Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow1,2,3

F, #10651, d. after 1126
FatherWaltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland4,2,5,6,3,7 b. c 1035, d. 31 May 1076
MotherJudith (?) of Lens2,8,5,3,7 b. 1054, d. a 1086
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow married Raoul/Ralph IV de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead, co. Hertford, son of Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead and Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi, in 1103 at Hertfordshire, England.9,10,4,2,11,12,13,3,7
Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow died after 1126.2,3
     Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow and Raoul/Ralph IV de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead, co. Hertford
Per Racines et Histoire: "Raoul IV «Le Jeune» de Tosny (Ralph III «The Younger») ° ~1079 + ~1126 seigneur de Tosny (~1102), Conches et Flamstead, X 28/09/1106 (Tinchebray), conseiller du duc (Rouen, 1120), bienfaiteur des Abbayes du Bec et de Conches
     ép.1103 Alice (Adeliza alias Judith) de Huntingdon, dame de Walthamstow (Essex) ° ~1085 + après 1126 (fille de Waltheof, earl of Northampton, Northumberland and Huntingdon, et de Judith de Lens ; veuve, fait don de l’église de Walthamstow à la Holy Trinity de Londres.)14"

Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow
Per Med Lands:
     "ADELISA of Huntingdon ([1073/76]-after [1126]). Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage and names her two sons and indicates she had "several daughters" without naming them[679]. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Alice younger daughter of Judith and "Rodolph de Tournay", her dowry being "the lordship of Wilchamstowe"[680]. She inherited Walthamstow, Essex[681]. “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiæ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “Hugonis de Toeni filii mei qui ibidem jacet sepultus…Radulphi de Toeni mariti mei…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiæ meæ Isabellæ", by undated charter[682].
     "m (1103) RAOUL de Tosny Seigneur de Tosny et de Conques, son of RAOUL [II] de Tosny & his wife Isabelle de Montfort (-[1126], bur Conques Saint-Pierre). "
Med Lands cites:
[679] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 55.
[680] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[681] CP XII/1 762.
[682] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Christ Church, Aldgate, London, VI, p. 152.7


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:705.
2. Genealogiske Tabeller over der Oldenburgske Huus, Kopenhagen, 1766, Birch, H. J. 95.3

GAV-24 EDV-24.

Reference: Weis [1992:95] Line 98A-24.9
She was living in 1126.9

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 113, HUNTINGDON 2:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice of Northumberland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177603&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Waltheofdied1076. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waltheof: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108320&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#AdelisaHuntingdondiedafter1126
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Lens: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108321&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 98A-24, p. 95. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6.
  11. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Raoul de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102180. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul IV de Conches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177602&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RaoulIIITosnydied1126
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille & seigneurs de Tosny, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Tosny.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Poyntz of Tylston Lodge Family Page.
  16. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Margaret de Tosny: http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=2763230.
  17. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6:v.
  18. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6:ii.
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6:iii.
  20. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6:iv.
  21. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 241-242, de TOENI 6:vi.
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#IsabelleTosnyMWalterFitzRichard

Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead1,2

M, #10652, b. between 1025 and 1030, d. 24 March 1102
FatherRoger I de Toeni Lord of Guerny3,4,2,5 b. c 990, d. bt 1038 - 1039
MotherGodehilde (?)6,2,5 d. a 1055
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead married Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi, daughter of Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury and Isabel Bardoul Dame de Nogent; per The Henry Project: "OV v, 13 (vol. 3, pp. 126-9) states this marriage occurred in exchange for marriage of Simon to Ralph's uterine sister Agnes d'Évreux."
OV = Marjorie Chibnall, ed. & trans., The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, 6 vols. (Oxford, 1969-80).4,7,8,9,2,10 Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead was born between 1025 and 1030.1,4
Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead died on 24 March 1102.1,4
     Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead
He participated in Duke William's victory over the French at Mortemer in 1054, and was sent by William to alarm the King of France with the news. About 1060 he was banished with Hugh de Grandmesnil and Ernald d'Echauffour, which led to Ralph and Ernald burning the Normandy town of St. Evroul in revenge. However, in 1063 they were recalled and Ralph was one of nine nobles summoned to counsel William on the news of the death of Edward the Confessor in England. He fount at Hastings, was given estates in seven counties by 1086, but kept his seat at Flanstead in Hertfordshire. He supported Rober Curthose against the king about 1078, and in 1080 went on a pilgrimage to Spain, agter which he made figts to the abbey in St. Evroul, the town which he had helped to destroy. After William the Conqueror died he was among the NOrman nobility who expelled royal garrisons from their castles, and in 1088 he served under Duke Robert against Maine. Due to a personal Quarrel between his wife Isabel and her sister-in-law Hwise, who was wife of her brother William, comte d'Evreux, the count attacked Ralph, besieging Conches. When William Rufus directed his adherents in Normandy to aid Ralph the tide turned, and after three years peace was established.1

Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead
Roger's son Ralph succeeded to his father's rank and estates. He too fell foul of his lord, Duke William, and was sent unto exile in about 1060. Recalled in 1063 when William's invasion of Maine made expedient a reconciliation with the barons of southern Normandy, Ralph thereafter served his duke faithfully. He fought at Hastings in 1066 and though he did not personally acquire any lands in England, other members of the family did: Domesday Book reveals Tosnys holding estates in Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire, and Yorkshire. Like his father Roger, Ralph visited Spain (between 1066 and 1076): we do not know whether this was in quest of military adventure or as a pilgrim to Santiago de Compostela. Ralph lived to a considerable age. Before his death in 1102 he saw his son-in-law Baldwin of Boulogne, one of the leaders of the First Crusade, established in the east first as count of Edessa (1098-1100) and then as king of Jerusalem (1100-18).11 GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead
Ralph, usually called Ralph de Conches; b probably c 1025-30; participated in Norman invasion of England 1066, being accordingly granted lands in Berks, Essex, Glos, Herefs, Herts, Norfolk and Worcs; m Elizabeth/Isabel, dau of Simon de Montfort, Seigneur of Montfort l'Amaury, and d 24 March, probably 1101/2, leaving, with an er s (Roger, dvp): Ralph.4

Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead
Weis [AR7] 98A-24.12 Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead was also known as Ralph de Tosny.8

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Raoul de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102183. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), pp. 240-241, de TOENI 4:iii and 5.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Raoul de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102180.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet, online http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/henry.htm, "[OV v, 13 (vol. 3, pp. 128-9), which gives only the date, and says that Agnes was uterine sister of Ralph, verifying that Ralph was a son of Godehilde. See also CP 12:757 (sub Tony), and Musset (1978):56, n. 53, where charters are cited in which Ralph refers to Godehilde as his mother]
    While Roger de Tosny had a number of other children, he had a previous wife, and Ralph is the only one who clan clearly be placed as a son of Godehilde by evidence of which I an aware. The other children of Roger de Tosny are discussed in the Commentary section."
    OV = Marjorie Chibnall, ed. & trans., The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, 6 vols. (Oxford, 1969-80).
    Musset (1977) = "Aux origines d'une classe dirigeante: les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIIe siècle", Francia 5 (1977): 45-80.. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth (Isabella) de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177610&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/henry.htm, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/simon000.htm
  9. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Isabeau de Montfort: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=82968.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beynes.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  11. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 78. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 98A-24, p. 95. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:i.
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:iiii.
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:iv.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul IV de Conches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177602&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RaoulIIITosnydied1126. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi1,2,3

F, #10653, d. 1092
FatherSimon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury4,5,1,2,6,3 b. c 1030, d. 25 Sep 1087
MotherIsabel Bardoul Dame de Nogent7,2,6,3
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi married Raoul/Ralph III de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead, son of Roger I de Toeni Lord of Guerny and Godehilde (?); per The Henry Project: "OV v, 13 (vol. 3, pp. 126-9) states this marriage occurred in exchange for marriage of Simon to Ralph's uterine sister Agnes d'Évreux."
OV = Marjorie Chibnall, ed. & trans., The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, 6 vols. (Oxford, 1969-80).4,1,2,6,8,3
Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi died in 1092.3
     GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi
Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 642, 705.1

Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi
Weis [AR7] 98A-24.9 Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort Dame de Nogent-le-Roi was also known as Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort.7

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth (Isabella) de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177610&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet, online http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/henry.htm, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/simon000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beynes.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079533&tree=LEO
  6. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Isabeau de Montfort: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=82968. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 159, de MONTFORT 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  8. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Raoul de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102183.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 98A-24, p. 95. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:i.
  11. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Roger de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102179.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:iiii.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 241, de TOENI 5:iv.
  14. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Raoul de Toëny: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=102180.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raoul IV de Conches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177602&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#RaoulIIITosnydied1126. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Agnes (?)1

F, #10654
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited28 Apr 2018
     Agnes (?) married Norman d'Arcy of Nocton, Lincs, son of Thomas d'Arcy and Joan (?).1
     EDV-22 GKJ-23.

Family

Norman d'Arcy of Nocton, Lincs d. b 16 Oct 1254
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Darcy de Knayth Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland1

M, #10655, b. circa 1035, d. 31 May 1076
FatherSiward 'the Dane' Biornsson Earl of Northumbria2,3 b. c 1000, d. 1055
MotherElfleda/Aelfled (?) of Northumbria2,3,4,5
ReferenceGAV25 EDV24
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland was born circa 1035.3 He married Judith (?) of Lens, daughter of Lambert (?) de Boulogne-su-Mer, Cte de Lens (Artois) and Adélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale, in 1070.6,1,7,8,9,10,2,3
Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland died on 31 May 1076 at St. Giles' Hill, Winchester, co. Hampshire, England; beheaded.11,12,1,13,7,8,3
Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland was buried after 31 May 1076 at Crowland Abbey, Crowland, South Holland District, Lincolnshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1050, England
     DEATH     31 May 1076 (aged 25–26), Winchester, City of Winchester, Hampshire, England
     "First Earl of Huntingdon. Son of Siward Bjornsson, Earl of Northumbria, and Aefflaed of Bernicia, daughter of Ealdred, Earl of Bambaugh.. In 1070, he married Judith of Lens, daughter of Lambert II, Count of Lens, and Adelaide of Normandy, sister of William the Conqueror (William I).
     Last anglo-saxon aristocrat and the only noble executed under the reign of William I. He joined the revolt of Earls against William and was beheaded, his body being thrown in a ditch. He was buried in the chapter house at Croyland Abby, at the request of his wife, then moved to the Abbey itself in 1092 when the chapter house was destroyed by fire (for more, see Wikipedia, "Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria"). (credit Wikipedia)
Children:
** Matilda, Queen of Scotland
** Adelise Huntingdon

     Family Members
     Parents
          Siward Bjornsson 1020–1055
          Aelflaed De Bernicia 1027–1050
     Spouse
          Judith of Lens 1054–1086 (m. 1070)
     Children
          Uchtred Johnston 1070–1155
          Matilda of Huntingdon 1074–1130
     BURIAL     Crowland Abbey, Crowland, South Holland District, Lincolnshire, England
     Created by: Ann
     Added: 16 Jan 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 46759295.8,2,14
     Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland
Per Genealogics:
     "Waltheof was the son of Siward 'the Dane', earl of Northumberland, and Elfleda of Northumberland. In 1054 Waltheof's brother Osbearn, who was much older than him, was killed in battle, making Waltheof his father's heir. Siward himself died in 1055, and Waltheof being far too young to succeed as earl of Northumbria, King Edward appointed Toste Godwinson to the earldom.
     "Waltheof is described as strong and of great repute as a warrior, but also pious. He had learnt the Psalter in his youth, was liberal to the clergy and the poor, and was a benefactor in particular in Jarrow and Crowland. The chief stain on his memory is his part in a family blood feud, for he ordered the murder of the sons of one Carl, who had killed Earl Ealdred, Waltheof's grandfather.
     "In October 1065, when Toste Godwinson, earl of Northumberland and brother of the future King Harold II was banished, Waltheof became earl of Huntingdon and earl of Northumberland. He is not known to have opposed William the Conqueror in 1066, but in the following year he was taken to Normandy. In 1069 he joined the Danes in their descent on Yorkshire, distinguishing himself in the attack on the city of York. In January 1070 when the Danes left, he submitted himself to William the Conqueror and was restored to his earldom, and in 1072 to his father's earldom of Northumberland.
     "In 1070 Waltheof married Judith of Lens, daughter of Lambert, comte de Lens and Adela of Normandy, comtesse d'Aumale, the sister of William 'the Conqueror', they had two daughters, both of whom would have progeny.
     "While attending the wedding of Ralph de Gael, earl of Norfolk, at Exning in the spring or summer of 1075, Waltheof was enticed to join the conspiracy of the earls of Norfolk and Hereford to seize England for themselves. He quickly repented, and on Lanfranc's advice he went to Normandy and asked pardon of the king, who treated the matter lightly at the time; but at Christmas Waltheof was brought to trial at Westminster, his wife Judith being a witness. He was imprisoned at Winchester, and on the resumption of the trial in May he was condemned and beheaded on St. Giles's Hill on 31 May 1076, and hastily buried. 'And here Earl Waltheof was beheaded in Winchester on the Feast of St. Petronella; and his body was led to Crowland, and there he is buried.' (_The Worcester Manuscript_)
     "A fortnight after Waltheof was beheaded, the Abbot Ulfketel, at Judith's request and by the king's permission, removed his body to Crowland, where it was honourably entombed. Many miracles are recorded as many regarded Waltheof as a saint.
     "His widow, recorded in Domesday as 'Judith the Countess', held Huntingdon as dower. She is recorded as holding estates in many counties in 1086, most of them apparently gifts from the king her uncle. She founded the Nunnery of Elstow, near Bedford."3

Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland
There seems to have been an Earldom of Huntingdon before the Norman Conquest, among its holders then being KING HAROLD, according to the chronicler Florence of Worcester, and Tostig, HAROLD's brother. The first post-Conquest Earl of Huntingdon appears to have been Waltheof, son of Siward Earl of Northumberland (see NORTHUMBERLAND, D, preliminary remarks) and indeed Siward's successor in the latter Earldom as well. Waltheof was later beheaded for conspiring against WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR. His son-in-law Simon de St Liz was the next holder of the Earldom, the family connections of Simon's wife Maud making the transition a natural one under the terms prevailing then. Indeed the history of the Earldom over the next few decades amply illustrates the almost chattel-like nature of such a title at this time, a quasi-hereditary post which was nevertheless as often as not held from the king at pleasure and which could be transferred between members of the same family like a parcel of land.15

Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland
Per Med Lands:
     "WALTHEOF, son of SIWARD Earl of Northumbria & his wife Ælfled of Northumbria (-executed St Giles's Hill, Winchester 31 May 1076, bur Crowland Abbey[655]). His parentage is recorded by Roger of Hoveden[656]. Matthew Paris specifies that he was the son of Siward, of Danish origin[657]. Snorre names “Earl Valthiof”, although stating that he was the son of “Earl Gudin Ulfnadson” and “Earl Ulf’s sister Gyda”[658]. He was installed as Earl of Huntingdon and Northamptonshire after Tostig Godwinson was banished in Oct 1065. Snorre recounts that “Earl Morukare and…Earl Valthiof” failed to prevent Harald III King of Norway after landing on the river Humber in 1066 in a battle “upon the Wednesday next Mathias’ day”, adding that “Earl Valthiof…fled up to the castle of York”[659]. Snorre also recounts that “Earl Valthiof” took part in the battle of Hastings and “escaped by flight”, seriously condensing his account of Waltheof’s subsequent career when he adds that King William “sent a message to Earl Valthiof that they should be reconciled” but that he was captured “at a heath north of Kastala-bryggia…put…in fetters and afterwards he was beheaded”[660]. Snorre’s narrative includes two fragments of a poem in praise of Waltheof, presumably written contemporarily with Waltheof’s life. Jonathan Allen suggests that Waltheof himself may have patronised an Icelandic skald (court poet) whose work was eventually passed through to Snorre, providing interesting evidence of the persistence of Scandinavian culture in England in the second half of the 11th century[661]. Florence of Worcester records that "Waltheofum Siwardi ducis filius" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][662]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Stigandum archipræsulem, Edgarum Adelinum Eduardi regis consobrinum et tres...comites: Eduinum, Morcarum et Guallevum, Egelnodum quoque Cantuariensem satrapam” accompanied King William to Normandy, dated to 1067 from the context[663]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Suenus rex Danorum” sent a fleet led by “duos...filios suos et Osbernum fratrem suum” to attack England, that they were repulsed at Dover, Sandwich and Ipswich, and at Norwich by “Radulfus de Guader”, that they were joined by “Adelinus, Guallevus, Siguardus” but defeated on the Humber, entered York headed by “Guallevus...Gaius Patricius, Marius Suenus, Elnocinus, Archillus et quatuor filii Karoli” but were eventually expelled, dated to 1069, a later passage adding that “Guallevus præsens et Gaius Patricius absens” made peace with King William at the river Tees[664]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northamtoniæ" to "Guallevo comiti filio Sivardi" and "Judith neptem suam" in marriage[665]. Simeon of Durham records that "Waltheu the son of earl Siward…by Elfleda daughter of Earl Aldred" was installed as Earl of Northumberland after the earldom was confiscated from Gospatrick [in 1072][666]. Earl Waltheof joined the conspiracy of the Earls of Norfolk and Hereford against King William in 1075, repented and asked for the king's pardon, but was tried at Westminster at Christmas 1075, imprisoned at Winchester and, after the trial resumed there, beheaded[667]. Florence of Worcester records that "comitumque Waltheofum" joined the conspiracy of William Earl of Hereford and Ralph Earl of Norfolk in [1074] but was tried and beheaded at Winchester the following year[668].
     "m (1070) JUDITH de Lens, daughter of LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens & his wife Adelais de Normandie (1054-after 1086). Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northamtoniæ" to "Guallevo comiti filio Sivardi" and "Judith neptem suam" in marriage[669]. A manuscript records that “Juditha comitissa…uxor Waldevi comitis Huntingdon, et neptis Gulielmi Conquestoris” founded Elstow priory[670]. Her parentage is further clarified by the foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia”[671]. The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis records that “Waldevus” married “rex Willelmus…neptem suam Juettam filiam comitis Lamberti de Lens, sororem…Stephani comitis de Albemarlia”[672]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Judith uxoris suæ" betrayed “Guallevus comes” to the king in relation to the conspiracy with the earls of Hereford and Norfolk of which he was accused[673]. "
Med Lands cites:
[655] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. II, Book IV, p. 323, and Florence of Worcester, 1075, p. 179.
[656] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. I, p. 59.
[657] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, p. 19.
[658] Snorre, Saga of Olaf Haraldson Part IV, 162.
[659] Snorre, Saga of Harald Hardrade Part I, 87 and 88.
[660] Snorre, Saga of Harald Hardrade Part I, 100 and 101.
[661] Jonathan Allen, of Washington State, in a private email to the author dated 13 Feb 2008.
[662] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 1.
[663] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, I, p. 167.
[664] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, V, pp. 190-3 and 197.
[665] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221.
[666] Simeon of Durham, p. 558.
[667] CP VI 639, Orderic Vitalis, Vol. II, Book IV, pp. 321 and 323.
[668] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, pp. 10 and 12.
[669] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221.
[670] Dugdale Monasticon III, Elstow Priory, Bedfordshire, I, p. 413.
[671] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60.
[672] Michel (1836), Tome II, Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis, p. 112.
[673] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XIV, p. 265.2


Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland
Per Wikipedia:
     "Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northumbria (died 31 May 1076) was the last of the Anglo-Saxon earls and the only English aristocrat to be executed during the reign of William I.
Early life
     "Waltheof was the second son of Siward, Earl of Northumbria. His mother was Aelfflaed, daughter of Ealdred, Earl of Bernicia, son of Uhtred, Earl of Northumbria. In 1054, Waltheof's brother, Osbearn, who was much older than he, was killed in battle, making Waltheof his father's heir. Siward himself died in 1055, and Waltheof being far too young to succeed as Earl of Northumbria, King Edward appointed Tostig Godwinson to the earldom.
     "Waltheof was said to be devout and charitable and was probably educated for a monastic life. Around 1065, however, he became an earl, governing Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire. Following the Battle of Hastings he submitted to William and was allowed to keep his pre-Conquest title and possessions.[1] He remained at William's court until 1068.
First revolt
     "When Sweyn II invaded Northern England in 1069, Waltheof and Edgar Aetheling joined the Danes and took part in the attack on York. He would again make a fresh submission to William after the departure of the invaders in 1070. He was restored to his earldom, and went on to marry William's niece, Judith of Lens. In 1072, he was appointed Earl of Northampton.[1]
     "The Domesday Book mentions Waltheof ("Walleff"): "'In Hallam ("Halun"), one manor with its sixteen hamlets, there are twenty-nine carucates [~14 km²] to be taxed. There Earl Waltheof had an "Aula" [hall or court]. There may have been about twenty ploughs. This land Roger de Busli holds of the Countess Judith." (Hallam, or Hallamshire, is now part of the city of Sheffield)
     "In 1072, William expelled Gospatric from the earldom of Northumbria. Gospatric was Waltheof's cousin and had taken part in the attack on York with him, but like Waltheof, had been pardoned by William. Gospatric fled into exile and William appointed Waltheof as the new earl. Construction of Durham Castle began under Waltheof in 1072 after receiving orders to commence this project from William. The castle would be significantly expanded by Bishop William Walcher and his successors in later years.[2]
     "Waltheof had many enemies in the north. Amongst them were members of a family who had killed Waltheof's maternal great-grandfather, Uchtred the Bold, and his grandfather Ealdred. This was part of a long-running blood feud. In 1074, Waltheof moved against the family by sending his retainers to ambush them, succeeding in killing the two eldest of four brothers.
Second revolt and death
     "In 1075 Waltheof joined the Revolt of the Earls against William. His motives for taking part in the revolt are unclear, as is the depth of his involvement. However he repented, confessing his guilt first to Archbishop Lanfranc and then in person to William, who was at the time in Normandy. He returned to England with William but was arrested, brought twice before the king's court and sentenced to death.[1]
     "He spent almost a year in confinement before being beheaded on 31 May 1076 at St. Giles's Hill, near Winchester.[1] He was said to have spent the months of his captivity in prayer and fasting. Many people believed in his innocence and were surprised when the execution was carried out. His body was initially thrown into a ditch, but was later retrieved and buried in the chapter house of Crowland Abbey in Lincolnshire.
Cult of martyrdom
     "In 1092, after a fire in the chapter house, the abbot had Waltheof's body moved to a prominent place in the abbey church. When the coffin was opened, it is reported that the corpse was found to be intact with the severed head re-joined to the trunk.[3] This was regarded as a miracle, and the abbey, which had a financial interest in the matter began to publicise it. As a result, pilgrims began to visit Waltheof's tomb. He was commemorated on 31 August.[4][5]
     "After a few years healing miracles were reputed to occur in the vicinity of Waltheof's tomb, often involving the restoration of the pilgrim's lost sight. They are described in the Miracula Sancti Waldevi. Waltheof's life thus became the subject of popular media, heroic but inaccurate accounts being preserved in the Vita et Passio Waldevi comitis,[6] a Middle English Waltheof saga, since lost, and the Anglo-Norman Waldef.[7]
Family and children
     "In 1070 Waltheof married Judith de Lens, daughter of Lambert II, Count of Lens and Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale. They had three children, the eldest of whom, Maud, brought the earldom of Huntingdon to her second husband, David I of Scotland, and another, Adelise, married the Anglo-Norman noble Raoul III of Tosny.
     "One of Waltheof's grandsons was Waltheof (died 1159), abbot of Melrose.[1]
In popular culture
** Waltheof was portrayed by actor Marcus Gilbert in the TV drama Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990).
** Waltheof is the subject of Juliet Dymoke's 1970 historical novel Of the Ring of Earls
** Waltheof is a major character in Elizabeth Chadwick's 2002 historical novel The Winter Mantle
** Waltheof is a character in Parke Godwin's 1991 historical novel Sherwood
References
1. Chisholm 1911.
2. "Durham Castle". Durham World Heritage Site. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
3. Webb, Diana Pilgrimage in Medieval England Hambledon and London 2000 pp32-3 ISBN 185285250X
4. "Den hellige Waldef av Croyland ( -1076)". Den katolske kirke. Retrieved 31 August 2017.
5. Farmer, David (14 April 2011). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Fifth Edition Revised. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 31 August 2017 – via Google Books.
6. 'Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis' (with the Miracula), in F. Michel (ed.), Chroniques Anglo-Normandes, Vol. II (Éduard Frère, Rouen 1836), pp. 99-142 (Internet Archive).
7. A.J. Holden (ed.), Le Roman de Waldef, Bibliotheca Bodmeriana, Textes, 5 (Coligny-Genève, Fondation Martin Bodmer 1984).
Sources
** This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Waltheof". Encyclopædia Britannica. 28 (11th ed.) Cambridge University Press. p. 299.
** Chronicle of Britain ISBN 1-872031-35-8
** Hunt, William (1899). "Waltheof (died 1076)" . In Lee, Sidney (ed.) Dictionary of National Biography. 58. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
** Lewis, C. P. "Waltheof, earl of Northumbria (c. 1050–1076)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.) Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28646. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
External links
** Waltheof 2 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England."16 GAV-25 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 169.3


Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland and Judith (?) of Lens
Per Genealogy.EU: "B1. Judith, *1054, +after 1086; m.1070 Walter, Earl of Huntingdon (+1076.)17" Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland was Earl of Northumbria between 1072 and 1075.6,16 He was Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton between 1072 and 1076.16

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 113, HUNTINGDON 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Waltheofdied1076. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waltheof: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108320&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elfleda of Northumberland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108323&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Siwarddied1055B.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 98A-23, p. 95. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page (Counts of Boulogne sur Mer): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  8. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Lens: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108321&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Judithdiedafter1086MWaltheof
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 98A-23, p. 95; line 148-23, p. 130: "beheaded."
  12. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 165. Hereinafter cited as Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 98A-23, p. 95: "...beheaded."
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 25 April 2020), memorial page for Waltheof of Huntingdon (1050–31 May 1076), Find a Grave Memorial no. 46759295, citing Crowland Abbey, Crowland, South Holland District, Lincolnshire, England ; Maintained by Ann (contributor 47184218), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46759295/waltheof-of_huntingdon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Huntingdon Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltheof,_Earl_of_Northumbria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Counts of Boulogne sur Mer: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html#L
  18. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice of Northumberland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177603&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#AdelisaHuntingdondiedafter1126
  21. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html

Judith (?) of Lens1,2

F, #10656, b. 1054, d. after 1086
FatherLambert (?) de Boulogne-su-Mer, Cte de Lens (Artois)1,2,3,4,5,6 b. c 1025, d. 1054
MotherAdélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale1,2,7,4,5,6 b. b 1030, d. bt 1081 - 1084
ReferenceGAV25 EDV24
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Judith (?) of Lens was born in 1054.8,9,1,2,5,6 She married Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland, son of Siward 'the Dane' Biornsson Earl of Northumbria and Elfleda/Aelfled (?) of Northumbria, in 1070.10,9,1,2,5,6,11,12
Judith (?) of Lens died after 1086.2,5,6
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 169.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter. 95.5

GAV-25 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

Judith (?) of Lens
Per Genealogics:
     "Judith was born in Normandy about 1054, the daughter of Lambert, comte de Lens, and Adela of Normandy, comtesse d'Aumale, the sister of William 'the Conqueror'.
     "In 1070 she married Waltheof, earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton, son of Siward 'the Dane', earl of Northumberland, and Elfleda of Northumberland. Their daughters Maud and Alice would have progeny. Maud, the eldest, brought the earldom of Huntingdon to her second husband Dabid mac Máil Choluim, David I 'the Saint', king of Scots.
     "In 1075 Waltheof joined the Revolt of the Earls against William. It was the last serious act of resistance against the Norman conquest of England. Judith betrayed Waltheof to her uncle, who had Waltheof beheaded on 31 May 1076.
     "After Waltheof's execution Judith was betrothed by William to Simon de St.Liz, earl of Huntingdon and Northampton. Judith refused to marry Simon and she fled the country to avoid William's anger. He then temporarily confiscated all of Judith's English estates.
     "Judith founded the convent at Elstowe in Bedfordshire in about 1078. She also founded churches at Kempston and Hitchin. She had land holdings in ten countries in the Midlands and East Anglia.
     "Judith died after 1086. In 1090 Simon de St.Liz became the first husband of Judith's daughter Maud."5

Reference: Per Weis [1992:115] 130-25: "Though generally shown as child of (2) Lambert of Lens, there is a possibility that she was a child of the 1st mar. to Enguerrand II of Ponthieu."13


