083 at Église de la Trinité de Caen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1031, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     DEATH     2 Nov 1083 (aged 51–52), Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     British monarch, Queen consort of William the Conquerer. Daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders and Adela Capet, she married William in 1051. While her husband invaded England, she took over ruling Normandy in his absence. She was crowned Queen of England in 1068, though she spent little time there. She was known for her formidable temper, and William was apparently faithful to her. She had 9 children, seven of whom survived. She died in Normandy after a long illness, and was buried in the abbey she founded. It is reported that William became tyrannical after her death. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Baudouin V de Flandre 1012–1067
          Adela Capet 1009–1079
     Spouse
          William the Conqueror 1028–1087
     Siblings
          Baldwin VI Count Of Hainaut 1030–1070
     Children
          Constance de Normandie de Bretagne unknown–1090
          Richard de Normandie 1054–1081
          Robert de Normandie 1054–1135
          King William de Normandie 1056–1100
          Cecilia Of Holy Trinity Princess Of England 1056–1126
          Agatha de Normandie 1064–1080
          Adele of Normandy 1066–1138
          Henry I of England 1068–1135
     BURIAL     Église de la Trinité de Caen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     PLOT     in the choir under a slab of black marble
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 10 Feb 2004
     Find a Grave Memorial 8375320.22
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Normandie, illegitimate son of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress Herlève --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/28]-Rouen, Prioré de Saint-Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbé de Saint-Etienne). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Roberto Duce...Willelmum filium suum” was born “apud Falesiam”[1]. His birth date is estimated from William of Malmesbury, according to whom Guillaume was born of a concubine and was seven years old when his father left for Jerusalem[2], and Orderic Vitalis, who states that he was eight years old at the time[3]. Deville suggests that Guillaume´s birthdate can be fixed more precisely to [mid-1027], taking into account that his father Robert occupied Falaise immediately after the death of his father Duke Richard II (23 Aug 1026), not wishing to accept the authority of his older brother Duke Richard III, but that Robert´s stay was short as the two brothers were reconciled soon after, it being reasonable to suppose that Robert´s relationship with Guillaume´s mother occurred soon after his arrival at Falaise[4]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Alain III Duke of Brittany was appointed his guardian during his father's absence in 1035[5]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy. He helped Henri I King of France defeat Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou at Mouliherne in [1045/55][6]. It appears that Edward "the Confessor" King of England acknowledged Guillaume as successor to the English throne on several occasions, maybe for the first time during his visit to England in 1051 which is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle[7]. Comte de Maine in 1063, after he conquered the county. In [1064/65], Duke Guillaume interceded with Guy de Ponthieu Comte d'Abbeville to secure the release of Harold, son of Godwin, from captivity in Normandy, in return for Harold's acknowledgement of Guillaume as successor to the English crown (according to the portrayal of the event in the Bayeux tapestry). Harold's visit to Normandy, and swearing allegiance to Duke William, is recorded by William of Jumièges[8]. According to Eadmer of Canterbury, the reason for his visit was to negotiate the release of his brother Wulfnoth and nephew Haakon, both of whom had been hostages in Normandy since 1051. On his deathbed, King Edward "the Confessor" bequeathed the kingdom of England to Harold. Duke Guillaume branded Harold a perjurer and appealed to Pope Alexander II for support. After receiving a papal banner in response to his request, William gathered a sizable army during summer 1066 in preparation for invasion. After some delay due to unfavourable weather conditions, the army set sail for England from Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme 28 Sep 1066[9]. William defeated and killed King Harold at Hastings 14 Oct 1066[10], marched north to Canterbury, then west to Winchester where he captured the royal treasury. He proceeded to London where he was crowned 25 Dec 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England at Westminster Abbey, possibly by Ealdred Archbishop of York who may have officiated because of doubts concerning the validity of the appointment of Stigand as Archbishop of Canterbury. The latter had received his pallium in 1058 from Pope Benedict X, later regarded as anti-Pope, an appointment which had not been regularised by Pope Alexander II. Orderic Vitalis records that King William was crowned again at Winchester by “cardinales Romanæ ecclesiæ...Alexander papa...vicarious: Ermenfredum pontificem Sedunorum et duos canonicos cardinales”, dated to 1070[11]. After taking several years to subdue the whole country, he imposed the Norman feudal structure and rule everywhere with methodical and harsh persistence. The minute description of the country contained in the Domesday Book, completed in 1086, enabled King William to create an effective tax base Orderic Vitalis records the death “V Id Sep Rotomagi” 1087 of “Guillelmus Nothus rex Anglorum” and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Stephani...Cadomi”[12]. He died from wounds received at the siege of Mantes, having been injured internally after being thrown against the pommel of his saddle[13], leaving Normandy to his eldest son Robert and England to his second surviving son William. Florence of Worcester records the death "Id Sep V" of King William and his burial "Cadomi in ecclesia S Stephani Protomartyris"[14]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Willelmus…Roberti filius" was buried "Cadomi in ecclesia beati Stephani" which he had built[15].
     "m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) MATHILDE de Flandre, daughter of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Rodbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[16]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume married “Balduinum Flandriæ comitem...filiam regali ex genere descendente...Mathilde”[17]. Orderic Vitalis records the marriage of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[18]. She founded the abbey of la Trinité at Caen, as confirmed by an undated manuscript which records the death "pridie nonas julias" of "abbatissam Mathildem" in the 54th year in which she held the position and names "Mathildem Anglorum reginam, nostri cœnobii fondatricem, Adilidem, Mathildem, Constantiam, filias eius" heading the list of the names of nuns at the abbey[19]. Her husband appointed Mathilde as his regent in Normandy when he left to invade England, and again after he returned to England after visiting Normandy in 1067: Orderic Vitalis records that, when King William returned to England, 6 Dec 1067, he appointed “Mathildi conjugi suæ filioque suo Rodberto adolescenti” to govern Normandy (“principatum Neustriæ”), adding that the king took with him “Rogerium de Monte-Gomerici” whom he had appointed as “tutorem Normanniæ...cum sua conjuge” when he had left for England for the first time[20]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "die Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York[21]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Mathildem conjugem suam” came to England in 1068 and was crowned queen “die Pentecostes anno II regni præfati regis” by the archbishop of York[22]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William sent “Mathildem” back to Normandy in light of the rebellions in England and to preserve intact “provinciæ...cum Rodberto puero” [referring to their eldest son], dated to 1069[23]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[24]. Orderic Vitalis records the death “III Non Nov” [1083] of “Mathildis regina Anglorum” and her burial “cœnobium Sanctæ Trinitatis...apud Cadomum”[25]. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen[26]."
Med Lands cites:
[1] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VI, XII, p. 266.
[2] William of Malmesbury, III, 229, p. 217.
[3] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 87, and Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77.
[4] Deville ‘Observations sur l’époque de la naissance de Guillaume le Conquérant’ (1837-39), p. 183.
[5] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 87.
[6] William of Poitiers, Book I, c. 11.
[7] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, D, 1051.
[8] William of Jumièges VII.13, discussed in Houts (2000), p. 114.
[9] Houts (2000), p. 105.
[10] William's campaign is commemorated in an anonymous poem The Carmen de Hastingae Proelio of Guy Bishop of Amiens, F. Barlow (ed. and trans.) (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1999).
[11] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 199.
[12] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, I, p. 256.
[13] Malmesbury, II, pp. 336-7, cited in Chibnall, Vol. IV, p. 79.
[14] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 20.
[15] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[16] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[17] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXI, p. 277.
[18] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[19] Delisle (1866), pp. 181-2.
[20] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 177.
[21] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 2.
[22] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, pp. 181-2.
[23] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, V, p. 188.
[24] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 330.
[25] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, IX, pp. 192-3.19


; Per Genealogics:
     “Matilda was born about 1031, the daughter of Baudouin V, count of Flanders, and Adèle de France. Matilda is known to have been very small, but very little is known about her early years. Her descent from the English king Alfred 'the Great' was one reason why William, duke of Normandy sought her in marriage. Apparently she refused him, as she did not want to be married to a bastard. Furious, William forced entry to her room and beat her. This rather unconventional behaviour led her to change her mind and they married in 1051, although they had to wait until 1059 before receiving the papal dispensation.
     “William relied heavily on her and she acted as regent in Normandy whenever he was absent. After the conquest of England she was crowned William's queen at Winchester. She went to the north of England with him and at Selby gave birth to the future King Henry I, probably their tenth or eleventh child. In 1069 she went back to the duchy of Normandy where she remained in charge.
     “When she became ill in 1083 William hurried over from England to be with her. She died on 2 November 1083 at Caen and was buried there.”.5

; This is the same person as ”Matilda of Flanders” at Wikipedia, as ”Mathilde de Flandre” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Mathilde van Vlaanderen” at Wikipedia (NL).23,24,25 GAV-27 EDV-25 GKJ-25.

; This is the same person as ” Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders” at The Henry Project.7

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 193.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “G3. Matilda, *ca 1032, +Caen 2.11.1083; m.1053 King William I of England, Duke of Normandy (*1027 +7.9.1087)”

Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “F1. WILLIAM I "The Conqueror" Duke of Normandy, King of England (1066-87) cr Westminster Cathedral 24.12.1066, *Falaise 1027, +nr Rouen 7.9.1087, bur St.Stephen Abbey, Caen; m.1053 Mathilde of Flanders (*1032 +2.11.1083”.2,26

; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Mathilde de Flandres ° ~1032 + 02/11/1083 (Caen) duchesse de Normandie, duchesse-régente, Reine d’Angleterre (cour. 11/05/1068, Westminster ou Winchester)
     ép. 1050/52 (Eu, Notre-Dame) Guillaume II «Le Bâtard» duc de Normandie (William 1er roi d’Angleterre) ° 1027/28 + 09/09/1087 (Prieuré Saint-Gervais de Rouen) (fils de Robert «Le Diable», duc de Normandie,et d’Herleue dite «de Falaise») ”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATHILDE de Flandre ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Rodbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[257]. Orderic Vitalis records the marriage of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[258]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "die Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York[259]. Orderic Vitalis also records that she was crowned queen of England 11 May 1068[260], presumably at Westminster Abbey or Winchester Cathedral although this appears to be unrecorded. Queen Matilda acted as regent in Normandy during her husband's absences in England. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina"[261]. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen[262].
     "m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy, illegitimate son of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress Herlève --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/28]-Rouen, Priory of St Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbey of St Etienne). He succeeded in 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England."
Med Lands cites:
[257] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[258] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[259] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), p. 2.
[260] "On Whit Sunday in the second year of King William's reign", Orderic Vitalis, Vol. 2, Book IV, p. 215.
[261] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 330.
[262] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 17.6


; Per Weis: “Maud (or Matilda) of Flanders, b. 1032, d. 3 Nov. 1083; m. 1053, William I, the Conqueror (121-24), Duke of Normandy, King o England. (Gens. 16-23; ES II/5. See also: Crispin, Falaise Rolle, (1938). 186-187; Bonston Evening Transcript, 26 Sept. 1927, Note 2257, D.L.J., Part VI (Flanders)."

Per Weis: “William I, the Conqueror (natural son by Herleve), b. Falaise, 1027, d. Rouen, 9 sept. 1087, Duke of Normandy, King of England 1066-1067. (CNN, 494; Moriarty; ES II/81).”.1 She was Queen consort of England between 29 December 1066 and 2 November 1083.23 She was Queen of England (date of crowning) on 11 May 1068.27

Family

William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
Children

Citations

  1. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 162-23, p. 156.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Mathildedied1083. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-23, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004011&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVdied1067B.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004012&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle of France: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele002.htm
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 183, NORMANDY 7. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 169-23, p. 145.
  16. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 498-505. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087.
  20. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  21. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  22. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 19 December 2020), memorial page for Matilda of Flanders (1031–2 Nov 1083), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8375320, citing Église de la Trinité de Caen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8375320. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  24. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Mathilde de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathilde_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  25. [S4777] Wikipedia - De vrije encyclopedie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Mathilde van Vlaanderen: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathilde_van_Vlaanderen. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NL).
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#W1
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  28. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Adelisadied1066.
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015364&tree=LEO
  32. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page ("Normandy family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#MR1
  33. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012366&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIdied1135B.

Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen1,2,3

M, #4217, b. circa 1012, d. 1 September 1067
FatherBaudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes2,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 980, d. 30 May 1035
MotherOtgiva/Ogive (?) de Luxembourg2,4,5,9,10,7,8 b. bt 990 - 995, d. 21 Feb 1030
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was born circa 1012 at Flanders, Belgium (now).2,11,7 He married Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance, daughter of Robert II "The Pious/le Pieux" (?) King of France and Constance (?) d'Arles, Queen of France, in 1028 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France;
Her 2nd husband. The Henry Project says m. 1028x1031.12,13,2,5,7,8,14,15,16
Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen died on 1 September 1067 at Lille, Normandy, France.11,13,2,5,7
Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was buried after 1 September 1067

; NB: There are at present (11 June 2020) two separate Find A Grave memorials for Baudouin V. This one (#84823575) shows the correct burial location. The other (#132583582) says incorrectly "Body lost or destroyed"
From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Arras, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     DEATH     1 Sep 1067, Lille, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Inscription:
at an unknown age Chy gist très haux, très noble et très poissans princes Baudewins li Deboinnaires, jadis contes de Flandres, li onziemes, qui funda ceste eglise, et trespassa l'an de grace 1067. Dite un Pater Noster pour s'ame.
[B] D.O.M. Hic extant exuviæ principis Balduini quinti, Flandriæ comitis septimi, Franciæ marchionis et bajuli, qui regnante Philippo primo, adhuc pupillo, strenue, prudenter, feliciter, regni clavum tenuit, has ædes capitulumque fundavit. Obiit anno MLXVII. Loco monumenti vetustate diruti et collapse tabulam hanc marmoream grati animi testem posuere Præpositus, Decanus et Capitulum, anno Domini MDCCLXIV. In memoria æterna erit justus.

Gravesite Details Two Inscriptions: (A) Au milieu du chœur, sur une tombe élevée de trois pieds, oú se trouvait l'effigie de Baudouin de Lille. (B) Pierre de marbre noir, substituée en 1764 à la tombe élevée.
     BURIAL     Collégiale de Saint-Pierre, Lille, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 11 Feb 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 84823575.17
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 9.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7
GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; This is the same person as "Baldwin (Baudouin) V de Lille (Balduinus Insulanus, Balduinus Pius) Count of Flanders, 1035-1067" on The Henry Project.18

; Per Genealogics:
     “Baudouin was born in 1012, the son of Baudouin IV, count of Flanders, and Otgiva de Luxembourg. In 1028 he married Adèle de France, daughter of King Robert II 'le Pieux' of France and Constance de Provence. Baudouin and Adèle had four children, of whom three would have progeny, including his daughter Matilda, who married William 'the Conqueror', king of England.
     “At Adèle's instigation Baudouin rebelled against his father, but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death in 1035.
     “During a long war (1046-1056) as an ally of Godfried I 'with the Beard', duke of Lower-Lorraine, comte de Louvain, against the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich III, Baudouin initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann, count of Hainault. However, when the latter died in 1049 Baudouin married his son Baudouin VI to Hermann's widow Richilde, and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the county of Hainault with Flanders. Upon the death of Emperor Heinrich III this marriage was acknowledged through a treaty with Agnes de Poitou, mother of and regent for Heinrich IV.
     “From 1060 to 1067 Baudouin was the co-regent with Anna of Kiev for her son Philippe I of France, his nephew-by-marriage, indicating the importance he had acquired in the international politics of his day.
     “Baudouin died on 1 September 1067, and was succeeded by his son Baudouin VI.”.7

; Per Stone (2000) chart 31-3: "He became one of the most influential men of his time and administered France as regent during the minority of King Philip I."11 Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was also known as Baldwin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille Count of Flanders.2

; This is the same person as:
”Baldwin V, Count of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as
”Baudouin V de Flandre” at Wikipédia (Fr.)19,20

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille St Pierre[221]). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Insulanum" as son of "Balduinum Barbatum [et] Odgivam"[222]. After 1028, he led a rebellion against his father who was forced to take refuge in Normandy. After his father returned with reinforcements, Baudouin submitted but was allowed to rule jointly[223]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders. He acquired overlordship of the county of Lens from the counts of Boulogne[224]. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[225]. He took part in the Lotharingian rebellion against Emperor Heinrich III and sacked the imperial palace at Nijmegen. Emperor Heinrich gathered a large army to wreak revenge in 1049[226], but in practical terms the only loss to Flanders was the march of Antwerp[227]. Count Baudouin returned Valenciennes to Hainaut, and thus indirectly to German suzerainty[228]. He maintained close relations with Godwin Earl of Wessex, first sheltering the latter´s son Svein after he was outlawed in 1049, then Earl Godwin himself when he was exiled from England in 1051. Emperor Heinrich III invaded Flanders again in 1054 but had to retreat[229]. On the death of Henri I King of France in 1060, Count Baudouin became regent of France for his nephew King Philippe I. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1067 of "Baldwinus potentissimus marchisus"[230].
     "m (Amiens 1028) ADELA de France, daughter of ROBERT II King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles (1009-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Rodberti regis Francorum Adelam" wife of "Balduinum Insulanum"[231]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" the daughter of King Robert[232]. Corbie was her dowry[233]. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[234]. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. Philippe I King of France donated “villam in pago Parisiacensi sitam...Curtesiolum” to Saint-Denis, at the request of “amita mea soror...patris mei H...Adela”, by charter dated 1060, after 4 Aug[235]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[236]."
Med Lands cites:
[221] Annales Elnonenses Maiores 1067, MGH SS V, p. 13, which records his death "Kal Sept" and his burial "Insulæ".
[222] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[223] Nicholas (1992), p. 48.
[224] Murray (2000), p. 28.
[225] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 113, p. 105.
[226] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle C, 1047, and D 1048 [1047].
[227] Nicholas (1992), p. 50.
[228] Nicholas (1992), p. 46.
[229] Nicholas (1992), p. 51.
[230] Annales Blandinienses 1067, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[231] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[232] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.
[233] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[234] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 113, p. 105.
[235] Prou, M. (ed.) (1908) Recueil des actes de Philippe I roi de France (Paris), IV, p. 13.
[236] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.8


; Per Racines et Histoire: [quote]1) Baudouin V «De Lille, «Insulanus»» ou «Le Pieux» de Flandres ° ~1012/13 + 01/09/1067 (Lille) 7° comte de Flandres (1035-1067), Régent de France pour son neveu Philippe 1er (1060-1067) (rebelle contre son père, puis co-comte avec lui, récupère la suzeraineté du comté de Lens sur Boulogne, se rebelle contre l’Empereur Heinrich III, saccage Nijmegen, doit céder à l’Empire la marche d’Anvers (1049), rend Valenciennes au Hainaut, soumet les Frisons ; allié au clan de Godwin : Svein (1049) et Godwin (1051), répousse un assaut impérial (1054)
     ép. 1028 (Amiens) comtesse Adèle (Adela, Aélis) de France ° 1009 + 08/01/1079 (Messines, près d’Ypres où elle avait fondé un Monastère Bénedictin) dame de Corbie (douaire), comtesse de Coutances, (fille du roi Robert II de France et de Constance d’Arles ; veuve de Richard III, duc de Normandie, + ass. en 1027)[end quote].3

; Per Genalogy.EU (Flanders 1): "F1. [1m.] Ct Baldwin V "de Lille" of Flanders (1035-67), Regent of France (1060-67), *ca 1012/13, +Lille 1.9.1067, bur there; m.Paris 1028 Cts Aelide de Contenance (*1009 +8.1.1079) dau.of King Robert II of France."2

; Per Genealogy.EU (CApet 4): “C7. [3m.] Adélaide, Cts de Coutance, *1009, +Messine 8.1.1079, bur there; 1m: I.1027 Duke Richard III of Normandy (+1027); 2m: Paris 1028 Ct Baldwin V of Flanders (*ca 1012/13 +1.9.1067)”.21

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELA de France (-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…regis Henrici Adela" as wife of "Balduino Insulano"[244]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" as the daughter of King Robert[245]. She is named as daughter of King Robert in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also refers to her marriage[246]. Kerrebrouck mentions her betrothal to Duke Richard "très jeune" but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[247]. "Richardus Nortmannorum dux" agreed grants of property to "Adela" on the occasion of their marriage by charter dated Jan 1026, which does not specify her parentage[248]. Her father gave her the seigneurie of Corbie as her dowry. Ctss de Contenance. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. Philippe I King of France donated “villam in pago Parisiacensi sitam...Curtesiolum” to Saint-Denis, at the request of “amita mea soror...patris mei H...Adela”, by charter dated 1060, after 4 Aug[249]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[250].
     "Betrothed (Jan 1027) to RICHARD III Duke of Normandy, son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Bretagne ([1001]-6 Aug 1027).
     "m (Amiens 1028) BAUDOUIN de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille, Saint-Pierre). He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V “le Pieux/Insulanus” Count of Flanders. He was regent of France for his nephew Philippe I King of France 1060-1066/67."
Med Lands cites:
[244] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.
[245] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.
[246] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 350.
[247] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.
[248] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 390.
[249] Prou, M. (ed.) (1908) Recueil des actes de Philippe I roi de France (Paris), IV, p. 13.
[250] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.15
He was 7th Count of Flanders between 1035 and 1067.2,5,19 He was Regent of France between 1060 and 1067.2,5

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw004.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018656&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004011&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVdied1067B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otgiva de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018657&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIVdied1035.
  11. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 31-3.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004012&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Adeladied1079
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle of France: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele002.htm
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 11 June 2020), memorial page for Baudouin de Flandre, V (unknown–1 Sep 1067), Find a Grave Memorial no. 84823575, citing Collégiale de Saint-Pierre, Lille, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/84823575/baudouin-de_flandre. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw005.htm
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V,_Count_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Baudouin V de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudouin_V_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#AR2
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVIdied1070.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I 'the Friesian': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018660&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#RobertIdied1093B.
  25. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-23, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Mathildedied1083.
  28. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm

Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance1,2,3,4,5

F, #4218, b. circa 1009, d. 8 January 1079
FatherRobert II "The Pious/le Pieux" (?) King of France1,2,3,6,4,7,5,8 b. 27 Mar 972, d. 20 Jul 1031
MotherConstance (?) d'Arles, Queen of France1,2,9,3,4,7,10,5,11 b. c 986, d. 25 Jul 1032
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance was born circa 1009 at Quierzy, Aisne, France; Genealogics says b. ca 1009; The Henry Project says probably ca 1010x1015.2,3,4,5 She and Richard III (?) Duke of Normandy were engaged in January 1027;
Med Lands says "Betrothed (Jan 1027.)12,1,2,13,14,15,7" Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance married Baudouin V "le Debonnaire" de Lille (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, son of Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes and Otgiva/Ogive (?) de Luxembourg, in 1028 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France;
Her 2nd husband. The Henry Project says m. 1028x1031.2,1,16,3,17,18,4,7,5
Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance died on 8 January 1079 at Mesen, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium (now).19,20,1,2,3,4,7,5
Adèle (Aelis) (?) de France, Cts de Coutance was buried after 8 January 1079 at Sint-Niklaaskerk, Mesen, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     Sep 1009, Midi-Pyrénées, France
     DEATH     8 Jan 1079 (aged 69), Midi-Pyrénées, France
     Also known as Adela of France or Adela of Flanders. She was a member of the House of Capet, rulers of France. She first married Richard III Duke of Normandy. As a widow she remarried to Baldwin V of Flanders. One of their children was Matilda of Flanders, the future wife of William The Conqueror, so she was the morther in law of William the Conqueror. She was responsible for establishing the Colleges of Aire & Lille & Harelbeke as well as the abbeys of Messines and Ename. After Baldwin's death she retreated to the convent of Messines near Ypres. There she died and was buried at the monastry. Her commemoration day is 8 september
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert II 972–1031
          Constance d'Arles unknown–1032
     Spouse
          Baudouin Comte De Flanders 1012–1067
     Siblings
          Advisa Capet 1003–1063
          Hugues de France 1007–1025
          Henri I 1008–1060
          Robert de Bourgogne 1011–1076
          Constance Capet De Dammartin 1014–1052
     Children
          Baldwin VI Count Of Hainaut 1030–1070
          Matilda of Flanders 1031–1083
     BURIAL     
Sint-Niklaaskerk
Mesen, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Maintained by: Plantagenet Princess
     Originally Created by: Rik Van Beveren
     Added: 25 Mar 2009
     Find a Grave Memorial 35175470
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.2,21
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: [quote]1) Baudouin V «De Lille, «Insulanus»» ou «Le Pieux» de Flandres ° ~1012/13 + 01/09/1067 (Lille) 7° comte de Flandres (1035-1067), Régent de France pour son neveu Philippe 1er (1060-1067) (rebelle contre son père, puis co-comte avec lui, récupère la suzeraineté du comté de Lens sur Boulogne, se rebelle contre l’Empereur Heinrich III, saccage Nijmegen, doit céder à l’Empire la marche d’Anvers (1049), rend Valenciennes au Hainaut, soumet les Frisons ; allié au clan de Godwin : Svein (1049) et Godwin (1051), répousse un assaut impérial (1054)
     ép. 1028 (Amiens) comtesse Adèle (Adela, Aélis) de France ° 1009 + 08/01/1079 (Messines, près d’Ypres où elle avait fondé un Monastère Bénedictin) dame de Corbie (douaire), comtesse de Coutances, (fille du roi Robert II de France et de Constance d’Arles ; veuve de Richard III, duc de Normandie, + ass. en 1027)[end quote].22

; Per Genalogy.EU (Flanders 1): "F1. [1m.] Ct Baldwin V "de Lille" of Flanders (1035-67), Regent of France (1060-67), *ca 1012/13, +Lille 1.9.1067, bur there; m.Paris 1028 Cts Aelide de Contenance (*1009 +8.1.1079) dau.of King Robert II of France."16