Judith (?) of Lens
Per Wikipedia:
     "Countess Judith (born in Normandy between 1054 and 1055, died after 1086), was a niece of William the Conqueror. She was a daughter of his sister Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale and Lambert II, Count of Lens.
Life
     "In 1070, Judith married Earl Waltheof of Huntingdon and Northumbria. They had three children. Their eldest daughter, Maud, brought the earldom of Huntingdon to her second husband, David I of Scotland. Their daughter, Adelise, married Raoul III de Conches whose sister, Godehilde, married Baldwin I of Jerusalem.
     "In 1075, Waltheof joined the Revolt of the Earls against William. It was the last serious act of resistance against the Norman conquest of England. Judith betrayed Waltheof to her uncle, who had Waltheof beheaded on 31 May 1076.
     "After Waltheof's execution Judith was betrothed by William to Simon I of St. Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton. Judith refused to marry Simon and she fled the country to avoid William's anger. William then temporarily confiscated all of Judith's English estates. Finally, Simon married Judith's daughter, Maud, in or before 1090.
     "Judith founded Elstow Abbey in Bedfordshire around 1078. She also founded churches at Kempston and Hitchin.
     "She had land-holdings in 10 counties in the Midlands and East Anglia. Her holdings included land at:
** Earls Barton, Northamptonshire
** Great Doddington, Northamptonshire
** Grendon, Northamptonshire
** Ashby Folville, Leicestershire
** Lowesby, Leicestershire
** Merton, Oxfordshire
** Piddington, Oxfordshire
** Potton, Bedfordshire
** Sawtry, Huntingdonshire
     "The parish of Sawtry Judith in Huntingdonshire is named after the Countess.
From the Domesday Book
     "In POTONE Hugh holds ½ virgate of land from the Countess. Land for 1 plough; it is there, with 1 smallholder. The value is and was 5s; before 1066, 2s. Earl Tosti held this land in Potton, his manor.
     "Countess Judith holds POTONE herself. It answers for 10 hides. Land for 12 ploughs. In lordship 3½ hides; 3 ploughs there. 18 villagers and 2 Freemen with 8 ploughs; a ninth possible. 13 smallholders and 3 slaves. 1 mill, 5s; meadow for 12 ploughs; pasture for the village livestock. In total, value £12; when acquired 100s; before 1066 £13. King Edward held this manor; it was Earl Tosti's. There were 4 Freemen who had 1 hide and 1 virgate; they could grant to whom they would.
     "In (Cockayne) HATLEY Countess Judith holds 3 hides and 2½ virgates as one manor. Land for 6½ ploughs. In lordship 1 hide and ½ virgate; 2 ploughs there. 8 villagers with 4½ ploughs; woodland, 4 pigs. Value £6 5s; when acquired 100s; before 1066 £6. Earl Tosti held this manor. It lies in Potton, the Countess' own manor. A Freeman had 1 virgate; he could grant and sell, and withdraw to another lord.
     "Ranulf brother of Ilger holds EVERTON from the Countess. It answers for 5 hides. Land for 5 ploughs; 2 ploughs there; 3 possible. 4 villagers; 5 smallholders. Meadow for 1 plough. Value £3; when acquired 100s; as much before 1066. Earl Tosti held this manor. It lay in Potton, the Countess' own manor.
Sources
** Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 98A-23, 130-25."14

Judith (?) of Lens
Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH (1054-after 1086). The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia”[1532]. The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis records that “Waldevus” married “rex Willelmus…neptem suam Juettam filiam comitis Lamberti de Lens, sororem…Stephani comitis de Albemarlia”[1533]. A manuscript records that “Juditha comitissa…uxor Waldevi comitis Huntingdon, et neptis Gulielmi Conquestoris” founded Elstow priory[1534]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northamtoniæ" to "Guallevo comiti filio Sivardi" and "Judith neptem suam" in marriage[1535]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Judith uxoris suæ" betrayed “Guallevus comes” to the king in relation to the conspiracy with the earls of Hereford and Norfolk of which he was accused[1536].
     "m (1070) WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon, son of SIWARD Earl of Northumbria & his wife Ælfled of Northumbria (-executed St Giles's Hill, Winchester 31 May 1076, bur Crowland Abbey). "
Med Lands cites:
[1532] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60.
[1533] Michel (1836), Tome II, Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis, p. 112.
[1534] Dugdale Monasticon III, Elstow Priory, Bedfordshire, I, p. 413.
[1535] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221.
[1536] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XIV, p. 265.6


Judith (?) of Lens and Adélaïde (?) de Normandie, comtesse d'Aumale
from the Henry Project: "Adelaide, m (1) Enguerrand II, count of Ponthieu, (2) Lambert, seigneur of Lens, (3) Eudes, count of Champagne.
Stapleton (1836), 350-1, quotes part of a charter mentioning count (consul) Enguerrand (son of Berta, daughter of Guerinfridus, who built the castle of Aumâle), his wife Addelidis, daughter of king William of England, countess Addelidis, daughter of Enguerrand and Addelidis aforesaid, and countess Judith (daughter of Addelidis the mother). Robert de Torigny, in his additions to GND, states in one place that Stephen, count of Aumâle, was son of count Eudes of Champagne and a nephew of William the elder through a sister ("... Stephanus, comes de Albamarla filius Odonis comitis de Campania, Willelmi autem regis Anglorum senioris ex sorore nepos ...") [GND (Rob. Tor.), viii, 3 (vol. 2, pp. 206-7)], and in another that Waltheof, earl of Huntingdon, had three daughters by his wife, a daughter of the countess of Aumâle, who had been a "uterine sister" of William ("Habuit enim idem Walleus tres filias ex uxore sua, filia comitisse de Albamarla, que comitissa fuit soror uterina Willelmi regis Anglorum senioris.") [GND (Rob. Tor.) viii, 37 (vol. 2, pp. 270-3)]. The Chronicle of Robert de Torigny states that Robert's daughter "Aeliz" (not strictly the same name as "Adelaide", but often confused with it, both then and now) was by a concubine other than Herleva ("... Robertus frater eius, qui genuit Willermum de Herleva non sponsata, qui postea Angliam conquisivit, et unam filiam nomine Aeliz de alia concubina.") [s.a. 1026, MGH SS 6, 478]. The name of Adelaide's second husband Lambert comes from two Scottish sources. The "Life of Waltheof" states that Waltheof's wife Judith was a niece of William the Conqueror, a daughter of count Lambert of Lens, and a sister of count Stephen of Aumâle [translation of relevant passage given in ESSH 2: 33], and the Chronicle of the Canons of Huntingdon also states that Judith was a daughter of count Lambert of Lens [ESSH 2: 28].
The above stated evidence combines to give a consistent picture for Adelaide's three marriages listed above. The evidence presents some minor problems, but they do not seem to be serious. Stapleton (1836) argued that count Eudes was married to the younger Adelaide, daughter of the present Adelaide by her first husband Enguerrand, but the evidence is consistent in making the younger Adelaide, Judith, and Stephen the children of Adelaide by three different husbands (although no single source gives all of this information). The most significant contradiction would appear to be Robert de Torigny's statement in one place that Adelaide was "soror uterina" to William, but, as pointed out Elisabeth van Houts, Robert uses the same adjective "uterine" in one other place to refer to duke Richard II of Normandy and his paternal half-brother count William of Eu [GND (Rob. Tor.), vii, (20) (vol. 2, pp. 128-8); van Houts (2002), 23, n. 22]. Thus, the evidence clearly suggests that William and Adelaide had different mothers. (Geoffrey White had left the matter of Adelaide's maternity open in his discussion of William's siblings in The Complete Peerage [White].) Another problem concerns Adelaide's second marriage to count Lambert of Lens. Morton & Muntz (1972), 127, stating that the Life of Waltheof was the only source for the second marriage (but erroneously, as the Chronicle of the Canons of Huntingdon also mentions Lambert as Judith's father: see the previous paragraph), and noting that Lambert died less than a year after Enguerrand, suggested that no such marriage took place. However, Barlow (1999), xlv, pointed out that Enguerrand was excommunicated in 1049 for "incest" (evidently because Enguerrand's sister had been married to Adelaide's uncle), leaving open the possibility that Lambert had married Adelaide before 1053.
[Note: Adelaide and her daughter Judith were the subject of numerous discussions on the soc.genealogy.medieval/GEN-MEDIEVAL internet newsgroup/mailing list in March 2003, of which postings by Chris Phillips (pointing out the van Houts paper and the Tabularia website), Douglas Richardson (pointing out that the Life of Waltheof was not the only source naming Lambert as the father of Judith) and Nathaniel Taylor (pointing out the discussion in Carmen de Hastingae Proelio) were particularly helpful.]"15

Judith (?) of Lens and Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland
Per Genealogy.EU: "B1. Judith, *1054, +after 1086; m.1070 Walter, Earl of Huntingdon (+1076.)16" Judith (?) of Lens was living in 1086; Genealogy.EU (Boulogne page) says d. after 1086.10,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page (Counts of Boulogne sur Mer): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  2. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lambert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108318&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Lambertdied1054. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Lens: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108321&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Judithdiedafter1086MWaltheof
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108319&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-23, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 113, HUNTINGDON 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 98A-23, p. 95.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Waltheofdied1076
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waltheof: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108320&tree=LEO
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 130-25, p. 115.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Lens. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet, online http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/henry.htm, Robert I "le Magnifique" ("the Magnificent"): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/rober000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Counts of Boulogne sur Mer: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html#L
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice of Northumberland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177603&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#AdelisaHuntingdondiedafter1126

Cecily de Baliol1,2,3

F, #10657, d. before 10 April 1273
FatherSir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland2,4,3,5 b. c 1200, d. b 24 Nov 1268
MotherDevorguilla Galloway2,4,5,6 b. c 1209, d. bt 28 Jan 1289 - 1290
ReferenceGAV21 EDV24
Last Edited2 Oct 2019
     Cecily de Baliol married Sir John de Burgh Knt., Baron Lanvallei of Walkern, Hertfordshire, son of Sir John de Burgh Knt., of Lanvallay and Hawise de Lanvallay, before 1255.7,2,8,3,9,5
Cecily de Baliol died before 10 April 1273.1,8,5
     GAV-21 EDV-24.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:707
     2. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States; Baltimore, 2004, Roberts, Gary Boyd. 463.5

Family

Sir John de Burgh Knt., Baron Lanvallei of Walkern, Hertfordshire b. c 1235, d. b 3 Mar 1280
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 94-29, p. 91. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fitz Walter 5: p. 327. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1822] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004 "Euphemia, Countess of Ross (was Re: Magna Carta line of Eufemia)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Cecily Baliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385220&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 99-29, p. 95.
  8. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John de Burgh, feudal Baron Lanvallei of Walkern: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385219&tree=LEO
  10. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 22.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla de Burgh: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385222&tree=LEO
  12. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Extinct Peerages, pp. 21-22.

Agnès/Isabel/Isabeau/Mahaut/Isabelle de Condé1,2,3,4

F, #10658, b. 1224
FatherNicholas I (?) Seigneur of Conde, Seigneur de Bailleul b. b 1188; Racines et Histoire says she was the daugher of Jacque, seigneur de Condé, Bailleul et Moriammez (son of Nicholas?)4
MotherIsabeau/Elisabeth de Morialmé dame de Beloeil et de Fraire-La-Grande, dame de Morialmé5,2,4
ReferenceGAV20 EDV21
Last Edited30 Dec 2013
     Agnès/Isabel/Isabeau/Mahaut/Isabelle de Condé was born in 1224. She married Sir Enguerrand/Ingelram II de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry et Ruminghen, Lord of Wendover, of Buckinghamshire, son of Guillaume I de Fiennes seigneur de Fiennes, baron de Tingry and Agnes/Alice de Dammartin, circa 1240.1,2,6,4
     Agnès/Isabel/Isabeau/Mahaut/Isabelle de Condé
Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VI 465
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 167
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XVIII 116.6 GAV-20 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 85, de FIENNES 5:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Isabeau) de Condé: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038521&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Florennes-Rumigny.pdf, p. 4.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth de Morialmé: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122014&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enguerrand de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038520&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Giles de Fiennes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038375&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Fiennes.pdf: p. 3.
  9. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."

Nicholas I (?) Seigneur of Conde, Seigneur de Bailleul1,2

M, #10659, b. before 1188
FatherRoger (?) Sire de Condé4,1
MotherAlix de Mons3,1 d. b 1207
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited30 Dec 2013
     Nicholas I (?) Seigneur of Conde, Seigneur de Bailleul was born before 1188.1 He married Isabeau/Elisabeth de Morialmé dame de Beloeil et de Fraire-La-Grande, dame de Morialmé, daughter of Arnoul IV de Morialmé Avoué d’Hanzinnes et de Fosse, seigneur de Ham-sur-Heure, Loverval and Jeanne ou Isabeau de Bailleul, between 1210 and 1216; her 1st husband.5,2,6
     Nicholas I (?) Seigneur of Conde, Seigneur de Bailleul
Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 167
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XVIII 116.1 He was Seigneur of Conde, Bailleul and Moriammez at Hainaut, France.7 GAV-21 EDV-22 GKJ-23. He was living in 1188.1

Family

Isabeau/Elisabeth de Morialmé dame de Beloeil et de Fraire-La-Grande, dame de Morialmé
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nicholas de Condé: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00038522&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bethune.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix de Mons: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313169&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00313168&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth de Morialmé: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122014&tree=LEO
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Florennes-Rumigny.pdf, p. 4.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 152-28, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jacques de Condé dit de Bauilleul: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00312733&tree=LEO

Hawise (Hedwig) (?) de Guincamp1

F, #10660
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited17 May 2020
     Hawise (Hedwig) (?) de Guincamp married Etienne I (?) Cte de Treguier et de Lamballe, son of Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany and Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille.2,1,3
     GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

Hawise (Hedwig) (?) de Guincamp
"an heiress of Guingamp."4

Hawise (Hedwig) (?) de Guincamp
(an unknown value.)5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 227-24, p. 189. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 214-24, p. 177.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#TheophaniaPenthievreMRabelTancarville. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain II 'the Black': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046734&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330999&tree=LEO

Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre1,2

F, #10661
FatherEtienne I (?) Cte de Treguier et de Lamballe1 b. c 1064, d. 21 Apr 1136
MotherHawise (Hedwig) (?) de Guincamp1
ReferenceGAV24
Last Edited1 Aug 2007
     Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre married Alan de Dinan vicomte de Dinan, son of Geoffroi II de Dinan Vicomte de Dinan and Orieldis/Radegonde de Dreux, in 1135.3,4,5,1,6,2
     Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre
also called Aginore de Penthievre[11] probably 'Aenor', given
granddaughter 'Eleanor' and her name.

identification as wife of Alan de Dinan, not Oliver by Todd A.
Farmerie (citing CP; versus identification as per K.S.B.
Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants p. 434[12])[11]

Spouse: Alan de Dinan[2]
Death: bef 1166[13]
Father: Geoffroi II de Dinan (->1122)
Mother: Orieldis

Children: Emma (-1208)
Roland (-<1190.)2 GAV-24.

Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre
van de Pas cites: Europaische Stammtafeln, J. A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 75.5 Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre was also known as Aginore (?) of Richmond.3 Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre was also known as Aginore (?) de Penthievre.5

Eleanor/Aginore (?) de Penthievre
Weis [AR7] 214-24.7

Family

Alan de Dinan vicomte de Dinan b. c 1090, d. b 1166
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  2. [S2077] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 3 June 2006: "Re: Brittany was Re: William de Mohun's (d Oct 1193) ancestors," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 June 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 3 June 2006."
  3. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan (Olivier II) de Dinan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0175568&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aginore de Penthievre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0438933&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 214-25, p. 177. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 214-24, p. 177.

Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany1,2,3

M, #10662, b. 999, d. 7 January 1079
FatherGeoffrey I (?) Count of Rennes, Duke of Bretagne2,4,5,3,6 b. c 980, d. 20 Nov 1008
MotherHawise (?) of Rennes, Duchess of Brittany2,7,8,3,6 b. c 977, d. 21 Feb 1034
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited16 May 2020
     Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany married Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille, daughter of Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle and Judith (?) de Nantes.9,2,3,10,11,6 Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany was born in 999.9,2,3
Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany died on 7 January 1079.9,2,3,6
Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany was buried after 7 January 1079 at Cathédrale Saint-Etienne de Saint-Brieuc, Saint-Brieuc, Departement des Côtes-d'Armor, Bretagne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     999, Rennes, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
     DEATH     7 Jan 1079 (aged 79–80), Cesson, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
     Eudes was the Count of Penthièvre, Duke and Regent of Brittany. He was the youngest son of Duke Geoffrey I of Brittany and Hawise of Normandy, daughter of Richard I of Normandy. Odo married Agnes of Cornouaille, sister of Hoel II of Brittany.
     Eudes children with Agnes were:
** Adele (to 1035-† after 1056/1057);
** Geoffrey I, Duke of Penthièvre (d. 1093);
** Brian (died 1084), participated in the conquest of England and received the honour of Richmond, died without issue;
** Alain le Roux (d. 1093), which held the honour of Richmond from 1070 to 1093, died without issue;
** William d. after 1055/1057;
** Robert d. after 1055/1057;
** Richard d. after 1056/1057;
** Alain le Noir († 1098), which held the honour of Richmond shortly after the death of his brother 1093, without posterity.
** Stephen (d. 1137), comte de Guingamp de Trégor and Goëlo seigneur, then count of Penthièvre, and which holds the honour of Richmond from 1093.
** Eudes illegitimate children,
** a daughter married to Enisan of Pleven
** Bodin (brother of Bardulf) monk at the Abbey Notre-Dame of York
** Ravensworth Bardulf
** Ribald of middleham married Béatrice Taillebois
** Arnold
** Brian Earl of Cornwall

     At least two of Eudes sons (Alan and Brian) participated in the Norman conquest of England.
     His descendants became the junior branch of the Breton ducal family, which eventually gained control of the duchy in 1156 under Conan IV of Brittany.
     He was also known as Odo of Rennes
     Family Members
     Parents
          Geoffroi de Bretagne unknown–1008
          Hawise De Normandie d'Rennes unknown–1034
     Half Siblings
          Alain de Bretagne unknown–1040
     Children
          Geoffroy de Bretagne unknown–1093
          Stephen de Penthièvre unknown–1136
          Robert Brehervalv unknown–1083
          Geoffroy Boterel de Bretagne unknown–1092
          Alain Rufus de Bretagne 1040–1093
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Saint-Etienne de Saint-Brieuc, Saint-Brieuc, Departement des Côtes-d'Armor, Bretagne, France
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 20 Feb 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 105554964.12
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:75.3


Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany
Per Genealogics:
     "Eudes was born about 999, the youngest son of Geoffrey I, duc de Bretagne, and Hawise of Normandy. With his wife Agnès de Cornouaille, daughter of Alain Cagniart, comte de Cornouaille, and Judith de Nantes, he had about nine children, of whom Etienne would have progeny. He also had at least five illegitimate children.
     "In 1031 he was present, with his brother Alain III, duc de Bretagne, at a donation to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, and the following year at the foundation of the abbey of Saint-Georges de Rennes of whom their sister Adèle became the first abbess.
     "After a dispute with his brother Alain III, arbitrated by their uncle Judicael, bishop of Vannes, in 1035 Alain formed a large apanage for him including the bishoprics of Saint Brieuc, Tréguier Saint Malo and Dol de Bretagne, and the counties and baronies of Penthièvre, Goëlo, Avaugour and Lamballe.
     "After the untimely death of his brother Alain III in 1040, Eudes took into custody his nephew Conon II and proclaimed himself co-regent of Brittany. The young duke was released by his followers in 1047.
     "Eudes defeated by William the Conqueror while fighting on the side of King Henri I of France at the Battle of Mortmemer in 1054, allied with Geoffrey III 'the Bearded', comte d'Anjou, against William, then the young duke of Normandy.
     "In 1056 Conon II became lord of Rennes and took Eudes prisoner. In 1062 a peace was concluded between Conon and Geoffrey Boterel, the eldest son of Eudes.
     "Years later, although very old, Eudes still participated in the 1075 uprisings against Hoel II of Brittany, the successor of Conon II, though he left the conduct of operations to his eldest son Geoffrey Boterel.
     "Eudes died on 7 January 1079, and was buried in the Cathedral of Saint Brieux in Brittany."3

GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-26.

Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany
Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Éon Ier de Penthièvre (souvent Eudes ou Eudon) (999 – 7 janvier 1079) fut comte de Penthièvre de 1035 à 1079. En 1040, il s'empare de son neveu Conan, successeur désigné à la tête du duché de Bretagne, puis après sa libération en 1047, il continue de régner sur une grande partie du territoire jusqu'à sa capture en 1056.
     "Eudes est le premier des Eudonides, prestigieux lignage des Comtes de Penthièvre, branche cadette des Comtes de Rennes et des Ducs de Bretagne1.
Historiographie
     "Du xvie au début du xxe siècle, les historiens, s'appuyant en partie sur la Chronique de Saint-Brieuc (datée d'une période comprise entre 1394 et 1416)2, ont écrit un récit de la vie d'Eudes dont la véracité est remise en cause par les historiens du xxe siècle et du xxie siècle. A l'époque où a été rédigée la Chronique de Saint-Brieuc, plusieurs documents ont en effet été inventés pour justifier la légitimité des Montfort face aux Eudonides3.
     "Bertrand d'Argentré4 en 1588, Augustin du Paz5 en 1619, Pierre Le Baud6 en 1638, puis Arthur de la Borderie en 18997 rapportent tous les mêmes faits :
** Eudes se serait révolté contre son frère Alain lorsqu'il reçut l'apanage de la Domnonée. Pour Eudes, le territoire de l'apanage était insuffisant, un conflit éclate entre les deux frères se terminant par le siège du château de Léhon et l'attaque d'Aleth par Alain. Judicaël, évêque de Vannes serait intervenu pour rétablir la paix entre les deux frères avec l'aide de Robert, Duc de Normandie. Eudes rend alors hommage à Alain.
** à la mort d'Alain III en 1040, Eudes aurait usurpé le pouvoir ducal et se serait emparé du fils d'Alain, le futur Conan II, contre l'avis de la duchesse Berthe de Blois et celui des grands du duché

     "En 1987, Noël-Yves Tonnerre8 considère que cette narration n'est pas crédible, Eudes et Alain auraient gouverné le duché en bonne entente, aucune source ne mentionne un éventuel conflit entre les deux frères à propos de l'apanage de la Domnonée. De plus, selon Stéphane Morin9, en 2009, Eudes aurait honoré honnêtement son tutorat envers Conan et lui aurait laissé la première place dans la signature des actes du Duché jusqu'en 1047.
     "Selon Noël-Yves Tonnerre, Conan serait devenu duc en 1047, et Eudes se serait replié dans son apanage à partir de 1047.
     "Plus récemment, Stéphane Morin, s'appuyant sur des écrits d'Orderic Vital et du pape Léon IX, estime que le pouvoir ducal est resté entre les mains d'Eudes jusqu'en 1057, Conan II le combattant de 1047 à 1057. En 1057, Eudes est capturé par Conan qui l'emmène à Chartres. Au-delà de cette date, Eudes semble s'être rapproché de Guillaume le Conquérant, ses fils participeront activement à la conquête de l'Angleterre.
Biographie
Origine

     "Eon ou Eudes est le fils cadet du duc de Bretagne Geoffroi Ier et d'Havoise de Normandie, fille du duc de Normandie Richard Ier. Son frère aîné est Alain III de Bretagne. Alain et Eudes sont élevés ensemble par leur mère, régente du duché après la mort de Geoffroi Ier en 1008. Richard II de Normandie est leur tuteur10.
     "Certains faits et textes pourraient laisser supposer qu'Eudes et Alain étaient jumeaux11.
Comte de Bretagne
     "De 1024 à 1030, Alain et Eudes semblent gouverner le duché ensemble, ils sont tous deux qualifiés de Brittanorum monarchi ou de Principes Brittaniae12.
     "En 1031, Eudes est présent avec son frère le duc Alain III de Bretagne, lors d'une donation faite à l'Abbaye du Mont-Saint-Michel et l'année suivante lors de la fondation de l'abbaye Saint-Georges de Rennes dont leur sœur Adèle devient la première abbesse13.
     "Vers 1035-1040, la protection de Guillaume, bâtard de Robert Ier de Normandie, est confiée aux deux frères1.
     "Après un conflit avec son frère et l'arbitrage de leur oncle Judicaël évêque de Vannes (version démentie par les études historiques récentes8,9), il obtient d'Alain III en 1035 l'apanage de la Domnonée constitué des évêchés de Saint Brieuc, Tréguier, Alet et Dol-de-Bretagne, et qui comprend les comtés et baronnies de Penthièvre, Goëlo et Lamballe.
     "Dans un article de 2017, André-Yves Bourgès s'interroge sur une éventuelle gémellité d'Alain et Eudes, l'attribution de l'apanage de la Domnonée à Eudes pourrait alors être envisagée comme un partage du royaume11.
     "La Domnonée pourrait correspondre à l'ancien pagus d'Alet. Ce pagus n'appartenait pas à la marche carolingienne de Bretagne et aurait donc pu avoir un mode d'organisation différent de celui du reste du Duché1. Il fut démembré successivement par la création de l'évêché de Dol au ixe siècle puis par celle des évêchés de Tréguier et de Saint-Brieuc au xe siècle (André-Yves Bourgés émet une hypothèse légèrement différente : les évêchés de Tréguier et de Saint-Brieuc auraient pu être érigés au 1er tiers du xie siècle dans le contexte de l'obtention de l'apanage par Eudes14,15).
     "Eudes devient alors Comte de Bretagne.
     "Après la disparition prématurée de son frère Alain III, en 1040 et le remariage de Berthe de Blois, épouse d'Alain III, il s'empare de la garde de son neveu Conan II de Bretagne et se proclame « comte de Bretagne ». Le jeune duc ne sera libéré par ses fidèles qu'en 1047.
     "L'historien Stéphane Morin analyse les relations entre Eudes, Alain III et Conan II d'une façon différente : Eudes aurait assuré un réel tutorat de Conan et aurait géré honnêtement le Duché après la mort de son frère, laissant toujours la première place au futur duc dans la signature des actes. La rupture entre Eudes et Conan II ne serait survenue qu'en 10471,16.
     "Vers 1045-1047, Berthe de Blois, mère de Conan, quitte la Bretagne pour se marier avec Hugues V, Comte du Mans17.
     "De 1040 à 1047, Eudes se rapproche du comte d'Anjou Geoffroy II à qui il donne sa fille Adèle en épouse1. Il rompt ainsi avec la tradition qui alliait les Comtes de Rennes aux Comtes de Blois. Allié du roi de France, le Comte d'Anjou était alors en conflit ouvert avec le Comte de Blois.
     "Après le départ de Conan, Eudes assure seul la direction du duché de 1047 à 1057. En 1049, il est qualifié de "Princes des Bretons" par le pape Léon IX qui lui reconnaît sa prééminence sur la noblesse bretonne1. Les deniers émis à cette époque par l'atelier monétaire de Rennes qualifie Eudes de dux Britanniae1,18.
     "En 1052, Eudes participe à une coalition réunissant le roi de France Henri Ier et le Comte d'Anjou pour combattre Guillaume de Normandie19. La coalition est battue à la bataille de Mortemer en 1054.
     "Lors d'une nouvelle offensive franco-angevine contre le duc de Normandie, Eudes est capturé puis emmené à Chartres par Conan II en 105720.
     "En 1062 la paix est conclue entre le duc et Geoffroy Boterel, fils aîné d'Éon qui continuait seul le combat.
     "Les enfants d'Eudes se rapprochent alors de Guillaume de Normandie et participeront avec beaucoup de succès à la conquête de l'Angleterre, cinq de ses fils y prennent part : Alain le Roux, Alain le Noir, Etienne, Brient, et Ribaud21.
     "Des années plus tard, bien que très âgé, Eudes participe encore en 1075 aux soulèvements des féodaux contre Hoël II de Bretagne, le successeur de Conan II il laisse toutefois la conduite des opérations à son fils aîné Geoffroy Boterel.
     "Il meurt le 7 janvier 1079 et est inhumé dans la cathédrale de Saint-Brieuc22
Union et postérité
     "De son union vers 1035 avec Orguen/Agnès, fille du comte de Cornouaille Alain Canhiart, il a neuf enfants? 23
** Adèle (vers 1035- † après 1056/1057) ;
** Geoffroy Ier de Penthièvre, dit Boterel? († 1093) ;
** Brian († 1084), participe à la conquête de l'Angleterre et reçoit l'Honneur de Richmond, mort sans postérité?;
** Alain le Roux († 1093), qui tient l'honneur de Richmond de 1070 à 1093, sans postérité?;
** Guillaume † après 1055/1057 ;
** Robert † après 1055/1057 ;
** Richard † après 1056/1057 ;
** Alain le Noir († 1098), qui tient l'honneur de Richmond peu de temps après la mort de son frère 1093, sans postérité?;
** Étienne († 1137), comte de Guingamp de Trégor et seigneur de Goëlo, puis comte de Penthièvre, et qui tient l'Honneur de Richmond à partir de 1093?.

     "Il avait par ailleurs au moins cinq enfants illégitimes24 :
** une fille épouse d'Enisan de Pléven
** Bodin (frère de Bardulf) moine à l'Abbaye Notre-Dame d'York
** Bardulf de Ravensworth
** Ribald de middleham épouse Béatrice Taillebois
** Arnold

     "L'historiographie traditionnelle le considère en outre comme le père de 25
** Derrien bastardus à qui l'on attribue la fondation du château de La Roche-Derrien.
Notes et références
1. Stéphane Morin, « De la noblesse de Bretagne au XIe siècle : une noblesse « bretonne » ? » [archive], sur https://www.tudchentil.org [archive], 20 novembre 2009 (consulté le 6 mai 2019)
2. Paul de Berthou, « Analyse sommaire et critique de la Chronique de Saint-Brieuc », Bulletin archéologique de l'Association bretonne,? 1900, p. 29-30 (lire en ligne [archive])
3. Jones, Michael, Le premier inventaire du Trésor des chartes des ducs de Bretagne (1395) Hervé Le Grant et les origines du Chronicon Briocense, Rennes, Société d'histoire et d'archéologie de Bretagne, 2007, 320 p. (ISBN 2-9505895-7-X), p. 78-84
4. Bertrand d' Argentré, L'Histoire De Bretaigne Des Roys, Ducs, Comtes, Et Princes D'Icelle, Paris, Jacques Du Puys, 1588, 832 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 169-172
5. Augustin du Paz, Histoire généalogique de plusieurs maisons illustres de Bretagne, Paris, Nicolas Buon, 1619, 862 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 3-4
6. Pierre Le Baud, Histoire de Bretagne, Paris, Gervais Alliot, 1638, 215 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 150-154
7. Arthur Le Moyne de La Borderie, Histoire de Bretagne, vol. 3, Rennes, J. Plihon et L. Hervé, 1899, 661 p. (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 11-17
8. André Chédeville et Noël-Yves Tonnerre, Bretagne Féodale, XIe-XIIIe siècle, Rennes, Ouest France, octobre 1987, 426 p. (ISBN 2737300142), p. 37-43
9. Stéphane Morin p. 44., Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIe au XIIIe siècle, Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes & Société d'émulation des Côtes-d'Armor, 2010, 406 p. (ISBN 978-2-7535-1012-8), p. 60
10. ibid p. 39
11. André-Yves Bourgés, « Gémellité et féodalité (version revue et corrigée) », Blog Variétés Historiques,? 16 avril 2017, p. 12 (lire en ligne [archive])
12. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 44
13. Hubert Guillotel, Actes des Ducs de Bretagne (944-1148), Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2014 (ISBN 9782753534988), actes 41 & 42 p.262-265.
14. André-Yves Bourgés, « Les origines diocesaines en Bretagne un chantier en cours », Blog Variétés historiques,? 26 août 2017, p. 6 (lire en ligne [archive])
15. André-Yves Bourgés, « Les origines de l'évêché de Tréguier : état de la question », Mémoires de la Société d'histoire et d'archéologie de Bretagne,? 2018, p. 8 (lire en ligne [archive])
16. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 64
17. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 61
18. Al. Ramé, « Attribution d'une monnaie à Eudon, duc de de Bretagne », Revue numismatique,? 1846, p. 56-58 ; 462 (lire en ligne [archive])
19. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 79
20. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p.92
21. Jeulin Paul, « . Un grand « Honneur » anglais. Aperçus sur le « Comté » de Richmond en Angleterre, possession des ducs de Bretagne (1069/71-1398) », Annales de Bretagne, vol. 42, nos 3-4,? 1935, p. 265-302 (DOI https://doi.org/10.3406/abpo.1935.1734, www.persee.fr/doc/abpo_0003-391x_1935_num_42_3_1734)
22. Augustin Du Paz Histoire généalogique de plusieurs maisons illustres de Bretagne, enrichie des armes et blasons d'icelles avec l'histoire chronologique des Evesques de tous les diocèses de Bretagne, Nicolas Buon, Paris 1619 p. 5.
23. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 55 tableau généalogique no 4 : « Descendance légitime du comte Eudes » .
24. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 184-185 tableau no 13: « Descendance naturelle du comte Eudes »
25. Stéphane Morin op. cit. p. 238-239 et tableau généalogique no 14 « Propositions de généalogie des La Roche-Derrien » :
Source
** Stéphane Morin Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du xie au xiiie siècle Presses Universitaires de Rennes & Société d'émulation des Côtes-d'Armor, Rennes 2010 (ISBN 9782753510128).
Bibliographie
** Arthur de La Borderie et Barthélemy-Ambroise-Marie Pocquet du Haut-Jussé Histoire de la Bretagne en VI tomes réédition Joseph Floch Mayenne (1975)
** André Chédeville & Noël-Yves Tonnerre, La Bretagne féodale XIe-XIIIe siècle, Rennes, Ouest-France Université, 1987 (ISBN 9782737300141)
** Hubert Guillotel, Actes des Ducs de Bretagne (944-1148), Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2014 (ISBN 9782753534988)
Voir aussi
** Duché de Bretagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duch%C3%A9_de_Bretagne
** Liste des ducs de Bretagne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_rois_puis_ducs_de_Bretagne."13



Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany
Per Med Lands:
     "EUDES de Bretagne, son of GEOFFROY I Duke of Brittany & his wife Havise de Normandie (-Cesson 1079, bur Saint-Brieuc). Guillaume of Jumièges names “Emma...secunda Hadvis...tertia Mathildis” as the three daughters of Richard and his wife “Gunnor ex nobilissima Danorum prosapia ortam”, adding that Havise married “Goiffredo Britannorum comiti” by whom she had “Alanum et Eudonem duces”[306]. A charter dated 1008 records that, after the death of "Gaufrido comite Britanniæ", "filii eius Alanus et Eudo cum matre eorum Hadeguisia" restored the abbey of Saint-Méen[307]. "Alanus et Egio Britannorum monarchi" founded the priory of Livré "in pago Redonensi" by charter dated to [1013/22], signed by "…Aduise matre eorum comitum, Rivalloni vicarii, Triscanni…"[308]. A charter dated 1026 recalls that "Gaufridus, Conani Curvi filius" was killed "apud Concuruz prelium", recalling that "quo defuncto, Alanus filius eius…renum patris suscipiens", witnessed by "Alanus comes…Heudo frater eius"[309]. He appears to have ruled Brittany jointly with his brother until the death of their mother in 1034. Following disputes with his brother, a division of territories was agreed, Eudes taking the dioceses of Dol, Saint Malo, Saint Brieuc and Tréguier, at which time he can be said to have become Comte de Penthièvre. "Manigenius…miles" founded the priory of Saint-Cyr-lès-Rennes and donated it to Tours Saint-Julien by charter dated 23 May 1037, subscribed by "Alanus dux…Eudonis fratris Alani ducis Britannorum, Gotzelini vicecomitis, Rualentis domini Doli…"[310]. After the death of his brother in 1040, Eudes seized Brittany and excluded his nephew, succeeding as EUDES I Duke of Brittany. According to Orderic Vitalis, Eudes ruled the country "freely without acknowledging any lord for 15 years"[311]. However, his nephew retaliated, captured Eudes and imprisoned him in chains[312]. "Comes Eudo et nepos eius Gaufridus, Robertus vicecomes et frater eius Eudo…Guichomarus filius Alani vicecomitis…" witnessed a charter dated to 1050 relating to the abbey of Saint-Georges de Rennes[313]. "Comes Eudo, uxor eius Orguen et filii eorum Gausfridus, Alanus, Willelmus, Rotbertus, Ricardus…" witnessed the charter dated to [1056/60] records the history of the acquisition by Angers Saint-Aubin of property "in pago Belvacensi", finally donated by "comiti Britannie Eudoni"[314]. The Chronicon Britannico records the death in 1079 of "Eudo Dux Britanniæ"[315].
     "m ORGUEN [Agnes] de Cornouaïlle, daughter of ALAIN "Caignard" Comte de Cornouaïlle & his wife Judith de Nantes . "Comes Eudo, uxor eius Orguen et filii eorum Gausfridus, Alanus, Willelmus, Rotbertus, Ricardus…" witnessed the charter dated to [1056/60] records the history of the acquisition by Angers Saint-Aubin of property "in pago Belvacensi", finally donated by "comiti Britannie Eudoni"[316]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
     "Mistresses (1) - (x): ---. The names of Eudes's mistresses are not known.
     "Comte Eudes & his wife had six children.
     "Comte Eudes had [eight] illegitimate children by Mistresses"
Med Lands cites:
[306] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247.
[307] La Borderie (1888), I, p. 3.
[308] La Borderie (1888), II, p. 6.
[309] Redon CCXCVI, p. 246.
[310] Tours Saint-Julien 13, p. 20.
[311] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 89, which says that Eudes "followed his brother Alain" without mentioning Alain's son Conan.
[312] William of Poitou Book I, c. 43.
[313] Rennes Saint-Georges, XIII, p. 238.
[314] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCLXXVII, p. 171.
[315] Ex Chronico Britannico, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 557.
[316] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCLXXVII, p. 171.6


Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany
Per Wikipedia:
     "Odo of Rennes (Medieval Breton: Eudon Pentevr, Modern Breton: Eozen Penteur, Latin: Eudo, French: Eudes/Éon de Penthièvre) at an unknown age (999–1079), Count of Penthièvre, was the youngest of the three sons of Duke Geoffrey I of Brittany and Hawise of Normandy, daughter of Richard I of Normandy. Eozen married Agnes of Cornouaille (Orguen Kernev), the daughter of Alan Canhiart, Count of Cornouaille and sister of Hoel II, Duke of Brittany who was married in 1066 to Eozen's niece Hawise, Duchess of Brittany.
Role in Governance of Brittany
     "When Eozen's father Duke[b] Geoffrey I died on 20 November 1008, both Eozen and his older brother Alan were minors.
     "Duke Geoffrey had initiated a dynastic double marriage with Richard II, Duke of Normandy by marrying Hawise of Normandy, one of Richard's sisters, in 996; this was followed by the marriage of Geoffrey's sister Judith of Brittany to Richard around the year 1000. Alan and Eozen were thus double-first cousins of Duke Richard II's children, including Richard III, Duke of Normandy and Robert I, Duke of Normandy (William the Conqueror's father), nephews of Emma of Normandy, and first cousins of Emma's children Edward the Confessor, Harthacnut, Goda of England, Gunhilda of Denmark and Alfred Aetheling.
     "At Geoffrey's death, Alan became de jure Duke, as Alan III, Duke of Brittany,[c] Hawise took on the role of Regent, and Richard asserted the role of Guardian of Brittany, an arrangement reciprocated on the death of Robert I, Duke of Normandy in 1035.
     "Also in 1035, after a dispute between Eozen and Duke Alan III, their uncle Judicaël Bishop of Vannes arbitrated, and Alan III gave Eozen the bishoprics of Saint-Brieuc, Saint-Malo, Tréguier and Dol-de-Bretagne, as well as the counties and baronies of Penthièvre, Goëlo, Avaugour and Lamballe. Eozen placed his capital at Lamballe, where he began issuing coins in his own name.
     "Following the death of his brother Duke Alan III in 1040, Eozen ruled as regent of Brittany in the name of his nephew Conan II, holding Conan in custody. Conan was freed by his supporters in 1047. Eozen's regency should have ended when Conan reached his majority (circa 1054), but Eozen refused to relinquish control of the Duchy.
     "In 1054 Geoffrey, Viscount of Mayenne in Maine, affronted by William of Normandy's new fortifications at Ambrieres, "appealed to Geoffrey, Count of Anjou" who "called to his assistance Guy-William of Aquitaine and Count Eudo of Brittany"[1]
     "In a charter dated to 1056/1060, Eozen ("Eudo") granted land "in pago Belvacensi" (Beauvais, Picardy) to the Abbey of Angers Saint-Aubin (q.v. Albinus of Angers). Witnesses included his wife Orguen and their sons Gausfridus, Alanus Rufus, Willelmus, Rotbertus and Ricardus (Geoffrey, Alan Rufus, William, Robert and Richard).
     "By 1056 Conan gained the upper hand in Brittany, and in 1057 he captured his uncle Eozen and chained him in a prison cell. Eozen's eldest son Geoffrey Boterel continued to fight.
     "In 1062, peace was concluded between Conan and Geoffrey. Eozen, who was now free, continued the fight alone.
     "In histories favourable to the house of Penthièvre, Eozen is shown as effectively ruling Brittany between 1040 and 1062. In other histories his rule is shown as ending with his capture in 1057.
     "Conan was a legitimate contender for the title of Duke of Normandy, so he became a serious rival to Duke William.
     "In 1064, Eozen's liegeman Rivallon I of Dol invited Duke William to join him against Conan, thus initiating the Breton-Norman War of 1064-1065 in which Normandy, Anjou, Dol de Bretagne and the captive Harold Godwinson combined against Conan II, as depicted in three panels of the Bayeux Tapestry. Historians differ on whether William or Conan should be considered the victor in this conflict.
Involvement in the Preparations for the Norman Conquest of England
     "Eozen provided, trained and equipped 5000 Breton soldiers for William the Conqueror's army. Of these, 4000 were professionals, comprising light cavalry, heavy cavalry, archers, crossbowmen and axemen; he also trained 1000 levied (conscripted) spearmen. Eozen put these troops on 100 ships under the command of his sons Count Alan Rufus and Count Brian, and they sailed from Brittany to join the Norman forces gathering at Barfleur then on to William's staging point at Saint-Valery-sur-Somme, in readiness to cross the Channel.
Rebellion against Hoel II of Brittany
     "Despite his advanced years, Eozen was involved in the failed 1075/1076 rebellion against Hoel II, Duke of Brittany, by Geoffrey Grenonat of Rennes and Ralph de Gael (fresh from his 1075 rebellion against King William). Hoel II was supported by William the Conqueror, briefly placing Eozen and William on opposing sides once again, a situation that was soon resolved when, to William's disappointment, Hoel came to terms with the rebels.
Death
     "On 7 January 1079, at about 80 years of age, Eozen died in Cesson-Sévigné, an eastern suburb of Rennes. He was buried in Saint-Brieuc Cathedral.
     "In his memory, “Comes Alanus Rufus” (Count Alan Rufus), his second son, donated property to Swavesey Abbey in Cambridgeshire, for the soul of “patris sui Eudonis comitis” (his father Count Eozen), by an undated charter witnessed by “…Ribaldus et Bardulfus fratres comitis…” (Ribald and Bardulf, brothers of Count Alan).
Family
     "Thomas Forester’s 1854 translation of volume 2 of Orderic Vitalis’s The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, book 5, chapter 9, section 43 and page 164, last paragraph, states concerning Eozen's sons:
“God also gave him seven sons, who became remarkable for the singular and changeable events of their lives. The studious might compose a long and pleasing history, from true accounts of their various fortunes.”

     "Eozen's children with Agnes include:
** Adèle (born c. 1035, died after 1056/1057).[2]
** Geoffrey Boterel I, count of Penthièvre (d. 24 August 1093).
** Brian - Earl of Cornwall (d. after 1084) (possibly illegitimate). an unknown date
** Alan Rufus (Latin; alternatively Alain Le Roux in French, or Alan Ar Rouz in Breton, called Count Alan in the Domesday Book, his name means "Red Deer" or "Hart") (d. between 1093 and 1098). He promoted trade at Boston, Lincolnshire, built St Mary's Abbey, York, Richmond Castle and the first castle at Middleham, and was effectively the first Earl of Richmond, though the majority of his manors were in East Anglia. Richmondshire in North Yorkshire is described in the Domesday Book as "Terra Alani Comitis" ("The Land of Count Alan") in "Eborakscire" (Yorkshire).[6] In the Rebellion of 1088, he was the first of the great magnates to support William II of England against Odo, Earl of Kent and his allies.
** Alan the Black (alternatively Alain Niger, or Alan Ar Du in Breton, his name means "Black Deer") (d. between 1094 and 1098), inherited from Alan Rufus.[e]
** Stephen, Count of Tréguier married Havise of Guingamp - succeeded Alan Rufus and Alan the Black as de facto Earl of Richmond. Stephen and Havise had a number of legitimate children and grandchildren, all of whom are ancestors of the current British Royal Family.
** Robert, a priest in Yorkshire (d. after 1083).
** Richard, a canon of Bayeux at the time when Thomas of Bayeux, Thomas's brother Samson and William de Saint-Calais were also canons there.
** Guillaume or William, who came to Switzerland, entering the service of the Holy Roman Emperor; he was the suppressor of the revolt of Agaunum (today Saint-Maurice-en-Valais), and received a castle in his honour.
** An unnamed daughter, who married Enisandus Musardus de Pleveno who was the Lord of Cheveley in Cambridgeshire (under Alan Rufus as tenant-in-chief) and first Constable of Richmond Castle and lord of some twenty manors in Richmondshire. Cheveley was recorded until 1457 as remaining under the overlordship of the Honour of Richmond.[7]

     "Sons of Eozen who were probably illegitimate include:
** Ribald, who received the Lordship of Middleham from Alan Rufus.[f]
** Bardolf, who moved to England where he held the lordship of Ravensworth and became the ancestor of the Fitzhugh family.
** Bodin, Lord of Bedale and brother of Bardolf.