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille St Pierre[221]). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Insulanum" as son of "Balduinum Barbatum [et] Odgivam"[222]. After 1028, he led a rebellion against his father who was forced to take refuge in Normandy. After his father returned with reinforcements, Baudouin submitted but was allowed to rule jointly[223]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders. He acquired overlordship of the county of Lens from the counts of Boulogne[224]. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[225]. He took part in the Lotharingian rebellion against Emperor Heinrich III and sacked the imperial palace at Nijmegen. Emperor Heinrich gathered a large army to wreak revenge in 1049[226], but in practical terms the only loss to Flanders was the march of Antwerp[227]. Count Baudouin returned Valenciennes to Hainaut, and thus indirectly to German suzerainty[228]. He maintained close relations with Godwin Earl of Wessex, first sheltering the latter´s son Svein after he was outlawed in 1049, then Earl Godwin himself when he was exiled from England in 1051. Emperor Heinrich III invaded Flanders again in 1054 but had to retreat[229]. On the death of Henri I King of France in 1060, Count Baudouin became regent of France for his nephew King Philippe I. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1067 of "Baldwinus potentissimus marchisus"[230].
     "m (Amiens 1028) ADELA de France, daughter of ROBERT II King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles (1009-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Rodberti regis Francorum Adelam" wife of "Balduinum Insulanum"[231]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" the daughter of King Robert[232]. Corbie was her dowry[233]. The Liber traditionum of Gant Saint-Pierre commemorates the donations of "Baldwinus junior marchysus filius Baldwini marchysi et Odgevæ comitissæ cum conjuge sua Adala", undated[234]. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. Philippe I King of France donated “villam in pago Parisiacensi sitam...Curtesiolum” to Saint-Denis, at the request of “amita mea soror...patris mei H...Adela”, by charter dated 1060, after 4 Aug[235]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[236]."
Med Lands cites:
[221] Annales Elnonenses Maiores 1067, MGH SS V, p. 13, which records his death "Kal Sept" and his burial "Insulæ".
[222] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[223] Nicholas (1992), p. 48.
[224] Murray (2000), p. 28.
[225] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 113, p. 105.
[226] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle C, 1047, and D 1048 [1047].
[227] Nicholas (1992), p. 50.
[228] Nicholas (1992), p. 46.
[229] Nicholas (1992), p. 51.
[230] Annales Blandinienses 1067, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[231] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[232] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.
[233] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.
[234] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 113, p. 105.
[235] Prou, M. (ed.) (1908) Recueil des actes de Philippe I roi de France (Paris), IV, p. 13.
[236] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.18


; Per Genealogics:
     “Adèle was born about 1009, the daughter of Robert II 'le Pieux', king of France, and Constance de Provence. In 1028 in Paris she married Baudouin V, Graaf van Vlaanderen, son of Baudouin IV, Graaf van Vlaanderen, and Otgiva de Luxembourg. They became the parents of four children of whom Baudouin VI-I, Matilda (wife of William 'the Conqueror') and Robert I 'the Friesian' would have progeny.
     “During their long marriage, Adèle and Baudouin founded several churches and the Benedictine Abbaye de Messines near Ypres. They also rebuilt the monastery of Einham. Baudouin died on 1 September 1067 in Lille and was buried there in the church of St. Pierre. Adèle became a nun, receiving her veil from the hand of Pope Alexander II. She then retired to the convent at Messines. She died there on 8 January 1079 and was buried in the crypt of the convent's church, which is called the Church of St.Nicholas.”.4 GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 9.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 310.
3. A Who's Who of Your Ancestral Saints Baltimore, 2010 , Koman, Alan J. some of her biographical details.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (CApet 4): “C7. [3m.] Adélaide, Cts de Coutance, *1009, +Messine 8.1.1079, bur there; 1m: I.1027 Duke Richard III of Normandy (+1027); 2m: Paris 1028 Ct Baldwin V of Flanders (*ca 1012/13 +1.9.1067)”.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELA de France (-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…regis Henrici Adela" as wife of "Balduino Insulano"[244]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" as the daughter of King Robert[245]. She is named as daughter of King Robert in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also refers to her marriage[246]. Kerrebrouck mentions her betrothal to Duke Richard "très jeune" but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[247]. "Richardus Nortmannorum dux" agreed grants of property to "Adela" on the occasion of their marriage by charter dated Jan 1026, which does not specify her parentage[248]. Her father gave her the seigneurie of Corbie as her dowry. Ctss de Contenance. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. Philippe I King of France donated “villam in pago Parisiacensi sitam...Curtesiolum” to Saint-Denis, at the request of “amita mea soror...patris mei H...Adela”, by charter dated 1060, after 4 Aug[249]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[250].
     "Betrothed (Jan 1027) to RICHARD III Duke of Normandy, son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Bretagne ([1001]-6 Aug 1027).
     "m (Amiens 1028) BAUDOUIN de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille, Saint-Pierre). He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V “le Pieux/Insulanus” Count of Flanders. He was regent of France for his nephew Philippe I King of France 1060-1066/67."
Med Lands cites:
[244] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.
[245] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.
[246] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 350.
[247] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.
[248] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 390.
[249] Prou, M. (ed.) (1908) Recueil des actes de Philippe I roi de France (Paris), IV, p. 13.
[250] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.7

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adèle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004012&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle of France: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II 'le Pieux': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007643&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Adeladied1079. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert II le Pieux (the Pious): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober102.htm
  9. [S1936] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 25 Aug 2005: "Robert II of France to Maud de Bernake (was CP Addition:..)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 25 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 25 Aug 2005."
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIIdied1031B
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Constance of Arles: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/const000.htm
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 128-22, p. 115. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_III,_Duke_of_Normandy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#RichardIIdied1026B
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004011&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVdied1067B.
  19. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 31-3.
  20. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 82. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 11 June 2020), memorial page for Adela Capet (Sep 1009–8 Jan 1079), Find a Grave Memorial no. 35175470, citing Sint-Niklaaskerk, Mesen, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium; Maintained by Plantagenet Princess (contributor 49922906), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/35175470. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html#AR2
  24. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 48, CHESTER 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVIdied1070.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I 'the Friesian': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018660&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#RobertIdied1093B.
  28. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 162-23, p. 142.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Mathildedied1083.
  31. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm

Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes1,2,3

M, #4219, b. circa 980, d. 30 May 1035
FatherArnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen1,4,5,6,7,3,8,9 b. c 961, d. 30 Mar 987
MotherRosella/Susanna (?) Princess of Ivrea, Dame de Montreuil1,10,4,5,11,3,8,9 b. c 952, d. 13 Dec 1003
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited31 Aug 2020
     Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes married Orgina (?) de Moselle;
His 3rd wife?
     NB: Genealogics, Wikipédia (Fr.) and Med Lands do not mention this 3rd marriage; only Racines et Histoire (Flanders) and Genealogy.EU (Flanders) do.1,2 Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes was born circa 980 at Flanders, Belgium (now).1,5,3 He married Otgiva/Ogive (?) de Luxembourg, daughter of Giselbert I (?) of Longwy, Graf im Moselgau, circa 1012;
His 1st wife.1,12,13,5,3,8,14,15
Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes died in 1030.16 He married Eleanor (?) of Normandy, daughter of Richard II "The Good" (?) Duke of Normandy and Judith "of Rennes" (?) of Brittany, circa 1031;
His 2nd wife. Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1 page) says m. April 1031.17,1,18,5,3,8,19,20
Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes died on 30 May 1035.21,1,4,5,3
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Baudouin was born in 980, the son of Arnulf II, count of Flanders, and Rosela Roxana of Italy. He was a seventh-generation descendant of Charlemagne through his father and an eighth-generation descendant through his mother.
     "About 1012 Baudouin married Otgiva de Luxembourg, daughter of Friedrich, Graf in Moselgau und Lutzelburg. They had a son Baudouin V. After Otgiva's death in 1030, Baudouin in 1031 married Eleanor (or perhaps Ainor or Judith) of Normandy, daughter of Richard II 'the Good', duke of Normandy, and Judith of Bretagne. In 1037 they had a daughter Judith, who first married Toste Godwinson, jarl in Northumbria, then in 1071 she married Welf IV, duke of Bavaria. She had progeny by both her husbands. These family connections demonstrate the political interests of the Flemish counts, in the kingdoms of France and England and the Holy Roman Empire.
     "In contrast to his predecessors, Baudouin turned his attention to the east and north, leaving the southern part of his territory in the hands of his vassals, the counts of Guînes, Hesdin, and St.Pol. To the north of the county Baudouin was given Zeeland as a fief by the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich II, while on the right bank of the Schelde River he received Valenciennes (in 1013) and parts of the Cambresis and Hainault.
     "In the French territories of the counts of Flanders, their supremacy remained unchallenged. They organised a great deal of colonisation of marshland along the coastline of Flanders and enlarged the harbour and city of Bruges.
     "Baudouin died on 30 May 1035, and was succeeded by his son Baudouin V. His granddaughter, Matilda of Flanders, daughter of Baudouin V, would go on to marry William 'the Conqueror', starting the line of Anglo-Norman kings of England."3

; This is the same person as "Baldwin IV "the Bearded" (Baudouin IV le Barbu, Balduinus Barbatus)" on The Henry Project.4

; This is the same person as:
"Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders" at Wikipedia and as
"Baudouin IV de Flandre" at Wikipédia (Fr.)22,23

Reference: Geneallogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 9.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.3
GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-27. Baudouin IV "le Barbu" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Cmte de Valenciennes was also known as Baldwin IV "le Barbu" (?) Count of Flanders, Cmte de Valenciennes.1

; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Baudouin IV «Le Barbu» («Pulchra barbae», «à la (belle) barbe») de Flandres ° ~980 + 30/05/1035 6° comte de Flandres et de Valenciennes (988-1035) (récupère l’Artois et l’Ostrevant, domine le nord du Ternois, Thérouanne, Fauquembergues et Saint-Omer, récupère temporairement le Valenciennois sur l’Empire (1006), perd définitivement le Ponthieu et Montreuil ; subit la révolte de son fils et doit se réfugier en Normandie (~1028)
ép. 1) ~1012 Otgiva (Ogive) de Luxembourg ° ~960/61 + 01 ou 21/02 ou 09/03/1030 héritière de Gleiberg (fille de Friedrich, graf im Moselgau Vogt von Stablo)
ép. 2) après 1030 (04/1031 ?) Eléonore de Normandie ° ~1010 + 1071 (fille de Richard II, duc de Normandie et de Judith de Rennes ; nièce de l’Impératrice Cunégonde)
ép. ? 3) Orgina de Moselle”.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “E1. Ct Baldwin IV "le Barbu" of Flanders (988-1035), Cte de Valenciennes, *ca 980, +30.5.1035; 1m: ca 1012 Otgiva of Luxemburg (*960/961 +30.3.1030); 2m: IV.1031 Eleanor of Normandy (*1010 +1071); 3m: Orgina of Moselle”.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([980]-30 May 1035). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Barbatum" as son of "Arnulfus…et…Ruzelam quæ et Susanna"[190]. He succeeded his father in 987 as BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders, presumably under a regency considering his youth although the name of the regent has not yet been identified. Hugues Capet King of France recognised Baudouin's claim to all of Flanders, including the part previously taken by King Lothaire, and also arranged Baudouin´s mother's second marriage to the king´s son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987[191]. "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi", by charter dated 1 Apr 988, signed by "…Waldberto advocato, Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…"[192]. After Count Baudouin's mother returned to Flanders following her repudiation, France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer, which provoked Flanders into joining a rebellion against King Hugues. The result was the return of Artois and Ostrevant to Flanders, although Ponthieu remained with France[193]. Count Baudouin established control over the northern part of the Ternois, including Thérouanne, Fauquembergues and Saint-Omer, which were previously under the suzerainty of the county of Boulogne[194]. "Susanna regina…cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…in pago Flandrensi…in Holtawa…in Fresnere…in Clemeskirca…in Jatbeka…in Sclefteta…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jun 1003[195]. Baudouin captured the march of Valenciennes from Germany in 1006, but lost it in the following year when King Heinrich II invaded Flanders and captured Gent. Count Baudouin subsequently arranged an alliance with the German king who, in 1012, helped him install a new bishop of Cambrai, and enfeoffed him with the islands of Zeeland and, in 1015, with Valenciennes. Emperor Heinrich II, however, invaded Flanders again in 1020, supported this time by Robert King of France[196]. Count Baudouin arranged the betrothal of his son to the French king's daughter to help restore good relations[197]. His son rebelled against Baudouin after 1028. Count Baudouin was forced to take refuge in Normandy, where he married the duke's daughter and from where he returned to Flanders with reinforcements. His son submitted, but his father permitted him to rule jointly[198]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1035 of "Balduinus, gloriosus marchisus"[199]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the death in 1035 of "Balduinus comes filius Susannæ"[200].
     "m firstly ([1012]) OGIVE de Luxembourg, daughter of FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau Vogt von Stablo [Wigeriche] & his wife --- heiress of Gleiberg [Konradiner] (-21 Feb or 9 Mar 1030, bur Gent St Peter). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Gisleberti comitis Odgivam" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum"[201]. “Gisleberti” in this source is presumably an error for “Friderici”. As noted in the document LUXEMBOURG, Giselbert brother of Friedrich was recorded as a “youth” when he was killed in battle in 1004. It is not impossible that he was married with a young child at the time. However, another version of the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ names "Adalberto Metensis episcopus, Fredericus dux Lotharingie, Henricus dux Baioarie, Gislebertus comes de Salinis" as brothers of Baudouin´s wife[202]. It is unlikely that the “youth” Giselbert was the father of five children when he died. In addition, other primary sources confirm that the brothers Heinrich and Adalbero were sons of Friedrich. It is probable therefore that Ogive was also Friedrich´s daughter. The marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Heinrich II as part of the alliance negotiated in 1012. Her name is confirmed by the Annales Blandinienses which record the death in 1030 of "Odgiva comitissa"[203]. The Memorial of "Odgiva…Balduino domino" records her death "IX Mar"[204].
     "m secondly ([after 1030]) [ELEONORE] de Normandie, daughter of RICHARD II Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Rennes [Brittany]. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana refers to "filiam secundi Ricardi ducis Normannorum" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum" after the death of Ogive[205]. The Annalista Saxo states that the mother of Judith was "cognatione beati Ethmundi regis", without naming her or giving a more precise origin[206]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that the second (unnamed) daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith” married “Balduino Flandrensi”[207]. She is sometimes named Eléonore in secondary sources but the primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[190] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[191] Nicholas (1992), p. 45.
[192] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92.
[193] Nicholas (1992), p. 46.
[194] Murray, A. V. (2000) The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: a dynastic history 1099-1125 (Prosopographica & Genealogica), p. 28.
[195] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101.
[196] Nicholas (1992), p. 46.
[197] Nicholas (1992), p. 46.
[198] Nicholas (1992), p. 48.
[199] Annales Blandinienses 1035, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[200] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1035, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[201] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[202] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 318.
[203] Annales Blandinienses 1030, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[204] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.
[205] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis, MGH SS IX, p. 307, footnote 19 naming her "Alienoram", without specifying the primary source on which this is based.
[206] Annalista Saxo 1066.
[207] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber V, XIII, p. 255.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “E3. [1m.] Eleanor, *ca 1002; m.IV.1031 Ct Baldwin IV of Flanders (*ca 980 +30.5.1035)”.25

; Per Racines et Histoire (Normandy): “1) Eléonore de Normandie ° ~1002
     ép. 04/1031 Baudouin IV de Flandres comte de Flandres ° ~980 + 30/05/1035”.26

; Per Med Lands:
     "[ELEONORE] de Normandie. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana refers to "filiam secundi Ricardi ducis Normannorum" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum" after the death of Ogiva[240]. The Annalista Saxo states that the mother of Judith was "cognatione beati Ethmundi regis", without naming her or giving a more precise origin[241]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that the second (unnamed) daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith” married “Balduino Flandrensi”[242]. She is sometimes named Eléonore in secondary sources but the primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.
     "m (after 1030) as his second wife, BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders, son of ARNOUL II "le Jeune" Count of Flanders & his wife Rozala di Ivrea [Italy] ([980]-30 May 1035)."
Med Lands cites:
[240] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis, MGH SS IX, p. 307, footnote 19 naming her "Alienoram", without specifying the primary source on which this is based.
[241] Annalista Saxo, 1066.
[242] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, XIII, p. 255.20


; Per Genealogy.EU (Luxemburg 3): “B7. Ogive, *ca 990/995, +21.2.1030/1036; m.ca 1012 Ct Baldwin IV of Flanders (*ca 980, +30.5.1035)”.27

; Per Racines et Histoire (Luxembourg): “Ogive de Luxembourg ° ~990/95 + un 21/02 ou 09/03 en 1030
     ép. 1012 Baldwin (Baudouin) IV «A la Barbe», comte de Flandres ° ~980 + 30/05/1035 (fils d’Arnoul II «Le Jeune» et de Rozala d’Ivrea)”.28

; Per Med Lands:
     "OGIVE (-21 Feb or 9 Mar 1030, bur Gent St Peter). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Gisleberti comitis Odgivam" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum"[96]. “Gisleberti” in this source is presumably an error for “Friderici”. As noted above, Giselbert brother of Friedrich was recorded as a “youth” when he was killed in battle in 1004. It is not impossible that he was married with a young child at the time. However, another version of the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ names "Adalberto Metensis episcopus, Fredericus dux Lotharingie, Henricus dux Baioarie, Gislebertus comes de Salinis" as brothers of Baudouin´s wife[97]. It is unlikely that the “youth” Giselbert was the father of five children when he died. In addition, other primary sources confirm that the brothers Heinrich and Adalbero were sons of Friedrich. It is probable therefore that Ogive was also Friedrich´s daughter. The date of her marriage suggests that Ogive was one of her parents´ older children. The marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Heinrich II as part of the alliance negotiated in 1012. Her name is confirmed by the Annales Blandinienses which record the death in 1030 of "Odgiva comitissa"[98]. The Memorial of "Odgiva…Balduino domino" records her death "IX Mar"[99].
m ([1012]) as his first wife, BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders, son of ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders & his wife Rozala di Ivrea [Italy] ([980]-30 May 1035)."
Med Lands cites:
[96] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[97] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 318.
[98] Annales Blandinienses 1030, MGH SS V, p. 26.
[99] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.15
He was Graaf van Vlaanderen between 987 and 1035.22

Family 1

Orgina (?) de Moselle

Family 2

Otgiva/Ogive (?) de Luxembourg b. bt 990 - 995, d. 21 Feb 1030
Children

Family 3

Eleanor (?) of Normandy b. c 1002, d. 1071
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018656&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw004.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018654&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#ArnoulIdied987B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIVdied1035.
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf II (Arnulfus iunior): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul001.htm
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosela Roxana of Italy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018655&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rozala_of_Italy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html
  13. [S1769] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005: "Re: Count Odo/Cunegonde"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/EG8fUGArHIU/m/Kjp8At_SVwoJ) to e-mail address, 12 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 12 Aug 2005."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otgiva de Luxembourg: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018657&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LUXEMBOURG.htm#Ogivedied1030
  16. [S584] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family # 0167 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 166-22, p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page (Normandy family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor|Ainor|Judith of Normandy.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#EleonoreNormandieMBaudouinIVFlanders
  21. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_IV,_Count_of_Flanders.
  23. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Baudouin IV de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudouin_IV_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#ER2
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg3.html#OF1
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Luxembourg, p.3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Luxembourg.pdf
  29. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 4.
  30. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Gand.pdf, p. 3.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004011&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinVdied1067B.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020476&tree=LEO
  34. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw004.htm
  35. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit000.htm
  36. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Judithdied1094.

Arnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen1,2,3,4

M, #4220, b. circa 961, d. 30 March 987
FatherBaudouin (Baldwin ) III (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen, Comte d'Artois1,3,4,5,6,7,8 b. bt 935 - 940, d. 1 Jan 962
MotherMathilde/Maud Billung (?) von Sachsen9,1,10,3,4,6,7 b. c 940, d. 25 May 1008
ReferenceGAV27 EDV28
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Arnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was born circa 961; Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1 page) and Med Lands say b. 961/2; The Henry Project says b. ca 960.11,1,3,4,12,7 He married Rosella/Susanna (?) Princess of Ivrea, Dame de Montreuil, daughter of Berengarius II (?) Ct of Milan, Margrave of Ivrea, King of Italy and Willa III (?) d'Arles, Princess of Tuscany, circa 968;
Her 1st husband.11,13,1,14,2,3,15,16,4,12,7
Arnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen died on 30 March 987; According to The Henry Project: Date of Death: (23 or 30?) March 988 (or, much less likely, 987).
The year of Arnulf's death is not given consistently in the annals ["Obiit Arnulfus marchysus, nepos magni Arnulfi." Ann. Bland., s.a. 989, Grierson (1937), 22; "Obiit Arnulfus, nepos magni Arnulfi. Sepultus est in Blandinio.", Ann. Elmarenses, s.a. 988, ibid., 87; "Obiit Arnulfus, nepos magni Arnulfi", Ann. Formos., s.a. 991, ibid., 126; "Obiit Arnulfus iunior." Annales Elnonenses ("minores"), s.a. 988, ibid., 152]. However, a charter dated 1 April 988 in which his widow Susanna is called regina indicates that he was dead by that date [Vanderkindere (1902), 1: 295; Grierson (1937), 22, n. 2; (both cite Van Lokeren I, no. 64)]. The date of 30 March is given by the Chronicle of Tronchiennes ["Trigesimo die Martii, Arnulphus Junior, relicto Balduino filio adhuc impubere, diem suum clausit: alii tribuunt anno sequenti." Chronicon Trunchinense, s.a. 988, de Smet 1: 596] and in Arnulf's claimed epitaph ["Inclytus Arnulphus comes hic est carne sepultus, / Arnulphus Magnus cujus habetur avus. / Hic nos ditavit, nec ab avo degeneravit, / Nam Camphim, Harnes et bona plura dedit. / Martis terdena lux ibat solis habena, / Cum pius hic heros transiit ad superos. // Auxit quippe data, fecit et esse rata. / Hujus Susanna conjux fuerat veneranda, / Balduinum generans, pignus avorum imitans. / Hunc, rex justorum, socium fac esse tuorum, / Atque bonis veris gaudeat in superis. / Terdena luce, cum Martius esset in axe, / Corpus humo tradit, cum moriendo cadit." Adrien de Budt, Chronicon Flandriae, de Smet 1: 273]. Anselme states that the date was 23 March and not 30 March, but does not give a source [Anselme 2: 715]. If the title of regina is interpreted as indicating that her marriage to king Robert II had already occurred by that date (as Vanderkindere interpreted it), then Arnulf's death would have to be placed on 30 March 987 (for Robert and Susanna would certainly not have married on the day after Arnulf's death). On the other hand, if the word regina simply indicates that Rozala/Susanna was emphasizing her rule of Flanders on behalf of her underage son [see Stewart (2006), where other examples are given], that would fit well with a death date Arnulf on the previous day. Since it is improbable that Susanna and Robert were married as early as 1 April 988, the latter is much more likely .
Place of Death: Unknown.11,13,1,3,4,7
Arnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was buried after 30 March 987 at Ghent, Flanders, Belgium (now).1


     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Arnulf was born about 961, the son of Baudouin III, count of Flanders, and Mathilde of Saxony. His father died in 962, when Arnulf was an infant, and his grandfather Arnulf I acted as regent for him. When Arnulf I died three years later (in 965), the regency was held by their kinsman Baudouin Balso.
     "About 968, when Arnulf was still a child, he was married to Rozala/Susanna of Italy, the daughter of Berengar II, king of Italy, and Willa of Tuscany. It is almost certain that his wife was christened Susanna, and that Rozala ('little Red') was her nickname. She was known as Susanna in and after both her marriages.
     "By the time Arnulf attained his majority in 976, Flanders had lost some of the southern territory acquired by Arnulf I. The latter had given some parts of Picardy to King Lothar of France to help assure his grandson's succession, and gave Boulogne as a fief to another relative. Then early in Arnulf's minority Lothar had taken Ponthieu and given it to Hugh Capet, and the first counts of Guînes had established themselves.
     "Arnulf and Rozala/Susanna had two children, of whom their son Baudouin IV, born in 980, would have progeny. Arnulf died on 30 March 987 and was succeeded by Baudouin." [See Note Per Med Lands]4

; This is the same person as ”Arnulf II, Count of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as ”Arnoul II de Flandre” at Wikipédia (FR).17,18 GAV-27 EDV-28 GKJ-28. Arnulf (Arnold) II "The Young" (?) Graaf van Vlaanderen was also known as Arnoul II “le Jeune” de Flandre Count of Flanders.12

; This is the same person as ”Arnulf II (Arnulfus iunior)” at The Henry Project.7

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 9.
2. Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried. 170.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Frlandres): "Arnoul (Arnulf) II «Le Jeune» de Flandres ° ~961/62 + 30/03/987 (Gand ?) comte de Flandres (964-988) d’abord sous la tutelle de Baudouin (Balzo) de Boulogne, fait comte de Courtrai (majeur en 976) ép. ~968 Rozala di Ivrea ° 950/60 + 13/12/1003 (ou 26/01 ou 07/02/1003, 1009 ?) conseillère de son fils Baudouin IV (fille de Berengario II, ex-roi d’Italie, et de Willa de Toscane- Arles ; mariage arrangé par l’empereur Otto 1er ; ép. 2 ) avant 01/04 988 (répud.) sous le nom de Suzanne Robert II, roi de France en lui apportant Montreuil en douaire, conservé par la France.)19"

; Per Med Lands:
     "ARNOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN III Joint Count of Flanders & his wife Mathilde [Billung] of Saxony ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Gent). The Annales Elnonenses Minores record that "Arnulfus, filius Balduini ex Matilde"[165] succeeded his grandfather in 964 as ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, under the guardianship of his father's first cousin Baudouin Baldzo [de Boulogne] who made himself Comte de Courtrai. Taking advantage of the weakness of the county during Count Arnoul's minority, [his uncle] Dirk II Count of [Holland] captured Gent and Waas, and Lothaire King of the West Franks occupied the south-east of the county, ostensibly in the role of protector of the young count[166]. To counter the perceived threat from France, Emperor Otto II established marches on the right bank of the river Schelde, from Valenciennes in the south to Antwerp in the north[167]. "Godefridi comitis, Ingelberti advocati, Arnulfi junioris marchysi…" signed the charter dated 11 Apr 969 under which "Theodericus comes" donated "sui iuris possessionem…Frilingim in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand[168]. "Arnulfus…marchysus" confirmed the possession of "Harnas…in pago Seirbiu" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 31 Jan 972, signed by "Theoderici comitis…Arnulfi Bononiensis comitis, Engelberti advocati…"[169]. "Arnulfi…junioris marchysi, Herimanni comitis filiis Godefridi comitis, Wiggeri, Ingelberti advocati…" signed the charter dated [21 Jan] 974 under which "Godefridus comes et uxor sua Mathildis" donated "regium fiscum Holinium…in pago Tornacensi…et…Ramelgeis ecclesia…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand[170]. "Arnulfo juniore marchyso…" signed the charter dated 2 Oct 974 under which "Theodericus comes et uxor sua Hildegardis" donated "in villa Haleftra in pago Mempesco sita" to Saint-Pierre de Gand[171]. Arnoul's majority was declared in 976. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 989 of "Arnulfus marchysus, nepos magni Arnulfii"[172].
     "m ([968][173]) as her first husband, ROZALA [Suzanne] di Ivrea, daughter of BERENGARIO II ex-King of Italy [Ivrea] & his wife Willa of Tuscany-Arles ([950/960]-13 Dec 1003 or 7 Feb 1004, bur Gent, St Pieter). Regino records that two of the daughters (unnamed) of ex-King Berengario were brought up in the imperial palace by the empress after being brought to Germany[174]. One of these two daughters was presumably Rozala, bearing in mind that the emperor arranged her marriage. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul[175]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regis Susannam"[176]. Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own control over the county. According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala di Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976[177], but the source on which this is based has not been identified. "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi", by charter dated 1 Apr 988, signed by "…Waldberto advocato, Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…"[178]. She married secondly (988 before 1 Apr[179], repudiated [991/92]) as his first wife, Robert Associate-King of France, who succeeded his father in 996 as Robert II King of France. The Vita Sancti Bertulfi names "Rozala filia…Berengarii Regis Italiæ", specifying that "post mortem Arnulfi [Balduini filius] principis, Roberto Regi Francorum nupsit et Susanna dicta"[180]. Kerrebrouck, presumably basing his supposition on this passage from the Vita Sancti Bertulfi, says that she adopted the name Suzanne on her second marriage[181], but the sources quoted above show that she was referred to by this name earlier. Hugues "Capet" King of France arranged her second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987[182]. She was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the county of Flanders as her dowry on her second marriage. Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby[183]. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer. "Susanna regina cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…Atingehem…et in Testereph" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "filie sue Mathildis", by charter dated 26 Jun 995[184]. "Susanna regina…cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…in pago Flandrensi…in Holtawa…in Fresnere…in Clemeskirca…in Jatbeka…in Sclefteta…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jun 1003[185]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina"[186]. The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb"[187]."
Med Lands cites:
[165] Annales Elnonenses Minores 964, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[166] Nicholas (1992), p. 43.
[167] Nicholas (1992), p. 44.
[168] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 77, p. 80.
[169] Gand Saint-Pierre 45, p. 44.
[170] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 86, p. 85.
[171] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 87, p. 86.
[172] Annales Blandinienses 989, MGH SS V, p. 25.
[173] ES II 5, and Rösch (1977), p. 167.
[174] Reginonis Chronicon 965, MGH SS I, p. 627.
[175] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[176] Annales Elnonenses Minores [950-968], MGH SS V, p. 19.
[177] Nicholas (1992), p. 44.
[178] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92.
[179] Date of a charter in which she is called "regina", cited in Vanderkindere, I, p. 295, citing Van Lokeren, Chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Pierre I, no. 64.
[180] Vita Sancti Bertulfi Abbatis Renticensis, RCGF 10, p. 365.
[181] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 60 footnote 32.
[182] Nicholas (1992), p. 45.
[183] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) IV.LXXXVII, p. 270.
[184] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 102, p. 96.
[185] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101.
[186] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1003, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[187] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.12


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Arnulf II of Flanders (965-988), *961/2, +30.3.987, bur Ghent; m.ca 968 Rosele=Suzanna of Ivrea (*945 +26.1.1003), dau.of Berenger II of Italy."1

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROZALA [Suzanne] d´Ivrea ([950/960]-13 Dec 1003 or 7 Feb 1004, bur Gent, church of the Abbey de Saint-Pierre du Mont-Blandin). Regino records that two of the daughters (unnamed) of ex-King Berengario were brought up in the imperial palace by the empress after being brought to Germany[571]. One of these two daughters was presumably Rozala, bearing in mind that the emperor arranged her marriage. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul[572]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regis Susannam"[573]. Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own control over the county. According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala d´Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976[574], but the source on which this is based has not been located. "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi", by charter dated 1 Apr 988, signed by "…Waldberto advocato, Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…"[575]. The Vita Sancti Bertulfi names "Rozala filia…Berengarii Regis Italiæ", specifying that "post mortem Arnulfi [Balduini filius] principis, Roberto Regi Francorum nupsit et Susanna dicta"[576]. Kerrebrouck, presumably basing his supposition on this passage from the Vita Sancti Bertulfi, says that she adopted the name Suzanne on her second marriage[577], but the sources quoted above show that she was referred to by this name earlier. Hugues "Capet" King of France arranged her second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987[578]. She was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the county of Flanders as her dowry on her second marriage. Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby[579]. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer. "Susanna regina cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…Atingehem…et in Testereph" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "filie sue Mathildis", by charter dated 26 Jun 995[580]. "Susanna regina…cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…in pago Flandrensi…in Holtawa…in Fresnere…in Clemeskirca…in Jatbeka…in Sclefteta…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jun 1003[581]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina"[582]. The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb"[583].
     "m firstly ([968][584]) ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, son of BAUDOUIN III joint Count of Flanders & his wife Mechtild of Saxony [Billung] ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Ghent).
     "-m secondly (988 before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as his first wife, ROBERT Associate-King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France."
Med Lands cites:
[571] Reginonis Chronicon 965, MGH SS I, p. 627.
[572] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.
[573] Annales Elnonenses Minores [950-968], MGH SS V, p. 19.
[574] Nicholas, p. 44.
[575] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92.
[576] Vita Sancti Bertulfi Abbatis Renticensis, RCGF 10, p. 365.
[577] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 60 footnote 32.
[578] Nicholas (1992), p. 45.
[579] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) IV.LXXXVII, p. 270.
[580] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 102, p. 96.
[581] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101.
[582] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1003, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[583] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.16

; According to the the Henry Project: "Falsely attributed son (existence unlikely, evidently a fabrication) [falsely attributed to Arnulf II Count of Flanders d. 987]:
     "MALE Eudes, count of Cambrai, m. (1) Adèle de Beaumont, his niece; (2) Adèle de Bois-Ferrand. (existence of both spouses also doubtful)
     "This falsehood, which has been picked up by some printed and internet references, is based largely on George Andrews Moriarty's The Plantagenet Ancestry, which in turn was evidently based on the work of a certain T. Friedrich von Stauffenberg. The account (in Moriarty's handwriting) reads as follows [Moriarty, 277]:
"T. Friedrich von Stauffenberg Esq. M. B. of Washington, D. C. has made an extensive study of the neglected cadets of the counts of Flanders and their descendants, based on the chartularies of the abbeys of St. Omer, St. Pierre, St. Bavo, Notre Dame d'Ourscamp and Cysoing and the most reliable chronicles of the Flemish region."
"The records of St. Pierre de Cambrai record an [sic] remembrance for the soul of Count Odo (Eudes), son of Count Arnulf, and Susanne 'lately Queen of France (i.e. Susanne of Italy, who married 1st Arnulf Count of Flanders and 2ndly Robert King of France before 988, divorced 992, cf. p. 14 ante). It provides for prayers for his soul and the souls of his father Arnulf, his mother Susanne, his sister Mathilda, widow of Guilbert de Beaumont.' "
"Eudes caused a scandal by marrying his neice [sic] Adele de Beaumont, daughter of Mathilda . He was anathematized by Pope Benedict IX and a letter of his brother Count Baldwin IV to the Pope in 1012 regarding the matter is in Migne P.L. vol. 116[?] or 117[?]. Adele died before 1015/16 and the chartularies of both St.Peter de Cambrai and St. Omer record Eudes' charters "in Poenitentia." He remarried Adele daughter of Thibaud Seigneur of Bois Ferrand, called 'Thibaud de Louvain' by Alberic de Trois Fontaines, Orderic Vitalis and William of Jumièges. By his first wife he had 2 sons Richard and Roger who joined the Normans in Italy and by his second wife Adele of Bois Ferrand he had Englebert of Brienne (see vols. ix, p. 84 and xiii, p. 257), Roger Count of St. Pol, and Peter Count of Arlon."

     "This is followed by a genealogical table repeating above information in tabular form. The page numbers in the two references to Migne are difficult to read in Moriarty's handwriting, and could be volumes 126-7 or 136-7. Moriarty's work is essentially a collection of handwritten notes, based largely on secondary sources, and was certainly not intended to be published in its present form. In the present case, it seems unlikely that Moriarty did any further research of his own to follow up the notes he took from Stauffenberg's work (which I have not seen). If he had, he would undoubtedly have noticed that Benedict VIII (not IX) was pope in 1012, and that volumes 116-7 (or 126-7, 136-7) do not contain letters of either Benedict. In addition, there appears to be no reference to a 'Thibaut de Louvain' in the works of Aubry de Troisfontaines, Orderic Vitalis, or Guillaume de Jumièges. Furthermore, standard histories of the city of Cambrai make no mention of this Eudes, despite the fact that the alleged marriage of a count to his own niece that attracted the attention of the pope would, if true, be a notable event that historians would be unlikely to miss. I know of no evidence which would confirm even the existence of count Eudes of Cambrai (or of either of his two wives, or of Guilbert de Beaumont, etc.) Given that the bibliographical references do not seem to check out, it is difficult to regard these claims as anything other than a fabrication.“.20 He was CountMarquis of Flanders between 965 and 987.1,21,7

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/arnul001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018654&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018652&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIIdied962. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf II (Arnulfus iunior): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul001.htm
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin/Baudouin III (Balduinus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw003.htm
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018653&tree=LEO
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/mathi000.htm
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-20, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#ArnoulIdied987B.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rosela Roxana of Italy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018655&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rozala_of_Italy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20ITALY%20900-1100.htm#RozalaM1ArnoulIIFlandresM2RobertIIFrance
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnulf_II,_Count_of_Flanders.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Arnoul II de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnoul_II_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  20. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul000.htm
  21. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 24 Feb 2004 "Re: Kuman lines into European( and other )Royalty"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnulf_II,_Count_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 16 Feb 2004."
  22. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw004.htm
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018656&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIVdied1035.

Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois1,2,3,4,5

M, #4221, b. between 885 and 889, d. 27 March 965
FatherBaudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois1,2,3,4,6,7,5,8 b. bt 863 - 865, d. 10 Sep 918
MotherÆlfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex1,2,3,4,9,6,10,5 b. bt 875 - 877, d. 7 Jun 929
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was born between 885 and 889; Racines et Histoire says b. 893/99; Genealogics says b ca 885; Wikipedia says b. ca 890.1,2,4,11 He married Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois, daughter of Heribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes and Adela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France, in 934; his 2nd wife (first wife unknown.)12,13,14,1,4,15,5
Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois died on 27 March 965; Racines et Histoire says d. 27 Mar 0965: "ass. par Heluin pour venger la mort du duc de Normandie, Gand ?". The Henry Project says d. 27 March 964x5.13,1,2,4,11,5
Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was buried after 27 March 965 at Abbaye de Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     890, Belgium
     DEATH     28 Mar 965 (aged 74–75), Belgium
     Arnulf the Great or Arnoul I "The Old" Count of Flanders, 3rd Count of Flanders. Arnulf was the son of Baudouin / Baldwin II and Ælfthryth of Wessex, and the grandson of Baudouin I and Judith of France (daughter of Charles the Bald), Alfred the Great and Ealhswith of Gaini. He was named after his distant ancestor, Saint Arnulf of Metz in order to affirm his descent from Charlemagne and the Carolingian dynasty.
     Arnulf married an unknown woman and had at least one daughter who married Isaac of Cambrai, and her son succeeded his father as Arnulf, Count of Cambrai. Hildegarde, listed below, may have been from this marriage.
     He married a second time to Adele de Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert II and Hildebrante, the daughter of Robert I de Morvais, the King of the West Franks. They were married in 934 and had the following children:
* Hildegarde, married Dirk II, Count of Holland
* Liutgard, married Wichmann IV, Count of Hamaland
* Egbert, died 953
* Baldwin III of Flanders, married Mathilde of Saxony, daughter of Hermann Billung
* Elftrude, married Siegfried, Count of Guînes

     Arnulf became Count of Flanders at his father's death in 918, while his younger brother, Adeloft, became the Count of Boulgone. Adeloft died in 933, wherein Arnulf took control but passed it along to his brother's son, Arnulf II. Arnulf ruled the County of Flanders, an area that is now northwestern Belgium and southwestern Holland. He expanded his territory to the south, including parts of Artois, Ponthieu, Amiens, and Ostravent. He actively used the conflicts between Charles the Simple and Robert I of France, and later the quarrels between Louis IV and his barons to further his own ambitions and wealth.
     Arnulf's conflicts in the south with the Normans trying to maintain their borders led to the ambush and murder of William Longspee, the son of Rollo Rognavaldsson, by Arnulf's men during a peace conference between William and Louis IV of France.
     After the wars ceased, Arnulf would concentrate of reform of the government. His son, Baldwin III died before his father, and his grandson, Baldwin III, became the new Count.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Baldwin II of Flanders 864–918
          Ælfthryth of Wessex Countess De Flanders 875–929
     Spouse
          Adele Of Vermandois
     Siblings
          Adelolf of Boulogne
     Children
          Hildegarde of Flanders
          Elstrude van Vlaanderen of Flanders
          Baldwin III of Flanders
     BURIAL     Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 11 Nov 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 61435379
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.1,16,17
     GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-28.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): "comte de Flandres et d’Artois (918-952 & 962-964/965) (continue l’expansion des Flandres vers le sud, soutient l’effort du roi Raoul contre les vikings et prend Eu (925), écrase les vikings (926), saisit l’abbaye de Saint-Vaast, Douai en Ostrevant et récupère Boulogne et le Ternois sur ses neveux ; se réconcilie avec Héribert II de Vermandois (934), résiste aux pressions des Normands du duc Guillaume en envahissant le Ponthieu, prend Montreuil sur le comte Herluin (939), fait assassiner le duc Guillaume lors d’une entrevue (942), assure sa position à Montreuil (949) mais doit céder Artois, Ostrevant, Ponthieu et Amiens au roi Lothaire.)4"

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 5.
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 9.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.18


; Per Genealogics:
     "Arnulf I, called 'the Great', was born about 885, the son of Baudouin II 'the Bald', count of Flanders and Elftrudis of Wessex, daughter of Alfred 'the Great', king of England. He was named after his distant ancestor, Saint Arnulf of Metz; this was intended to emphasise his family's descent from the Carolingian dynasty.
     "Arnulf succeeded as count of Flanders on his father's death in 918. He greatly expanded Flemish rule to the south, taking all or part of Artois, Ponthieu, Amiens, and Ostravent. He exploited the conflicts between Charles 'the Simple' and Robert I of France, and later those between Louis IV and his barons.
     "In the southern expansion Arnulf inevitably had conflicts with the Normans, who were trying to secure their northern frontier. This led to the murder in 943 of Guillaume I 'Longsword', duke of Normandy, at the hands of Arnulf's men.
     "The Viking threat was receding during the last years of Arnulf's life, and he turned his attentions to the reform of the Flemish government.
     "In 934 he married Adela de Vermandois, daughter of Heribert II, comte de Vermandois, and Adela/Liegarde/Hildebrante of Neustria, daughter of Robert I, king of France. Arnulf and Adela had four children, of whom only their eldest son Baudouin III would have progeny. Arnulf made Baudouin co-ruler in 958, but following Baudouin's early death in 962, Arnulf was succeeded by Baudouin's infant son Arnulf II.
     "Arnulf died on 28 March 965."18

; This is the same person as ”Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus)” at The Henry Project.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): "Ct Arnulf I "the Great" of Flanders and Artois (918-965), *Flanders 885/889, +27.3.964, bur Ghent; 1m: NN; 2m: 934 Adele of Vermandois (*ca 910/915 +10.10.960); all kids were by 2m."1

; Per Med Lands:
     "ARNOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders & his wife Ælfthryth of Wessex ([885/890]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus"[103]. "Arnulfus" is named as son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders[104]. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[105]. Count Arnoul I was responsible for a major expansion of Flemish territory to the south. He and his brother joined the expedition of Raoul King of the Franks against the Normans in 925 and captured Eu. Count Arnoul inflicted a heavy defeat on the Normans in 926. In 932, he seized the abbey of St Vaast, as well as Douai in Ostrevant. In 933, after his brother's death, he seized Boulonnais and Ternois and disinherited his nephews. Count Arnoul made an alliance with Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in 934, which was sealed by his marriage to the latter's daughter[106]. Responding to raids by Guillaume Comte [de Normandie], Count Arnoul invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although the county was later recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. "Arnulfus…regis…marchysus" restored property to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 8 Jul 941, signed by "…Baldwini filii Arnulfi marchysi, Isaac comitis, Arnulfi filii eius, Theoderici comitis, Wenemari advocati…"[107]. After agreeing to meet Count Guillaume in 942 in order to settle the dispute over Montreuil, Guillaume was murdered, presumably at Count Arnoul's instigation[108]. Count Arnoul was secure in his possession of Montreuil by 949[109]. "Arnulfus Flandrie comes et marchisus" granted use of property "Snellenghem in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for "uxore mea…Adala atque…filio meo Balduino et filia mea Lietgardis" and for deceased "Balduino genitore meo et Elstrudis genetrice mea atque Heeberto filio meo", and returned "in pago Hainau super fluvio Savo villam…Dulciaca", by charter dated 10 Jul 953[110]. After the death of his son in 962, Count Arnoul was obliged to cede Artois, Ostrevant, Ponthieu and Amiens to Lothaire King of the West Franks in order to ensure the latter's support for the succession of Count Arnoul's infant grandson to the county of Flanders[111]. "Arnulfus marchysus" donated property to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 5 May 962, signed by "…Baldwini advocati, Theoderici comitis…"[112]. "Arnulfus…comes" donated "villam Canlin" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 17 Jun 962, signed by "…Balduini advocati…"[113]. An undated charter, dated to [962], records the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", noting that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[114]. Comte Arnoul was allegedly murdered by Heluin in revenge for the murder of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death "VI Kal Apr 964" of "Magnus Arnulfus, restaurator huius Blandiniensis coenobii"[115]. A charter dated 2 Jul 964 records the donation by "bone memorie Arnulfus marchysus" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, signed by "Odgaudi qui susceptor traditionis fuit…Ingelberti advocati…"[116].
     "[m firstly ---. Both Rösch[117] and Europäische Stammtafeln[118] state that Count Arnoul had another wife before marrying Adela de Vermandois. No evidence has been found concerning this supposed first marriage. However, as discussed below, the estimated birth date of Arnoul´s supposed daughter Hildegard, as well as his own advanced age when he married Adela de Vermandois, both suggest an earlier marriage. Although logic points to such a first marriage, doubt remains. The genealogical traces of this family are well marked in numerous contemporary sources. It is difficult to imagine that all such sources would have ignored an earlier marriage of Comte Arnoul, who was such a prominent figure in his day.]
     "m [secondly] (934) ADELA de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Adela [Capet] ([915]-[Bruges 10 Oct] 960, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Adelam, domni Heriberti comitis filiam" as wife of "comes Arnulfus", specifying that she was "duorum Francorum regum, Odonis atque Rotberti, neptem"[119]. "Adala coniunx Arnulfi" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[120]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 931 and 949] of "Arnulfus" and "Adelam, filiam Heriberti Vermandorum comitis"[121]. Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance made in 934 between her father and her future husband[122]. "Arnulfus Flandrie comes et marchisus" granted use of property "Snellenghem in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for "uxore mea…Adala atque…filio meo Balduino et filia mea Lietgardis" and for deceased "Balduino genitore meo et Elstrudis genetrice mea atque Heeberto filio meo", by charter dated 10 Jul 953[123]. "Adhela comitissa" freed two serfs and granted them to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "fidelis nostri Amalrici", by charter dated 8 Sep 954, signed by "Balduini comitis…Odacri advocati"[124]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 960 of "Adala comitissa"[125]."
Med Lands cites:
[103] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[104] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[105] Gand Saint-Pierre 18, p. 24, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 60, p. 52.
[106] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[107] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 65, p. 68.
[108] Felice Lifshitz ( ed.) Dudo of St Quentin's Gesta Normannorum, Chapter 26, The Online Reference Book for Medieval Sources, (6 Jan 2003).
[109] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[110] Gand Saint-Pierre 22, p. 28.
[111] Nicholas (1992), p. 42.
[112] Gand Saint-Pierre 30, p. 34, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 69, p. 75.
[113] Gand Saint-Pierre 31, p. 34.
[114] Gand Saint-Pierre 29, p. 33.
[115] Annales Blandinienses 964, MGH SS V, p. 25.
[116] Gand Saint-Pierre 37, p. 40, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 72, p. 77.
[117] Rösch (1977), p. 138.
[118] ES II 5.
[119] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[120] Saint-Bertin II.76, 938, p. 141.
[121] Annales Elnonenses Minores [931-949], MGH SS V, p. 19.
[122] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[123] Gand Saint-Pierre 22, p. 28.
[124] Gand Saint-Pierre 23, p. 29.
[125] Annales Blandinienses 960, MGH SS V, p. 25.19
He was Count of Flanders and Artois between 918 and 964.1,5 He was Lay yAbbot of St. Bertin between 933 and 945.5 He was Count of Boulogne and Ternois between 933 and 962.5

Family 1

Child
  • Hildegard (?) Comtesse de Flandres+ b. bt 933 - 934, d. 10 Apr 990; The Henry Project say: "Possible daughter (undocumented, evidence primarily onomastic): (but unlikely to be a daughter of Adèle even if she was a daughter of Arnulf)"1,20,16,11,19,21,22

Family 2

Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois b. c 910, d. 10 Oct 960
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018650&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2114] Doug Smith, "Smith email 17 Dec 2006 "Early Comtes de Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Smith email 17 Dec 2006."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIFlandersdied918. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin II 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018645&tree=LEO
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw002.htm
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrudis|Alfthryth of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018646&tree=LEO
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfthryth (Ælfðryð, Elftrude): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelft001.htm
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnulf_I,_Count_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018651&tree=LEO
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-20, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle de Vermandois: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele000.htm
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/arnul000.htm
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 November 2019), memorial page for Arnulf I Count of Flanders (890–28 Mar 965), Find A Grave Memorial no. 61435379, citing Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/61435379/arnulf_i-count_of-flanders. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf I 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018650&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#ArnoulIdied964B.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard of Flanders: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091840&tree=LEO
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Hildegarddied990.
  23. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin/Baudouin III (Balduinus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw003.htm
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018652&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIIdied962.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ekbert of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331108&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrude of Flanders: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331110&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Elftrudedied966.

Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois1,2,3,4

F, #4222, b. circa 910, d. 10 October 960
FatherHeribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes2,1,3,5,6,7,4 b. bt 879 - 880, d. 23 Feb 943
MotherAdela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France1,2,3,8 b. c 895, d. a 931
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois was born circa 910 at Vermandois, Normandy, France.2,1 She married Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois, son of Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois and Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex, in 934; his 2nd wife (first wife unknown.)1,9,2,10,3,4,11
Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois died on 10 October 960 at Brugges, Arrondissement Brugge, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium (now).1,9,2,3,12,4
Adèle/Alix (?) de Vermandois was buried after 10 October 960 at Abbaye de Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, France
     DEATH     unknown, Bruges, Arrondissement Brugge, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Born 910, Died October 10 958
     Family Members
     Parents
          Herbert II Of Vermandois 884–943
          Adele de Capet
     Spouse
          Arnulf I Count of Flanders 890–965
     Siblings
          Adalbert I of Vermandois
          Heribert III de Vermandois
          Robert de Vermandois 910–968
          Luitgardis de Vermandois 914 – unknown
     Children
          Hildegarde of Flanders
          Elstrude van Vlaanderen of Flanders
          Baldwin III of Flanders
     BURIAL     Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 28 Feb 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 66300313
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.2,12
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ARNOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders & his wife Ælfthryth of Wessex ([885/890]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus"[103]. "Arnulfus" is named as son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders[104]. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[105]. Count Arnoul I was responsible for a major expansion of Flemish territory to the south. He and his brother joined the expedition of Raoul King of the Franks against the Normans in 925 and captured Eu. Count Arnoul inflicted a heavy defeat on the Normans in 926. In 932, he seized the abbey of St Vaast, as well as Douai in Ostrevant. In 933, after his brother's death, he seized Boulonnais and Ternois and disinherited his nephews. Count Arnoul made an alliance with Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in 934, which was sealed by his marriage to the latter's daughter[106]. Responding to raids by Guillaume Comte [de Normandie], Count Arnoul invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although the county was later recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. "Arnulfus…regis…marchysus" restored property to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 8 Jul 941, signed by "…Baldwini filii Arnulfi marchysi, Isaac comitis, Arnulfi filii eius, Theoderici comitis, Wenemari advocati…"[107]. After agreeing to meet Count Guillaume in 942 in order to settle the dispute over Montreuil, Guillaume was murdered, presumably at Count Arnoul's instigation[108]. Count Arnoul was secure in his possession of Montreuil by 949[109]. "Arnulfus Flandrie comes et marchisus" granted use of property "Snellenghem in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for "uxore mea…Adala atque…filio meo Balduino et filia mea Lietgardis" and for deceased "Balduino genitore meo et Elstrudis genetrice mea atque Heeberto filio meo", and returned "in pago Hainau super fluvio Savo villam…Dulciaca", by charter dated 10 Jul 953[110]. After the death of his son in 962, Count Arnoul was obliged to cede Artois, Ostrevant, Ponthieu and Amiens to Lothaire King of the West Franks in order to ensure the latter's support for the succession of Count Arnoul's infant grandson to the county of Flanders[111]. "Arnulfus marchysus" donated property to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 5 May 962, signed by "…Baldwini advocati, Theoderici comitis…"[112]. "Arnulfus…comes" donated "villam Canlin" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 17 Jun 962, signed by "…Balduini advocati…"[113]. An undated charter, dated to [962], records the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", noting that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[114]. Comte Arnoul was allegedly murdered by Heluin in revenge for the murder of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death "VI Kal Apr 964" of "Magnus Arnulfus, restaurator huius Blandiniensis coenobii"[115]. A charter dated 2 Jul 964 records the donation by "bone memorie Arnulfus marchysus" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, signed by "Odgaudi qui susceptor traditionis fuit…Ingelberti advocati…"[116].
     "[m firstly ---. Both Rösch[117] and Europäische Stammtafeln[118] state that Count Arnoul had another wife before marrying Adela de Vermandois. No evidence has been found concerning this supposed first marriage. However, as discussed below, the estimated birth date of Arnoul´s supposed daughter Hildegard, as well as his own advanced age when he married Adela de Vermandois, both suggest an earlier marriage. Although logic points to such a first marriage, doubt remains. The genealogical traces of this family are well marked in numerous contemporary sources. It is difficult to imagine that all such sources would have ignored an earlier marriage of Comte Arnoul, who was such a prominent figure in his day.]
     "m [secondly] (934) ADELA de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Adela [Capet] ([915]-[Bruges 10 Oct] 960, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Adelam, domni Heriberti comitis filiam" as wife of "comes Arnulfus", specifying that she was "duorum Francorum regum, Odonis atque Rotberti, neptem"[119]. "Adala coniunx Arnulfi" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[120]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 931 and 949] of "Arnulfus" and "Adelam, filiam Heriberti Vermandorum comitis"[121]. Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance made in 934 between her father and her future husband[122]. "Arnulfus Flandrie comes et marchisus" granted use of property "Snellenghem in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for "uxore mea…Adala atque…filio meo Balduino et filia mea Lietgardis" and for deceased "Balduino genitore meo et Elstrudis genetrice mea atque Heeberto filio meo", by charter dated 10 Jul 953[123]. "Adhela comitissa" freed two serfs and granted them to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "fidelis nostri Amalrici", by charter dated 8 Sep 954, signed by "Balduini comitis…Odacri advocati"[124]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 960 of "Adala comitissa"[125]."
Med Lands cites:
[103] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[104] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[105] Gand Saint-Pierre 18, p. 24, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 60, p. 52.
[106] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[107] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 65, p. 68.
[108] Felice Lifshitz ( ed.) Dudo of St Quentin's Gesta Normannorum, Chapter 26, The Online Reference Book for Medieval Sources, (6 Jan 2003).
[109] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[110] Gand Saint-Pierre 22, p. 28.
[111] Nicholas (1992), p. 42.
[112] Gand Saint-Pierre 30, p. 34, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 69, p. 75.
[113] Gand Saint-Pierre 31, p. 34.
[114] Gand Saint-Pierre 29, p. 33.
[115] Annales Blandinienses 964, MGH SS V, p. 25.
[116] Gand Saint-Pierre 37, p. 40, and Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 72, p. 77.
[117] Rösch (1977), p. 138.
[118] ES II 5.
[119] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[120] Saint-Bertin II.76, 938, p. 141.
[121] Annales Elnonenses Minores [931-949], MGH SS V, p. 19.
[122] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[123] Gand Saint-Pierre 22, p. 28.
[124] Gand Saint-Pierre 23, p. 29.
[125] Annales Blandinienses 960, MGH SS V, p. 25.13


; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): "Ct Arnulf I "the Great" of Flanders and Artois (918-965), *Flanders 885/889, +27.3.964, bur Ghent; 1m: NN; 2m: 934 Adele of Vermandois (*ca 910/915 +10.10.960); all kids were by 2m."10

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Css Adele de Vermandois, *Vermandois ca 910/915, +Bruges 10.10.960, buried in St Pierre Abby, Grand, Flanders; m.934 Ct Arnulf I of Flanders (*ca 889 +27.3.964.)14"



Reference: Genealogics Pas:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 9
2. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 124
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 50.15


; Per Med Lands: "ADELA de Vermandois ([915]-[Bruges 10 Oct] 960, bur Ghent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Adelam, domni Heriberti comitis filiam" as wife of "comes Arnulfus", specifying that she was "duorum Francorum regum, Odonis atque Rotberti, neptem"[212]. Flodoard refers to the wife of "Arnoul" as sister of "Hugo [de Vermandois Archbishop of Reims]"[213]. Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance made in 934 between her father and her future husband[214]. "Arnulfus Flandrie comes et marchisus" granted use of property "Snellenghem in pago Flandrensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for "uxore mea…Adala atque…filio meo Balduino et filia mea Lietgardis" and for deceased "Balduino genitore meo et Elstrudis genetrice mea atque Heeberto filio meo", by charter dated 10 Jul 953[215]. "Adhela comitissa" freed two serfs and granted them to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "fidelis nostri Amalrici", by charter dated 8 Sep 954, signed by "Balduini comitis…Odacri advocati"[216]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 960 of "Adala comitissa"[217]. m (934) as his second wife, ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders, son of BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders & his wife Ælfthryth of Wessex ([885/890]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Ghent, St Pieter)."
Med Lands cites:
[212] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[213] Flodoard 946, MGH SS III, p. 393.
[214] Nicholas (1992), p. 40.
[215] Gand Saint-Pierre 22, p. 28.
[216] Gand Saint-Pierre 23, p. 29.
[217] Annales Blandinienses 960, MGH SS V, p. 25.


; This is the same person as ”Adèle de Vermandois” at The Henry Project.4 GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-28.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adele of Vermandois (bef. 915–960) was both a Carolingian as well as a Robertian Frankish noblewoman who was the Countess of Flanders (934–960).
Life
     "Adele, born c.?910–915[1] was a daughter of Herbert II of Vermandois and his wife, Adele, daughter of Robert I of France.[2] She died in 960 in Bruges.[1]
     "In 934 Adele married Count Arnulf I of Flanders (c. 890 – 965).[3] Together they had the following children:
** Hildegarde, at an unknown age born c. 934, died 990; she married Dirk II, Count of Holland.[4]
** Liutgard, born in 935, died in 962; married Wichmann IV, Count of Hamaland.[3]
** Egbert, died 953.[3]
** Baldwin III of Flanders.[3] (c. 940 – 962). Married Mathilde Billung of Saxony (c. 940 – 1008), daughter of Hermann Billung, and had issue, Arnulf II, Count of ** Flanders (c. 960 – 987), who succeeded as count after Arnulf I, skipping one generation.
** Elftrude; married Siegfried, Count of Guînes.[3]

Notes
a. It remains uncertain if Hildegarde was Arnulf's daughter by his first wife, whose name was not preserved, or by his second wife Adele. See: Heather J. Tanner, Families, Friends and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England, C.879-1160 (Brill, Leiden, Netherlands, 2004) p. 55 n. 143
References
1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 49
2. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds. & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), pp. 21 n. 77, 92
3. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 5
4. Heather J. Tanner, Families, Friends and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England, C.879-1160 (Brill, Leiden, Netherlands, 2004) p. 55 n. 143."16

She was Countess of Flanders between 934 and 960.16

Family

Arnulf/Arnoul I "The Great" or "The Old" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois b. bt 885 - 889, d. 27 Mar 965
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018651&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle de Vermandois: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/herib002.htm
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HeribertIIdied943B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/herib002.htm
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, NN: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/nn000002.htm
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-20, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul000.htm
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 November 2019), memorial page for Adele Of Vermandois (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66300313, citing Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium ; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66300313/adele-of_vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#ArnoulIdied964B.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#AH2
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018651&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adele_of_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/arnul000.htm
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018652&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIIdied962.
  20. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin/Baudouin III (Balduinus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw003.htm
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ekbert of Flanders: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331108&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrude of Flanders: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331110&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Elftrudedied966.

Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois1,2,3

M, #4223, b. between 863 and 865, d. 10 September 918
FatherBaudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres4,5,6,7,3,8,9 b. bt 837 - 840, d. 879
MotherJudith (?) de France4,10,6,7,3,11,8,12 b. 844, d. a 879
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was born between 863 and 865; per The Henry Project: "parents married 862."4,13,10,7 He married Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex, daughter of Alfred "the Great" (?) King of England and Ealhswith (?) of Mercia, in 884; The Henry Project cites: Vanderkindere 1, 283, citing the Chronicle of St. Bavon; Med Lands says m. 893/99.14,15,16,4,13,2,1,17,18,19,6,7,20,3
Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois died on 10 September 918; The Henry Project cites: Folcwine, 627 (exact date); Ann. Blandin. (year only); see Vanderkindere 1, 286.21,15,4,10,7,3
Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was buried after 10 September 918 at Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; The Henry Project says buried in Blandimberg and cites Ann. Blandin.
Per Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     864
     DEATH     10 Sep 918 (aged 53–54)
     Belgian Royalty. Baldwinus II 'de Kale' Graaf van Vlaanderen was born in 864. He was the son of Baldwin I 'de Ijzeren' Graaf van Vlaanderen and Judith, Princesse de France. He married Ælfthryth, Princess of Wessex, daughter of Ælfræd, King of Wessex and Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia, between 883 and 899. He died on 10 September 918. He was buried at St. Pieter Abbey, Gent, Belgium.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Baldwin I Count of Flanders unknown–879
          Judith de France 844–870
     Spouse
          Ælfthryth of Wessex Countess De Flanders 875–929
     Children
          Adelolf of Boulogne
          Arnulf I Count of Flanders 890–965
     BURIAL     Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Created by: Gene Stephan
     Added: 4 Jul 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 132292734.4,13
     ; This is the same person as ”Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus)” at The Henry Project.3

; This is the same person as ”Baldwin II, Margrave of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as ”Baudouin II de Flandre” at Wikipédia (FR).22,23

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Baudouin II 'the Bald' was born about 863, son of Baudouin I, count of Flanders, and Judith, daughter of Emperor Charles 'the Bald'. Baudouin became count of Flanders on his father's death in 879. From his stronghold at Bruges he maintained, as his father Baudouin I before him, a vigorous defence of his lands against the incursions of the Norsemen. On his mother's side a descendant of Charlemagne, he strengthened the dynastic importance of his family by marrying Elftrudis/Alfthryth of Wessex, daughter of Alfred 'the Great', king of England. Baudouin II and Elftrudis had four children, of whom their son Arnulf I would continue his line. He annexed lands and rights in the area between the river Schelde and Artois and had his opponents murdered. He died on 10 September 918 and was buried in the Abbey of St.Peter in Ghent."7 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-29. Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was also known as Baudouin II 'Calvus' (?) Count of Flanders & Artois.24,1 Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was also known as Baldwin II "the Bald" (?) Count of Flanders and Artois.4 Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois was also known as Baldwin II "Calvus" (?) Count of Flanders.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN ([865/67]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Gent, St Pieter). He is named as second of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[57]. He succeeded his father in 879 as BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders. According to Rösch, Baudouin II was nicknamed after his maternal grandfather although it is surprising that such a personal nickname could be so transmitted[58]. From his succession, he came under great pressure from Viking raids, and took refuge in the marshes of Saint-Omer in 883[59]. Baudouin II expanded his territories by occupying the pagi of Mempisc, Courtrai and the Ijzer, seizing control of the counties of Ternois and Boulonnais after 892 as well as the Tournaisis (except for the town of Tournai)[60]. Although Count Baudouin at first supported the election of Eudes as king of France in 888, the latter opposed the count's becoming lay-abbot of St Bertin (in 892, in succession to abbot Rudolf[61]) and pursued the count to Bruges, although the king was unable to capture the town. The Annales Vedastini record the death "Non Ian 892" of "Rodulfus abba", that "castellani Egfridum comitem" was sent to announce the news to the king, and that in his absence "Balduinum a Flandris…per consilium Evreberti qui nimis fuerat versutissimus" seized the abbacy against the wishes of the king who had promised it to Egfrid[62]. The Annales Vedastini record that "Balduinus" captured Artois in 892[63]. Count Baudouin supported the coronation of Charles III "le Simple" as king of the West Franks in 895, but afterwards supported Zwentibold Duke of Lotharingia. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold in 895[64]. Baudouin II invaded Péronne in 899[65] and attacked Vermandois, Artois and Boulogne, but was driven out of Vermandois by 900, although he reconquered it and killed Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in revenge for the death of his brother Raoul[66]. Count Baudouin also controlled the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 918 of "Balduvinus comes", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinio"[67]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[68]. His territories were divided between his two sons on his death[69].
     "m ([893/99]) ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex, daughter of ALFRED King of Wessex & his wife Ealhswith of the Gainas ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Gent, St Pieter). "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden, third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith[70]. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser[71]. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin without giving her origin[72]. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "filia Edgeri regis Anglorum, nomine Elferudem" as the wife of "Balduinus Calvus"[73], although "Edgeri" is clearly an error for "Alfredi". This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest in preventing Viking settlements along the coast. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[74]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "filia regis Elftrudis comitissa"[75]. The Memorial of "Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii"[76]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[77]."
Med Lands cites:
[57] Saint-Bertin, p. 11.
[58] Rösch, S. (1977) Caroli Magni Progenies (Verlag Degener & Co, Neustadt an der Aisch), p. 117.
[59] Nicholas (1992), p. 37.
[60] Nicholas (1992), pp. 17-18.
[61] Annales Blandinienses 892, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[62] Annales Vedastini 892, MGH SS II, p. 527. .
[63] Annales Vedastini 892, MGH SS II, p. 527. .
[64] Annales Vedastini 895, MGH SS I p. 529.
[65] Annales Vedastini 899, MGH SS II, p. 209.
[66] Nicholas (1992), p. 19.
[67] Annales Blandinienses 918, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[68] Gand Saint-Pierre, 29, p. 33.
[69] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[70] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 41.
[71] Asser, Part II.
[72] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[73] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 2, MGH SS IX, p. 309.
[74] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 60, p. 52.
[75] Annales Blandinienses 929, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[76] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 298.
[77] Gand Saint-Pierre 29, p. 33.19


; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): "A1. Ct Baldwin II "the Bald" of Flanders and Artois (879-918), *863/5, +10.9.918, bur Ghent; m.884 Pss Aelfrid of Wessex (*ca 877 +7.6.929.)25"

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Baudouin II «Le Chauve» de Flandres ° ~863/65 + ~10/09/918 (inh. à Saint-Pierre de Gand) Marquis, comte en Flandres et en Artois (879-918) (subit les assauts vikings (~883) ; conquiert le Mempisc, Courtrai, domine le Ternois et le Boulonnais (après 892) et le Tournaisis sans Tournai ; soutient le Roi Eudes (~888) puis lui résiste à Bruges, soutient Charles III «Le Simple» (895) puis Zwentibold, duc de Lotharingie ; investit Péronne (899), le Vermandois, l’Artois & Boulogne (899) et venge la mort de son frère en tuant Hér(i)bert 1er de Vermandois, mais ne peut se maintenir dans ses conquêtes)
     ép. ~893/99 (ou 884 ?) Princesse Aelfthyth (Elstrude) de Wessex ° ~877 + 07/06/929 (fille d’Alfred «Le Grand», Roi de Wessex et d’Ealhswith = début d’une alliance de fait avec les souverains anglais qui durera des siècles.)9" He was Count/Marquis of Flanders between 879 and 918.21,13 He was Count of Artois and lay-abbot of Saint-Vaast between 892 and 899.3 He was Count of Boulogne between 892 and 918.3 He was Lay Abbot of St. Bertin between 892 and 918.3

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018643&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIFlandersdied918. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin II 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018645&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIdied879B.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Judith: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit002.htm
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018644&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw002.htm
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-17, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 74, ENGLAND 15:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/edwar001.htm
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrudis|Alfthryth of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018646&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Aelfthrythdied929MBaudouinIIFlanders.
  20. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfthryth (Ælfðryð, Elftrude): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelft001.htm
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 44-16, p. 46.
  22. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Baudouin II de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudouin_II_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_II,_Margrave_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  24. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/arnul000.htm
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104012&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud of Flanders: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104013&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018650&tree=LEO
  29. [S2114] Doug Smith, "Smith email 17 Dec 2006 "Early Comtes de Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Smith email 17 Dec 2006."
  30. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul000.htm
  31. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelolf,_Count_of_Boulogne.

Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex1,2,3,4,5

F, #4224, b. between 875 and 877, d. 7 June 929
FatherAlfred "the Great" (?) King of England3,6,7,8,4,9,10,5 b. bt 099 - 099, d. 26 Oct 899
MotherEalhswith (?) of Mercia3,6,11,7,8,4,5,12,10 b. bt 850 - 855, d. bt 5 Dec 904 - 905
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited5 Sep 2020
     Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex was born between 875 and 877.3,6,8 She married Baudouin II "Le Chauve" (?) comte de Flandres et d’Artois, son of Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres and Judith (?) de France, in 884; The Henry Project cites: Vanderkindere 1, 283, citing the Chronicle of St. Bavon; Med Lands says m. 893/99.13,1,3,14,15,16,17,18,7,8,19,20,4,21
Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex died on 7 June 929.13,3,6,18,7,8,4
Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex was buried after 7 June 929 at Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium,

; Per Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     c.875
     DEATH     7 Jun 929 (aged 53–54), Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     English Royalty. Ælfthryth, Princess of Wessex was born in 875. She was the daughter of Ælfræd, King of Wessex and Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia. She married Baldwinus II 'de Kale' Graaf van Vlaanderen, son of Baldwin I 'de Ijzeren' Graaf van Vlaanderen and Judith, Princesse de France, between 883 and 899. She died on June 7, 929 at Flanders, Belgium. She was buried at St. Peter's Abbey, Ghent, Belgium.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfred the Great 849–899
          Ealhswith of Gaini 852–902
     Spouse
          Baldwin II of Flanders 864–918
     Half Siblings
          Æthelflæd 869–918
          Edward the Elder 874–924
     Children
          Adelolf of Boulogne
          Arnulf I Count of Flanders 890–965
     BURIAL     Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium
     Created by: Gene Stephan
     Added: 4 Jul 2014
     Find a Grave Memorial 132292736.3,8,22
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN ([865/67]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Gent, St Pieter). He is named as second of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[57]. He succeeded his father in 879 as BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders. According to Rösch, Baudouin II was nicknamed after his maternal grandfather although it is surprising that such a personal nickname could be so transmitted[58]. From his succession, he came under great pressure from Viking raids, and took refuge in the marshes of Saint-Omer in 883[59]. Baudouin II expanded his territories by occupying the pagi of Mempisc, Courtrai and the Ijzer, seizing control of the counties of Ternois and Boulonnais after 892 as well as the Tournaisis (except for the town of Tournai)[60]. Although Count Baudouin at first supported the election of Eudes as king of France in 888, the latter opposed the count's becoming lay-abbot of St Bertin (in 892, in succession to abbot Rudolf[61]) and pursued the count to Bruges, although the king was unable to capture the town. The Annales Vedastini record the death "Non Ian 892" of "Rodulfus abba", that "castellani Egfridum comitem" was sent to announce the news to the king, and that in his absence "Balduinum a Flandris…per consilium Evreberti qui nimis fuerat versutissimus" seized the abbacy against the wishes of the king who had promised it to Egfrid[62]. The Annales Vedastini record that "Balduinus" captured Artois in 892[63]. Count Baudouin supported the coronation of Charles III "le Simple" as king of the West Franks in 895, but afterwards supported Zwentibold Duke of Lotharingia. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold in 895[64]. Baudouin II invaded Péronne in 899[65] and attacked Vermandois, Artois and Boulogne, but was driven out of Vermandois by 900, although he reconquered it and killed Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in revenge for the death of his brother Raoul[66]. Count Baudouin also controlled the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 918 of "Balduvinus comes", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinio"[67]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[68]. His territories were divided between his two sons on his death[69].
     "m ([893/99]) ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex, daughter of ALFRED King of Wessex & his wife Ealhswith of the Gainas ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Gent, St Pieter). "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden, third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith[70]. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser[71]. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin without giving her origin[72]. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "filia Edgeri regis Anglorum, nomine Elferudem" as the wife of "Balduinus Calvus"[73], although "Edgeri" is clearly an error for "Alfredi". This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest in preventing Viking settlements along the coast. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[74]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "filia regis Elftrudis comitissa"[75]. The Memorial of "Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii"[76]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[77]."
Med Lands cites:
[57] Saint-Bertin, p. 11.
[58] Rösch, S. (1977) Caroli Magni Progenies (Verlag Degener & Co, Neustadt an der Aisch), p. 117.
[59] Nicholas (1992), p. 37.
[60] Nicholas (1992), pp. 17-18.
[61] Annales Blandinienses 892, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[62] Annales Vedastini 892, MGH SS II, p. 527. .
[63] Annales Vedastini 892, MGH SS II, p. 527. .
[64] Annales Vedastini 895, MGH SS I p. 529.
[65] Annales Vedastini 899, MGH SS II, p. 209.
[66] Nicholas (1992), p. 19.
[67] Annales Blandinienses 918, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[68] Gand Saint-Pierre, 29, p. 33.
[69] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[70] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 41.
[71] Asser, Part II.
[72] Saint-Bertin II.73, 918, p. 138.
[73] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 2, MGH SS IX, p. 309.
[74] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 60, p. 52.
[75] Annales Blandinienses 929, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[76] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 298.
[77] Gand Saint-Pierre 29, p. 33.8


; This is the same person as ”Ælfthryth (Ælfðryð, Elftrude) (Edward) "the Elder"” at The Henry Project.4 Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex was also known as Aelfrid (Aelfthryth) of Wessex.17

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 9.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . 189.
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 46.7


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ælfthryth of Wessex (877 – 7 June 929), also known as Elftrudis (Elftrude, Elfrida), was an English princess and a countess consort of Flanders.
Life
     "She was the youngest daughter of Alfred the Great, the Saxon King of England and his wife Ealhswith. Her siblings included King Edward the Elder and Æthelflæd.
     "Between 893 and 899, Ælfthryth married Baldwin II (died 918), Count of Flanders.[1]
     "They had the following issue:
** Arnulf I of Flanders (c. 890–964/65); married Adela of Vermandois
** Adalulf, Count of Boulogne (c. 890 – 933)
** Ealswid
** Ermentrud

References
1. Abels, Richard P. (1988). Lordship and Military Obligation in Anglo-Saxon England. British Museum Press. p. 189. ISBN 978-0-7141-0552-9.
External links
Ælfthryth 5 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England: http://www.pase.ac.uk/jsp/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=13053


Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Ælfthryth, parfois francisé en Elftrude, est une princesse de la maison de Wessex morte en 929.
Biographie
     "Ælfthryth est la plus jeune des trois filles du roi Alfred le Grand et de son épouse Ealhswith, après Æthelflæd et Æthelgifu. La principale source concernant sa jeunesse est la biographie d'Alfred le Grand rédigée par le moine gallois Asser vers 893. Asser rapporte qu'Ælfthryth est éduquée à la cour de son père, tout comme son frère aîné Édouard l'Ancien1. Elle fait partie des bénéficiaires du testament d'Alfred, qui lui lègue les domaines de Wellow (en) (île de Wight), Ashton (Ashton Keynes, dans le Wiltshire ?) et Chippenham (Wiltshire), ainsi que 100 livres2,3.
     "Ælfthryth se marie entre 893 et 899 avec le comte de Flandre Baudouin II. Ce dernier est le fils de la princesse carolingienne Judith, qui a été successivement la femme du père d'Alfred Æthelwulf et de son frère aîné Æthelbald avant d'épouser Baudouin Ier, le père de Baudouin II. Ils ont quatre enfants, deux fils et deux filles3 :
** Arnoul (mort en 965), comte de Flandre ;
** Adalolphe (mort en 933), comte de Boulogne ;
** Ealhswith ;
** Eormenthryth.

     "Ælfthryth survit à son époux, qui meurt en 918. Les annales de l'abbaye Saint-Pierre de Gand, compilées au xie siècle, datent sa mort de l'année 929, et son épitaphe la situe le 7 juin. Elle est inhumée auprès de Baudouin en cette même abbaye3.
Références
1. Asser 2013, p. 110-113.
2. Asser 2013, p. 236-237.
3. van Houts 2004.
Bibliographie
** Asser (trad. Alban Gautier), Histoire du roi Alfred, Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 2013 (ISBN 978-2-25134063-0).
** (en) Elisabeth van Houts, « Ælfthryth (d. 929) », dans Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (lire en ligne [archive]) (inscription nécessaire).
Lien externe
** (en) Ælfthryth sur Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England [archive]: http://www.pase.ac.uk/jsp/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=13053."23,24

; Per Med Lands:
     "ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Ghent, St Pieter). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva… Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd" as the children of King Alfred & his wife[1601]. "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealswith[1602]. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser[1603]. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[1604]. This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest of preventing Viking settlements along the coast. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[1605]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "Elftrudis comitissa"[1606]. The Memorial of "filia regis Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii"[1607]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[1608].
     "m ([893/99]) BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders, son of BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders & his wife Judith of the Franks [Carolingian] ([863/65]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Ghent, St Pieter)."
Med Lands cites:
[1601] Asser, p. 25.
[1602] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 41.
[1603] Asser, Part II.
[1604] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris) ("Saint-Bertin") II.73, 918, p. 138.
[1605] Lokeren, A. van (1868) Chartes et documents de l’abbaye de Saint Pierre au Mont Blandin à Gand (Gand) ("Gand Saint-Pierre"), 14, p. 20, and Fayen, A. (1906) Cartulaire de la ville de Gand, Chartes et documents T. I, Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis (Gand) ("Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis"), 60, p. 52.
[1606] Annales Blandinienses 929, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[1607] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 298.
[1608] Gand Saint-Pierre 29, p. 33.8
Ælfthryth/Elfrida (?) of Wessex was also known as Elftrudis|Alfthryth of Wessex.7 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-29.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): "A1. Ct Baldwin II "the Bald" of Flanders and Artois (879-918), *863/5, +10.9.918, bur Ghent; m.884 Pss Aelfrid of Wessex (*ca 877 +7.6.929.)25"

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Baudouin II «Le Chauve» de Flandres ° ~863/65 + ~10/09/918 (inh. à Saint-Pierre de Gand) Marquis, comte en Flandres et en Artois (879-918) (subit les assauts vikings (~883) ; conquiert le Mempisc, Courtrai, domine le Ternois et le Boulonnais (après 892) et le Tournaisis sans Tournai ; soutient le Roi Eudes (~888) puis lui résiste à Bruges, soutient Charles III «Le Simple» (895) puis Zwentibold, duc de Lotharingie ; investit Péronne (899), le Vermandois, l’Artois & Boulogne (899) et venge la mort de son frère en tuant Hér(i)bert 1er de Vermandois, mais ne peut se maintenir dans ses conquêtes)
     ép. ~893/99 (ou 884 ?) Princesse Aelfthyth (Elstrude) de Wessex ° ~877 + 07/06/929 (fille d’Alfred «Le Grand», Roi de Wessex et d’Ealhswith = début d’une alliance de fait avec les souverains anglais qui durera des siècles.)26"

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 74, ENGLAND 15:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 468 (Chart 30). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfthryth (Ælfðryð, Elftrude): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelft001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfred "the Great": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelfr000.htm
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrudis|Alfthryth of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018646&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Aelfthrythdied929MBaudouinIIFlanders. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 1-14; p. 1.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Alfreddied899B.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ealhswith: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/ealhs000.htm
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ealhswith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018647&tree=LEO
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-17, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw002.htm
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 3.
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 2.
  18. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/edwar001.htm
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIFlandersdied918.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin II 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018645&tree=LEO
  21. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw002.htm
  22. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 May 2020), memorial page for Ælfthryth of Wessex Countess De Flanders (c.875–7 Jun 929), Find a Grave Memorial no. 132292736, citing Abbaye De Saint Pierre-Du-Mont Blandin, Ghent, Arrondissement Gent, East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen), Belgium ; Maintained by Gene Stephan (contributor 48184541), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132292736/_lfthryth_of_wessex-countess_de-flanders. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth,_Countess_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  24. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Ælfthryth (fille d'Alfred): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfthryth_(fille_d%27Alfred). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104012&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmtrud of Flanders: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00104013&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arnulf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018650&tree=LEO
  30. [S2114] Doug Smith, "Smith email 17 Dec 2006 "Early Comtes de Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Smith email 17 Dec 2006."
  31. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Arnulf (Arnoul) I "the Great" or "the Old" (Arnulfus Magnus, Arnulfus Vetulus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/arnul000.htm
  32. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelolf,_Count_of_Boulogne.