(Possibly) Derrien, Lord of La Roche-Derrien in Brittany.
     "At least two of Eozen's sons (Alan Rufus and Brian) were early participants in the Norman conquest of England.[8]
     "Eozen's descendants formed the junior branch of the Breton ducal family, which gained control of the duchy in 1156 under Conan IV of Brittany.
     "Odo is a twenty-eighth great-grandfather of Cindy Crawford.
Ancestry
Ancestors of Odo, Count of Penthièvre
See also
Dukes of Brittany family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kings_and_dukes_of_Brittany_family_tree
Notes
a. Odo in French is Eudes.
b. The title of Duke of Brittany had not yet been recognized by the King of France, although it was in use since Alan II, Duke of Brittany. Since Brittany was not in fact under the French Crown until the late 15th century, and not incorporated into the French State until the French Revolution, what the King of France thought is a moot point.
c. In some histories Eozen is shown co-Duke with his brother Alan, followed by a period where Alan ruled as Duke of Brittany alone. Eozen's position as co-Duke is unlikely and remains an historical uncertainty in search of documented proof. In any event Alan would go on to shed the control of Normandy circa 1026, and from this date it is clear there was no ruling role for Eozen until Alan died.
d. The detailed documented histories are lacking and limited. He is presumed to have been illegitimate, though his title of Count suggests that he was a legitimate son, as does the genealogy in Gale's edition of the Registry of the Honour of Richmond which gives his wife's name as Imogen. Brian participated in the conquest of England. The website of Charles Cawley reports that Brian (French: Brien; Latin: Briennius) defeated a second raid in the southwest of England, launched from Ireland by Harold's sons in 1069. Brian's forces then went north to counter the rebellion by Eadric the Wild, as William the Conqueror's army travelled west; the two armies joined and won the Battle of Stafford.[3] For a time, Brian held the Honour of Brittany, including 227 manors in Cornwall and a number in eastern England. However, he became an invalid and subsequently relinquished all his estates in south-west England (William then gave them to his own half-brother Robert, Count of Mortain), and retired to Brittany to be with his bride. He is recorded as a witness to two documents issued by Geoffrey I Boterel in 1084. He is believed to have died without offspring,[4] however Domesday Book[5] entries for the year 1086 refer to "Ralph son of Brian" (http://domesdaymap.co.uk/name/418750/ralph-son-of-brian/) as holding seven properties in Essex and Suffolk, some under the Bishop of London St Paul, the others under Ranulf (Ranulph) Peverel (see William Peverel); to "William son of Brian" (http://domesdaymap.co.uk/name/597200/william-son-of-brian/) as holding land under the Bishop of London St Paul at Great and Little Totham in the Hundred of Thurstable in Essex; to "Everard son of Brian" (http://domesdaymap.co.uk/name/196550/everard-son-of-brian/), whose name is the first listed for the Hundred of Cheveley, as holding land, under Aubrey de Vere I in Ashley and in Saxon [Street], either side of Cheveley; and to "Brian's wife" (http://domesdaymap.co.uk/name/118700/brians-wife/) as holding property under the Bishop of London St Paul in Stepney in the Hundred of Ossulstone in Middlesex. The timing of the lives of Alan Rufus and Stephen of Tréguier suggests that Brian did not hold Richmond. It is reported elsewhere that he was an Earl of Cornwall but resigned the title and returned to Brittany; Brian's lands in England were then granted by King William I to the latter's half-brother Robert, Count of Mortain. During the Anarchy, Alan the Black II claimed Cornwall on the basis of his uncle Brian having held it; a claim that was accepted by King Stephen.
e. Not to be confused with Alan the Black II, the son of Stephen, Count of Tréguier, who also would inherit the Earldom, after Stephen. There is little reliable written documentation of his life save for a record of his death - possibly in the same year as his brother Alan Rufus, as he is believed to have held the Earldom for a very brief period of time before it passed to Stephen.
f. Middleham later passed by marriage and consequent female descent to the House of Neville.
References
1. David Charles Douglas (1967). William the Conqueror: The Norman Impact Upon England. University of California Press. p. 71.
2. Stéphane Morin, Trégor, Goëlo, Penthièvre. Le pouvoir des Comtes de Bretagne du XIIe au XIIIe siècle, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2010, ISBN 9782753510128, date April 2014, p. 55, tableau généalogique n°4 : « Descendance légitime du comte Eudes »
3. Tallent, Mike. "Battle of Stafford". Retrieved 24 February 2014.
4. Cawley, Charles. "Comtes de Penthièvre". Medieval Lands. Retrieved 17 April 2010.
5. "Open Domesday". Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
6. "Land of Count Alan". Archived from the original on 16 September 2011. Retrieved 25 February 2014.
7. "British History Online: Cheveley Manors and estate". Retrieved 24 February 2014.
8. Green, Judith A. (2002) The Aristocracy of Norman England, p. 41
Further reading
** Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1991). "The Bretons and Normans of England 1066-1154: the family, the fief and the feudal monarchy". Nottingham Medieval Studies. 36: 42–78.
** Sharpe, Richard (2007). "King Harold's Daughter". Haskins Society Journal: Studies in Medieval History. 19: 1–27.
** "Epistolae: Letter sent by Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury to Gunhilda, royal nun". epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu. Columbia University. 1093. Retrieved 20 May 2013.
** "Epistolae: Letter sent by Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury to Gunhilda, royal nun". epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu. Columbia University. 1093–1094. Retrieved 20 May 2013."14

Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany was also known as Odo/Éon I de Penthièvre Comte de Penthièvre.13 Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany was also known as Odo (?) Count of Penthièvre. He was Count of Penthièvre in 1034.9,2 He was Co-Regent of Brittany/Duke of Brittany with Alan III
     See attached image of family tree of the Dukes of Brittany from the 9th century, to the annexation of Brittany by France in 1532. (from Wikipedia: By Muriel Gottrop - drawn by Muriel Gottrop and corrected by others, CC BY-SA 1.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=76637945)
     Also see attached image of map of Brittany in the 9th century. (from Wikipedia: By France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svg: (Sémhurderivative work: Fab5669 (talk) - France - Grand Ouest - map-blank.svgLouis Élegoët, Bretagne une histoire, CRDP de Bretagne, 2000, p. 54 : Limites successives de la Bretagne au IXe siècle.Il était une fois l'Ouest, éditions Ouest-France, 2009, p.11 : Les frontières de la Bretagne des origines au XVe siècle., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12049589) between 1040 and 1062.2

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 93, Fitz HERVEY 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293974&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020199&tree=LEO
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_I,_Duke_of_Brittany. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#EudesIdied1062B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawise_of_Normandy
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hawise of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020200&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 214-23, p. 177. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orguen (Agnès) de Cornouaille: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293975&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#OrguenCornouaillesMEudesIPenthievre
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 November 2019), memorial page for Eudes de de Penthièvre (999–7 Jan 1079), Find A Grave Memorial no. 105554964, citing Cathédrale Saint-Etienne de Saint-Brieuc, Saint-Brieuc, Departement des Côtes-d'Armor, Bretagne, France ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/105554964/eudes-de-de_penthi_vre. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Éon Ier de Penthièvre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89on_Ier_de_Penthi%C3%A8vre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (Fr.).
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odo,_Count_of_Penthi%C3%A8vre.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#RibaldMBeatrix
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain 'the Red': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00612628&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#AlainRufusdied1089

Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille1,2

F, #10663
FatherAlain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle1,2,3,4,5 b. c 995, d. 4 Oct 1058
MotherJudith (?) de Nantes1,2,6,4,5 b. c 1000, d. 27 Feb 1063
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited16 May 2020
     Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille married Eudes I (?) de Bretagne, Cte de Penthièvre, Co-Regent of Brittany, son of Geoffrey I (?) Count of Rennes, Duke of Bretagne and Hawise (?) of Rennes, Duchess of Brittany.7,8,9,2,5,10
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:75.2


Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille
Per Med Lands:
     "ORGUEN [Agnès] de Cornouaïlle . "Comes Eudo, uxor eius Orguen et filii eorum Gausfridus, Alanus, Willelmus, Rotbertus, Ricardus…" witnessed the charter dated to [1056/60] records the history of the acquisition by Angers Saint-Aubin of property "in pago Belvacensi", finally donated by "comiti Britannie Eudoni"[47].
m EUDES [I] Comte de Penthièvre, son of GEOFFROY I Duke of Brittany & his wife Havise de Normandie (-1062)."
Med Lands cites: [298] Morbihan 149, p. 123.5

Orguen/Agnès (?) de Cornouaille
Weis AR7 [1992:177].7 GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-27.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 4 page (Cournouaille (Cornwall) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne4.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orguen (Agnès) de Cornouaille: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293975&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain Cagniart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00326841&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#AlainCornouailleMJudithNantes. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#OrguenCornouaillesMEudesIPenthievre
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de Nantes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00326842&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 214-23, p. 177. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293974&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#EudesIdied1062B
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain 'the Red': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00612628&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#AlainRufusdied1089

Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle1,2

M, #10664, b. circa 995, d. 4 October 1058
FatherBenoit de Cornouaïlle Comte de Cornouaïlle3,2,4 b. c 960, d. 1026
MotherGuigoëdon (?)5,2
ReferenceGAV27
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle was born circa 995.6 He married Judith (?) de Nantes, daughter of Judicaël (?) Comte de Nantes and Melisende (?), circa 1026.1,6,7,8,2
Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle died on 4 October 1058.1,6,9,2
Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle was buried after 4 October 1058 at Church of Notre-Dame, next to Saint-Corentin, Quimper, Département de Finistère, Bretagne, France.2


     Reference: Genealogics cites: "Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:Neu 75.6


Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle
Per Genealogics:
     "Alain was from a family of viscounts and counts who imposed their hereditary authority on Cornouaille in Brittany from the mid-10th century. He was the son of Benoit de Cornouaille, comte de Cornouaille, who was elected to the episcopal see of Quimperlé in Brittany after 990 in unknown circumstances, and the performed both functions. Alain's nickname 'Cagniart' derived from the old Breton 'Kann' (Combat), and was probably related to his fighting spirit. His mother Guigoëdon or Guiguoedon was the daughter of Orscand 'le Grand', bishop of Vannes, from the family of Alain I 'le Grand', duc de Bretagne.
     "Alain became count of Cornouaille in 1020 by waiver of his father, who also resigned from his bishopric after 1022 in favour of his second son Orscand. Relations between the two brothers and their wives were sometimes tense, but Alain always kept the loyalty of his brother the bishop.
     "He quarrelled with Alain III, duc de Bretagne, who accused him of aiding rebels, and the duke confiscated land belonging to Alain Cagniart including the island of Guadet (Belle-île-en-Mer). Alain Cagniart soon returned to the duke's good graces after facilitating the marriage of his lord to Berthe de Blois, the daughter of Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Troyes et Champagne, and he recovered the island of Guadet, which had belonged to his mother's dowry.
     "About 1026 Alain married Judith de Nantes, daughter of Judicael, comte de Nantes, and his wife Melisende. Among other gifts he gave her five hamlets in Quistillic and half of the church of Cluthgual with its tithe, the crypt and all his rights. They had six children of whom Hoel V and Agnès would have progeny.
     "The potential growth of Alain's power stemming from his marriage attracted the attention of Alain III, duc de Bretagne. A ducal army entered Cornouaille but was repelled in 1031 near Locronan through the intervention of St. Ronan. After a second reconciliation with Alain III, Alain Cagniart faced the rebellion of his own vassals in Léon, headed by Guihomar, vicomte de Léon, and Morvan, vicomte de Faou. Alain quickly put down the revolt.
     "Following his recovery from a serious illness, in 1029 Alain founded the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé in Brittany together with his brother Bishop Orscand, and he entrusted its direction to Abbot (later Saint) Gurloës.
     "In 1050 after the death of his wife's nephew Mathias I, comte de Nantes, Alain asserted the rights of his wife and governed the county of Nantes on behalf of their son and heir Hoel.
     "Alain died in 1058, and was buried at the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé which he had founded."6

Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle
Per Wikipedia:
     "Alain Canhiart (died 1058) was the Count of Cornouaille from 1020-1058. He was the son of Benoît de Cornouaille and the father of Hoel II, Duke of Brittany. His family name, Canhiart, is understood to be derived from the old Breton Kann Yac'h at an unknown age and was translated into the Latin texts of his era as Bellator fortis.
Life
     "According to Paul Le Baud, Alain was a descendant of Rivallon Mur Marzou and therefore was a male line descendant of the early Kings of Brittany. [1] As Count of Cornouaille he inherited his regnal rights from the family that appears to have ruled the Cornouaille region of Brittany from about the 10th century [b] His father Benoît (or Benedic) died between 1008 and 1029. He was the Count-Bishop of Cornouaille; he had been elected Bishop of Quimper circa 990 and exercised the offices jointly but kept them separated. [c] His mother was Guigoëdon (or Guiguoedon); she was the daughter of Orscand le Grand, the Bishop of Vannes an unknown date She was a member of the family of Alan I, King of Brittany. [e]
     "Alain became Count of Cornouaille circa 1020 when his father renounced this title. Alain's brother Orscand succeeded their father as Bishop of Cornouaille.
     "At one point Alain supported rebels who opposed Alan III, Duke of Brittany. Alan III prevailed and punished Count Alain by confiscating his territories, in particular Belle-Île-en-Mer. Alain returned to the Duke's good graces by facilitating his marriage to Berthe of Blois, the daughter of Count Odo; the duke allowed Alain to recover the property that had been seized that belonged to the dowry of Alain's mother.
     "Alain married Judith of Nantes and through her gained a claim on the County of Nantes. In part as a result of his rising power, he was attacked by Alan III but was able to push back the Duke's army in 1031 in a battle near Locronan. In this battle Alain was assisted by Saint Ronan. Alan III and Alain were again reconciled.
     "After this second battle with the Duke of Brittany, Alain faced difficulties with his vassals in the Viscounty of Leon, most notably Guyomarch I. Guyomarch I allied with Morvan, Viscount of Faou, to oppose Alain. Alain was successful in putting down these revolts.
     "Around 1029, after a serious illness, Alain founded the Abbey of Sainte-Croix of Quimperlé with the assistance of his brother Orscand, the Bishop. He included Belle-Île in his donation to the Abbey.
     "In 1050, at the death of his wife's nephew, Mathias I of Nantes, Alain confirmed her inheritance and his rights to rule Nantes as regent for his son Hoel, the eventual Count of Nantes.
Family
     "Around 1026, Alain married Judith of Nantes, the daughter of Judicaël of Nantes, who became the heir to the County of Nantes after the death of her nephew, Matthew, in 1050. As was the custom of the period, under the dowry arrangements Alain obtained five villages in Quistillic and half of the church of Cluthgual with the sepulcher and all appertaining rights. [2] [f]
     "Alain and Judith had six children
** Hoel II- Count of Nantes, Count of Rennes, and eventually Duke of Brittany (jure uxoris)
** Guérech (Quiriac) (1030-1079) - elected Bishop of Nantes in 1059, consecrated 7 January 1061
** Budic - died 1091
** Hodiern - Abbess of Locmaria de Quimper
** Benoît - Abbot of the Abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé in 1066, elected Bishop of Nantes in 1079, consecrated in 1081; retired in 1114 and murdered in 1115
99 Orguen, or Agnes - wife of Odo I of Penthievre.
Death and succession
     "Alain died in 1058. He was buried at Quimperle. His tomb was destroyed during the French Revolution. [g] He was succeeded as Count of Cornouaille by his son Hoel.
Notes
a. translated from breton, vigorous combatant
b. This Cornouaille region of Brittany is geographically distinct from the Cornwall region of England.
c. Benoît held the joint title Count-Bishop, or Lord-Bishop during the era when Bishops were also lords and before the Roman Catholic church forced the separation of secular from ecclesiastical titles, rights and powers.
d. In this era the Roman Catholic church had not yet imposed mandatory celibacy on its prelates, and bishops and priests alike frequently were married and had issue.
e. Orscand had de facto control of the Vannetais region of Brittany at the end of the 10th century.
f. Judith inherited Nantes from her nephew Mathias Ier de Nantes.
g. Jacques Cambry states that his tomb contained an effigy along the traditions of the period representing Alain with a short sword, a shield and his arms.
References
1. Croniques et Ystoires des Bretons, Book III Chapter 90, p. 21-22.
2. Loth, p. 224.
Bibliography
** Cronicques et Ystoires des Bretons (Book III). Société des bibliophiles Bretons. 1911.
** Loth, Joseph (1980). L'émigration Bretonne en Armorique. Paris-Genève: Slatkine Reprints. ISBN 2051001022."9

Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle
Per Med Lands:
     "ALAIN "Caignart" de Cornouaïlle, son of BENEDICT Comte de Cornouaïlle & his wife Guinodeon --- (-4 Jun 1058, bur Church of Notre-Dame, next to Saint-Corentin). Comte de Cornouaïlle. A charter dated 1021 records that the bishop of Vannes restored rights to Redon abbey, witnessed by "…Alanus Cornugallensis comes et Guethenocus vicecomes et Gozolinus eius filius…"[30]. "Benedictus episcopus atque comes" founded the monastery of Locmaria de Quimper, later confirmed by "Alanus comes filius Benedicti supradicti" (witnessed by "…femina ipsius comitis Iudeth…"), by charter dated to [1022/38] which also records a later donation by "Alanus comes et uxor illius Iudeth…et filiæ suæ Hodiernæ abbatissæ", witnessed by "Hoel…filius eiusdem comitis…Moruan vicecomes…"[31]. A charter dated 1029 records the property of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé with the consent of "Alano comite…et conjugem eius Judith, Orscando episcopo fratre comitis…Guethenoc et Guerec fratribus comitis…"[32]. "Alano comite Chanarth…Cornubiam regente" founded the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1029[33]. "Alanus Britannice gentis dux atque princeps" founded the abbey of Saint-Georges de Rennes by charter dated to [1028/30], witnessed by "Eudo meus germanus, Gozolinus vicecomes, Rivallonis vicarius, Alanus Cornugallie comes…"[34]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiense records the death in 1058 of "Alanus Comes Cornugalliæ, Kemperlegiensis monasterii fundator et pater"[35]. A fragmentary chronicle in the cartulary of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé records that "consul Alanus cognomento Cainard" died 30 years after building the abbey of Sainte-Croix at Quimperlé and was buried "in ecclesia Beate Virginis Marie que adjacent ecclesie Sancti Courentini"[36]. The necrology of Landévennec records the death “pridie Non Jun” of “Alanus Caignart Cornugalliæ comes frater noster”[37].
     "m ([1026]) JUDITH de Nantes, daughter of JUDICAËL Comte de Nantes & his wife Mélisende --- (-1063, bur Sainte-Guénolé de Landevenec). The Chronicon Briocensi names "Judith…filia Juhelli quondam comitis Nannetensis" as wife of "Alani Cagnart" and mother of "Hoellus Dux"[38]. "Benedictus episcopus atque comes" founded the monastery of Locmaria de Quimper, later confirmed by "Alanus comes filius Benedicti supradicti" (witnessed by "…femina ipsius comitis Iudeth…"), by charter dated to [1022/38] which also records a later donation by "Alanus comes et uxor illius Iudeth…et filiæ suæ Hodiernæ abbatissæ", witnessed by "Hoel…filius eiusdem comitis…Moruan vicecomes…"[39]. A charter dated 1029 records the property of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé with the consent of "Alano comite…et conjugem eius Judith, Orscando episcopo fratre comitis…Guethenoc et Guerec fratribus comitis…"[40]. "Alanus comes nobilis Cornubensium partium" donated property to Landévennec by an undated charter, affirmed by "conjugis Iudett"[41]. An undated charter dated to [1031/55] records a donation to Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by "Alano principe…uxor eiusdem consulis, religiosa domina et mater nostra Judith comitissa, filia…Judicaelis Nannetensium comitis", in the presence of "domini sui"[42]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiense records the death in 1063 of "Iudith Comitissa Cornugalliæ"[43]. The Chronicon Universum in the cartulary of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé records the death in 1063 of "Judith comitissa Cornugallie"[44]. A fragmentary chronicle in the cartulary of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé records that "comitissa Judith" lived for six years as a nun after her husband died and was buried "in ecclesia Sancti Guingualoei"[45].
     "Alain & his wife had seven children."
Med Lands cites:
[30] Redon CCCLVI, p. 307.
[31] La Borderie (1888), VIII, p. 17.
[32] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, p. 124.
[33] La Borderie (1888), IX, p. 22.
[34] Rennes Saint-Georges, I, p. 217.
[35] Chronicon Kemperlegiense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, p. 521.
[36] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, Chronici fragmentum, p. 122.
[37] Landévennec Necrology.
[38] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 565.
[39] La Borderie (1888), VIII, p. 17.
[40] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, p. 124.
[41] Landévennec 48, p. 574.
[42] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, IX, p. 147.
[43] Chronicon Kemperlegiense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, p. 521.
[44] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, Chronicon Universum, p. 104.
[45] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, Chronici fragmentum, p. 122.2


Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle
Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Alain Canhiart, (né vers 1000 - † 1058), fils de Benoît de Cornouaille et père d'Hoël II, fut comte de Cornouaille de 1020 à 1058. Son surnom « Canhiart » issu du vieux breton Kann Yac'h (Combattant plein de vigueur, sain) est traduit dans les documents en latin par « Bellator fortis » il est vraisemblablement lié à son ardeur au combat1.
Origine et famille
     "Selon Pierre Le Baud Alain Canhiart est un descendant de « Rivallon Mur Marzou » et il appartient donc à la « ligne masculine des rois de Bretagne » 2.
     "Alain Canhiart est plus certainement issu de la lignée de vicomtes puis comtes qui depuis le milieu du xe siècle ont imposé leur pouvoir héréditaire sur la Cornouaille. Il est le fils de Benoît ou Benedic († entre 1008 et 1019), comte et évêque de Cornouaille, puisqu'il a été élu au siège épiscopal de Quimper après 990 dans des circonstances inconnues et qu'il exerce les deux fonctions de Comte et d’Évêque3. Sa mère Guigoëdon ou Guiguoedon est la fille d’Orscand le Grand évêque de Vannes4 qui appartient à la famille du roi Alain de Bretagne dont Alain Canhiart porte d’ailleurs le nom qui n’appartient pas au stock onomastique de la famille de Cornouaille5.
Comte de Cornouaille
     "Alain accède au comté vers 1020 par renonciation de son père qui se démettra peu après en 1022 de son évêché en faveur de son second fils Orscand. Les relations entre les deux frères et leurs épouses respectives seront parfois tendues mais Alain gardera toujours la prééminence sur son frère l’évêque.
     "Une brouille l’oppose à son suzerain Alain III de Bretagne qui reproche au comte d’avoir soutenu des rebelles et le duc confisque des territoires appartenant à Alain dont l’île de Guadel (Belle-Île-en-Mer). Alain Canhiart rentre en grâce rapidement après avoir facilité le mariage de son suzerain en enlevant, selon la tradition, pour son compte Berthe de Blois, la fille du comte Eudes il recouvre l’île confisquée précédemment qui « avait appartenu à la dot de sa mère Guinoedon »6.
     "Alain Canhiart épouse vers 1026 Judith fille de Judicaël de Nantes et héritière de ce comté. Entre autres dons de mariage il lui cède, les noces ayant été célébrées suivant la coutume, cinq hameaux en Quistillic et la moitié de l'église de Cluthgual, avec la dîme, la sépulture et tous ses droits7
     "L'accroissement potentiel de sa puissance lié à son union semble avoir attiré l’attention du duc Alain III de Bretagne Une armée ducale entre en Cornouaille mais elle est repoussée en 1031 près de Locronan grâce à l’intervention de Saint Ronan selon la tradition. Après une seconde réconciliation avec Alain III de Bretagne Alain Canhiart doit faire face à l’indiscipline de ses propres vassaux les Léonais avec à leur tête Guyomarch Ier de Léon vicomte de Léon qui s’est soulevé avec « des tyrans » de sa région puis Morvan vicomte du Faou. Le comte s’impose rapidement aux révoltés.
     "À la suite sa guérison d’une grave maladie, Alain Canhiart fonde selon la tradition vers 1029 l’Abbaye Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé avec à ses côtés son frère l’évêque Orscand et il en confie la direction à Gurloës. Il attribue à sa fondation Belle-Île8
     "En 1050 après la mort de Mathias Ier de Nantes, Alain Canhiart fait valoir les droits de son épouse contre Conan II de Bretagne et prend en charge en 1054 le comté de Nantes pour le compte de son fils et héritier Hoël.
     "Le comte meurt en 1058 et il est inhumé à l'abbaye Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé selon son obituaire. Jacques Cambry, dans son catalogue des objets échappés au vandalisme dans le Finistère, nous apprend que son tombeau fut détruit pendant la Révolution. Il y était représenté en costume de son temps, avec sa courte épée, son bouclier, ses armes.
Union et descendance
     "Vers 1026, il épouse Judith, héritière du comté de Nantes, qui revient à celle-ci à la mort de son neveu, le comte Mathias Ier de Nantes.
     "Le couple a au moins six enfants dont quatre garçons 9:
1. Hoël, comte de Nantes, de Cornouaille, duc de Bretagne
2. Guérech (ou Quiriac) (1030 - 1078), évêque élu de Nantes en 1059, consacré le 7 janvier 1061 ;
3. Budic, mort en 1091 ;
4. Hodiern, abbesse de Locmaria de Quimper ;
5. Benoît, abbé de l'Abbaye Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé en 1066, évêque élu de Nantes en 1079, consacré en 1081, se retire en 1114 et meurt en 1115 ;
6. Orguen/Agnès, épouse d'Éon Ier de Penthièvre.
Annexes
Notes et références
1. Au moins cinq rues en Bretagne portent son nom, d'après Les noms qui ont fait l'histoire de Bretagne, 1997
2. Cronicques et Ystoires des Bretons Société des bibliophiles Bretons 1911. Livre III chapitre 90 p. 21-22
3. Joëlle Quaghebeur, La Cornouaille du IXe siècle au XIIe siècle, Mémoire, pouvoirs, noblesse, Presses Universitaires Rennaises, 2002, (ISBN 2-86847-743-7) p. 114-116
4. Ce dernier comme son fils Rudald, sans doute issus d'Alain Ier de Bretagne est un grand féodal qui contrôle de facto le vannetais à la fin du xe siècle
5. Joëlle Quaghbeur op.cit p. 120-121
6. Cartulaire de l'abbaye Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé p. 102
7. Joseph Loth L'émigration Bretonne en Armorique Slatkine Reprints. Paris-Genève 1980 (ISBN 2051001022) p. 224 & note n°4.
8. Joëlle Quaghbeur op.cit p. 127 estime que l'abbaye a été fondée « avant 1050 ».
9. Il est significatif que les deux aînés portent, comme le comte d'ailleurs, des noms liés à la lignée d'Alain Ier de Bretagne, jugée plus prestigieuse. Les noms traditionnels à la maison de Cornouaille « Budic » et « Benoît » sont réservés aux cadets
Bibliographie
**Joëlle Quaghebeur, La Cornouaille du IXe siècle au XIIe siècle, Mémoire, pouvoirs, noblesse, Presses Universitaires Rennaises, 2002, (ISBN 2-86847-743-7)
**Les noms qui ont fait l'histoire de Bretagne, Coop Breizh et Institut culturel de Bretagne, 1997.
**André Chédeville & Noël-Yves Tonnerre La Bretagne féodale XIe-XIIIe siècle. Ouest-France Université Rennes (1987) (ISBN 9782737300141)."10

Reference: Weis [1992:177] Line 214-23.11
GAV-27 EDV-26 GKJ-27. Alain Cagniart Cte de Cornouaïlle was also known as Alain Canhiart Count of Cornouaille.9 He was Comte de Cornouaille between 1020 and 1058.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 4 page (Cournouaille (Cornwall) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne4.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#AlainCornouailleMJudithNantes. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Benoit de Cornouaille: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00616868&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#BenedictCornouailleTresvauxdied1026
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guigoëdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00616869&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain Cagniart: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00326841&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de Nantes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00326842&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#JudithNantesdied1053
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alain_Canhiart. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Alain Canhiart: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alain_Canhiart. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (Fr.).
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 214-23, p. 177. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orguen (Agnès) de Cornouaille: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293975&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittcope.htm#OrguenCornouaillesMEudesIPenthievre

Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn1

M, #10665, b. before 1242, d. after 1273
FatherRichard Comyn Lord of Badenoch d. bt 1244 - 1249
ReferenceGAV21
Last Edited14 Nov 2019
     Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn married Amabilia (Or Alicia) (?)2 Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn married Marian MacDonal, daughter of Alan fitz Roland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland and Margaret de Huntingdon.3 Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn was born before 1242.2
Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn died after 1273.2
     GAV-21 GKJ-23.