Alfred "the Great" (?) King of England1,2,3,4,5

M, #4225, b. between 099 and 099, d. 26 October 899
FatherAethelwulf (?) King of Wessex2,6,3,4,5,7 b. c 795, d. 13 Jan 858
MotherOsburh/Osburga (?)2,3,4,5,7 b. 810, d. c 852
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited5 Sep 2020
     Alfred "the Great" (?) King of England was born between 099 and 099 at Wantage, Berkshire, England.8,2,3,5,7 He married Ealhswith (?) of Mercia, daughter of Aethelred Mucil/Mucel (?) Ealdorman of the Gaini and Eadburh (?), between 868 and 869 at City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England; Genealogics says m. 869; Genealogy.EU says m. 868/9; The Henry Project says m. 868.1,2,9,3,4,5,7,10
Alfred "the Great" (?) King of England died on 26 October 899 at Winchester, co. Hampshire, England.11,8,2,3,5,7
Alfred "the Great" (?) King of England was buried after 26 October 899 at Hyde Abbey, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England,

; [He was buried first at Newminster Abbey but later transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester.]
From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     849
     DEATH     26 Oct 899 (aged 49–50)
     Anglo-Saxon monarch. The son of King Aethelwulf and his queen, Osburga. He married Ealswitha of Mercia in 868, and succeeded his brother Aethelred in 871. Known as one of the greatest kings ever to rule mankind, his reign began amidst devasting viking raids. He defended his kingdom effectively, formulated a code of laws, and instituted a dramatic rebirth of scholastic and religious activity, as well as the arts. Alfred was not only a successful military leader, but a scholar as well, who translated Latin texts into the Anglo-Saxon language. The "Anglo-Saxon Chronicle," the record of the English race, was inspired by Alfred. He is the only monarch in the history of England to be referred to as "the Great." He died at the age of 50. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Ethelwulf 806–858
          Osburh, Queen Consort Of Wessex
     Spouse
          Ealhswith of Gaini 852–902
     Siblings
          Ethelbald 834–860
          Ethelbert, King of Kent 836–866
          Ethelred I of Wessex 844–871
     Children
          Æthelflæd 869–918
          Edward the Elder 874–924
     BURIAL     Hyde Abbey, Winchester, City of Winchester, Hampshire, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 25 Mar 2005
     Find a Grave Memorial 10675258.2,12,5
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Alfred 'the Great' was born in 849 in the royal manor of Wantage in Berkshire, son of Aethelwulf, king of England, and Osburh. It is said that his mother encouraged Alfred and his brothers by showing them a beautifully illuminated book of poetry, promising that the one who could read it first could have it. Alfred, the youngest, was first.
     “As a young man he was his brother King Ethelred's supporter in the struggle against the marauding Vikings. In 868 he married Ealhswith, by whom he had a large family. When in 871 he succeeded his brother Ethelwulf as king, most of England was in Danish hands. Though the English won several small victories, and a sea battle in 875, the Danes had the upper hand. In 877 Alfred had to go into hiding. During this period stories emerged of him disguised as a wandering minstrel and strolling into Danish camps to gather information. The story of him burning the cakes he had been asked to watch stems from that time.
     “In May 878, joined by English forces, he drove the Danes back to Chippenham. This was the turning point from which Alfred again emerged as king of England. Twice a year he called a great council, which was the beginning of the English parliament.
     “Apparently Alfred suffered from a strange, regularly recurring illness recorded by Asser, bishop of Sherborne. According to the genealogist and historian Sir Iain Moncreiffe of that Ilk it might have been porphyria. Alfred died on 26 October 899 and was buried at Winchester. His wife lived until 5 December 902.”.4 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-30.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 2.4


; This is the same person as ”Alfred the Great” at Wikipedia; as ”King Alfred "the Great" of England” at Geneagraphie; as ”Ælfred "the Great"” at The Henry Project; and as ”Alfred [Ælfred]” at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.13,14,15,7

; Per Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1): “C4. Alfred "the Great", King of Wessex (871-99), cr Kingston-upon-Thames, *Wantage, Dorset 849, +Winchester 26.10.899, bur Newminster Abbey but later transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester; m.Winchester 868/9 Ethelswitha (*ca 850/5, +as a nun at St.Mary's Abbey, Winchester 5/8.12.905, bur there later at Winchester Cathedral), dau.of Ethelred Mucel, Ealdorman of the Gainas”.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "ÆLFRED, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (Wantage, Berkshire 849-26 Oct 899, bur Winchester Cathedral, transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester, later called the New Minster[1571]). Asser records the birth in 849 of Alfred, son of King Æthelwulf, at Wantage in Berkshire[1572]. "Ælfred filius regis" subscribed charters of Kings Æthelwulf, Æthelberht, Æthelred I in 855, 862 (anachronistic), 864 and 868[1573]. Asser records that in 853, his father sent him to Rome where Pope Leo IV baptised him[1574]. He succeeded his brother in 871 as ALFRED King of Wessex. After the Danish victory at Wilton in May 871, King Alfred agreed to pay Danegeld for the first time as the price for ceasing further attacks. After a second invasion of Wessex in 875/77, during which Wareham in Dorset and Exeter were occupied, Alfred again bought peace in 877. He was forced to flee westwards in the face of a third invasion in 878 during which Chippenham was occupied, and took refuge at Athelney in Somerset. King Alfred's subsequent counter-offensive proved more effective, as he defeated the Danes under Guthrum at Edington in Wiltshire in May 878. After mixed successes against the Danes in East Anglia in 885, and his occupation of London in 886, Alfred made a peace treaty with Guthrum which lasted until 892. "Ælfred rex" subscribed a charter of "Æthelred dux et patricius gentis Merciorum" dated 887[1575]. The Danish offensive of 892/96 was less successful and no further Danish attacks on Wessex are recorded after 896. King Alfred is famous for the fleet of ships built to his design in the hope of defeating the Danes while they were still at sea, considered as forming the basis for the modern English navy. Having learnt Latin late in life, Alfred was responsible for English translations of five Latin works between 892 and 899: Gregory the Great's Cura Pastoralis, Orosius's History of the Ancient World, Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica, Boethius's De Consolatione Philosophae, and a collection which starts with the Soliloquies of St Augustine. He was also responsible for a collection of laws, although these were largely refinements of the works of his predecessors Ine King of Wessex, Offa King of Mercia and Æthelberht King of Kent. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Alfred on 26 Oct 899[1576]. King Alfred, under his will probably dated to [879/88], made bequests (in order) to "Edward my elder son", his unnamed younger son, his unnamed eldest, middle and youngest daughters, "my brother's son Æthelhelm…my brother's son Æthelwold…my kinsman Osferth" and Ealswith[1577].
     "m (Winchester 868) EALHSWITH, daughter of ÆTHELRED "Mucil" Ealdorman of the Gainas & his wife Eadburh (-Winchester 5 or 8 Dec 905[1578], bur Winchester, St Mary's Abbey, transferred to Winchester Cathedral). Asser records the marriage in 868 of Alfred and "a noble Mercian lady, daughter of Athelred surnamed Mucil earl of the Gaini…[and] Edburga of the royal line of Mercia"[1579]. Roger of Hoveden records the names of her parents, specifying that her mother was related to the kings of Mercia. "Ealhswith mater regis" subscribed a charter of King Edward dated 901[1580]. She founded the convent of St Mary's at Winchester, and became a nun there after her husband died. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in [902/05] of "Ealhswith"[1581]."
Med Lands cites:
[1571] Malmesbury II, 124, p. 108.
[1572] Asser, p. 2.
[1573] S 315 (King Æthelwulf), S 333 (King Æthelberht), S 334 and S 340 (King Æthelred).
[1574] Asser, Part I. Kirby (2000), p. 164, suggests it is more likely that Alfred accompanied his father to Rome in 855.
[1575] S 217.
[1576] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A, D and E, 901 [899].
[1577] S 1507, and EHD, 96, pp. 534-7.
[1578] Florence of Worcester, 905, p. 88.
[1579] Asser, p. 11.
[1580] S 363.
[1581] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A, 905 [904], C, 902, and D, 905.5


; Per Weis: "Alfred the Great, by (1), King of England, 871-899, b. Wantage, Berkshire, 849; d. 26 Oct. 899; m. 869, Ealhswith, d. 904, dau. of Aethelred Mucill, ealdorman of the Gaini, by Edburga, his wife. (ASC 853, 871, 891, 894, 897, 901; DNB 1:153-162; Asser, Life of Alfred; ES II/78)."4

; Per Friend email (Provides theoretical descent from Scipio Africanus to Alfred the Great, suggested by M. Settipani's latest book about the nobility of the Midi):
     "Having raised the possibility at the end of my previous post of a descent from Scipio Africanus to Alfred the Great, suggested by M. Settipani's latest book about the nobility of the Midi, I thought I ought to sit down and work it out.
     "Generations 1 - 23 are from Settipani: Continuite (and the Addenda to this) Generations 23 - 25 are the result of the suggestions made in recent posts on this site about the family of the patrician Philagrius and the Eparchii Generations 25 - 31 are from Settipani: Midi
     "Generations 31 - 32 are from Settipani: Prehistoire
     "Generations 32 - 43 are, I suppose, common knowledge, except the precise nature of the Kent-West Saxon connection, but for this substitute to personal taste.
     "1. P. CORNELIUS SCIPIO AFRICANUS. Born about 235 BC; consul 205 and 194; died 183.Son of L. Cornelius Scipio, by Pomponia, sister of M. Pomponius Matho, consul 233. He m. Aemila. Born about 225 BC; died after 182. Daughter of L. Aemilius Paullus, consul 219 and 216, and sister of L. Aemilius Paulus, consul 182 and 168.
     "2. CORNELIA. Born about 205 BC. She m. P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica Corculum. Consul 162.
     "3. P. CORNELIUS SCIPIO NASICA SERAPIO. Born about 182/1 BC; consul 138; died 133.
     "4. P. CORNELIUS SCIPIO NASICA SERPAIO. Born about 155 BC; consul 111, died 111. He m. (Caecilia). Born about 155/0.
     "5. (CORNELIA). Born about 125 BC. She m. P. Cornelius Mar.f. Lentulus. Born about 130; died after 101.
     "6. Cn. CORNELIUS P.f. LENTULUS MARCELLINUS. Born about 104/5 BC; consul 56. He m. (Fabia). Born about 100. Daughter of Q. Fabius Maximus, praetor 91. Descendant of Q. Fabius Maximus Aemilianus.
     "7. Cn. CORNELIUS LENTULUS. Born about 85/80 BC; praef. class. Sicily 30.
     "8. Cn. CORNELIUS Cn.f. LENTULUS. Born about 60 BC; quaestor 30/28.
     "9. Ser. CORNELIUS Cn.f. LENTULUS MALUGINENSIS. Born about 30BC; suf. 10 AD; died 23.
     "10. Ser. CORNELIUS Ser.f. LENTULUS CETHEGUS. Born about 10BC; consul 24 AD; proconsul of Africa 30/40. He m. (Munantia Plancina). Born about 10 BC. Daughter of L. Munantius L.f. Plancus, and sister of L. Munantius L.f. Plancus, consul 13 AD.
     "11. CORNELIA CETHEGILLA. Born about 25 AD. She m. Ser. Cornlius Ser.f. Salvidienus Orfitus. Born about 15/20 AD; consul 51; proconsul of Africa 62-63.
     "12. (Ser. CORNELIUS) SALVIDIENUS ORFITUS. Born about 50; suffectus about 80/87; died 93.
     "13. Ser. CORNELIUS SCIPIO SALVIDIENUS ORFITUS. Born about 75/80; consul 110; PUR 138. He m. Calpurnia. Born about 100. Daughter of C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus.
     "14. Ser. CORENLIUS SCIPIO SALVIDIENUS ORFITUS. Born about 115/120; consul 149; proconsul of Africa 163/4. He m. (Arria Sextia Paulina). Born about 160. Daughter of M. Nonius Arrius Mucianus Manlius Carbo, by Sextia T.f. Asinia Polla.
     "15. (CORNELIA) Ser.f. NIGRINA. Born about 150. She m. L. Eggius Cornelius Marulllus. Born about 145; consul 184; proconsul of Africa 198/9.
     "16. L. (CORNELIUS) COSSONIUS SCIPIO (SALVIDIENUS) ORFITUS. Born about 170; proconsular legate of Africa 198.
     "17. (CORNELIA MARULLINA). Born about 205. She m. M. Pupienus Africanus. Born about 200; died 236. Son of M. Clodius Pupienus Maximus, emperor 238, by Sextia Cethegilla.
     "18. PUPIENA SEXTIA PAULINA CETHEGILLA. Born about 225. She m. (M. Maecius Probus). Born about 220.
     "19. (M. MAECIUS ORFITUS). Born about 240/5. He m. (Furia). Born about 245. Daughter of the emperor Gordian III 238-244.
     "20. (MAECIA CETHEGILLA). Born about 265. She m. (C. Memmius Caecilianus Placidus). Born about 260/5. Son of C. Memmius Caecilianus Placidus, suffectus at the end of the 3rd century.
     "21. (PLACIDA). Born about 290. Sister of M. Maecius Memmius Furius Baburius Caecilianus Placidus, consul 343. She m. (Cornelius Severus). Born about 285.
     "22. (CORNELIA SEVERA). Born about 310. She m. Q. Flavius Maesius Egnatius Lollianus Mavortius. Born about 300; PUR 342; consul 355.
     "23. (Q. FLAVIUS EGNATIUS) PLACIDUS SEVERUS. Born about 330; vic.urb. 365. He m. Antonia Marcianilla. Born about 335. Daughter of Antonius Marcellinus, by Pontia Privata, daughter of Pontius Paulinus, founder of Burgos. Hence, sister of St. Melania, and cousin of Meropius Pontius Paulinus, bishop of Nola 409/13-431.
     "24. (EGNATIA AVITA). Born about 350. Sister of Avita, wife of Turcius Apronianus, and aunt of Flavius Avitus Marinianus and Egnatia Susanna Avita. She m. (Flavius Eparchius) Philagrius. Born about 330; Comes Orientis; Patrician after 382.
     "25. EPARCHIUS. Born about 370; v.nob. of Toul. Uncle of the emperor Eparchius Avitus.
     "26. LUPUS (St. Loup). Born about 395; Bishop of Troyes 426/7; died 475. He m. Pimeniola. Born about 400. Sister of Hilarius, Bishop of Arles 430.
     "27. HILARIUS. Born about 420/25; v.nob. of Langres. He m. Quieta.
     "28. (HILARIA). Born about 455. She m. (Aemilius). Born about 445. Son of Aemilius, v.nob. of Laon, and brother of St. Remi, Bishop of Reims, and Principius, Bishop of Soissons.
     "29. HILARIUS. Born about 480. Heir of St. Remi. Possibly his brother, Lupus, Bishop of Soissons, was father of generation 30.
     "30. HILARIUS. Born about 500. Heir of St. Remi. Brother of Loup, Bishop of Chalons 535, and Principius, Bishop of Meaux c.540. He m. a sister of Arnegonde and Ingonde, queens of Clothaire I. Possibly an anonymous brother was the father of generation 31, but in any case the mother of generation 31 was a sister in law of Clothaire I.
     "31. INGOBERGA. Born about 519; died 589. Sister of Lupus, Duke of Champagne. She m. Charibert I. Born about 520; King of the Francs 561-567.
     "32. BERTHA. Born about 550. She m. Aethelbert. King of Kent 560-616; Died 616.
     "33. EADBERT. Born about 570; King of Kent 616-640.
     "34. ERKINBERT. Born about 600; King of Kent 640-664. He m. Sexburga. Daughter of Anna, King of the East Angles.
     "35. EGBERT I. Born about 625; King of Kent 664-673.
     "36. WIHTRED. Born about 650; King of Kent c.690-725.
     "37. AETHELBERGA.Born about 675. She m. about 694, Ingeld. Born about 670; died 718. Brother of Ine, King of Wessex 688-726.
The source for this construction of the relationship between the Kentish and West Saxon dynasties is Leonard Dutton.
     "38. EOPPA. Born about 700. Possibly brother of Aethelheard, King of Wessex 726-740.
     "39. EAFA. Born about 725.
     "40. EALHMUND. Born about 750; King of Kent 784.
     "41. EGBERT. Born about 775; King of Wessex 802-839; died 4 February 839. He m. Redburgh.
     "42. AETHELWULF. Born about 800; King of Wessex 839-855; died 13 January 855. He m. Osburgh. Died 852. Daughter of Oslac.
     "43. ALFRED “the Great”. Born about 848; King of England 871-899; died 25 October 899.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "EALHSWITH ([848/53]-904). Asser records the marriage in 868 of Alfred and "a noble Mercian lady, daughter of Athelred surnamed Mucil earl of the Gaini…[and] Edburga of the royal line of Mercia"[154]. Roger of Hoveden records the names of her parents, specifying that her mother was related to the kings of Mercia[155]. Her birth date is estimated from her having given birth to her first child in 869. "Ealhswith mater regis" subscribed a charter of King Edward dated 901[156]. She founded the convent of St Mary's at Winchester, and became a nun there after her husband died.
     "m (868) ALFRED of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [first] wife Osburga (Wantage, Berkshire 849[157]-26 Oct 899, bur Winchester Cathedral, transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester, later called the New Minster). He succeeded in 871 as ALFRED King of Wessex."
Med Lands cites:
[154] Asser, p. 11.
[155] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 38. According to Weir (2002), p. 9, Eadburh was perhaps the daughter of Cenwulf King of Mercia, although the basis of this hypothesis is not clear.
[156] S 363.
[157] Asser, Part I.10
He was King of the Anglo-Saxons in 871.11

; Per Enc. of World History:
     “ALFRED THE GREAT purchased peace until he could organize his forces and build up a navy. Almost overwhelmed by the winter invasion of 878, he finally defeated the Danes and forced the peace of Wedmore, whereby Guthrun the Dane became a Christian and divided England with Alfred. The Danelaw, north of the Thames-Lea line, went to Guthrun; the south, together with London, went to Alfred.
     “878-900: Alfred proceeded to organize the defense of his kingdom. London was walled and garrisoned, with burghers charged with its defense. Earth forts (burhs) of the Viking type were thrown up and garrisoned. The fyrd (army of foot soldiers) and the fleet were reorganized, the army increased, the thegns (thanes) began to be used as a mounted infantry. All citizens of the requisite wealth were forced into thegnhoodto join the military class attached to the royal household. A Danish reaction (892-96) was firmly suppressed.
     “Alfred was a patron of learning. Foreign scholars and learned refugees were welcomed at court. Alfred translated Bede's Historia, Orosius, and Boethius's Consolatio into the vernacular. To provide trained administrators, Alfred established schools for the sons of thegns and nobles. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was started.”.18 He was King of England: [Ashley, p. 319-321] ALFRED THE GREAT Wessex, 23 April 87 1-26 October 899. Born: Wantage (?), c847; Died: Winchester (?), 26 October 899, aged 52(?). Buried: Winchester. Married: 868, Ealhswith (d. 902) of Mercia - 5 children. Although Alfred is certainly the best known of the West Saxon kings, much of what we think we know about him is myth, created by later writers in veneration of the saviour of the Saxons who alone held back the onslaught of the Danes and who established a period of prosperity in England. In that sense he shares something of the role in folk memory of king ARTHUR. Alfred was also a man of learning and did much to establish a history and chronology of his time, and was responsible for starting (or reforming) the ASC, but that does not mean we have to trust everything that was written about him at the time. This includes his Life written by Bishop Asser which some claim to be a forgery and which certainly has many anomalies. Contrary to our image of him as a strong and valiant king, he was something of a hypochondriac, being struck down with or threatened by mystery diseases, and a long sufferer of piles.
Alfred was the fourth son and fifth child of ATHELWOLF. His mother is recorded as Osburh, though he may have been the son of a second, unknown, marriage as there is a gap of several years between Alfred's birth and those of his elder brothers. Alternatively Alfred may have been older than we are led to believe, a point which may be attested by his ill health in his final years. Little is known of his childhood -as the youngest son with three elder brothers he was not thought likely to become king - so even the place of his birth is not certain. Asser's reference to Wantage is generally accepted but not definite, and somewhere like Wimborne is more probable. It is also unlikely that, as a child, Alfred was sent to Rome on his own and consecrated by the pope as future king. It is likely that he accompanied his father on his pilgrimage to Rome from 854-855 and spent some time at the court of Charles the Bald, king of the Franks. Alfred became fascinated with the Frankish world, the court of the descendants of Charlemagne, and modeled his own court on it, which included his passion for scholarship. Alfred was probably being groomed for the church, as his father was intensely religious.
Although Alfred's name begins to appear on authenticated charters around the year 861, he does not step onto the stage of history until around 865 and 866 when we find him in harness with his brother ATHELRED in battle against the Danes who had been harrying England for decades but were now showing greater strength of arms. At best Athelred and Alfred held the Danes at bay, but in 871 Athelred died of wounds and, though he had two infant sons (see ATHELWOLD), it was Alfred who was declared successor. Alfred had already proved his battle prowess, particularly at Ashdown in 870, but there was no time to celebrate his succession - there is no record of his coronation, despite the claim that he was crowned at Kingston upon Thames. Within a month of his succession Alfred was in pitched battle with the Danes at Wilton, a day which Alfred thought he had won but the wiliness of the Danes with a false retreat caught the English off guard. Battle followed battle that first year, the outcomes swinging both ways till, at the end of the year, Alfred bought peace with the Danes. The Danes settled north of the Thames, where peace was also bought with the Mercians, and for a period Alfred could consolidate his army. It was also during this time that Alfred began to develop a navy in order to meet the Danes on their own terms.
In 876 a new generation of Danish warrior leaders, of whom the most significant was GUTHRUM, began further incursions into Wessex. His army descended on Alfred's camp at Wareham, but Alfred was prepared and defeated the Danes, buying extra time. The Danes also suffered defeat in a naval campaign off the coast at Swanage, but in the winter of 878 they caught the English by surprise at Chippenham, taking over the royal court, and forcing the English to flee into the surrounding marshes at Athelney, in Somerset. It is to this period that belong the legends of Alfred burning the cakes and disguising himself as a harper to spy in the camp of Guthrum. Other Danish forces were called to the area, including a Danish fleet established in the Bristol Channel, endeavouring to blockade Alfred. However, Alfred's forces in Devon defeated the fleet and then, with his local knowledge, Alfred was able to outwit the Danes and led his army out of Athelney to Selwood. There he strengthened his forces, marched on the Danes and defeated them at the battle of Ethandune (probably Edington). The Danes submitted and, more significantly, Guthrum agreed to be baptized a Christian. Peace was declared with the treaty of Wedmore.
The next eight years, 878-885, were a period of peace in Wessex. It was now that Alfred became regarded by all the Saxons of England as their overlord, but he was never king of all England, as the Danes still held the greater part of the north and east. He spent this period reviewing the administration, fortification and legal system of the Saxons. He created a series of twenty-five fortified boroughs around his kingdom, such as Oxford and Hastings, and extensively refortified London. He developed seats of learning across southern England, and introduced his law code, extensively revising that of INE. This code was administered by a number of local reeves (or sheriffs) and judges, and Alfred reviewed their activities in his own series of visits. This forced the local administrators to read to ensure the books were properly kept. Alfred also decreed that all the sons of freemen should learn to read and write, firstly in English and, for those destined for high office, in Latin.
Apart from a brief skirmish with the Danes in 885, peace held until 893 when another war with the Danes of East Anglia erupted and lasted until 897. The Danes caused havoc across Mercia and into Wales, but were unable to penetrate the fortifications of Wessex. Alfred re-organized the navy into a major fleet, for which he is remembered as the father of the English navy. Alfred's strength eventually drained the Danish vitality and their army faded away. Although they would return again and again, Alfred had established a kingdom which, for the next few decades, was invincible.
Alfred had married in around 868 at a time when he had not expected to become king. His wife, Ealhswith, was the daughter of a Mercian nobleman and, through her mother, descended from the Mercian royal line, so that Alfred's sons could claim the royal blood of both Wessex and Mercia. He had five children (possibly six; one may have died in infancy) including ATHELFLEDA, who became the Lady of the Mercians, and Elfreda, who married Baldwin, count of Flanders, whose mother was Judith, Alfred's own stepmother. From Elfreda was descended Matilda, who became the wife of WILLIAM I. Alfred was succeeded by his son EDWARD. In later centuries, when Alfred earned the epithet "the Great", it was not solely because he held the Saxon nation together against the Danes, but because he improved the strength, culture and quality of his realm. Although this golden age also owed something to his son and grandson, Alfred was truly the most impressive of the Saxon kings. between 23 April 871 and 26 October 899.8

Family

Ealhswith (?) of Mercia b. bt 850 - 855, d. bt 5 Dec 904 - 905
Children

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 298, 319-321. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfred 'the Great': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000123&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 1-14; p. 1.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Alfreddied899B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aethelwulf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020042&tree=LEO
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfred "the Great": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelfr000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-15, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ealhswith: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/ealhs000.htm
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Ealhswithdied904.
  11. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), chart 10-14.
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 05 September 2020), memorial page for Alfred the Great (849–26 Oct 899), Find a Grave Memorial no. 10675258, citing Hyde Abbey, Winchester, City of Winchester, Hampshire, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10675258/alfred_the_great. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, King Alfred "the Great" of England: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I6504&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  15. [S2286] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, Alfred [Ælfred]: https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/183. Hereinafter cited as ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  17. [S1646] Alasdair Friend, "Friend email 7 July 2004: "DFA: Scipio - Philagrius - Alfred"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 7 July 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Friend email 7 July 2004."
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 181. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  19. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), appendix. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Edwarddied924B.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'the Elder': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020066&tree=LEO
  22. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/edwar001.htm
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elftrudis|Alfthryth of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018646&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Aelfthrythdied929MBaudouinIIFlanders.
  26. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ælfthryth (Ælfðryð, Elftrude): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/aelft001.htm

Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres1,2,3

M, #4226, b. between 837 and 840, d. 879
FatherOdoaker (Odacre, Audacer, Odoscer) (?) seigneur d’Harlebeek, Gouverneur de Flandres4,5,6,3,1 b. c 805, d. 837
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited11 Dec 2020
     Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres was born between 837 and 840; Genealogics says b. ca 830; Wikipedia says b. "830's."7,8,9,2 He married Judith (?) de France, daughter of Charles II "The Bald" (?) King of West Franks, King of Aquitaine, Holy Roman Emperor and ErmentrudeErmengardeHermintrudis (?) of Orleans, on 13 December 862 at Auxerre, France (now);
Her 3rd husband. Ashley says m. ca 864.10,11,7,12,2,9,13,1,3,14,15
Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres died in 879 at Arras, Belgium (now).7,11,16,8,2,17
Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres was buried in 879 at Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, France
     DEATH     879, Belgium
     Boudouin, Baldwin I, Baldwin Iron Arm, first Count of Flanders. vHe is thought to be the son of Odoacre, and the grandson of Engleran or Count Enguerrand, son of Leideric Forrester or Liderie of Flanders, France.
     Baldwin married Judith of France, the daughter of Charles the Bald, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and King of the West Franks and his first wife, Ermentrude of Orleans. They had the following children:
* Charles, died at a young age
* Baudouin II married Aelfthryth
* Raoul, Count of Cambrai, murdered in 896
* Widnille, wife of Wilfrid I de Besalu

     Count Baldwin became known through his marriage, but his origins are unknown beyond the legends that claim his family received his fiefdoms from Dagobert I.
     Judith was forced by her father into a strategic, diplomatic marriage with Æthelwulf, the King of Wessex, that took place 01 Oct 856. Judith was about fourteen, Æthelwulf was about fifty. Judith's father insisted she be crowned queen in exchange for this alliance with Carolingina name, despite the King's consorts were never crowned. Æthelwulf's eldest surviving son, Æthelbald, was forming a rebellion, from fear he would be usurped by a child of Judith, when his father appeased him by giving him the Eastern territories. When Æthelwulf died in 858, Æthelbald took Judith for his wife and queen to enhance his name and position, but the marriage was condemned by Asser in his "Life of Alfred the Great":
"Contrary to the practice of all pagans, [Æthelbald] took over his father's marriage-bed and married Judith, daughter of Charles, king of the Franks, incurring great disgrace from all who heard of it."