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Marian MacDonal
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 59, COMYN 6:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-28, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, MacDougall of MacDougall Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1728] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Comyn 'the Black', Lord of Badenoch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027691&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Amabilia (Or Alicia) (?)

F, #10666
ReferenceGAV25 EDV22
Last Edited2 Oct 2019
     Amabilia (Or Alicia) (?) married Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn, son of Richard Comyn Lord of Badenoch.1
     GAV-25 EDV-22 GKJ-23. Amabilia (Or Alicia) (?) was living in 1280.1

Family

Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn b. b 1242, d. a 1273
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-28, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Comyn 'the Black', Lord of Badenoch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027691&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Richard Comyn Lord of Badenoch1

M, #10667, d. between 1244 and 1249
FatherWilliam Comyn Earl of Buchan2 b. c 1160, d. 1233
MotherSarah (?) 'filia Roberti'2
ReferenceGAV26 EDV23
Last Edited18 Jan 2009
     Richard Comyn Lord of Badenoch died between 1244 and 1249.3
     GAV-26 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 59, COMYN 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1728] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005."
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-28, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 59, COMYN 6:ii.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 59, COMYN 6:iii.

Sarah (?) 'filia Roberti'1,2

F, #10668
FatherRobert Fitz Hugh1 d. c 1201
ReferenceGAV27 EDV24
Last Edited19 Jul 2008
     Sarah (?) 'filia Roberti' married William Comyn Earl of Buchan, son of Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch and Hextilda (?) of Tynedale.3,2
     GAV-27 EDV-24 GKJ-25. Sarah (?) 'filia Roberti' was living in 1204.3,1

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 59, COMYN 5. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1728] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005 "Re: Ancestry of Beatrice, wife of Robert Hauley - Part Two"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 17 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 17 Jan 2005."
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-26, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 59, COMYN 5:ii.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 59, COMYN 5:iii.

Sir William de Seton Lord of Seton1,2

M, #10669, d. before March 1410
FatherAlan de Wyntoun1,3
MotherMargaret de Seton of Seton1
ReferenceGAV19
Last Edited19 Aug 2019
     Sir William de Seton Lord of Seton married Janet Fleming, daughter of Sir David Fleming of Biggar and Cumbernauld and Jean Barclay.1,2,4
Sir William de Seton Lord of Seton died before March 1410.1,2
     Reference: van de Pas cites: Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938. Page 921.2
GAV-19.

Citations

  1. [S2022] Stirnet Genealogy, online http://www.stirnet.com/, Seton 02 - Families covered: Seton of Meldrum, Seton of Seton, Seton of Touch
    http://www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/ss4as/seton02.htm. Hereinafter cited as Stirnet Genealogy.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William de Seton, Lord of Seton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046327&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan de Wyntoun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046325&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Janet Fleming: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046328&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Alexander Seton, of That Ilk: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046189&tree=LEO

Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch1

M, #10670, d. between 1176 and 1182
FatherWilliam Comyn d. b 1140
MotherMaud Banaster (Basset)2
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited29 Dec 2007
     Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch married Hextilda (?) of Tynedale, daughter of Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale and Bethoc (?), circa 1145; Ravilious says "m. bef 1153"; her 1st husband.3,1,4
Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch died between 1176 and 1182; Ravilious says d. 1182.3,4
     GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-24.

Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch
per Ravilious: Richard Comyn.
died in 1182.[34]

of Northallerton[1]

2nd son and heir of brother William [Young pp. 15-16[34]]

m. bef 1153 to Hextilda of Tynedale [34]]

'Richard Cumin', witness to a charter. 4 Oct 1172 :
' Witnessed by Eugene Bishop of Glascow, Mathew Bishop of
Aberdeen, Earl Duncan, Odenell de Umfraville, Richard
Cumin, Hugh Ridele, Gilbert son of Richard, William de Haya,
Walter de Berkeley, Richard de Moreville, constable, Robert
Avenell, Philip de Valones, Robert de Quency, Ranulf de
Sules, William de Munford, Herbert de Samer, the King's
clerk Richard of Lincoln, Simon son of Hutered, Adam his
brother, at Maidens Castle 4 October in the 12th year of
his reign ' - A2A, Northumberland Record Office:
Swinburne (Capheaton) estate records [ZSW/1 - ZSW/59] ,
Swinburne Manuscript Vol. 1 [ ZSW/1 ][46]


' Richard Comyn ', one of the hostages given by King
William of Scots to Henry II of England ' for the
performance of the treaty ' [of Falaise], 8 Dec 1174
[Bain, Cal. Doc. Scotland I:19, No. 139[15]]


record of amercement, 1175-6:
' Ricardus Cumin redd. comp. de .c. l. quia non fuit
coram justiciis, et fuit in comitatu quando summonitio
venit. In thesauro .xx. s. et .ij. d. Et is soltis
per breve regis Aaron et Ysaac Iudeis .xlviij. l. et
.xix. s. et .x. d. Et debet .l. l. ' [ Pipe Roll XXV:138[47] ]


" Ricardus Cumyn ", granted charter for land next
to 'Kyngsetburne' to Holyrood priory, with the assent
of his wife Hextilda and witnessed by his sons Odinel
and Simon (together with others), 1182 or before [Reg.
Honoris de Morton II:2, no. 2[6]]


bef 1153 Richard married Hextilda of Tynedale.[34]4

Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch
Weis [AR7] 121A-25.3

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 58, COMYN 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 3.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-25, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2180] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #3 11 June 2007: "Re: Ancestry of Sir John de Graham of Dalkeith (d. 1337)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #3 11 June 2007."
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:i.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:iii.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:iv.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:v.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:vi.
  10. [S2155] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 9 June 2007: "Graham of Dalkeith: their Comyn ancestry"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 9 June 2007, Dorothy FitzWilliam: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00466068&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 9 June 2007."

Hextilda (?) of Tynedale1

F, #10671, d. before 1199
FatherHuctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale
MotherBethoc (?)2
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited29 Dec 2007
     Hextilda (?) of Tynedale married Richard Comyn of Northallerton & Badenoch, son of William Comyn and Maud Banaster (Basset), circa 1145; Ravilious says "m. bef 1153"; her 1st husband.3,4,5 Hextilda (?) of Tynedale married Malcolm mac Madadh (?) 2nd Earl of Atholl, son of Madach mac Maelmare (?) 1st Earl of Atholl and Margaret Haakonsdotter (?), in 1182; his 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.4,2,1
Hextilda (?) of Tynedale died before 1199 at Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, Scotland.5
     Hextilda (?) of Tynedale
per Ravilious: Hextilda of Tynedale.
she died bef 1199 in Dunfermline Abbey, Fife.[48]


had Walwick, Thornton, Staincroft and Henshaw in Tynedale,
Northumberland as her maritagium [Young p. 15[49], cites
Cal. Charter Rolls (1257-1300), pp. 40-41]


also, the lordship of Bedrule (Roxburghshire)[34]


" Hestild' vxoris mee ", assented to the charter of her
husband Richard Comyn, granting lands next to
'Kyngsetburne' to Holyrood priory, 1182 or before
[Reg. Honoris de Morton II:2, no. 2[6]]


'Hextilda filia Ucthredi uxor ejus' [in re: Malcolm of Athol], benefactress of the church of St. Cuthbert in
Durham before 24 Aug 1198[35],[50],[51]


she m. lstly Richard Comyn,
2ndly Malcolm, Earl of Athol[1].5 GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-24.

Hextilda (?) of Tynedale
Weis [AR7] 121A-25.3

Family 2

Malcolm mac Madadh (?) 2nd Earl of Atholl b. c 1120, d. b 24 Oct 1198

Citations

  1. [S1680] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 28 Sept 2004: "Descent from Jarl Haakon Paulsson (was Re: Somerled's mother-in-law)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 28 Sept 2004."
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-25, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 58, COMYN 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  5. [S2180] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #3 11 June 2007: "Re: Ancestry of Sir John de Graham of Dalkeith (d. 1337)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #3 11 June 2007."
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:i.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:iii.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:iv.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:v.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 4:vi.
  11. [S2155] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 9 June 2007: "Graham of Dalkeith: their Comyn ancestry"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 9 June 2007, Dorothy FitzWilliam: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00466068&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 9 June 2007."

William Comyn

M, #10672, d. before 1140
FatherJohn Comyn d. a 1135
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited13 Aug 2002
     William Comyn married Maud Banaster (Basset), daughter of Thurstan Banaster (Basset).1
William Comyn died before 1140.1
     GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-25.

William Comyn
(an unknown value.)2

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 58, COMYN 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-25, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 3:i.

John Comyn1

M, #10673, d. after 1135
FatherRobert Comyn d. 28 Jan 1069
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited13 Feb 2003
     John Comyn married (?) Giffard.1
John Comyn died after 1135; killed in the wars between the forces of the Empress Maud and King Stephen in England.1
     GAV-24 EDV-24.

John Comyn
(an unknown value.)2

Family 1

(?) Giffard

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 58, COMYN 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-25, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Robert Comyn

M, #10674, d. 28 January 1069
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited17 Feb 2003
     Robert Comyn died on 28 January 1069 at Durham, England; slain with all of his followers.1
     Robert Comyn
"The Scots Peerage" referred to him as "one of the Conqueror's companions", who was created in 1069 Earl of Northumberland. He was slain in the attempt to take possession of the territories awarded him.1 GAV-25 EDV-25.

Robert Comyn
(an unknown value.)2 He was Earl of Northumberland in 1069.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 57-58, COMYN 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-25, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001), p. 58, COMYN 1:ii.

Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale1

M, #10675
FatherWaldef (?)
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited18 Jan 2009
     Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale married Bethoc (?), daughter of Donald III Bane "the White" (?) King of Scotland.2,3,4
     Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale
(an unknown value.)2 GAV-23 EDV-23. Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale was also known as Hudred.5 Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale was also known as Uhtred of Tynedale.3

Family

Bethoc (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 226-227, SCOTLAND 24:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-24, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 410 (Chart 22). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Bethoc (?)1,2

F, #10676
FatherDonald III Bane "the White" (?) King of Scotland3,2 b. 1033, d. 1099
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited18 Jan 2009
     Bethoc (?) married Huctred fitz Waldeve of Tyndale, son of Waldef (?).4,3,2
     GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-27.

Bethoc (?)
Weis [AR7] 121A-24.4

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 226-227, SCOTLAND 24:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001).
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-24, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Waldef (?)

M, #10677
ReferenceGAV24 EDV24
Last Edited13 Feb 2003
     GAV-24 EDV-24.

Waldef (?)
(an unknown value.)1

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121A-24, p. 108. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland1,2

M, #10678, d. before 12 March 1344
FatherThomas de Grey3 b. c 1266, d. 1310
ReferenceGAV22 EDV17
Last Edited4 Jul 2010
     Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland married Margaret de Presfen/Pressen, daughter of William de Presfen/Pressen.4,1 Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland was born circa 1297 at Heton, Northumberland, England.3
Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland died before 12 March 1344.3
     Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland
Sir THOMAS de GREY, of Heton in Islandshire, Northumberland; m Agnes -, and d just prior to 12 March 1343/4, leaving: Sir THOMAS GREY.1

Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland lived at Heton in Islandshire, Northumberland, England.1

Sir Thomas de Grey Knt., of Heaton (in Norham), Northumberland
(an unknown value.)5,6 GAV-22 EDV-17 GKJ-18.

Family

Margaret de Presfen/Pressen b. c 1301
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Earl Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2335] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 26 Dec 2008: "Umfreville Family, Earls of Angus"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Dec 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Dec Aug 2008."
  3. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I4347
  4. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I4346
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121D-32, p. 109. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (n.p.: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1999, unknown publish date), line 109-6, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  7. [S2148] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 April 2007: "Re: de Clavering family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 April 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 April 2007."
  8. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I47415

Margaret Umfreville1,2

F, #10679, b. circa April 1397, d. 23 June 1444
FatherSir Thomas Umfreville Knt., of Harbottle, Northumberland, Holmside and Wheatley, co. Durham, Hessle, Yorkshire, etc.2,3,1 b. c 1364, d. bt 12 Feb 1390 - 1391
MotherAgnes Grey3,1 b. c 1361, d. 25 Oct 1420
Last Edited27 Dec 2012
     Margaret Umfreville married William Luddington; her 1st husband.3,1,4 Margaret Umfreville was born circa April 1397.5,1 She married Sir John Constable Knt., of Halsham and Burton constable, Yorkshire, son of Sir William Constable of Halsham, Yorkshire and Elizabeth Metham of Metham, before 26 April 1423; her 2nd husband.6,2,3,1
Margaret Umfreville died on 23 June 1444.5,1
     Reference: van de Pas cites: 1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 99731
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: I 152.1
Margaret Umfreville was also known as Margaret de Umfreville.1,3

Family 1

William Luddington d. bt 9 Jan 1419 - 1420

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Umfreville: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214501&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Mallory 11: p. 486. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2335] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 26 Dec 2008: "Umfreville Family, Earls of Angus"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Dec 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 26 Dec Aug 2008."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Lodington, of Gunby: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464355&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121D-34, p. 109. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Constable: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00214500&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes Constable: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00566998&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Constable, of Halsham: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139318&tree=LEO

Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway1

M, #10680, b. between 858 and 860, d. between 934 and 940
FatherHalfdan II "The Black" Gudrodson (?)2 d. c 860
MotherRagnhild Sigurdsdottir (?)2
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited23 Aug 2004
     Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway was born between 858 and 860.2 He married Asa Hakonsdotter (?), daughter of Hakon Grjotgardsson (?) Ladejarl; his 1st wife.2 Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway married Gyda (?), daughter of Eirik (?) King of Hoerdeland; his 2nd wife.2 Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway married Swanhild Eysteinsdottir (?), daughter of Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands and Aseda Rognvaldsdottir; his 3rd wife.3,2 Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway married Snaefried (?), daughter of Finnen Svase (?); his 4th wife.2 Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway married Alvhild (?), daughter of Ring Dagsson (?) of Ringerike; his 5th wife.2 Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway married Ragnhild "the Rich" (?) Princess of Haithabu, daughter of Erik (?) King of Haithabu; his 6th? wife.4,2
Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway died between 934 and 940.2
     GAV-32 EDV-32.

Harald I "Fairhair" or "Finehair" (?) King of Norway
King Harald I "Fairhair" of Norway (863-930) abdicated, *858/860, +934/940; 1m: Asa Hakonsdotter, dau.of Hakon Ladejarl; 2m: Gyda, dau.of King Eirik of Hoerdeland; 3m: Svanhild, dau.of Eystein, Jarl in Hedemarken; 4m: Snaefried, dau.of Finnen Svase; 5m: Alvhild, dau.of Ring Dagsson of Ringerike; 6m: Pss Ragnhild "the Rich" of Haithabu.2 He was King of Norway between 883 and 890.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway2.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 2 page - Yngling Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway2.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 243A-17, p. 206. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 1 page - Kings of Haithabu: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway1.html
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27), 442-443. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.