     Æthelbald died in 860, Judith had remained childless through both marriages, sold all her Wessex properties and returned to France, only to be placed under guard in the monastery at Senlis by her father until her could arrange another suitable, advantageous marriage.
     Judith met and married Baldwin, secretly at the monastery but with her brother. Louis's permission. Judith is thought to have been the instigator, not a victim, when she and Baldwin escaped and fled north, around Christmas of 861. Charles was furious, writing to his bishops as well as Rorik, the Viking and founder of the Russian dynasty, demanding they excommunicate the couple and refuse them shelter.
     Judith and Baldwin took refuge with her cousin, Lothar II of Francia, and asked Pope Nicholas to argue their case with her father. Eventually Charles seceded, allowing Judith and Baldwin to return to France and marry formally at Auxerre on 13 December 863.
     Baldwin became a staunch supporter of Charles, as well as his son, Louis the Stammerer, assisted in the continuing Viking wars, and expanded his territories to Western Francia.
     Baldwin died in 879 and was buried in the Abbey of Saint-Bertin, near Saint-Omer, succeeded by his son Baldwin II.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Judith de France 844–870
     Children
          Baldwin II of Flanders 864–918
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 11 Nov 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 61434593
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.17
     Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres lived at an unknown place ; Per Genealogics:
     "Baudouin, also known as Baudouin 'Iron Arm', was probably born about 830. His father was probably Audacer or Odoacer, but nothing definitive is recorded about him. He rose to prominence in 862 when he eloped with Judith de France, daughter of Charles 'the Bald', king of West Francia and Holy Roman Emperor. Judith had previously been married to Aethelwulf, king of England, and his son Aethelbald of Wessex, who succeeded his father as king of England.
     "Charles did not accept his daughter's marriage and asked his bishops to excommunicate Baudouin and Judith. Judith and Baudouin responded by travelling to Rome to plead their case to Pope Nicholas I. When this was granted, Charles was forced to accept the marriage, and the couple returned to France and then officially married at Auxerre. To give his new son-in-law appropriate status, Charles made him count of Ghent. In the following years Baudouin was also given the responsibility for the areas later known as the counties of Ternois and Flanders, directly south of the Schelde, to fight Viking attacks. Although among historians it is still disputed whether Charles did this in the hope that Baudouin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baudouin managed the situation remarkably well, hunted the Vikings down, and expanded both his army and his territory quickly. He became one of the most strong, secure and faithful supporters of Charles. The March of Baudouin, which came to be known as the county of Flanders, was for a long time the most powerful principality of France.
     "Baudouin died in 879. He was succeeded by his elder son by Judith, Baudouin II. His second son Raoul (died 28 June 896) became comte de Vermandois."2

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 9, 12.2

; See The Henry Project for more information. NB: The Henry Project discounts any proposed ancestors for Baudouin beyond his father "Audacer/Odoacer."5

; This is the same person as ”Baldwin I, Margrave of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as ”Baudouin Ier de Flandre” at Wikipédia (FR).9,18 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-30. Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres was also known as Baldwin I "Bras de Fer" Count of Flanders.7,12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “Ct Baldwin I of Flanders (862-879), *ca 837/840, +Auxerre 879; m.Auxerre 13.12.862 Judith (*844, +after 870), dau.of the Emperor Charles II; they left issue:”.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN, son of [ODACRE [Audacer or Odoscer] & his wife ---] ([830/37]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer[39]). The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, dated to the second decade of the 12th century, names "Balduinum Ferreum" as son of "Audacer"[40]. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Balduinum Ferreum" as son of "Audacer"[41]. He is named as son of Audacer in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which records his year of death and place of burial[42]. His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult at the time of his marriage, which means that he must have been a child when his father died. He eloped with his future wife around Christmas 861. The Annales Blandinienses name "Baldwinum Ferreum filium Audacri" and "Balduvinus filius Audacri" when recording (respectively) his abduction of his wife in 862 and his death in 879[43]. He was granted the “pagus Flandrensis” in 863, and shortly after Ternois, Waas and the lay abbacy of St Peter of Gent[44], although the primary sources on which this is based have not yet been identified. He is known to history as BAUDOUIN I “der Gute/Ferreus/der Eisenarme” Count of Flanders, but it is improbable that he was referred to as such by contemporaries. An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "…ex comitibus aut Tedericus, aut Balduinus, sive Chuonradus, seu Adalelmus" as those willing to support the emperor's son[45]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 879 of "Balduvinus, filius Audacri", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinie"[46]. According to legend, he built the church of St Donatien ("Sint Donaatskapittel") at Bruges.
     "m (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) as her third husband, JUDITH, widow firstly of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex and secondly of ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks [Carolingian] & his first wife Ermentrudis [d'Orléans] ([844]-after [870]). She is named as wife of Baudouin in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which also names her parents and her three sons[47]. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf[48]. Asser records that "Iuthittam, Karoli Francorum regis filiam" married "Æthelbald filius eius [=Æthelwulfo rege]" after the death of her first husband, commenting that it was "cum magna ab omnibus audientibus infamia"[49]. Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith[50]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[51]. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that Judith married "Balduinus comes"[52]. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[53]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage in 862 of "Balduinus, Odacri filius" and "Iudith, Caroli regis filiam"[54]. The preceding information is pulled together by the Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ which names "Iudith vidua Adelbaldi regis Anglorum, filia Karoli Calvi regis Francorum" as the wife of "Balduinum Ferreum"[55]. No information has been found in the primary sources so far consulted which throws light on the possible date of death of Judith, although it is unlikely that she died before about 870 at the earliest, assuming that she was the mother of all the children who are named below. "
Med Lands cites:
[39] Saint-Bertin, p. 11. Also included in Annales Vedastini 879, MGH SS II, p. 197.
[40] Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 305.
[41] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 1, MGH SS IX, p. 309.
[42] Saint-Bertin, p. 11. Also included in Annales Vedastini 879, MGH SS II, p. 197.
[43] Annales Blandinienses 862 and 879, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[44] Nicholas (1992), p. 17.
[45] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537.
[46] Annales Blandinienses 879, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[47] Saint-Bertin, p. 11.
[48] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1868) Chronica, Magistri Rogeri de Houedene (London) ("Roger of Hoveden") I, p. 37.
[49] Asserii Gestis Ælfredi MGH SS XIII, p. 121.
[50] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 37.
[51] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.
[52] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[53] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[54] Annales Elnonenses Minores 862, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[55] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 1, MGH SS IX, p. 309.3


; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Baudouin 1er (Baldwin) «Brasde Fer» de Flandres («der Gute», «Ferreus», «Eisenarme») ° ~830/37/40 + 879 (Abbaye de Saint-Bertin à Saint-Omer ou Arras ?) comte d’Harlebeek et 1er comte en Flandres (officiellement seulement comte royal et marquis des Flamands, investi par Charles «Le Chauve», 863-879, et relevant de la Couronne) puis comte du Pays de Waas, Gand
et du Ternois (dit «comte entre les rivières Scheldt et Leie», il aurait fondé l’église Sint-Donaaskapittel de Bruges et érigé les premiers châteaux de Bruges et de Gand ; séjourne ordinairement à Bruges)
     ép. 13/12/862 (Auxerre) Judith de Francie ° ~844 + après 870 (fille de l’Empereur Charles II, séduite vers Noël 861, et d’Ermentrude ; veuve de 1) Aethelwulf, Roi de Wessex + 13/01/858 et de 2) Aethelbald, Roi de Wessex + 20/12/860)”.1
; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolingian 1): “C1. [1m.] Pss Judith, *843/844, +after 870; 1m: Verberie sur Oise 1.10.856 King Aethlwulf of Wessex (*ca 806 +17.6.857); 2m: 858 King Aethebald of Wessex (+20.12.860); 3m: 862 Ct Baldwin I of Flanders (*ca 837/840, +879)”.20
; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH ([844]-after 870). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that she married "Balduinus comes"[250]. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[251]. Her first husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice in the kingdom of Wessex[252]. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[253]. Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[254]. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[255]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[256].
     "m firstly (Verberie-sur-Oise, near Senlis 1 Oct 856) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, son of ECGBERT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/800]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester).
     "m secondly (858) ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne).
     "m thirdly (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders, son of ODACRE [Audacer/Odoscer] Graf van Harlebeek & his wife --- ([837/840]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer)."
Med Lands cites:
[250] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[251] Annales Bertiniani II 856.
[252] Giles, J. A. (trans.) (2000) Asser, Annals of the Reign of Alfred the Great (Cambridge, Ontario, In parentheses Publications) Part I.
[253] Annales Bertiniani II 858.
[254] Asser, p. 8.
[255] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[256] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.15

; According to The Henry Project: "Falsely attributed daughter [to Baudouin I and Judith of France]: Guinidilda, m. Guifred, count of Barcelona, 870-897. Gesta comitum Barcinonensium (of which this part was composed shortly after 1160) states that Guifred impregnated a daughter (unnamed) of the count of Flanders (also unnamed) and later married her [see RHF 9: 68]. Later authors have expanded the story to identify this girl with Guifred's known wife Guinidilda, with the count of Flanders in question being variously identified as Baldwin I or Baldwin II [e.g., Anselme 2: 714]. There is no good reason to accept this late and legendary source on this point. The legend is probably modelled on the story of Baldwin and Judith [see Freedman (1988), 15-6, 18 n. 54]."21 He was Count of Flanders between 862 and 879 at Flanders, Belgium (now).7

Citations

  1. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018643&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIdied879B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/baldw002.htm
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_I,_Margrave_of_Flanders. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 298, 317-318. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Cambrai.pdf, p. 2.
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Judith: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit002.htm
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018644&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#JudithM1AethelwulfM2AethelbaldM3Baudouin
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 162-16, p. 142. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 16 November 2019), memorial page for Baldwin I Count of Flanders (unknown–879), Find A Grave Memorial no. 61434593, citing Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/61434593/baldwin_i-count_of-flanders. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Baudouin Ier de Flandre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudouin_Ier_de_Flandre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolingian 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#JC2
  21. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin I "Iron-arm" (Baudouin I "Bras de Fer", Balduinus Ferreorum-brachiorum): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw001.htm
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf: p. 2.
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIFlandersdied918.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin II 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018645&tree=LEO
  25. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw002.htm

Judith (?) de France1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #4227, b. 844, d. after 879
FatherCharles II "The Bald" (?) King of West Franks, King of Aquitaine, Holy Roman Emperor3,5,8,9,6,7 b. 13 Jun 823, d. 6 Oct 877
MotherErmentrudeErmengardeHermintrudis (?) of Orleans3,5,9,10,6,4,7 b. 27 Sep 830, d. 6 Oct 869
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited11 Dec 2020
     Judith (?) de France was born in 844 at Orléans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France (now).3,11,4,7 She married Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex, son of Ecgberht (?) King of Wessex and Redburga (Raedburh) (?), on 1 October 856 at Verberie-sur-Oise, France;
His 3rd wife.1,2,3,12,5,13,14,6,4,7 Judith (?) de France married Aethelbald (?) King of Wessex, son of Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex and Osburh/Osburga (?), after 858.15,16,3,5,6,4,7 Judith (?) de France married Baudouin I «Bras de Fer» (?) comte d’Harlebeek et de Flandres, son of Odoaker (Odacre, Audacer, Odoscer) (?) seigneur d’Harlebeek, Gouverneur de Flandres, on 13 December 862 at Auxerre, France (now);
Her 3rd husband. Ashley says m. ca 864.16,3,17,18,19,20,6,21,22,4,7
Judith (?) de France was buried after 879 at Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     Oct 844, Orleans, Departement du Loiret, Centre, France
     DEATH     Apr 870 (aged 25), Auxerre, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France
     French Royalty. Judith, Princesse de France was born circa 844. She was the daughter of Charles I, Roi de France and Ermentrude d'Orléans. Her first husband was Æðelwulf, King of Wessex, son of Ecgbeorht, King of Wessex and Redburga. They were married 0n Oct 1 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. She married Æthelbald, King of Wessex, son of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga in 858 as her second husband. As a result of her marriages Judith Princesse de France was also known as Queen Judith of Wessex as of October 856. Her marriage to Æthelbald, King of Wessex was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity. She married Baldwin I 'de Ijzeren' Graaf van Vlaanderen circa 863 at Auxerre, France. She was the mother of Baldwin II de Kale Graaf van Vlaanderen, Count de Flanders, born 864 who also went by the nick-name of Baldwin 'the Bald'. She is said to have passed away in April 870. Bio by: Gene Stephan
     Family Members
     Parents
      Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
      Ermentrude 823–869
     Spouses
      Ethelwulf 806–858
      Ethelbald 834–860
      Baldwin I Count of Flanders unknown–879
     Siblings
      Louis The Stammerer 846–879
      Godehilde Carolingian de France 864–923
     Half Siblings
      Rothilde de France 871–927
     Children
      Baldwin II of Flanders 864–918
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Gene Stephan
     Added: 3 Jul 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 132281976.11
Judith (?) de France died after 879 at Auxerre, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says d. after 870; Find A Grave says d. Apr 870; Med Lands says d. aft 870.2,3,11,7
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Flanders 1): “Ct Baldwin I of Flanders (862-879), *ca 837/840, +Auxerre 879; m.Auxerre 13.12.862 Judith (*844, +after 870), dau.of the Emperor Charles II; they left issue:”.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN, son of [ODACRE [Audacer or Odoscer] & his wife ---] ([830/37]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer[39]). The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, dated to the second decade of the 12th century, names "Balduinum Ferreum" as son of "Audacer"[40]. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Balduinum Ferreum" as son of "Audacer"[41]. He is named as son of Audacer in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which records his year of death and place of burial[42]. His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult at the time of his marriage, which means that he must have been a child when his father died. He eloped with his future wife around Christmas 861. The Annales Blandinienses name "Baldwinum Ferreum filium Audacri" and "Balduvinus filius Audacri" when recording (respectively) his abduction of his wife in 862 and his death in 879[43]. He was granted the “pagus Flandrensis” in 863, and shortly after Ternois, Waas and the lay abbacy of St Peter of Gent[44], although the primary sources on which this is based have not yet been identified. He is known to history as BAUDOUIN I “der Gute/Ferreus/der Eisenarme” Count of Flanders, but it is improbable that he was referred to as such by contemporaries. An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "…ex comitibus aut Tedericus, aut Balduinus, sive Chuonradus, seu Adalelmus" as those willing to support the emperor's son[45]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 879 of "Balduvinus, filius Audacri", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinie"[46]. According to legend, he built the church of St Donatien ("Sint Donaatskapittel") at Bruges.
     "m (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) as her third husband, JUDITH, widow firstly of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex and secondly of ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks [Carolingian] & his first wife Ermentrudis [d'Orléans] ([844]-after [870]). She is named as wife of Baudouin in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which also names her parents and her three sons[47]. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf[48]. Asser records that "Iuthittam, Karoli Francorum regis filiam" married "Æthelbald filius eius [=Æthelwulfo rege]" after the death of her first husband, commenting that it was "cum magna ab omnibus audientibus infamia"[49]. Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith[50]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[51]. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that Judith married "Balduinus comes"[52]. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[53]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage in 862 of "Balduinus, Odacri filius" and "Iudith, Caroli regis filiam"[54]. The preceding information is pulled together by the Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ which names "Iudith vidua Adelbaldi regis Anglorum, filia Karoli Calvi regis Francorum" as the wife of "Balduinum Ferreum"[55]. No information has been found in the primary sources so far consulted which throws light on the possible date of death of Judith, although it is unlikely that she died before about 870 at the earliest, assuming that she was the mother of all the children who are named below. "
Med Lands cites:
[39] Saint-Bertin, p. 11. Also included in Annales Vedastini 879, MGH SS II, p. 197.
[40] Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, MGH SS IX, p. 305.
[41] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 1, MGH SS IX, p. 309.
[42] Saint-Bertin, p. 11. Also included in Annales Vedastini 879, MGH SS II, p. 197.
[43] Annales Blandinienses 862 and 879, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[44] Nicholas (1992), p. 17.
[45] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537.
[46] Annales Blandinienses 879, MGH SS V, p. 24.
[47] Saint-Bertin, p. 11.
[48] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1868) Chronica, Magistri Rogeri de Houedene (London) ("Roger of Hoveden") I, p. 37.
[49] Asserii Gestis Ælfredi MGH SS XIII, p. 121.
[50] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 37.
[51] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.
[52] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[53] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[54] Annales Elnonenses Minores 862, MGH SS V, p. 19.
[55] Lamberti Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ 1, MGH SS IX, p. 309.22


; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “Baudouin 1er (Baldwin) «Brasde Fer» de Flandres («der Gute», «Ferreus», «Eisenarme») ° ~830/37/40 + 879 (Abbaye de Saint-Bertin à Saint-Omer ou Arras ?) comte d’Harlebeek et 1er comte en Flandres (officiellement seulement comte royal et marquis des Flamands, investi par Charles «Le Chauve», 863-879, et relevant de la Couronne) puis comte du Pays de Waas, Gand
et du Ternois (dit «comte entre les rivières Scheldt et Leie», il aurait fondé l’église Sint-Donaaskapittel de Bruges et érigé les premiers châteaux de Bruges et de Gand ; séjourne ordinairement à Bruges)
     ép. 13/12/862 (Auxerre) Judith de Francie ° ~844 + après 870 (fille de l’Empereur Charles II, séduite vers Noël 861, et d’Ermentrude ; veuve de 1) Aethelwulf, Roi de Wessex + 13/01/858 et de 2) Aethelbald, Roi de Wessex + 20/12/860)”.21 GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

; This is the same person as ”Judith” at The Henry Project.


This is the same person as ”Judith of Flanders” at Wikipedia and as ”Judith de France” at Wikipédia (FR).6,24,25

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 12.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 189.
3. Kwartieren Greidanus-Jaeger in Stamreeksen 1994, 's-Gravenhage., Mr. G.J.J. van Wimersma Greidanus, Reference: 756.4


; Per Genealogics:
     “Judith, daughter of Emperor Charles 'the Bald' and Ermentrudis of Orléans, was about twelve when, on 1 October 856 at Verberie-sur-Oise, she was married to the sixty-one-year-old Aethelwulf, king of England. After his death on 13 January 858, she married his son Aethelbald, but this marriage was annulled. After her second husband died in 860 she returned to France, having sold the possessions which she had obtained in England, and returned to her father. She was kept in the city of Senlis with the honour due to a queen under the guardianship of her father until she could be properly married.
     “In 862, with the assistance of her brother Louis II, Judith eloped to Lorraine with Baudouin, about whom nothing is known definitively other than that his father was probably called Audacer or Odoacer. Charles did not accept his daughter's marriage and asked his bishops to excommunicate Baudouin and Judith. They responded by travelling to Rome to plead their case to Pope Nicholas I. When this was granted, Charles was forced to accept the marriage, and the couple returned to France and then officially married at Auxerre. Baudouin became one of Charles' most strong, secure and faithful supporters. Judith and Baudouin had two sons, of whom Baudouin II would have progeny.”.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH ([844]-after 870). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that she married "Balduinus comes"[250]. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[251]. Her first husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice in the kingdom of Wessex[252]. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[253]. Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[254]. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[255]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[256].
     "m firstly (Verberie-sur-Oise, near Senlis 1 Oct 856) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, son of ECGBERT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/800]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester).
     "m secondly (858) ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne).
     "m thirdly (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders, son of ODACRE [Audacer/Odoscer] Graf van Harlebeek & his wife --- ([837/840]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer)."
Med Lands cites:
[250] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[251] Annales Bertiniani II 856.
[252] Giles, J. A. (trans.) (2000) Asser, Annals of the Reign of Alfred the Great (Cambridge, Ontario, In parentheses Publications) Part I.
[253] Annales Bertiniani II 858.
[254] Asser, p. 8.
[255] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[256] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolingian 1): “C1. [1m.] Pss Judith, *843/844, +after 870; 1m: Verberie sur Oise 1.10.856 King Aethlwulf of Wessex (*ca 806 +17.6.857); 2m: 858 King Aethebald of Wessex (+20.12.860); 3m: 862 Ct Baldwin I of Flanders (*ca 837/840, +879)”.26
; Per Genealogy.EU: "Ethelwulf, King of Wessex (839-855)+(857-858), King of Essex, Sussex & Kent (839-58), *ca 795/810, +13.1.858, bur Winchester Cathedral;
     1m: ca 830 Osburga (+852/5), dau.of Oslac of Hampshire or the Isle of Wight;
     2m: Verberie-sur-Oise, France 1/15.10.856 Judith of Franks (*843/444, +after 870); all issue from 1m."27
; Per Med Lands:
     ""ÆTHELWULF, son of ECGBERHT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/810]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester Cathedral). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names Æthelwulf as son of Ecgberht[1486]. Kirby suggests[1487] that Æthelwulf could have been born as late as 810, although this would not be consistent with the supposed date of his father's marriage and is unlikely to be correct if Æthelstan (see below) was King Æthelwulf's son. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 825 "Egbert king of Wessex…sent his son Æthelwulf…and Wulfheard his ealdorman to Kent with a great force" where they expelled King Baldred[1488]. "Æthelwulfi regis filii mei" was co-grantor of land at Canterbury to "Ciaba clericus" with "Ægberhtus rex occidentalium Saxonum" by charter dated 836[1489]. "Æthelwulf rex Cancie" was co-grantor of land in Kent with "Egberthus rex occident Saxonum pater meus" by charters dated [833/39] and 838 respectively[1490]. Under-King of Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey 825-839. He succeeded his father in 839 as ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, crowned [later in 839] at Kingston-upon-Thames. Danish raids intensified during his reign. Great damage was done in Lindsey, East Anglia and Kent in 841, and Southampton was plundered in 842. Before 850, King Æthelwulf had settled the ancient dispute with Mercia about the lands to the west of the middle Thames by transferring Berkshire from Mercia to Wessex[1491]. He defeated a large Danish army south of the Thames at Aclea in 851 after it had stormed Canterbury and London and driven Burghred King of Mercia to flight[1492]. King Æthelwulf made a pilgrimage to Rome in 855, leaving the government in the hands of his son Æthelbald. At the request of Pope Benedict III, he made a public distribution of gold and silver to the clergy, leading men of Rome and the people[1493]. William of Malmesbury records that Æthelbald rebelled against his father during his absence and, after returning, King Æthelwulf abdicated part of his realm in Wessex in favour of his son to avoid civil war, continuing to rule in the other part of Wessex, Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex[1494]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Æthelwulf two years after returning from Rome and his burial at Winchester[1495].
     "[m] [firstly] ([815/20]) ---. There is no direct proof of this supposed first marriage. However, the likely birth date of King Æthelwulf's son Æthelstan suggests a substantial age difference with his brothers, indicating that he was probably not born from the same mother.
     "m [secondly] ([830/33]) OSBURGA, daughter of OSLAC Ealdorman of the Isle of Wight & his wife --- (-[852/55]). Asser names "Osburga…daughter of Oslac the famous butler of King Æthelwulf…a Goth by nation" as the mother of King Alfred, specifying that her father was descended from "the Goths and Jutes…namely of Stuf and Whitgar two brothers…who…received possession of the Isle of Wight from their uncle King Cerdic"[1496]. She is named as mother of King Alfred by Roger of Hoveden, who also names her father, specifying that he was "pincerna regis"[1497].
     "m [thirdly] ([Verberie-sur-Oise] 1 Oct 856) as her first husband, JUDITH of the Franks, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrudis [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870). The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[1498]. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf[1499]. Her husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice according to Asser, who also says that the subservient position previously given to the queen was adopted in Wessex after the reign of King Beorhtric because of the unpopular influence of his queen Eadburh of Mercia[1500]. Queen Judith married secondly ([858/59]) her stepson, Æthelbald King of Wessex. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[1501]. She eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanders, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[1502]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[1503].
     "[Mistress (1): ---. The uncertain nature of the precise relationship of King Æthelberht to the royal family is explained below, one of the possibilities being that he was an illegitimate son of King Æthelwulf by an unknown concubine.]
Medieval Lands cites:
[1486] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A, 855.
[1487] Kirby (2000), p. 166.
[1488] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 823 [825].
[1489] S 279.
[1490] S 323 and S 286.
[1491] Stenton (2001), p. 245.
[1492] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A and E 851. Asser, Book I. Stenton (2001), p. 245 says that the site of this battle is unknown, but that it is most unlikely to be Oakley in Surrey.
[1493] Liber Pontificalis, 106.34.
[1494] Malmesbury II, 113, p. 95.
[1495] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A and E, 855.
[1496] Asser, p. 3.
[1497] Roger of Hoveden I, pp. 35-6.
[1498] Annales Bertiniani II 856.
[1499] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 37.
[1500] Asser, Part I.
[1501] Annales Bertiniani II 858.
[1502] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[1503] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218."

For further information:
** See Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelwulf,_King_of_Wessex
** See The Henry Project: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/aethe001.htm.14


; Per Med Lands:
     "ÆTHELBALD ([835/40]-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne Abbey, Dorset). "Edelbaldus filius suus" fought with King Æthelwulf at Temesmuthe, London and in Kent in 851[1512]. He was appointed under-king in Wessex when his father left for Rome in 855. Asser records that "king Ethelbald and Ealstan bishop of…Sherborne, with Eanwulf earl of the district of Somerton are said to have made a conspiracy together that king Ethelwulf, on his return from Rome, should never again be received into his kingdom" and that "many ascribe [the plot] solely to the insolence of the king, because the king was pertinacious in this matter, and in many other perversities…as also was proved by the result of that which follows"[1513]. After his return, Æthelwulf abdicated part of his realm in favour of his son, who succeeded as ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, while his father continued to rule in the other part of Wessex and in Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex. Stenton says that Æthelwulf did this "to avoid a civil war" after learning that "his eldest son and some of the leading men of Wessex were resolved that he should not be received as king" after returning to England[1514]. Presumably he bases this on the report by Asser. The new conclusions referred to below regarding the possible illegitimacy of King Æthelwulf's son Æthelberht suggest another possible explanation. Æthelberht, most likely older than his half-brother Æthelbald, may have been the ring-leader of the plot. King Æthelwulf may have wished to control Æthelberht's ambitions by installing his oldest legitimate son as king during his own lifetime. Asser's report blaming Æthelbald may have been due to the chronicler's evident disapproval of the king's marrying his stepmother after his father's death (see below). In fact, this rather surprising marriage may also have been motivated by the need to reinforce Æthelbald's possibly weak power-base in the face of a continuing threat from his more powerful older half-brother Æthelberht. "Adelbaldus ex occidentalium Saxonem" granted land at Teffont, Wiltshire to "Osmund minister" by charter dated 860, subscribed by (in order) "Iudith regis filius [sic]" and "Osric dux"[1515]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 860 of King Æthelbald and his burial at Sherborne[1516].
     "m ([858/59], separated) as her second husband, his stepmother, JUDITH of the Franks, widow of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrudis [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870). Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[1517]. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[1518]. Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith[1519]. Roger of Wendover records the marriage and adds that Æthelbald repudiated his wife in penitence for the marriage[1520]. "Iudith regis filius [sic]" subscribed a charter of King Æthelbald dated 860[1521]. This presumably refers to Judith, Æthelbald's wife. Although it is not impossible that Queen Judith had a daughter by her first husband, her own date of birth indicates that it is unlikely that such a child could have been born before [858], in which case the daughter would probably not have been considered old enough to have subscribed a charter in 860. The "regis filius [=filia]" reference is nevertheless surprising (why not "regina"?), although one explanation is that it refers to her as daughter of the Frankish king rather than her relationship to the Wessex royal family. Another simpler explanation is that it was simply a copyist's error. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[1522]. Judith eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanders, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[1523]."
Medieval Lands cites:
[1512] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 32.
[1513] Asser, p. 5.
[1514] Stenton (2001), p. 245.
[1515] S 326.
[1516] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A and E, 860.
[1517] Asser, p. 8.
[1518] Annales Bertiniani II 858.
[1519] Roger of Hoveden I, p. 37.
[1520] Roger of Wendover, Vol. I, p. 295.
[1521] S 326.
[1522] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
[1523] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.28


; Per Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1): “C1. Ethelbald, King of Wessex (855-856)+(858-860), *ca 834, +20.12.860, bur Sherborne Abbey, Dorset; m.860 his father's widow Judith of Franks (*843/444, +after 870)”.29 The marriage of Judith (?) de France and Aethelbald (?) King of Wessex was annulled circa 859.16,3,4

Family 1

Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex b. c 795, d. 13 Jan 858

Family 2

Aethelbald (?) King of Wessex b. bt 831 - 832, d. 20 Dec 860

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 27. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 298, 316-317. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018644&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Judith: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#JudithM1AethelwulfM2AethelbaldM3Baudouin. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020041&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#CharlesIIleChauveB
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrudis of Orléans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020074&tree=LEO
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 October 2019), memorial page for Judith de France (Oct 844–Apr 870), Find A Grave Memorial no. 132281976, citing Abbaye Saint-Bertin, Saint-Omer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132281976/judith-de_france. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aethelwulf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020042&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelwulf,_King_of_Wessex. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy, p. 44.
  16. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 298, 317-318.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Cambrai.pdf, p. 2.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018643&tree=LEO
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_I,_Margrave_of_Flanders.
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIdied879B.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Flanders 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/flanders/flanders1.html
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Flanders
  25. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Judith de France: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_de_France. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolingian 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#JC2
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html#EW
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelbald,_King_of_Wessex.
  29. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page (The House of Cerdic): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  30. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf: p. 2.
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#BaudouinIIFlandersdied918.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Baudouin II 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00018645&tree=LEO
  33. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Baldwin II "the Bald" (Baudouin "le Chauve", Balduinus Calvus): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/baldw002.htm

Robert II "Curthose" (?) Duke of Normandy1

M, #4228, b. circa 1052, d. 10 February 1134
FatherWilliam I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England2,1,3,4,5 b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
MotherMathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England2,1,6,7,8,5 b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Robert II "Curthose" (?) Duke of Normandy married unknown (?)9 Robert II "Curthose" (?) Duke of Normandy and Margaret (?) were engaged.10 Robert II "Curthose" (?) Duke of Normandy was born circa 1052 at Normandy, France; Ashley says d. ca 1052; Genealogy.EU Normandy page says d. 1054.11,1 He married Sybilla/Sibyl/Sibille (?) de Conversano, daughter of Godfrey (?) Count of Conversano, in May 1100 at Apulia, Italy.12,1
Robert II "Curthose" (?) Duke of Normandy died on 10 February 1134 at Cardiff Castle, Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales.1,13
     ; Duke Robert III "Curthose" of Normandy, *1054, +Cardiff Castle 10.2.1134; m.Sybille de Conversano.1 He was Duke of Normandy between 1087 and 1106.14

Family 1

Margaret (?)

Family 2

unknown (?) b. c 1057
Children

Family 3

Child

Family 4

Sybilla/Sibyl/Sibille (?) de Conversano b. c 1079, d. 1103
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Flandre(s) Vlaanderen, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  9. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Hugues IV: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/hugh0004.htm
  11. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 732. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  12. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  13. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated), p. 35: "...died as his brother William's prisoner after his capture twenty-eight years before in the battle of Tinchebrai."
  14. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  15. [S1556] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 Jan 2004: "Bastards of Robert 'Curthose', Duke of Normandy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 Jan 2004."
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 6.

William II "Rufus" (?) King of England1,2

M, #4229, b. circa 1057, d. 2 August 1100
FatherWilliam I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England2,3,4,5 b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
MotherMathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England2,6,7,5 b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     William II "Rufus" (?) King of England was born circa 1057 at Normandy, France; Fraser says b. ca 1057; Genealogy.EU Normandy page says b. 1056.8,2
William II "Rufus" (?) King of England died on 2 August 1100 at New Forest, co. Hampshire, England.9,2
William II "Rufus" (?) King of England was buried after 2 August 1100 at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, City of Winchester, co. Hampshire, England.2


     ; WILLIAM II Rufus, King of England (1087-1100), *1056, +New Forest 2.8.1100, bur Winchester Cathedral.2 He was King of England, [Ashley, pp. 505-508] WILLIAM II RUFUS King of England, 9 September 1 087-2 August 1100; Crowned: Westminster, 26 September 1087. Born: Normandy, c1057. Died: New Forest, 2 August 1100, aged about 43. Buried: Winchester Cathedral. The third and favourite son of WILLIAM the Conqueror, William was bequeathed the kingdom of England although many believed he might also inherit the duchy of Normandy. The duchy, however, went to William's eldest brother Robert. The two were always in open hostility, and had been during their father's lifetime, with William remaining loyal to his father. The consequences were divisive because barons who held lands in both Normandy and England found it impossible to know whom to support without fear of losing their lands on one side or the other. Much of William's reign, therefore, was spent in rivalry with Robert. It looked initially as if Robert's star might prevail, as barons rose in support of him in an insurrection in 1088 led by his uncle Odo. However Robert failed to capitalise on this support and William was quick to quash the rebellion, devastating Odo's estates in Kent. The rivalry between William and Robert was eventually solved to some degree in 1091, after a brief attempt at a coup by their younger brother Henry, which united William and Robert. William now showed his negotiating skills by reaching an agreement between all three brothers to their mutual benefit, and William even brought Robert to England to join him in an expedition against the Scots (see MALCOLM III). The position, however, was not fully resolved until 1096 when Robert decided to join the First Crusade. He pledged the duchy to William in exchange for money to raise his army. William was never officially duke, serving instead as his brother's regent, but he was more successful than Robert and won back lands in France that Robert had lost.
In fact William was a king for whom much seemed to go right. One might almost think that God smiled on him, though such a belief would have horrified the clergy who regarded William with total disdain. Because the chronicles of the time were written by monks, the opinion has passed down in history of William as a vicious and avaricious man who was "hated by almost all his people and abhorrent to God." It is difficult to get an objective picture of a man who had strong and powerful enemies amongst his own barons as well as within his own family. Some have claimed he was homosexual, his court being described as like that of the Roman emperor Caligula, with men dressed effeminately, if dressed at all. It is true that he never married, though there were later unsubstantiated rumours that he had an illegitimate son. He was portrayed as having a fiery temper, his face often flushed red, hence his nickname Rufus. The red face may be more an indication of his drinking and eating habits. He was stout, and despite being a man of action may well have had heart problems.
Despite all this William was a good soldier, who took a liking to England and endeavoured to rule justly. He attempted to conquer lands in Wales, and initially made considerable advances against the Welsh prince GRUFFYDD AP CYNAN but was eventually repulsed in 1094. A second onslaught in 1098 regained ground, and several of the Welsh princes recognized William as their overlord. During this period William established a line of castles along the Welsh marches.
William also continued an uneasy relationship with the Scottish king, MALCOLM III. William had spurned the Saxon prince EDGAR the Atheling, who returned to Scotland and, in 1090, encouraged Malcolm to invade England again, primarily with the purpose of regaining Scottish lands in Lothian and Northumbria, and defending Cumbria. William soon rebuffed Malcolm and succeeded in renewing the Peace of Abernethy. In fact Malcolm was friendly toward William and eventually despatched Edgar as a nuisance. William did not necessarily return that friendship for, in 1092, he seized the lands around Carlisle, establishing a castle there, and when visited by Malcolm for a parley, refused to see him. As the infuriated Malcolm returned to Scotland he was attacked and killed by the Normans in Northumbria. Malcolm's brother DONALD BANE claimed the throne in a period of violent upheaval against the Normans. William Rufus, however supported first DUNCAN II and EDGAR, the sons of Malcolm III, in overthrowing Donald. Edgar, whose reign was more stable, acknowledged the help and support of the Normans and realized that thereafter he was subservient to them. William thus stamped his authority on an expanding Norman base with tentacles creeping into Wales and Scotland.
Where William really roused the wrath of the clergy was in his dealings with them. He did not seem respectful of the church, unlike his father. Although he was held in check initially by Archbishop Lanfranc, when Lanfranc died in 1089, William did not bother to appoint a successor and, instead, took advantage of the revenues himself. In the eyes of the church, William was stealing from God. They urged that William appoint Lanfranc's student and friend, Anselm, as archbishop but William refrained. It was not until William was taken ill in 1092 and believed he was dying that he gave in. As Anselm was in England at that time, William offered him the archbishopric. Anselm at first refused but, under pressure from the clergy, he accepted. This was only the start of the problems between him and William. At this time there was a schism in the papacy. Urban II was the pope installed in Rome and he was supported by Anselm, but there was a rival anti-pope in Ravenna, Clement III. William remained uncommitted. In 1095 he called a council to judge the matter. William finally agreed to support Urban, but only because he extracted acceptance from Urban that papal legates could not enter England without royal agreement. It was more an agreement of convenience than of loyalty. William in fact interpreted it as his freedom from the church. Although Anselm supported Urban, he refused to accept the way in which William had approached the issue, maintaining that church matters could not be judged in a secular court. William appealed to Urban, seeking for the pope to depose Anselm. A papal legate was despatched to England but no decision was made. In the end the relationship between Anselm and William became so impossible that Anselm went into self-imposed exile in 1097.
It was little wonder that the clergy so despised William, and they had good grounds, but they may have blackened his character a little too much. There have even been recent allegations that William was a devil-worshipper and practised the black arts, but there is no real evidence for this. What it boils down to is that William was a perfectly able and capable king who was successful in most of his campaigns, but whose temperament and affectations annoyed both the church and many of his barons.
This background consequently led to much speculation about William's death. He was hunting one summer's evening in the New Forest when he was killed by an arrow apparently shot at a fleeing deer. It was immediately claimed as an accident, the offending party being Walter Tirel. Tirel always proclaimed his innocence, stating that he was nowhere near the king when the arrow was fired, but Tirel was rapidly transported back to France. The conspiracist theory is that William was murdered, perhaps by order of one of the barons who supported his brother Robert. Duncan Grinnell-Milne, in his compelling piece of detective work The Killing of William Rufus (1968), was convinced that William's death was part of a master plan by his brother Henry to gain the throne. Certainly there were many relieved at the death of the king, and the verdict of accidental death was satisfactory to all (except Tirel who felt he was falsely accused), so no one investigated it further. William's body was hurriedly conveyed in a farm cart to Winchester Cathedral where it was peremptorily buried in the early hours of the next morning. Though there were official mourners, everyone seemed in much greater haste to return to Westminster. There is a strong feeling in reading about William's death and Henry's succession that William was a nuisance who was now out of the way and everyone could get back to the real purpose of government.
In retrospect William's reign is a minor episode in England's history, though had he lived he might have caused more problems in his relationship with the church. It remains a fact, though, that he was not only able to sustain his kingdom in England but that he reached workable relations with the kings and princes of Scotland and Wales as well as his brother in Normandy, which demonstrates an able administrator and king for all that he was opinionated, arrogant and ill tempered. England would have many rulers who were far worse than William. between 26 September 1087 and 2 August 1100.10,11,12

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix II: The Continental Dynasties 1066-1216. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda van Vlaanderen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000015&tree=LEO
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  8. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 19.
  9. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated), p. 29.
  10. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  11. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated), p. 27.
  12. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 505-508. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Adela/Adèle (?) de Normandie, Countess of Blois and Chartres1,2,3

F, #4230, b. between 1062 and 1067, d. 8 March 1138
FatherWilliam I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England2,4,3,5,6,7 b. 1028, d. 9 Sep 1087
MotherMathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England2,8,3,5,9,7 b. bt 1031 - 1032, d. 2 Nov 1083
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited19 Dec 2020
     Adela/Adèle (?) de Normandie, Countess of Blois and Chartres was born between 1062 and 1067 at Normandy, France; Med Lands says b. 1066/67; Genealogics says b. 1062/67; Weis [1992:145] says b. 1062; Racines et Histoire (Normandie & Blois-Champagne) both say b. 1062; Genealogy.EU (Normandy & Blois) both say b. 1062.10,1,8,5,11,12 She married Etienne (Stephen) Henri de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Sancerre, son of Thibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne and Gersende (?) de Maine, circa 1080 at Breteuil, Eure, France; Genealogics says m. 1081 in Chartres; Henry Project says m. 1080; Genealogics.EU (Normandy) says m. 1080; Genealogics.EU (Blois) says m. 1081; Racines et Histoire (Normandie) says m. 1080/81; Weis [1992:121] says m. ca 1080; Med Lands says "Betrothed Breteuil, Chartres 1081."13,14,15,8,3,5,4,11,16,17
Adela/Adèle (?) de Normandie, Countess of Blois and Chartres died on 8 March 1138 at Marcigny-sur-Loire, France.10,18,8,3,5
Adela/Adèle (?) de Normandie, Countess of Blois and Chartres was buried after 8 March 1138 at Église de la Trinité de Caen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1066
     DEATH     8 Mar 1138 (aged 71–72), Marcigny, Departement de Saône-et-Loire, Bourgogne, France
     Royalty. Born the daughter of William the Conquerer and Mathilda of Flanders. She married Stephen of Blois sometime between 1080 and 1084. She acted as regent while he was in the Holy Land during the first crusade. He returned after the siege of Antioch (1100) and she pursued him to complete his promise to see Jerusalem. So he returned in 1101 and was killed in the Battle of Ramla. She continued to act as regent for her minor children. She later retired to the Abbey of Marcigny where she died.
     Family Members
     Parents
          William the Conqueror 1028–1087
          Matilda of Flanders 1031–1083
     Spouse
          Stephen II de Blois 1045–1102
     Siblings
          Constance de Normandie de Bretagne unknown–1090
          Gundred, Countess of Surrey 1051–1085
          Robert de Normandie 1054–1135
          Richard de Normandie 1054–1081
          King William de Normandie 1056–1100
          Cecilia Of Holy Trinity Princess Of England 1056–1126
          Agatha de Normandie 1064–1080
          Henry I of England 1068–1135 (m. 1100)
     Children
          Lucia-Mahaut Of Blois unknown–1120
          William de Blois 1082–1150
          Thibaut II de Champagne 1090–1152
          King Stephen 1096–1154
     BURIAL     
Église de la Trinité de Caen
Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 14 Feb 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 48107633
     SPONSORED BY Shirley Henderson.19
     Reference:      Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . page 193.
     See also Weis [1992] 169-24.5,20

; Per Genealogics:
     "Adela of Normandy born between 1062 and 1067, daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda van Vlaanderen, was the mother of Stephen, king of England, whose right to the throne derived through her. She married about 1081 in Chartres, Stephen, count of Meaux en Brie. Upon the death of his father in 1090, her husband Stephen succeeded to the counties of Blois and Chartres. She took an active interest in civil and ecclesiastical affairs and was instrumental in rebuilding the cathedral of Chartres in stone.
     "In 1095 Adela became regent when her husband took part in the First Crusade. Stephen de Blois went together with Adela's brother Robert, duke of Normandy. In 1099 Stephen returned to France, but he was forced by Adela to return to the East to redeem his reputation. He was killed in the battle of Ramleh on 19 May 1102.
     "Adela continued as regent during the minority of her sons and was increasingly active in public life. Anselm, her guest and teacher in 1097, was often entertained by her during 1103 and 1105. She achieved a temporary reconciliation between him and her brother, King Henry I of England. In 1107 Adela entertained Pope Pascal during Easter and the following year she was hostess to Boemund of Antioch.
     "She made her son Thibaut her successor in 1109 and entered a convent in the diocese of Autun. Here she continued to wield an important influence in public and clerical affairs. She persuaded Thibaut to join her brother Henry I against France in 1117, and she was a benevolent patroness of churches and monasteries. She died in 1137 and was buried at Caen."5

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELA de Normandie (Normandy [1066/67]-Marigney-sur-Loire 8 Mar 1138, bur Abbey of Holy Trinity, Caen). Orderic Vitalis names “Adelizam et Constantiam, Ceciliam et Adalam” as the daughters of “Willermus Normanniæ dux” and his wife “Mathildem Balduini ducis Flandrensium filiam, neptem...ex sorore Henrici regis Francorum”[113]. In another passage, the same source names the daughters “Agatham et Constantiam, Adelizam, Adelam et Ceciliam”[114], and in a third place “Agathen ac Adelizam, Constantiam, Adalam et Ceciliam”[115]. She is named third in his list of the daughters of King William I by Matthew Paris[116], but this appears unlikely in view of Adela's child-bearing until her husband's death in 1102. Her birth date is estimated bearing in mind that marriage frequently took place in early adolescence at the time, and also because Adela clearly continued to bear children until her husband's death. Orderic Vitalis records the betrothal “apud Bretolium” of “Stephanus Blesensis palatinus comes” and “Guillelmo rege...Adelam eius filiam” and their marriage “apud Carnotum”, dated to 1081[117]. Orderic Vitalis records that she encouraged her husband to join the First Crusade and did not hide her shame when he deserted from Antioch in 1098[118]. Regent of Blois 1102-1107, after the death of her husband. She became a nun at the Cluniac priory of Marigney-sur-Loire in [1122]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Adela comitissa"[119], and in another manuscript the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Adela nobilis Blesensium comitissa regis Anglorum Willelmi filia"[120].
     "m (Betrothed Breteuil, Chartres 1081) ETIENNE [Henri] de Blois, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his [first/second wife Gersende de Maine/Gundrada ---] (-killed in battle Ramleh 19 May 1102). He succeeded his father in 1089 as ETIENNE Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Sancerre et de Meaux."
Med Lands cites:
[113] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92.
[114] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, V, p. 189.
[115] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, II, p. 159.
[116] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1086, p. 21.
[117] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XI, p. 393.
[118] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 325.
[119] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 8.
[120] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 56.16


; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Adèle d'Angleterre ou de Normandie ou de Blois (v. 10671,2 – 8 mars 11372), princesse anglaise, fut régente de la principauté de Blois-Chartres, et mère du roi Étienne d'Angleterre.
Biographie
Une femme de pouvoir

     "Elle est la fille de Guillaume le Conquérant († 1087), duc de Normandie et roi d'Angleterre, et de Mathilde de Flandre († 1083). Sa date de naissance a généralement été estimée à la période 1060-1062, mais un poème écrit pour elle lorsqu'elle était régente de Blois suggère que son père est déjà couronné lors de sa naissance. Il est donc assez probable qu'elle soit la plus jeune des filles du Conquérant et qu'elle soit née entre le début de la conquête normande de l'Angleterre et la naissance de son plus jeune frère Henri, le futur Henri Ier (fin 1068-début 1069)2.
     "Des sources tardives relatent que, encore enfant, elle est promise à Simon de Crépy, le comte d'Amiens et héritier présomptif des comtés de Valois et Mantes2. Mais en 1077, il embrasse la vie monastique.
     "Elle est finalement fiancée à Étienne Henri, comte de Blois, Châteaudun, Chartres et Meaux, et elle l'épouse entre 1080 et 1085 à Bourgueil2. Elle s'implique dans la gestion de la principauté de son mari, puisqu'on la retrouve régulièrement témoin des chartes de celui-ci2. Elle s'occupe aussi du patronage ecclésiastique du comté, et s'allie avec l'évêque Yves de Chartres pour faire régner la paix et l'ordre dans le comté2.
     "Ayant hérité de l'appétit et de l'habileté à régner de son père, elle persuade son faible mari de rejoindre la première croisade en 1096, afin de pouvoir régir elle-même ses comtés3. Étienne-Henri, responsable des fonds de la croisade, découragé par les rigueurs et les difficultés du siège d'Antioche, déserte de la ville assiégée en 1098, afin d'éviter une mort inéluctable3. Mais des croisés survivent, et réussissent à reprendre Jérusalem en 10993.
     "De retour à Blois, il est fraîchement accueilli par Adèle qui se dit offusquée d'être mariée à un lâche3. Après une campagne de harcèlement moral, elle le persuade de penser à sa réputation, et de retourner en Terre sainte3. Étienne-Henri repart en 1101, et trouve une mort digne l'année suivante à Ramla3.
     "Pendant ses absences, Adèle contrôle totalement la gestion de la principauté, et continue de la régir seule jusqu'en 1107, quand son fils Thibaut est adoubé chevalier2. Ils gèrent alors le comté ensemble jusqu'en 11202. Elle maintient son réseau de contacts politiques, notamment avec son frère Henri Ier d'Angleterre, à qui elle a confié deux de ses fils, Étienne, qui lui succédera sur le trône d'Angleterre, et Henri qui recevra le plus riche évêché d'Angleterre, Winchester3.
     "Elle semble très proche de son frère Henri2. Lorsque, en 1105, celui-ci est sur le point de se faire excommunier par le pape Pascal II à la suite de la querelle des investitures laïques, Adèle sert de conciliatrice et arrange une rencontre entre les deux hommes en Normandie qui se conclut par une trêve2. Anselme de Cantorbéry, dans une lettre adressée au pape, vante ses qualités de négociatrice et la décrit comme un ardent soutien du mouvement de réforme2.
     "En 1101, elle envoie cent chevaliers de ses comtés à l'ost du roi Louis VI, pour le siège de Montmorency, parce que ses fils Guillaume et Thibault sont trop jeunes pour conduire leurs troupes2. Elle utilise encore ses talents de conciliatrice dans le conflit qui oppose le roi de France et ses alliés à son frère Henri Ier d'Angleterre et son fils Théobald, en 1113 et encore en 11182.
     "Elle se retire au Prieuré de la Sainte-Trinité de Marcigny-lès-Nonnains entre 1120 et 1122, et elle y meurt en 1137, peut-être un 8 mars2. Une tradition tardive basée sur une erreur de personne veut qu'elle choisisse de se faire enterrer à Caen aux côtés de sa mère et de ses sœurs, sous l'inscription « Adèle, fille du roi », mais les preuves contemporaines placent sa tombe à Marcigny2.
Une femme de culture
     "Un bas-bleu fameux, c'était l'une des femmes les plus lettrées de son époque. Elle s'intéressait particulièrement aux sciences géographiques et astronomiques4. Elle comptait parmi ses amis deux intellectuels importants de son époque, le canoniste Yves de Chartres, et Anselme de Cantorbéry. Son goût pour la littérature, la poésie et les sciences indique qu'elle a reçu une éducation très soignée, probablement dans un environnement monastique ou par des précepteurs2. Elle semble aussi très impliquée dans la vie ecclésiastique. Notamment, le pape Pascal II fait un long séjour dans ses domaines lors de sa tournée en France de 11072. Elle correspond aussi avec l'évêque Hildebert du Mans et Baudri de Bourgueil qui devient, peut-être grâce à son soutien, évêque de Dol2.
     "L'un de ses admirateurs, le poète Baudri de Bourgueil, composa un poème décrivant sa chambre5 : il y a plusieurs tentures, l'une représente la Genèse jusqu'au déluge, une autre représente des scènes allant de l'Arche de Noé jusqu'à la construction du Temple par Salomon, une troisième des scènes de la mythologie grecque6. Une autre semble être une version plus réduite de la Tapisserie de Bayeux7. Le plafond est peint d'étoiles, de planètes et de signes du zodiaque, et le sol une mappemonde6.
Famille et descendance
     "Entre 1080 et 1085 à Bourgueil, elle épouse Étienne Henri, comte de Blois, Châteaudun et de Chartres et Meaux. Ensemble ils ont pour descendance connue2.
** Guillaume (avant 1092-v. 1150), déshérité2 pour des problèmes mentaux. Il épouse cependant l'héritière de la seigneurie de Sully et a des descendants2?;
** Thibaud IV le Grand (avant 1092-1152), comte de Blois, de Châteaudun, de Chartres et de Champagne?;
** Eudes, mort jeune2.
** Mathilde († 1120), mariée en 1115 à Richard d'Avranches, 2e comte de Chester?;
** Étienne (v. 10928-1154), comte de Mortain, puis roi d'Angleterre en 1135?;
** Henri (v. 10969-1171), abbé de Glastonbury puis évêque de Winchester.

     "Enfants possibles dont la filiation n'est pas prouvée10 :
** Agnès11, épouse d'Hugues III, seigneur du Puiset?;
** Lithuaise ou Adélaïde, mariée en 1112 (et séparée en 1113) à Milon de Bray, seigneur de Montlhéry?;
** Éléonore, mariée en 1120 à Raoul de Vermandois et répudiée en 1142?;
** Alix épouse de Renard III, comte de Joigny.

Voir aussi
Notes et références
1. Matthew Paris, chroniqueur anglais du xiiie siècle la désigne comme la troisième fille du Conquérant, mais en prenant en compte le fait qu'elle est enceinte au décès de son mari en 1102. Il est donc probable qu'au moment de son mariage, en 1080, elle avait à peine l'âge légal de 14 ans.
2. Lois L. Huneycutt, « Adela, countess of Blois (c.1067–1137) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
3. Christopher Tyerman, « Adela of Blois », dans Who's Who in Early Medieval England, 1066-1272, Éd. Shepheard-Walwyn, 1996, p. 67-68.
4. Régine Pernoud, La femme au temps des croisades, Paris, Livre de Poche, 1990, 404 p. (ISBN 2-253-06152-2), p. 39.
5. Au Moyen Âge, la chambre d'une comtesse est en fait une pièce d'apparat, celle où elle vit et reçoit.
6. Régine Pernoud, ibid., p. 40.
7. Andrew Bridgeford (trad. Béatrice Vierne), 1066, l’histoire secrète de la tapisserie de Bayeux, Éditiond du Rocher, coll. « Anatolia », 2004 (réimpr. 2005) [détail des éditions] (ISBN 2-268-05528-0), p. 386
8. Edmund King, « Stephen (c.1092–1154) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Oct 2006.
9. Edmund King, « Blois, Henry de (c.1096–1171) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
10. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, voir section sources.
10. sa filiation est cependant incertaine
Bibliographie
** Notices d'autorité : Fichier d’autorité international virtuelInternational Standard Name IdentifierSystème universitaire de documentationBibliothèque du CongrèsGemeinsame NormdateiBibliothèque royale des Pays-BasBibliothèque nationale tchèqueWorldCat
** Kimberly A. LoPrete, « The Anglo-Norman Card of Adela of Blois », Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, vol. 22, no 4 (hiver 1990), p. 569-589
Sources
** « Adela of Blois », Christopher Tyerman, Who's Who in Early Medieval England, 1066-1272, Shepheard-Walwyn, 1996 (ISBN 0856831328), p. 67-68.
** Lois L. Huneycutt, « Adela, countess of Blois (c.1067–1137) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
** (en) Charles Cawley, « Central France » [archive], sur Medieval Lands, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2016.21


"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adela of Normandy, of Blois, or of England (c. 1067 – 8 March 1137),[1] also known as Saint Adela in Roman Catholicism,[2] was a daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders who later became the Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux by marriage to Stephen II, Count of Blois. Her husband greatly benefited from the increased social status and prestige that came with such a marriage. She brought with her not only her bloodline, but a wedding gift of money and other movable goods from the prodigious store of Anglo-Norman wealth. She was regent of Blois during the absence of her spouse in 1096–1100 and 1101–02, and during the minority of her son from 1102 until 1120.[3]
     "Adela was the mother of Stephen, King of England and Henry of Blois, Bishop of Winchester. The couple had ten children, though it is not certain if all were Adela's biological children. It is only certain that she had five sons and might have had three or more daughters.[4]
Early life
     "Adela was born, it is generally believed, after her father's accession to the English throne, between 1066 and 1070.[1] Her royal blood marked her as noble in the eyes of her peers. She was the favorite sister of King Henry I of England, and they were probably the youngest of the Conqueror's children.[5] Adela was a high-spirited and educated woman, with a knowledge of Latin.[6] She had three older brothers and one younger, and thus she would not inherit her father's honors, but her bloodline would be a valuable asset to any suitor.[7]
     "Adela married Stephen Henry, son and heir to the count of Blois, between 1080 and 1083, around her fifteenth birthday.[8] Stephen was nearly twenty years her senior.[1] Stephen inherited Blois, Chartres and Meaux upon his father's death in 1089, as well as lands and right in parts of Berry and Burgundy.[8] The Thibaudian dynasty had other possessions east of Paris, and by the end of Adela's life these were coalescing into the county of Champagne. While Theobald IV takes most of the credit for the emergence of that principality, Adela helped lay its foundations.[9] Adela and her husband had a relationship based on trust and mutual respect, if not affection, and she made decisions along with Stephen.[10] She swore, for instance, to bind herself and her husband to protect the bishop of Chartres, then in a dispute with the king of France.[11]
First regency
     "Stephen-Henry joined the First Crusade in 1096, along with his brother-in-law Robert Curthose. Stephen's letters to Adela form a uniquely intimate insight into the experiences of the Crusade's leaders[12] and show that he trusted Adela to rule as regent while he was on crusade.[8]
     "Adela filled in as regent for her husband's duties during his extended absence as a leader of the First Crusade (1095–1098)[8] as well as during his second expedition in 1101. This included granting monks the right to build new churches, as well as other charters. Adela also worked with Ivo of Chartres at various points, exchanging letters throughout her regency,[13] to discuss matters such as the control of misbehaving nuns and larger issues such as disputes about sworn oaths.[8] While her husband was away, Adela would continue to tour their lands, settling disputes, promoting economic growth, and even commanding knights to go to battle with the king.[8] This however was not unique, as during the crusades it was common for noble women to take upon themselves the duties of their male counterparts.[14]
     "The Count of Blois returned to France in 1100 bringing with him several cartloads of maps, jewels and other treasures, which he deposited at Chartres. When he abandoned the First Crusade returning to France in ignominy, Adela constantly berated him, even during their love-making, urging him to return to the Holy Land.[15] He was under an obligation to the pope for agreements made years earlier and returned to Antioch to participate in the crusade of 1101. He was ultimately killed in an ill-advised charge at the Battle of Ramla in 1102.[16] The image of Adela persuading her ease-loving husband to redeem his reputation through action has proved popular with historians attempting to account for the crusader motivations.[17]
Second regency
     "Adela continued to act as regent after her husband's death and through her son Thibaud's early rule until her retirement in 1120.[8] Even after Thibaud came of age and no longer needed a regent, Adela continued to issue charters and act as co-ruler of many parts of their land. Adela did not secure a marriage alliance for Thibaud, who did not get married until after Adela's retirement, which helped to maintain her power and influence over both her son and her lands.[18]
     "Adela, a devout Benedictine sympathizer, employed several high-ranking tutors to educate her children.[19] Her youngest son, Henry, was conceived during the single year Stephen was in France between crusading duties. At two years of age Henry was pledged to the Church at Cluny Abbey, Saône-et-Loire, France, as an oblate child, that is, he was dedicated to the service of God, according to medieval practice. Henry went on to be appointed Abbot of Glastonbury and Bishop of Winchester. In that capacity, he sponsored hundreds of constructions including bridges, canals, palaces, forts, castles, and whole villages. In addition, Bishop Henry built dozens of abbeys and chapels and sponsored books including the treasured Winchester Bible.
     "In 1105, after St Anselm visited her during a sickness, she was responsible for communicating the archbishop's earnestness in threatening excommunication to her brother Henry I. Orderic Vitalis praises her as a "wise and spirited woman" who ably governed her husband's estates and her own.[8] Adela's power and interests are reflected in letters collected, they demonstrate her religiosity and intellect. In one such letter to the public from 1104, Adela gifts a monastery a portion of land with all the wildlife inhabiting it, but she reserves the power to pass judgment upon crimes committed in the area. She also makes sure to mark her place as a woman, tying herself to not only her late husband but her sons.[20]
     "Adela quarrelled with her eldest son William and despite his previously being named heir-designate,[21] she appointed his younger brother Theobald to replace him as heir in 1107. Her son Stephen moved to London in 1111 to join his uncle's court and became the favorite of his uncle King Henry I (Beauclerc). Upon Beauclerc's death in Normandy (1135), Stephen of Blois seized the English throne. He seized the English crown from the Empress Matilda, King Henry I's daughter whom the monarch had named as his successor. This started a protracted civil war in England that lasted nearly twenty years.[22]
Retirement
     "Adela retired to Marcigny Convent in 1120. Though she may have considered retiring to an abbey in Normandy, where members of her family, including sisters and nieces, may have already been living; Adela was drawn to and chose the larger, more prestigious convent at Marcigny near her son Henry at Cluny Abbey.[23] Adela may have acted as prioress within the community at Marcigny, though this is not certain.[24] She continued to interact with her children and the ecclesiastical leaders of lands that she had once ruled, communicating with them and maintaining her influence over the area.[25] In one instance, Adela sent letters to both her son Thibaud [26] and Geoffrey, bishop of Chartres reminding them of her settlement of a monastic case.[27] In these letters she reminds her son how his father and herself felt about alms gifting to monasteries.[28]
     "Later that same year, her daughter Lucia-Mahaut, was drowned in the wreck of the White Ship alongside her husband. Adela lived long enough to see her son Stephen on the English throne, though any response she had to this development has been lost.[29] She likely took pride in the ascension of her youngest child, Henry of Blois, to the bishopric of Winchester in 1129.[5] She died in 1137 at Marcigny.[30] After her death, prayers were offered at a number of churches that she had endowed personally or had recognized at some point during her life.[31] With her money and influence, and later entry into the convent, Adela became a saint within the Catholic Church.[32]
Issue
     "Adela and Stephen's children are listed here in probable birth order. Their birth order is uncertain.
1. William, Count of Sully married Agnes of Sully (d. aft 1104) and had issue
2. Theobald II, aka Thibaud IV Count of Champagne
3. Odo of Blois, aka Humbert. died young
4. Adela, married Milo II of Montlhéry (divorced 1115)
5. King Stephen of England, married Matilda of Boulogne
6. Lucia-Mahaut, married Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester. Both drowned on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster.
7. Agnes, married Hugh de Puiset and were parents to Hugh de Puiset, Bishop of Durham
8. Alix, (d. 1145) married Renaud II of Joigny (d.1134) and had issue
9. Henry, Bishop of Winchester (1096–1171), an oblate child raised at Cluny Abbey in Saône-et-Loire, France[33]
10. Eleanor, (d. 1147) married Raoul I of Vermandois (d.1152) and had issue, they were divorced in 1142

     "Some of the daughters may have been step-daughters of Adela, rather than biological children. It is known that Adela had five biological sons and may have had three or more daughters,[1] though not all of the daughters were necessarily Adela's biological children.[34] The daughters are not mentioned by name during their youth, only appearing when they reached marriageable age and played an important part in building alliances.[8]
Legacy
     "Adela is a saint in the Roman Catholic church. Her feast day is 24 February.[2]
In fiction
     "Adela was portrayed by Nike Arrighi in the two-part BBC TV play Conquest (1966), about her father's conquest of England, part of the series Theatre 625.
In art
     "Adela is a featured figure on Judy Chicago's installation piece The Dinner Party, being represented as one of the 999 names on the Heritage Floor.[35][36]
References
1. LoPrete, Kimberly. "Adela of Blois." Women and Gender in Medieval Europe: An Encyclopedia. Ed. Margaret Schaus. New York: Routledge, 2006. 6–7.
2. Catholic Online. "St. Adela".
3. Loprete, Kimberly A. (1990). "The Anglo-Norman Card of Adela of Blois". Albion. 22 (4): 569–589. doi:10.2307/4051390. JSTOR 4051390.
4. Daniel. "Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy (c.1050–1134), by William M. Aird Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137), by Kimberley LoPrete | The English Historical Review | Oxford Academic." OUP Academic. 1 December 2011. Accessed 26 April 2018.
5. LoPrete, Kimberly A. (1990). "The Anglo-Norman Card of Adela of Blois". Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies. 22 (4): 569–589. doi:10.2307/4051390. JSTOR 4051390.
6. LoPrete, Kimberly A. "Adela of Blois as Mother and Countess." Medieval Mothering. Ed. John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler. New York: Garland Pub., 1999. 315–316.
7. Evergates, Theodore, and Kimberly A. LoPrete. "Adela of Blois: Familial Alliances and Female Leadership." Aristocratic Women in Medieval France, 1999, 8–43. Accessed 19 March 2018. Muse.
8. LoPrete, Kimberly A. "Adela of Blois: Familial Alliances and Female Lordship." Aristocratic Women in Medieval France. Ed. Theodore Evergates. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1999. 15.
9. Daniel. “Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy (C.1050–1134), by William M. Aird Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (C.1067–1137), by Kimberley LoPrete | The English Historical Review | Oxford Academic." OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 December 2011, academic.oup.com/ehr/article/CXXVI/523/1498/673178. Copy & paste citation
10. Evergates, Theodore, and Kimberly A. LoPrete. "Adela of Blois: Familial Alliances and Female Leadership." Aristocratic Women in Medieval France, 1999, 8–43. Accessed 19 March 2018.
11. Evergates, Theodore, and Kimberly A. LoPrete. "Adela of Blois: Familial Alliances and Female Leadership." Aristocratic Women in Medieval France, 1999, 8–43. Accessed 19 March 2018.
12. "A letter from Count Stephen of Blois (03/1098)".
13. "Adela, countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux".
14. Natasha Hodgson (2011) Nobility, women and historical narratives of the crusades and the Latin east, Al-Mas?q, 17:1, 61–85, DOI: 10.1080/0950311042000328589
15. Daniel. “Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy (C.1050–1134), by William M. Aird Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (C.1067–1137), by Kimberley LoPrete | The English Historical Review | Oxford Academic." OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 December 2011, academic.oup.com/ehr/article/CXXVI/523/1498/673178. Copy & paste citation
16. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 115.
17. Daniel. “Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy (C.1050–1134), by William M. Aird Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (C.1067–1137), by Kimberley LoPrete | The English Historical Review | Oxford Academic." OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 December 2011, academic.oup.com/ehr/article/CXXVI/523/1498/673178.
18. LoPrete, Kimberly A. "Adela of Blois as Mother and Countess." Medieval Mothering. Ed. John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler. New York: Garland Pub., 1999. 322.
19. LoPrete, Kimberly A. "Adela of Blois as Mother and Countess." Medieval Mothering. Ed. John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler. New York: Garland Pub., 1999. 318-19.
20. "A Letter from Adela." A Letter from Adela | Epistolae. Accessed 26 April 2018. https://epistolae.ctl.columbia.edu/letter/25996.html.
21. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 111.
22. Reporter, Laura McCallenChief. “Who Was Adela of Normandy?” Royal Central, 6 October 2016, royalcentral.co.uk/blogs/who-was-adela-of-normandy-69264.
23. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 408–411
24. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 412.
25. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 412–418.
26. Women's Biography: Adela, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux
27. "A letter from Adela, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux (1133–37)".
28. A Letter from Adela, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux (1133–37)." A Letter from Adela, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux (1133–37) | Epistolae. Accessed 26 April 2018. https://epistolae.ctl.columbia.edu/letter/77.html.
29. LoPrete, Kimberly A. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts, 2007. 416.
30. "Adela, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux". Epistolae. Columbia University. Retrieved 27 September 2016.
31. LoPrete, Kimberly, Adela of Blois. Four Courts Press, Dublin. 417–418.
32. Patron Saint Stories, Stories of Patron Saints for Baptismal Names. Accessed 24 April 2018. https://www.patronsaintstories.com/adela.
33. Senette, Douglas John. "A Cluniac Prelate: Henry of Blois, Bishop of Winchester (1129–1171)". Tulane University Digital Library. Retrieved 27 September 2016.
34. LoPrete, Kimberly A. "Adela of Blois as Mother and Countess." Medieval Mothering. Ed. John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler. New York: Garland Pub., 1999. 323-24
35. "Adela of Blois". Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Heritage Floor: Adela of Blois. Brooklyn Museum. 2007. Retrieved 15 December 2011.
36. Chicago, 121.
37. Carpenter, David (2004). The Struggle for Mastery: The Penguin History of Britain 1066–1284. New York: Penguin. pp. 531–532. ISBN 0-14-014824-8.
38. Green, Judith (2009). Henry I: King of England and Duke of Normandy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 322. ISBN 978-0-521-74452-2.
Further reading
** Chicago, Judy. The Dinner Party: From Creation to Preservation. London: Merrell (2007). ISBN 1-85894-370-1
** Evergates, Theodore, ed. Aristocratic Women in Medieval FrancePhiladelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press (1999). ISBN 0-8122-3503-7
** LoPrete, Kimberly. Adela of Blois: Countess and Lord (c.1067–1137). Dublin: Four Courts Press (2007). ISBN 1-85182-563-0
** LoPrete, Kimberly. "Adela of Blois and Ivo of Chartres: Piety, Politics and Peace in the Diocese of Chartres'." Anglo-Norman Studies xiv (1992): 131–152
** Parsons, John and Bonnie Wheeler. Medieval Mothering (New Middle Ages). New York: Routledge (1999). ISBN 0-8153-3665-9
** Schaus, Margaret, ed. Women and Gender in Medieval Europe: An Encyclopedia. New York: Routledge (2006). ISBN 0-415-96944-1
External links
** Media related to Adela of Normandy at Wikimedia Commons
** RoyaList Online interactive family tree (en): https://web.archive.org/web/20110718093813/http://www.royalist.info/execute/tree?person=131
** Women's Biography: Adela, countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux.22 "

; Per History The Insteresting Bits: "Adela of Normandy – Daughter of the Conqueror
20/11/2015 by Sharon Bennett Connolly
Adela, Adela of Normandy, Countess of Blois and Chartres
     "Adela of Normandy was the daughter of William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy and King of England, and his wife, Matilda of Flanders.
     Although most sources give her date of birth around 1061/2, the Oxford Database of National Biography argues that her birth was after the Norman Conquest, as contemporary poetry suggests she was born the daughter of a king.
     Adela was one of 9 or 10 children born to William and Matilda, with at least 4 sisters and 4 brothers. Given her high level of literacy, and her patronage of poets in adulthood, it is likely that Adela was very well-educated as a child; either through tutors or possibly through residence in a convent, as happened with many daughters of the nobility at that time.
     As a child, it seems, a marriage was arranged between Adela and Simon Crispin, count of Amiens; however, the groom chose to take monastic vows. As part of an alliance directed against the aggressive counts of Anjou, Adela was then betrothed to Stephen of Blois, son of Count Theobald III, count of Blois and Champagne. Stephen was about 20 years her senior. The formal betrothal took place at Bourgueil and was later followed by a lavish wedding ceremony in Chartres Cathedral in about 1081.
StepanBlois_1089. Stephen, Count of Blois and Chartres
     Adela and Stephen would have about 11 children in all, with at least 2 sons born before Stephen succeeded his father as Count of Blois and Champagne in 1090.
     Of their 5 daughters, Matilda married Richard d’Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester. The couple drowned in the White Ship disaster which deprived Henry I of his son and heir, William. Another daughter, Eleanor, married Raoul, Count of Vermandois and brother of Isabelle de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester and Surrey.
     Adela’s eldest surviving son seems to have been disinherited at an early age. However, while he is described as an ‘idiot’ by some, William married Agnes, the daughter of Giles, Lord of Sulli, and was given the titles Count of Chartres and Lord of Sulli, but was not allowed to inherit the richer county of Blois; which went to his younger brother, Theobald.
     Poetry from the time of her wedding describes Adela as valorous, learned and generous. Indeed, she seems to have been a great asset to her husband, who included her in charitable donations and even in his early judicial rulings. Adela developed a cordial relationship with Bishop Ivo of Chartres, which worked well to maintain the peace between the laity and the clergy in the county.
     In 1095 Stephen of Blois joined the First Crusade, leaving Adela as head of the family and regent of his domains. Letters that the count sent to his wife indicate a great level of affection and trust; Adela was given charge of the family’s finances. However, Stephen’s return from crusade appears of have been less than happy. Adela believed that he had not fulfilled his crusader’s vow and her criticism may have been a contributing factor in his return to the Holy Land in 1101 – she certainly approved of it.
Theobald, Theobald IV, Count of Blois and Champagne
     Stephen was killed in combat in the Holy Land, during the siege of Ramallah in May 1112. He was succeeded as Count of Blois by his 2nd surviving son, Theobald. Theobald was knighted in 1107, by which point his older brother, William, had already been removed from the succession to Blois. William inherited the lesser title of Count of Chartres.
     Following Stephen’s death Adela continued to act as regent until Theobald attained his majority. Even after Theobald came of age, mother and son ruled jointly until Adela retired from public life in 1120.
     Adela was particularly close to her younger brother, Henry, who would later become King Henry I of England. She even supported him against their oldest brother, Robert, when Henry claimed the English crown.
     An able administrator and negotiator, Adela settled many disputes among monasteries, and even between monasteries and laymen, in her own domains and beyond. Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury during the reign of William II and Henry I, praised her skills as negotiator and peacemaker following her success at achieving a temporary truce between Anselm and her brother in 1105.
HenryBlois, Henry of Blois, Bishop of Winchester
     Anselm described her as an ardent supporter of papal reform, and enjoyed her hospitality during his exile from England. Adela hosted many other church dignitaries, including archbishop Thurstan of York and Pope Paschal II. Her family’s prestige and power was bolstered by her friendships with the leading ecclesiastic figures in both France and England.
     An avid patroness of the arts, Adela corresponded with such dignitaries as Hildebert, bishop of Le Mans and Abbot Baudri of Bourgeuil – later bishop of Dol – who both wrote poems dedicated to the countess. The book Ecclesiastical History Together with the Deeds of the Romans and the Franks, written by Hugh of Fleury, was dedicated to Adela.
     One of Adela’s youngest sons, Henry of Winchester, was dedicated to the church at an early age, and was raised at the Priory of Cluny in France. He was nominated as Bishop of Winchester in 1129 and was a great support to his older brother, Stephen, when he claimed the throne of England on his uncle Henry’s death in 1135, at the expense of Henry’s daughter, Matilda
     An active ruler Adela regularly toured the family’s domains, both as regent and mother of the reigning count. She also maintained links with the Anglo-Norman and Capetian kings . In 1101 Adela sent knights to help Philip I of France’s son, Louis, battling against rebels north of Paris.
Stepan_Blois, King Stephen
     However, by 1107 her son Theobald had joined the revolt and relations with France were to deteriorate further in 1113 when the allied forces of Theobald, Henry I and Adela defeated a Capetian-Angevin army. After further conflict in 1118 Adela used her wealth and diplomatic skills to benefit her family.
     In 1120 Adela stopped using the title of countess and retired to the Clunaic Priory of Marcigny; the same year that her daughter Matilda died in the White Ship disaster off Barfleur in Normandy. She continued to be active in political affairs and lived to see her son, Stephen, claim the throne of England, though not the 20 years of conflict that ensued.
     Aged almost 70, and having been a widow for half of her life, this most remarkable woman, Adela of Normandy, former Countess of Blois and Chartres, died in 1137, possibly on 8th March. Although later tradition has her buried with her mother at Holy Trinity in Caen, contemporary sources say she was buried at Marcigny.23 GAV-25 EDV-25.

;      Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): "Adela, *1062, +Marcigny-sur-Loire 3.3.1137; m.1080 Cte Etienne III de Blois (*1046 +V.1102)"
     Per Genealogy.EU (Blois): " [2m.] Cte Etienne de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Sancerre et de Meaux, *1046, +k.a.Ramleh V.1102, bur there; m.1081 Adela of England (*1062 +Marseilles 8.3.1135/37/38.)8,24"

; Per Racines et Histoire:
Normandie: "Adèle ° 1062 + 03/03/1137 (Marcignysur-Loire)
     ép. 1080/81 comte Etienne Henri de Blois ° 1046 +X 05/1102 (Ramlah) comte de Blois et Chartres"
Blois-Chartres: "2) Etienne-Henri de Blois ° 1046/47 +X 19/05/1102 (Ramlah, Palestine, peut-être décapité par les Turcs après capture) comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Saint-Florentin, seigneur de Sancerre (1089), croisé (09/1096 avec Robert II, comte de Flandres, puis Robert «Courteheuse», duc de Normandie, s’enfuit honteusement lors du siège d’Antioche en 1098 ; croisé à nouveau printemps 1101, prend Ankara aux Turcs le 23/01/1101)
     ép. 1080 (Breteuil) & confirmé en 1081 (Chartres) ou entre 01 et 11/1083 ? Adèle d’Angleterre (alias de Normandie), Régente de Blois (1102-1107) ° 1062 ou 1067/68 ? (Normandie) + 08/03/1138 (Marcigny-sur-Loire, religieuse puis Prieure Clunisienne dès 1122) (fille de Guillaume II, duc de Normandie (William 1er, Roi d’Angleterre), et de Mathilde de Flandres.)11,12"

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 183, NORMANDY 7:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page ("Normandy family"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#MR1
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012366&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William I 'the Conqueror': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000002&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#WilliamIdied1087. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Matilda (Mathilde) of Flanders: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/matil000.htm
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 169-24, p. 145. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 137-23, p. 121.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012365&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Adeladied1138.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EtienneIdied1102B
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 183, NORMANDY 7.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 April 2020), memorial page for Adele of Normandy (1066–8 Mar 1138), Find a Grave Memorial no. 48107633, citing Église de la Trinité de Caen, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/48107633/adele-of_normandy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Line 169-24.
  21. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Adèle de Blois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A8le_de_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adela_of_Normandy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S3341] History The Interesting Bits, online http://historytheinterestingbits.com/, http://historytheinterestingbits.com/2015/11/20/adela-of-normandy-daughter-of-the-conqueror/. Hereinafter cited as History The Interesting Bits.
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 5.
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EleonoreBloisdiedafter1148
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199412&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046835&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda|Maud de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036500&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#MahautBloisdied1120
  31. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 137-25, p. 121.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut IV-II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020141&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIVdied1152B
  34. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Stephendied1154B.
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lithuaise de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046841&tree=LEO
  37. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#LithuaiseBloisM1112MilonMontlheryTroyes
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046839&tree=LEO
  39. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#AliceMRenaudIIIJoigny